Asus SpaceLink WL-100 User`s manual

®
SpaceLink™ Access Point
WL-300
User’s Manual
Copyright Information
No part of this manual, including the products and software described in it,
may be reproduced, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system,
or translated into any language in any form or by any means, except
documentation kept by the purchaser for backup purposes, without the
express written permission of ASUSTeK COMPUTER INC. (“ASUS”).
ASUS PROVIDES THIS MANUAL “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY
OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT
NOT LIMITED TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS
OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL ASUS, ITS DIRECTORS, OFFICERS,
EMPLOYEES OR AGENTS BE LIABLE FOR ANY INDIRECT,
SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES
(INCLUDING DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF PROFITS, LOSS OF
BUSINESS, LOSS OF USE OR DATA, INTERRUPTION OF BUSINESS
AND THE LIKE), EVEN IF ASUS HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE
POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES ARISING FROM ANY DEFECT
OR ERROR IN THIS MANUAL OR PRODUCT.
Product warranty or service will not be extended if: (1) the product is
repaired, modified or altered, unless such repair, modification of alteration
is authorized in writing by ASUS; or (2) the serial number of the product is
defaced or missing.
Products and corporate names appearing in this manual may or may not be
registered trademarks or copyrights of their respective companies, and are
used only for identification or explanation and to the owners’ benefit, without
intent to infringe.
SPECIFICATIONS AND INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS
MANUAL ARE FURNISHED FOR INFORMATIONAL USE ONLY, AND
ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AT ANY TIME WITHOUT NOTICE, AND
SHOULD NOT BE CONSTRUED AS A COMMITMENT BY ASUS. ASUS
ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY OR LIABILITY FOR ANY ERRORS
OR INACCURACIES THAT MAY APPEAR IN THIS MANUAL,
INCLUDING THE PRODUCTS AND SOFTWARE DESCRIBED IN IT.
Copyright © 2002 ASUSTeK COMPUTER INC. All Rights Reserved.
Product Name:
Manual Revision:
Release Date:
2
SpaceLink Access Point (WL-300)
1.00 E1020
May 2002
SpaceLink Access Point
Copyright Information
ASUSTeK COMPUTER INC. (Asia-Pacific)
Address:
General Tel:
General Fax:
General Email:
150 Li-Te Road, Peitou, Taipei, Taiwan 112
+886-2-2894-3447
+886-2-2894-3449
info@asus.com.tw
Technical Support
MB/Others (Tel):
+886-2-2890-7121 (English)
Notebook (Tel):
+886-2-2890-7122 (English)
Desktop/Server (Tel): +886-2-2890-7123 (English)
Support Fax:
+886-2-2890-7698
Support Email:
tsd@asus.com.tw
Web Site:
www.asus.com.tw
Newsgroup:
cscnews.asus.com.tw
ASUS COMPUTER INTERNATIONAL (America)
Address:
General Fax:
General Email:
6737 Mowry Avenue, Mowry Business Center,
Building 2, Newark, CA 94560, USA
+1-510-608-4555
tmd1@asus.com
Technical Support
Support Fax:
+1-510-608-4555
Notebook (Tel):
1-877-918-ASUS (2787)
Web Site:
www.asus.com
Support Email:
tsd@asus.com
ASUS COMPUTER GmbH (Europe)
Address:
General Fax:
General Email:
Harkortstr. 25, 40880 Ratingen, BRD, Germany
+49-2102-442066
sales@asuscom.de (for marketing requests only)
Technical Support
Support Hotline:
MB/Others: +49-2102-9599-0
Notebook (Tel):
+49-2102-9599-10
Support Fax:
+49-2102-9599-11
Support (Email):
www.asuscom.de/de/support (for online support)
Web Site:
www.asuscom.de
SpaceLink Access Point
3
Safety Statements
Federal Communications Commission Statement
This device complies with FCC Rules Part 15. Operation is subject to the following
two conditions:
•
•
This device may not cause harmful interference, and
This device must accept any interference received, including interference that
may cause undesired operation.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a class B
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However,
there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If
this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which
can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try
to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
•
•
•
•
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which
the receiver is connected.
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
WARNING! The use of a shielded-type power cord is required in
order to meet FCC emission limits and to prevent interference to
the nearby radio and television reception. It is essential that only
the supplied power cord be used. Use only shielded cables to connect I/O devices to this equipment. You are cautioned that changes
or modifications not expressly approved by the party responsible
for compliance could void your authority to operate the equipment.
Reprinted from the Code of Federal Regulations #47, part 15.193, 1993. Washington
DC: Office of the Federal Register, National Archives and Records Administration,
U.S. Government Printing Office.
Canadian Department of Communications
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class B limits for radio noise emissions
from digital apparatus set out in the Radio Interference Regulations of the Canadian
Department of Communications.
This Class B digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B est conforme à la norme
NMB-003 du Canada.
4
SpaceLink Access Point
Safety Information
In order to maintain compliance with the FCC RF exposure guidelines,
this equipment should be installed and operated with minimum distance 20
cm between the radiator and your body. Use only with supplied antenna.
Unauthorized antenna, modification, or attachments could damage the
transmitter and may violate FCC regulations. Any changes of modifications
not expressly approved by the grantee of this device could void the users
authority to operate the equipment.
FCC Radio Frequency Exposure Caution Statement
Installation and use of this Wireless LAN device must be in strict accordance
with the instructions included in the user documentation provided with the
product. Any changes or modifications (including the antennas) made to
this device that are not expressly approved by the manufacturer may void
the user’s authority to operate the equipment. The manufacturer is not
responsible for any radio or television interference caused by unauthorized
modification of this device, or the substitution or attachment of connecting
cables and equipment other than manufacturer specified. It is the
responsibility of the user to correct any interference caused by such
unauthorized modification, substitution or attachment. Manufacturer and
its authorized resellers or distributors will assume no liability for any damage
or violation of government regulations arising from failing to comply with
these guidelines.
SpaceLink Access Point
5
Table of Contents
1. Introduction .......................................................................................... 8
The SpaceLink™ Family ....................................................................... 8
System Requirements ........................................................................... 8
The IEEE 802.11b Specification .......................................................... 11
Direct-Sequence Spread Spectrum ..................................................... 12
Wireless Operation .............................................................................. 13
SpaceLink™ Access Point LED Indicators .......................................... 16
Power Requirements ........................................................................... 16
2. Installation .......................................................................................... 17
Installation Procedure .......................................................................... 17
Wall Mounting Option .......................................................................... 18
3. SpaceLink Access Point Manager ................................................... 20
Installing the Access Point Manager .................................................... 20
Connecting to SpaceLink Access Points ............................................. 22
Wired Ethernet Cable ...................................................................... 22
Wireless Connection ....................................................................... 22
Across Gateways ............................................................................ 22
Searching for SpaceLink Access Points .............................................. 23
Using the SpaceLink Access Point Manager ....................................... 25
Buttons ............................................................................................ 29
SSID ................................................................................................ 30
SSID Broadcasting .......................................................................... 30
Name .............................................................................................. 30
Data Rate ........................................................................................ 30
Advanced ............................................................................................. 32
64/128bits versus 40/104bits .......................................................... 34
Authorization Table .............................................................................. 35
Operational Mode ................................................................................ 36
SSID ................................................................................................ 37
MAC Address of Host AP ................................................................ 37
Point to Point ................................................................................... 38
Channel ........................................................................................... 38
MAC Address of Host AP ................................................................ 38
Point to MultiPoint ........................................................................... 38
6
SpaceLink Access Point
Table of Contents
4. Wireless Performance ....................................................................... 39
Site Topography ................................................................................... 39
Site Surveys ........................................................................................ 39
Range .................................................................................................. 39
External Antenna Placement ............................................................... 40
Location of antenna connector ............................................................ 41
5. Troubleshooting ................................................................................. 42
Common Problems and Solutions ....................................................... 42
Reset to Defaults ................................................................................. 43
Updating the SpaceLink Access Point Firmware ................................. 46
6. Appendix ............................................................................................. 48
IEEE 802.11b Direct Sequence Channels ........................................... 48
Country Identification Codes ............................................................... 49
Data Input Criteria ............................................................................... 51
SpaceLink Access Point Specifications ............................................... 52
Operating Modes ............................................................................ 53
SpaceLink Access Point
7
Chapter 1 - Introduction
1. Introduction
Chapter 1
Thank you for choosing the SpaceLink™ Access Point, a member of ASUS’
SpaceLink™ wireless infrastructure family. The SpaceLink™ Access Point
complies with the IEEE 802.11b wireless standard to provide wireless
mobile clients with network connectivity at data rates of up to 11 Mbps.
The stand-alone SpaceLink™ Access Point connects to a small Ethernet
network to provide wireless access for wireless mobile clients.
The SpaceLink™ Family
The SpaceLink™ Access Point is a member of a product family that provides
a complete wireless networking solution.
•
•
•
The SpaceLink™ Access Point (WL-300) creates a wireless network
using the IEEE 802.11b wireless standard.
The SpaceLink™ PC Card (WL-100) is a wireless LAN adapter that
fits into a PCMCIA Type II slot in a Notebook PC.
The SpaceLink™ CF Card (WL-110) is a wireless LAN adapter that
fits into a Compact Flash Type II slot in a Portable Digital Assistant
(PDA).
System Requirements
To begin using the SpaceLink™ Access Point, you must have the following
minimum requirements:
• An Ethernet (10Base-T or 10/100Base-TX) LAN switch or hub
• At least one 802.11b wireless adapter for a wireless mobile client
Note: The SpaceLink™ Access Point only supports 10Base-T, therefore it cannot be connected to pure 100Base-TX networks. The network must be either 10-Base or 10/100Base-TX.
8
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 1 - Introduction
The Product Package
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Chapter 1
Each SpaceLink™ Access Point comes with:
One SpaceLink™ Access Point (WL-300)
One power adapter (5 Volts DC, 1 Amp)
One SpaceLink™ Access Point (WL-300) Quick Start Guide
One SpaceLink™ Access Point (WL-300) User’s Manual
One warranty card
One installation CD (tools and documentation)
One RJ-45 Ethernet cable
One Bracket for ceiling mounting
One Bracket for office partition mounting
One Sticker for wall mounting alignment
SpaceLink Access Point
9
Chapter 1 - Introduction
SpaceLink™ Access Point Models
Chapter 1
There are two models of the SpaceLink™ Access Point available. Both
models offer the same functionality and have the same user interface.
Basic Model is an SpaceLink™ Access Point that ships with an integrated
antenna that provides diversity. For best results, stand the SpaceLink™
Access Point in the vertical position. The integrated antenna cannot be
seen or removed from this model.
Wide LAN model is an SpaceLink™ Access Point that ships with an
external antenna that can increase the range of the SpaceLink™ Access
Point. The external antenna connector supports antenna diversity, which
can improve system reliability. Due to the characteristics of radio waves, it
is possible that one antenna may provide better performance than a second
antenna installed a short distance away. Note that a second antenna provides
diversity only; it cannot be used to further increase the range of the Access
Point or increase its coverage area.
The wide LAN model SpaceLink™ Access Point ships with one high-gain
omnidirectional antenna that connect directly to the unit’s antenna connector.
A high-gain external antenna and antenna cabling for this model are sold
separately. Contact your reseller for information on the available antennas
that have been certified for use with the SpaceLink™ Access Point.
10
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Chapter 1
The IEEE 802.11b Specification
In 1997, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) adopted
the 802.11 standard for wireless devices operating in the 2.4 GHz frequency
band. This standard includes provisions for three radio technologies: direct
sequence spread spectrum, frequency hopping spread spectrum, and
infrared. Devices that comply with the 802.11 standard operate at a data
rate of either 1 or 2 Mbps.
In 1999, the IEEE created the 802.11b standard. 802.11b is essentially
identical to the 802.11 standard except 802.11b provides for data rates of
up to 11 Mbps for direct sequence spread spectrum devices. Under 802.11b,
direct sequence devices can operate at 11 Mbps, 5.5 Mbps, 2 Mbps, or 1
Mbps. This provides interoperability with existing 802.11 direct sequence
devices that operate only at 2 Mbps.
Direct sequence spread spectrum devices spread a radio signal over a range
of frequencies. The IEEE 802.11b specification allocates the 2.4 GHz
frequency band into 14 overlapping operating Channels. Each Channel
corresponds to a different set of frequencies. See the Appendix to determine
the center frequency used by each Channel.
If operating multiple 802.11b Access Points in the same vicinity, the distance
between the center frequencies must be at least 25 MHz to avoid
interference. Note that the Channels available to an 802.11b Access Point
will vary from country to country. In the United States, the 802.11b standard
allocates 11 operating Channels for direct sequence devices. Channels 1,
6, and 11 are independent and do not overlap with each other. To avoid
interference between 802.11b Access Points, It is recommended that you
configure the Access Points using only Channels 1, 6, and 11.
SpaceLink Access Point
11
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Direct-Sequence Spread Spectrum
Chapter 1
Spread spectrum (broadband) uses a narrowband signal to spread the
transmission over a segment of the radio frequency band or spectrum. Directsequence is a spread spectrum technique where the transmitted signal is
spread over a particular frequency range. The Space Link Access Point
uses Direct-Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) for radio communication.
Direct-sequence systems communicate by continuously transmitting a
redundant pattern of bits called a chipping sequence. Each bit of transmitted
data is mapped into chips by the access point and rearranged into a
pseudorandom spreading code to form the chipping sequence. The chipping
sequence is combined with a transmitted data stream to produce the access
point output signal.
Wireless mobile clients receiving a direct-sequence transmission use the
spreading code to map the chips within the chipping sequence back into
bits to recreate the original data transmitted by the access point. Intercepting
and decoding a direct-sequence transmission requires a predefined algorithm
to associate the spreading code used by the transmitting access point to the
receiving wireless mobile client.
This algorithm is established by IEEE 802.11b specifications. The bit
redundancy within the chipping sequence enables the receiving wireless
mobile client to recreate the original data pattern, even if bits in the chipping
sequence are corrupted by interference. The ratio of chips per bit is called
the spreading ratio. A high spreading ratio increases the resistance of the
signal to interference. A low spreading ratio increases the bandwidth
available to the user. The access point uses a constant chip rate of 11Mchips/
s for all data rates, but uses different modulation schemes to encode more
bits per chip at the higher data rates. The access point is capable of an 11
Mbps data transmission rate, but the coverage area is less than a 1 or 2
Mbps access point since coverage area decreases as bandwidth increases.
12
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Chapter 1
Wireless Operation
The SpaceLink™ Access Point supports three modes of operation:
•
Access Point: The SpaceLink™ Access Point operates as a stand-alone
device to provide network access to wireless mobile clients.
• Access Point Client: The SpaceLink™ Access Point partners with
another SpaceLink Access Point to provide network access to wireless
mobile clients.
• Wireless Bridge: The SpaceLink™ Access Point communicates only
with other SpaceLink™ Access Points that are set to Wireless Bridge
Mode. (SpaceLink™ Access Points set to Wireless Bridge mode cannot
support wireless mobile clients.)
By default, the SpaceLink™ Access Point operates in Access Point mode.
Access Point Mode
In “Access Point” mode, the SpaceLink™ Access Point will operate as a
MAC layer learning bridge and forward packets between wireless mobile
clients and the Ethernet network.
A wireless LAN that uses the SpaceLink™ Access Point in “Access Point”
mode generally consists of one or more 802.11b Access Points and one or
more wireless mobile clients that have an 802.11b adapter installed.
The SpaceLink™ Access Point maintains a table of MAC addresses, which
it has learned are located either on the Ethernet network or on the radio
network by monitoring the source address of packets it receives. For
example, if the SpaceLink™ Access Point receives a packet over its radio,
it creates an entry in its table for the node that sent the packet and labels the
entry as a member of the radio network. The SpaceLink™ Access Point
removes an entry from the table after five minutes of inactivity.
When the SpaceLink™ Access Point receives a packet from the Ethernet
network, it compares the packet’s destination address with the node
addresses listed in its table. If the packet’s destination address is not in the
table, the SpaceLink™ Access Point will forward the packet to the wireless
mobile clients. If the packet’s destination address is listed in the table as a
member of the radio network, the SpaceLink™ Access Point will forward
the packet to the wireless mobile clients. If the packet’s destination address
is listed in the table as a member of the Ethernet network, the SpaceLink™
SpaceLink Access Point
13
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Chapter 1
Access Point will not forward the packet to the wireless mobile clients.
The SpaceLink™ Access Point applies the same principles to determine if
a packet received over its radio should be forwarded to the Ethernet network.
The SpaceLink™ Access Point forwards all broadcast packets to wireless
mobile clients. Given this, the SpaceLink™ Access Point can only support
a limited amount of network traffic. It is recommended that you only use
the SpaceLink™ Access Point on networks that contain less than 512 nodes.
The number of wireless mobile clients that can be supported by the
SpaceLink™ Access Point depends on the amount of information that each
client exchanges with the network. Therefore, the number of clients that
can be supported by one SpaceLink™ Access Point will vary based on the
applications in use and how frequently network information is accessed.
Roaming Between SpaceLink™ Access Points
If there are multiple SpaceLink™ Access Points on the network, then a
wireless mobile client may seamlessly roam from one SpaceLink™ Access
Point to another.
Each SpaceLink™ Access Point creates its own wireless cell or coverage
area. This is also known as a Basic Service Set (BSS). Any wireless mobile
client can communicate with a particular SpaceLink™ Access Point if it is
within the SpaceLink™ Access Point’s coverage area.
If the cells of multiple SpaceLink™ Access Points overlap, then the wireless
mobile client may switch from one SpaceLink™ Access Point to another
as it travels throughout the facility. During the hand-off from one
SpaceLink™ Access Point to another, the wireless mobile client maintains
an uninterrupted connection to the network. This is known as “roaming.”
Multiple SpaceLink™ Access Points connected to a common Ethernet
network form an Extended Service Set (ESS). All members of an Extended
Service Set are configured with an ID, known as the SSID or ESSID.
Wireless mobile clients must be configured with the same SSID as the
SpaceLink™ Access Points on the network; a client can only roam between
SpaceLink™ Access Points that share the same SSID.
14
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Roaming Guidelines
•
•
•
•
An 802.11b PC Card can only roam between 802.11b Access Points.
All SpaceLink™ Access Points must have the same SSID.
All computers with SpaceLink™ PC card or CF card adapters must
have the same SSID as the Access Points that they will roam between.
If WEP encryption is enabled, then all SpaceLink™ Access Points and
client adapters must use the same encryption level and WEP Key(s) to
communicate.
The SpaceLink™ Access Points’ cells must overlap to ensure that there
are no gaps in coverage and to ensure that the roaming client will always
have a connection available.
SpaceLink™ Access Points that use the same Channel should be installed
as far away from each other as possible to reduce potential interference.
It is strongly recommended that you perform a site survey using the
utility provided with the SpaceLink™ PC card or CF card to determine
the best location for each SpaceLink™ Access Point in the facility.
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 1
•
•
•
15
Chapter 1 - Introduction
SpaceLink™ Access Point LED Indicators
Chapter 1
There are three LEDs on the front of the SpaceLink™ Access Point, as
shown here.
Power (Amber)
Air (Green)
Link (Green)
Power LED
The Power LED is the top LED and turns amber when the power adapter is
connected and the power switch is turned ON.
Air LED
The Air LED is the middle LED and turns green when the wireless function
is working.
Link LED
The Link LED is the bottom LED and turns green when the Access Point
has a physical connection to the Ethernet network.
Power Requirements
The SpaceLink™ Access Point requires power from an external power
supply. The SpaceLink™ Access Point ships with a UL listed, Class 2 power
supply (5V, 1A).
16
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Chapter 1
2. Installation
This chapter describes the installation procedure for the SpaceLink Access
Point and includes a description of the LEDs found on the unit.
Installation Procedure
Follow these steps to install the SpaceLink Access Point.
1. Determine the best location for the SpaceLink Access Point. Keep in
mind the following considerations:
• The length of the Ethernet cable that connects the Access Point to
the network must not exceed 100 meters.
• For standard placement, try to place the Access Point on a flat, sturdy
surface as far from the ground as possible, such as on top of a desk
or bookcase, keeping clear of metal obstructions and away from
direct sunlight.
• For external antenna mounting, install the external antennas so that
they are clear of obstructions; refer to the documentation that came
with the antennas for mounting and installation instructions.
• Try to centrally locate the Access Point or its antennas so that it will
provide coverage to all of the wireless mobile devices in the area.
• Use only the power supply that came with this unit. Other power
supplies may fit but the voltage and power may not be compatible.
It is the responsibility of the installer and users of the SpaceLink
Access Point to guarantee that the antenna is operated at least 20
centimeters from any person. This is necessary to insure that the
product is operated in accordance with the RF Guidelines for Human Exposure which have been adopted by the Federal Communications Commission.
2. Place the Access Point in the desired location. Wall mounting is also
possible for the Access Point. Refer to the section entitled “Wall
Mounting Option” on the next page for details.
3. Attach one end of an RJ-45 Ethernet cable to the Access Point and
attach the other end to the RJ-45 10Base-T port of a network hub, switch,
router, or patch panel (possibly on a wall).
The SpaceLink Access Point does not support 100Base-TX; it only
supports 10Base-T. Hubs or switches that supports both 10Base-T
and 100Base-TX may be used.
SpaceLink Access Point
17
Chapter 2 - Installation
4. Attach one end of the AC power adapter, included in the product package,
to the back of the SpaceLink Access Point and the other end to a power
outlet.
Chapter 2
Note: Use the Access Point only with the power adapter supplied in
the product package. Using another power supply may damage the
Access Point.
The Power LED on the front of the Access Point will light up when the unit
is powered ON. In addition, the green Link LED will turn ON to indicate
that the Access Point has a physical Ethernet network connection.
Wall Mounting Option
Out of the box, the SpaceLink Access Point is designed to sit on a raised
flat surface like a file cabinet or book shelf. The unit may also be converted
for mounting to a wall or ceiling.
Follow these steps to mount the Access Point to a wall:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Remove the base by pressing the tab and sliding the base.
Remove the side cover to expose the mounting hooks.
Locate the screws provided with the Access Point.
Mark two holes in a flat surface using the provided hole template.
Tighten the two provided screws until only 1/4” is showing.
Latch the Access Point onto the two screws.
Note: Readjust the screws if you cannot latch the Access Point onto
the screws or if it is too loose.
18
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 2 - Installation
Step 1
After:
Chapter 2
Before:
1
2
Step 2
Before:
After:
Note: Mounting brackets are provided for you to hang the SpaceLink
Access Point on an office partition or office ceiling.
SpaceLink Access Point
19
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
3. SpaceLink Access Point Manager
This chapter describes how to access the SpaceLink Access Point Manager,
which is used to configure SpaceLink Access Points.
Installing the Access Point Manager
Follow these steps to install the SpaceLink Access Point Manager in
Windows:
1. Insert the support CD, select a lan- 2. Click Next after reading the Welguage if necessary, and click on Income message.
stall WLAN AP Utilities.
Chapter 3
3. Click Next to accept the default di- 4. Click Next to use the default prorectory or browse to another locagram folder or enter another folder.
tion.
20
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Installing the Access Point Manager (Cont.)
Chapter 3
5. Click Next after reading the set- 6. When setup is complete, click Fintings.
ish to exit the setup wizard.
7. Launch ASUS AP Manager
through “Start | Programs”.
SpaceLink Access Point
21
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Connecting to SpaceLink Access Points
Wired Ethernet Cable
Besides using a network hub, you can also connect a LAN cable from your
computer’s network card to the Access Point using either a straight or
crossover cable because the SpaceLink Access Point RJ-45 port has autocrossover capability.
Wireless Connection
If you are using a Notebook PC with a wireless adapter, you can connect to
the SpaceLink Access Point using the SpaceLink Access Point Manager
without a wired Ethernet connection.
Across Gateways
The SpaceLink Access Point Manager can connect to any SpaceLink Access
Point using its IP address even across gateways. The gateway settings of
the SpaceLink Access Point and your computer must be set correctly
according to the network environment.
Chapter 3
22
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Searching for SpaceLink Access Points
The computer running the SpaceLink Access Point Manager must be on
the same IP subnet as the SpaceLink Access Point in order to successfully
find SpaceLink Access Points.
1. When you open the SpaceLink Access Point Manager, it automatically
searches for SpaceLink Access
Points on the same subnet. You will
not be able to see or configure settings until the IP address is changed
so that the subnet matches that of
your computer running the
SpaceLink Access Point Manager.
Chapter 3
2. Click the IP Config tab and change
the IP address and subnet mask.
By default, the SpaceLink Access
Point Manager shows correct settings of SpaceLink Access Points
on the same subnet. For example,
if your SpaceLink Access Point
Manager software is running on IP
address 192.168.8.8 subnet mask
255.255.255.0, you can enter IP address 192.168.8.9 (assuming that
it is not already assigned to another
network device), subnet mask
255.255.255.0. Usually, you should
use the same subnet mask as your
computer.
Note: In some situations, the SpaceLink Access Point Manager
cannot retrieve the MAC address of your SpaceLink Access
Point. In this case, you should key it in manually. You can see
the MAC address on the sticker after removing the base of the
SpaceLink Access Point.
SpaceLink Access Point
23
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Searching for SpaceLink Access Points (Cont.)
3. Enter the default password asus
(lower case) and click OK.
The password is required to make
setting changes.
Note: If you cannot find any SpaceLink Access Points due to a problem in the IP settings, push and hold the “Reset to Defaults” over
five seconds to restore factory default settings.
When using the SpaceLink Access Point manager through a wireless connection, set your IP to 192.168.39.X (X being any number 1254 that is not assigned to another device) if you still cannot connect to any SpaceLink Access Points after using “Reset to Defaults”.
Chapter 3
24
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Using the SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Once the IP address of the SpaceLink
Access Point is configured correctly,
the name of the SpaceLink Access
Point will be shown in place of the
default IP address. Information will
be shown in each of the pages. You
can see each of the pages by clicking
on the tabs.
General
Click the General tab to view the
SpaceLink Access Point Status
screen. The Status screen reports the following information:
•
•
•
•
•
Firmware Version: (Next to the SpaceLink Access Point icon) This
field reports the Flash Code (Firmware) version installed on the
SpaceLink Access Point. Periodically, a new Flash Code is available
for SpaceLink Access Points on ASUS’s Web site. You can update the
SpaceLink Access Point’s Flash Code using the Access Point upgrade
tool called “ASUS AP Live Update” installed along with the Access
Point Manager found in the “ASUS WLAN AP Utilities”. You can find
this folder in Windows “Start” menu. If you are experiencing a problem
with your SpaceLink equipment, a Technical Support representative
may ask you to report the device’s Flash Code (Firmware) version.
Operational Mode: Different operational modes are discussed later.
Normally “Access Point” is set by default.
IP Address: The IP address of the Access Point whether assigned by a
DHCP server or manually entered will be shown here.
MAC Address: SpaceLink Access Point’s physical address is assigned
at the factory and cannot be changed by the end user. The physical
address or MAC address is a 48-bit unique identifier assigned to each
networking device. The physical address is commonly written as six
pairs of two hexadecimal digits separated by colons (for example,
00:E0:18:3E:A3:A3).
Current Channel: The SpaceLink Access Point channel assigned by
the user using the SpaceLink Access Point manager can be seen here. It
is set to “Channel 1” by default.
SSID: The SpaceLink Access Point SSID can be assigned any name using
the SpaceLink Access Point manager but is set as “default” from the factory.
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 3
•
25
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Buttons
Search AP: Searches for compatible SpaceLink Access Points that are
within your subnet. This function cannot search across gateways. If you
cannot see your SpaceLink Access Point, use the “Reset to Defaults” on
the back of the SpaceLink Access Point and try again. See Appendix for
more information on connection problems.
Connect to AP: The SpaceLink Access Point Manager can connect to any
compatible user-entered SpaceLink Access Point using its IP address even
across gateways.
Refresh AP status: The SpaceLink Access Point Manager will refresh all
information from the SpaceLink Access Point and update all the pages in
the SpaceLink Access Point Manager utility.
Reboot AP: This has the same effect as turning OFF and ON the SpaceLink
Access Point. If the SpaceLink Access Point is not working correctly,
“Reboot AP” may solve the problem.
Reset to Defaults: Resets the SpaceLink Access Point to its factory default
settings.
Chapter 3
Change Password: Change the
password required to make setting
changes. You can enter any usable
characters between 1-16 characters long
(cannot be left blank). Each time you
apply a change, you will be prompted
to enter a Password. The default
Password is “asus” (lower case). If you
forget the SpaceLink Access Point’s
password, you can reset the SpaceLink Access Point to its factory settings
(see troubleshooting).
Note: The password is case sensitive.
Left Pane Tree View
1st level: SSID
2nd level: SpaceLink Access Point names
3rd level: Associated wireless mobile clients
Note: SpaceLink Access Points with the same SSID will gather in
the same branch.
26
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Connection
Click the Connection tab to view
the SpaceLink Access Point Radio
Statistics screen. The Radio
Statistics provide information
concerning the number of packets
sent and received by the SpaceLink
Access Point every second.
The following Radio Statistics are available for an 802.11b Access Point:
•
•
•
Wireless Throughput: This statistic provides information concerning
the number of packets transmitted and received by an Access Point over
the wireless network.
Wireless Frame Errors: This statistic reports the number of packets
for which the AP did not receive an acknowledgment within the
maximum number of retries or discarded by the radio due to a
transmission error, such as exceeding the number of retries.
Ethernet Throughput: This statistics provide information concerning
the number of packets transmitted and received by an Access Point over
the Ethernet network.
Ethernet Frame Errors: This statistic provides information concerning
the number of error packets transmitted and received by the SpaceLink
Access Point over the Ethernet network.
Chapter 3
•
Note: You can show or hide any of the four lines in the chart by
checking or unchecking the boxes.
SpaceLink Access Point
27
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
IP Config
The SpaceLink Access Point
Manager has many smart features
including:
•
•
•
•
•
The SpaceLink Access Point can
receive a dynamic IP address from
a network DHCP (Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol) server.
The SpaceLink Access Point can
be assigned a static IP address via
the SpaceLink Access Point
Manager.
The SpaceLink Access Point Manager will automatically add or modify
the subnet mask according to the IP address class A, B, or C when the
user changes the IP address of the SpaceLink Access Point.
The SpaceLink Access Point Manager will ping the IP address before
applying the user-defined IP address to the SpaceLink Access Point.
The SpaceLink Access Point Manager will warn when changing to a
different subnet IP address (not supported in NT4).
Chapter 3
Note: Normally, the SpaceLink Access Point needs about 3 seconds to bootup when there is a successful IP address. If you select
“Obtain an IP address automatically” and there is no DHCP server
on the network, the bootup time of the SpaceLink Access Point will
be 25 seconds. After this timeout period, the SpaceLink Access
Point will use the last successful IP address. The SpaceLink Access Point Manager will not be able to connect to the SpaceLink
Access Point until this lengthy bootup is completed.
Obtain an IP address automatically
This parameter determines if the SpaceLink Access Point will send out a
DHCP request during bootup. If you have a DHCP server on the network,
set this option so that the SpaceLink Access Point can receive an automatic
IP address assignment. Choose the request method either through the
physically connected “Ethernet” cable or “Wireless”.
28
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
If you have a DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) server on the
network, then the DHCP server will automatically assign the SpaceLink Access
Point an IP address when the SpaceLink Access Point is powered up. To determine
what IP address has been assigned to the SpaceLink Access Point, review the IP
address on the “General” page after clicking “Refresh AP Status”.
Specify an IP Address
The SpaceLink Access Point also accepts a static IP address. You may
manually configure the IP address and subnet mask on the “IP Config”
page. Enter an IP address and a subnet mask in the field provided to assign
the SpaceLink Access Point a static IP address. Normally you do not need
to enter a “Gateway” address unless you want to manage the SpaceLink
Access Point in another IP domain. Enter “0.0.0.0” for the Gateway if the
Access Point is in your IP domain.
Only allow IP Packets
If you check this item, only IP protocol packets will be allowed to pass
through the SpaceLink Access Point and other protocol packets will be
filtered out
Chapter 3
Buttons
These buttons will be available if you make changes to this page.
Undo: If you make a mistake while configuring this page, click “Undo” to
revert the parameters on this page to the last saved settings
Apply: Clicking “Apply” will attempt to save the currently modified
settings. You will be asked for the password to save changes.
SpaceLink Access Point
29
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Wireless Config
SSID
The SSID is a string of up to 32
ASCII characters that must match on
all communicating 802.11b devices
within the same network. SSID
stands for Service Set ID. The SSID
is also referred to as the “ESSID” or
“Extended Service Set ID.”
All SpaceLink Access Points and
SpaceLink 802.11b client adapters must have the same SSID to allow a
wireless mobile client to roam between SpaceLink Access Points. By default,
the SSID is set to “default”.
SSID Broadcasting
Chapter 3
By default, this is checked so that wireless mobile users can see your
SpaceLink Access Point’s SSID and join. If this is unchecked, your
SpaceLink Access Point will not show in site surveys by wireless mobile
clients and they will have to manually enter your SpaceLink Access Point’s
SSID. If you want to restrict access to “your” SpaceLink Access Point, this
is a simple way to do it but for security reasons, don’t forget to change the
SSID to something other than “default”.
Name
The name is used to identify an Access Point when multiple SpaceLink Access
Points are used at the same time. For example, “1F_AP1” or “2F_AP2”.
Data Rate
If your application requires that the SpaceLink 802.11b PC Card or CF Card
maintains an 11 Mbps data rate, you can check 11 Mbps. The SpaceLink
Access Point and PC/CF Card will always attempt to operate at 11 Mbps but
this may greatly reduce the size of the coverage area provided by the
SpaceLink Access Point. Once the PC/CF Card moves outside the range that
provides 11 Mbps operation, the PC/CF Card will lose connectivity with the
network. Other options are available for lower speeds but increased coverage.
“Fully Auto” will adjust speeds to provide the best coverage.
30
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Channel
IEEE 802.11b devices are direct sequence spread spectrum devices that
spread a radio signal over a range of frequencies. The range of frequencies
used by a direct sequence device is called a Channel.
The IEEE 802.11b specification supports up to 14 overlapping Channels
for radio communication. But only 11 Channels are supported in the United
States and therefore on the SpaceLink Access Point. To minimize
interference, configure each SpaceLink Access Point to use Nonoverlapping channels. Non-overlapping channels have 25Mhz separation
beginning at the first allowed channel for the country (for the US and most
of Europe, channels 1, 6 & 11 are used).
Make sure that the SpaceLink Access Points sharing the same Channel (or
Channels close in number) are as far away from each other as possible,
based on the results of your site survey of the facility. You can find the site
survey utility in the SpaceLink PC card or CF card setup CD.
Supported Rates
Chapter 3
The IEEE 802.11b specification supports four data rates: 11 Mbps, 5.5
Mbps, 2 Mbps, and 1 Mbps. As a wireless mobile client travels further and
further away from the SpaceLink Access Point, the data rate automatically
decreases in order to maintain a usable radio connection. Therefore, a client
that is close to an SpaceLink Access Point may operate at 11 Mbps, but a
client that is far away from the SpaceLink Access Point may operate at 2
Mbps. By default, the SpaceLink Access Point supports all four data rates.
However, you can specify a data rate by checking the appropriate box.
Supported Clients
802.11b products can operate at 11 Mbps, 5.5 Mbps, 2 Mbps or 1 Mbps. This
allows 802.11b devices to communicate with any existing 802.11 direct sequence
devices that operate only at 1 or 2 Mbps. By default, the SpaceLink Access Point
will support both 802.11b and 2 Mbps 802.11 direct sequence clients.
Encryption (Button)
Click this button to open the Encryption page.
Advanced (Button)
Click this button to open the advanced settings page. The advanced settings
page is normally hidden.
SpaceLink Access Point
31
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Advanced
This page is normally hidden unless
you click the “Advanced” button
from the “Wireless Config” page.
RTS threshold
This is the minimum packet size to
require the RTS (Request To Send).
For packets smaller than this
threshold, an RTS is not sent and the
packet is transmitted directly to
wireless mobile client. The range is 64 to 2346 bytes
Fragmentation Threshold
This is the minimum size at which packets will be fragmented. The range
is 64 to 2346 bytes.
Authentication Algorithm
Chapter 3
Open System: Any wireless mobile client can associate with the SpaceLink
Access Point and receive and transmit data. This is basically null
authentication.
Shared Key: Only stations using a shared key encryption identified by the
SpaceLink Access Point are allowed to associate with it.
Both: Wireless mobile clients can communicate with the SpaceLink Access
Point either with or without encryption.
Preamble Type
Preamble is the first sub-field of PPDU, which is the appropriate frame
format for transmission to PHY (Physical layer).
There are two options, Short Preamble and Long Preamble. The Short
Preamble option improves throughput performance. All wireless mobile
clients must use the SpaceLink Access Point’s preamble setting in order to
connect.
32
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Encryption
Security
The IEEE 802.11b standard
specifies an optional encryption
feature, known as Wired Equivalent
Privacy or WEP, that is designed to
provide a wireless LAN with a
security level equal to what is found
on a wired Ethernet network.
WEP encrypts the data portion of
each packet exchanged on the 802.11b network using either a 64-bit or
128-bit encryption algorithm. In addition, WEP is also used in conjunction
with the optional Shared Key Authentication algorithm to prevent
unauthorized devices from associating with an 802.11b network.
WEP Encryption
The SpaceLink Access Point offers several configuration options for WEP
Encryption: Disabled, 64 Bits, 128 Bits.
Chapter 3
When set to Disabled, the SpaceLink Access Point does not encrypt any
data or authentication packets.
The SpaceLink Access Point supports both 64-bit and 128-bit encryption
using the Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) algorithm. Select the type of
encryption you want to use (64 or 128 bit) and configure one to four WEP
Keys.
Automatic Generation
Type a combination of up to 64 letters, numbers, or symbols in the
Passphrase column, then the SpaceLink Access Point Manager uses an
algorithm to generate four WEP keys for encryption.
The SpaceLink family of products all use the same algorithm to generate
the keys so that they can all use the same WEP key.
Note: This function eases users from having to remember their
passwords and is compatible to ASUS SpaceLink family of products. But this is not as secure as manual assignment.
SpaceLink Access Point
33
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Default Key
The Default Key field lets you specify which of the four encryption keys
you use to transmit data on your wireless LAN. As long as the SpaceLink
Access Point or wireless mobile client with which you are communicating
has the same key in the same position, you can use any of the keys as the
default key.
64/128bits versus 40/104bits
You may be confused about configuring WEP encryption, especially when
using multiple wireless LAN products from different vendors. There are
two levels of WEP Encryption: 64 bits and 128 bits.
Firstly, 64 bit WEP and 40 bit WEP are the same encryption method and
can interoperate in the wireless network. This lower level of WEP encryption
uses a 40 bit (10 Hex character) as a “secret key” (set by user), and a 24 bit
“Initialization Vector” (not under user control). This together makes 64
bits (40 + 24). Some vendors refer to this level of WEP as 40 bits and
others refer to this as 64 bits. ASUS SpaceLink products use the term 64
bits when referring to this lower level of encryption.
Chapter 3
Secondly, 104 bit WEP and 128 bit WEP are the same encryption method
and can interoperate in the wireless network. This higher level of WEP
encryption uses a 104 bit (26 Hex character) as a “secret key” (set by user),
and a 24 bit “Initialization Vector” (not under user control). This together
makes 128 bits (104 + 24). Some vendors refer to this level of WEP as 104
bits and others refer to this as 128 bits. ASUS SpaceLink products use the
term 128 bits when referring to this higher level of encryption.
34
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Authorization Table
To add security, the SpaceLink
Access Point has the ability to only
associate with wireless mobile clients
that have their MAC address entered
into this page.
In order to see the currently entered
authorized MAC Address, you must
click “Get from AP” and enter the
SpaceLink Access Point password.
Saving or Loading an
Authorization List
You can save the current
authorization list to a text file and
load it into another SpaceLink Access
Point.
Adding Authorized Clients
Chapter 3
To add authorized wireless mobile
clients to this SpaceLink Access
Point, click “Add” and enter its MAC
Address.
You can add or remove MAC
addresses in both the “Disable” or
“Enable” modes.
Note: The table will not be
cleared when the SpaceLink
Access Point is “Reset to Defaults”. This table allows a maximum of 680 entries.
SpaceLink Access Point
35
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Operational Mode
Access Point
The Operation Mode configures the
SpaceLink Access Point for a specific
purpose. By default, the SpaceLink
Access Point is set to serve as an
“Access Point” where a wireless
mobile client can connect wirelessly
to a wired Ethernet network.
Chapter 3
36
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Access Point Client
The “Access Point Client” mode
allows one SpaceLink Access Point
(the one on the right in the picture) to
be used as a “client” in order to bridge
a group of wired clients to another
network (the one on the left). In this
mode, the SpaceLink Access Point
“client” (the one on the right) cannot
serve wireless mobile clients so an
additional SpaceLink Access Point
must be installed if wireless mobile
clients exist. Whereas the SpaceLink Access Point on the left treats the
SpaceLink Access Point client on the right as just another wireless mobile
client.
SSID
Set both SpaceLink Access Points used in “Access Point Client” mode and
access point mode to the same SSID to allow communication.
Chapter 3
MAC Address of Host AP
Enter the MAC address of the host SpaceLink Access Point in order to
designate which SpaceLink Access Point will be the host for this client
SpaceLink Access Point.
SpaceLink Access Point
37
Chapter 3 - SpaceLink Access Point Manager
Wireless Bridge
The Wireless Bridge mode has two
options; a Point to Point setting and
a Point to MultiPoint setting.
Point to Point
With Point to Point, the SpaceLink
Access Point can only communicate
with one other SpaceLink Access Point
that is also set to Wireless Bridge mode.
This provides the best option to bridge
to locations but it is recommended to get the optional external antenna for the
rooftop to increase signal strength. Remember that the speed will automatically
decrease to accommodate weak signals.
Channel
Both Access Points in Wireless Bridge mode must be set to the same channel.
MAC Address of Host AP
Chapter 3
Enter the MAC address of the target SpaceLink Access Point (set to Wireless
Bridge mode) in order to designate which SpaceLink Access Point will be
the partner for this SpaceLink Access Point (also set to Wireless Bridge
mode).
Point to MultiPoint
With Point to MultiPoint, one
SpaceLink Access Point in Wireless
Bridge mode can communicate with
several other SpaceLink Access
Points (also set to Wireless Bridge
mode). This option will decrease
bandwidth and range.
38
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 4 - Wireless Performance
4. Wireless Performance
This section provides the user with ideas for how to improve the performance
of a SpaceLink 802.11b network.
Site Topography
For optimal performance, locate wireless mobile clients and SpaceLink
Access Points away from transformers, heavy-duty motors, fluorescent
lights, microwave ovens, refrigerators, and other industrial equipment.
Signal loss can occur when metal, concrete, walls or floors block
transmission. Locate SpaceLink Access Points in open areas or add
SpaceLink Access Points as needed to improve coverage.
Microwave ovens operate in the same frequency band as the SpaceLink
Access Point. Therefore, if you use a microwave within range of the
SpaceLink Access Point you may notice network performance degradation.
However, both your microwave and your SpaceLink Access Point will
continue to function.
Site Surveys
Chapter 4
A site survey (utility provided with the SpaceLink PC card and CF card)
analyzes the installation environment and provides users with
recommendations for equipment and its placement. The optimum placement
of 11 Mbps access points differs for 1 or 2 Mbps access points, because the
locations and number of access points required are different.
Range
Every environment is unique with different obstacles, barriers, materials,
etc. and, therefore, it is difficult to determine the exact range that will be
achieved without testing. However, has developed some guidelines to
estimate the range that users will see when the product is installed in their
facility, but there are no hard and fast specifications.
Radio signals may reflect off of some obstacles or be absorbed by others
depending on their construction. For example, with two 802.11b radios,
you may achieve up to 1000' in open space outdoors where two devices
have a line of sight, meaning they see each other with no obstacles. However,
the same two units may only achieve up to 300' of range when used indoors.
SpaceLink Access Point
39
Chapter 4 - Wireless Performance
The IEEE 802.11b specification supports four data rates: 11 Mbps, 5.5 Mbps,
2 Mbps, and 1 Mbps. Operation at 1 Mbps provides greater range than
operation at 11 Mbps. The SpaceLink Access Point will automatically adjust
the data rate to maintain a usable radio connection.
Therefore, a client that is close to the SpaceLink Access Point may operate
at 11 Mbps while a client that is on the fringe of coverage may operate at 1
Mbps. As mentioned earlier, you can configure the data rates that the
SpaceLink Access Point will use. Note that if you limit the range of data
rates available to the SpaceLink Access Point, you may reduce the effective
wireless range of the SpaceLink 802.11b products.
External antenna options are available for the SpaceLink Access Point that
can increase the product’s range. Contact your reseller for more information.
External Antenna Placement
Proper antenna placement can help improve communication range. Here
are some guidelines:
Chapter 4
An external omnidirectional antenna for the SpaceLink Access Point
should be placed in a vertical position. It can be mounted upside down
to the ceiling or a beam.
Place the antenna as high as possible. In an office environment, try to
place it above cubicle walls.
Do not place a metal (like a filing cabinet) between two antennas.
Two antennas that are communicating should be in the same plane. For
example, do not lie one antenna on its side and have its partner standing
upright.
Note: Optional antenna kits are not currently available. Check with
your local dealer for availability.
40
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 4 - Wireless Performance
Location of antenna connector
Chapter 4
Slide the right side cover back to reveal the antenna connector.
Note: Optional antenna kits are not currently available. Check with
your local dealer for availability.
SpaceLink Access Point
41
Chapter 5 -Troubleshooting
5. Troubleshooting
The SpaceLink Access Point is designed to be very easy to install and operate.
However, if you experience difficulties, use the information in this chapter
to help diagnose and solve problems. If you cannot resolve a problem, contact
Technical Support, as listed on the front of this manual.
Common Problems and Solutions
Problem
AP does not power up:
Solution
• Check for faulty SpaceLink Access Point power supply by measuring
the output voltage with an electrical test meter.
• Check failed AC supply (power outlet)
Problem
Cannot communicate with the SpaceLink Access Point through a wired
network connection.
Chapter 5
Solution
• Verify network configuration by ensuring that there are no duplicate IP
addresses. Power down the device in question and ping the assigned IP
address of the device. Ensure no other device responds to that address.
• Check that the cables used have proper pin outs and connectors or use
another LAN cable.
• Check that the hub, switch, or computer that the SpaceLink Access Point
is connected to supports 10Mbps speed.
This is what you will see if you connect the SpaceLink Access Point to a:
10/100 Mbps Hub
Pure 100 Mbps Hub
Hub LED
ON
OFF
Access Point (Link) LED
ON
ON
So you will not know if the connection is bad from the SpaceLink Access
Point Link LED alone, you will have to look at the Hub LED if you are not
sure what kind of hub the SpaceLink Access Point is attached to.
42
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 5 -Troubleshooting
Problem
The SpaceLink Access Point Manager still cannot find or connect
to the SpaceLink Access Point after verifying the IP address and
LAN cable, changes cannot be made, or password is lost.
Solution
In case the SpaceLink Access Point is inaccessible, you can
restore the SpaceLink Access Point’s factory default settings.
Use a straightened paper clip to press the button located in
the hole labeled “Reset” on the back of the SpaceLink Access
Point and keep it depressed over 5 seconds. The amber power
LED will darken and then light up when reset is successful.
Reset to Defaults
Name
Default Value
Password
IP address assignment
Primary port
IP address
Subnet mask
Gateway
SSID
Channel
WEP type
AP name
Operational mode
Only allow IP packets
Authorization table
Host AP / Wireless Bridge MAC Add.
Fragmentation threshold
RTS threshold
Preamble mode
Authentication type
“asus”
obtain an IP address automatically
Ethernet
192.168.39.130
255.255.255.0
0.0.0.0
“default”
1
WEP disable
“ASUS AP”
AP mode
Disable
Disable
00-00-00-00-00-00
2346
2346
Long preamble
Both
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 5
The following are factory default values. These values will be present when you
first receive your SpaceLink Access Point, if you push the reset button on the
back of the SpaceLink Access Point over 5 seconds, or if you click the “Reset to
Defaults” on the “General” page of the SpaceLink Access Point Manager.
43
Chapter 5 -Troubleshooting
Problem
My 802.11b PC Card will not associate with the SpaceLink Access Point.
Solution
Follow these steps:
1. Try to bring the devices closer together; the PC Card may be out of
range of the SpaceLink Access Point.
2. Confirm that the SpaceLink Access Point and PC Card have the same
SSID.
3. Confirm that the SpaceLink Access Point and PC Card have the same
Encryption settings, if enabled.
4. Confirm that the SpaceLink Access Point’s Air and Link LEDs are solid
green.
5. Confirm that the authorization table includes the MAC address of the
SpaceLink PC card if “Authorization Table” is enabled.
6. Confirm that the operational mode is “Access Point” mode.
7. Confirm that the SpaceLink Access Point and SpaceLink PC card have
the same preamble mode.
Problem
The throughput seems slow.
Chapter 5
Solution
To achieve maximum throughput, verify that your antennas are well-placed,
not behind metal, and do not have too many obstacles between them. If
you move the client closer to the SpaceLink Access Point and throughput
increases, you may want to consider adding a second SpaceLink Access
Point and implementing roaming.
•
•
•
•
44
Check antenna, connectors and cabling.
Verify network traffic does not exceed 37% of bandwidth.
Check to see that the wired network does not exceed 10 broadcast
messages per second.
Verify wired network topology and configuration.
SpaceLink Access Point
Chapter 5 -Troubleshooting
Problem
I cannot find SpaceLink Access Points using the SpaceLink Access Point Manager.
Solution
To configure the SpaceLink Access Point through a wireless LAN card,
your computer must be in the same subnet of the SpaceLink Access Point.
You cannot find SpaceLink Access Points with subnet different from your
computer within the same gateway. You must change your computer to the
same subnet as the SpaceLink Access Point. The factory default subnet of
the SpaceLink Access Point is "192.168.39.0".
If you put the SpaceLink Access Point on different subnets, but physically
connected inside the same gateway, the following symptoms will occur:
For example, if your computer’s TCP/IP settings are:
IP address: 192.168.1.1, Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
AP TCP/IP Settings
Ethernet Network
Wireless LAN
IP address
192.168.2.130
192.168.2.130
192.168.2.130
Subnet mask
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0
Gateway
0.0.0.0
Not 0.0.0.0
Any value
Success of Search AP
Yes, then you can
change the AP to
match your subnet
No, you should
“reset to defaults”,
then search again.
No, you should
1. “reset to defaults”
2. change your PC’s IP
address to 192.168.39.X
then search again
Chapter 5
In Windows NT/2000/XP, you must login with Administrator privileges so that all functions of the SpaceLink Access Point Manager
can function correctly. If you do not login as a member of the Administrator group, you cannot run Access Point Manager.
Problem
How do I upgrade the firmware on the SpaceLink Access Point?
Solution
Periodically, a new Flash Code is available for SpaceLink Access Points
on the Web site at http://www.asus.com. Ideally, you should update an
Access Point’s Flash Code using the “ASUS AP Live Update” utility
installed along with the “ASUS AP Manager”. See the next section for
instructions on using “ASUS AP Live Update”.
SpaceLink Access Point
45
Appendix
Updating the SpaceLink Access Point Firmware
Run ASUS AP Live Update from
Start | Programs | ASUS WLAN AP
Utilities.
Choose a method of updating the
SpaceLink Access Point firmware. If
you choose the update from Internet
option, it will compare your version
to determine if updating is necessary.
If updating is not necessary, you will
be prompted to exit the update utility.
If you choose “Download Firmware
from the Internet”, you will be asked
for the destination.
Once downloaded, you can exit or
click No to return to the update utility.
You can also update by selecting a
file downloaded earlier.
Appendix
46
SpaceLink Access Point
Appendix
When you update from disk, you will
be asked to choose the SpaceLink
Access Point you wish to update. You
should close the SpaceLink Access
Point Manager if opened. If it is
opened, the update utility will not
automatically detect the SpaceLink
Access Point and you will be asked
to enter the IP address manually.
You will be asked to select the file
containing the updates.
It will compare to see whether the
update is newer than your current
version.
You will be warned to close all other
applications.
Appendix
The utility will then being updating
your SpaceLink Access Point
firmware.
SpaceLink Access Point
47
Appendix
6. Appendix
IEEE 802.11b Direct Sequence Channels
The IEEE 802.11b standard specifies 14 Channels within the 2.4 GHz
frequency band. The following table lists the center frequency for each
Channel.
If operating multiple SpaceLink Access Points in the same vicinity, the
distance between the center frequencies must be at least 25 MHz to avoid
interference. There are three independent Channels that do not overlap: 1,
6, and 11.
Note that the available Channels differ from country to country and based
on Model number. In the United States, Channels 1 through 11 are available.
Channel #
Center Frequency
1
2.412 GHz
2
2.417 GHz
3
2.422 GHz
4
2.427 GHz
5
2.432 GHz
6
2.437 GHz
7
2.442 GHz
8
2.447 GHz
9
2.452 GHz
10
2.457 GHz
11
2.462 GHz
12
2.467 GHz
13
2.472 GHz
14
2.484 GHz
Appendix
48
SpaceLink Access Point
Appendix
Country Identification Codes
Use the table below to select a Country Name, First Channel, Number (No.)
of Channels, Default Channel, Maximum Transmit Power, Regulatory
Domain, and Country ID. Update these values in the AP installation screen.
Note: Contact a local representative for any country not listed.
Country Name
Country ID
Channels
Max. Tx
Power (dBm)
Regulatory
Domain
Argentina
AR
1
13 11
30
99
Australia
AU
1
13 11
20
9
Austria
AT
1
13 11
20
30
Bahrain
BH
1
13 3
20
99
Belarus
BY
1
13 3
20
99
Belgium - Indoor
BE
1
13 11
20
30
Belgium - Outdoor
BE
1
1
13
20
30
Brazil
BR
1
13 11
30
99
Bulgaria
BG
1
13 3
20
30
Canada
CA
1
13 3
27
20
Chile
CL
1
13 11
17
99
China
CN
1
13 3
20
99
Columbia
CO
1
13 11
30
99
Costa Rica
CR
1
13 3
20
99
Croatia
HR
1
13 11
20
30
Czech Republic
CZ
1
13 3
20
30
Denmark
DK
1
13 11
20
30
Finland
FL
1
13 11
20
30
France
FR
11 3
11
20
32
Germany
DE
1
13 11
20
30
Greece
GR
1
13 11
20
30
Guatemala
GT
1
13 3
20
99
Hong Kong
HK
1
13 3
20
99
Hungary
HU
1
13 3
20
30
Iceland
IS
1
13 11
20
30
SpaceLink Access Point
Appendix
First No. Default
49
Appendix
Country Name
Country ID
Channels
Power (dBm)
Max. Tx
Regulatory
Domain
First No. Default
India *
IN
1
13 3
20
99
Indonesia
ID
1
13 3
20
99
Ireland
IE
1
13 11
20
30
Israel
IL
5
4
20
99
Italy
IT
1
13 11
20
30
Japan
JP
1
14 11
20
40
Jordan
JO
1
13 3
20
99
Kuwait
KW
1
13 11
20
99
Liechtenstein
LN
1
13 11
20
30
Lithuania
LT
1
13 3
20
99
Luxembourg
LU
1
13 11
20
30
Malaysia
MY
1
13 3
20
99
Mexico
MX
11 3
30
99
Morocco
MA
1
13 3
20
99
Netherlands
NL
1
13 11
20
30
New Zealand
NZ
1
13 3
20
99
Norway
NO
1
13 11
20
30
Peru
PE
1
13 3
20
99
6
11
* A site license is required for India. To support this regulatory requirement,
please contact your local representative.
Appendix
50
SpaceLink Access Point
Appendix
Data Input Criteria
Length
1-16
Criteria
1. All printable characters
2. Cannot be null string.
IP address
[field 1]
[field 2]
[field 3]
[field 4]
1-223
0-255
0-255
1-254
Subnet mask
[field 1]
[field 2]
[field 3]
[field 4]
0-255
0-255
0-255
0-255
Gateway
[field 1]
[field 2]
[field 3]
[field 4]
0-223
0-255
0-255
0-254
SSID
1-32
1. All printable characters
2. Cannot be null string.
Name
1-16
1. All printable characters
2. Cannot be null string.
Passphrase
0-64
1. All printable characters
2. Null string is accepted
WEP key
Hexadecimal numbers
(Numbers and letters a~f, A~F)
MAC Add. of station, Host
AP, or Wireless Bridge
Hexadecimal numbers
(Numbers and letters a~f, A~F)
RTS threshold
64-2346
Fragmentation threshold
64-2346
SpaceLink Access Point
Appendix
Data field
Password
51
Appendix
SpaceLink Access Point Specifications
The following technical specification is for reference purposes only. Actual
product’s performance and compliance with local telecommunications
regulations may vary from country to country. ASUS will only ship products
that are type approved in the destination country.
Ethernet Interface
RJ45 for 10BaseT with auto crossover MDI/MDI-X
Data Rate
11 Mbps with auto fallback to 5.5, 2 and 1 Mbps
Modulation
CCK (11Mbps, 5.5Mbps), DQPSK (2Mbps), DBPSK (1Mbps)
Technology
Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum
RF Output Power
14 ~ 17 dBm (at nominal temperature range)
Antenna
2 internal polarization diversity dipole antennas,
One RF connector for optional external antenna
Range
Indoor 130 ft (40 m), semi-open 330 ft (100 m),
outdoor (LOS, Light-Of-Sight) 1500 ft (457 m) at 11Mbps
The range may vary by different environment
Receiver Sensitivity
Per< 8% @ length=1024 octets (at nominal temp. range)
11Mbps: -82 to -85 dBm; 5.5Mbps: -85 to -88 dBm;
2 Mbps: -88 to -91 dBm; 1 Mbps: -91 to -93 dBm
Operating Frequency 2.412 to 2.462 GHz (North America)
2.412 to 2.484 GHz (Japan)
2.412 to 2.472 GHz (Europe ETSI)
2.457 to 2.462 GHz (Spain)
2.457 to 2.472 GHz (France)
Appendix
52
WEP
64/128-bit WEP; each includes 4 user-defined keys
Utilities
AP Manager: User-friendly utility for discovering and
configuring SpaceLink Access Points with Access
Control List features
AP Live Update: Download the newest firmware from
the Internet
SpaceLink Access Point
Appendix
Supported OS
Windows 98, 98SE, ME, NT4, 2000, XP
SNMP Support
MIB II, Proprietary Wireless MIBs
LED Indicators
Power, Wireless, Ethernet
DC Power Adapter
AC Input: 100V to 240V(50 to 60HZ)
DC Output: 5V with max. 1 A current
Operating Temp.
0ºC to 55ºC
Storage Temp.
-20ºC to 70ºC
Humidity
5 to 95% (non-condensing)
Emissions
ETS 300 328 and ETS 300 826; CE Mark
FCC Part 15C, Section 15.247
Size
40 mm (L) 138 mm (W) 150 mm (H) (± 0.2)
Weight
400 g excluding power supply
Warranty
One Year Limited Warranty
Access Point
Standard 802.11b based access point, provides
roaming capability between Wi-Fi compliant Access
Points
Access Point Client
Act as a client station to associate with existing access
points and bridge traffic from Ethernet port to a remote
backbone network through the wireless interface
Wireless Bridge
Point-to-point or point-to-multi-points to bridge individual
networks
SpaceLink Access Point
Appendix
Operating Modes
53