Motorola Personal Communicator User`s guide

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User's Guide
series
Personal Communicator
Model V100
GSM 1900 MHz
010096
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Motorola V100 Personal Communicator
Quick Reference Card
Control Buttons
,
Press and hold to turn on or off.
( Accept and end a call, setting, or option.
) Reject or cancel a call, setting, option, and to return to the
previous screen. In text mode, deletes the previous character.
$ Press to enter Quick Access menu.
! Scroll through messages and text, and increase and decrease
volume.
# Press to read a message.
. Press to write a message.
M Used to enter numbers 0 - 9. Press once for single number,
press twice for multiple numbers. Press twice to stop entering
numbers.
+ Press once to capitalize a letter. Press twice for continuous
capitalization, press twice again to stop capitalization.
] Smart Button. Answers, makes, and end calls. Press to go to
Phone Book, and recall a number using Voice Tags.
} Located on outside of communicator. Press to answer and end
a call.
Press to record VoiceNotes, press again to stop recording.
Sending a Text Message
1. Press ., type your message, press (.
2. Enter the phone number or select the phone number from the
Phone Book, then follow the prompts given by your
communicator.
3. When the phone number is displayed, press (.
Mobile Internet Session
During a mobile internet session, the functions of the % and (
buttons change. To access an option displayed on the bottom right
of your screen, press (. To access an option displayed in the
&
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bottom middle of the screen, %. To go to a previous screen,
press ).
Making a Call
Note: Use your headset and use ! to adjust the volume.
Press ] to go to Phone Book, or use Voice Tags, select the
number, press (.
Note: Press and release ) to remove the last character, press
and hold ) to remove multiple characters.
Ending a Call
Press ( or ).
Receiving a Call
Note: Use your headset and ! to adjust the volume.
Press ( to answer the call.
Note: When communicator is closed or in the holster, press } to
answer a call and to end a call.
SIM Card and Battery Installation
1. Remove the battery cover.
2. Align the SIM card so the notch in the card lines up with the
notch in the recess, insert card.
3. Align the battery contacts with the contacts in the battery
compartment. Press down on the battery until it clicks into
place.
4. Replace the battery cover.
Note: If the SIM card is inserted incorrectly, “Check Card” is
displayed. Remove the SIM card and re-insert it. If the card does
not work, contact your service provider.
Charging your Battery
Charge the battery by inserting the adapter plug into the port on
your communicator and plugging the adapter into a wall outlet.
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Congratulations! You are now the proud owner of a Motorola V100
Personal Communicator. Your Personal Communicator combines
advanced calling and messaging capabilities in a small compact unit
that is stylish, easy to use, and will look great on you when you wear
it with the holster.
Your Personal Communicator provides cool and exciting ways to keep in contact with
your family and friends. Just review this user guide carefully and you will be ready to
start using your new Personal Communicator.
A detachable Quick Reference Card is included with this guide.
Personalized Control
You can setup your Personal Communicator to access important messages, phone
numbers, and features quickly. You can even answer calls with just one push of a
button, even when your Personal Communicator is closed. When you are performing
routine tasks, your Personal Communicator provides prompts and messages that
assist you with the next task or confirms your selection.
• You can add nine of your most used features in your Quick Access menu so you
can get to them with just a couple of presses of a button.
• Voice Tags let you add voice activated commands to call your phone book
entries. You can also add voice commands to select Quick Access options.
Introduction
Introduction
1
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•
•
•
Introduction
•
2
•
With voice notes, you can record notes to yourself or record parts of a call.
(Note: use of this feature is subject to varying state, federal, and country laws
regarding privacy of phone conversations.)
The ] button lets you display your Phone Book entries quickly.
When your Personal Communicator is closed or in the holster, press } on
the outside of your Personal Communicator, to answer a call quickly and easily.
With VibraCall® alert, your Personal Communicator vibrates when you get new
messages or calls to avoid disturbing others or when in a noisy environment.
You can personalize the menus by choosing the features you want readily
available and storing the ones you use less frequently out of sight.
MOTOROLA, the Stylized M Logo, and all other trademarks indicated as such
herein are trademarks of Motorola, Inc.
® Reg. U.S. Pat. & Tm. Off.
All other product or service names are the property of their respective owners.
© 2001 Motorola, Inc. All rights reserved.
Personal Communications Sector
1500 Gateway Blvd., Boynton Beach, FL 33426-8292
Printed in the United States 05/01
6881036B10-A
8988485L46-O
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Contents
Introduction ....................................... 1
Personalized Control ....................... 1
Safety Information............................. 8
Getting Started ................................ 15
Installing the SIM Card and Battery15
Control Buttons ............................ 17
The Display .................................. 19
Backlight ........................................ 20
Turning On Your V100 Personal
Communicator ............................ 20
Entering Your SIM Card Personal
Identification Number (PIN) ........ 21
Entering Your Unlock Code ........... 21
Turning Off Your Personal
Communicator ............................ 21
Tips on Using this Guide ............... 22
The Main Menu.............................. 22
Menu Navigation............................ 22
Entering the Menus ....................... 22
Getting Around in the Menus......... 23
Exiting the Menus .......................... 23
Personal Communicator Menus..... 24
How to Use the Control Buttons .... 30
Prompts and Messages ................. 30
Testing Your V100 Personal
Communicator ............................ 30
Text Messaging................................ 31
Sending a Text Message ............... 31
Storing a Text Message ................. 33
Receiving and Reading a Text
Message ..................................... 33
Sending Email Messages .............. 34
Making a Call.................................... 35
International Phone Calls............... 35
Emergency Calls............................ 35
Ending a Call.................................. 36
Redialing the Last Number Called
from Standby Mode .................... 36
Receiving a Call ............................... 36
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In-call Menu ......................................36
Hold Call.........................................37
Make a New Call ............................37
Turn Mute On or Off .......................37
Restrict My Phone Number ............37
End Active Call ...............................38
Reconnect ......................................38
Reconnect Held Call ......................38
End Held Call .................................38
End Current and Held Call .............39
Conference Calls............................39
Transfer Calls .................................40
Split Call .........................................40
Reject Waiting Call .........................41
Voice Notes ......................................41
Recording a Voice Note .................41
Voice Activation ...............................42
Adding Voice Tags for Phone
Book Entries................................43
Using Voice Activation with Phone
Book Entries................................44
Access Internet................................ 46
Mobile Internet Home Menu .......... 46
Internet Browser Menu .................. 47
Using the Soft Keys ....................... 47
Mobile Internet Messages.............. 48
Entering or Editing Text Within a
Mobile Internet Session .............. 48
Setting Up for Mobile Internet
Access ........................................ 49
Setting a Bookmark ....................... 50
Internet Service Alerts ................... 51
Making and Receiving Calls During
a Mobile Internet Session ........... 51
Ending a Mobile Internet Session .. 51
Phone Book ..................................... 52
Inserting Pauses into Phone
Numbers ..................................... 53
Voice Dialing.................................. 53
Personal Numbers ......................... 54
Last Ten Calls................................ 56
My Phone Numbers ....................... 57
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Fixed Dialing.................................. 57
Set Up One-Touch Dialing............. 59
Alarm Clock ..................................... 60
Set Alarm....................................... 60
Show Alarm Status ........................ 61
Call Related Features...................... 61
Show Battery Meter ....................... 61
Restrict My Phone Number ........... 61
Call Forwarding ............................. 62
Call Waiting ................................... 64
Call Barring.................................... 64
Messages Menu............................... 66
Call Voice Mail............................... 66
Received Messages ...................... 66
Outgoing Messages....................... 68
Message Editor.............................. 70
Voice Notes ................................... 70
Cell Broadcast ............................... 72
Message Settings .......................... 73
Phone Setup..................................... 75
Select Phone Line.......................... 75
Adjust Ring Volume ....................... 75
Ring or Vibrate ............................... 75
Set Ringer Tone............................. 75
Set Alarm Ringer Tone .................. 76
Set Ringer Tone 2.......................... 76
Set Message Alert Tone ................ 76
Edit Music Tone ............................. 76
Message Popup Alert..................... 77
Quick Access Setup....................... 78
Phone Lock .................................... 78
Adjust Contrast .............................. 78
Require SIM Card PIN ................... 79
Change SIM PIN2 Code ................ 79
Unblocking Your V100 Personal
Communicator ............................ 80
New Security Code ........................ 80
Extended Menus ............................ 80
Show Time and Date ..................... 80
Set Time and Date ......................... 81
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Set Time Format ............................81
Backlight Timing Control ................81
Language Selection .......................81
Battery Saving Mode ......................81
Select Keypad Tones .....................82
Phone Status..................................82
Network Selection............................84
Available Networks.........................84
Network Search..............................85
Preferred Networks ........................86
Find New Network ..........................87
Call Meters Menu .............................87
Show Call Charges ........................88
Show Call Timers ...........................88
Set Audible Call Timers..................88
Set In-Call Display..........................88
Call Charge Settings ......................89
Lifetime Timer ................................90
Games .............................................. 91
Closing and Saving a Game .......... 91
Towers of Hanoi............................. 92
Baccarat......................................... 93
Bricks ............................................. 94
Quick Access Menu ....................... 95
Adding Location Numbers to
Quick Access Features .............. 96
Adding/Editing Voice Tags to
Quick Access Features .............. 96
Delete Voice Tag ........................... 97
Special Characters .......................... 98
Accessories ................................... 100
Headset ....................................... 100
Power Adapter ............................. 100
Holster ......................................... 100
Troubleshooting ............................ 101
What to do if................................. 101
Use and Care ................................ 105
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Radio Waves Exposure Statement106
FDA Update for Mobile Phones ... 109
Motorola Limited Warranty........... 119
Patents ........................................... 127
Export Law Assurances ............... 128
Index............................................... 129
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Safety Information
Safety Information
8
IMPORTANT INFORMATION ON SAFE AND EFFICIENT OPERATION
READ THIS INFORMATION BEFORE USING YOUR PHONE
The information provided in this document supersedes the general safety
information contained in user guides published prior to July 2000. For information
regarding radio use in a hazardous atmosphere please refer to the Factory Mutual
(FM) Approval Manual Supplement or Instruction Card, which is included with radio
models that offer this capability.
RF Operational Characteristics
Your Personal Communicator contains a transmitter and a receiver. When it is ON,
it receives and transmits radio frequency (RF) energy. The Personal Communicator
operates at a frequency of 1900 MHz and employs digital modulation techniques.
When you communicate with your Personal Communicator, the output power level is
1.0 watt.
Exposure To Radio Frequency Energy
Your Motorola V100 Personal Communicator is designed to comply with the
following national and international standards and guidelines regarding exposure of
human beings to radio frequency electromagnetic energy:
• United States Federal Communications Commission, Code of Federal
Regulations; 47 CFR part 2 sub-part J
• American National Standards Institute (ANSI) / Institute of Electrical and
Electronic Engineers (IEEE) C95. 1-1992
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Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) C95.1-1999 Edition
National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) of the
United States, Report 86, 1986
• International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP)
1998
• Ministry of Health (Canada) Safety Code 6. Limits of Human Exposure to
Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields in the Frequency Range from 3 kHz
to 300 GHz, 1999
• Australian Communications Authority Radiocommunications
(Electromagnetic Radiation - Human Exposure) Standard 1999 (applicable
to wireless phones only)
To assure optimal Personal Communicator performance and make sure human
exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic energy is within the guidelines set
forth in the above standards, always adhere to the following procedures:
PORTABLE PHONE OPERATION AND EME EXPOSURE
Antenna Care
Use only the supplied or an approved replacement antenna. Unauthorized
antennas, modifications, or attachments could damage the phone and may violate
FCC regulations.
DO NOT hold the antenna when the Personal Communicator is “IN USE.”
Holding the antenna affects call quality and may cause the Personal Communicator
to operate at a higher power level than needed.
Safety Information
•
•
9
Safety Information
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10
Phone Operation
The Personal Communicator is designed to be used with a headset for talking and
listening. When placing or receiving a phone call, you must use the headset and
speak directly into the microphone.
Body-worn Operation
To maintain compliance with FCC RF exposure guidelines, if you wear a phone on
your body when transmitting, always place the phone in a Motorola supplied or
approved clip, holder, holster, case, or body harness for this product. Use of
non-Motorola-approved accessories may exceed FCC RF exposure guidelines. If
you do not use a body-worn accessory, ensure the antenna is at least one
inch (2.5 cm) from your body when transmitting.
Data Operation
When using any data feature of the Personal Communicator, with or without an
accessory cable, position the Personal Communicator and its antenna at least
one inch (2.5 cm) from the body.
Approved Accessories
For a list of approved Motorola accessories, call 1-800-331-6456 or visit our
website at www.mot.com.
ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERFERENCE/COMPATIBILITY
Note: Nearly every electronic device is susceptible to electromagnetic interference
(EMI) if inadequately shielded, designed or otherwise configured for
electromagnetic compatibility.
•
•
•
FACILITIES
To avoid electromagnetic interference and/or compatibility conflicts, turn off
your Personal Communicator in any facility where posted notices instruct you to
do so. Hospitals or health care facilities may be using equipment that is
sensitive to external RF energy.
AIRCRAFT
When instructed to do so, turn off your Personal Communicator when onboard
an aircraft. Any use of a Personal Communicator must be in accordance with
applicable regulations per airline crew instructions.
MEDICAL DEVICES
Pacemakers
The Advanced Medical Technology Association recommends that a minimum
separation of 6 inches (15 centimeters) be maintained between a handheld
wireless phone and a pacemaker.These recommendations are consistent with
the independent research by, and recommendations of, the United States Food
and Drug Administration.
Safety Information
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Safety Information
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Persons with pacemakers should:
• ALWAYS keep the Personal Communicator more than six inches
(15 centimeters) from their pacemaker when the Personal Communicator is
turned ON.
• not carry the Personal Communicator in the breast pocket.
• use the ear opposite the pacemaker to minimize the potential for
interference.
• turn the Personal Communicator OFF immediately if you have any reason to
suspect that interference is taking place.
Hearing Aids
Some digital wireless phones may interfere with some hearing aids. In the
event of such interference, you may want to consult your hearing aid
manufacturer to discuss alternatives.
Other Medical Devices
If you use any other personal medical device, consult the manufacturer of your
device to determine if it is adequately shielded from RF energy. Your physician
may be able to assist you in obtaining this information.
SAFETY AND GENERAL
• USE WHILE DRIVING
Check the laws and regulations on the use of phones in the area where you drive.
Always obey them.
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OPERATIONAL WARNINGS
•
•
FOR VEHICLES WITH AN AIR BAG
Do not place a portable phone in the area over an air bag or in the air bag
deployment area. Air bags inflate with great force. If a portable phone is placed
in the air bag deployment area and the air bag inflates, the phone may be
propelled with great force and cause serious injury to occupants of the vehicle.
POTENTIALLY EXPLOSIVE ATMOSPHERES
Turn off your phone prior to entering any area with a potentially explosive
atmosphere, unless it is a phone type especially qualified for use in such areas
as “Intrinsically Safe”. Do not remove, install, or charge batteries in such areas.
Sparks in a potentially explosive atmosphere can cause an explosion or fire
resulting in bodily injury or even death.
Note: The areas with potentially explosive atmospheres referred to above
include fueling areas such as below decks on boats, fuel or chemical transfer or
storage facilities, areas where the air contains chemicals or particles, such as
Safety Information
When using your Personal Communicator while driving, please:
• give full attention to driving and to the road.
• use hands-free operation, if available.
• pull off the road and park before making or answering a call if driving
conditions so require.
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Safety Information
•
14
grain, dust or metal powders, and any other area where you would normally be
advised to turn off your vehicle engine. Areas with potentially explosive
atmospheres are often but not always posted.
BLASTING CAPS AND AREAS
To avoid possible interference with blasting operations, turn off your Personal
Communicator when you are near electrical blasting caps, in a blasting area, or
in areas posted: “Turn off two-way radio.” Obey all signs and instructions.
OPERATIONAL CAUTIONS
•
•
ANTENNAS
Do not use any portable phone that has a damaged antenna. If a damaged
antenna comes into contact with your skin, a minor burn can result.
BATTERIES
All batteries can cause property damage and/or bodily injury such as burns if a
conductive material such as jewelry, keys, or beaded chains touch exposed
terminals. The conductive material may complete an electrical circuit (short
circuit) and become quite hot. Exercise care in handling any charged battery,
particularly when placing it inside a pocket, purse, or other container with metal
objects.
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Installing the SIM Card and Battery
Before you can send or receive messages or calls, you need to install your SIM
(Subscriber Identity Module) card and the battery. The SIM card that was supplied
by your service provider contains your Personal Communicator’s number, service
details, and memory for storing numbers and messages.
Note: Some networks let you make emergency calls without a SIM card.
Note: Your SIM card can be used in someone else’s Personal Communicator and
you will be charged for the call, so keep it in a safe place. Do not bend or scratch it
and do not expose it to static electricity or water.
Getting Started
Getting Started
15
Getting Started
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16
SIM Card and Battery Installation
Slide Battery
Battery
1. Remove the battery cover.
Door Lock
Compartment
2. Slide the SIM card into the recess
to Open
so that the notch in the card lines up
with the notch in the recess.
3. Align the contacts on the battery
with the contacts in the battery
compartment and press downward
toward the contacts until the battery Slide to Remove
Battery Door
Battery
clicks into place.
SIM
Card
Charger
4. Replace the battery cover.
Recess
Port
Note: If the SIM card is inserted
incorrectly, “Check Card” is displayed. Remove the SIM card and re-insert it. If the
card does not work, contact your service provider.
Charging Your Battery:
• Charge the battery by inserting the adapter plug into the port on your Personal
Communicator and plugging the adapter into a wall outlet.
• Charge your battery at room temperature and never leave it in really hot, cold,
or wet places.
• Charge only Motorola batteries in your Personal Communicator.
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Getting Started
Control Buttons
]
}
17
Getting Started
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18
,
Press and hold to turn on or off.
(
Press to accept and end a call, setting, or option.
)
Press to reject or cancel a call, setting, option, and to return to the
previous screen. When in text mode, press to delete the previous
character.
$
Press to enter the Quick Access menu.
%
Press to access the Main Menu.
!
Use to scroll through menus and text, and increase and decrease
volume.
#
Press to read a message.
.
Press to write a message.
M (0 - 9)
Press for ALT and 0 - 9 numbers.
M*
Press for symbols and additional characters.
]
Smart Button. Use to access your Phone Book and make calls
using Voice Tags.
+
Press once to capitalize a letter. Press twice for continuous
capitalization, press twice to stop capitalization.
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}
When the communicator is closed, or in the holster, press to answer
and end a call.
&
The Display
Displays text and numbers.
/ Signal Strength. The more segments, the stronger the signal
strength.
A call is in progress or hanging up.
k
ABC123
l
Displayed when on a system other than your home system.
:
Home Zone. Availability depends on your service provider.
Displayed when a text message is received. Flashes when you have
an unread text message, or your message storage area is full.
Note: Text Messaging is a network and subscription dependent
feature and may not be available in all areas.
Displayed when you have voice mail. Availability depends on your
service provider.
I
J
Getting Started
Press to start and stop recording voice notes.
Note: use of this feature is subject to varying state, federal, and
country laws regarding privacy of phone conversations.
19
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\
Call Ringer is On.
Battery Charge Indicator. The more segments, the stronger the
>
charge.
B...K Displayed when the Quick Access menu is open.
Getting Started
z
20
12:00
Menu item is currently selected.
Real-Time Clock. Displays the time in either AM/PM or 24 hours.
Backlight
Your Personal Communicator’s backlight turns on any time a button is pressed, and
remains on during keyboard activity.
Note: Prolonged use of the backlight may shorten battery life depending on your
setting.
Turning On Your V100 Personal Communicator
Press and hold , until your Personal Communicator vibrates or makes a sound.
Note: If the SIM card is not installed, your Personal Communicator displays a
message to install one.
Entering Your SIM Card Personal Identification Number (PIN)
When prompted, enter your PIN and press (.
• If you make a mistake, press and release ) to remove the last character, or
hold down ) to remove multiple characters.
• If you enter the wrong PIN, your Personal Communicator lets you know with a
displayed message.
Note: If the correct PIN is not entered within three attempts, your SIM card locks
up. See “Unblocking Your V100 Personal Communicator” on page 80.
Entering Your Unlock Code
When prompted, enter your unlock code, then (.
Note: If you forget your unlock code, press %(, enter your security
code, enter a new unlock code, then press (.
When a network name is displayed, it means your Personal
Communicator is ready for use.
Getting Started
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Turning Off Your Personal Communicator
Press and hold ,.
21
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Tips on Using this Guide
Tips on Using this Guide
22
The Main Menu
Your Personal Communicator’s features are
accessible through the Main Menu. Press % to
display the Main Menu. To scroll through the Main
Menu, use !. Press ( to enter a submenu.
Main
Access Internet
Phone Book
Alarm Clock
Select?
Main Menu Example
Menu Navigation
Many of your Personal Communicator’s features are accessed by using menus and
submenus for selection, change, or cancellation. Please read this section carefully.
When you understand the menu navigation, you will be able to access and change
settings with ease.
Entering the Menus
• % - press to enter the Main Menu when your Personal Communicator is in
the Standby mode.
• $ - press to enter the Quick Access menu.
Getting Around in the Menus
• ! - to scroll through menu selections.
• ( - to enter the selected menu and to accept and confirm
settings.
• ) - to go to the previous screen without making changes.
(When in text mode, use to backspace and delete characters.)
• z - indicates the current setting of a feature (usually on or off).
Note: When “View Options?” is displayed, a submenu exists for that menu
selection. Press ( to enter the submenu and to accept and confirm settings.
Exiting the Menus
• ) - press and hold for 2 seconds to exit any menu or screen and return to the
Standby Screen.
Short and Extended Menus
As you become accustomed to the menus and features you use the
most, you can select which features you want readily accessible, and
which ones to store out of view.
With extended menus on, all features are always displayed. When you
remove a feature from the short menu, it is not displayed until you turn
on extended menus.
Tips on Using this Guide
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Tips on Using this Guide
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1. To move a feature from the extended menu to the short menu, highlight the
feature then press and hold ( until a menu prompting a decision is
displayed.
2. Select either to move or keep it on the short menu, or to move or keep it in the
extended menu.
Note: If a feature cannot be moved to the short menu, your Personal
Communicator will let you know with a message.
Note: To turn extended menus on or off, refer to “Extended Menus” on page 80.
Personal Communicator
Menus
Note: Menu selections marked with an
asterisk (*) are features that are
network and/or subscription dependent
and may not be available on your V100
Personal Communicator.
Access Internet *
Phone Book
Voice Dialing
Personal Numbers
• Find Entry by Name
• Find Entry by Location
• Add Entry
• Check Capacity
• Prevent Access
Show Services
Last 10 Calls
• Missed Calls
• Answered Calls
• Made Calls
• Erase All Numbers
My phone number(s)
Fixed Dialing *
• View Fixed Dial List
• Setup Fixed Dialing
One-Touch Dial Setting
• To Phone Memory
• To SIM Memory
• To Fixed Dial List *
Alarm Clock
Set Alarm
• One Time
• Daily
• Weekly
• Mon-Fri
• Mon-Sat
Personal Communicator Menus
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Personal Communicator Menus
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26
Show Alarm Status
Call-Related Features
Show Battery Meter
Restrict My Phone Number *
• Show ID on Next Call
• Restrict ID on Next Call
Call Forwarding *
• Forward Voice Calls
• Forward When Unavailable
• Forward All Voice Calls
• Detailed Forwarding
( If Busy
( If Not Reachable
( If No Answer
• Forward Data Calls
• Cancel All Forwarding
Call Waiting *
Call Barring *
• Bar Outgoing Calls
( International Calls
( International Calls Except
Home
( All Calls
( Off
• Bar Incoming Calls
( When Roaming
( All Calls
( Off
• Cancel All Barring
( Enter Password
• Change Bar Password
Messages
Call Voicemail *
Received Messages *
Outgoing Messages *
Message Editor *
VoiceNotes
• Play VoiceNotes
• Show Time Available
• Erase All VoiceNotes
Cell Broadcast *
• On
• Off
• Channel List
• Language List
Message Settings
• Voicemail Number
• Service Center
• Expiry Period
• Outgoing Message Type
( Text
( Fax
( Paging
( E-Mail
Phone Setup
Select Phone Line
Adjust Ring Volume
Ring or Vibrate
Set Ringer Tone
Set Alarm Ringer Tone
Set Ringer Tone 2
Set Message Alert Tone
• Standard Tone
• List of Available Tones
Edit Music Tone
Message Popup Alert
• On
• Off
Quick Access Setup
Phone Lock
• Automatic Lock
• Lock Now
• Change Unlock Code
Personal Communicator Menus
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27
Personal Communicator Menus
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28
Adjust Contrast
Require SIM Card PIN
• On
• Off
• Change SIM Card PIN Code
Change SIM Card PIN2 Code
New Security Code
Extended Menus
• On
• Off
Show Time and Date
Set Time and Date
Set Time Format
• 12 Hour
• 24 Hour
Backlight
• Off
• Normal
• Continuous
Language Selection
• English
• Français
• Español
• Portuguès
• Automatic
Battery Saving Mode
• On
• Off
Select Keypad Tones
• Normal Tones
• Single Tones
• No Tones
Internet
Phone Status
• Status Review
• Master Reset
• Master Clear
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•
Show List of Networks
( Move to New Location ‡
( Delete Selection ‡
( Switch View ‡
Find New Network
† Menu selections displayed only if a
network is available and your Personal
Communicator can register with the
network.
‡ Menu selections displayed only if you
have one or more networks listed in the
preferred list. Otherwise, “Empty” is
displayed.
Call Meters
Show Call Charges **
• Show Last Call **
• Total for All Calls **
• Credit Remaining **
Personal Communicator Menus
Network Selection
Available Networks
• Register Now †
• Make Preferred †
• Switch View †
Network Search
• Registration Preferences
( Automatic Search
( Manual Search
• Frequency of Search
( Slow Search
( Medium Search
( Fast Search
( Continuous Search
Preferred Networks
• Add Network to List
( Choose from Available
( Choose from Known
( Add New Network Code
29
Personal Communicator Menus
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30
Show Call Timers
• Show Last Call
• Total for All Calls
• Reset All Timers
Set Audible Call Timers
• Single Alert Timer
• Repetitive Timer
Set In-call Display
• Show Time Per Call
• Show Charge Per Call **
• Show Total Call Charges **
• No In-call Display
Call-Charge Settings **
• Reset Call Charges **
• Set Total Charge Limit **
Lifetime Timer
** The Call Charges menu selections
are available only if you have the Advice
of Charge service.
Games
Towers of Hanoi
Baccarat
Bricks
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The control buttons are represented as graphics which look like the buttons on your
Personal Communicator. A sequence of button presses might be shown
as: %().
This means that you would press %, then ( and then ) in sequence, not at the
same time.
Prompts and Messages
Your Personal Communicator responds to button presses by
displaying easy to understand prompts to guide you to the next
action, or simple messages confirming that your action is
complete.
Testing Your V100 Personal Communicator
It's a good idea to test your service by sending a text message or by calling a friend
or family member, from your Personal Communicator. Start by using the phone
number, web site, or email address (and a PIN, if required) your service provider
gave you, then try making a call. When you reach a friend or family member, ask
them to send a message to you or call you back.
How to Use the Control Buttons
How to Use the Control Buttons
31
Text Messaging
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32
Refer to the following sections for information about text messages and making
and receiving calls. If your Personal Communicator does not send or receive
messages or calls, contact your service provider. After you've tested your Personal
Communicator, read the rest of this guide to learn about the many useful features of
your new Personal Communicator.
Note: Text Messaging is a network and subscription-dependent feature and may
not be available in all areas.
Text Messaging
Your Personal Communicator can send and receive short text
messages up to 160 characters, also known as “Short Message
Services (SMS),” that are sent by your service provider. These
messages are transmitted for a limited amount of time. If a
memory location is not available before the message is removed
from the network, it is not stored.
Note: Text messaging is a network and subscription feature and may not be
available in all areas.
Sending a Text Message
1. Press ..
2. Type your message.
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Entering Text
• To type a capital letter, press and release +, then type the letter.
• To type multiple capital letters, press ++. To switch back to lowercase
letters, press ++ again.
• If you make a mistake while typing, press ) to erase the previous character.
To erase multiple characters, press and hold ). You can use ! to move to a
character or line to make a correction.
• To enter special characters, refer to “Special Characters” on page 98.
Text Messaging
3. When your message is complete, press (.
4. From the Message Editor, select to send the message, then press (.
5. Choose from the menu selections to enter the phone number, then follow the
prompts given by your Personal Communicator.
6. When the phone number you want to send your message to is displayed,
press (.
Entering Numbers in Text Mode
• To type a single number, press M then type the number.
• To type a series of numbers, press M M. To stop entering numbers,
press M M again.
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Text Messaging
Storing a Text Message
1. Press . and type your message.
2. Press (.
3. Select the store option, then press (. Your message is automatically stored in
the Outgoing Message folder.
34
Receiving and Reading a Text Message
Cool...I got a message! Before long you’ll be getting a lot of
messages.
When a text message is received, your Personal Communicator
alerts, displays I and stores the message. The I flashes until the
message is read. If there is not enough memory to store the
message the I flashes after you read the message. One or more
messages must be deleted before the message can be stored.
1. Press # to read the message.
2. Select your view options for the message and press (.
3. You can reply to the message, store it, or delete it.
Note: If you send and receive a lot of text messages, battery life could be
shortened.
Sending Email Messages
Contact your service provider to find out if this option is supported and to get the
email server number.
1. Type the email address followed by either a space or a number sign (#), then
type the message text. For example, to send a “Hello” message to email
address “abc123@isp.com” type abc123@isp.com#Hello.
Note: Depending on your service provider, you may need to use a space in
place of the number sign (#) between the address and the email text.
2. When your message is complete, press (.
3. From the Message Editor, select to send the message, then press (.
4. Choose Phone Number Entry, then enter the email server number.
5. When the email server number is displayed, press (. Verify that “Sending” is
displayed.
Note: If you get the “Unable to deliver message.” error, return to the email
address and try replacing the number sign (#) with a space, or vice versa.
Text Messaging
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35
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Making a Call
Making a Call
36
Note: Don’t forget to use your headset so you can hear your call. Use
! to decrease or increase the volume level.
Note: You can press ] to quickly go to your Phone Book, select the
number you want to call, and then press (.
Enter the phone number, then press (.
Note: If you make a mistake, press and release ) to remove the last character, or
hold down ) to remove multiple characters.
International Phone Calls
1. Press and hold 0 (zero) until + is displayed.
2. Enter the country code, then the phone number. The country code follows the
conventional format, 44 for the UK, 46 for Sweden, etc.
As for a conventional international call, remove the first “0” of the area code when
you dial.
Emergency Calls
The emergency call number is 911, to dial in cases of emergency. The emergency
call is directed to a central operator. The call can be made without any security codes
and, depending on the network, without a SIM card inserted.
To dial the emergency number, press 911 (.
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Ending a Call
Press ( or ).
Receiving a Call
Note: Don’t forget to use your headset so you can hear your call. Use !
to decrease or increase the volume level.
Press ( to answer the call.
Note: When your Personal Communicator is closed or in the holster, you can press
}, located on the outside of your Personal Communicator, to answer a call right
away.
Receiving a Call
Redialing the Last Number Called from Standby Mode
Press (((.
In-call Menu
There are lots of things you can do during a call. To access the In-call menu, press
% during a call, to exit the menu, press ).
Note: Menu selections depend on the state of the call, the type and setting of your
SIM card, and your subscription to these services. The following paragraphs
explain all possible options.
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Hold Call
You can place a current call on hold and accept an incoming call, or start a second
call.
In-call Menu
To Put an Active Call on Hold:
1. Press % (.
2. To reconnect, press (.
Make a New Call
Select this option to put an active call on hold and make a call to
someone else.
1. Press %.
2. Select the Make a New Call option, enter the number, then press (.
3. To end the new call and go back to your first call, press %(.
Turn Mute On or Off
Turns the microphone off during a call. Select again to turn the microphone back on.
Restrict My Phone Number
You can keep your Personal Communicator’s number a secret while you make a call.
38
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Reconnect
Use to go back to a call that’s on hold.
Reconnect Held Call
This is similar to Reconnect. If you have a call on hold, and a call waiting, select this
option to connect with your held call.
End Held Call
Time to say bye to the person you put on hold.
1. Press % .
2. Select End Held Call, then press (.
In-call Menu
End Active Call
When a call comes in while you are already on a call, you can end the active call.
1. Press ( to put the active call on hold.
2. Press % , select the End Active Call option, then press (.
Note: If you have a call on hold, it becomes your active call.
39
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End Current and Held Call
Select this to say bye to everyone.
In-call Menu
Conference Calls
Let’s have a phone party! If you have both Conference Call and Call
Waiting, you can talk to up to 5 people at the same time.
Starting a Conference Call:
1. Call one of the people you want to conference with.
2. Place the active call on hold, dial another phone number, then
press (.
3. Press % then select Conference Call.
Note: There may be times when your request is not successfully completed.
Wait a little while, then try your call again.
40
To Add a Person to Your Conference Call:
1. Place the Conference Call on hold.
2. Add a new call by:
• Entering the phone number.
• Making a new call.
• Recalling a Phone Book Entry.
• Answering a Call Waiting.
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3. Select In-Call then Conference Call to bring in the new call.
Initiating Transfer Call Before Third Party is Connected:
1. Press % and select the transfer call option.
2. Enter the number to where you want the call transferred, then press (. When
the call is transferred, you are disconnected automatically.
Note: There may be times when a call transfer is not completed successfully.
Please try again.
Initiating Transfer Call After the Third Party is Connected
Press % and select the transfer call option. After the call is transferred, you are
disconnected automatically.
Split Call
Want to share a secret or a private joke with someone? Split call allows you to
separate a conference call member and have a private conversation with them.
Note: You cannot have any calls on hold to have a split call.
1. Press % then select Split Call.
In-call Menu
Transfer Calls
If you have both Conference Call and Call Waiting, you can transfer a
call to another phone.
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Voice Notes
2. Press ! until the phone number of the person you want to separate from the
conference call is displayed, then press (. You can now talk privately to the
person.
3. To re-join both of you to the Conference Call, re-select Conference Call from
the In-Call menu.
Reject Waiting Call
When you’re too busy to talk, you can reject an incoming call by pressing and
holding ).
Voice Notes
With voice notes, you can record up to three minutes of voice messages for yourself
or record part of a call. You can record when your Personal Communicator is idle,
when you are on a single call, or when you are on an active call with a waiting call.
Note: Use of this feature is subject to varying state, federal, and county laws
regarding privacy of phone conversations.
Recording a Voice Note
1. To start recording, press &.
2. To stop recording, press & again.
42
Notes:
• When recording a call, both parties are recorded and the other party hears a
tone every 10 seconds.
• Recording stops automatically if you accept or make a call.
• While recording, your Personal Communicator alerts you at 10 seconds, and
again at 1 second before recording capacity is reached. If you do not stop,
recording automatically stops.
To listen to your voice note, select voice notes from the Messages menu.
Voice Activation
With Voice Activation you can dial a phone number or access a feature with a single
spoken command called a Voice Tag.
You can assign up to 25 Voice Tags to Phone Book numbers and up to 9 Quick
Access features.
Voice Activation
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43
Voice Activation
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44
•
Notes:
• You cannot assign Voice Tags to numbers in your SIM card
memory.
• For best results, make sure there is no background noise
and speak in a clear, natural voice when recording.
• Your Personal Communicator can record two seconds for
each Voice Tag.
You cannot record Voice Tags if you have selected to prevent access to phone
memory, see “Prevent Access” on page 57.
Adding Voice Tags for Phone Book Entries
You can have up to 25 Phone Book Voice Tags, and add a new Voice Tag when you
set up a Phone Book entry.
Add Voice Tag
When you add an entry to your Personal Numbers list, your Personal Communicator
asks you if you want to add a Voice Tag. If you don’t want to add a Voice Tag,
press ).
To Add a Voice Tag:
1. Press (.
Note: If there are 25 Phone Book Voice Tags in your Personal Communicator,
you must delete one before you can add another.
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Add or Edit Voice Tag:
If an entry has a Voice Tag, )) is displayed before the location number.
1. Find the entry either by name or location.
2. Press (, then select to add or edit the Voice Tag.
3. To add the Voice Tag, follow the steps in “Add Voice Tag” on page 44.
Delete Voice Tag:
1. Find the entry either by name or location, see “Personal Numbers” on page 55.
2. Press (, select the delete option, then press ( again.
Voice Activation
2. When prompted by the Personal Communicator, press ( and record after
the tone.
3. When recording is successful, your Personal Communicator returns to the Add
To Phone Memory menu.
Note: If the recording is not successful, the Personal Communicator prompts
you to record again.
Using Voice Activation with Phone Book Entries
You can easily access phone book entries that have Voice Tags assigned
to them.
45
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Voice Activation
Voice Activation from the Standby Mode:
1. Press ]. When prompted, say the Voice Tag name. The Personal
Communicator highlights the matching entry in your phone book list. If there is
no matching entry, the Personal Communicator highlights an alternate entry in
the list.
2. Press ( to make the call, ! to select a different entry, or ) to cancel.
46
Voice Activation from the Phone Book Menu:
1. Select Voice dialing from the Phone Book menu.
2. When prompted, press ].
3. When prompted, say the Voice Tag name. If a matching entry is found, the
Personal Communicator highlights it or highlights an alternate entry in the list.
4. Press ( to make the call, ! to select a different entry, or ) to cancel.
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When you’re on the go, you can still keep up with the latest news,
sports scores, entertainment stories, check flight status, and
much more. Access Internet is a network and subscriptiondependent feature that offers mobile Internet access of
Information Services and certain web sites using the Wireless Application Protocol
(WAP). Contact your service provider for details about these services.
Mobile Internet Home Menu
Note: Your service provider determines the layout and information shown on your
Personal Communicator.
After connection is made, your ISP’s Home menu is displayed. A typical Home menu
page might contain the name of your ISP and a list of options to select from.
1. Highlight the option menu you want, then press (.
2. To return to the previous screen, press ).
If the text in a menu is too wide for the screen, the Personal Communicator uses two
screens and repeats each half of the menu until you make a selection.
Access Internet
Access Internet
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Access Internet
Internet Browser Menu
48
To display the browser menu:
1. Press and hold % for at least two seconds.
Note: If you release % too quickly, you might enter the menu for the
currently highlighted option.
2. Scroll to the menu selection you want, then press (.
A typical browser menu might include:
• Help - provides help for the previously highlighted option.
• Home - returns you to your ISP’s home page.
• Mark site - lets you add a site to your Bookmarks folder.
• Setup - contains the options to set up your ISP access.
Using the Soft Keys
During a mobile Internet session, the functions of the
% and ( buttons change to accommodate the
current display. In the example display, to go back to
the previous screen, press (, to quit and exit,
press %.
To go to a previous screen, press ).
Menu
1>Option 1
2>Option 2
u
Exit
Back
Soft Keys Example
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Entering or Editing Text Within a Mobile Internet Session
You can enter or edit text the same way you do for all other text
functions. However, you can’t access the non-Roman characters.
• For a single capital letter, press and release +.
• For multiple capital letters, press ++. To switch back, press
++ again.
• Press ) to erase the previous character, press and hold for
multiple characters.
• For a single number, press M then type the number.
• For a series of numbers, press M M. To stop entering numbers, press M M
again.
Access Internet
Mobile Internet Messages
Messages displayed at the bottom left of the screen indicate when activities such
as receiving or sending data, connecting to the Internet, and Internet activities are
being performed. A u indicates you are in a non-secure Internet location.
Note: Your ISP determines the icons and messages displayed on your Personal
Communicator.
49
Access Internet
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50
For Internet Access
Text Character
~
€
^
[
{
]
}
|
\
Press M * then
press...
T
Y
D
F
FF
G
GG
M
?
Setting Up for Mobile Internet Access
Your service provider may set up your mobile Internet access for you.
If not, you will need the following information to set it up:
Information
Description
Primary Data
The IP address to access the mobile Internet
Gateway
Phone Number The number your Personal Communicator calls to access the
Internet. This is provided by your ISP
User Name
Provided by your ISP
User Password Provided by your ISP
Baud Rate
This is likely to be 9600, the standard data rate for GSM phones
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Line Type or
Port
Connection
Type
Description
The amount of time the Personal Communicator waits before
hanging up if it detects no Internet activity
Modem or ISDN
Non-transparent or transparent
To set up your mobile Internet access:
1. From the browser menu, select Setup, then press (.
2. Enter your user information by first selecting an item and choosing the softkey
to edit it as necessary.
3. When you have entered all information, exit to the Standby Screen, turn your
Personal Communicator off and then on again to register all information or
changes.
Setting a Bookmark
You can set up bookmarks so you can quickly access your favorite Internet sites.
1. From your browser menu, select Mark Site.
2. Press any key from 1 to 9 when prompted. The Personal Communicator
provides a confirmation message that the bookmark has been stored.
Access Internet
Information
Idle Time Out
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3. To go back to the bookmark, press and hold the appropriate location number
key (1 to 9).
Access Internet
Internet Service Alerts
You do not need to be using the mobile Internet to receive an Internet service alert.
When you receive an alert, the Personal Communicator displays a screen with the
details. Press ( to view the contents or ) to reject it.
52
Making and Receiving Calls During a Mobile Internet Session
You must first end the mobile Internet session, then make your call in the
normal way. If you receive a call, press ( to accept it ) to reject it.
If you answer a call, press ( to resume your mobile Internet session or
) to return to the Standby mode.
Ending a Mobile Internet Session
Press and hold ) until your ISP’s Home page is displayed, then press ) again.
Note: To quickly exit a mobile Internet session, press ].
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You can store important numbers in your Phone Book so you can
retrieve them quickly and easily.
Your Personal Communicator can store up to 100 entries and the SIM
card can store up to 250 entries in your Personal Numbers list. The
number of SIM card entries varies depending on the type of SIM card issued by your
service provider.
You can store up to 40 entries in a fixed dialing list, if you have this feature. Fixed
dialing allows limited use of your Personal Communicator to particular numbers, or,
if you wish, to country codes, area codes, or other prefixes of your choosing.
Each Phone Book entry contains:
• A telephone number. Up to 32 digits can be stored, but this is reduced to
20 digits for SIM card locations.
• A name. Up to 16 characters for phone locations. Up to 50 characters for SIM
card locations.
• A location label. From 1 to 255 in your Personal Numbers list. From 1 to 40 in
your Fixed Dial list.
Phone Book
Phone Book
53
Phone Book
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54
Inserting Pauses into Phone Numbers
Pauses can be inserted into a string of numbers to allow the called number time
to react to certain activities such as going into voice mail or entering a password.
To insert a three-second pause in a phone number, press and hold (*) until Ü is
displayed.
For example, you have voice mail on 555-6911, with mailbox number 1066 and
password 2001. Then you can dial: 5556911Ü1066Ü2001 then press (.
The first part of the number calls the voice mail system. When the call is answered,
there is a pause before the tones for 1066 are sent. Then there is a second pause
before the tones for your password of 2001 are sent.
Voice Dialing
You can quickly access a phone number that has a Voice Tag assigned to
it.
1. When selected, your Personal Communicator prompts you to press the Smart
button ].
2. Next, you are prompted to say the name (Voice Tag) after the tone.
3. Press ( to make the call, or highlight a different selection then press (.
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Personal Numbers
Use to create and manage your list of personal numbers.
Find Entry By Location
Use to select a number from your list of Phone Book locations.
1. At the prompt, enter a location number, then press (. If the number is not valid,
the Phone Book list is displayed and the number closest to your entry is
highlighted.
2. Use ! to navigate through the entries.
3. Press ( to make your selection. From the submenu select:
• Switch View - to display the information for the selected entry.
• Call Number - to call the selected number.
• Modify Name or Details - to modify the information for the selected entry.
• Erase Name and Number - to delete the phone book entry.
• Add or Edit Voice Tag - to add or edit a Voice Tag.
Phone Book
Find Entry By Name
Use to find a number from your list of Phone Book names by typing up
to three of the first characters of the name, then press (.
55
Phone Book
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56
Add Entry
Allows you to add a phone number and name to the Personal Communicator’s
(phone) memory or to SIM card memory.
1. When prompted, enter the phone number, name, and location number. If you
do not specify a location number, the entry is stored in the next available
location.
2. The Personal Communicator then asks if you want to enter a Voice Tag. For
Voice Tags information, see “Add Voice Tag” on page 44.
3. If you don’t want to add a Voice Tag, press ).
Check Capacity
Use to check the number of free Phone Book or SIM card memory areas. From the
submenu you can:
• Check Phone Capacity and Check SIM Capacity - displays the phone and SIM
capacity.
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Last Ten Calls
When selected, allows you to review time and date information of your
last 10 missed or answered calls, or to calls you made. Depending on
your selection, you can redial a phone number, store a phone number, or
erase all of the phone numbers.
Note: This list is erased when a new SIM is inserted in the Personal
Communicator.
Phone Book
Prevent Access
Select to control access to your Personal Numbers list.
Note: You will not be able to record Voice Tags if you choose to prevent access to
phone memory.
• To SIM Card Memory, To Phone Memory, To Phone & SIM Memory, No
Memory Restrictions - You can prevent access to your SIM card memory, the
Personal Communicator’s memory, both, or cancel all access restrictions.
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Phone Book
My Phone Numbers
When selected, displays your list of phone numbers. From the submenu, you can:
• Modify Name or Details - to make changes to the selection.
• Switch View - to display information for the selected entry.
Note: The list is stored on your SIM card. Depending on your service provider, one
or more of these entries is already defined and you may not be able to change
them.
Fixed Dialing
Limits the use (typically third-party) of your Personal Communicator to a list of
predefined telephone numbers, country codes, area codes, or other prefixes. When
set, the Personal Communicator does not allow dialing of any number other than an
emergency number. This option may be affected by the call barring setting.
Note: Fixed dialing is a network and subscription dependent feature and may not
be available in all areas.
View Fixed Dial List
Use ! to scroll through the list of numbers. Press ( to make a call.
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On
Turn fixed dialing on.
Off
Turn fixed dialing off.
Edit Entry
Scroll to the entry you want to change, press ( to edit the
entry or ) to erase it.
Add Entry
To add a phone number and name, and a location number.
If you do not specify a location number, the entry is stored
in the next available location.
Erase Entry
Scroll to the entry you want to delete then press (.
Phone Book
Set Up Fixed Dialing
Use to turn fixed dialing on or off, and to enter or change entries in the list. After
you enter your PIN2 code, you can:
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Set Up One-Touch Dialing
You can specify which phone book list is one-touch dialed. The
selections are:
Phone Book
To Phone Memory
60
Changes One-Touch Dialing to your Personal Numbers
list (locations 1 to 9).
To SIM Card Memory Changes One-Touch Dialing to your Personal Numbers
list stored on your SIM card (locations 101 to 109).
To Fixed Dial List
Changes One-Touch Dialing to your Fixed Dial list
(locations 1 to 9).
One-Touch Dialing from Phone Book Numbers
To quickly retrieve and dial a number stored in one of the first nine
locations of your Phone Book, press and hold the appropriate number
key. For example, press and hold 2 to call the phone number stored in
location 2 of your phone book.
Dialing Phone Book Numbers with Smart Button
• Press ] and say the Voice Tag name after the tone.
• Press ] then scroll to the number, or press the appropriate number to skip to
a particular entry.
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Alarm Clock
Set Alarm
Each alarm can be set to alert on a specific day and time, daily, weekly, every
Monday to Friday, or every Monday to Saturday.
1. To set an alarm, select the day(s) in DD/MM/YY format for the alarm to occur.
2. When prompted, enter the alarm time in 24-hour format (for example, set 2:30
p.m. by entering 14:30) using the keypad numbers and press (.
3. When prompted, enter your reminder memo then press (.
Note: Depending on your alarm selection, you may need to enter a date.
Alarm Clock
You can set up to 5 alarms on your Personal Communicator, and attach a
41-character memo to each alarm.
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Call Related Features
Show Alarm Status
When selected, displays the alarms that are set. Use ! to select an alarm. From
the submenu, you can:
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Switch View
See the details for alarm. Select Switch View again to return to
the previous screen.
Edit Alarm
Change the time, date, and attached memo.
Disable Alarm
Suspends (but does not delete) the alarm.
Call Related Features
Show Battery Meter
Displays the remaining battery charge. The more segments displayed, the more
battery charge is left.
Restrict My Phone Number
This is a network-dependent feature. Please check with your service provider for
more information.
Show ID on Next Call
Sends your Personal Communicator’s number with the next call.
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Call Forwarding
You can have incoming calls sent to other phone numbers.
Note: You cannot set call forward when you are out of your network
coverage area.
Note: Call Forwarding is a network and subscription dependent
feature and may not be available in all areas.
Forward Voice Calls
You can have voice calls sent to other phone numbers. From the submenu you can
select the following settings:
Forward When
Unavailable
Forwards all incoming voice calls to a single number
whenever your Personal Communicator is unavailable. To
forward, select On, then enter a forwarding phone number.
When set to On, has the same effect as setting all “Detailed
Forwarding” options to On and takes priority over Detailed
Forwarding settings.
Call Related Features
Restrict ID on Next Call
Prevents your Personal Communicator’s ID number from being sent with the next
call. You need to reselect this option each time you want to restrict sending your ID
number.
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Call Related Features
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64
Forward All
Voice Calls
Forwards all incoming voice calls to a single number. To
forward, select On, then enter a forwarding phone number.
When set to On, this option takes priority over all other voice
call forwarding settings.
Detailed
Forwarding
Forwards voice calls to different numbers, depending on the
current status of your Personal Communicator. The
selections are:
1. If Busy - forwards calls when your Personal
Communicator is engaged.
2. If Not Reachable - forwards incoming calls when your
Personal Communicator cannot be contacted by the
network.
3. If No Answer - forwards incoming calls when you do
not answer.
Cancel All
Forwarding
Cancels forwarding of incoming calls, resets all forwarding
settings to Off, and removes all forwarding numbers.
Call Waiting
When set to On, an audible alert and a call waiting message notify
you of a waiting call. Press ( to answer the call or ) to reject it.
If you have Caller Line Identification, the caller’s number or name is
displayed instead of the Call Waiting message. Availability of this feature depends
on your service provider.
Note: Call Waiting is a network and subscription dependent feature and may not
be available in all areas.
Call Barring
Call barring is a network feature used to bar outgoing and incoming calls. If you
change the setting, you may be asked to enter your barring password. There is a
short delay while the Personal Communicator notifies the network of the new setting.
When the change is made, the Personal Communicator displays a confirmation
message.
Note: The initial password is supplied to you by your service provider. This option
may be affected by the Fixed Dialing setting.
Call Related Features
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Call Related Features
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66
Bar Outgoing Calls
• Int’l Calls - bars all outgoing international calls.
• Int’l Calls Except Home - bars all outgoing international calls except those to
your home country.
• All Calls - bars all outgoing non-emergency calls.
• Off - removes call barring for all calls.
Bar Incoming Calls
• When Roaming - bars incoming calls when you are roaming.
• All Calls - bars all incoming calls.
• Off - removes call barring for all calls.
Cancel All Barring
Cancels this option for all calls.
Change Bar Password
When prompted, enter the current password, then enter and confirm a new four-digit
password.
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Messages Menu
Received Messages
Note: For quick access, press #.
Displays the number of new and old text messages, then displays the
message list.
1. Use ! to scroll through your message list.
2. Most times, only part of your message is displayed. To view the entire
message, press ( to see your options.
Messages Menu
Call Voice Mail
Select to make a call to your voice mail number.
Note: Voice mail is a network and subscription dependent feature and may not be
available in all areas.
Switch View
Displays the entire message. Press ( to return to the view options screen.
Delete Message
Deletes the message.
Note: Before you delete a message, verify that the message you want deleted was
selected in your received message screen.
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Messages Menu
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Retrieve Numbers
You can retrieve all numbers embedded in a text message. You can call the
number, store it into your Personal Communicator, or store it into SIM card memory.
Press ( while viewing the numbers.
Note: Only 20 characters of a number can be retrieved. If the number is longer
than allowed, the remaining characters are not retrieved. Space and - (dash)
characters are not counted as part of the character length.
Reply to Message
Type your message then press ( to send it.
Return Call
When a phone number is attached to a message, you can call the person who sent
the message to you.
Edit Message
Use the message editor to edit the message. Then either send the edited message
or store it in your Outgoing Message list.
Go to Next Message
Displays the next message in the list.
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Outgoing Messages
Note: You cannot send outgoing messages until the Message Service Center
number has been set.
You can view and manage your outgoing messages that are stored on your SIM
card. When selected, the number of messages is displayed followed by the first
message in the list.
To Send a Stored Text Message
Select the message from your message list, press ( to view your
options, then send it.
Messages Menu
Delete All Messages
Deletes all messages, read and unread.
Note: Deleted messages are not retrievable. It’s a good idea to make
sure you have read all your messages before deleting them.
Switch View
Displays the entire message. Press ( to return to the view options screen.
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Messages Menu
Send Message
Adds the destination phone number, then sends a message. From the submenu,
select to either enter the number, find it by name, or find it by location.
When you have set up a destination phone number, select ( to send the message,
press ( again to confirm.
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Edit Message
Use to edit a message, then send or store it in your Outgoing Messages list.
Delete Message
Use to delete the current message.
Note: Before you delete a message, make sure the message you want deleted
was selected in your received message screen.
Go to Next Message
Use to display the next outgoing message.
Message Editor
Compose a text message and send it to a friend, or store it to send it
later.
Note: There is a limit of 160 characters in a text message.
• For a single capital letter, press and release +, then type the letter.
•
•
•
•
•
For multiple capital letters, press ++. To switch back to lowercase letters,
press ++ again.
Press ) to erase the previous character, press and hold ) to erase multiple
characters.
For special characters, see “Special Characters” on page 98.
For a single number, press M then type the number.
For a series of numbers, press M M. To stop entering numbers, press M M
again.
Note: You don’t always have to come to this menu to get to your
message editor, you can press . from any screen for immediate
access.
Voice Notes
Play, erase, or show remaining time available for your recorded voice notes. See
“Voice Notes” on page 42 for more information.
Messages Menu
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Play Voice Note
1. Scroll to the voice note you want to play, then press (.
2. Press ) to stop playback.
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Messages Menu
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72
3. To erase, set an alarm for a voice note, or go to the next voice note, press (
to display the options menu.
• Erase Voice Note - erases the selected voice note.
• Set Alarm (Alarmed voice notes) - You can set an alarm to up to 5 voice
notes. See “Set Alarm” on page 61.
• Go to Next Voice Note - selects and plays the next voice note in the list.
4. Press ) to return to the previous menu.
Show Time Available
Displays the remaining recordable time.
Erase All Voice Notes
Erases all recorded voice notes.
Cell Broadcast
These are general messages that your service provider
broadcasts in numbered channels to all Personal Communicators
in a geographic area. Please contact your service provider for a list
of available channels and the information they provide.
Note: Your Personal Communicator can receive broadcast messages only when it
is in Standby mode.
While a broadcast message is scrolling across the screen, you can:
• Press ! to stop and start the message.
• Press ) to remove the message.
Note: The ! functions change while you are receiving a cell broadcast message.
You must remove the message before ! functions return to normal.
When the message is complete, the beginning of the message remains displayed
until you remove it, a new message arrives, or you leave the geographic area.
From the Cell Broadcast submenu, you can select On to receive these messages, or
Off to stop receiving them.
Note: Selecting Off causes deletion of all stored cell broadcast messages.
Channel List
• Channel Index - displays a list of available channels that you can edit. When
you edit a channel, you also remove any message associated with it. Select the
channel index you want to edit, then press (. Enter the channel number and
press (. The channel details are stored and your Personal Communicator
returns to the channel index list.
• Delete All Channels - deletes all channels.
Language List
Use to select a different language for Cell Broadcast messages. Availability depends
on the type and settings of the SIM card, and/or your subscription to this feature.
Messages Menu
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Message Settings
Messages Menu
Voice Mail Number
You can enter, modify, or delete your voice mail number.
Note: Remember to add the + symbol and the appropriate country code prefix to
the phone number.
Service Center
You can modify or delete it as desired. Remember to add the + symbol and the
appropriate country code prefix to the phone number.
Note: Before you can send messages, you need to enter your Message Service
Center number provided by your service provider.
Expiry Period
Use to specify the maximum time, in hours, that your unforwarded messages remain
with the Message Service Center before being deleted. The default is 24 hours. The
maximum value you can enter is 10584, although the real limit depends on your
Message Service Center.
Outgoing Message Type
This option is network dependent and can be used to specify the format of your
outgoing messages. You can select Text (default), Fax, Paging, or E-Mail.
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Phone Setup
Select Phone Line
Allows you to switch between Line 1 and Line 2 of your Personal Communicator.
Note: Availability depends on the type and settings of the SIM card, and/or your
subscription to this feature.
Adjust Ring Volume
Use to increase or decrease the ringer volume of your Personal
Communicator.
Ring or Vibrate
From the submenu, you can set your Personal Communicator to ring, vibrate, or a
combination of both. You can also set it to no ring or no vibrate to send and receive
text messages and Internet service messages in a silent mode. However, when this
option is selected, you will not be notified when you receive an incoming voice call if
the device is closed.
Set Ringer Tone
Use to select a musical alert or a standard ringing tone for incoming calls.
Phone Setup
You can set custom alerts, the time and date, security codes, the contrast of your
display, and other features.
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Set Alarm Ringer Tone
Use to turn the alarm alert ringer tone on or off.
Phone Setup
Set Ringer Tone 2
Use to select a tone alert for incoming calls on Line 2.
Note: This is a network and subscription dependent feature and may not be
available in all areas.
76
Set Message Alert Tone
Use to set a musical alert or standard tone for incoming text messages.
Edit Music Tone
Compose a musical alert and send it via
Text Messaging to another compatible
A A a A
C
G F G
Motorola phone. The alert can have up to
A5 A5 a2 A2 G2 F2 G5 C5
35 notes and 3 octaves.
• A to G on the keyboard are musical
r
View Options?
notes A to G.
Edit Tone Example
• R (rest) adds a pause. Press and hold R to extend
the length of the pause.
• Add a P between a note and the duration to change the pitch to either Flat or
Sharp. Add a P anywhere else to change the pitch for all notes.
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Change the duration of a note or rest by placing the cursor between the note
and the duration indicator, then enter a duration length: 1 is the shortest, 6 is
the longest and equals one second.
• Change the octave of the note by placing the cursor on the note and use ! to
increase or decrease it.
• Change the tempo of your tune to 1 (slowest), 4 (fastest), or 2 and 3 for
somewhere in between.
Now you are ready to listen (play) to your new tune. If you like it, you can save it, or
go back and edit it or erase it and compose a new one.
Send as a Text Message
Impress your friends with your musical ability by sending your composed music tone
in a text message to another Motorola phone. If you receive a music tone, you can
play, save, or delete it.
Message Popup Alert
You can enable or disable the Message Popup Alert (a rolling envelope and
Message-Read Now screen) that appears when a text message is received. The
selections are On or Off. When set to On, Message Popup Alert is enabled, which
allows you to read an incoming text message immediately. When set to Off, Message
Popup Alert is disabled, which allows you to continue using your Personal
Communicator without interruption and read new messages later.
Phone Setup
•
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Quick Access Setup
You can customize your Quick Access menu so you can quickly get
to the features you use the most. Refer to “Quick Access Menu” on
page 95 for usage and set up information.
Phone Setup
Phone Lock
You can lock your Personal Communicator to prevent others from using it.
Automatic Lock
When set to On, your Personal Communicator is locked automatically when it is
turned on. To use it, enter the unlock code.
Lock Now
Immediately locks your Personal Communicator from further use. To use it again,
enter the unlock code.
Change Unlock Code
Use to change your unlock code. Follow the prompts to enter a new code. The code
set by the manufacturer is 1234. If this code does not work, check with your service
provider.
78
Adjust Contrast
Lets you lighten or darken your display.
Require SIM Card PIN
When set to On, you must enter your SIM card PIN each time the SIM card is
inserted or your Personal Communicator is turned on.
Note: This is not available if the SIM card does not support PIN code disabling.
How do I change my SIM card PIN? No problem, your Personal Communicator gives
you all the instructions.
Note: Be careful, if you enter your PIN incorrectly three times in a row, your
Personal Communicator locks up. See “Entering Your Unlock Code” on page 21 if
this happens.
Change SIM PIN2 Code
You can change your SIM PIN2 code just like your standard SIM code.
Note: This is a network and subscription dependent feature and may not be
available in all areas.
Note: Be careful, your Personal Communicator locks up if the code is entered
incorrectly three times in a row.
Caution: If the PIN2 unblocking operation is performed incorrectly ten
times in a row, your PIN2 code becomes permanently blocked, please
see your service provider.
Phone Setup
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Unblocking Your V100 Personal Communicator
If you are blocked from accessing your V100 Personal Communicator, use the
following key sequence and the 8-digit PIN unblocking code that was provided by
your Cellular Service Provider to unblock it:
Phone Setup
† † ‡ … †
Unblock Code ( New PIN Code ( New PIN Code (
The new PIN code must contain four to eight digits.
Caution: If this operation is performed incorrectly 10 times in a row, your SIM card
will become permanently blocked.
New Security Code
Enter the current security code, then a new six-digit code. The security code is set
by the manufacturer to 000000. If this code does not work, see your service provider.
Extended Menus
Turn extended menus on or off. When Off, you cannot access any of the extended
features.
Show Time and Date
When selected, time and date is displayed until you press a button.
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Set Time and Date
Setting the time and date is easy. Just follow the instructions given by your
Personal Communicator. But remember, use the international date format (day/
month/year).
Backlight Timing Control
Set this feature to Off to help your battery last longer by preventing the backlight from
coming on during keyboard activity. You can also select Normal, which sets the
backlight to come on any time a button is pressed and remain on during keyboard
activity, or Continuous, which keeps the backlight ON until you select either Normal
or Off.
Phone Setup
Set Time Format
You can change to either 12-hour or 24-hour format.
Language Selection
All prompts and help messages are displayed in the language you select.
Battery Saving Mode
Set this feature to On to help your battery last longer. All status indicators and the
backlight for incoming Cell Broadcast messages are turned off.
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Select Keypad Tones
You can set this feature to hear tones when you press the buttons on your Personal
Communicator, or you can turn off the tones.
Phone Setup
Phone Status
82
Status Review
When selected, your Personal Communicator displays a list of menu items that have
been changed from the default setting.
Master Reset
Caution: Using this feature restores certain options to their default settings.
This feature does the following:
• Cancels automatic answer, audible call timers, in-call display meter, battery
saver, auxiliary alert, automatic handsfree, automatic lock, and cell broadcast.
• Restores language selection, band selection, and extended menus to their
default settings.
• Restores keypad tones to normal, ringer tones to standard, text message alert
tones to standard, volume level to medium, and network search frequency to
medium.
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Master Clear
The master clear option performs the same operations as the Master
Reset, but it also does the following:
• Clears phone book entries from memory (but not from SIM memory).
• Clears the list of all last calls you made and received.
• Clears the message editor.
• Resets call timers.
• Erases all recorded Voice Notes and Voice Tags.
Master Clear does not clear:
• Fixed Dial list
• My Number list
• Charge meters
• Received and outgoing messages list
• Voice mail number
• Service Center number
• Lifetime timer
Phone Setup
Caution: All phone book entries are deleted with this feature!
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Network Selection
Network Selection
84
To make and receive calls, your Personal Communicator must be registered with one
of the available networks.
Your Personal Communicator automatically searches for the last network used. If
this network is not available, your Personal Communicator attempts to register with
a different network.
When your Personal Communicator attempts to register with a different network, it
generates a sorted list of networks.
The network list is sorted in the following order:
• The Home network.
• Networks from a preferred list.
• A random list of other networks found above a certain signal strength.
• All remaining networks in descending order of signal strength.
Available Networks
This feature lists which networks are operating in your area. When scanning
is complete, a list is displayed. When you find a network you want to register
with or store in your preferred list, press (. Follow the instructions given by your
Personal Communicator to register and store your selection.
Note: The menu options to Register Now, Make Preferred, and Switch View are
displayed only if a network is available in your area.
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Registration Preferences
Set this to automatic search (performed by your Personal Communicator) or to
manual search (performed by you).
• Automatic Search - Your Personal Communicator automatically generates a
list of networks and then tries to register with the first network in the list. If
registration fails, it tries to register with the next listed network. If registration
totally fails, it starts searching all over again.
• Manual Search - Your Personal Communicator provides a list of networks from
which to choose. If registration is successful, the network name is displayed. If
registration fails, the list is displayed again.
Frequency of Search
You can set how quickly your Personal Communicator tries to re-register: slow,
medium, fast, or continuous search.
Note: Fast and continuous search may use up a lot of battery power.
Network Selection
Network Search
Determines how often your Personal Communicator attempts to register with a
network and how the attempt is made.
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Network Selection
Preferred Networks
86
Add Network to Preferred List
You can add networks to your preferred list.
• If you choose from the available list, your Personal Communicator scans for the
networks in your area, then displays the list. To store one in your preferred list,
follow the instructions provided by your Personal Communicator.
• You can select from a list of known networks, then store it in your preferred list.
• To add a new network code, follow the instructions provided by your Personal
Communicator to enter the service provider number before storing it in your
preferred list.
Show List of Networks
You can have your Personal Communicator show you a list of preferred
networks. From the list, you can select one, then move it, delete it, or have
your Personal Communicator display the information for the network.
Note: The menu options to Move to New Location, Delete Selection, and Switch
View are displayed only if you have one or more preferred networks stored.
Otherwise, “Empty” is displayed.
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Find New Network
When you select this feature, your Personal Communicator attempts to register
with a network other than your current network. If the attempt fails, your Personal
Communicator tries to register with the previous network.
You can have your Personal Communicator keep track of your calling time
and charges. You can also have audible alert tones tell you how long you
have been on a call. Your Personal Communicator can accept values up
to 21 digits, although during calls it can display only the last 12 digits. You
also can set a maximum charge limit so that your Personal Communicator monitors
either the number of units used or the call charges, and not allow the limit to be
exceeded.
Note: Call cost information is available only if you receive the Advice of Charge
service. If you do not receive this service, then only time meters are available.
Call Meters Menu
Call Meters Menu
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Call Meters Menu
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88
Show Call Charges
You can find out the charges for last call cost, the total for all your calls, and how
much credit you have left.
Note: Show Call Charges is a network and subscription feature that may not be
available in all areas.
Note: If you do not have the Advice of Charge service, your Personal
Communicator only keeps track of the length of the call.
Show Call Timers
Find out how long you talked during your last call, or the total time for all your calls.
You can also reset all your timers to zero.
Note: If you do not receive the Advice of Charge Service, either all calls or only
outgoing calls are timed.
Set Audible Call Timers
You can set single or repetitive audible alerts at preset times to help you keep track
of your time and charges. When the timer is set, your Personal Communicator
sounds an alert 10 seconds before the end of the programmed time.
Set In-Call Display
Set this option to display the time or charge meters displayed during a call.
Note: If you have a total charge limit set, your remaining credit is always displayed.
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Show Charge Per Call and Show Total Call Charges
These two options display the call charges meter during and after chargeable calls.
The meter shows phone units or currency depending on your charge type (unit or
currency) setting.
Note: If you do not receive the Advice of Charge, either all calls or only
outgoing calls are timed, depending on the Personal Communicator model
you have.
No In-Call Display
Use this feature to turn off all display of time and charges.
Call Meters Menu
Show Time Per Call
Displays the time meter during your calls.
Note: If you have the Advice of Charge service, your chargeable calls are always
displayed.
Call Charge Settings
If you receive the Advice of Charge service, you can customize your settings.
Reset Call Charges
Use this to reset all your meters to zero.
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Call Meters Menu
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90
Set Total Charge Limit
You can set a maximum limit for call charges. When your limit is reached, the
network does not allow you to receive any more chargeable calls.
• When set to On, you need to enter a new limit as either units or currency,
depending on the setting of your Set Charge Type option.
Note: Units are entered as whole numbers and currency is entered by name. For
example, USD for US dollars.
Reset or turn off your Total Charge Limit option to make more chargeable calls.
Lifetime Timer
Displays the total time of all calls that have been made on your Personal
Communicator.
Note: This meter cannot be reset.
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A
A
7
Games
Closing and Saving a Game
You can close a game at any time by pressing ). At the End game prompt, press
) to return to the game or ( to save the game so you can finish it later.
While playing a game, the playing state can be interrupted when you receive an
incoming call, the alarm expires, or the battery is discharging. Press ) to return to
the game or ( to save the game so you can finish it later.
Games
You can play three different games on your Motorola V100 Personal Communicator
when you select Games from the main menu. Your choices are Towers of Hanoi,
Baccarat, and Bricks. When you select a game, you can start a new game, continue
with a saved game, or see what your best score is for that game.
Note: Prolonged playing of games may shorten battery life.
Towers of Hanoi
This game involves skill and logic and is intended for only one player. The skill levels
range from 3 to 7 and indicate the number of disks in the game. The more disks in a
game, the more difficult the game. When you start the game, disks of different
lengths are stacked on a center pole. The object of the game, is to stack the disks in
ascending order with the smallest disk at the top and the largest disk at the bottom.
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7
A
When you successfully move all disks from the center pole to any other pole, you
win the game.
A
Games
Game Rules
• Only one disk can be moved at a time.
• You can move only the top disk on the stack.
• Larger disks cannot be stacked onto smaller disks.
92
How to Play
When you select a new game, enter the skill level you want to play (3 through 7).
1. Press the up portion of ! to select a disk. A gap between disks indicates that
disk has been moved up.
2. Press the left or right portions of ! to move to another pole. A square cursor
above the pole indicates your location.
3. Press the down portion of ! to move selected disk to a new pole.
4. Continue with steps 1 through 3 until you move all disks to a new pole.
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How to Play
1. When a new hand is started, select hand B, P, or a tie, then press (.
2. Enter the amount of the wager, then press (. The wager should be from 5 to
500 points, or your current balance.
3. When prompted, press ( to deal the cards. The cards for both B and P hands
flash and are displayed for a limited time.
Games
Game Rules
The game starts by placing a wager on hand P, B, or whether there will be a tie. Each
player is given 2 cards. A third card may be given to P and/or B.
• The hand with points closest to 9 wins the game. If points total more than 10,
subtract 10 and the remainder is the number of points. For example, 8 (for P) +
8 (for P) = 16; subtract 10 from 16 for a total of 6.
• If either P or B wins, all winning wagers pay evenly. If you win by betting on B,
then B receives a 5% commission. If you win by betting on a tie, you get 8 times
the amount of your wager, otherwise, the wager is returned.
• Ace cards equal one point, tens and face cards (Kings, Queen, and Jacks)
equal zero. All other cards equal the point value stated on the card.
A
A
7
Baccarat
The object of this game is to predict which hand will get closest to 9 points, or if
there will be a tie game. The two hands are P for player and B for banker.
93
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7
A
A
Games
Bricks
This fun game is intended for a single player. In this game, there is a set of bricks
at the top of the display, a paddle at the bottom, and a moving ball. The object of the
game is to strike the ball with the paddle, causing the ball to move diagonally and hit
the bricks at the top, without letting the ball hit the bottom boundary. The direction of
the ball is determined by the angle when the paddle hits it, head on or sideways. The
ball can hit more than one brick at a time. When a brick is hit by the ball, it
disappears, increasing the game score by the number of points assigned to that
brick.
The bricks in the fifth row have a point value of 30, the fourth-row bricks are
25 points, third-row bricks are 20 points, second-row bricks are 15 points, and the
first-row bricks are 10 points.
Game Rules
• The game ends if the ball hits the bottom boundary or if all bricks are hit.
• The paddle area is determined by the left and right boundaries. The paddle will
not wrap around the screen to the other side.
How to Play
• When a new game is started, the paddle is located in the center of the screen
in the lower boundary. The ball is located just above the paddle.
94
•
•
•
•
The first movement of the ball is automatic and happens at a random angle.
Thereafter, it moves according to the way in which it hits any surface.
Use the left and right portion of ! to move the paddle to the left and right.
The object of the game is to hit all bricks without letting the ball touch the
bottom boundary.
When a game ends, the screen flashes and the game results are displayed.
Quick Access Menu
a1 W2
O3
While the features in your Personal Communicator
are available through easy-to-use menus, some of
R4 K5 L6
Add to SIM?
the most commonly used features are also available
in the Quick Access menu. Each feature in the menu
Quick Access Menu Example
is assigned a location number from 1 to 9.
Press $ to display the Quick Access menu. The menu in the example represents
some of the features you can set up in your Quick Access menu.
With appropriate setup, you can use a Quick Access feature by:
• Pressing $ and saying the Voice Tag name.
• Pressing $ then entering the location number.
• Pressing $ then using ! to highlight a menu option and then pressing ( to
select it.
Quick Access Menu
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95
1036b10a.book Page 96 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
Quick Access Menu
Each Quick Access feature is represented by an icon. A selected icon has a dark
background.
You can change the features and the positions of the features in the Quick Access
menu.
96
Adding Location Numbers to Quick Access Features
1. From the Phone Setup menu, select the Quick Access Setup menu. Your
Personal Communicator displays a list of features from which to choose.
2. Use ! to scroll to the feature you want to add then press (.
3. Select Assign Key to Feature and press (.
4. When prompted, press any number from 1 to 9 to store the feature in that
location.
Note: If a feature is already stored in the location number you choose, the new
feature takes that location and the older feature is automatically removed.
Adding/Editing Voice Tags to Quick Access Features
You can assign a Voice Tag to each of the nine Quick Access Menu features.
1. From your Quick Access Setup menu, highlight the feature then press (.
2. Select Add or Edit Voice Tag and press (.
3. When prompted, say a Tag name. If there is a matching Voice Tag, the Personal
Communicator repeats the name and displays the entry.
4. When recording is successful, your Personal Communicator displays a
message that the tag has been stored and returns to the Quick Access Setup
menu. If the recording is not successful, your Personal Communicator prompts
you to record the Tag again.
Important Notes:
• If any one of the nine Quick Access features has a Voice Tag assigned to it, and
you attempt to display the Quick Access menu while wearing your headset, you
must say a tag name, or your Personal Communicator returns to the Standby
Screen.
• If you are not wearing your headset, your Personal Communicator prompts for
a tag name, then displays the Quick Access menu after a few seconds.
Delete Voice Tag
Note: This option is not displayed if there are no Voice Tags to delete.
Highlight the Quick Access feature that has the Voice Tag you want to delete then
press (.
Quick Access Menu
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97
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Special Characters
Special Characters
To enter a special character, press M * and the keyboard character from the
following table. Multiple presses of the key may be required to access the character.
For example, to type è, press M * , then press E twice.
98
Keyboard
Character
M
*
M
*
M
*
M
*
M
*
M
*
M
*
1 time
2 times
3 times
4 times
5 times
6 times
7 times
è
É
E
é
T
θ
Y
ψ
¥
U
ü
ù
Ü
I
ì
O
ö
ø
ò
Ω
Ö
Ø
P
Π
A
ä
å
à
æ
Ä
Å
Æ
1036b10a.book Page 99 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
M
*
M
*
M
*
M
*
M
*
M
*
M
*
1 time
2 times
3 times
4 times
5 times
6 times
7 times
S
Σ
F
Φ
G
Γ
L
Λ
Z
Ξ
C
Ç
B
β
N
ñ
?/
¿
!:
i
§
Ñ
Special Characters
Keyboard
Character
99
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Accessories
Accessories
The following accessories are work with your Personal Communicator. Additional
accessories may be available. Please refer to your local service provider or retail
outlet for more information.
100
Headset
The headset provides hands free use of your Personal Communicator and is
required for phone operation.
Power Adapter
The Power Adapter (charger) connects directly to your Personal Communicator.
When connected, it charges the battery and provides normal operation of your
Personal Communicator.
Holster
Place your Personal Communicator inside this stylish holster, then clip the holster
onto your belt, pocket, or handbag, or other apparel.
Note: The holster is designed for your convenience and is not meant to secure
your Personal Communicator under all circumstances.
1036b10a.book Page 101 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
Troubleshooting
Personal
Communicator
does not turn on
• Check the battery. Is it charged, properly fitted, and are
the contacts clean and dry?
You can’t make
calls
• Check the signal strength meter. If the signal is weak,
move to an open space or, if in a building, move close to
a window.
• Check your network settings. Try to select another
network.
• Check your coverage map. Are restrictions set?
• Check your Call Barring and Fixed Dialing settings.
• Have you reached your call charge limit? Reset your
limit or contact your service provider.
• Have you inserted a new SIM card? Make sure no new
restrictions have been imposed.
You can’t cancel
Call Forwarding or
Call Barring
• Wait until you are in an area with good network
coverage and try again.
Troubleshooting
What to do if...
101
Troubleshooting
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102
You can’t receive
calls
• Check the signal strength meter. If the signal is weak,
move to an open space or, if in a building, move closer
to a window.
• Check Call Forwarding and Call Barring settings. Check
Ringer and VibraCall® settings. If both are off, there is no
audible alert.
Personal
Communicator
won’t unlock
• Have you inserted a new SIM card? Enter the new PIN
code.
• Do you have a replacement Personal Communicator?
Enter the default unlock code of 1234.
• Did you forget your unlock code? Press % to change
it (you will need your security code).
Your PIN is blocked • Enter the PIN unblocking code supplied with your SIM
card.
Your PIN2 is
blocked
• Enter the PIN2 unblocking code supplied with your SIM
card.
The I symbol is
flashing
• There is not enough memory available to store another
text message. Use the Messages menu to delete one or
more existing messages.
Your SIM card
won’t work
• Is the card inserted correctly?
• Is it chipped, scratched, or visibly damaged? Return it to
your service provider.
• Check the SIM contacts. If dirty, clean them with an
antistatic cloth.
You can’t make
international calls
• Some service providers block the ability to make
international calls. Contact your Service Provider.
• Have you included the correct codes? Press and
hold 0 (zero) to display the international dialing prefix (+)
and then enter the country code followed by the phone
number.
The battery won’t
charge
• Check the charger. Is it properly connected? Are its
contacts clean and dry?
• Check the battery contacts. Are they clean and dry?
• Check the battery temperature. If it is warm, let it cool
before recharging.
• Is it an old battery? Replace the battery.
• Are you using a Motorola original battery? Your charging
system may not be able to communicate with your
battery.
Troubleshooting
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103
Troubleshooting
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104
The battery icon
and meters are
missing
• Are you using a Motorola original battery? Your charging
system may not be able to communicate with your
battery.
The battery loses
charge faster than
normal
• Are you in an area of variable coverage? This uses extra
battery power.
• Is it a new battery? A new battery needs two to three
charge/discharge cycles to attain normal performance.
• Is it an old battery? Battery performance declines after
several years of use.
• Is it a battery that hasn’t been completely discharged?
Allow the battery to fully discharge (until the Personal
Communicator turns itself off) and then charge the
battery overnight.
• Check that the Frequency Of Search feature in the
Network Selection menu has not been set to Fast or
Continuous.
• Check that the Battery Saving Mode feature has not
been set to Off.
• Are you using your Personal Communicator in extreme
temperatures? At extreme hot or cold temperatures,
battery performance is significantly reduced.
1036b10a.book Page 105 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
Use and Care
glub
Clean with a soft cloth
dampened with
soap and water.
Do not immerse in water.
Do not use alcohol or other
cleaning solutions.
Do not expose to
excessive heat ...
... or extreme shock ...
... or moisture.
Use and Care
XXX
105
Radio Waves Exposure Statement
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106
Questions?
If you have any questions about the use of your Motorola phone, in the U.S. call
1-800-331-6456 or 1-888-390-6456 (TTY). If you have questions about your text
messaging service, contact your text messaging service provider. For information
about other Motorola products, visit our web site at www.motorola.com.
Radio Waves Exposure Statement
THIS MODEL PHONE MEETS THE GOVERNMENT’S REQUIREMENTS FOR
EXPOSURE TO RADIO WAVES.
Your wireless phone is a radio transmitter and receiver. It is designed and
manufactured not to exceed the emission limits for exposure to radiofrequency (RF)
energy set by the Federal Communications Commission of the U.S. Government.
These limits are part of comprehensive guidelines and establish permitted levels of
RF energy for the general population. The guidelines are based on standards that
were developed by independent scientific organizations through periodic and
thorough evaluation of scientific studies. The standards include a substantial safety
margin designed to assure the safety of all persons, regardless of age and health.
The exposure standard for wireless mobile phones employs a unit of measurement
known as the Specific Absorption Rate, or SAR. The SAR limit set by the FCC is
1.6W/kg.* Tests for SAR are conducted using standard operating positions reviewed
by the FCC with the phone transmitting at its highest certified power level in all tested
frequency bands. Although the SAR is determined at the highest certified power
level, the actual SAR level of the phone while operating can be well below the
maximum value. This is because the phone is designed to operate at multiple power
levels so as to use only the power required to reach the network. In general, the
closer you are to a wireless base station antenna, the lower the power output.
Before a phone model is available for sale to the public, it must be tested and
certified to the FCC that it does not exceed the limit established by the governmentadopted requirement for safe exposure. The tests are performed in positions and
locations (e.g., at the ear and worn on the body) as required by the FCC for each
model. The highest SAR value for this model phone when tested for use worn on the
body, as described in this user guide, is 0.065 W/kg.**
Radio Waves Exposure Statement
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107
Radio Waves Exposure Statement
1036b10a.book Page 108 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
108
(Body-worn measurements differ among phone models, depending upon available
accessories and FCC requirements). While there may be differences between the
SAR levels of various phones and at various positions, they all meet the government
requirement.
The FCC has granted an Equipment Authorization for this model phone with all
reported SAR levels evaluated as in compliance with the FCC RF exposure
guidelines. SAR information on this model phone is on file with the FCC and can be
found under the Display Grant section of http://www.fcc.gov/oet/fccid after searching
on FCC ID IHDT6AW1.
________________________________________________________________
* In the United States and Canada, the SAR limit for mobile phones used by the
public is 1.6 watts/kg (W/kg) averaged over one gram of tissue. The standard
incorporates a substantial margin of safety to give additional protection for the public
and to account for any variations in measurements.
**The SAR information provided to the FCC includes the FCC-accepted Motorola
testing protocol, assessment procedure, and measurement uncertainty range for
this product.
1036b10a.book Page 109 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center
for Devices and Radiological Health Consumer
Update on Mobile Phones
FDA has been receiving inquiries about the safety of mobile phones, including
cellular phones and PCS phones. The following summarizes what is known--and
what remains unknown--about whether these products can pose a hazard to health,
and what can be done to minimize any potential risk. This information may be used
to respond to questions.
Why the concern?
Mobile phones emit low levels of radiofrequency energy (i.e., radiofrequency
radiation) in the microwave range while being used. They also emit very low levels
of radiofrequency energy (RF), considered non-significant, when in the stand-by
mode. It is well known that high levels of RF can produce biological damage through
heating effects (this is how your microwave oven is able to cook food). However, it is
not known whether, to what extent, or through what mechanism, lower levels of RF
might cause adverse health effects as well. Although some research has been done
to address these questions, no clear picture of the biological effects of this type of
radiation has emerged to date. Thus, the available science does not allow us to
conclude that mobile phones are absolutely safe, or that they are unsafe. However,
FDA Update for Mobile Phones
FDA Update for Mobile Phones
109
1036b10a.book Page 110 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
FDA Update for Mobile Phones
the available scientific evidence does not demonstrate any adverse health effects
associated with the use of mobile phones.
110
What kinds of phones are in question?
Questions have been raised about hand-held mobile phones, the kind that have a
built-in antenna that is positioned close to the user's head during normal telephone
conversation. These types of mobile phones are of concern because of the short
distance between the phone's antenna--the primary source of the RF--and the
person's head. The exposure to RF from mobile phones in which the antenna is
located at greater distances from the user (on the outside of a car, for example) is
drastically lower than that from hand-held phones, because a person's RF exposure
decreases rapidly with distance from the source. The safety of so-called “cordless
phones,” which have a base unit connected to the telephone wiring in a house and
which operate at far lower power levels and frequencies, has not been questioned.
How much evidence is there that hand-held mobile phones might be harmful?
Briefly, there is not enough evidence to know for sure, either way; however, research
efforts are on-going. The existing scientific evidence is conflicting and many of the
studies that have been done to date have suffered from flaws in their research
methods. Animal experiments investigating the effects of RF exposures
characteristic of mobile phones have yielded conflicting results. A few animal
studies, however, have suggested that low levels of RF could accelerate the
development of cancer in laboratory animals. In one study, mice genetically altered
to be predisposed to developing one type of cancer developed more than twice as
many such cancers when they were exposed to RF energy compared to controls.
There is much uncertainty among scientists about whether results obtained from
animal studies apply to the use of mobile phones. First, it is uncertain how to apply
the results obtained in rats and mice to humans. Second, many of the studies that
showed increased tumor development used animals that had already been treated
with cancer-causing chemicals, and other studies exposed the animals to the RF
virtually continuously--up to 22 hours per day.
For the past five years in the United States, the mobile phone industry has supported
research into the safety of mobile phones. This research has resulted in two findings
in particular that merit additional study:
In a hospital-based, case-control study, researchers looked for an association
between mobile phone use and either glioma (a type of brain cancer) or acoustic
neuroma (a benign tumor of the nerve sheath). No statistically significant association
was found between mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma. There was also no
association between mobile phone use and gliomas when all types of gliomas were
considered together. It should be noted that the average length of mobile phone
exposure in this study was less than three years.
FDA Update for Mobile Phones
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111
FDA Update for Mobile Phones
1036b10a.book Page 112 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
112
When 20 types of glioma were considered separately, however, an association was
found between mobile phone use and one rare type of glioma,
neuroepithelliomatous tumors. It is possible with multiple comparisons of the same
sample that this association occurred by chance. Moreover, the risk did not increase
with how often the mobile phone was used, or the length of the calls. In fact, the risk
actually decreased with cumulative hours of mobile phone use. Most cancer causing
agents increase risk with increased exposure. An ongoing study of brain cancers by
the National Cancer Institute is expected to bear on the accuracy and repeatability
of these results.(1)
Researchers conducted a large battery of laboratory tests to assess the effects of
exposure to mobile phone RF on genetic material. These included tests for several
kinds of abnormalities, including mutations, chromosomal aberrations, DNA strand
breaks, and structural changes in the genetic material of blood cells called
lymphocytes. None of the tests showed any effect of the RF except for the
micronucleus assay, which detects structural effects on the genetic material. The
cells in this assay showed changes after exposure to simulated cell phone radiation,
but only after 24 hours of exposure. It is possible that exposing the test cells to
radiation for this long resulted in heating. Since this assay is known to be sensitive
to heating, heat alone could have caused the abnormalities to occur. The data
already in the literature on the response of the micronucleus assay to RF are
conflicting. Thus, follow-up research is necessary.(2)
FDA is currently working with government, industry, and academic groups to ensure
the proper follow-up to these industry-funded research findings. Collaboration with
the Cellular Telecommunications Industry Association (CTIA) in particular is
expected to lead to FDA providing research recommendations and scientific
oversight of new CTIA-funded research based on such recommendations.
Two other studies of interest have been reported recently in the literature:
Two groups of 18 people were exposed to simulated mobile phone signals under
laboratory conditions while they performed cognitive function tests. There were no
changes in the subjects' ability to recall words, numbers, or pictures, or in their
spatial memory, but they were able to make choices more quickly in one visual test
when they were exposed to simulated mobile phone signals. This was the only
change noted among more than 20 variables compared.(3)
In a study of 209 brain tumor cases and 425 matched controls, there was no
increased risk of brain tumors associated with mobile phone use. When tumors did
exist in certain locations, however, they were more likely to be on the side of the head
where the mobile phone was used. Because this occurred in only a small number of
cases, the increased likelihood was too small to be statistically significant.(4)
FDA Update for Mobile Phones
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113
FDA Update for Mobile Phones
1036b10a.book Page 114 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
114
In summary, we do not have enough information at this point to assure the public that
there are, or are not, any low incident health problems associated with use of mobile
phones. FDA continues to work with all parties, including other federal agencies and
industry, to assure that research is undertaken to provide the necessary answers to
the outstanding questions about the safety of mobile phones.
What is known about cases of human cancer that have been reported in
users of hand-held mobile phones?
Some people who have used mobile phones have been diagnosed with brain cancer.
But it is important to understand that this type of cancer also occurs among people
who have not used mobile phones. In fact, brain cancer occurs in the U.S. population
at a rate of about 6 new cases per 100,000 people each year. At that rate, assuming
80 million users of mobile phones (a number increasing at a rate of about 1 million
per month), about 4800 cases of brain cancer would be expected each year among
those 80 million people, whether or not they used their phones. Thus it is not possible
to tell whether any individual's cancer arose because of the phone, or whether it
would have happened anyway. A key question is whether the risk of getting a
particular form of cancer is greater among people who use mobile phones than
among the rest of the population. One way to answer that question is to compare the
usage of mobile phones among people with brain cancer with the use of mobile
phones among appropriately matched people without brain cancer. This is called a
case-control study. The current case-control study of brain cancers by the National
1036b10a.book Page 115 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
What is FDA's role concerning the safety of mobile phones?
Under the law, FDA does not review the safety of radiation-emitting consumer
products such as mobile phones before marketing, as it does with new drugs or
medical devices. However, the agency has authority to take action if mobile phones
are shown to emit radiation at a level that is hazardous to the user. In such a case,
FDA could require the manufacturers of mobile phones to notify users of the health
hazard and to repair, replace, or recall the phones so that the hazard no longer
exists.
Although the existing scientific data do not justify FDA regulatory actions at this time,
FDA has urged the mobile phone industry to take a number of steps to assure public
safety. The agency has recommended that the industry:
• support needed research into possible biological effects of RF of the type
emitted by mobile phones;
• design mobile phones in a way that minimizes any RF exposure to the user that
is not necessary for device function; and
• cooperate in providing mobile phone users with the best possible information
on what is known about possible effects of mobile phone use on human health.
FDA Update for Mobile Phones
Cancer Institute, as well as the follow-up research to be sponsored by industry, will
begin to generate this type of information.
115
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FDA Update for Mobile Phones
•
116
At the same time, FDA belongs to an interagency working group of the federal
agencies that have responsibility for different aspects of mobile phone safety to
ensure a coordinated effort at the federal level. These agencies are:
• National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
• Environmental Protection Agency
• Federal Communications Commission
• Occupational Health and Safety Administration
• National Telecommunications and Information Administration
The National Institutes of Health also participates in this group.
In the absence of conclusive information about any possible risk, what can
concerned individuals do?
If there is a risk from these products--and at this point we do not know that there is-it is probably very small. But if people are concerned about avoiding even potential
risks, there are simple steps they can take to do so. For example, time is a key factor
in how much exposure a person receives. Those persons who spend long periods
of time on their hand-held mobile phones could consider holding lengthy
conversations on conventional phones and reserving the hand-held models for
shorter conversations or for situations when other types of phones are not available.
People who must conduct extended conversations in their cars every day could
switch to a type of mobile phone that places more distance between their bodies and
the source of the RF, since the exposure level drops off dramatically with distance.
For example, they could switch to:
• a mobile phone in which the antenna is located outside the vehicle,
• a hand-held phone with a built-in antenna connected to a different antenna
mounted on the outside of the car or built into a separate package, or
• a headset with a remote antenna to a mobile phone carried at the waist.
Again, the scientific data do not demonstrate that mobile phones are harmful. But if
people are concerned about the radiofrequency energy from these products, taking
the simple precautions outlined above can reduce any possible risk.
Where can I find additional information?
For additional information, see the following websites:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) RF Safety Program (select
“Information on Human Exposure to RF Fields from Cellular and PCS Radio
Transmitters”): http://www.fcc.gov/oet/rfsafety
World Health Organization (WHO) International Commission on Non-Ionizing
Radiation Protection (select Qs & As): http://www.who.int/emf
United Kingdom, National Radiological Protection Board:
http://www.nrpb.org.uk
FDA Update for Mobile Phones
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117
FDA Update for Mobile Phones
1036b10a.book Page 118 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
118
Cellular Telecommunications Industry Association (CTIA):
http://www.wow-com.com
U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological
Health: http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/consumer/
1. Muscat et al. Epidemiological Study of Cellular Telephone Use and Malignant
Brain Tumors. In: State of the Science Symposium;1999 June 20; Long Beach,
California.
2. Tice et al. Tests of mobile phone signals for activity in genotoxicity and other
laboratory assays. In: Annual Meeting of the Environmental Mutagen Society;
March 29, 1999, Washington, D.C.; and personal communication, unpublished
results.
3. Preece, AW, Iwi, G, Davies-Smith, A, Wesnes, K, Butler, S, Lim, E, and Varey,
A. Effect of a 915-MHz simulated mobile phone signal on cognitive function in
man. Int. J. Radiat. Biol., April 8, 1999.
4. Hardell, L, Nasman, A, Pahlson, A, Hallquist, A and Mild, KH. Use of cellular
telephones and the risk for brain tumors: a case-control study. Int. J. Oncol., 15:
113-116, 1999
1036b10a.book Page 119 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
Motorola Limited Warranty
I.
•
What This Warranty Covers
Products. Defects in materials and workmanship in wireless cellular
telephones, pagers, and/or two-way radios, and certain accessories that are
sold with them, such as the battery, battery charger and holster manufactured
and/or sold by Motorola (Products).
•
Batteries. Defects in materials and workmanship in batteries that are
manufactured by Motorola and/or sold with Products are covered by this
warranty only if the fully-charged capacity falls below 80% of rated capacity or
they leak.
•
Software. Physical defects in the media that tangibly embodies each copy of
any software supplied with the Products.
II.
What the Period of Coverage Is
From the date the Products are purchased by the first end-user:
• Products. The warranty is for one year. Exception: The warranty for Spirit GT
series and Talkabout series two-way radio accessories is for 90 days.
•
Motorola Limited Warranty
Limited Warranty for Motorola Personal Communications
Products Purchased in the United States and Canada
Software. The warranty is for 90 days.
119
1036b10a.book Page 120 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
•
Repairs / Replacements. The warranty is for the balance of the original
warranty or for 90 days from the date you receive it, whichever is longer.
Motorola Limited Warranty
III. Who is Covered
This warranty extends to the first end-user purchaser, only.
120
IV. What We Will Do to Correct Warranty Problems
At no charge to you, we have the option to repair or replace the Products or
software that do not conform to the warranty, or to refund the Products’ purchase
price. We may use functionally equivalent reconditioned/refurbished/pre-owned or
new Products or parts. No software updates are provided.
V.
How to Get Warranty Service
Please call:
USA
Cellular
1-800-331-6456
Paging
1-800-548-9954
Two-Way 1-800-353-2729
TTY
1-888-390-6456
(Text Telephone)
Canada
All Products
TTY
1-800-461-4575
1-888-390-6456
(Text Telephone)
You will receive instructions on how to ship the Products to Motorola. You must ship
the Products to us with freight, duties and insurance prepaid. Along with the
Products you must include: (a) a copy of your receipt, bill of sale or other
comparable proof of purchase; (b) a written description of the problem; (c) the
name of your service provider (if this Product requires subscription service); (d) the
name and location of the installation facility (if applicable) and, most importantly; (e)
your address and telephone number. If requested, you must also return all
detachable parts such as antennas, batteries and chargers.
RETAIN YOUR ORIGINAL PROOF OF PURCHASE.
We will ship repaired or replacement Products at our expense for the freight and
insurance, but at your expense for any duties. If additional information is needed,
please contact us at the telephone number listed above.
VI. What This Warranty Does Not Cover
• Products that are operated in combination with ancillary or peripheral
equipment or software not furnished by Motorola for use with the Products
(“ancillary equipment”), or any damage to the Products or ancillary equipment
as a result of such use. Among other things, “ancillary equipment” includes
batteries, chargers, adaptors, and power supplies not manufactured or supplied
by Motorola. Any of these voids the warranty.
Motorola Limited Warranty
1036b10a.book Page 121 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
121
Motorola Limited Warranty
1036b10a.book Page 122 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
•
Someone other than Motorola (or its authorized service centers) tests, adjusts,
installs, maintains, alters, modifies or services the Products in any way. Any of
these voids the warranty.
•
Rechargeable batteries that: (a) are charged by other than the Motorolaapproved battery charger specified for charging such batteries; (b) have any
broken seals or show evidence of tampering; (c) are used in equipment other
than the Product for which they are specified; or (d) are charged and stored at
temperatures greater than 60 degrees centigrade. Any of these voids the
warranty.
•
Products that have: (a) serial numbers or date tags that have been removed,
altered or obliterated; (b) board serial numbers that do not match each other, or
board serial numbers that do not match the housing; or (c) nonconforming or
non-Motorola housings or parts. Any of these voids the warranty.
•
Defects or damage that result from: (a) use of the Products in a manner that is
not normal or customary; (b) improper operation or misuse; (c) accident or
neglect such as dropping the Products onto hard surfaces; (d) contact with
water, rain, extreme humidity or heavy perspiration; (e) contact with sand, dirt
or the like; or (f) contact with extreme heat, or spills of food or liquid.
•
Physical damage to the surface of the Products, including scratches, cracks or
other damage to a display screen, lens or other externally exposed parts.
•
Failure of Products that is due primarily to any communication service or signal
you may subscribe to or use with the Products.
122 •
Coil cords that are stretched or that have any broken modular tabs.
1036b10a.book Page 123 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
Products that are leased.
Flat-rate repair rates may apply to Products not covered by this warranty. To obtain
information about Products needing repairs that are not covered by this warranty,
please call the telephone number previously listed. We will provide information on
repair availability, rates, methods of payment, where to send the Products, etc.
VII. Some Other Limitations
This is Motorola’s complete warranty for the Products, and states your
exclusive remedies. This warranty is given in lieu of all other express
warranties. Implied warranties, including without limitation, the implied
warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose, are given
only if specifically required by applicable law. Otherwise, they are specifically
excluded.
No warranty is made as to coverage, availability, or grade of service provided
by the Products, whether through a service provider or otherwise.
No warranty is made that the software will meet your requirements or will
work in combination with any hardware or applications software products
provided by third parties, that the operation of the software products will be
uninterrupted or error free, or that all defects in the software products will be
corrected.
Motorola Limited Warranty
•
123
Motorola Limited Warranty
1036b10a.book Page 124 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
124
In no event shall Motorola be liable, whether in contract or tort (including
negligence) for damages in excess of the purchase price of the Product, or
for any indirect, incidental, special or consequential damages of any kind, or
loss of revenue or profits, loss of business, loss of information or data, or
other financial loss arising out of or in connection with the ability or inability
to use the Products, to the full extent these damages may be disclaimed by
law.
VIII. Patent and Software Provisions
At Motorola’s expense, we will defend you, and pay costs and damages that may be
finally awarded against you, to the extent that a lawsuit is based on a claim that the
Products directly infringe a United States patent. Our obligation is conditioned on:
(a) you notifying us promptly in writing when you receive notice of the claim; (b) you
giving us sole control of the defense of the suit and all negotiations for its settlement
or compromise; and (c) should the Products become, or in Motorola's opinion be
likely to become, the subject of a claim of infringement of a United States patent,
you permit us, at our option and expense, either to: procure for you the right to
continue using the Products; replace or modify them so that they become noninfringing; or grant you a credit for such Products, as depreciated, and accept their
return. The depreciation will be an equal amount per year over the lifetime of the
Products, as established by Motorola.
Motorola will have no liability to you with respect to any claim of patent infringement
that is based upon the combination of the Products or parts furnished under this
limited warranty with ancillary equipment, as defined in VI., above.
This is Motorola’s entire liability with respect to infringement of patents by the
Products.
Laws in the United States and other countries preserve for Motorola and other third
party software providers certain exclusive rights for copyrighted software, such as
the exclusive rights to reproduce in copies and distribute copies of such software.
The software may be copied into, used in and redistributed with only those Products
that are associated with such software. No other use, including without limitation,
disassembly or reverse engineering of such software or exercise of exclusive rights
in such software is permitted.
IX. State Law and Other Jurisdiction Rights
Some states and other jurisdictions do not allow the exclusion or limitation of
incidental or consequential damages, or limitation on the length of an implied
warranty, so the above limitations or exclusions may not apply to you.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights,
which vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.
Motorola Limited Warranty
1036b10a.book Page 125 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
125
Motorola Limited Warranty
1036b10a.book Page 126 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
126
To obtain information on Motorola Personal Communications Products, including
warranty service, accessories and optional Extended Warranties on selected
Products, please call:
USA
Canada
Cellular
1-800-331-6456
All Products 1-800-461-4575
Paging
1-800-548-9954
TTY
1-888-390-6456
Two-Way 1-800-353-2729
(Text Telephone)
TTY
1-888-390-6456
(Text Telephone)
To correspond with Motorola about the Products, please write us at
http://www.motorola.com or at:
In the USA:
Motorola, Inc.
600 North U.S. Highway 45
Libertyville, IL 60048
In Canada:
Motorola Canada Limited
5875 Whittle Road
Mississauga, ON L4Z 2H4
1036b10a.book Page 127 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
Patents
4,128,740
4,590,473
4,636,791
4,654,867
4,742,514
4,799,253
4,833,701
4,872,204
4,887,265
4,905,301
5,036,531
5,253,269
5,434,947
5,570,453
5,826,224
4,517,561
4,591,851
4,644,351
4,696,027
4,754,450
4,811,380
4,852,090
4,873,683
4,893,327
5,029,233
5,127,100
5,265,219
5,502,752
5,675,702
6,006,104
Patents
This Motorola product is manufactured under one or more Motorola U.S. patents.
Other U.S. patents for this product are pending.
127
1036b10a.book Page 128 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
Export Law Assurances
Export Law Assurances
128
This product is controlled under the export regulations of the United States of
America and Canada. The Governments of the United States of America and
Canada may restrict the exportation or re-exportation of this product to certain
destinations. For further information contact the U.S. Department of Commerce or
the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.
1036b10a.book Page 129 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
A
Access Internet ............................... 47
Accessories ................................... 100
Headset ..................................... 100
Holster ....................................... 100
Power Adapter .......................... 100
Adjust Ring Volume ........................ 75
Alarm Clock ..................................... 61
Available Networks ......................... 84
B
Backlight ......................................... 20
Battery ............................................. 15
Charging ..................................... 16
Installing ...................................... 15
Set Saving Mode ......................... 81
Show Meter ................................. 62
Buttons
Control .........................................17
C
Call Barring ......................................65
Call Charge Settings .......................90
Call Forwarding ...............................63
Call Meters
Lifetime Timer ..............................90
Set Audible Call Timers ...............88
Set In-Call Display .......................88
Show Call Charges ......................88
Show Call Timers ........................88
Call Meters Menu ............................87
Call Related Features ......................62
Call Voice Mail .................................67
Call Waiting .....................................65
Index
Index
129
Index
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Calls
Ending a Call ............................... 37
GSM Emergency ......................... 36
International ................................ 36
Receiving .................................... 37
Redialing Last Number ................ 37
Conference Calls ............................ 40
Add a Person .............................. 40
Starting ........................................ 40
Control Buttons ............................... 17
How to Use .................................. 31
D
Display ............................................ 19
130
E
End Active Call ................................ 39
End Current and Held Call .............. 40
End Held Call .................................. 39
Ending a Call ................................... 37
Expiry Period ...................................74
F
Fixed Dialing ....................................58
Setup ...........................................59
G
Games .............................................91
Baccarat ......................................93
Bricks ...........................................94
Towers of Hanoi ..........................91
H
Headset .........................................100
Hold Call ..........................................38
Holster ...........................................100
I
In-Call Menu ....................................37
International Phone Calls ................36
K
Keypad Tones
Setting ......................................... 82
L
Language Selection ........................ 81
Last Ten Calls ................................. 57
Lifetime Timer ................................. 90
M
Make a New Call ............................. 38
Making a Call .................................. 36
Master Clear ................................... 83
Master Reset ................................... 82
Menus
Call Meters .................................. 87
Extended ...............................23, 80
In-Call Menu ................................ 37
Main ............................................ 22
Messages .................................... 67
Navigation ....................................22
Quick Access ...............................95
Short ............................................23
Messages
Cell Broadcast .............................72
Message Editor ............................70
Outgoing ......................................69
Received ......................................67
Mobile Internet .................................47
Browser Menu .............................48
Ending the Session ......................52
Entering/Editing Text ...................49
Making and Receiving Calls ........50
Messages ....................................49
Setting Up ....................................50
Using the Soft Keys .....................48
My Phone Numbers .........................58
Index
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131
Index
1036b10a.book Page 132 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
N
Network
Registration ................................. 85
Search ......................................... 85
Selection ..................................... 84
Networks
Available ...................................... 84
Find New Network ....................... 87
Preferred ..................................... 86
O
One-Touch Dialing
Phone Book Numbers ................. 60
Setup ........................................... 60
P
Patents .......................................... 127
Pauses
Inserting into Phone Numbers ..... 54
132
Personal Numbers ...........................55
Prevent Access ............................57
Phone Book .....................................53
Last Ten Calls ..............................57
Personal Numbers .......................55
Voice Dialing ................................54
Phone Setup ....................................75
Adjust Contrast ............................79
Adjust Ring Volume .....................75
Battery Saving Mode ...................81
Change SIM PIN2 Code ..............79
Edit Music Tone ...........................76
Keypad Tones .............................82
Language Selection .....................81
Phone Lock ..................................78
Require SIM PIN ..........................79
Ring or Vibrate .............................75
Select Phone Line .......................75
1036b10a.book Page 133 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
Q
Quick Access Menu .........................95
Adding Location Numbers ...........96
Adding/Editing Voice Tags ..........96
Setup ...........................................78
R
Receiving a Call ..............................37
Reconnect .......................................39
Reconnect Held Call ........................39
Redialing the Last Number Called ...37
Reject Waiting Call ..........................42
Restrict ID on Next Call ...................63
Restrict My Number .........................38
Restrict My Phone Number .............62
S
Security Code
Changing .....................................80
Sending Email .................................35
Index
Set Alarm Ringer Tone ................ 76
Set Message Alert Tone .............. 76
Set Ringer Tone .......................... 75
Set Ringer Tone 2 ....................... 76
Set Time and Date ...................... 81
Set Time Format ......................... 81
Show Time and Date ................... 80
Unblocking Your V100 ................ 80
Phone Status .................................. 82
Master Clear ................................ 83
Master Reset ............................... 82
Status Review ............................. 82
Power Adapter .............................. 100
Preferred Networks ......................... 86
Add Network to List ..................... 86
Show List .................................... 86
133
Index
1036b10a.book Page 134 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
Service Center ................................ 74
Set Audible Call Timers .................. 88
Set In-Call Display .......................... 88
Show Call Charges ......................... 88
Show Call Timers ............................ 88
Show ID on Next Call ...................... 62
SIM Card ......................................... 15
Installing ...................................... 15
PIN .............................................. 21
Special Characters .......................... 98
Split Call .......................................... 41
T
Text Messages
Sending Email ............................. 35
Text Messaging ............................... 32
Reading a Text Message ............ 34
Sending a Text Message ............ 32
134
Time and Date
Setting .........................................81
Show ............................................80
Time Format
Setting .........................................81
Transfer Calls ..................................41
After Third Party is Connected ....41
Before Third Party is
Connected ....................41
Troubleshooting .............................101
Turn Mute On or Off ........................38
U
Unlock Code ....................................21
Entering .......................................21
V
Voice Activation ...............................43
From Phone Book Menu ..............46
Phone Book Entries .....................45
1036b10a.book Page 135 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
Index
Voice Dialing ................................... 54
Voice Mail Number .......................... 74
Voice Notes ..................................... 42
Playing Voice Notes .................... 71
Recording .................................... 42
Voice Tags
Adding to Phone Book ................ 44
6881036B10-A
135
Notes
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136
1036b10a.book Page 1 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
Wireless Phone Safety Tips
“Safety is your most important call!”
Your Motorola wireless telephone gives you the powerful ability to communicate by voice—almost anywhere,
anytime, wherever wireless phone service is available and safe conditions allow. But an important
responsibility accompanies the benefits of wireless phones, one that every user must uphold.
When driving a car, driving is your first responsibility. If you find it necessary to use your wireless phone while
behind the wheel of a car, practice good common sense and remember the following tips:
1. Get to know your Motorola wireless phone and its features such as speed dial and redial. If
available, these features help you to place your call without taking your attention off the road.
2. When available, use a hands-free device. If possible, add an additional layer of convenience to your
wireless phone with one of the many Motorola Original™ hands-free accessories available today.
3. Position your wireless phone within easy reach. Be able to access your wireless phone without
removing your eyes from the road. If you receive an incoming call at an inconvenient time, if possible, let
your voice mail answer it.
4. Let the person you are speaking with know you are driving; if necessary, suspend the call in
heavy traffic or hazardous weather conditions. Rain, sleet, snow, ice, and even heavy traffic can be
hazardous.
5. If you receive an incoming call at an inconvenient time do not take notes or look up phone
numbers while driving. Jotting down a “to do” list or going through your address book takes attention
away from your primary responsibility—driving safely.
6. Dial sensibly and assess the traffic; if possible, place calls when you are not moving or before
pulling into traffic. Try to plan calls when your car will be stationary. If you need to make a call while
moving, dial only a few numbers, check the road and your mirrors, then continue.
* Wherever wireless phone service is available.
1036b10a.book Page 2 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
7.
Do not engage in stressful or emotional conversations that may be distracting. Make people you
are talking with aware you are driving and suspend conversations which have the potential to divert your
attention away from the road.
8. Use your wireless phone to call for help. Dial 9-1-1 or other local emergency number in the case of
fire, traffic accident or medical emergencies.*
9. Use your wireless phone to help others in emergencies. If you see an auto accident, crime in
progress or other serious emergency where lives are in danger, call 9-1-1 or other local emergency
number, as you would want others to do for you.*
10. Call roadside assistance or a special non-emergency wireless assistance number when
necessary. If you see a broken-down vehicle posing no serious hazard, a broken traffic signal, a minor
traffic accident where no one appears injured, or a vehicle you know to be stolen, call roadside
assistance or other special non-emergency wireless number.*
Check the laws and regulations on the use of wireless telephones and their accessories in the areas
where you drive. Always obey them. The use of these devices may be prohibited or restricted in
certain areas.
For more information,
please call
1-888-901-SAFE
or visit the
CTIA Web site at
www.wow-com.com™
* Wherever wireless phone service is available.
1036b10a.book Page 3 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
1036b10a.book Page 4 Thursday, May 24, 2001 3:47 PM
8988485L46-O