User’s Guide
ADI-8 QS
The Professional’s Converter Solution
™
TotalRemote
™
FlexGain
I64 Option Slot
™
SteadyClock
™
™
SyncCheck
Professional 8-Channel AD/DA Converter
Reference Low Latency Conversion
8-Channel Analog <> AES / ADAT Interface
Optional 64-Channel MADI Interface
24 Bit / 192 kHz Digital Audio
MIDI Remote Control
Desktop Monitor Level Remote
AES-3
AES-10
24 Bit Interface
Important Safety Instructions ..................................4
General
1
2
3
4
Introduction ...............................................................6
Package Contents .....................................................6
Brief Description and Characteristics.....................6
First Usage – Quick Start
4.1 Controls - Connectors - Displays ............................7
4.2 Quick Start ..............................................................9
5
Accessories .............................................................10
6
Warranty...................................................................11
7
Appendix ..................................................................11
Usage and Operation
8
Front Panel Controls
8.1 Input .....................................................................14
8.2 Limiter...................................................................14
8.3 Input State ............................................................15
8.4 Meter ....................................................................15
8.5 Remote.................................................................15
8.6
Clock Section .......................................................15
8.7
Digital Input ..........................................................16
8.8
Output State .........................................................16
8.9 Set (Rotary Encoder) ...........................................16
8.10 Output...................................................................17
9
The Setup Menu
9.1 Exit .......................................................................17
9.2 Global Output Level .............................................17
9.3 Input Trim .............................................................18
9.4 Output Trim ..........................................................18
9.5 ID (Id) ...................................................................18
9.6 Bank (bA) .............................................................19
9.7 Auto ID (Au) .........................................................19
9.8 Delay Compensation (dC)....................................19
9.9 Follow Clock (FC).................................................20
9.10 Word Clock Out (Co)............................................20
9.11 Trim Enable (TE)..................................................21
9.12 Global Output Level Enable (GE) ........................21
9.13 Direct Level (dL)...................................................21
9.14 Effects (FX) ..........................................................21
9.15 Digital to Digital (dd).............................................22
9.16 Digital Patch Mode ...............................................23
9.17 Dark and Lock Keys .............................................24
10
Remote Control
10.1 Hardware Remote ................................................25
10.2 MIDI......................................................................25
10.3 MIDI over MADI....................................................25
10.4 Remote Control Software.....................................26
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
Inputs and Outputs
11
12
13
14
15
Analog Inputs / Outputs
11.1 Line In .................................................................. 30
11.2 Line Out ............................................................... 31
Digital Inputs / Outputs
12.1 AES / EBU ........................................................... 32
12.2 ADAT Optical ....................................................... 33
12.3 I64 MADI Card ..................................................... 34
12.4 Differences I64 MADI Card / ADI-642 ................. 35
Word Clock
13.1 Word Clock Input and Output .............................. 36
13.2 Technical Description and Background ............... 37
13.3 Cables and Termination....................................... 38
MIDI........................................................................... 39
Remote ..................................................................... 39
Technical Reference
16
Technical Specifications
16.1 Analog.................................................................. 42
16.2 Digital Inputs ........................................................ 43
16.3 Digital Outputs ..................................................... 44
16.4 Digital ................................................................... 44
16.5 MIDI ..................................................................... 44
16.6 General ................................................................ 45
16.7 Firmware .............................................................. 45
16.8 MADI User Bit Chart ............................................ 45
16.9 Connector Pinouts ............................................... 46
17
Technical Background
17.1 Terminology ......................................................... 48
17.2 Lock and SyncCheck ........................................... 49
17.3 Latency and Monitoring ....................................... 50
17.4 DS – Double Speed ............................................. 51
17.5 QS – Quad Speed ............................................... 51
17.6 AES/EBU – SPDIF............................................... 52
17.7 Signal to Noise ratio in DS / QS Operation.......... 53
17.8 MADI Basics ........................................................ 54
17.9 SteadyClock......................................................... 55
18
Block Diagram......................................................... 56
19
MIDI Implementation ADI-8 QS
19.1 Basic SysEx Format ............................................ 57
19.2 Message Types ................................................... 57
19.3 Table .................................................................... 58
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
3
Important Safety Instructions
ATTENTION! Do not open chassis – risk of electric shock
The unit has non-isolated live parts inside. No user serviceable parts inside.
Refer service to qualified service personnel.
Mains
• The device must be earthed – never use it without proper grounding
• Do not use defective power cords
• Operation of the device is limited to the manual
• Use same type of fuse only
To reduce the risk of fire or electric shock do not expose this device to rain or
moisture. Prevent moisture and water from entering the device. Never leave
a pot with liquid on top of the device. Do not use this product near water, i. e.
swimming pool, bathtub or wet basement. Danger of condensation inside –
don't turn on before the device has reached room temperature.
Installation
Surface may become hot during operation – ensure sufficient ventilation.
Avoid direct sun light and do not place it near other sources of heat, like radiators or stoves. When mounting in a rack, leave some space between this
device and others for ventilation.
Unauthorized servicing/repair voids warranty. Only use accessories
specified by the manufacturer.
Read the manual completely. It includes all information necessary
to use and operate this device.
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
User’s Guide
ADI-8 QS
General
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
5
1. Introduction
RME's ADI-8 QS is an 8-channel high-end AD/DA converter with a truly unique feature set. The
device combines excellent analog circuit design with the latest generation of outstanding low
latency AD/DA converter chips. Along with its integrated SteadyClock, the ADI-8 QS offers AD
and DA conversion of the highest quality.
When developing the ADI-8 QS we used all our experience, and also the experience of our
customers, to create a unique, excellent and high-quality unit. Although the ADI-8 QS is built to
highest reference standards, it still offers the typical, outstanding price/performance ratio known
from RME. ADI-8 QS features will excite you – but even more the performance and smartness
that it shows in solving any given task. Have fun!
2. Package Contents
Please check that your ADI-8 QS package contains each of the following:
•
•
•
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•
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ADI-8 QS
Power cord
Manual
RME Driver CD
1 optical cable (TOSLINK), 2 m
Desktop remote control
3. Brief Description and Characteristics
The ADI-8 QS is an 8-channel hi-end AD and DA converter in reference quality, fully remote
controllable. In a standard 19" box with 1 unit height the device offers numerous extraordinary
features like Intelligent Clock Control (ICC), SyncCheck®, SteadyClock, analog and digital Limiter, four hardware reference levels up to +24 dBu, AES/EBU and ADAT I/O, optional MADI I/O,
192 kHz sample rate, MIDI remote control, digital input and output trimming for full level calibration, calibration, volume control for all 8 analog outputs, either separately or globally, and a digital thru-mode.
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•
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6
8-channel AD converter, full symmetrical design, 117 dBA
8-channel DA converter, DC coupled design, double balanced output, 120 dBA
Low latency conversion: less than 12 samples delay
4 x AES/EBU I/O per D-sub, 8 channels @ 192 kHz
2 x ADAT I/O, 8 channels @ 96 kHz
Optional MADI I/O (I64 MADI Card)
Word clock input and output
MIDI I/O
Digital input/output trim over a range of 6 dB per I/O
AD-conversion includes switchable analog and digital Limiter
2 x 8-channel level meter with 7 LEDs per channel
Noise suppression on power-on and power-off at the analog outputs
Included Hardware remote for store/recall, volume and DIM
Fully remote controllable via MIDI and MADI
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
4. First Usage – Quick Start
4.1 Controls - Connectors - Displays
The front of the ADI-8 QS features 16 LED level meters, nine select keys, one rotary encoder,
and 30 LEDs providing a detailed status display.
The analog input sensitivity can be changed in the area INPUT. Choosing DIG with the select
key, the digital input signal is routed to the digital outputs, with the AD-conversion being deactivated.
The 8-channel LIMITER is available as analog (MODE ANA), digital (MODE DIG) or combined
(both LEDs lit) function.
The 8 level meter of the INPUT STATE
show the digital value (dBFS) of the
input level per channel. With activated
METER GR AUTO the amount of Gain
Reduction is shown in dB as soon as
the Limiter becomes active. METER PH
provides a Peak Hold function, either
permanently (ON) or switched off by
Auto Reset (AR) after 3 seconds.
When the Setup menu is active, the according parameter values are displayed in this level meter window.
REMOTE defines the source for MIDI remote control operation (Option Slot/MADI or DIN jack).
In the CLOCK SECTION the current clock reference and frequency multiplier is chosen.
The digital input signal of the DA-converters is chosen by pushing the DIGITAL INPUT button.
The 8 level meter of the OUTPUT STATE show
the digital input level per channel as digital value
(dBFS). METER PH provides a Peak Hold
function, either permanently (ON) or switched off
by Auto Reset (AR) after 3 seconds.
When the Setup menu is active, all available
options are displayed in this level meter window.
Pushing the knob SET activates the Setup
Menu. The rotary encoder is a highly intuitive
multifunctional device. It is used to set the trim values, the volume, and various options in the
Setup menu.
The key ANALOG OUT defines the analog reference level at the analog outputs. This level is
reached at full scale of the AD-converters, thus matching the front panel level meter's level indication.
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
7
The rear panel of the ADI-8 QS has eight analog inputs, eight analog outputs, mains power, a
connector for the included Hardware Remote, MIDI I/O, word clock I/O, the I64 Option Slot, and
all digital inputs and outputs (AES/ADAT).
ANALOG INPUTS: Eight balanced Line inputs, 1/4" TRS inputs and D-sub.
ANALOG OUTPUTS: Eight balanced Line outputs, 1/4" TRS outputs and D-sub.
AES I/O (25-pin D-sub): The D-sub connector provides four AES/EBU outputs (AD signals) and
four AES/EBU inputs (DA signals). The 25 pin D-sub connector is wired according to the widely
spread Tascam standard (pinout see chapter 16.9). The AES I/Os are transformer-coupled. The
high sensitivity type input accepts all common digital sources, even SPDIF.
ADAT I/O MAIN (TOSLINK): Standard ADAT optical port.
ADAT I/O AUX (TOSLINK): Transmits further channels at activated sample multiplexing.
WORD IN (BNC): A push switch allows to activate internal termination (75 Ohms).
WORD OUT (BNC): Standard word clock output.
MIDI I/O (5-pin DIN): MIDI input and output via 5-pin DIN jacks. Used to remote control the ADI8 QS, and – with installed MADI Card - to transmit MIDI data via MADI.
REMOTE (Mini DIN): Jack to connect the included Hardware Remote.
IEC receptacle for power connection. The specially developed, internal hi-performance switch
mode power supply lets the ADI-8 QS operate in the range of 100V to 240V AC. It is shortcircuit-proof, has an integrated line-filter, is fully regulated against voltage fluctuations, and suppresses mains interference.
With installed I64 MADI Card:
MADI I/O optical: Standard MADI ports.
MADI I/O coaxial (BNC): Standard MADI ports.
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
4.2 Quick Start
After connection of all cables and power-on of the device, the configuration of the ADI-8 QS
begins in the CLOCK section. Choose a clock source and a sample rate.
Connect the TRS-jacks or the D-sub connector with the analog signal source. Change the input
sensitivity by pressing INPUT until the input level is sufficient to avoid noisy operation. Try to
achieve an optimum input level by adjusting the source itself. Raise the source’s output level
until the red Over LED flashes at the loudest parts of the signal, then reduce the level a bit until
no more overs are detected.
The analog line inputs of the ADI-8 QS can be accessed by using D-sub (for an optional XLR
multicore) and 1/4" TRS jacks. Both are internally connected, so not operational at the same
time. The electronic input stage is built in a servo balanced design which handles unbalanced
(mono TS) and balanced (XLR, stereo TRS jacks) correctly, automatically adjusting the level
reference.
When switched on for the first time the ADI-8 DS starts in a default mode which should be suitable for most applications:
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•
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AD/DA conversion in master mode (CLOCK INTERNAL)
Sample rate 48 kHz
Input ADAT optical
Level reference +19 dBu
On the DA-side just choose the desired digital input by pressing DIGITAL INPUT. A coarse
correction of the analog output level can be done by pressing the OUTPUT button.
The ADI-8 QS stores all current settings and automatically activates them when the device is
turned on.
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
9
5. Accessories
RME offers several optional components for the ADI-8 QS:
Part Number
Description
OK0050
OK0100
OK0200
OK0300
OK0500
OK1000
Optical cable, Toslink, 0.5 m (1.7 ft)
Optical cable, Toslink, 1 m (3.3 ft)
Optical cable, Toslink, 2 m (6.6 ft)
Optical cable, Toslink, 3 m (9.9 ft)
Optical cable, Toslink, 5 m 16.4 ft)
Optical cable, Toslink, 10 m (32.8 ft)
BO25MXLR4M4F1PRO Digital Breakout Cable Pro, AES/EBU
25-pin D-sub to 4 x XLR male + 4 x XLR female, 1m (3.3 ft)
BO25MXLR4M4F3PRO same, 3 m (9.9 ft)
BO25MXLR4M4F6PRO same, 6 m (19.8 ft)
BO25M25M1PRO
Digital D-sub Cable Pro, AES/EBU,
25-pin D-sub to 25-pin D-sub, 1m (3.3 ft)
BO25M25M3PRO
same, 3m (9.9 ft)
BO25M25M6PRO
same, 6m (19.8 ft)
BO25MXLR8M3
Analog Breakout Cable, 25-pin D-sub to 8 x XLR male, 3 m (9.9 ft)
BO25MXLR8M6
same, 6 m (19.8 ft)
BO25MXLR8M10
same, 10 m (33 ft)
BO25MXLR8F3
Analog Breakout Cable 25-pin D-sub to 8 x XLR female, 3 m (9.9 ft)
BO25MXLR8F6
same, 6 m (19.8 ft)
BO25MXLR8F10
same, 10 m (33 ft)
I64 MADI Card
MADI module featuring thru-input, Delay Compensation, Auto ID, MIDI
over MADI, remote via MADI
BOB32
BOB-32, Universal breakout box, 19" 1 Unit height. The professional
digital AES/EBU breakout solution
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
6. Warranty
Each individual ADI-8 QS undergoes comprehensive quality control and a complete test at IMM
before shipping. The usage of high grade components allows us to offer a full two year warranty. We accept a copy of the sales receipt as valid warranty legitimation.
If you suspect that your product is faulty, please contact your local retailer.
Audio AG grants a limited manufacturer warranty of 6 months from the day of invoice showing
the date of sale. The length of the warranty period is different per country. Please contact your
local distributor for extended warranty information and service. Note that each country may
have regional specific warranty implications.
In any case warranty does not cover damage caused by improper installation or maltreatment replacement or repair in such cases can only be carried out at the owner's expense.
No warranty service is provided when the product is not returned to the local distributor in the
region where the product had been originally shipped.
Audio AG does not accept claims for damages of any kind, especially consequential damage.
Liability is limited to the value of the ADI-8 QS. The general terms of business drawn up by Audio AG apply at all times.
7. Appendix
RME news and further information can be found on our website:
http://www.rme-audio.com
Distributor: Audio AG, Am Pfanderling 60, D-85778 Haimhausen, Tel.: (49) 08133 / 918170
Manufacturer:
IMM Elektronik GmbH, Leipziger Strasse 32, D-09648 Mittweida
Trademarks
All trademarks and registered trademarks belong to their respective owners. RME, Hammerfall
and DIGICheck are registered trademarks of RME Intelligent Audio Solutions. SyncAlign, TotalGain, SyncCheck, ZLM, SteadyClock, ADI-8 QS, I64 Option Slot, I64 MADI Card and Intelligent Clock Control (ICC) are trademarks of RME Intelligent Audio Solutions. Alesis and ADAT
are registered trademarks of Alesis Corp. ADAT optical is a trademark of Alesis Corp. S/MUX is
copyright Sonorus. Digidesign and Pro Tools are trademarks or registered trademarks of Avid
Technology, Inc.
Copyright © Matthias Carstens, 04/2014. Version 1.4
Although the contents of this User’s Guide have been thoroughly checked for errors, RME can
not guarantee that it is correct throughout. RME does not accept responsibility for any misleading or incorrect information within this guide. Lending or copying any part of the guide or the
RME Driver CD, or any commercial exploitation of these media without express written permission from RME Intelligent Audio Solutions is prohibited. RME reserves the right to change
specifications at any time without notice.
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
11
CE / FCC Compliance
CE
This device has been tested and found to comply with the limits of the European Council Directive on the approximation of the laws of the member states relating to electromagnetic compatibility according to RL89/336/EWG and RL73/23/EWG.
FCC
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment.
This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed
and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his own expense.
RoHS
This product has been soldered lead-free and fulfills the requirements of the RoHS directive.
ISO 9001
This product has been manufactured under ISO 9001 quality management. The manufacturer,
IMM Elektronik GmbH, is also certified for ISO 14001 (Environment) and ISO 13485 (medical
devices).
Note on Disposal
According to the guide line RL2002/96/EG (WEEE – Directive on Waste
Electrical and Electronic Equipment), valid for all european countries, this
product has to be recycled at the end of its lifetime.
In case a disposal of electronic waste is not possible, the recycling can
also be done by IMM Elektronik GmbH, the manufacturer of the ADI-8
QS.
For this the device has to be sent free to the door to:
IMM Elektronik GmbH
Leipziger Straße 32
D-09648 Mittweida
Germany
Shipments not prepaid will be rejected and returned on the original sender's costs.
The included hardware remote is a product of RME Trading Ltd., Hong Kong. In case a disposal
of electronic waste is not possible, the recycling can be done by Audio AG. For this the device
has to be sent free to the door to:
Audio AG
Am Pfanderling 60
D-85778 Haimhausen
Germany
Shipments not prepaid will be rejected and returned on the original sender's costs.
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
User’s Guide
ADI-8 QS
Usage and Operation
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
13
8. Front Panel Controls
8.1 Input
In the INPUT area, the select key causes a change of the analog input
sensitivity, referenced to digital full scale level (0 dBFS) of the ADconverters. The choices are: +4.2 dBu (-10 dBV compatible), +13 dBu,
+19 dBu and +24 dBu. As the adaptation is performed in the analog domain, the ADI-8 QS achieves the highest possible values for Signal to
Noise ratio and distortion in any setting.
After selecting DIG, the digital input signal is routed to the digital outputs, with the ADconversion being deactivated. The level meters now show the level of the digital input signal.
8.2 Limiter
The LIMITER is available as analog function (MODE ANA), digital function (MODE DIG), or
combined (both LEDs lit).
Analog Limiter
For the ADI-8 QS, RME developed a new fully symmetrical circuit design with
digitally controlled release time. While the analog limiter is constantly within
the signal path, it operates fully transparent as long as there is no control signal generated, so does not cause noise or distortion. This special feature
made it possible to define a threshold of +3 dB in deactivated mode, preventing an overload of more than 3 dB of the AD-converters. This avoids not only
extreme overload effects, but also prevents the AD-converters from being
damaged.
Both the fully symmetrical design and the digitally controlled release time contribute to the reduction of the unavoidable distortion of a peak limiter (linearity errors of the control elements,
generation of the control voltage). The distortion value of about 0.3% stays the same at any
level and any frequency.
Another exceptional feature is the ability to handle extremely high levels. At the level references
+24 dBu, +19 dBu and +13 dBu up to +30 dBu can be fed, the signal is still limited correctly (-3
dBFS), THD is still 0.3%. At the setting +4.2 dBu the maximum unclipped input level is +24 dBu.
So there is more than 20 dB overload possible!
Note: As with all such basic designs, increasing dynamic ratio and gain reduction causes audible pumping effects.
Digital Limiter
The digital limiter is a non linear compressor. The input signal is processed with a special amplitude function. The resulting third order harmonics are widely masked by the original signal.
The digital limiter allows for additional headroom of up to 5 dB without audible clipping (clipping:
brickwall limiting leading to high distortion). It also allows for an increase of the loudness without
increasing the maximum peak level, similar to the effect known as Maximizer. Unlike the analog
limiter there is no attack and release time and therefore no pumping effects.
The strength of the limiter effect can be adjusted in the Setup menu in steps of 1.5, 3, 4 and 5
dB, indicating the maximum level or loudness gain (chapter 9.14).
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
8.3 Input State
The 8 level meter of the INPUT STATE show the digital value (dBFS) of the input level per
channel. The level data incorporate Input Trim and Digital Limiter. The red LED OVR is lit 0.2
dB before full scale level (-0.2 dBFS).
With activated METER GR AUTO the amount of Gain Reduction is shown in dB as bar from top
to bottom, as soon as the Limiter becomes active. In case of overload a display is even performed when the Limiter has not been activated, because the Limiter is indeed always active,
operating at a threshold of +3 dB.
When the Setup menu is active, the according parameter values are displayed in this level meter window.
8.4 Meter
METER PH provides a Peak Hold function for all level meters, either
permanently (ON) or switched off by Auto Reset (AR) after 3 seconds.
In mode ON, a reset (erasing the current peak values) is issued by a
single push of the PH button. The function itself is not changed.
8.5 Remote
REMOTE defines the source of MIDI remote control commands. Choices are
the MIDI DIN jack, AES1 and the MADI input of the I64 MADI Card (Option Slot).
Note: Via MIDI remote control, all front panel controls can be locked (Lock
Keys). An exception is the REMOTE key. In the Off state (no LED lit) Lock Keys
is deactivated. Therefore a locking of all the controls can be revoked directly at
the unit at any time.
8.6 Clock Section
The source and frequency of the unit's clock is configured in the CLOCK SECTION. The button
CLOCK lets you step through the options external clock (Word, ADAT, AES, Option = MADI)
and internal clock, and sets the sample rate for both an external and the internal clock.
WCK, AES, OPTN (Slave Mode)
Defines the corresponding input as clock reference. A missing or invalid clock source signal is
indicated by flashing of the corresponding LED.
INT (Master Mode)
Activates the internal clock.
With a setting of INT (internal clock) it is mandatory that the clock rate of the sources is
synchronous to the ADI-8 QS. Therefore the external device has to be synchronized to the
ADI-8 QS word clock output or AES/ADAT/MADI output.
The ADI-8 QS thus has to be master, all devices connected to it must be slave. In order to avoid
clicks and drop outs due to faulty or missing synchronicity, a special process called SyncCheck
compares the incoming data and the ADI-8 QS internal clock. The SYNC state is indicated by a
flashing (error) or turned off (OK) LED.
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
15
44.1, 48
Activates the internal clock at 44.1 kHz or 48 kHz.
DS, QS
With the DS LED additionally lit, the sample rate will be 88.2 or 96 kHz, with QS lit it will be
176.4 or 192 kHz.
A selection of DS and QS is also possible when using
external clock (Slave). If the ADI-8 QS should operate
at 192 kHz, but receives a synchronous word clock of
48 kHz, the button STATE allows to activate DS or QS
mode. This way, AD-conversion and digital outputs are
configured to operate in the frequency ranges Single
Speed, Double Speed or Quad Speed.
Single Speed
All outputs carry a signal in the range of 32 kHz up to 48 kHz.
DS (Double Speed)
The AES outputs 1-8 carry a signal in the range of 64 kHz up to 96 kHz. ADAT and MADI stay
at no higher than 48 kHz, with the data transmitted in the S/MUX format.
QS (Quad Speed)
The AES outputs 1-8 carry a signal in the range of 176.4 kHz up to 192 kHz. ADAT and MADI
stay at no higher than 48 kHz, with the data transmitted in the S/MUX4 format. Therefore ADAT
is limited to 4 channels (2 per optical output) in this mode.
8.7 Digital Input
The key DIGITAL INPUT defines the signal source of the DAconverters. This is also true for the mode Digital to Digital, where the
chosen digital input signal is sent directly to the digital outputs.
Each input has its own SYNC LED. If a valid input signal is applied,
SyncCheck is active automatically. SyncCheck takes the chosen clock
(internal, external, etc.) as reference and compares it with the input
clocks. Inputs which are not synchronous will be signalled by flashing of
the corresponding SYNC LED.
8.8 Output State
The 8 level meter of the OUTPUT STATE show the digital input level per channel as digital
value (dBFS). The display incorporates the settings of Global Output Level and Output Trim.
Therefore overloads of the DA-converters will always be displayed.
When the Setup menu is active, all available options are displayed in this level meter window.
8.9 Set (Rotary Encoder)
The rotary encoder is a highly intuitive multifunctional device. It is used to set
the trim values, the volume, and various options in the Setup menu.
Pushing the knob SET activates the Setup menu. Within the Setup menu a
push on SET changes between left and right window.
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
8.10 Output
In the OUTPUT area, the select key causes a change of the analog output
level, referenced to digital full scale level (0 dBFS) of the DA-converters.
The choices are: +4.2 dBu (-10 dBV compatible), +13 dBu, +19 dBu and
+24 dBu. As the adaptation is performed in the analog domain, the ADI-8
QS achieves the highest possible values for Signal to Noise ratio and distortion ratio in any setting.
9. The Setup Menu
Some options and settings are seldom accessed and changed. These have been collected in
the Setup menu. The Setup menu is entered by pushing the rotary encoder (SET) in both level
meter windows. The right window shows all the options, the left window is used to configure
them. In the currently active window all red LEDs are lit, similar to a cursor function.
The setup procedure is run as follows:
• Push SET one time. The level display vanishes, the cursor marks the right window.
• Turn SET left or right until the desired option shows up, for example Digital to Digital, shown
as the letters d d.
• Push SET one time. The cursor jumps to the left window.
• Turn SET left or right until the desired parameter value shows up. In this example, d d can
be activated (check symbol) or deactivated (no check symbol).
• Push SET one time to return to the options in the right window, or simply wait for 6 seconds.
The last setting stays valid, the setup menu is left, and the level meters work again.
9.1 Exit
The Setup menu is exit automatically when no entries are received for
about 6 seconds. A quicker is to use the option Exit. Selecting the
arrow in the left window will exit the Setup menu immediately. All settings performed before are stored and stay valid.
9.2 Global Output Level
Ganged setting of all 8 analog output levels simultaneously. This
function provides a global volume control, which is indispensable
when doing surround monitoring. The included remote control box
directly uses this function.
The level attenuation is calculated and performed in the digital domain. When using higher attenuation settings most of the time, the hardware output level (OUTPUT) should be changed to
a lower setting to utilize the whole dynamic range of the DA-converters as much as possible.
There are 48 steps from 0 dB (no attenuation) down to -96 dB available. Each step is shown as
one LED in the left window. The more LEDs light up, the higher is the output level. At 0 dB attenuation all 48 LEDs are lit. In the range of 0 db down to –20 dB the attenuation takes place in
steps of 1 dB.
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17
When all LEDs of a column are turned off, the corresponding attenuation is:
Channel 8
Channel 7
Channel 6
-6 dB
-12 dB
-18 dB
Channel 5
Channel 4
Channel 3
-28 dB
-40 dB
-54 dB
Channel 2
No LED
-78 dB
Mute
When changing the Global Output Level the individual settings of Output Trim are maintained.
So the gain of all channels can be increased or decreased without them loosing their level relations.
9.3 Input Trim
Default: 0 dB
Available settings: 0 up to +6 dB in steps of 0.5 dB
Additionally to the four hardware-based reference levels a digital amplification of up to +6 dB
can be applied to any input channel. This allows for an individual and separate level calibration
of the AD-conversion. At the same time the ADI-8 QS is provided with a near stepless input
sensitivity from +7 dBu up to +24 dBu, adjustable in steps of 0.5 dB.
Naturally the digital amplification reduces the signal to noise ratio according to the current gain.
At +6 dB the maximum SNR of 114 dB is reduced to 108 dB.
9.4 Output Trim
Default: 0 dB
Available settings: -6 dB up to +6 dB, in steps of 0.5 dB
Additionally to the four hardware-based reference levels a digital gain change of +/- 6 dB can be
applied to any output channel. This allows for an individual and separate level calibration of the
DA-converter outputs, as required in a surround monitoring setup.
With a full scale signal (0 dBFS) positive values cause an overload of the DA-converter, but this
is clearly shown on the output level meter. Using the ADI-8 QS as converter for surround monitoring, overloads are usually no issue. The typical operation range of the volume control is
about -6 and -12 dB. With this there is enough headroom available for an amplification of up to
6 dB.
9.5 ID (Id)
Default: 1
Available settings: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
To remote control more than one ADI-8 QS each device can have its own ID, providing a separated remote control of multiple devices via a single MIDI channel.
I64 MADI Card: The ID defines the 8-channel group within the MADI signal that is used to insert
the device's audio data:
ID 1: channels 1-8
ID 2: channels 9-16
ID 3: channels 17-24
18
ID 4: channels 25-32
ID 5: channels 33-40
ID 6: channels 41-48
ID 7: channels 49-56
ID 8: channels 57-64
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
When several ADI-8 QS, Micstasy or ADI-642 are connected via MADI, Auto ID normally takes
care of the channel assignment (see chapter 9.7, Auto ID). In special cases, it may be desirable
to set the ID manually, e.g. if the first device in a MADI chain does not support the Auto ID
mode, or if a group of eight channels needs to be routed or processed in a particular way.
With activated mode Digital to Digital ID also defines which MADI channels are sent to the
ADAT/AES outputs, see chapter 9.15.
When the ADI-8 QS is in mode Auto ID Slave, the automatically given ID is displayed by a single red LED lit, replacing the cursor display (all red LEDs lit). A manual setting of the ID is still
possible, but is not active during slave mode.
9.6 Bank (bA)
Default: 1
Available settings: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
To remote control more than one ADI-8 QS each device can have its own ID, providing a separated remote control of multiple devices via a single MIDI channel (chapter 9.5). Additionally But
there are not only 8 IDs, but 8 banks of 8 IDs each available.
9.7 Auto ID (Au)
Default: Off
Available settings: On, Off
This option relates to the use of the I64 MADI Card. Multiple ADI-8
QS (and Micstasy, ADI-642, OctaMic XTC, see chapter 12.3)
connected serially can assign consecutive IDs to themselves (see
chapter 9.5). At the first device in the chain Auto ID is set to On (see
picture to the left), all other devices automatically turn into slaves.
9.8 Delay Compensation (dC)
Default: Off
Available settings: On, Off
This option relates to the use of the I64 MADI Card. When multiple devices are connected serially, the MADI I/O of each ADI-8 QS causes a delay of 3 samples. Therefore at the MADI output
of the last device, the data of all previous devices are delayed. At Double Speed the delay rises
to 6 samples per unit, at Quad Speed to 12 samples.
The problem of this offset is solved by the function Delay Compensation. It delays the signals in
a way that they are sample-synchronous in multi-device operation.
Attention: Delay Compensation has to be activated manually in each unit!
The following table lists the delay in samples from two up to eight units connected serially.
When using four units, the data of the first unit are delayed by 9 samples to the last unit, the
units 2 and 3 are delayed by 6 and 3 samples respectively. At Double Speed and Quad Speed
the values rise. Please note that in Double Speed no more than four, in Quad Speed no more
than two ADI-8 QS can be used serially with MADI.
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19
Units
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Delay
3
6
9
12
15
18
21
Delay DS
6
12
18
-
Delay QS
12
-
DC
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
DC DS
18
18
18
-
DC QS
12
-
21 samples @ 48 kHz
equal 437 µs.
18 samples @ 96 kHz
equal 187 µs.
12 samples @ 192
kHz equal 62.5 µs.
As shown in the table, activating DC causes a constant delay of 21 samples in Single Speed,
no matter how many devices are connected serially. In Double Speed the delay is 18, in Quad
Speed 12 samples. The in most cases slightly increased delay is outweighed by the big advantage of sample-aligned I/Os when using multiple units.
Delay Compensation always uses the worst case, the operation of 8 units, but delays the signals individually. The amount of the respective delay is solely derived from the current ID, no
matter if it has been assigned manually or by Auto ID.
9.9 Follow Clock (FC)
Default: Off
Available settings: On, Off
The signal at the word clock or AES input can be Single, Double or Quad Speed, the ADI-8 QS
can use it in any case, independent of its current clock range. When activating the option Follow
Clock the ADI-8 QS follows the input clock 1:1. At 96 kHz the DS LED will light up automatically,
at 192 kHz the QS LED. This function is automatically deactivated for the I64 MADI Card and
the ADAT input, as it is not possible to detect the sample rate range automatically.
9.10 Word Clock Out (Co)
Default: FS
Available settings: Si, FS
Si stands for Always Single Speed, FS for the current sample rate or Follow Sample rate. In
default state (FS) the word clock output follows the current sample rate up to 192 kHz. Selecting
Si causes the word clock output to always stay within the range of 32 kHz to 48 kHz. So at 96
kHz and 192 kHz sample rate, the output word clock is 48 kHz.
Note: A reliable sample-accurate synchronicity between multiple devices having digital interfaces in S/MUX technology (ADAT and MADI*) at sample rates in the Double Speed and Quad
Speed range is only possible when all units are synced by Single Speed word clock. Because of
the S/MUX method the device else can not know which of the incoming 2 (DS) or 4 (QS) word
clock edges is the right one.
* With the ADI-8 QS this limitation is also valid for the AES output, as the device internally handles all the data streams
in S/MUX mode.
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
9.11 Trim Enable (TE)
Default: On
Available settings: On, Off
The settings of the level calibration per channel, Input Trim and Output Trim (see chapter 9.3
and 9.4), can be deactivated globally. The gain is then set to 0 dB. The individual settings are
not lost, changing between the calibrated (On) and the linear setting (Off) is possible back and
forth anytime.
9.12 Global Output Level Enable (GE)
Default: On
Available settings: On, Off
With the volume control deactivated the gain is fixed to 0 dB. Even if Direct Level is activated
SET can not be used to change the volume.
Note: This setting is also valid for the included remote control box.
9.13 Direct Level (dL)
Default: Off
Available settings: On, Off
When Direct Level is activated, turning the rotary encoder immediately changes the global output level, in the same way as the included Hardware Remote. This option provides a comfortable setting of the volume at the unit, without the need to enter the according Setup menu first.
At each change the level meters are shortly switched off, displaying the current gain value instead.
Note: The included Hardware Remote is operational even when Direct Level is deactivated.
9.14 Effects (FX)
Default: 5
Available settings: 1.5, 3, 4, 5 dB
The digital limiter can be adjusted in four steps. The left LED display
shows the I/O ratio curve of a limiter. The picture to the left shows the
setting 1.5 dB, having the smallest effect. At 5 dB the curve is more
horizontal, indicating a stronger influence on the input signal.
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21
9.15 Digital to Digital (dd)
Default: Direct
Available settings: Direct, Effects
The function Digital to Digital can operate in two ways. In mode Direct the digital input signal is
sent with bit-accuracy to the digital outputs. In mode Effects the digital input signal is first processed by the digital settings Output Trim and Global Level, then by the Input Trim settings, then
– when activated – by the digital limiter, before finally reaching the digital outputs. The block
diagrams show the signal flow for both modes.
Digital to Digital - Direct
Digital to Digital - Effects
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
9.16 Digital Patch Mode
The symbol o stands for the Option Slot, MADI, and will appear only when the ADI-8 QS has a
firmware 3.0 or higher, and is equipped with an i64 MADI card with two Sync LEDs (since late
2011). Then a digital patch mode is available, where up to 12 different outputs can be freely
assigned to up to 12 inputs.
The number 12 is a result of dividing all inputs and outputs into 8-channel blocks:
An
Analog, channels 1-8
AS
AES, channels 1-8
.A
.A
ADAT Main, channels 1-8
ADAT Aux, channels 1-8
o (1)
o (2)
o (3)
o (4)
o (5)
o (6)
o (7)
o (8)
MADI channels 1-8
MADI channels 9-16
MADI channels 17-24
MADI channels 25-32
MADI channels 33-40
MADI channels 41-48
MADI channels 49-56
MADI channels 57-64
The bottom LED signals the current 8-channel output block. One input channel block can then
be assigned to the current output block via the left LED display where all the above options are
available as input choice. The MADI output signal can therefore be freely rebuilt from the ADI-8
QS’ up to 12 input blocks.
The digital patch mode is available for all hardware outputs. Further turning the encoder will
make the analog outputs, ADAT 1 (Main) and ADAT 2 (Aux) as well as AES/EBU (same symbols as on the left) appear on the right side. Each of these output blocks can have one of the
input blocks assigned to.
With this the QS can serve as converter from ADAT to AES and/or AES to ADAT. It can pass
through ADAT to ADAT, with simultaneous analog monitoring, sort MADI channel blocks freely
or convert these to different formats, insert ADAT and/or AES into MADI, serve as MADI breakout box, and much more.
To activate or deactivate the Digital Patch Mode press and hold the key DIGITAL INPUT for 4
seconds. If active all LEDs of the DIGITAL INPUT section are lit constantly (valid input signal) or
flash (none or not synchronous). The ADI-8 QS stores all settings of the routings.
The block diagram on the next page again shows the output-related selection of the available
inputs, the division into blocks 1 to 7 (MADI blocks 8 to 12 are not shown for better overview),
and that the digital patch mode does not offer fully free channel-wise routing or mixing.
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23
9.17 Dark and Lock Keys (dK)
Default: Off
Available settings: On, Off
Turns off all LEDs after a few seconds (stage mode), and disables all buttons and the encoder
(lock keys mode). To temporarily reactivate all LEDs and controls press any button for 3 seconds.
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
10. Remote Control
10.1 Hardware Remote
The included Hardware Remote offers direct access to the most important functions needed in
a typical DAW workplace:
•
•
•
•
Turning the big knob changes the volume (Global Output Level)
Pushing the big knob activates DIM (Global Output Level -20 dB)
Pushing the PROG button for 2 seconds stores the current level setting
After changing the volume, RECALL sets the stored level value again
Note: The Hardware Remote uses the function Global Output Level, see chapter 9.2. The volume can not be changed if this option is deactivated in the Setup menu.
10.2 MIDI
The ADI-8 QS can be completely remote controlled via MIDI. It reacts on special SysEx commands. Furthermore, upon request it will report the complete device status, including all controls and LEDs on the front plate. Each ADI-8 QS can be programmed with its own ID, providing
a separated remote control of multiple devices via a single MIDI channel. A description of the
MIDI implementation is found in chapter 19.
The button REMOTE is used to select the source of the MIDI remote control commands: MIDI
port, MADI port and Off. The latter is a safety function to prevent any setup-change by any MIDI
signal.
With an installed I64 MADI Card the ADI-8 QS can also be remote controlled via MADI. Status
information of the unit is sent to all outputs simultaneously. With an installed I64 MADI Card this
includes embedded information at the MADI outputs (see 15.2, MIDI over MADI).
The diagram shows the signal flow of
the MIDI data with all I/Os. The MIDI
input signal reaches both the internal
Remote Command Processor and the
MIDI outputs. This MIDI Through function provides the base for a simplified
serial MIDI cabling when using multiple ADI-8 QS. The same is true for
remote control via MADI, where MIDI
is passed through from device to device automatically via the serial MADI
cabling.
10.3 MIDI over MADI
MADI allows for a transmission of 64 audio channels over long distances with a single line –
perfect. So what about MIDI? Be it remote control commands or sequencer data, in practice
only a single MADI line will not suffice. Therefore RME developed a MIDI over MADI technology. The data at the MIDI input are being included into the MADI signal invisibly, and can be
collected at the MIDI output of another ADI-8 QS, ADI-6432, ADI-642, ADI-648, Micstasy or a
HDSP MADI, at the other end of the MADI line.
Technically every single MADI channel includes several additional bits, containing various information (Channel Status). RME uses the usually unused User bit of channel 56 (channel 28 in
96k frame mode) to transmit MIDI data invisibly within MADI, ensuring full compatibility.
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25
Unlike other MADI-based devices from RME, the ADI-8 QS is no bi-directional MIDI to
MADI converter, because only one direction is available for the transmission.
The block diagram shows the signal flow
in a HDSP MADI-based remote control
system. MIDI commands from a software
on PC or Mac travel from the MADI Out
of the HDSP MADI to the MADI In as well
as to the MIDI Out and MADI Out of the
ADI-8 QS.
Additional to the remote commands further MIDI data can be transmitted, available then at the DIN MIDI output jack of
the ADI-8 QS. However, MIDI signals at
the DIN input jack can not travel back to
the computer. With input setting MIDI the
other direction is active. MIDI data travel
from the MADI out to the computer, but
not back from the computer via MADI to
the ADI-8 QS.
10.4 Remote Control Software
A software can be downloaded for free from the RME website. It can use any existing MIDI port
within the system to perform remote control and status requests of any number of ADI-8 QS via
a simple mouse click. Most appealing is the combination with a HDSP MADI (PCI card), offering
a direct control of the ADI-8 QS via MADI. The remote control software then uses a virtual MIDI
port of the card (port 3), which directly sends and receives MIDI data via MADI.
Software download: http://www.rme-audio.de, Downloads, MIDI Remote
Brief description of the Software ADI-8 QS MIDI Remote for Windows and Mac OS
The unique multi-window concept of the software MIDI Remote allows for a simultaneous usage
and configuration not only of multiple ADI-8 QS, but also of all other supported devices, even in
mixed setups. The function ADI-8 QS has been extended compared to the unit. All settings of
the Setup menu are directly accessible, the gain reduction is shown on separate meters etc.
Names can be assigned to all channels and all devices.
The program includes an extensive english online help (F1). After the start first choose the function ADI-8 QS in the menu Functions (also available via F4).
Then select a MIDI input and output via Options - MIDI I/O Setup.
Using the command Options – Start/Stop MIDI I/O the communication with the ADI-8 QS is
started. The top line of the program window shows the current state, like selected ID, Online /
No Response / Offline etc.
Save Workspace as allows to store complete setups including all windows in a file, and to reload them at any time.
Send Single Set of Data allows an offline configuration of the ADI-8 QS, and uses a single
one-time transmission of all settings.
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
Via MIDI remote control, all front panel controls of the ADI-8 QS can be locked (Lock Keys). An
exception is the REMOTE key. In Off-state Lock Keys is deactivated. Therefore a locking of all
the controls can be revoked directly at the unit at any time.
The new Digital Patch Mode will
be supported (configuration and
saving of setups) soon in an
updated
version
of
MIDI
Remote. The Digital Patch
Mode is already now remote
controlable, see the table of
MIDI commands in chapter 19.3
of this manual.
The software MIDI Remote also
controls RME's ADI-648, ADI6432,
ADI-642,
Micstasy,
OctaMic XTC, the complete Mseries and the MADI Bridge.
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User’s Guide
ADI-8 QS
Inputs and Outputs
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
29
11. Analog Inputs / Outputs
11.1 Line In
The ADI-8 QS rear has 8 balanced Line inputs, provided by 1/4"
TRS and a 25-pin D-sub connector. Both are internally connected,
so can not be used at the same time. The electronic input stage is
built in a servo balanced design which handles unbalanced (mono
jacks) and balanced (XLR, stereo jacks) signals correctly, automatically adjusting the level reference.
When using unbalanced cables with XLR or TRS connectors be
sure to connect pin 3 (- or ring) to 1 (ground). Otherwise noise may
occur, caused by the unconnected negative input of the balanced
input.
The 25-pin D-sub connector follows the pinout known from devices
manufactured by Tascam (pinout see chapter 16.9). Your local
dealer will supply analog breakout multicores D-sub to XLR in Tascam pinout in different lengths.
The ADI-8 QS uses a completely symmetrical signal path (including limiter) that guarantees an
exceptional sound quality, outstanding low distortion and highest Signal to Noise ratio in all level
settings.
One of the main issues when working with an AD-converter is to maintain the full dynamic
range within the best operating level. Therefore the ADI-8 QS internally uses hi-quality electronic switches, which introduce no additional noise or distortion to the audio path. The key
INPUT allows for a perfect adaptation of all 8 channels to the most often used studio levels.
Each analog input has its own 7-segment level meter, so every channel can be checked for
input signal and overloads easily. The level data incorporate the current Input Trim setting and
the digital limiter. The red LED OVR lights up 0.2 dB before full scale level (-0.2 dBFS).
The ADI-8 QS uses the following level references:
Reference
+24
+19
+13
+4.2
0 dBFS @
+24 dBu
+19 dBu
+13 dBu
+4.2 dBu
Headroom @ +4 dBu
20 dB
15 dB
9 dB
12 dB at -10 dBV
Other RME devices
LoGain
+4 dBu
-10 dBV
The setting +4.2 dBu equals -10 dBV with 12 to 15 dB headroom. Set to +24 dBu the ADI-8 QS
is compatible to SMPTE (+24 dBu @ 0 dBFS, +4 dBu with 20 dB of headroom).
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
11.2 Line Out
The ADI-8 QS has 8 balanced Line outputs on the rear,
provided by 1/4" TRS and a 25-pin D-sub connector. They
have their own output drivers respectively and can therefore – in contrary to the inputs – be used simultaneously.
The electronic output stage of the TRS jacks is built in a
servo-balanced design which handles unbalanced (mono
plugs) and balanced (stereo plugs) correctly, automatically adjusting the level reference. The maximum output
level is +21 dBu.
When selecting +24 dBu the LEDs +19 dBu and +24 dBu
are lit at the same time, because the TRS jacks stay at the
+19 setting, while the D-sub connector outputs are operated in the +24 setting.
The electronic output stage of the D-sub connector does not operate servo-balanced! When
connecting unbalanced equipment, make sure pin 3 of the XLR output is not connected. A
connection to ground can cause a higher THD value (higher distortion)!
The 25-pin D-sub connector follows the pinout known from devices manufactured by Tascam
(pinout see chapter 16.9). Your local dealer will supply analog breakout multicores D-sub to
XLR in Tascam pinout in different lengths. The maximum output level at the D-sub connector is
+27 dBu.
Each output channel has its own 7-segment level meter, so every channel can be checked for
output signal and overloads easily. The level data are taken directly in front of the DA-converter,
so behind the digital level settings of Output Trim and Global Output Level. The red LED OVR
lights up 0.2 dB before full scale level (-0.2 dBFS).
To maintain an optimum level for devices connected to the analog outputs, the ADI-8 QS internally uses hi-quality electronic switches, which introduce no additional noise or distortion to the
audio path. The key OUTPUT allows for a perfect adaptation of all 8 channels to the most often
used studio levels. The different output levels guarantee optimal conversion results, while still
being compatible to any attached analog equipment.
The ADI-8 QS uses the following level references:
Reference
+24
+19
+13
+4.2
0 dBFS @
+24 dBu
+19 dBu
+13 dBu
+4.2 dBu
Headroom @ +4 dBu
20 dB
15 dB
9 dB
12 dB at -10 dBV
Other RME devices
HiGain
+4 dBu
-10 dBV
The setting +4.2 dBu equals -10 dBV with 12 to 15 dB headroom. Set to +24 dBu the ADI-8 QS
is compatible to SMPTE (+24 dBu @ 0 dBFS, +4 dBu with 20 dB of headroom).
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31
12. Digital Inputs / Outputs
12.1 AES/EBU
The four AES/EBU inputs and outputs are provided on the rear of the ADI-8 QS via a 25-pin Dsub connector with Tascam pinout (also used by Digidesign). A digital breakout cable will provide 4 male and 4 female XLR connectors. Every input and output is transformer-balanced and
galvanically isolated.
The inputs can be used in any combination, e. g. it is sufficient to connect an input signal only to
input 3. In slave mode, this input is automatically being used as clock source. If more than one
signal is present, the one furthest left is being used as clock source, i. e. the active input with
the lowest number. Channel Status and Copy bit are ignored.
In standard operation the AES outputs carry the converted analog input signal. When activating
the option Digital to Digital in the Setup menu the currently chosen digital input data is present
at the outputs instead, see chapter 9.15.
The ADI-8 QS supports Single Wire only, in the range of 32 kHz up to 192 kHz: a total of 8
channels, 2 channels per AES wire. The effective sample frequency equals the clock on the
AES wire. In case a conversion from/to Single, Double and Quad Wire is required, the RME
ADI-192 DD, an 8-channel universal sample rate and format converter, is highly recommended.
Besides the audio data, digital signals in SPDIF or AES/EBU format contain a channel status
coding, which is being used for transmitting further information. The output signal coding of the
ADI-8 QS has been implemented according to AES3-1992 Amendment 4:
• 32 kHz, 44.1 kHz, 48 kHz, 64 kHz, 88.2 kHz, 96 kHz, 176.4 kHz, 192 kHz according to the
current sample rate
• Audio use
• No Copyright, Copy permitted
• Format Professional
• Category General, Generation not indicated
• 2-Channel, No Emphasis
• Aux bits audio use, 24 bit
• Origin: ADI8
Emphasis
AES/EBU and SPDIF can contain an Emphasis information. Audio signals with Emphasis have
a strong high frequency boost and thus require a high frequency attenuation on playback.
An Emphasis indication gets lost! This information is neither passed on to the MADI output,
nor to any of the AES outputs!
Connecting devices with coaxial SPDIF
ports to the ADI-8 QS inputs is accomplished by simple cable adapters
XLR/RCA. To achieve this, pins 2 and 3 of
an XLR plug are being connected to the
two contacts of a Phono/RCA plug. The
ground shield of the cable is only connected to pin 1 of the XLR plug.
The same is true for the outputs, but a male XLR connector is used then. Note that most consumer HiFi equipment with phono SPDIF inputs will only accept signals with Channel Status
‘Consumer’! In such cases the above adapter cable will not work.
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12.2 ADAT Optical
The ADI-8 QS provides two digital inputs and outputs in ADAT optical format. Using sample
rates up to 48 kHz only the port labeled MAIN is relevant for operation. Higher sample rates
than 48 kHz are realized by sample multiplexing. When using more than four channels at Double Speed or two channels at Quad Speed, the port labeled AUX has to be used as well.
The ADAT optical inputs of the ADI-8 QS use RME's unsurpassed Bitclock PLL, which prevents
clicks and drop outs even in extreme varipitch operation, and guarantees a fast and low jitter
lock to the digital input signal. A usual TOSLINK cable is sufficient for connection.
In Single Speed mode both outputs carry the same audio data. Therefore the output signal can
be sent to two devices at the same time.
In standard operation the ADAT outputs carry the converted analog input signal. When activating the option Digital to Digital in the Setup menu the currently chosen digital input data is present at the outputs instead, see chapter 9.15.
The ADAT outputs can be used in parallel to the AES outputs at up to 192 kHz, but in QS mode
only channels 1 to 4 will be available.
ADAT MAIN
Interface for the first or only device sending/receiving an ADAT signal. Carries the channels 1 to
8. In S/MUX mode (Double Speed), this port carries the channels 1 to 4. In S/MUX4 mode
(Quad Speed) this port carries channels 1 and 2.
ADAT AUX
Additional port for a transmission of channels 5 to 8 in S/MUX mode, or 3 and 4 in S/MUX4
mode.
With signals encoded as S/MUX, the Clock Section (STATE) has to be switched into DS mode
manually, depending on the current application. Each port carries the data of 4 channels only,
for up to 8 channels MAIN and AUX have to be used.
With signals encoded as S/MUX4, the Clock Section (STATE) has to be switched into QS mode
manually, depending on the current application. Each port carries the data of 2 channels only,
for up to 4 channels MAIN and AUX have to be used.
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12.3 I64 MADI Card
The I64 MADI Card provides the ADI-8 QS with a 64-channel MADI input and output. Coaxial
and optical outputs operate simultaneously and deliver the same data. The card’s ID determines which MADI channels the ADI-8 QS will use (see chapter 9.5, ID). The MADI outputs
operate in parallel to the AES/EBU and ADAT outputs, provide the same audio data, and are
configured with the same front panel controls.
The I64 MADI Card also features optical and coaxial MADI input. The input is switched automatically, according to where a valid input signal is detected. This ensures full redundancy operation, immediately changing to the other input in case of loss of the input signal.
Since late 2011 a newer version of the i64 MADI card is shipped, having two green Sync LEDs
beside the inputs. Here the above automatic input switching can be changed to different modes,
like giving optical or coaxial input priority. The leaflet included with the i64 MADI card explains
those options in detail. This newer version also enables the special Digital Patch Mode, see
chapter 9.16.
The MADI input will operate as an optional clock source (Clock section, OPTN) as well as a
through input. Since each ADI-8 QS uses only 8 channels, up to 56 channels can be passed
through.
This technique is used to serially cascade several ADI-8 QS. Incoming MADI data is passed
through unchanged, only one block of eight channels is replaced, according to the ADI-8 QS’
ID. This allows up to 8 devices to be connected serially. All 64 combined channels are available
at the last device's output. The ID determining the block of eight channels used by an individual
device is determined automatically (Auto ID) or manually in the setup menu (ID):
ID 01: Channels 1-8
ID 04: Channels 25-32
ID 07: Channels 49-56
ID 02: Channels 9-16
ID 05: Channels 33-40
ID 08: Channels 57-64
ID 03: Channels 17-24
ID 06: Channels 41-48
The I64 MADI Card defaults to the 56-channel format at its outputs. As soon as a 64-channel
format is detected at the inputs, or the ID 08 is used, the output switches to 64-channel format.
Note: The 96k frame mode is activated at the outputs automatically when the MADI input signal
is 96k frame. A manual selection of the output format, and with this a converter functionality
48k/96k, is not available.
With an installed I64 MADI Card the ADI-8 QS can be remote controlled via MADI. At the same
time MIDI data are transmitted via MADI, see chapter 10.3.
When multiple devices are connected serially, the MADI I/O of each ADI-8 QS causes a delay
of 3 samples. Therefore at the MADI output of the last device, the data of all previous devices
are delayed. At Double Speed the delay rises to 6 samples per unit, at Quad Speed to 12 samples.
The problem of this offset is solved by the function Delay Compensation, see chapter 9.8. It
delays the signals in a way that they are sample-synchronous in multi-device operation. The
diagram on the next page shows a serial setup with HDSP MADI card, three ADI-8 QS and
activated Delay Compensation.
Delay Compensation has to be manually activated in each unit!
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
12.4 Differences serial MADI with I64 MADI Card and ADI-642
I64 MADI Card: Activate Auto ID in the first unit (ID of the master can be changed). All following
units become Slave, get a consecutive ID, and with this the according channel routing. If desired, Delay Compensation has to be manually activated in each unit.
ADI-642: Activate ADC (Auto Delay Compensation) in the first unit (ID of the master is always
1). All following units become Slave, and compensate the respective delay automatically. The
routing is done according to the setting of the matrix. If Auto (Auto Channel Assignment) is activated in the first unit too, all following units get a consecutive ID, and with this the according
channel routing.
Mixed setups: Auto ID and Auto are compatible. In contrast (A)DC is automatic only with the
642. The ADI-8 QS require to activate Delay Compensation manually in each unit.
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
35
13. Word Clock
13.1 Word Clock Input and Output
Input
The ADI-8 QS transformer isolated word clock input is active when WCK is chosen in the clock
section. The signal at the BNC input can be Single, Double or Quad Speed, the ADI-8 QS automatically adapts to it. As soon as a valid signal is detected, the WCK LED is constantly lit, otherwise it is flashing.
Thanks to RME's Signal Adaptation Circuit, the word clock input still works correctly even with
heavily mis-shaped, dc-prone, too small or overshoot-prone signals. Thanks to automatic signal
centering, 300 mV (0.3 V) input level are sufficient in principle. An additional hysteresis reduces
sensitivity to 1.0 V, so that over- and undershoots and high frequency disturbances don't cause
a wrong trigger.
The word clock input is shipped as high impedance type (not terminated). A push switch allows
to activate internal termination (75 Ohms). The switch is found on the back beside the BNC
socket. Use a small pencil or similar and carefully push the blue switch so that it snaps into its
lock position and the yellow LED lights up. Another push will release it again and de-activate the
termination.
Output
The ADI-8 QS word clock output is constantly active, providing the current sample frequency as
word clock signal. In master mode, the word clock will be fixed to 44.1 kHz or 48 kHz (DS x 2,
QS x 4). In any other case the sample rate is identical to the one present at the currently chosen clock input. When the current word clock source fails, the last valid sample rate will be held
automatically.
Selecting the option Si in the Setup menu Co causes the word clock output to always stay
within the range of 32 kHz to 48 kHz. So at 96 kHz and 192 kHz sample rate, the output word
clock is 48 kHz.
The word clock signal received by the ADI-8 QS can be distributed to other devices by using the
word clock output. With this the usual T-adapter can be avoided, and the ADI-8 QS operates as
Signal Refresher. This kind of operation is highly recommended, because
•
•
•
Input and output are phase-locked and in phase (0°) to each other
SteadyClock removes nearly all jitter from the input signal
the exceptional input (1 Vpp sensitivity instead of the usual 2.5 Vpp, dc cut, Signal Adaptation Circuit) plus SteadyClock guarantee a secure function also with most critical word
clock signals.
Thanks to a low impedance, but short circuit proof output, the ADI-8 QS delivers 4 Vpp to 75
Ohms. For wrong termination with 2 x 75 Ohms (37.5 Ohms), there are still 3.3 Vpp at the output.
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
13.2 Operation and Technical Background
In the analog domain one can connect any device to another device, a synchronization is not
necessary. Digital audio is different. It uses a clock, the sample frequency. The signal can only
be processed and transmitted when all participating devices share the same clock. If not, the
signal will suffer from wrong samples, distortion, crackle sounds and drop outs.
AES/EBU, SPDIF, ADAT and MADI are self-clocking, an additional word clock connection in
principle isn't necessary. But when using more than one device simultaneously problems are
likely to happen. For example any self-clocking will not work in a loop cabling, when there is no
'master' (main clock) inside the loop. Additionally the clock of all participating devices has to be
synchronous. This is often impossible with devices limited to playback, for example CD players,
as these have no SPDIF input, thus can't use the self clocking technique as clock reference.
In a digital studio synchronization is maintained by connecting all devices to a central sync
source. For example the mixing desk works as master and sends a reference signal, the word
clock, to all other devices. Of course this will only work as long as all other devices are
equipped with a word clock or sync input, thus being able to work as slave (some professional
CD players indeed have a word clock input). Then all devices get the same clock and will work
in every possible combination with each other.
Remember that a digital system can only have one master! If the ADI-8 QS uses its internal
clock, all other devices must be set to ‘Slave’ mode.
But word clock is not only the 'great problem solver', it also has some disadvantages. The word
clock is based on a fraction of the really needed clock. For example SPDIF: 44.1 kHz word
clock (a simple square wave signal) has to be multiplied by 256 inside the device using a special PLL (to about 11.2 MHz). This signal then replaces the one from the quartz crystal. Big
disadvantage: because of the high multiplication factor the reconstructed clock will have great
deviations called jitter. The jitter of a word clock is much higher as when using a quartz based
clock.
The end of these problems should have been the so called Superclock, which uses 256 times
the word clock frequency. This equals the internal quartz frequency, so no PLL for multiplying is
needed and the clock can be used directly. But the Superclock proved to be much more critical
than word clock. A square wave signal of 11 MHz distributed to several devices - this simply
means to fight with high frequency technology. Reflections, cable quality, capacitive loads - at
44.1 kHz these factors may be ignored, at 11 MHz they are the end of the clock network. Additionally it was found that a PLL not only generates jitter, but also rejects disturbances. The slow
PLL works like a filter for induced and modulated frequencies above several kHz. As the Superclock is used without any filtering such a kind of jitter and noise suppression is missing.
The actual end of these problems is offered by the SteadyClock technology of the ADI-8 QS.
Combining the advantages of modern and fastest digital technology with analog filter techniques, re-gaining a low jitter clock signal of 22 MHz from a slow word clock of 44.1 kHz is no
problem anymore. Additionally, jitter on the input signal is highly rejected, so that even in real
world usage the re-gained clock signal is of highest quality.
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
37
13.3 Cabling and Termination
Word clock signals are usually distributed in the form of a network, split with BNC T-adapters
and terminated with resistors. We recommend using off-the-shelf BNC cables to connect all
devices, as this type of cable is used for most computer networks. Actually you will find all the
necessary components (T-adapters, terminators, cables) in most electronics and computer
stores. The latter usually carries 50 Ohm components. The 75 Ohm components used for word
clock are part of video technology (RG59).
Ideally, the word clock signal is a 5 Volt square wave with the frequency of the sample rate, of
which the harmonics go up to far above 500 kHz. To avoid voltage loss and reflections, both the
cable itself and the terminating resistor at the end of the chain should have an impedance of 75
Ohm. If the voltage is too low, synchronization will fail. High frequency reflection effects can
cause both jitter and sync failure.
Unfortunately there are still many devices on the market, even newer digital mixing consoles,
which are supplied with a word clock output that can only be called unsatisfactory. If the output
breaks down to 3 Volts when terminating with 75 Ohms, you have to take into account that a
device, of which the input only works from 2.8 Volts and above, does not function correctly already after 3 meter cable length. So it is not astonishing that because of the higher voltage,
word clock networks are in some cases more stable and reliable if cables are not terminated at
all.
Ideally all outputs of word clock delivering devices are designed as low impedance types, but all
word clock inputs as high impedance types, in order to not weaken the signal on the chain. But
there are also negative examples, when the 75 Ohms are built into the device and cannot be
switched off. In this case the network load is often 2 x 75 Ohms, and the user is forced to buy a
special word clock distributor. Note that such a device is generally recommended for larger
studios.
The ADI-8 QS word clock input can be high-impedance or terminated internally, ensuring maximum flexibility. If termination is necessary (e.g. because the ADI-8 QS is the last device in the
chain), push the switch at the back (see chapter 13.1).
In case the ADI-8 QS resides within a chain of devices receiving word clock, plug a T-adapter
into its BNC input jack, and the cable supplying the word clock signal to one end of the adapter.
Connect the free end to the next device in the chain via a further BNC cable. The last device in
the chain should be terminated using another T-adapter and a 75 Ohm resistor (available as
short BNC plug). Of course devices with internal termination do not need T-adaptor and terminator plug.
Due to the outstanding SteadyClock technology of the ADI-8 QS, we recommend to not
pass the input signal via T-adapter, but to use the ADI-8 QS word clock output instead.
Thanks to SteadyClock, the input signal will both be freed from jitter and - in case of loss or
drop out – be held at the last valid frequency.
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
14. MIDI
The ADI-8 QS has a standard MIDI input and output, a 5-pin
DIN jack each. The MIDI I/O is used for:
•
remote control of the ADI-8 QS, see chapter 10.2
•
transmission of MIDI data and remote control commands over MADI, in case the optional I64
MADI Card has been fitted, see chapter 10.3.
15. Remote
This mini-DIN jack can only be used to connect the included remote control.
The 5 meter (16 ft) long cable is fixed to the Hardware Remote unit. More information on usage and functionality is found in chapter 10.1.
Note: The Hardware Remote uses the function Global Output Level, see chapter 9.2. The volume can not be changed if this option is deactivated in the Setup menu.
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
39
40
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
User’s Guide
ADI-8 QS
Technical Reference
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
41
16. Technical Specifications
16.1 Analog
Line In 1-8, TRS/D-Sub
• Input: 6.3 mm TRS jack and D-sub 25-pin, servo-balanced
• Input impedance: 10 kOhm
• Input sensitivity switchable +24 dBu, +19 dBu, +13 dBu, +4.2 dBu @ 0 dBFS
Analog Limiter
• Maximum analog input level unclipped: +30 dBu
• Threshold On: -3 dBFS
• Threshold Off: +3 dB
• THD+N: 0.03%, -52 dB
• Attack time: 3 ms
• Release time: 2-step, digitally controlled
AD-Conversion
• Resolution: 24 bit
• Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) @ +24 dBu, 44.1 kHz: 114.0 dB RMS unweighted, 117 dBA
• Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) @ +19 dBu: 114.0 dB RMS unweighted, 117 dBA
• Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) @ +13 dBu: 113.6 dB RMS unweighted, 116.6 dBA
• Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) @ +4.2 dBu: 109.8 dB RMS unweighted, 113 dBA
• Frequency response @ 44.1 kHz, -0.5 dB: 5 Hz – 21.5 kHz
• Frequency response @ 96 kHz, -0.5 dB: 5 Hz – 45.5 kHz
• Frequency response @ 192 kHz, -1 dB: 5 Hz – 66.5 kHz
• THD: < -110 dB, < 0.00032 %
• THD+N: < -104 dB, < 0.00063 %
• Channel separation: > 110 dB
DA-Conversion
• Resolution: 24 bit
• Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) @ +24 dBu, 44.1 kHz: 117,0 dB RMS unweighted, 120 dBA
• Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) @ +19 dBu: 117 dB RMS unweighted, 120 dBA
• Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) @ +13 dBu: 117 dB RMS unweighted, 120 dBA
• Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) @ +4.2 dBu: 114 dB RMS unweighted, 117 dBA
• Frequency response @ 44.1 kHz, -0.5 dB: 5 Hz – 22 kHz
• Frequency response @ 96 kHz, -0.5 dB: 5 Hz – 45.9 kHz
• Frequency response @ 192 kHz, -1 dB: 5 Hz - 90 kHz
• THD: < -104 dB, < 0.00063 %
• THD+N: < -102 dB, < 0.0008 %
• Channel separation: > 110 dB
Line Out 1-8, TRS
• Maximum output level: +21 dBu
• Output: 6.3 mm TRS jack, servo-balanced
• Output impedance: 75 Ohm
• Output level switchable +4.2 dBu, +13 dBu, +19 dBu @ 0 dBFS
Line Out 1-8, D-Sub
• Maximum output level: +27 dBu
• Output: D-sub 25-pin, electronically balanced
• Output impedance: 150 Ohm
• Output level switchable +4.2 dBu, +13 dBu, +19 dBu, +24 dBu @ 0 dBFS
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
16.2 Digital Inputs
AES/EBU
• 4 x 25-pin D-sub, transformer-balanced, galvanically isolated, according to AES3-1992
• High-sensitivity input stage (< 0.3 Vpp)
• SPDIF compatible (IEC 60958)
• Accepts Consumer and Professional format
• Lock Range: 27 kHz – 200 kHz
• Jitter when synced to input signal: < 1 ns
• Jitter suppression: > 30 dB (2.4 kHz)
ADAT Optical
• 2 x TOSLINK, according to Alesis specification
• Standard: 8 channels 24 bit, up to 48 kHz
• S/MUX: 2 x 8 channels 24 bit / 48 kHz, equalling 8 channels 24 bit 96 kHz
• S/MUX4: 2 x 8 channels 24 bit / 48 kHz, equalling 4 channels 24 bit 192 kHz
• Bitclock PLL ensures perfect synchronization even in varispeed operation
• Lock range: 31.5 kHz – 54 kHz
• Jitter when synced to input signal: < 1 ns
• Jitter suppression: > 30 dB (2.4 kHz)
Word Clock
• BNC, not terminated (10 kOhm)
• Switch for internal termination 75 Ohm
• Automatic Double/Quad Speed detection and internal conversion to Single Speed
• SteadyClock guarantees super low jitter synchronization even in varispeed operation
• Transformer coupled, galvanically isolated input
• Not affected by DC-offsets within the network
• Signal Adaptation Circuit: signal refresh through auto-center and hysteresis
• Overvoltage protection
• Level range: 1.0 Vpp – 5.6 Vpp
• Lock Range: 27 kHz – 200 kHz
• Jitter when synced to input signal: < 1 ns
• Jitter suppression: > 30 dB (2.4 kHz)
I64 MADI Card
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Coaxial via BNC, 75 Ohm, according to AES10-1991
High-sensitivity input stage (< 0.2 Vpp)
Optical via FDDI duplex SC connector
62.5/125 and 50/125 compatible
Accepts 56 channel and 64 channel mode, and 96k frame
Single Wire: up to 64 channels 24 bit 48 kHz
Double Wire / 96k frame: up to 32 channels 24 bit 96 kHz
Quad Wire: up to 16 channels 24 bit 192 kHz
Lock range: 28 kHz – 54 kHz
Jitter when synced to input signal: < 1 ns
Jitter suppression: > 30 dB (2.4 kHz)
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
43
16.3 Digital Outputs
AES/EBU
• 4 x, transformer-balanced, galvanically isolated, according to AES3-1992
• Output voltage Professional 4.0 Vpp
• Format Professional according to AES3-1992 Amendment 4
• Single Wire: 4 x 2 channels 24 bit, up to 192 kHz
ADAT
• 2 x TOSLINK
• Standard: 8 channels 24 bit, up to 48 kHz
• S/MUX: 16 channels 24 bit / 48 kHz, equalling 8 channels 24 bit 96 kHz
• S/MUX4: 16 channels 24 bit / 48 kHz, equalling 4 channels 24 bit 192 kHz
Word Clock
• BNC
• Max. output voltage: 5 Vpp
• Output voltage @ 75 Ohm: 4.0 Vpp
• Impedance: 10 Ohm
• Frequency range: 27 kHz – 200 kHz
I64 MADI Card
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Coaxial via BNC, 75 Ohm, according to AES10-1991
Output voltage 600 mVpp
Cable length coaxial: up to 100 m
Optical via FDDI duplex SC connector
62.5/125 and 50/125 compatible
Cable length optical: more than 500 m
Generates 56 channel and 64 channel mode, and 96k frame
Single Wire: up to 64 channels 24 bit 48 kHz
Double Wire / 96k frame: up to 32 channels 24 bit 96 kHz
Quad Wire: up to 16 channels 24 bit 192 kHz
16.4 Digital
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Clocks: Internal, AES In, ADAT In, Word Clock In, Option In
Low Jitter Design: < 1 ns in PLL mode, all inputs
Internal clock: 800 ps Jitter, Random Spread Spectrum
Jitter suppression of external clocks: > 30 dB (2.4 kHz)
Effective clock jitter influence on AD-conversion: near zero
PLL ensures zero dropout, even at more than 100 ns jitter
Supported sample rates: 28 kHz up to 200 kHz
16.5 MIDI
• 16 channels MIDI
• 5-pin DIN jacks
• Optocoupled, ground-free input
I64 MADI Card
• Invisible transmission via User bit of channel 56 (48k frame)
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16.6 General
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Power supply: Internal switching PSU, 100 - 240 V AC, 40 Watts
Typical power consumption: 23 Watts
Maximum power consumption: < 30 Watts
Dimensions including rack ears (WxHxD): 483 x 44 x 242 mm (19" x 1.73" x 9.5")
Dimensions without rack ears/handles (WxHxD): 436 x 44 x 235 mm (17.2" x 1.73" x 9.3")
Weight: 3 kg ( 6.6 lbs)
Temperature range: +5° up to +50° Celsius (41° F up to 122°F)
Relative humidity: < 75%, non condensing
16.7 Firmware
The ADI-8 QS is internally based on programmable logic. By re-programming of a little component called Flash-PROM, both function and behaviour of the unit can be changed at any time.
At the time of writing this manual, the unit is shipped with firmware 1.2. The firmware version is
displayed after power on for about one second on the level meters of the ADI-8 QS.
Firmware 1.1: Initial release
Firmware 1.2: Seldom problem with the combination of word clock and AES input fixed.
Firmware 3.1: Enables the Digital Ptach Mode, when an i64 MADI card version 2 (green sync
LEDs) is present in the unit.
16.8 MADI User Bit Chart
• RS-232: channels 1 to 9 (through mode active in the I64 MADI Card)
• ADC: channel 19
• MIDI: channel 56 (48k) / 28 (96k)
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
45
16.9 Connector Pinouts
D-Sub AES/EBU
The D-sub connector provides four AES inputs and outputs. The pinout uses the widely spread
Tascam scheme, which is also used by Digidesign.
Tascam / Digidesign:
Signal
D-Sub
Signal
D-Sub
In
1/2+
24
In
1/212
In
3/4+
10
In
3/423
In
5/6+
21
In
5/69
In
7/8+
7
In
7/820
Out
1/2+
18
Out
1/26
Out
3/4+
4
Out
3/417
Out
5/6+
15
Out
5/63
Out
7/8+
1
Out
7/814
GND is connected to pins 2, 5, 8, 11, 16, 19, 22, 25. Pin 13 is not connected.
The Yamaha pinout is quite popular as well. When building a D-sub to D-sub adapter or connection cable, please make sure that the connectors are clearly labeled with Tascam and Yamaha. The cable can only be used when the Tascam side is connected to a Tascam connector,
and the Yamaha side is connected to a Yamaha connector.
Yamaha:
Signal
D-Sub
Signal
D-Sub
In
1/2+
1
In
1/214
In
3/4+
2
In
3/415
In
5/6+
3
In
5/616
In
7/8+
4
In
7/817
Out
1/2+
5
Out
1/218
Out
3/4+
6
Out
3/419
Out
5/6+
7
Out
5/620
Out
7/8+
8
Out
7/821
GND is connected to pins 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 22, 23, 24, 25.
The same is true for a direct adapter cable Tascam D-sub to Euphonix D-sub.
Euphonix:
Signal
D-Sub
Signal
D-Sub
In
1/2+
15
In
1/22
In
3/4+
4
In
3/416
In
5/6+
18
In
5/65
In
7/8+
7
In
7/819
Out
1/2+
21
Out
1/28
Out
3/4+
10
Out
3/422
Out
5/6+
24
Out
5/611
Out
7/8+
13
Out
7/825
GND is connected to pins 3, 6, 9, 12, 14, 17, 20, 23. Pin 1 is not connected.
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
D-Sub Analog Inputs / Outputs
The 25 pin D-sub connectors of analog input and output are wired according to the Tascam
scheme, as shown in this table:
Channel
D-sub
1+
24
112
2+
10
223
3+
21
39
4+
7
420
5+
18
56
6+
4
617
7+
15
73
8+
1
814
GND is connected to pins 2, 5, 8, 11, 16, 19, 22, 25. Pin 13 is unconnected.
The servo balanced input circuitry allows to use unbalanced connections with no loss in level.
For this to work, pins 3 (-) and 1 (GND) have to be connected.
The output circuitry does not operate in a servo-balanced way. When connecting unbalanced
devices make sure that pin 3 (-) stays unconnected.
TRS jacks analog inputs / outputs
The stereo ¼" TRS jacks of the analog inputs are wired according to international standards:
Tip = + (hot)
Ring = – (cold)
Sleeve = GND
The servo-balanced circuitry allows to use monaural TS jacks (unbalanced) with no loss in
level. This is the same as when using a TRS-jack with ring connected to ground.
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47
17. Technical Background
17.1 Terminology
Single Speed
Sample rate range originally used in Digital Audio. Typical applications are 32 kHz (digital radio
broadcast), 44.1 kHz (CD), and 48 kHz (DAT).
Double Speed
Doubles the original sample rate range, in order to achieve higher audio quality and improved
audio processing. 64 kHz is practically never used, 88.2 kHz is quite rare in spite of certain advantages. 96 kHz is a common format. Sometimes called Double Fast.
Quad Speed
Controversially discussed way of ensuring hi-end audio quality and processing by quadrupling
the sample frequency. 128 kHz is non-existent, 176.4 kHz is rare, if at all then 192 kHz is used,
e.g. for DVD Audio.
Single Wire
Standard audio data transfer, where the audio signal's sample rate is equal to the rate of the
digital signal. Used from 32 to 192 kHz. Sometimes called Single Wide.
Double Wire
Before 1998 there were no receiver/transmitter circuits available that could receive or transmit
more than 48 kHz. Higher sample rates were transferred by splitting odd and even bits across
the L/R channels of a single AES connection. This provides for twice the data rate, and hence
twice the sample rate. A stereo signal subsequently requires two AES/EBU ports.
The Double Wire method is an industry standard today, however it has a number of different
names, like Dual AES, Double Wide, Dual Line and Wide Wire. The AES3 specification uses
the uncommon term Single channel double sampling frequency mode. When used with the
ADAT format, the term S/MUX is commonly used.
Double Wire not only works with Single Speed signals, but also with Double Speed. As an example, Pro Tools HD, whose AES receiver/transmitter only work up to 96 kHz, uses Double
Wire to transmit 192 kHz. Four channels of 96 kHz turn into two channels of 192 kHz.
Quad Wire
Similar to Double Wire, with samples of one channel spread across four channels. This way
single speed devices can transmit up to 192 kHz, but need two AES/EBU ports to transmit one
channel. Also called Quad AES.
S/MUX
Since the ADAT hardware interface is limited to Single Speed, the Double Wire method is used
for sample rates up to 96 kHz, but usually referred to as S/MUX (Sample Multiplexing). An
ADAT port supports four channels this way.
S/MUX4
The Quad Wire method realizes the transmission of two channels at up to 192 kHz via ADAT.
The method is referred to as S/MUX4.
Note: All conversions of the described methods are lossless. The existing samples are just
spread or re-united between the channels.
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User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
17.2 Lock and SyncCheck
Digital signals consist of a carrier and the data. If a digital signal is applied to an input, the receiver has to synchronize to the carrier clock in order to read the data correctly. To achieve this,
the receiver uses a PLL (Phase Locked Loop). As soon as the receiver meets the exact frequency of the incoming signal, it is locked. This Lock state remains even with small changes of
the frequency, because the PLL tracks the receiver's frequency.
If an AES or MADI signal is applied to the ADI-8 QS, the corresponding LED starts flashing. The
unit indicates LOCK, i. e. a valid input signal (in case the signal is in sync, the LED is constantly
lit, see below).
Unfortunately, LOCK does not necessarily mean that the received signal is correct with respect
to the clock which processes the read out of the embedded data. Example [1]: The ADI-8 QS is
set to 44.1 kHz internal clock (clock mode master), and a mixing desk with MADI output is connected to the I64 MADI input. The OPTN LED will start flashing immediately, because the mixing desk's sample rate is generated internally, and thus slightly higher or lower than the ADI-8
QS's internal sample rate. Result: When reading out the data, there will frequently be read errors that cause clicks and drop outs.
Also when using multiple inputs, a simple LOCK is not sufficient. The above described problem
can be solved elegantly by setting the ADI-8 QS from internal clock to MADI (its internal clock
will then be the clock delivered by the mixing desk). But in case another asynchronous device is
connected, there will again be a slight difference in the sample rate, and therefore clicks and
drop outs.
In order to display those problems optically at the device, the ADI-8 QS includes SyncCheck®.
It checks all clocks used for synchronicity. If they are not synchronous to each other (i. e. absolutely identical), the LED of the asynchronous input flashes. In case they are synchronous the
LED stays dark, only the LED of the current clock source will be lit (constantly). In example 1 it
would have been obvious that the OPTN LED starts flashing after connecting the mixing desk.
In practice, SyncCheck allows for a quick overview of the correct configuration of all digital devices. This way one of the most difficult and error-prone topics of the digital studio world finally
becomes easy to handle.
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
49
17.3 Latency and Monitoring
The term Zero Latency Monitoring has been introduced by RME in 1998 for the DIGI96 series
and describes the ability to pass-through the computer's input signal at the interface directly to
the output. Since then, the idea behind has become one of the most important features of modern hard disk recording. In the year 2000, RME published two ground-breaking Tech Infos on
the topics Low Latency Background, which are still up-to-date: Monitoring, ZLM and ASIO, and
Buffer and Latency Jitter, found on the RME website.
How much Zero is Zero?
From a technical view there is no zero. Even the analog pass-through is subject to phase errors, equalling a delay between input and output. However, delays below certain values can
subjectively be claimed to be a zero-latency. This applies to analog routing and mixing, and in
our opinion also to RME's Zero Latency Monitoring. RME's digital receiver's buffer and the output via the transmitter cause a typical delay of 3 samples. At 44.1 kHz this equals about 68 µs
(0.000068 s), at 192 kHz only 15 µs.
Oversampling
While the delays of digital interfaces can be disregarded altogether, the analog inputs and outputs do cause a significant delay. Modern converter chips operate with 64 or 128 times oversampling plus digital filtering, in order to move the error-prone analog filters away from the audible frequency range as far as possible. This typically generates a delay of about 40 samples,
equalling one millisecond. A playback and re-record of the same signal via DA and AD (loopback) then causes an offset of the newly recorded track of about 2 ms.
Low Latency!
The ADI-8 QS uses high-class AD- and DA-converters from Cirrus Logic, offering exceptional
Signal to Noise and distortion figures. But the biggest difference to all other converter chips is
their innovative digital filter, achieving for the first time a delay of only 12 samples in Single
Speed, 9 samples in Double Speed, and 5 (!) samples in Quad Speed. The exact delays
caused by the AD- and DA-conversion of the ADI-8 QS are:
Sample frequency kHz
44.1
48
AD (12 x 1/fs) ms
0.27
0.25
AD (9 x 1/fs) ms
88.2
96
0.1
0.09
AD (5 x 1/fs) ms
DA (10 x 1/fs) ms
DA (5 x 1/fs) ms
0.22
176.4
192
0.028
0.026
0.028
0.026
0.2
0.056
0.052
DA (5 x 1/fs) ms
These values are less than a quarter of those available from even much more expensive devices. They represent an important step in further reducing the latency in the computer-based
recording studio. At Double Speed and Quad Speed the added latency can simply be ignored.
In short: the ADI-8 QS turns 'analog digital monitoring' into real analog-style monitoring.
50
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
17.4 DS - Double Speed
When activating the Double Speed mode the ADI-8 QS operates at double sample rate. The
internal clock 44.1 kHz turns to 88.2 kHz, 48 kHz to 96 kHz. The internal resolution is still 24 bit.
Sample rates above 48 kHz were not always taken for granted, and are still not widely used
because of the CD format (44.1 kHz) dominating everything. Before 1998 there were no receiver/transmitter circuits available that could receive or transmit more than 48 kHz. Therefore a
work-around was used: instead of two channels, one AES line only carries one channel, whose
odd and even samples are being distributed to the former left and right channels. By this, you
get the double amount of data, i. e. also double sample rate. Of course in order to transmit a
stereo signal two AES/EBU ports are necessary then.
This transmission mode is called Double Wire in the professional studio world, and is also
known as S/MUX (Sample Multiplexing) in connection with the ADAT format.
Not before February 1998, Crystal shipped the first 'single wire' receiver/transmitters that could
also work with double sample rate. It was then possible to transmit two channels of 96 kHz data
via one AES/EBU port.
But Double Wire is still far from being dead. On one hand, there are still many devices which
can't handle more than 48 kHz, e. g. digital tape recorders. But also other common interfaces
like ADAT or TDIF are still using this technique.
Because the ADAT interface does not allow for sampling frequencies above 48 kHz (a limitation
of the interface hardware), the ADI-8 QS automatically uses Sample Multiplexing in DS mode.
One channel's data is distributed to two channels according to the following table:
Analog In
DS Signal
Port
1
1/2
ADAT1
2
3/4
ADAT1
3
5/6
ADAT1
4
7/8
ADAT1
5
1/2
ADAT2
6
3/4
ADAT2
7
5/6
ADAT2
8
7/8
ADAT2
As the transmission of double rate signals is done at standard sample rate (Single Speed), the
ADAT outputs still deliver 44.1 kHz or 48 kHz.
17.5 QS – Quad Speed
Due to the small number of available devices that use sample rates up to 192 kHz, but even
more due to a missing real world application (CD...), Quad Speed has had no broad success so
far. An implementation of the ADAT format as double S/MUX (S/MUX4) results in only two
channels per optical output. Therefore in Quad Speed mode the ADI-8 QS is limited to 4 channels at the ADAT outputs.
The AES outputs provide 192 kHz as Single Wire only.
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
51
17.6 AES/EBU - SPDIF
The most important electrical properties of 'AES' and 'SPDIF' can be seen in the table below.
AES/EBU is the professional balanced connection using XLR plugs. The standard is being set
by the Audio Engineering Society based on the AES3-1992. For the 'home user', SONY and
Philips have omitted the balanced connection and use either Phono plugs or optical cables
(TOSLINK). The format called S/P-DIF (SONY/Philips Digital Interface) is described by IEC
60958.
Type
Connection
Mode
Impedance
Level
Clock accuracy
AES3-1992
XLR
Balanced
110 Ohm
0.2 V up to 5 Vpp
not specified
Jitter
< 0.025 UI (4.4 ns @ 44.1 kHz)
IEC 60958
RCA / Optical
Unbalanced
75 Ohm
0.2 V up to 0.5 Vpp
I: ± 50 ppm
II: 0.1%
III: Variable Pitch
not specified
Besides the electrical differences, both formats also have a slightly different setup. The two
formats are compatible in principle, because the audio information is stored in the same place in
the data stream. However, there are blocks of additional information, which are different for both
standards. In the table, the meaning of the first byte (#0) is shown for both formats. The first bit
already determines whether the following bits should be read as Professional or Consumer
information.
Byte
0
0
Mode
Pro
Con
Bit 0
P/C
P/C
1
Audio?
Audio?
2
3
4
5
Emphasis
Locked
Copy
Emphasis
6
7
Sample Freq.
Mode
It becomes obvious that the meaning of the following bits differs quite substantially between the
two formats. If a device like a common DAT recorder only has an SPDIF input, it usually understands only this format. In most cases, it will switch off when being fed Professional-coded data.
The table shows that a Professional-coded signal would lead to malfunctions for copy prohibition and emphasis, if being read as Consumer-coded data.
Nowadays many devices with SPDIF input can handle Professional subcode. Devices with
AES3 input almost always accept Consumer SPDIF (passive cable adapter required).
52
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
17.7 Signal to Noise Ratio in DS- / QS-Operation
The outstanding signal to noise ratio of the ADI-8 QS AD-converters can be verified even without expensive test equipment, by using record level meters of various software. But when activating the DS and QS mode, the displayed noise level will rise from -114 dBFS to -110 dBFS at
96 kHz, and –79 dBFS at 192 kHz. This is not a failure. The software measures the noise of the
whole frequency range, at 96 kHz from 0 Hz to 48 kHz (RMS unweighted), at 192 kHz from 0
Hz to 96 kHz.
When limiting the measurement range from 20 Hz to 20 kHz (so called audio bandpass) the
value would be -114 dB again. This can be verified with RME's DIGICheck. The function Bit
Statistic & Noise measures the noise floor by Limited Bandwidth, ignoring DC and ultrasound.
The reason for this behaviour is the noise shaping technology of the analog to digital converters. They move all noise and distortion to the in-audible higher frequency range, above 45 kHz.
Therefore the noise is slightly increased in the ultrasound area. High-frequent noise has a high
energy. Add the quadrupled bandwidth, and a wideband measurement will show a significant
drop in SNR, while the human ear will notice absolutely no change in the audible noise floor.
As can be seen in the above picture, the noise floor stays fully unchanged up to 45 kHz. With
sample rates up to 96 kHz the noise shaping completely happens outside of the transmission
range.
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
53
17.8 MADI Basics
MADI, the serial Multichannel Audio Digital Interface, has been defined already in 1989 as an
extension of the existing AES3 standard following several manufacturers' wish. The format also
known as AES/EBU, a balanced bi-phase signal, is limited to two channels. Simply put, MADI
contains 28 of those AES/EBU signals in serial, i. e. after one another, and the sample rate can
still even vary by +/-12.5%. The limit which cannot be exceeded is a data rate of 100Mbit/s.
Because an exact sampling frequency is used in most cases, the 64 channel mode was introduced officially in 2001. It allows for a maximum sample rate of 48 kHz + ca. 1%, corresponding
to 32 channels at 96 kHz, without exceeding the maximum data rate of 100 Mbit/s. The effective
data rate of the port is 125 Mbit/s due to additional coding.
Older devices understand and generate only the 56 channel format. Newer devices often work
in the 64 channel format, but offer still no more than 56 audio channels. The rest is being eaten
up by control commands for mixer settings etc.. The ADI-6432 shows that this can be done in a
much better way, with an invisible transmission of 16 MIDI channels plus serial RS232 data
stream, and the 64-channel MADI signal still being 100% compatible.
For the transmission of the MADI signal, proved methods known from network technology were
applied. Most people know unbalanced (coaxial) cables with 75 Ohms BNC plugs, they are not
expensive and easy to get. The optical interface is much more interesting due to its complete
galvanic separation, but for many users it is a mystery, because very few have ever dealt with
huge cabinets full of professional network technology. Therefore here are some explanations
regarding 'MADI optical'.
•
The cables used are standard in computer network technology. They are thus not at all
expensive, but unfortunately not available in every computer store.
•
The cables have an internal fibre of only 50 or 62.5 µm diameter and a coating of 125 µm.
They are called network cables 62.5/125 or 50/125, the former mostly being blue and the latter mostly being orange. Although in many cases not clearly labelled, these are always (!)
glass fibre cables. Plastic fibre cables (POF, plastic optical fibre) can not be manufactured in
such small diameters.
•
The plugs used are also an industry standard and called SC. Please don't mix them up with
ST connectors, which look similar to BNC connectors and are being screwed. Plugs used in
the past (MIC/R) were unnecessarily big and are not being used any longer.
•
The cables are available as a duplex variant (2 cables being glued together) or as a simplex
variant (1 cable). The ADI-6432's optical module supports both variants.
•
The transmission uses the multimode technique which supports cable lengths of up to almost 2 km. Single mode allows for much longer distances, but it uses a completely different
fibre (8 µm). Due to the wave-length of the light being used (1300 nm) the optical signal is
invisible to the human eye.
54
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
17.9 SteadyClock
The SteadyClock technology of the ADI-8 QS guarantees an excellent performance in all clock
modes. Its highly efficient jitter suppression refreshes and cleans up any clock signal, and provides it as reference clock at the word clock output.
Usually a clock section consists of an analog PLL for external synchronization and several
quartz oscillators for internal synchronization. SteadyClock requires one quartz only, using a
frequency not equalling digital audio. Latest circuit designs like hi-speed digital synthesizer,
digital PLL, 100 MHz sample rate and analog filtering allow RME to realize a completely newly
developed clock technology, right within the FPGA at lowest costs. The clock's performance
exceeds even professional expectations. Despite its remarkable features, SteadyClock reacts
quite fast compared to other techniques. It locks in fractions of a second to the input signal,
follows even extreme varipitch changes with phase accuracy, and locks directly within a range
of 28 kHz up to 200 kHz.
SteadyClock has originally been developed to gain a stable and clean
clock from the heavily jittery MADI data
signal. The embedded MADI clock
suffers from about 80 ns jitter, caused
by the time resolution of 125 MHz
within the format. Common jitter values
for other devices are 5 ns, while a very
good clock will have less than 2 ns.
The picture to the right shows the
MADI input signal with 80 ns of jitter
(top graph, yellow). Thanks to SteadyClock this signal turns into a clock with
less than 2 ns jitter (lower graph, blue).
Using the other input sources of the
ADI-8 QS, word clock, ADAT and
AES/EBU, you'll most probably never
experience such high jitter values. But
SteadyClock is not only ready for
these, it would also handle them just
on the fly.
The screenshot to the right shows an
extremely jittery word clock signal of
about 50 ns jitter (top graph, yellow).
Again SteadyClock provides an extreme clean-up. The filtered clock
shows less than 2 ns jitter (lower
graph, blue).
The cleaned and jitter-freed signal can be used as reference clock for any application, without
any problem. The signal processed by SteadyClock is of course not only used internally, but
also available at the ADI-8 QS' word clock output. It is also used to clock the digital outputs
MADI, ADAT and AES/EBU.
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
55
18. Block Diagram
56
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
19. MIDI Implementation ADI-8 QS
19.1 Basic SysEx Format
Value
F0h
00h 20h 0Dh
41h
00h..7Eh, 7Fh
mm
nn
oo
F7h
Name
SysEx header
MIDITEMP manufacturer ID
Model ID (ADI-8 QS)
Bank number / device ID (7Fh = broadcast, all IDs)
Message type
Parameter number (see table 1)
Data byte
EOX
Bank Number / Device ID
The lower nibble refers to the device ID (0..7), the higher nibble refers to the bank number
(0..7), e. g. 25h means bank 2, device 5. 7Fh addresses all banks and all devices.
19.2 Message Types
Value
10h
11h
20h
30h
31h
Name
Request value
Request level meter data
Set value
Value response
Level meter data response
Request Value
Format: F0 00 20 0D 41 (bank no. / dev ID) 10 F7
This string triggers a complete dump of all value response data bytes.
Request Level meter Data
Format: F0 00 20 0D 41 (Bank no. / dev ID) 11 F7
This string triggers a shorter dump of only the level meter data.
Set Value
Sets any number of parameters.
nn / oo can be repeated freely.
Value Response
After being triggered by receiving a request value command, device sends a string of all value
response data bytes. Message type is set to 30h.
Level Meter Response
After being triggered by receiving a request level meter data command, device sends a string of
all level meter data bytes. Message type is set to 31h.
Level meter Data Response Format
F0 00 20 0D 41 (bank no. / dev ID) 31 (AD ch.1) (ch.2) (ch.3) (ch.4) (ch.5) (ch.6) (ch.7) (ch.8)
(DA ch.1) (ch.2) (ch.3) (ch.4) (ch.5) (ch.6) (ch.7) (ch.8) F7
The peak level value will be stored and transmitted with the next level meter data request,
and the stored value will be reset.
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
57
19.3 Table
Set
Val.
Val.
Resp. Data bytes
No.
No.
Name
00h
0
Output Level
x
x
01h
02h
03h
04h
05h
06h
07h
08h
09h
0Ah
0Bh
0Ch
0Dh
0Eh
0Fh
10h
11h
12h
13h
14h
15h
16h
17h
18h
19h
1Ah
1Bh
1Ch
1Dh
1Eh
1Fh
20h
21h
22h
23h
24h
25h
26h
27h
28h
29h
2Ah
2Bh
2Ch
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
Trim Output Ch. 1
Trim Output Ch. 2
Trim Output Ch. 3
Trim Output Ch. 4
Trim Output Ch. 5
Trim Output Ch. 6
Trim Output Ch. 7
Trim Output Ch. 8
Trim Input Ch. 1
Trim Input Ch. 2
Trim Input Ch. 3
Trim Input Ch. 4
Trim Input Ch. 5
Trim Input Ch. 6
Trim Input Ch. 7
Trim Input Ch. 8
Setup 1
Setup 2
Setup 3
Setup 4
Lock / Sync Info 1
Lock / Sync Info 2
Lock / Sync Info 3
Mute Output 1..4
Mute Output 5..8
Reference Level
Setup 5
Option 1 source
Option 2 source
Option 3 source
Option 4 source
Option 5 source
Option 6 source
Option 7 source
Option 8 source
ADAT 1 source
ADAT 2 source
AES source
Analog source
(reserved)
(reserved)
(reserved)
(reserved)
Set bank no./Dev. ID
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
58
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
0..48 (see output level table)
4..28, 0.5dB steps, 4 = -6dB, 16 = 0dB,
28 = +6dB
see above
see above
see above
see above
see above
see above
see above
see above
see above
see above
see above
see above
see above
see above
see above
see setup 1 table
see setup 2 table
see setup 3 table
see setup 4 table
see lock / sync table 1
see lock / sync table 2
see lock / sync table 3
bit 0..3: 0 = normal operation, 1 = mute
bit 0..3: 0 = normal operation, 1 = mute
0..48, see output level table
see setup 5 table
0 = Option 1,
1 = Option 2,
2 = Option 3,
3 = Option 4,
4 = Option 5,
5 = Option 6,
6 = Option 7,
7 = Option 8,
8 = ADAT 1,
9 = ADAT 2,
10 = AES,
11 = Analog, 12 = n.c.
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
Output
Level:
0
1..13
14..28
29..47
48
Setup 1
Setup 2
Setup 3
Setup 4
-oo,
-98, -94, -90, -86, -82, -78, -74, -70, -66, -62, -58, -54, -50
-48, -46, -44, -42, -40, -38, -36, -34, -32, -30, -28, -26, -24, -22, -20
-19, -18, -17, -16, -15, -14, -13, -12, -11, -10, -9, -8, -7, -6, -5, -4, -3, -2, -1
0dB
MSB /
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
LSB / 0
MSB /
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
LSB / 0
MSB /
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
LSB / 0
MSB /
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
LSB / 0
MSB / 2
1
LSB / 0
MSB / 1
LSB / 0
MSB / 1
LSB / 0
0
analog input: 0 = +4dBu, 1 = +13dBu, 2 = +19dBu
analog input: 3 = +24dBu, 4 = dig. Input
(analog input)
analog output: 0 = +4dBu, 1 = +13dBu,
analog output: 2 = +19dBu, 3 = +24dBu
limiter mode: 0 = off, 1 = digital,
limiter mode: 2 = analog, 3 = analog + digital
MSB / 2
1
LSB / 0
MSB / 1
LSB / 0
0
follow clock: 0 = off, 1 = on
clock out: 0 = Fs, 1 = always single speed
clock select: 0 = int. 44.1, 1 = int. 48, 2 = WCK
clock select: 3 = Option, 4 = AES, 5 = ADAT
clock select
clock range: 0 = single speed, 1 = ds, 2 = qs
clock range
MSB / 1
LSB / 0
MSB / 1
LSB / 0
MSB / 1
LSB / 0
0
Auto-Device: 0 = off, 1 = on
Delay Compensation: 0 = off, 1 = on
Peak Hold: 0 = off, 1 = auto reset,
Peak Hold: 2 = manual, 3 = reset (tx only)
Digital Input: 0 = Option, 1 = ADAT, 2 = AES
Digital Input
Lock Keys: 0 = unlock, 1 = lock
0
fx drive: 0..3 = 1..4
(fx drive)
analog output dim: 0 = normal level, 1 = dim
direct level: 0 = disable, 1 = enable
enable trim: 0 = disable, 1 = enable
enable global level: 0 = disable, 1 = enable
display mode: 0 = normal, 1 = auto gain reduction
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME
59
Setup 5
MSB /
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
LSB / 0
0
dd: 0 = di, 1 = fx
Lock / Sync 1
(Request only)
(Request only)
(Request only)
(Request only)
Lock / Sync 2
(Request only)
(Request only)
(Request only)
(Request only)
Lock / Sync 3
(Request only)
(Request only)
(Request only)
(Request only)
MSB / 7
6
5
4
3
2
1
LSB / 0
0
0
0
0
WCK Sync: 0 = no sync, 1 = sync
WCK Lock: 0 = unlock, 1 = lock
Option Sync: 0 = no sync, 1 = sync
Option Lock: 0 = unlock, 1 = lock
MSB / 7
6
5
4
3
2
1
LSB / 0
0
0
ADAT 1 Sync: 0 = no sync, 1 = sync
ADAT 1 Lock: 0 = unlock, 1 = lock
ADAT 2 Sync: 0 = no sync, 1 = sync
ADAT 2 Lock: 0 = unlock, 1 = lock
AES 1 Sync: 0 = no sync, 1 = sync
AES 1 Lock: 0 = unlock, 1 = lock
MSB / 7
6
5
4
3
2
1
LSB / 0
0
0
AES 2 Sync: 0 = no sync, 1 = sync
AES 2 Lock: 0 = unlock, 1 = lock
AES 3 Sync: 0 = no sync, 1 = sync
AES 3 Lock: 0 = unlock, 1 = lock
AES 4 Sync: 0 = no sync, 1 = sync
AES 4 Lock: 0 = unlock, 1 = lock
Request Level Meter Data
Level meter Data
60
MSB / 7
6
(A/D only)
5
MSB / 2
(A/D only)
4
/1
(A/D only)
3
LSB / 0
2
MSB / 2
1
LSB / 0
/1
LSB / 0
0
0
gain reduction: 0 = no gr, 1 = < 1dB,
2 = > 1dB
gain reduction: 3 = > 3dB,
4 = > 6dB, 5 = > 9dB
gain reduction: 6 = > 12dB,
7 = > 15dB
level: 0 = < -60dBFS,
1 = < -30dBFS, 2 = < -12dBFS
level: 3 = < -6dBFS,
4 = < -3dBFS, 5 = < -1dBFS
level: 6 = < 0dBFS, 7 = over
User’s Guide ADI-8 QS © RME