Digital Audio Corporation MicroDAC IV User`s manual

Multi-Channel Reference Canceller
USER’S MANUAL
Version 1.5
MicroDAC 5
Multi-Channel Reference Canceller
USER’S MANUAL
Version 1.5
July 20, 2007
Document Number 061103JW
Phone:
Fax:
919 572 6767
919 572 6786
sales@dacaudio.com
www.dacaudio.com
Copyright © 2006-2007 by Digital Audio Corporation
All rights reserved.
Table of Contents
1 Overview............................................................................................................1
1.1
Introduction.............................................................................................1
1.2
Original Factory Configuration ................................................................1
1.3
Customization with the Software Utility...................................................2
1.4
Programming Custom Settings for Standalone Use ...............................2
2 Rear Panel Connectors......................................................................................3
2.1
Audio I/O.................................................................................................3
2.2
Using Digital Input Audio for Reference Cancellation .............................4
2.3
Other Connectors ...................................................................................4
3 Standalone Controls ..........................................................................................5
3.1
Front Panel .............................................................................................5
3.1.1
Audio I/O Format .............................................................................5
3.1.2
Headphone Controls........................................................................5
3.1.3
Input Level Controls.........................................................................6
3.1.4
Filter Controls ..................................................................................6
3.1.5
Lock/Unlock Unit..............................................................................8
3.2
Rear Panel..............................................................................................8
3.2.1
External Clear Switch ......................................................................8
3.2.2
External Freeze Switch....................................................................8
4 Specifications.....................................................................................................9
4.1
Power .....................................................................................................9
4.2
Analog Audio ..........................................................................................9
4.3
Digital Audio ...........................................................................................9
4.4
Physical ................................................................................................10
5 MicroDAC 5 Configuration Utility Overview......................................................11
5.1
Introduction...........................................................................................11
5.2
Main Screen .........................................................................................11
5.3
Filters....................................................................................................12
5.4
System Bandwidth ................................................................................12
5.5
Clearing and Freezing Filters................................................................13
5.6
Channel Configurations ........................................................................13
5.6.1
Mono Configurations .....................................................................13
5.6.2
Stereo Configurations....................................................................16
5.6.3
Audio Line Out Configuration ........................................................19
5.7
Storing Configurations ..........................................................................19
5.8
Recalling Configurations.......................................................................20
5.9
Connecting to the MicroDAC 5 .............................................................20
5.10 Programming the MicroDAC 5..............................................................21
5.10.1 Locked Standalone Behavior after PC Programming ....................22
5.10.2 Unlocked Standalone Behavior after PC Programming.................22
5.11 Synchronizing to the MicroDAC 5.........................................................24
5.12 Updating MicroDAC 5 Firmware ...........................................................24
6 Filters ...............................................................................................................25
6.1
Reference Canceller (nCH) Filter .........................................................25
6.2
1CH Filter .............................................................................................27
6.3
Highpass Filter......................................................................................30
6.4
Automatic Gain Control.........................................................................30
7 Installation........................................................................................................33
7.1
Windows XP/2000 Installation Instructions...........................................33
7.2
Windows Vista Installation Instructions.................................................40
Table of Figures
Figure 2-1: MicroDAC 5 Rear Panel .....................................................................3
Figure 3-1: MicroDAC 5 Front Panel.....................................................................5
Figure 5-1: Main Configuration Utility Screen .....................................................11
Figure 5-2: Stereo 2CH Filter plus AGC..............................................................12
Figure 5-3: Mono sub-menu................................................................................14
Figure 5-4: Mono 2CH with Reference on LRef Input .........................................15
Figure 5-5: Mono 3CH with References on Right and LRef Inputs .....................15
Figure 5-6: Mono 4CH ........................................................................................16
Figure 5-7: Stereo sub-menu ..............................................................................17
Figure 5-8: Stereo 2CH.......................................................................................18
Figure 5-9: Stereo 3CH.......................................................................................18
Figure 6-1: nCH Filter Dialog ..............................................................................26
Figure 6-2: 1CH Filter Dialog ..............................................................................28
Figure 6-3: Highpass Filter Dialog.......................................................................30
Figure 6-4: Automatic Gain Control Dialog .........................................................31
Figure 7-1: Extracting necessary files .................................................................33
Figure 7-2: Installing Microsoft .NET 2.0.............................................................34
Figure 7-3: Welcome screen...............................................................................35
Figure 7-4: Installing files ....................................................................................35
Figure 7-5: Finish screen ....................................................................................36
Figure 7-6: Windows driver compatibility warning. ..............................................36
Figure 7-7: Hardware wizard welcome screen. ...................................................37
Figure 7-8: Starting the hardware wizard. ...........................................................38
Figure 7-9: Windows driver compatibility warning. ..............................................38
Figure 7-10: Completing the hardware wizard. ...................................................39
Figure 7-11: AutoPlay prompt .............................................................................40
Figure 7-12: Extracting necessary files ...............................................................40
Figure 7-13: Welcome screen .............................................................................41
Figure 7-14: Windows Vista "unidentified program" warning ..............................41
Figure 7-15: Installing files ..................................................................................42
Figure 7-16: Finish screen ..................................................................................42
Figure 7-17: Windows Vista "unidentified program" warning ..............................43
Figure 7-18: Windows Vista driver installation warning.......................................43
Figure 7-19: Installing drivers..............................................................................44
Figure 7-20: Driver installation complete.............................................................44
1 Overview
1.1
Introduction
MicroDAC 5 is the latest generation of DAC's most popular tactical digital
adaptive filter. The MicroDAC 5 is designed to complement your tactical
surveillance efforts, packaging the most commonly used filters in a powerful and
easy-to-operate unit.
MicroDAC 5 contains four different filters for removing common noise problems
in surveillance audio. The four filters are:

A Multi-Channel Adaptive filter. This filter can be used as a reference
canceller to remove up to three reference signals. This filter can also be
configured as a one-channel adaptive filter, or deconvolver, to remove
common noises such as power hum, tones, and echoes.

A One-Channel adaptive filter. Following the reference canceller, this
second adaptive filter removes any remaining tonal noise or
reverberations.

A Highpass filter. This filter removes low-frequency rumble that lies below
the range of normal speech.

An Automatic Gain Control. This filter boosts low-level speech for easier
hearing while leaving unaffected the parts of the signal that are already at
a comfortable listening level.
The MicroDAC 5 is suitable for processing recorded audio or for use in live
listening situations, but it is specifically designed for easy use in a tactical
environment. The unit comes programmed with default settings that are
appropriate for the most common audio situations. The software utility that
accompanies the MicroDAC 5 allows finer control of the filtering behavior of the
unit, and can be used to build a configuration that works best for your recorded
audio or listening environment. Your configuration can then be programmed into
the unit for tactical use.
1.2
Original Factory Configuration
In the factory configuration, the two adaptive filters are always running at default
settings that are appropriate for cancellation of most common noises. Sensible
adaptive filter lengths and delays are chosen. A sensible adapt rate is selected
so that the filter can adapt in reasonable time to most noises without becoming
unstable. Auto-scaling of the adapt rate based on the signal power aids filter
Page 1
stability, and automatic crash detection is enabled to allow recovery in the event
that the filter does crash.
The highpass filter (HPF) and automatic gain control (AGC) can be enabled or
disabled using push buttons on the front panel. The factory default HPF has a
cutoff of 200 Hz (meaning all frequencies below 200 Hz will be removed). The
factory default AGC can add up to 10 dB of gain to the audio.
1.3
Customization with the Software Utility
The software utility allows you to configure the individual filters in the system.
You can change settings such as filter sizes, adapt rates, and delays for the
adaptive filters. You can change the HPF cutoff frequency and the maximum
gain that can be applied by the AGC. Although only one of these custom
configurations can be programmed into the hardware at a given time, you can
save multiple configurations to files on your PC for later recall and reuse.
1.4
Programming Custom Settings for Standalone Use
Although the front panel controls don't allow the fine-grained adjustments to filter
behavior that the software provides, you can still use your custom settings when
operating the MicroDAC 5 in tactical situations. With the unit connected to a PC
running the configuration software, you can program your custom configuration
into the unit. The custom settings are stored in nonvolatile memory so that the
MicroDAC 5 will continue to use your custom settings even after it is
disconnected from the PC and power cycled. After programming, you can still
change the settings provided on the front panel of the unit, but the custom
settings (those not configurable from the front panel) will be preserved and used
where applicable. See section 5.10 for more information.
Page 2
2 Rear Panel Connectors
The rear panel contains the following connectors:





Audio input
o Four ANALOG inputs
o S/PDIF input
o TOSLINK optical input
Audio output
o Two ANALOG line outputs
o TOSLINK optical output
External filter control connectors
o External filter freeze (EXT FRZ)
o External filter clear (EXT CLR)
USB 2.0 connector
POWER connector
Figure 2-1: MicroDAC 5 Rear Panel
2.1
Audio I/O
The rear panel contains several audio I/O connectors for a variety of ways to get
audio into and out of the MicroDAC 5 unit.
There are three input options: ANALOG INPUTS, S/PDIF DIGITAL INPUT, and
TOSLINK DIGITAL INPUT. Only the LEFT and RIGHT input channels are
selectable from among these options; regardless of the INPUT SELECT setting;
the LREF and RREF inputs are always ANALOG.
There are two output options: ANALOG OUTPUTS and TOSLINK DIGITAL
OUTPUT. Regardless of the INPUT SELECT setting, both analog and digital
outputs are enabled at all times.
Page 3
2.2
Using Digital Input Audio for Reference Cancellation
The S/PDIF and TOSLINK inputs always receive two channels of audio, LEFT
channel and RIGHT channel. For reference cancellation, these two channels
may contain a stereo primary signal, a mono primary and a reference signal, or
only a mono primary.
This means that if you want to cancel more than one reference from a mono
digital signal, or if you want to apply reference cancellation to a stereo digital
signal, you will need to use a combination of digital and analog inputs. For
example:

To cancel one reference from a stereo S/PDIF primary, select S/PDIF on
the front panel INPUT SELECT, and choose STEREO and 2CH in the
Filter Controls. Use the S/PDIF input connector to feed the primary
channels into the unit. Use the LREF ANALOG input to feed the reference
signal into the unit.

To cancel three references from a mono TOSLINK primary, select
TOSLINK on the front panel INPUT SELECT, and choose MONO and
4CH in the FILTER CONTROLS. Use the TOSLINK input connector to
feed the primary and one of the references into the unit. Use the LREF
and RREF ANALOG inputs to feed the other two references into the unit.

To cancel a single reference from a mono S/PDIF primary, put the primary
signal on the left S/PDIF channel, and choose MONO in the FILTER
CONTROLS. You may put the reference signal on either the S/PDIF right
channel OR the ANALOG LREF input, setting the FILTER CONTROLS to
the 2CH mode, where the red LED is lit on the reference channel you are
using.
See section 3.1.4 for more information on how to define your use of primary and
reference channels.
2.3
Other Connectors
The POWER connector should be connected to +12V DC, 2A. The USB 2.0
connector is used to connect the unit to the PC for use with the MicroDAC 5
configuration software.
Two external switch connectors are available for remotely clearing and freezing
the adaptive filters. See section 3.2 for more information on these controls.
Page 4
3 Standalone Controls
Controls on the MicroDAC 5 unit are used to configure the audio I/O and also to
provide a limited set of filter controls. While the PC software provides much finer
control of the filtering in the MicroDAC 5 unit, these panel controls can be used to
configure the MicroDAC 5 unit when not connected to the PC. These
“standalone” controls are described below.
3.1
Front Panel
Figure 3-1: MicroDAC 5 Front Panel
3.1.1 Audio I/O Format
Use the INPUT SELECT switch in the upper left corner to select ANALOG,
S/PDIF, or TOSLINK audio format for the primary inputs. This selection affects
only the LEFT and RIGHT input signals. Regardless of the selection, reference
signals can be input on the LREF and RREF ANALOG inputs. Also regardless of
the selection, the output audio is sent to both the ANALOG OUTPUTS and the
TOSLINK OUTPUT.
3.1.2 Headphone Controls
Use the controls in the lower left corner to control the audio you listen to on the
headphones. Use the INPUT/OUTPUT switch to select the audio you want to
listen to on the headphones (via the 3.5mm jack). When INPUT is selected, you
will hear the primary input signals – left and right for the stereo modes, or left in
both ears for the mono modes. When OUTPUT is selected, you will hear the
processed output audio. Use VOLUME to adjust the listening level on the
headphones.
By default, these controls affect only the headphone audio, and the ANALOG
OUTPUTS and TOSLINK OUTPUT always contain output audio. However,
using the MicroDAC 5 Configuration Utility software, you can enable a “Line Out
Toggle” mode in which the rear panel audio outputs toggle along with the
headphone output. Regardless of whether rear-panel output toggling is enabled,
Page 5
the VOLUME knob always controls only the headphone level; the rear-panel
output level is not adjustable.
3.1.3 Input Level Controls
The center section of the front panel contains INPUT LEVELS controls for the
input signals. The four LEDs above each knob provide level bargraphs for each
of the input signals. The red LED in each bargraph indicates that the audio is
overdriving. In general, it is a good idea to make your input signals fairly loud but
without overdriving. Ideally, your input signals will light the yellow “-6dB” LED at
their loudest parts, but never the red “OL” LED.
Also, note that each of the four inputs has an associated ACTIVE LED, in order
to indicate whether that particular input is in use in the selected filtering mode,
and what it is being used for. GREEN illumination indicates the input is being
used as a primary input for the multi-channel adaptive filter, while RED
illumination indicates the input is being used as a reference. When the LED is not
illuminated, the input is not in use in the selected mode.
For the ANALOG INPUTS, the level adjustment is applied to the analog signal
using the analog amplifier, with a range of +/- 30 dB. For the digital inputs, the
level adjustment is applied digitally, with exactly the same adjustment range.
3.1.4 Filter Controls
The right-hand section of the front panel contains FILTER CONTROLS used to
change the behavior of the filtering applied by the MicroDAC 5. The individual
controls are described in more detail below.
3.1.4.1 Channel Selection Controls
There are two controls on the front panel that can be used to define the input
audio channels. The MONO/STEREO select is used to specify whether there
are one or two primary channels. The nCH selection is used to specify the
number of reference signals, and which inputs those references are found on.
Choose 1CH for no reference cancellation, 2CH for a single reference, 3CH for
two references, and 4CH for three references (available only when the primary is
MONO). Together, these two controls allow a total of 9 channel modes, shown in
the table below:
Page 6
MONO/STEREO
Selection
nCH
Selection
MONO
1CH
Description
Mono input, no references.
MONO
2CH, Option A Mono primary, one reference on LREF.
MONO
2CH, Option B Mono primary, one reference on RIGHT.
MONO
3CH, Option A Mono primary, two references on LREF and RREF.
MONO
3CH, Option B Mono primary, two references on RIGHT and LREF.
MONO
4CH
Mono primary, three references on RIGHT, LREF, and RREF.
STEREO
1CH
Stereo input, no references.
STEREO
2CH
Stereo primary, one reference on LREF.
STEREO
3CH
Stereo primary, two references on LREF and RREF.
Table 1: Filter Input Configurations
As you press the MONO/STEREO and nCH selection buttons, the LEDs next to
each input gain dial will indicate the use of each channel. Cycle through the
modes until you reach the one you want. Note that only the legal nCH modes
are shown based on the MONO/STEREO section. For instance, you cannot
select 4CH if STEREO is selected, because STEREO 4CH is not a valid mode.
The LEDs light green for primary channels and red for reference channels. For
instance, in the MONO 2CH Option A mode, the LEFT channel LED is green and
the LREF LED is red. In the STEREO 3CH mode, the LEFT and RIGHT channel
LEDs are green and the LREF and RREF LEDs are red.
3.1.4.2 Bandwidth Control
Use the BW selection to choose the bandwidth at which audio will be processed.
The 5 kHz bandwidth uses a sample rate of 9.8 kHz, the 10 kHz bandwidth uses
a sample rate of 22.05 kHz, and the 20 kHz bandwidth uses a sample rate of
44.1 kHz.
Regardless of the sample rate at which audio is processed, the TOSLINK output
always uses a 44.1 kHz sample rate.
3.1.4.3 Highpass Filter
Use the HPF button to turn the highpass filter on and off. When the button is in,
the HPF is applied.
3.1.4.4 Automatic Gain Control
Use the AGC button to turn the automatic gain control on and off. When the
button is in, the AGC is applied.
Page 7
3.1.4.5 Clear Filters
Use the CLEAR button to clear the solution of all adaptive filters.
3.1.5 Lock/Unlock Unit
As marked on the front panel, the BW and nCH select buttons can be used to
lock the filter controls. To LOCK or UNLOCK the unit, hold these buttons down
together for three seconds; the MEM/LOCK LED in the upper right corner of the
front panel will turn on or off to indicate when the state has changed. The LED is
on when the unit is locked and off when the unit is unlocked.
When the unit is locked, the FILTER CONTROLS section of the front panel is
disabled. These controls include the MONO/STEREO selector, the BW and nCH
selectors, the AGC and HPF enable/disable buttons, and the CLEAR button.
Pressing these buttons will have no effect when the unit is locked. The EXT FRZ
(external freeze) and EXT CLR (external clear) switch-closure connectors on the
rear panel are also disabled and have no effect when the unit is locked.
The INPUT LEVELS, INPUT SELECT, and headphone controls remain active
even when the unit is locked.
When the user unlocks the MicroDAC 5, it will keep running at the locked
settings, except that the current state of the AGC and HPF buttons will be
applied. For example, if you lock the unit with the AGC button “in” (enabled),
then toggle the AGC button to the OUT position (disabled) while the unit is
locked, then unlock the unit, the AGC will automatically be disabled when the unit
is unlocked. This guarantees that when the unit is unlocked, the filtering
behavior and the front panel controls are always in agreement.
3.2
Rear Panel
Two connectors on the back panel (EXT CLR and EXT FRZ) can be used to
connect external switches for additional filter controls.
3.2.1 External Clear Switch
An external pushbutton switch wired to the EXT CLR connector can be used to
remotely clear the filter solution. Function is identical to the CLEAR switch on the
front panel; when the button is pressed, the filters are cleared.
3.2.2 External Freeze Switch
An external switch (slide or toggle switch recommended) wired to the EXT FRZ
switch can be used to freeze the adaptive filters. When the switch is closed, the
filters are frozen; when open, the filters are adapting. When the filters are frozen,
the ADAPT LED on the front panel goes out.
Page 8
4 Specifications
4.1



4.2






4.3

Power
9-18VDC input, 2A
2.1mm “barrel” connector, positive tip
Universal AC adaptor supplied
Analog Audio
Line Inputs (4);
o Standard RCA jack
o -39dBV to +6dBV input level, adjustable gain
o Zin = 25kΩ, AC coupled
Line Outputs (2):
o Standard RCA Jack
o +6dBV output level
o Zout = 100Ω, AC-coupled
Headphone Jack (1):
o Standard 3.5mm stereo headphone jack
o INPUT/OUTPUT monitoring selection
o VOLUME control
LED Indicators:
o Four-LED bar graph for each input channel
o “Active” LEDs to indicate use of the four input channels
o Status LEDs to indicate ADAPT, USB and MEM/LOCK condition
Bandwidth Options:
o 5kHz, 9.8kHz processing sample rate
o 10kHz, 22.05kHz processing sample rate
o 20kHz, 44.1kHz processing sample rate
Analog Conversion:
o Four channels of 24-bit, 256x-oversampling, sigma-delta stereo A/D
conversion
o Two channels of 24-bit, 256x-oversampling, delta-sigma stereo D/A
conversion
o >90dB SINAD, >100dB dynamic range
Digital Audio
Audio Inputs (2):
o TOSLINK optical interface, 16-24 bit data resolution and 32-192kHz
sample rates supported
o S/PDIF coaxial interface, RCA jack, 16- to 24-bit data resolution
and 32-192kHz sample rates supported
Page 9









4.4


Audio Output (1):
o TOSLINK optical interface, constant 24-bit data resolution and
44.1kHz sample rate
Control Interface (1):
o USB 2.0 full-speed interface
o Windows-based interactive control and programming utility
Processor Functions (DSP #1):
o 4500-tap (at 5kHz BW option) adaptive FIR stage, configurable as:
 4500-tap monaural 2CH filter
 2 x 2100-tap monaural 3CH or stereo 2CH filter
 3 x 1400-tap monaural 4CH filter
 4 x 1050-tap stereo 3CH filter
o Adaptive filters derate to 2100 and 1000 total filter taps at 10kHz
and 20kHz bandwidths, respectively
Processor Functions (DSP #2):
o 2048-tap at 5kHz BW, 1024-tap at 10kHz BW, 512-tap at 20kHz
BW stereo 1CH adaptive predictive deconvolver stage
o Stereo highpass filter stage with cutoff at 200, 250, or 300 Hz
o Stereo automatic gain control (AGC) with maximum boost of 40dB
Algorithms:
o Time-domain, continuous adjustment, Normalized Least Mean
Square (NLMS) for all 1CH, 2CH, 3CH, and 4CH adaptive filters
o Automatic “crash detection” and clearing for all adaptive filters
o Fourth-order Butterworth IIR implementation for 200Hz highpass
filter
o Time-domain, peak-sensitive, envelope tracking compressor with
“lookahead” for AGC
Cancellation Capability:
o >70dB for 1kHz sine wave (1CH mode)
o >60dB for white noise (2CH, 3CH, 4CH modes)
Processors:
o Dual 300MHz TMS320C6713 floating point DSP, 4.8 billion
instructions/second peak speed, 3.6GFLOPS
o 109 million floating-point adaptive filter taps/second
Computation Precision:
o 32-bit IEEE floating-point, single precision
Signal Delays:
o 4096 total samples available for primary or reference channels on
DSP #1
o 64 total samples available for 1CH prediction span on DSP #2
Physical
8.5”W x 1.7”H x 6.6”D chassis, 8lbs.
1U rack mounting kit available
Page 10
5 MicroDAC 5 Configuration Utility Overview
5.1
Introduction
The MicroDAC 5 Configuration Utility allows for complete setup and intuitive,
interactive control of all the audio processing on the MicroDAC 5, via USB
connection between the hardware and a Windows®-based PC.
The software can be used to control the MicroDAC 5 unit in real time. Once you
have decided on the appropriate settings for your target audio, all processing
settings can be saved in nonvolatile memory on the MicroDAC 5 for stand-alone
operation without the computer connection. In addition, favorite configurations
can be saved on the PC and subsequently recalled.
5.2
Main Screen
An image of the main window for the MicroDAC 5 Configuration Utility is shown
below in Figure 5-1. The signal diagram represents the flow of the audio signal
going from left to right. On the right hand side, you can select which filters you
want in the signal chain and the system bandwidth.
Figure 5-1: Main Configuration Utility Screen
Page 11
5.3
Filters
Four different filters are available to place into the signal chain. These are
selectable on the right-hand side of the main screen. Figure 5-2 is a sample
showing only the reference canceller filter and AGC selected. With this
configuration, the audio signal is only processed by these two filters; the 1CH
and Highpass (HPF) filters are excluded.
Figure 5-2: Stereo 2CH Filter plus AGC
The same filters are applied to both left and right channels of input. You cannot
have a different set of filters on the left channel versus the right channel.
To configure the settings for a filter, simply click on that filter in the audio flow
diagram to open the filter configuration window. The same settings are applied
to both left and right channels in stereo configurations, so clicking on either the
left or right channel filter takes you to the same configuration window, and the
settings changes made there are applied to both channels.
5.4
System Bandwidth
The available bandwidths are 5, 10 and 20 kHz and are selectable on the righthand side of the main screen (see Figure 5-1). Select a bandwidth by clicking on
the radio button next to the desired bandwidth. The new bandwidth selected will
be effective immediately on the hardware.
Page 12
5.5
Clearing and Freezing Filters
The reference canceller and 1CH filters are adaptive filters. This means that
their filter coefficients are constantly changing to adapt to new signal conditions.
If you want to reset the filter coefficients and have them adapt from a fresh start,
then click the “Clear Filter Solution” button. This will clear ALL the adaptive filters
in both channels.
To “freeze” the filters, which prevents them from further updating their
coefficients, click the “Disable Adaptation” button. This will change the text of the
button to read “Enable Adaptation”. The text of the button is an indication of the
action that will be taken if you press it, not the current status. So, to allow the
filters to continue to adapt again, press the “Enable Adaptation” button (and
again, the text will revert to “Disable Adaptation”).
5.6
Channel Configurations
The MicroDAC 5 can operate in a mono or stereo configuration. Different
reference canceling options are available depending on which configuration you
are working with. The channel configurations can be accessed via the
“Channels” menu.
5.6.1 Mono Configurations
To configure the unit for a mono signal, click the “Channels” menu and select the
“Mono” sub-menu, as shown in Figure 5-3. In mono mode, the primary signal is
always the Left Input and the output is sent to both the Left and Right Outputs.
Page 13
Figure 5-3: Mono sub-menu
In mono mode, there are six options available, three of which are shown in the
following figures:






1CH: This is a single channel without any reference cancellation.
2CH with reference on Right Input
2CH with reference on LRef Input (see Figure 5-4)
3CH with references on Right and LRef Inputs (see Figure 5-5)
3CH with references on LRef and RRef Inputs
4CH with references on Right, LRef and RRef Inputs (see Figure 5-6)
Page 14
Figure 5-4: Mono 2CH with Reference on LRef Input
Figure 5-5: Mono 3CH with References on Right and LRef Inputs
Page 15
Figure 5-6: Mono 4CH
5.6.2 Stereo Configurations
To configure the unit for a stereo signal, click the “Channels” menu and select the
“Stereo” sub-menu, as shown in Figure 5-7.
Page 16
Figure 5-7: Stereo sub-menu
In stereo mode, there are three options available, two of which are shown in the
following figures:



1CH: This places an additional 1-CH filter on both the Left and Right
Inputs and provides no reference cancellation.
2CH: Reference for both signals is LRef Input (see Figure 5-8)
3CH: References for both signals are LRef and RRef Inputs (see Figure
5-9)
Page 17
Figure 5-8: Stereo 2CH
Figure 5-9: Stereo 3CH
Page 18
5.6.3 Audio Line Out Configuration
By default, the audio line outputs on the rear panel (labeled ANALOG OUTPUTS
and DIGITAL OUTPUT) always contain output audio. This default behavior
allows the user to toggle between input and output on the headphones without
affecting the line output.
However, it may at times be desirable to have the line outputs toggle along with
the headphones. To make this possible, a “Toggle Line Out with Headphones”
option is available in the Channels menu, as shown in Figure 5-10.
Figure 5-10: Toggle Line Out with Headphones
When this item is checked, the INPUT/OUTPUT button on the front panel toggles
both the headphones and the rear-panel outputs. When the item is unchecked,
only the headphones toggle and the rear-panel outputs always contain output
audio.
5.7
Storing Configurations
With the MicroDAC 5 software you can store configurations into files on your
PC’s hard drive for later recall and reuse. These files contain the settings for the
configuration including system bandwidth, channel configuration and filter
settings.
The adapt/freeze settings are not stored in the configuration files, because
storage of adaptive filter coefficients is not supported. New configurations
Page 19
always load to an adapting state. (If you want to clear a filter and leave it cleared
for a period of time, you can first freeze adaptation and then clear the filter.)
To store a configuration, click the “File” menu and then “Save Config As…”.
5.8
Recalling Configurations
With the MicroDAC 5 software you can recall configurations that you have
previously saved to files. Upon recalling a config file, the software screen will
update to those settings and also send those settings down to the hardware if a
MicroDAC 5 unit is connected.
To restore a configuration, click the “File” menu and then “Open Config…”. This
will bring up a standard Windows browse dialog where you can select the config
file you want to load. Click “Open” and the configuration will be loaded.
Important Note: Recalling a configuration is not the same as “programming”
settings into the unit! Recalling a configuration file will change the current
operating behavior of the unit (if one is connected), but it will not change the
settings stored in nonvolatile memory on the unit. Think of recalling configuration
files as a shortcut to manually changing all your software settings. If you want to
program these settings into the nonvolatile memory in the hardware (so that
those settings will be used after the unit is disconnected from the PC), you still
need to choose “Program MicroDAC 5” from the File menu. See section 5.10 for
more information about programming the MicroDAC 5 hardware.
5.9
Connecting to the MicroDAC 5
The hardware is connected to the PC via a USB cable. To connect the
MicroDAC 5, follow these steps:
1. Connect the USB cable that is provided to the MicroDAC 5 hardware and
the PC.
2. Power on the MicroDAC 5 unit.
3. The PC should recognize the MicroDAC 5 within a few seconds.
4. Start the MicroDAC 5 Configuration Utility software.
5. The software will automatically detect and connect to the MicroDAC 5.
If the Controller software is already running, you can still connect a MicroDAC 5
to the PC by selecting “Connect” from the File menu.
Upon connect, is it is likely that the current software settings will be different from
the programmed settings in the hardware. When these settings do not match,
the user is prompted to load the current hardware configuration into the software.
If the user selects “Yes,” then the software will read the programmed settings
from the MicroDAC 5 unit. (This is the easiest way to determine what settings
Page 20
are stored in nonvolatile memory on an unknown unit.) If “No” is selected, then
the most recent software configuration will be “pushed” down to the hardware,
and the hardware will begin running at the settings that were in the software prior
to connection. Note that “pushing” software settings will not overwrite the
nonvolatile memory – if you were to disconnect, the unit would return to its stored
settings unless you explicitly re-program its nonvolatile memory.
You can only have one MicroDAC 5 powered up and connected to the PC at any
given time.
5.10 Programming the MicroDAC 5
Once the MicroDAC 5 is connected to the software, you can program it at any
time by clicking on the “File” menu and then selecting “Program MicroDAC 5”.
By programming the MicroDAC 5, you are taking the current settings in the
software and storing them in the nonvolatile memory of the hardware. This
enables the MicroDAC 5 to be disconnected from the PC, turned off, and
deployed. Now, when the unit powers on, it will reload the settings that you
programmed into its memory.
If you attempt to disconnect from the hardware without programming the latest
settings, the software will display a prompt asking if you wish to do so. This is to
help prevent the user from accidentally neglecting to program the unit upon
disconnect. If you choose to program, the latest software settings will be
programmed and the unit will continue to run at these settings after it is
disconnected. If you choose not to program, the unit will revert to its
programmed settings upon disconnect.
To protect against inadvertent changes in the programmed settings, the PC
always programs the nonvolatile memory into the “locked” state. In order to
change the channel mode or bandwidth in a tactical situation after PC
programming, the user would have to unlock the device (see section 3.1.5).
Once a unit is programmed, there are only two ways to change its nonvolatile
memory state:
1. Reconnect to the PC and reprogram the unit, or
2. Unlock the unit and use the front panel filter controls to change the
behavior.
Important Note: Once the unit is unlocked, any changes made using the front
panel filter controls are preserved in the nonvolatile memory. This behavior
allows the unit to maintain its current operational state in the event of an
unexpected power loss.
Page 21
5.10.1 Locked Standalone Behavior after PC Programming
After PC programming, the unit will power up in the locked state. As long as the
unit is never manually unlocked, it will power up in the locked state each time
power is cycled, and it will always run at the programmed settings.
Note that the INPUT LEVELS controls, INPUT SELECT, and headphone controls
are NOT programmed, and their controls remain fully functional even when the
unit is locked.
5.10.2 Unlocked Standalone Behavior after PC Programming
If a programmed unit is unlocked, it will continue to use the programmed settings
to whatever extent is sensible, but it will choose default values where necessary.
BW Changes
If only the BW (Bandwidth) setting is changed, then the filter behavior is
preserved as closely as possible. For the adaptive filters, three of the settings
are time-dependent and therefore scaled for bandwidth changes; these are the
filter length, the adapt rate, and the delay. When the bandwidth is changed, the
filter length and delay are changed proportionally, and the adapt rate is changed
inverse-proportionally. These scalings preserve filter behavior in relation to time
(if your delay at 10 kHz bandwidth was 5 ms, then your delay at 20 kHz
bandwidth should also be 5 ms, which now requires twice as many delay taps.)
These scalings are subject to the maximum and minimum possible settings for a
given bandwidth, so after a bandwidth change the settings may not be able to be
perfectly scaled. For instance, consider the case where the user programs a
maximum-length filter at 5 kHz bandwidth. If the unit is later unlocked and the
bandwidth is changed to 10 kHz, then the hardware will not be capable of
running twice as many taps to achieve the same effective filter duration. The unit
will run at its maximum filter length, but this will correspond to a shorter time in
milliseconds than the 5 kHz setting.
MONO/STEREO Changes
If the MONO/STEREO setting is changed, then again the filter behavior is
preserved as closely as possible. The 1CH adaptive filter, highpass filter, and
AGC will continue unchanged. However, if a reference canceller is running, the
maximum possible filter size will change. If the change is from stereo to mono,
the ceiling is actually increased, so the filter will continue running at the
programmed settings. If the change is from mono to stereo, however, the ceiling
is decreased and the length of the filter will be shortened as necessary.
Filter In/Out Changes
If the HPF or AGC setting is changed, then the filters will continue to run at their
programmed settings when they are “in,” and the filters will not be applied when
Page 22
they are “out.” Taking one of these filters out and then putting it back in does not
overwrite the programmed cutoff (for the HPF) or maximum gain (for the AGC)
settings.
The two adaptive filters always use their programmed enable/disable setting.
There is no way to enable or disable these filters in standalone mode, so if you
program the unit with one or both of these filters disabled, then it can never be
enabled again until the unit is re-connected to the PC. There is no way to specify
that an adaptive filter should be run in some channel modes but not in others.
nCH Setting Changes
Changes in the nCH setting produce the largest chance of diverging from the
programmed settings. If a reference canceller mode (2CH, 3CH, or 4CH) is
programmed and the unit is changed to another reference canceller mode, then
the behavior is just like a mono/stereo change – the stored settings will be used,
although they will be clamped as necessary to stay within the legal range for the
new channel mode. If a reference canceller mode is programmed and the unit is
changed to a 1CH filter, then the stored settings are no longer meaningful and
are ignored; the 1CH runs at factory default settings. Similarly, if a 1CH is
programmed and the unit is changed to a 2CH, 3CH, or 4CH mode, the 1CH
settings are ignored and factory defaults are used for the reference canceller.
Lock State Changes
When the unit is powered down, its lock state is always preserved in nonvolatile
memory. When the unit is programmed from the PC, it is always programmed to
power up locked. But, if later in standalone mode it is unlocked and powered
down in the unlocked state, then it will power up unlocked the next time.
Similarly, if the unit is powered down locked, it will power up locked the next time
it is turned on.
Preservation of Programmed Settings
Only settings that are controllable from the front panel can be overwritten in
unlocked standalone mode. This means that, if a programmed unit is unlocked
and its front panel settings are changed, then it can be returned to its exact
programmed state by using the front panel controls to return to the original mode
settings.
For instance, say the unit is programmed to use a maximum length mono 2CH
reference canceller. If the unit is unlocked and changed to a stereo mode, then a
ceiling will be applied to the filter size to accommodate the second filter stage
that is required. However, the new clamped filter size is NOT stored in the
nonvolatile memory, so if the mode is later changed back to mono, then the
original programmed size is used.
In short, filter controls available on the front panel WILL overwrite their
nonvolatile memory values once the unit is unlocked. These are:
Page 23






MONO/STEREO setting
BW setting
nCH setting
HPF in/out
AGC in/out
LOCK/UNLOCK state
Other settings cannot be overwritten in nonvolatile memory unless the unit is
connected to the PC and explicitly reprogrammed.
5.11 Synchronizing to the MicroDAC 5
Whenever the software connects to a MicroDAC 5 hardware unit,
synchronization MUST occur to maintain consistency between what is displayed
in the interface and what is currently running on the unit. The user has two
choices; either the software will push down to the hardware its current settings
(changing what is currently running on the unit) OR the software will retrieve the
current settings directly from the hardware and update its interface accordingly
(leaving the hardware essentially unchanged).
Regardless of which option is selected, after the synchronization occurs the PC
software is in control and any changes made will be sent down to the hardware
unit.
The user will be prompted to make a choice between these options each time a
connection is made.
Upon disconnecting, the hardware will always revert to running whatever is
stored in its nonvolatile memory. This may have the unintended side effect of
resetting any adaptive filters.
5.12 Updating MicroDAC 5 Firmware
Whenever the software connects to a MicroDAC 5 unit, it will automatically check
to see if that unit is running the latest firmware. If the unit is not running the latest
firmware, the user will be prompted to update the firmware. The firmware update
will take a few minutes.
Also, the user can verify that the unit is running the latest firmware by choosing
Update Firmware from the File menu, which will check the firmware version and
notify if an update is available.
Page 24
6 Filters
To configure a specific filter, click on that filter in the signal flow diagram on the
main window. Doing so will open the configuration window for that filter. Note
that, in stereo configurations, the selected settings are always applied to both
channels; you cannot choose different filter settings for the left and right
channels.
6.1
Reference Canceller (nCH) Filter
The Reference Canceller (nCH) adaptive filter is used to automatically cancel
from the “primary” channel(s) any audio which matches one of the “reference”
channels. For example, consider a signal containing microphone audio with the
desired voices masked by radio or TV sound. The radio/TV interference can be
cancelled in real-time if the original broadcast audio, usually available from a
second receiver, is simultaneously connected as a reference channel.
As described in section 3.1.4, controls on the front panel can be used to define
which input channels are primaries and which are references. These same
selections are available in the Channels menu within the PC software.
When the MicroDAC 5 is running standalone (not connected to the PC), the filter
runs at whatever settings are stored in the nonvolatile memory. When running
connected to the PC, finer control is available. Figure 6-1 shows the filter
controls available for the reference canceller. The window shown is for a 2CH
filter, but the same controls are available for 3CH and 4CH filters as well.
If desired, this first filter can be run as a 1CH adaptive filter instead of a reference
cancellation filter. If so, its available controls are identical to those described in
section 6.2.
Page 25
Figure 6-1: nCH Filter Dialog
Description of the controls pictured in Figure 6-1 follows:
Filter Size
Used to set the number of FIR filter taps in the adaptive filter. Filter size is
indicated both in taps (filter order) and in milliseconds. Minimum filter size is 16
taps, but can be set as high as 4500 taps depending on the channel
configuration and system bandwidth.
Adapt Rate
Used to set the rate at which the adaptive filter adapts to changing signal
conditions (mathematically known as Mu). A Mu of 1 x 2-18 provides very slow
adaptation, while a Mu of 5884 x 2-18 provides fastest adaptation. Slower adapt
rates take longer to reach a solution or to adapt to changing signal
characteristics. Faster adapt rates are more susceptible to filter crashes.
Delay
Sets the amount of delay to be applied to the input. The delay can be applied to
either the primary or the reference channel(s). Delay is indicated both in
Page 26
samples and in milliseconds. Minimum Delay is 1 sample, but can be set to as
high as 2250 samples depending on the channel configuration.
Filter Output
Selects the output of the filter. The normal output, or “residue,” is the primary
signal that remains after the reference has been cancelled. The prediction, or
rejected output, is the part of the primary signal that is removed by the reference
canceller. This setting provides a way to hear what is being cancelled from the
signal. For most situations, the Normal output should be selected.
Adapt Mode
When Auto Adapt Mode is enabled, the specified Adapt Rate is continuously
scaled based upon the input signal level. This generally results in faster
convergence for a given adapt rate setting without greatly increasing the risk of a
filter crash. When Fixed is selected, the specified Adapt Rate is used at all times
without scaling. Auto is the recommended setting.
Enable Crash Detect
When checked, enables the Crash Detect algorithm in the MicroDAC 5.
Coefficients of adaptive filters have the potential of diverging instead of
converging; this is most likely to happen for faster adapt rates or when there is a
quick and dramatic change in the input signal such as a sudden loud noise.
When the filter diverges, it is called a filter “crash” and the audio becomes
distorted. Since MicroDAC 5 is designed for unmanned deployment, a filter
crash would be unacceptable. A good choice of adapt rate coupled with the Auto
adapt mode should make crashes extremely rare, but with Crash Detection
enabled the filter will automatically detect any crash and then clear the filter so it
can reconverge to a good solution.
Clear Filter Solution
The Clear Filter Solution button is used to restart the adaptive filters as deemed
necessary. This function is sometimes used in the case of a filter crash, although
this use should be unnecessary if Crash Detection is enabled. Another example
of when to press the Clear Filter Solution button is when the audio scene
changes suddenly, requiring a new filter solution; this may occur when the
microphone is moved, or when processing tape recorded conversations that
occurred at different locations.
6.2
1CH Filter
The 1CH Adaptive filter is used to automatically cancel predictable noises and
effects from the input audio. Predictable noises include tones, hum, buzz,
engine/motor noise, and, to some degree, music. Predictable effects include
echoes, reverberations, and room acoustics.
Page 27
When the MicroDAC 5 is running standalone (not connected to the PC), the filter
runs at whatever settings are stored in the nonvolatile memory. When running
connected to the PC, finer control is available. Figure 6-2 shows the filter
controls available for the 1CH adaptive filter.
Figure 6-2: 1CH Filter Dialog
Description of the controls pictured in Figure 6-2 follows:
Filter Size
Used to set the number of FIR filter taps in the adaptive filter. Filter size is
indicated both in taps (filter order) and in milliseconds. Minimum Filter Size is 16
taps, but can be set to as high as 2048 taps depending on the system bandwidth.
Small filters are most effective with simple noises such as tones and music.
Larger filters should be used with complex noises such as severe reverberations
and raspy power hums.
Adapt Rate
Used to set the rate at which the adaptive filter adapts to changing signal
conditions (mathematically known as Mu). A Mu of 1 x 2-18 provides very slow
adaptation, while a Mu of 5884 x 2-18 provides fastest adaptation.
Page 28
Slower adapt rates take longer to reach a solution or to adapt to changing signal
characteristics, but a slow rate is still quite effective for stable tones and
reverberations and slow adapt rates make filter crashes less likely. Faster adapt
rates may be required for changing noises, but a fast adapt rate can also affect
the quality of the target speech as the filter may attack sustained vowel sounds.
Prediction Span
Sets the number of samples in the prediction span delay line. Prediction span is
indicated both in samples and in milliseconds, and can be adjusted from 1 to 64
samples. Shorter prediction spans allow maximum noise removal, while longer
prediction spans preserve voice naturalness and quality. A prediction span of 2
or 3 samples is normally recommended.
Filter Output
Used to select the output of the filter. The Normal output, or “residue,” is the
signal that remains after predictable noises have been removed. The Prediction
(rejected) output contains the predictable noise that is removed. The Prediction
setting isn’t typically used in normal operation, but it allows you to hear the noise
that the filter is removing, which can be useful when configuring the filter settings.
For most situations, the Normal output should be selected.
Adapt Mode
When Auto Adapt Mode is enabled, the specified Adapt Rate is continuously
power scaled based upon the input signal level. This generally results in faster
convergence for a given adapt rate setting without greatly increasing the risk of a
filter crash. When Fixed is selected, the specified Adapt Rate is utilized at all
times without power scaling. Auto is the recommended setting.
Enable Crash Detect
When checked, enables the Crash Detect algorithm in the MicroDAC 5.
Coefficients of adaptive filters have the potential of diverging instead of
converging; this is most likely to happen for faster adapt rates or when there is a
quick and dramatic change in the input signal such as a sudden loud noise.
When the filter diverges, it is called a filter “crash” and the audio becomes
distorted. Since the MicroDAC 5 is meant for unmanned deployment, a filter
crash would be unacceptable. A good choice of adapt rate coupled with the Auto
adapt mode should make crashes extremely rare, but with Crash Detection
enabled the filter will automatically detect any crash and then clear the filter so it
can reconverge to a good solution.
Clear Filter Solution
The Clear Filter Solution button is used to restart the adaptive filters as deemed
necessary. This function is sometimes used in the case of a filter crash, although
this use should be unnecessary if Crash Detection is enabled. Another example
of when to press the Clear Filter Solution button is when the audio scene
Page 29
changes suddenly, requiring a new filter solution; this may occur when the
microphone is moved, or when processing tape recorded conversations that
occurred at different locations.
6.3
Highpass Filter
The Highpass filter is used to attenuate all signal frequencies below a specified
cutoff frequency. This filter is used to reduce low-frequency noises, such as tape
or acoustic room rumble, from the input audio. The Highpass filter is sometimes
called a "rumble filter."
Figure 6-3 shows the filter configuration window for the Highpass filter.
Figure 6-3: Highpass Filter Dialog
The only adjustable setting available for the Highpass filter is the cutoff
frequency. Any signal frequencies below this cutoff frequency will be attenuated.
6.4
Automatic Gain Control
The Automatic Gain Control, or AGC, is used to boost low-level output signals to
a good listening level. The AGC monitors the signal level, and if it drops below a
minimum reference level, gain is gradually applied to bring the signal back up to
the reference level. The gain continues to be applied until the signal level again
rises above the reference level or until the maximum allowable gain is applied. If
the output signal level is above the reference level, the AGC has no effect on the
output audio.
Figure 6-4 shows the filter configuration window for the Automatic Gain Control.
Page 30
Figure 6-4: Automatic Gain Control Dialog
The only adjustable setting available for the Automatic Gain Control is the
maximum possible gain to be applied. In the example above, the maximum gain
is set to 10 dB. If the output signal falls more than 10 dB below the reference
level, then a 10 dB gain will be applied but the output level will still be below the
reference level.
The AGC is useful in near party/far party conversations where one party’s voice
is much softer than the other. The AGC can be used to boost the softer speaker
without boosting the louder speaker. The AGC can also be used to compensate
for losses in signal level which may have occurred as a result of the preceding
filters. For most near party/far party applications, max gain of 10-15 dB is the
recommended setting, as a larger maximum gain may elevate background
noises too much during pauses in speech. A “soft AGC” of 5 dB is often useful
even when large voice level differences are not present.
Page 31
Page 32
7 Installation
To install the MicroDAC 5 software, insert the MicroDAC 5 Installation CD into
your CD-ROM drive. If the installation software does not automatically run after
several seconds you will need to manually start the installation as follows:
With the MicroDAC 5 Installation CD in your CD-ROM drive click on the
Start menu and then the Run option. In the window that appears type:
X:\setup.exe
where “X” is the drive letter of your CD-ROM. Then click OK or press
Enter to start the installation.
7.1
Windows XP/2000 Installation Instructions
The MicroDAC 5 software requires Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 be installed. If
it is not yet installed on your computer, the setup package will install it for you.
The following steps assume you need to install the .NET Framework 2.0.
1. Setup will first examine your system to make sure it meets the minimum
requirements. Next it will extract the files it needs from the installation
disk.
Figure 7-1: Extracting necessary files
Page 33
2. If .NET 2.0 is not already installed on your machine, it will be installed
automatically.
NOTE: The .NET 2.0 Framework is large and takes about 10 minutes
to install. During this time the installation may appear to hang, or
“freeze” on your system. This is normal. Do not attempt to stop the
installation; just let it work and do not reboot the system.
Figure 7-2: Installing Microsoft .NET 2.0
Page 34
3. After the .NET install completes, you will get a “Welcome” screen. If there
is a MicroDAC 5 unit connected to your computer, make sure it is turned
off. Then click “Next” to continue.
Figure 7-3: Welcome screen
4. Setup will then install the necessary MicroDAC 5 files and drivers.
Figure 7-4: Installing files
Page 35
5. When Setup has completed the installation, the “Finish” screen will be
displayed. Click “Finish” to close the window.
Figure 7-5: Finish screen
6. After clicking Finish, you may be presented with a warning window
regarding Windows XP compatibility. Click “Continue Anyway” each time
this window appears.
Figure 7-6: Windows driver compatibility warning.
Page 36
7. Next, before running the MicroDAC 5 software, attach the MicroDAC 5
hardware to your computer via the included USB cable, and turn on the
unit. After a few moments, the computer will begin the Found New
Hardware setup.
If you are running Windows XP:
a. You will see a window asking if Windows should use Windows Update
to search for software. Select “No, not this time”, then click “Next”.
Figure 7-7: Hardware wizard welcome screen.
Page 37
b. You will see a window asking if the software should be installed
automatically. Select “Install the software automatically”, then click “Next”.
The driver will begin to load.
Figure 7-8: Starting the hardware wizard.
c. You may again see the driver compatibility warning(s) from step 6.
Again, click “Continue Anyway”.
Figure 7-9: Windows driver compatibility warning.
Page 38
d. Once the driver has finished installing you will be presented with a
window indicating completion of the Found New Hardware wizard. Click
“Finish”.
Figure 7-10: Completing the hardware wizard.
e. If prompted to do so, repeat steps a-d to load any additional drivers.
If you are running Windows 2000:
The drivers should load automatically with no intervention from you.
8. Now your MicroDAC 5 is ready for use! To start using your MicroDAC 5,
connect the MicroDAC 5 unit to the PC, turn it on, and double click the
“MicroDAC 5” icon on your desktop.
Page 39
7.2
Windows Vista Installation Instructions
1. After inserting the installation disk, you may be presented with an
AutoPlay window prompting you do choose what should be done with the
disk you just inserted. Choose “Run setup.exe”.
Figure 7-11: AutoPlay prompt
2. Setup will extract the files it needs from the installation disk.
Figure 7-12: Extracting necessary files
Page 40
3. You will be presented with a “Welcome” screen. If there is a MicroDAC 5
unit connected to your computer, make sure it is turned off. Then click
“Next” to continue.
Figure 7-13: Welcome screen
4. You may see a Windows Vista security warning similar to that shown
below. Choose “Allow” to continue installation.
Figure 7-14: Windows Vista "unidentified program" warning
Page 41
5. Setup will then install the necessary MicroDAC 5 files and drivers.
Figure 7-15: Installing files
6. When Setup as completed the installation, the “Finish” screen will be
displayed. Click “Finish” to close the window.
Figure 7-16: Finish screen
Page 42
7. You may see another “unidentified program” warning window; again,
choose “Allow”.
Figure 7-17: Windows Vista "unidentified program" warning
8. You may see a security warning about a driver with an unverifiable
publisher. Choose “Install this driver anyway”.
Figure 7-18: Windows Vista driver installation warning
Page 43
9. Next, before running the MicroDAC 5 software, attach the MicroDAC 5
hardware to your computer via the included USB cable, and turn on the
unit. After a few moments, the computer will begin installing the required
drivers. This will happen automatically, with notification balloons
indicating the status.
Figure 7-19: Installing drivers
Figure 7-20: Driver installation complete
10. Now your MicroDAC 5 is ready for use! To start using your MicroDAC 5,
connect the MicroDAC 5 unit to the PC, turn it on, and double click the
“MicroDAC 5” icon on your desktop.
Page 44