Maxford USA RC Model Nieuport 28 Specifications

22% NIEUPORT 28 ARF
R A D I O C O N T RO L W W I M O D E L A I R P L A N E
I N S T R U C T I O N M A N UA L
Shown with optional Nieuport 28 scale
machine guns, motor and propeller.
Congratulations on your acquisition of Maxford USA’s Nieuport 28 ARF!
The Nieuport 28 was a French biplane fighter flown during World War I, designed by Gustave Delage and built by Nieuport,
also known as Nieuport-Delage – a French airplane company famous for racers before World War I and fighter aircraft during
World War I and between the wars.
Retaining many of the Nieuport 17’s best features, the Nieuport 28 was a lightly built, highly maneuverable fighter: It had a
more powerful engine; carried twin synchronized machine guns; its ailerons were fitted only to the lower wing; and it had twospar wings – top and bottom – in place of the earlier Nieuport types’ sesquiplane (a biplane with one long wing and one short one
above or below it).
The Nieuport 28 was the first aircraft to see service in any American fighter squadron. By the time the Nieuport 28 became
available in early 1918, it was already considered “surplus” from the French point of view. Their SPAD S.XIII was a superior
aircraft in most respects and had already become firmly established as the standard French fighter. (A 1/5-scale ARF SPAD XIII
is also available from Maxford USA at www.maxfordusa.com.)
When the Nieuport 28 was offered to the United States, it was immediately accepted by the American Expeditionary Force,
and 297 Nieuport 28s were put into service in the 27th, 94th, 95th and 103rd Aero Pursuit Squadrons.
Several well-known WWI American pilots, including 26-victory American ace Captain Eddie Rickenbacker and Lieutenant
Quentin Roosevelt – the youngest son of former President Theodore Roosevelt – flew Nieuport 28s.
Sadly, on July 14, 1918, just 4 months before his 21st birthday, Lieutenant Roosevelt’s Nieuport 28 was downed behind enemy
lines, felled by two machine gun bullets which struck him in the head. His body was buried at the crash site by the Germans.
Twenty-six years later, following the World War II D-Day invasion of France, Quentin's brother, Brig. Gen. Theodore Roosevelt,
Jr. died of a heart attack on July 12, 1944 and was buried at the Omaha Beach War Memorial. Quentin’s remains were then
reinterred beside his elder brother.
This model of the Nieuport 28 is a new design and lots better than the previous 68-inch V1.0 or 1.1 products. It is constructed
mainly of laser-cut balsa and light ply and is finished with a Mylar film covering patterned after the "Hat in the Ring" aircraft
flown by the 94th Aero Squadron’s ace, Eddie Rickenbacker. (A 40-inch EP version is also available at www.maxfordusa.com.)
We invite you to enjoy the pride of ownership and the joy of flying your highquality balsa and light-ply almost-ready-to-fly version of this historic aircraft.
Entire contents – Copyright 2012
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
I.
Important safety precautions & assembly tips ...
Warranty, liability waiver, and return policy ....
Special features of this Nieuport 28 model .......
Specifications ..................................................
Parts List .........................................................
2
3
3
3
4
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
Assembly photo-instructions ........................ 5
Setup and adjustments ................................ 15
Preparation for transport and field setup ..... 16
Preflight checks ......................................... 16
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS & ASSEMBLY TIPS:
(IMPORTANT – READ THIS SECTION BEFORE YOU BEGIN ASSEMBLY)
1. This product should not be considered a toy, but rather a sophisticated, working model that functions much like a full-scale
airplane. Because of its performance capabilities, this product, if not assembled and operated correctly, could cause injury to
you or spectators and damage to property. Maxford USA provides you with a high-quality, thoroughly tested model airplane
kit with assembly instructions. However, the quality and capabilities of your finished model airplane depend on how you
assemble it, and your safety depends on how you use and fly it. Any testing or flying of this model airplane is done entirely
at your own risk.
2. Assemble this model airplane according to these instructions. Do not alter or modify the model beyond the assembly and
power system options covered in these instructions, as doing so may result in an unsafe or unworkable model. In a few cases
the instructions may differ slightly from the photos; in those instances the written instructions should be considered as
correct. If you have a question or concern about these instructions, before you proceed with assembly of this product, contact
your dealer or speak to a Maxford USA customer service representative at 562-529-3988 (Monday through Friday, except
national holidays, 9 AM to 5 PM Pacific time).
3. While this kit has been flight-tested to meet or exceed our rigid performance and reliability standards in normal use, if you
elect to perform any extremely high-stress flying, such as racing or advanced aerobatics, or if you install a larger power
system than specified, you (the buyer or user of this product) are solely responsible for taking any and all necessary steps to
reinforce the high-stress points and/or substitute hardware that is more suitable for such increased stresses.
4. Throughout the lifetime of this model, use only the Maxford USA-recommended or same-sized motor and a new or
well-maintained radio control system and batteries recommended by the maker of your motor and radio system.
5. It is your responsibility to install the R/C system and other components in such a way that this model airplane passes all
applicable safety/range tests and that the power system and controls operate correctly and smoothly.
6. Recheck the operation of this model airplane before every flight to ensure that all equipment is still operating correctly and
that the model has remained structurally sound. Also before every flight, check all electrical and/or structural connections; do
not fly without replacing any that you find damaged or worn.
7. Before you begin assembly of this model airplane, read all instructions and test-fit each part to ensure you fully understand
the instructions and that no parts are missing, damaged or unsatisfactory. (Note: Temperature and/or humidity differences
and changes between the factory, our warehouse and your home may dictate the need for slight adjustment to the wing
and/or the horizontal stabilizer to ensure the wing is parallel to the horizontal stabilizer; however, we recommend you
contact us before you attempt any such adjustment.)
8. If you are not an experienced R/C pilot or have not assembled and flown this type of model before, we strongly urge you to
get assistance from an experienced R/C pilot.
9. To help ensure the security of servo connections, we recommend you install optional Maxford USA servo
extension safety clips wherever you connect servo-leads to a servo extender or Y-cable.
10. After you have determined each servo-mounting-screw’s location, apply thin CA adhesive to harden the
wood where the servo’s mounting screws will be inserted.
11. Use the tip of a hot soldering iron to burn and remove any Mylar covering material to obtain good woodto-wood gluing surfaces at the horizontal and vertical stabilizers.
12. If Mylar hides a CA hinge’s slot, find and open the slot by pressing with a fingernail or sharp hobby knife.
13. We recommend 30-minute epoxy for permanent attachment of critical parts such as where the horizontal and vertical
stabilizers attach to the fuselage.
14. If you have concern about the security of any factory fabrication procedure(s), we recommend you apply 30-minute epoxy
around the perimeter of such part(s) as an extra safety precaution.
15. String may be supplied to pull your servo’s lead and servo extension through the wing to your radio receiver; however, you
may find it easier to use masking tape to temporarily attach the connector to the end of a length of coat-hanger wire, then use
the coat hanger wire to PUSH the lead and its connector through the airframe.
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16. We recommend use of a thread-locking compound to secure all hardware from
vibration. Also, once the included clevises are adjusted, we suggest you coat each
clevis and rod with epoxy to securely and safely affix each clevis to its rod. As a
safety precaution, always check each clevis before and after each flight.
17. This model includes some fiberglass or carbon-fiber reinforced parts. If you drill,
grind or sand a fiberglass or carbon-fiber reinforced part, always wear safety
goggles, a particle mask and rubber gloves to guard yourself from eye, skin and respiratory-tract irritation; never blow into
the part to remove fiberglass or carbon fiber dust (the dust may blow back into your face).
18. Check the Mylar covering material’s joints and surfaces; if necessary, carefully use an iron (do NOT set the iron’s
temperature too high) to secure the edges and to tighten any loosened areas. Recheck and retighten from time to time.
II.
WARRANTY, LIABILITY WAIVER, AND RETURN POLICY
Maxford USA guarantees this kit to be free from defects in material and workmanship at the time of purchase. All of our
products have been inspected in our factory and are checked again when shipped from our warehouse.
However, Maxford USA cannot directly control the materials you may use nor your final-assembly process. Therefore,
Maxford USA can NOT in any way guarantee the performance of your finished model airplane. Furthermore, in purchasing
this product, you (the buyer or user of this product) exempt, waive, and relieve Maxford USA from all current or future
liability for any personal injury, property damage, or wrongful death, and if you (the buyer or user of this product) are
involved in any claim or suit, you will not sue Maxford USA or any of its representatives.
If you do not fully accept the above liability and waiver, you may request a return merchandise authorization number (RMA#)
as explained in item 2, below.
If you think there is a missing part or any shipping damage, please read our after-sales service and return policy as outlined
below.
1. Inspect your order upon delivery for any shipping damage or missing part. If you find a problem you must contact us within
10 days from receipt of your purchase by calling (562) 529-3988, Monday through Friday, except holidays, between the
hours of 8:30 AM and 5 PM Pacific time. During this telephone conversation, and with your support, we will determine how
to resolve your concern. (Note: Maxford USA Li-Po batteries are sold without warranty and are not eligible for return or
credit.)
2. To request an RMA#, call (562) 529-3988, Monday through Friday, except holidays, between the hours of 8:30 AM to 5 PM
Pacific time. If we elect to issue you an RMA#, you must clearly mark this RMA# on the outside of the package. (No return
or exchange will be authorized after 10 days from the date of your receipt of the product; any package delivered to us without
a Maxford USA RMA# is subject to being returned to the sender, as received, with return postage payable upon delivery.)
Returned merchandise must be in its original condition as received from Maxford USA, with no assembly or modification, in
the original packing materials, complete with all manuals and accessories. Return shipping and insurance charges must be
prepaid by you, the buyer.
3. Returned merchandise that is accepted by Maxford USA for credit is subject to a 10% to 20% restocking fee (the final
amount will be determined by Maxford USA upon receipt and examination of the returned merchandise).
Return Address:
Maxford USA RC Model Distribution, Inc.
15939 Illinois Avenue #C
Paramount, CA 90723
(Print the RMA# issued by Maxford USA on the package near the address.)
III.
SPECIAL FEATURES OF THIS NIEUPORT 28 MODEL
· Wing panel sets remove from the fuselage for
storage and transport.
· Prepainted fiberglass cowl mounted with
Maxford USA’s Max Cowling
‘invisible’ attachment system.
· Each aileron is separately operated
by its own in-wing servo.
· Precut dashboard openings for your
ignition and radio switches.
· Wing support kit is included for safe
transport and storage.
· Streamlined landing gear with scale-like wheels and
steerable tail wheel.
· Scale looking dummy engine, fuel-system venturi and
air intake tube.
· Includes cockpit coaming and dummy frapping for
struts and cabanes.
· Pull-pull rudder with steerable tail wheel.
· Scale-looking wheels and stick-on decal set.
· Supplied machine gun mounting platforms.
(Scale-looking machine guns are optional.)
· Photo assembly instructions.
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IV.
SPECIFICATIONS*
Wingspan .......................................................................................................................... 70 inches
Wing Area .......................................................................................................... 1,165 square inches
Length ............................................................................................................................... 56 inches
ARF weight ................................................................................................. 10 pounds and 6 ounces
Flying weight ............................................................................................ 11 pounds and 14 ounces
Engine required (Not included) ........... 26cc gas, 90 to 120 glow or equivalent electric power system
Propeller (Not included) ............................................................................................... 16 to 18 inch
(as recommended for your power system)
Radio system (Not included) ..................................... Minimum of 4 channels and 5 standard servos
(or 4 standard servos and an electronic speed control, if you use an electric power system)
* (All dimensions and weights are approximate.)
V.
PARTS LIST
1. Items you must supply to complete this Nieuport 28:
·
5- and 30-minute epoxy or aliphatic resin glue, thin and thick Cyanoacrylate (CA) adhesives.
·
Long-nosed and cutting pliers, Allen wrenches, a high speed rotary tool, a pair of scissors and masking tape.
·
26cc gas engine, 90 to 120 glow engine, or equivalent-powered motor system.
·
Propeller.
·
Five(5) standard-sized servos [four(4) standard servos if you use an electric power system], two(2) 18-inch
extensions, one(1) 6-inch Y-connector, and a minimum of a 4-channel radio control system.
·
Optional upgrade items: Scale machine guns; WWI pilot figure; Scimitar-type propeller.
2. Items included with this Nieuport 28:
·
Precovered fuselage, upper and lower-wing panels and upper-wing’s center
section, vertical and horizontal stabilizers, rudder and elevator halves, with
all hinge openings precut.
·
Prepainted and pretrimmed fiberglass cowl.
·
Rudder pull-pull cables and aileron and elevator pushrods.
·
Wing joiners, preformed cabanes and struts, and all required control horns,
hinges, linkages, wing and tail flying wires and related hardware, including
self-threading and machine screws and self-locking nuts (except those
normally supplied with the servos and a glow or gas engine or electric power
system).
·
Fuel tank with clunk and fuel lines included.
·
Streamlined landing gear with scalelike wheels.
·
Complete set of scale markings.
·
Magnetically secured cockpit hatch
and coaming.
·
Simulated fuel-system
venturi and air intake
tube.
·
This illustrated
Instruction Manual.
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VI.
ASSEMBLY PHOTO-INSTRUCTIONS
1. Position the landing gear’s cross-struts into the slots in the fuselage.
2. Position the wooden landing gear rear retainer between the landing
gear’s rear struts, then press the rear strut and retainer into the fuselage
until the outer edge of the retainer is flush with the bottom surface of
the fuselage.
3. Position the three metal landing gear front retainers
over the landing gear’s front strut. Secure the metal
landing gear’s front retainers by driving 6 ea. bolts
into the 6 ea. blind nuts preinstalled inside the fuselage.
4. Using a total of 4 ea. wheel collars, attach both main
wheels to the landing gear’s axles with a wheel collar
at each side of both wheels and secure with threadlock.
5. Test fit the hatch: (1) Lift the rear of the hatch above the magnet and toward
the rear; (2) Lift the front, and the hatch’s front corners will clear the edges
of the cockpit. (Note: If you install the cockpit coaming, remove a bit of
wood from the hatch’s front corners to add some additional clearance.)
6. Slide the lower wing’s spar midway through the fuselage, then temporarily
position the left and right lower wing panels onto the lower wing’s spar.
1
2
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(Note: As you press the lower wing panels firmly against the fuselage, carefully align the lower wing panel’s dowel pins
with the matching openings in the fuselage.)
7. Cut away the Mylar covering the slotted
opening in the horizontal stabilizer for the
vertical stabizer and test-fit the vertical
stabilizer to the horizontal stabilizer.
8. Test fit the horiz. stabilizer to its platform
at the top-rear of the fuselage. Remove the
Mylar at the bottom of the horiz. stab.
to ensure a good wood-to-wood glueing
surface between the horiz. stab. and the
fuselage as shown below.
9. To ensure the horizontal stabilizer is parallel to the lower wing, visually compare the lower wing to the horizontal stabilizer.
10. Secure the horiz. stab. to the fusealge with 30 minute epoxy. Use masking tape to
hold the horiz. stab. parallel to the lower wing until the epoxy is fully cured.
11. Identify two identical plastic packets containing all the parts for the wooden wing
supports which help to ensure the wings, struts and wing wires
may be safely transported and stored when removed from your
Nieuport 28.
12. Test fit the parts
of the two sets of
wooden wing
supports as shown
at the right.
13. Glue the wooden
wing supports
together with epoxy
or aliphatic resin.
(Note: One layer of curved pieces at the top and bottom is ommitted above for clarity. When completed, each supports’
curved wooden surfaces have three layers of wood touching the left and right pair of wing panels against the bottom of the
top wing and the top of the bottom wing. Secure the wing supports to the wing panels with rubber bands or string.)
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14. Securely glue the metal joiner into the each half of the elevator.
15. After the epoxy used to secure the horizontal stabilizere to the fuselage has fully cured, use
CA hinges to attach the elevator to the horizontal stabilizer.
16. Make sharp 90-degree bends in the ends of two metal pushrods. Cut a groove leading to the
predrilled holes in each end of the wooden elevator pushrod. Permanently attach each metal
pushrod to the wood by wrapping the ends with epoxy-coated
thread or string and/or heat-shrink tubing. Bend one of the metal
pushrods so it can exit the aft end of the fuselage and be attached
to the elevator’s control horn as shown below.
¼-inch by ¼-inch squares
17. Use a Servo Tester or connect your servos to your radio and ‘center’ each servo. Disconnect
the servos and set aside your Servo Tester or radio system. (Reminder: To help ensure the
security of each servo extension connection, we recommend you install an optional “servo
extension safety clip” at all servo wire/extension junctions.)
18. Use epoxy to secure the vertical stabilizer into the opening in the horizontal stabilizer and
to the rear of the fusealge. Use masking tape to hold the vertical stabilizer at 90degrees relative to the horizontal stabilizer until the epoxy is fully cured.
19. Cut and remove the Mylar covering one of the rectangular openings at the rear
of the fuselage.*
*(Plan ahead: If you use a
gas or glow engine, its throttle
servo must be mounted on the
opposite side of the airplane
as the rudder pushrod’s
opening.)
20. Guide the end of the elevator
pushrod with the bent end
into the opening in the nose, through the fuselage, and out of this rectangular opening.
21. Test fit the elevator control horn. Drill a hole in the elevator and mount the elevator control horn to the elevator. Attach the
elevator pushrod to the elevator’s control horn.
22. Attach an EZ Link connector to your elevator servo’s arm. Install
your elevator servo in an outer position in the fuselage’s servo
mounting tray on the same side of the airplane as you installed the
elevator control horn. Trim the length of the forward end of the
elevator pushrod to fit the position of the elevator servo’s EZ Link
connector. Hold your elevator at neutral (on the same level as the
horizontal stabilizer) and tighten the elevator’s EZ Link
connector onto the elevator pushrod.
23. Position the tail wheel’s strut immediately behind the vertical
stabilizer’s vertical post and use three screws to attach the tail
wheel to the bottom-rear of the fuselage. (Do NOT apply threadlock compound at this time to these three screws.)
24. Ensure the tail wheel spins freely on its strut. use an Allen wrench
to tighten the tail wheel’s collar and secure with threadlock.
25. Prepare your rudder servo’s output arm to operate the pull-pull
cables without binding: If you will use an “X” output arm on your
rudder servo, cut off and discard one of the thickest arms and ream the
arm’s outer holes as necessary to fit the supplied clevises.
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26. Prepare two clevises twisted halfway onto
their brass rods. Slide crimp tubes onto
one end of the rudder cables. Guide the
end of the cable through the hole in the
threaded rod. Bring the end of the cable
back into and all the way through the
crimp tube. Use pliers to firmly squeeze
the crimp tube to secure it to the cable.
Attach the clevises to the rudder servo’s
output arm and secure each with a short
length of silicon tubing.
(Note: If necessary, use the tip of a scribe
or a small nail to slightly expand the crimp tube’s openings.)
27. Attach the rudder servo’s output arm (with its attached pull-pull cables) to your rudder servo’s output shaft. Install your
rudder servo (with its control arm and pull-pull cables) in the center position of the fuselage’s servo mounting tray.
28. Use a bright light or gently apply pressure with the tip of your finger to locate the two precut slitted openings for the
rudder’s pull-pull cables. (They are on the left and right sides of the fuselage under the Mylar below and in front of the
rectangular elevator pushrod openings). Cut a small opening in the Mylar covering each of the openings.
29. Guide a length of straight coat hanger (or heavier) wire into the pull-pull cable’s opening in the left side of the tail, into the
fuselage, and to the servo tray. Use masking tape to temporarily attach the free end of the right-side rudder pull-pull cable
to the end of the length of coat hanger (or heavier) wire. Gently pull the coat hanger (or heavier) wire and the attached
pull-pull cable out through the small opening in the tail. Remove the masking tape to free the end of the pull-pull cable, and
temporarily secure the end of the wire to the rear of the fuselage with masking tape. Repeat the above process to pull the
rudder servo’s left side pull-pull cable through the opening in the right side of the tail. (Note: The rudder’s pull-pull cables
cross over each other inside the fuselage.)
30. Use CA hinges and epoxy to attach the rudder to the bent end of the tail wheel’s strut and to the vertical stabilizer.
31. Test fit and install the rudder’s pull-pull horn assembly directly behind where the rudder’s pull-pull cable exits the fuselage.
32. Use masking tape to temporarily hold the rudder in a neutral (straight ahead) position. Slide a crimp tube onto each of the
rudder’s pull-pull cables. Guide the end of the cable through the holes in the rudder’s control horns. Draw the pull-pull cables
snug, then guide the end of each cable back into and all the way through its crimp tube. Use pliers to firmly squeeze each
crimp tube to secure the rudder’s pull-pull cables. Trim off the excess cable and remove the masking tape from the rudder.
(Note: Decide which position to use for your elevator servo
and throttle servo on the basis of which location will
work the best with your particular power system.)
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33. Cut a small opening in the Mylar covering each
of the openings in the four mounting tabs in
the top wing’s center section.
34. Use the holes in the center section’s tabs as a
guide to drill a hole in each cabane strut.
35. Attach each cabane strut to the top wing’s center
section with a bolt and nut plus a metal wing wire anchor.
36. Insert each cabane strut’s mounting tab into its mounting
pocket in the fuselage.
37. Drill a 3/32-inch guide hole through each cabane strut and
into the inner wall of each pocket.
38. Secure the cabane struts to the fuselage by driving a wood
screw into each guide hole.
(If future repairs are not a concern, also apply some glue to permanently secure the cabane struts in their fuselage pockets.)
39. Prepare the 4 wing struts for installation: Test fit a strut mounting tab at each end
of all four struts; drill a set of holes through both ends of each strut and its
mounting tab; secure each tab to its strut with a bolt and nut plus a metal wing
wire anchor as shown at the right.
40. Test fit the wing struts into the openings in the top of the bottom wing: The
shorter struts belong at the front (nearest the leading edge); the longer struts go
in the rear (nearest the trailing edge).
41. Slide the upper wing’s spar midway through the
upper wing’s center section, then position the
left and right upper wing panels onto the upper
wing’s spar. As the upper wing panels near the
upper wing’s center section, carefully align the
upper wing panel’s dowel pins with the matching openings in the upper wing’s center section.
42. Carefully guide the wing struts into their
openings in the bottom of both left and right
panels of the top wing. Use 5-minute epoxy to
secure all four wing struts and tabs into their
openings in both the top and bottom wing
panels. While this epoxy is fresh, firmly press
the left and right pairs of top and bottom wing
panels together, secure each pair of wing panels
with masking tape, and set the fuselage with its
wing panel assemblies aside until the epoxy is fully cured.
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43. After the wing strut’s epoxy has fully cured, remove the masking tape from the left and right pairs of wing panels.
44. Drill guide holes in the provided hardwood blocks to fit your servo’s mounting-hole
pattern. Use the servo manufacturer’s hardware to attach a servo arm to each aileron
servo and to attach an aileron servo to each of the aileron servo mounting hatchplate’s
hardwood mounting blocks.
45. Cut the hatchplate’s Mylar to open the precut slot for each aileron servo’s output arm.
Position each aileron servo’s output arm in the center of its slot and use epoxy
to secure each servo on its mounting blocks to its hatchplate.
46. Slide the left and right pairs of wing panels a few inches away from the fuselage and
from the top wing’s center section. Tape the male end of an 18-inch servo extension
to one end of a length of straight coat hanger (or heavier) wire. Guide the wire and
servo extension inside the bottom wing from the root rib and into each aileron
servo’s wing compartment.
47. Connect the servo extensions to the aileron servos. (Reminder: To help ensure the
security of these servo extension connections, install an optional “servo extension
safety clip” at all servo wire/extension junctions.)
48. Use a scribe or a small, sharp nail to open the Mylar covering the predrilled mounting holes in
the four corners of each aileron’s hatchplate, position the hatchplates over the aileron servo’s
wing compartments and secure each hatchplate with 1/4-inch wood screws.
49. Secure each aileron to its wing panel with thin CA and the included CA hinges. Temporarily
hold each aileron in its ‘neutral’ position by placing a piece of masking tape between each
aileron and the trailing edge of the adjacent wing.
50. Attach an aileron pushrod’s clevis to the output arm of each aileron servo and align each
pushrod toward its aileron, directly to the rear of the servo. Secure each clevis with a short
length of silicon tubing. Using the pushrod as a guide, mark and drill a hole
hole in each aileron, install the aileron control horn assemblies, and attach
the clevis on the loose end of the aileron’s pushrod’s to the aileron’s
control horn. Remove the masking tape from the ailerons. (Reminder: Once
the clevises are adjusted, coat each clevis and rod with epoxy to securely
and safely affix each clevis to its rod; also, as a safety precaution, check
each clevis before and after each flight.)
51. Using wood screws, attach two(2) wing wire anchors: One near the leading edge and the
For clarity: The wing
second near the trailing edge of the lower wing (at 1-inch from the root rib at the leading
panel is shown removed
edge and 1/2-inch from the root rib at the trailing edge). Harden the holes with thin CA
adhesive where the wing wire anchor screws are inserted into the wood. Direct the free end from the airplane, and
the wing wire anchor
of each wing wire anchor away from the fuselage as you tighten these two screws.
has an attached clevis
52. Remove the masking tape from the ailerons and guide the excess servo extension wires
and wing wire.
inside the fuselage as you slide the left and right pairs of wing panels firmly against the
wing center section and fuselage.
53. Test-fit the plastic wing/landing gear retainer between the landing gear’s rear crossmember and the two lower wing panels. Position two of its mounting holes behind the
landing gear’s rear crossmember, covering the slot in the bottom of the fuselage to secure
the main landing gear’s rear cross-member, and position the remaining two holes onto
each of the lower wing panels. Using the predrilled holes in the retainer as your guide, drill four 1/16-inch guide holes:
into the fuselage and into both lower wing panels. Use four wood screws to secure the retainer to the fuselage and to the lower
wing panels. (Note: If future repairs are not a concern, you may permanently secure the landing gear’s wooden retainer into its slot in the fuseNose
lage with glue.)
Nose
54. Twist 2 clevises halfway onto their
brass rods. Slide crimp tubes onto all
four 59-inch long wing wires. Guide
the wire through the hole in the rod.
Bring the wire back into and through
the crimp tube, then firmly crimp
the tube onto the wire.
Page 10 of 16 pages
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55. Attach the wing wire’s clevises to the wing wire anchors near the root rib of each lower wing panel (see anchor points 1 and 5,
below). Secure each clevis with a short length of silicon tubing, then coat the clevis and rod with epoxy.
56. Install wing wires between the upper & lower wing panels as shown in the following illustrations –
Warning: As you guide the wing wires between the numbered anchor points, adjust the tension on each segment of the
wire to ensure the wing panels do not become warped. Although these wing wires are mostly cosmetic, it is possible for
uneven tension on the wing wires to warp the wings, causing the airplane to not be safely controllable in flight.
57. After the wing wires have been routed through all anchor points (1 through 8), secure the end of each wing wire by installing
a final set of threaded brass rods and clevises at anchor points 4 and 8 at the top of each cabane strut.
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58. Once installed and correctly adjusted, the wing wires appear as shown below –
59. Cut and remove the excess wire. Adjust the clevises to
‘snug’ the wing wires. Tighten each brass rod’s lock
nut against its clevis. Add a short length of silicon tubing.
Coat the the clevises and rods with epoxy.
NOTE: Since there are no industry standards for engine
mounts, RC-radio features, nor the varied personal
preferences of today’s RC pilots, the following power
system installation steps are generalized – you are
invited to make adjustments in accordance with your
particular engine, motor, radio equipment and favored
flying style. If you require assistance, call us or the
maker of your engine, motor or radio, or call upon
your local RC club’s instructor or WWI warplane ‘guru.’
60. If you install an electric power system, the dimensions
of your motor might allow you to mount the motor directly onto the
supplied engine mounting box. (An optional electric motor mounting box
is available to bolt to the front of the supplied engine mounting box
if required.)
61. To utilize the engine mounting box’s built-in tilt and offset, position your
engine or motor so its propeller’s backplate is in line with the intersecting
lines drawn on the engine mounting box’s firewall.
62. Once you determine your engine’s or motor’s correct position, drill holes
in the mounting box’s firewall for the engine’s or motor’s mounting bolts,
and any other required openings (such as high-voltage ignition leads,
throttle servo mounting and/or control wires, etc.).
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63. Secure your engine or motor to the engine box’s firewall using the engine’s or
motor’s supplied T-nuts, mounting bolts, standoffs, washers, etc.. If you are
using a 90- to 120-sized glow engine, install an engine mount sized to fit your
particular engine. If you install an electric power system, use your electric
motor’s supplied mounting hardware to attach your motor to the included
engine box, or you may purchase an optional EP motor mounting box for
attachment to the front of the engine box.
64. If you are using a gas or glow engine, install the supplied fuel tank inside the
engine mounting box. Route all appropriate fuel lines (such as the ‘clunk’ line
to the carburetor, vent line, and a line to fill the tank). If you are using a gas
engine, you may also install a ‘kill’ switch and/or any extra linkages or
controls your engine may require. Power system batteries may be attached on
either side or at the top and bottom of the engine mounting box.
65. Slide the engine mounting box into its opening in the Nieuport 28’s nose and test-fit how far the engine mounting box needs
to be slid inside the opening in the fuselage so the engine’s (or motor’s) propeller backplate has
approx. 3/16-inch clearance between the back of the propeller and the front
of the cowl.
66. Install 4 wood screws at the locations marked on the
fuselage’s front former. Adjust the depth of each
screw to fit the Max Cowling mounting ring, then
lock each screw into position with a few drops of
thin CA adhesive. (Whenever these four screws are
captured in the cowl’s four key-shaped openings,
the cowl is then held in position by two preinstalled
magnets at the top of the cowl.)
67. Make any necessary engine-access, exhaust and/or
cooling openings in the cowl. (Note: If you drill, grind or sand the fiberglass cowl, wear safety
goggles, a particle mask, and rubber gloves to guard yourself from eye, skin and respiratorytract irritation; never blow into the cowl to remove fiberglass dust – the dust may blow back
into your face.)
68. Attach the two included pieces of aluminum L-channel with wood screws to secure the engine
mounting box to the fuselage.
69. To install the empennage wire, make three small holes in the tail section: One at the top of the
vertical stabilizer’s tail post; and two more at approx. 8 1/4-inches on each side of the center
of the horizontal stabilizer (through each of the horizontal stabilizer’s outer CA hinges).
70. Use the tail wheel’s forward-most mounting screw to attach the empennage wire’s mounting
plate at the front of the tail wheel. Use the supplied length of empennage wire and a crimp tube
to attach one end of the empennage wing wire to the mounting plate. Guide the wire up
and through the
hole in the horizontal stabilizer,
to and through the
hole at the top of the
vertical stabilizer’s
tail post, then down
and through the
second hole in the
horizontal
stabilizer.
71. Pull the wire snug,
use a crimp tube to attach the loose end of the wire to the remaining hole in the mounting plate, then cut off and discard the
remaining length of excess wire.
72. Apply CA adhesive to securely anchor the tail-wheel’s mounting screws into the fuselage. As a safety precaution, doublecheck that every brass rod’s lock nut is snugged against its clevis and that every clevis and brass pull-rod is permanently
anchored with a coating of epoxy.
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73. Test fit the dummy engine inside the cowl and use your engine’s or motor’s propeller backplate as
a guide to make an opening in the center of the dummy engine. Use a high speed rotary tool with a
router bit or small sanding drum to form a smooth, properly fit opening. Also use a high speed
rotary tool with a router bit or small sanding drum to cut away the molding-flash between cylinders.
When you are content with the size of the openings and fit of the dummy engine, secure the dummy
engine inside the cowl with epoxy. (Note: Installation of the dummy engine is optional, since it is
barely visible inside the cowl.)
74. Free the windshield from its molding-flash, then test fit and trim the
windshield to fit in front of the cockpit. Using epoxy, thick CA or
windshield adhesive, secure the windshield at the front of the cockpit.
(Use care to ensure the top-edge of the windshield is visually aligned
with the top wing.)
75. Free the turtle deck from its molding-flash. Use epoxy, thick CA or
windshield adhesive to secure the turtle deck behind the cockpit at the
center-top of the fuselage.
76. Free the venturi and air intake tube from
their molding-flash; free the laser-cut
plywood mounts and internal formers
from their excess wood. Assemble and
use epoxy to bond together the two
halves of the venturi horn and intake tube,
then sand the joined surfaces smooth and
apply touch-up paint as needed. Make mounting
holes on the right side of the fuselage behind
the cowl and use epoxy to secure the venturi
horn and vent tube as shown at the right.
77. If you are installing the optional machine guns,
free the machine gun mounts from their molding flash, then drill guide holes
and use wood screws and epoxy to attach a gun to each mount. Apply epoxy
or thick CA adhesive around the base of each mount and position and hold it
against the fuselage until the glue is fully set.
78. Align the landing gear fairings and apply
epoxy at each end of the fairings to hold
them in position on the landing gear struts.
79. Install your radio equipment and make
any necessary adjustments to servo
control throws including the engine’s
throttle, ‘kill’ or choke controls, etc.
80. Mount your engine’s ignition switch and
your radio receiver’s power switch in the cockpit’s precut dashboard openings.
(Note: The cockpit dashboard’s openings are sized to fit Maxford USA’s heavy duty
‘DSC Switch with Charge Jack’ – rated for up to 8A, this switch includes a built-in charge
jack with a JR connector, mounting plate, mounting screws, 20-inch long wire leads and
Futaba male and female connectors. Available at www.maxfordusa.com.)
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81. Using the ‘Max Cowling’ feature, twist and lock the cowl in place – and it will be
held in position with its built-in magnetic latch.
82. Balance and install your propeller. (Note: An optional Xoar WWI Scimitar Style
painted wood propeller is available from Maxford USA at www.maxfordusa.com.)
83. Trim around the “Hat in the Ring”
and the tail number markings.
84. Peal and stick the markings in their
positions as shown below.
85. To further enhance the scale appeal of your ARF Nieuport 28 you may optionally: Wrap simulated frapping (supplied in the
form of trim tape) around each of the struts; cut off and discard the excess length of axle that extends beyond each outer
wheel collar; use epoxy to attach an optional 1/5 scale WWI pilot figure (available at www.maxfordusa.com) to the cockpit
hatch; and use epoxy, thick CA or windshield adhesive to install the included presliced cockpit coaming around the edge of
the cockpit. (Note: If you install the cockpit coaming, remove a bit of wood from each of the hatch’s front corners to
maintain the necessary clearance for installing and removing the cockpit hatch.)
Congratulations! Assembly is finished!
VII.
SETUP AND ADJUSTMENTS
1. Set the Nieuport 28’s center of gravity (CG) within 3 5/8- to 3 7/8-inches back from the leading edge of the top wing.
If necessary, move batteries and/or add weight to the nose or tail to ensure the CG is correct.
2. Check the heat-shrink covering material’s joints and surfaces; if necessary, carefully use a dedicated covering-material iron
and heat gun to secure the edges and to tighten any loosened areas. Recheck and retighten from time to time.
3. Check/adjust servo centering, direction and end-point adjustments. When you pull the right stick toward you, the elevator
should deflect upwards; push the right stick to the right and the right aileron should deflect upwards and the left aileron
should deflect downwards; push the left stick left and the rudder should deflect to the left as viewed from the rear of the
fuselage. Review your radio’s instruction manual if you require assistance with any radio-related servo-adjustment
questions.
4. If you are using a Computer Radio: For initial flights set all linkages for near-max. possible deflections; then, soften the
aileron’s and elevator’s control throws by selecting 60% or more exponential (use 30% exponential for the rudder).
Initial settings if you are using a Non-Computer Radio:
Low rates
High rates
Ailerons ................ +12 degrees / +3/4 inches .......... +20 degrees / +1 inch
Elevator ................. +12 degrees / + 1 3/4 inches ........ +15 degrees / +2 inches
Rudder .................. +20 degrees / +2 inches
......... +25 degrees / +3 inches
5. Trim adjustments: The ailerons and rudder will probably require no adjustments (you will probably be able to leave them
centered, as assembled); however, be prepared to set the elevator trim depending on how slow or fast you fly. For example,
if you prefer to fly at slow, scale-looking air speeds, your Nieuport 28’s elevator will probably require a bit of up-trim.
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VIII.
PREPARATION FOR TRANSPORT AND FIELD SETUP
1. To remove and store the wings:
a) Remove and set aside the two wood screws that secure the plastic wing/landing gear retainer to the two lower wing
panels.
b) Release the four wing wire clevises at the top of the center section’s cabanes struts.
c) Gently pull the wing panels outwards a few inches, disconnect the aileron extensions from the Y-cable, and set
aside the servo extension safety clips.
d) Continue to gently pull outwards on each set of wing panels until the left- and right-side pairs of upper and lower
wing panels slide fully off their wing joiner tubes.
e) Use the supplied wing-transport ‘crutch’ assemblies and rubber bands or string to safely store each set of left and
right wing panels.
f) For safe-keeping, drive the two wood screws removed in step ‘a’ above into their CA-reinformed openings in the
lower wing panels.
2. To reinstall the wings:
a) Carefully align and slide each set of left and right wing panels toward each other on the joiner tubes.
b) Remove and set aside the wing-transport ‘crutch’ assemblies and the two wood screws stored in their
CA-reinformed openings in the lower wing panels.
c) Reconnect the aileron extension wires to the Y-cable, reattach the servo extension safety clips and neatly dress the
wires inside the wing or fuselage.
d) Carefully position the plastic wing/landing gear retainer onto the outer surface of the lower wing and guide the
alignment dowels into their openings as you slide each pair of wing panels firmly against the fuselage.
e) Reinstall the wood screws to attach the lower wing panels to the fuselage.
f) Reattach the four wing wire clevises to the top of the center section’s cabane struts.
IX.
PRE-FLIGHT CHECKS
1.
2.
3.
4.
Double-check the security of the engine-mounting box (and electric power motor box if installed) and the firewall.
Make certain all clevises, horns, screws and other connected parts throughout the air frame are secure.
Double-check the control directions of the throttle, ailerons, elevator and rudder.
As with all radio-controlled model airplanes, this model must pass the radio range ground check recommended by your
radio’s manufacturer, or you may not safely fly.
5. Get into the habit of moving your transmitter’s throttle to minimum before turning ON your transmitter, and carefully
break-in and operate your engine (or electric power system) according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
6. For your safety and for the safety of those around you, perform a final pre-flight check of all connections and clevises.
REMINDER:
An important notice to our customers –
THIS PRODUCT IS NOT A TOY.
PLEASE ENJOY YOUR HOBBY AND FLY SAFELY!
Designed by:
Maxford USA RC Model Mfg., Inc.
Distributed by: Maxford USA RC Model Distribution, Inc.
15939 Illinois Avenue #C
Paramount, CA 90723
Page 16 of 16 pages
Telephone (voice) ............. (562) 529-3988
Fax ................................... (562) 529-6988
Toll free (orders only) ...... (866) 706-8288
Website ………….. www.maxfordusa.com
S120629 / Copyright 2012