Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 Specifications

Administration Guide
Administration Guide
MaxAttach NAS 6000
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Installation and Configuration Guide
Document Revision Information
Document Title:
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Part Number:
000001628
Corporation:
Maxtor Corporation
Product Name:
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Operating System:
Microsoft Windows-Powered Max Operating System Version 2.0
O/S Name Revision:
Max O/S 2.0
Manual Release Date:
11/07/01
Manual Revision:
Revision 2.0.03A
Change History:
Second Release - 2.0.04A - 11/07/01; First release - 2.0.03 - 10/16/01
Copyright and Trademarks
©2001 Maxtor Corporation. All Rights Reserved. Maxtor is a registered trademark of Maxtor Corporation.
MaxAttach™ and MaxNeighborhood™ are trademarks of Maxtor Corporation. Other product names, company names,
and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
Specifications Subject to Change
Specifications are subject to change without notice. Maxtor reserves the right to revise this publication and to make
changes in the content hereof without the obligation of Maxtor to notify any person of such revision or changes.
Register Your System for On-site Support
Register now to activate on-site service for your Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000. We are pleased to provide standard
Next Business Day on site service for your MaxAttach NAS 6000 and wish to ensure that your service is activated. If
you have not already received a service activation contract from Maxtor, please contact 1-800-4MAXTOR or visit our
web site at www.MaxAttach.com. Should you have any questions about activating your MaxAttach NAS 6000, please
do not hesitate to contact us. Thank You
Worldwide Customer Support
Technical support is available worldwide.
United States
1-800-4MAXTOR
www.maxattach.com
United Kingdom, France, Italy, Spain, Portugal, and
Denmark
+353 1 204 11 11 (Ireland)
EuroNSG@Maxtor.com
Germany
+49 (0) 89 96241919
EuroNSG@Maxtor.com
Asia Pacific
+852-2585-4500
ApacNSG@Maxtor.com
ii
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Max Attach NAS 6000
Administration Guide
Table of Contents
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
Chapter #13 - Appendix - Disk Drive Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
iii
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Detailed Table of Contents
Who Should Use This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
How to Use This Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Documentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
Quick Start Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Getting Started Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Installation and Configuration Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Release Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Typographical Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Observing Notes, Cautions, and Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
Cautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Chapter Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
User-Supplied Materials and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Install the Equipment Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Install the AC Power Strips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Mount the MaxAttach NAS 6000 Equipment Enclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Re-Seat All Hard Disk Drive Carrier Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Review the Connector Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Install the External SCSI Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Cabinet-Mount System or Single Base Unit Rack Mount System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
SCSI Connections Between Base Unit and First Expansion Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
SCSI Connections Between the First and Second Expansion Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Install EMU Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
EMU Cable on Base Unit Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
DECISION POINT - Are there Expansion Units to Install? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
EMU Cable Between Base Unit and First Expansion Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
DECISION POINT - One or Two Expansion Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
EMU Cable Between First and Second Expansion Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Install Network and AC Power Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Network Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
AC Power Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
International AC Power Strip Solutions for Rack Mount Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Localized Internal AC Power Cords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
iv
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Localized AC Power Strips/Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Australia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Europe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
United Kingdom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13
13
14
15
15
16
Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Chapter Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
System Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Cross-Platform File Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Enclosure Configuration Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Rack Mount Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Cabinet Mounted System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Major Components of the Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Base Unit Front Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Base Unit Front Panel Status LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Front Panel LEDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Hard Disk Drive Module Status LEDs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Power Supply Status LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
LCD Alert Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Logo and Alert Message Display Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Network Information Display Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Status Icon Display Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Base Unit Back Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Expansion Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Expansion Unit Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Expansion Unit Back Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Description of System Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Power Supply Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Disk Drive Carriers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
CPU I/O Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
CPU Ethernet Port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Network Interface Cards (NICs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Hot Swappable Fans and Blower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
SCSI Interface Connectors to Optional Expansion Enclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Environmental Monitoring Unit (EMU) Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Chapter Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
O/S Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Navigation Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Welcome Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Take a Tour. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Initial System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Set Server Appliance Name. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
v
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Set Administrator Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set Default Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Status Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Status Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Summary Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Health Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installed Software Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows System Files Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Export SysInfo Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identification Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Global Settings Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interfaces Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Administrator Account Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Administration Web Site Properties Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SNMP Service Configuration Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Telnet Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NIC Configuration Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Base Unit Network Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Standard NIC Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gigabit Ethernet NIC with Copper Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gigabit Ethernet NIC with Fiber Optic Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disks and Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disks Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disks and Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disk Quotas Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Persistent Storage Manage Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disk Defragmenter Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Users and Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Users Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local Users Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local Groups Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local Groups Members Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Folders and Shares. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shares Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Volumes Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Folders Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shared Folders Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shared Properties - General Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Protocols Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AppleTalk Service Properties Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FTP Service Properties Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HTTP - Hypertext Transfer Protocol Service Properties Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NetWare Protocol Service Properties Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NFS Protocol Properties Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
vi
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
45
45
46
46
46
47
48
48
49
49
50
50
53
57
61
62
63
63
64
65
65
67
67
70
70
71
71
74
80
81
81
81
83
84
85
85
85
86
87
88
93
93
94
96
97
97
99
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Software Update Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Date and Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backup Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terminal Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alert Email . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Language Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Recovery Option Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Session Timeout Options Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Re-Image System Drive Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Services for UNIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NFS Client Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NFS Locks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User & Group Mappings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Services for Netware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NetWare Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Help Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
100
101
101
101
103
103
105
106
107
107
109
110
110
110
111
111
114
114
114
115
Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Chapter Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Standard Disk Array Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Disk Drive Array Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Logical Drive Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
SCSI Channel Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Notes on SCSI Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
SCSI Bus and Target LUN IS Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
RAID Array Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Base Unit Operating System Arrays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Drive C:\ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Drive D:\ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Base Unit User Data Arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Drive E:\ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Drive F:\ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
First Expansion Unit User Data Arrays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Drive G:\ and Drive H:\ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Second Expansion Unit User Data Arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Drive I:\ and Drive J:\ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Re-Configuring Your MaxAttach NAS 6000 Drive Arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Best Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Chapter Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Network Configuration Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Network Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Server Appliance Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
vii
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Workgroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Global Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DNS Name Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Name Resolution Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DNS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP/IP Hosts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NetBIOS LMHOSTS File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for LMHOSTS Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IPX Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Adapter Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Network Adapter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Renaming a Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AppleTalk Local Area Network Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring an AppleTalk Network Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IP Address Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing IP General Tab Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing IP Settings on the Advanced Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Gateway Address Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DNS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Obtaining IP Address from DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manually Setting DNS Server to Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WINS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing WINS Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Administrator Account and Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Administrator Account Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Administrator Account Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Administration Web Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Administration Web Site Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Telnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring System for Telnet Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Adapter Interfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Network Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Renaming a Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Apple Talk Local Area Network Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IP Address Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DNS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WINS Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Administrator Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Administration Web Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Telnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Interface Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Standard Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Base Unit Network Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Simple Network Management Protocol - SNMP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
134
135
136
137
138
138
140
141
143
144
145
145
146
146
146
147
147
148
149
149
150
150
151
152
152
153
154
154
155
155
155
156
156
157
157
158
160
161
162
164
165
166
166
166
166
O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Chapter Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
viii
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Disks and Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disk Quota Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling Quota Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Quota Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Quota Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Quota Entries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying Quota Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Persistent Storage Manager and Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
168
168
169
170
171
171
172
174
Persistent Storage Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Chapter Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Persistent Storage Manager Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Persistent Storage Manager and Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Using Persistent Storage Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Persistent Image Scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Disaster Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Setting Up Persistent Storage Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Persistent Storage Manager Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Configuration Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Managing Persistent Storage Manager Schedules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Working with Persistent Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Creating a New Persistent Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Deleting a Persistent Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Undoing Persistent Image Writes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Editing Persistent Image Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Context of Persistent Image Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Group Page Field Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Managing Persistent Image Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Adding Persistent Image Schedule Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Deleting a Persistent Image Schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Editing Persistent Image Schedule Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Disaster Recovery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Restoring a Volume Set from a Persistent Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Chapter Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Overview of Supported Protocols. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Supported Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Microsoft Windows File Sharing Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Manual Caching for Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Automatic Caching for Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Automatic Caching for Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Network File System (NFS) Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
File Transfer Protocol (FTP) Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Web Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
NetWare Sharing Protocol Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
AppleTalk Protocol Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
ix
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Managing Folders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navigating Through Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening a Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying Folder Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing a Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Shares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Share. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying Share Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Windows CIFS Share Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting NFS Share Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting FTP Share Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Web HTTP Share Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting NetWare Share Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting AppleTalk Share Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Sharing Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling Sharing Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling Sharing Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Sharing Protocol Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NFS Sharing Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting NFS Sharing Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding NFS Client Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing NFS Client Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing NFS Client Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting NFS Locks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NFS Protocol with User and Group Mappings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting NFS User and Group Mappings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling Simple NFS Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Explicit User NFS Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Explicit Group Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FTP Sharing Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting FTP Sharing Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling FTP Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling FTP Anonymous Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling FTP Anonymous Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Custom FTP Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Web HTTP Sharing Protocol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Web HTTP Sharing Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NetWare Sharing Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting NetWare Sharing Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AppleTalk Sharing Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
190
191
191
192
193
193
194
195
196
196
197
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
205
205
206
206
207
207
207
208
209
209
210
210
212
213
215
216
216
217
217
218
218
219
219
220
220
221
221
O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Chapter Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
x
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Users and Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manage Local Users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a User Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling the Guest Account. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a User Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting a User Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying User Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manage Local Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Group Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Group Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying Group Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
222
223
223
224
225
226
226
228
228
229
230
O/S 2.0 - Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Chapter Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Software Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Setting Date and Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Shutting Down the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Add or Remove Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
Automatic System Backup Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
Changing the Automatic Backup Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
Disabling the Automatic Backup Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
Manual Back Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Re-Image System Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Set Session Timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Setting Alert E-Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
Backing up and Restoring the O/S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
Terminal Services Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
Using the Clipboard During Terminal Server Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Local Printing During Terminal Server Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Automatic Printer Redirection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Manual Printer Redirection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
To Close the Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Managing Application Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Managing FTP Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
Managing NFS Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
System Log. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
Security Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
Managing Web HTTP Shares Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
Managing Web Administration Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
Clear Log Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Download Log Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Modify Log Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
View Log Entry Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Global Array Manager Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
Chapter Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
xi
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID - Redundant Array of Independent Disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Introduction and Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key RAID Technical Methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware RAID and Software RAID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Striping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parity Checking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID and JBOD Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID 0 Striping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fault Tolerance Cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Application Focus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Array Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID 1 Mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fault Tolerance Cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Application Focus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Array Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID 0 +1 Mirrored Sets of Striped Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fault Tolerance Cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Application Focus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Array Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID 5 Multiple Disk Striping with Distributed Parity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fault Tolerance Cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Array Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
JBOD Just a Bunch of Disks Single Disk Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fault Tolerance Cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Array Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Benefits Comparison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Functional Comparison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Fault Tolerance Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID and Obtaining Maximum Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 RAID Operations and the GAM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Normal Array Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Critical Array Status. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hot Swap Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hot Spare Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Comparison of Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xii
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
255
255
255
256
256
256
256
257
257
258
258
258
258
258
258
259
259
259
259
259
259
260
260
260
260
260
260
261
261
261
262
262
263
263
263
263
263
263
264
265
265
266
266
266
266
267
268
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Volume Set. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
Logical (System) Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
System Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
Appendix - SNMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
Chapter Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
MaxAttach SNMP Alert Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
SNMP Management System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
SNMP Agent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
MaxAttach and Windows 2000 as SNMP Agents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
Respond Only To Queries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
SNMP Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
Management Information Base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
Configuring SNMP Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
MaxAttach SNMP Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
MIB File Locations and Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
Windows 2000 Server SNMP MIBs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
MIB Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
MaxAttach NAS 6000 SNMP MIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Series MIB Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Series MIB Tree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275
MaxAttach SNMP Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
Appendix - Disk Drive Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
Mylex Disk Drive Failure Error Codes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
Error Codes Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
Mylex Severity Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
O/S Error Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
Listing of SupportedEvents.Inf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
Instructions to Turn Amber Disk Status LEDs Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
Instructions to Turn Amber Disk Status LEDs On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
Viewing and Changing Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Error Codes - EVENTDEF.TXT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
Mylex Error Codes Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
xiii
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
List of Procedures
Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
To see total system space and total space used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
To see total system space for each volume or logical drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
To re-configure the disk RAID arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
To set the name and domain membership of the server appliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
To set the default domain used for logon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135
To set or change the workgroup membership of the server appliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136
To automatically set or change DNS suffixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136
To manually add specific DNS suffixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137
To manually remove specific DNS suffixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137
To set the server appliance to automatically obtain DNS server information from a DHCP server . . . . . . . .139
To manually set the DNS servers to be used by the server appliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139
To edit the Hosts file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
To edit the LMHOSTS file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
To configure the IPX address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
To configure a network adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145
To rename an interface connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146
To configure a network interface for AppleTalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146
To set or change the IP settings on the General tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147
To set or change the IP settings on the Advanced tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
To set or change the gateway address settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149
To set the server appliance to automatically obtain DNS server information from a DHCP server . . . . . . . .150
To manually set the DNS servers to be used by the server appliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150
To change the WINS settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152
To change the administrator account password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153
To change the administrator account name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154
To change the administration web site properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
To configure the MaxAttach NAS 6000 for Telnet administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
To configure a network adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156
To rename an interface connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157
To configure a network interface for AppleTalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
xiv
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
To set or change the IP settings on the General tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158
To set or change the IP settings on the Advanced tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158
To set or change the gateway address settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159
To set the server appliance to automatically obtain DNS server information from a DHCP server . . . . . . . .160
To manually set the DNS servers to be used by the server appliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160
To change the WINS settings of the server appliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
To change the administrator account password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
To change the administrator account name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
To change the administration web site properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
To configure your NAS 6000 appliance for Telnet administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
To enable or disable quota management on a volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
To set or change quota entries on the server appliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
To add a new quota entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171
To allow unlimited disk use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171
To limit disk space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171
To remove a quota entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171
To modify the properties of a quota entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172
To allow unlimited disk use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172
To limit disk space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172
To modify the properties of multiple quota entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .173
To allow unlimited disk use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .173
To limit disk space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .173
Persistent Storage Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
To create a new persistent image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178
To delete a persistent image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .179
To undo persistent image writes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .179
To edit persistent image properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180
To work with schedule items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .181
To add a persistent image to the schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .181
To delete a persistent image schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .181
To edit persistent image schedule properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182
Using disaster recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182
To restore volumes from a persistent image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183
O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
To share folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191
To manage folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191
To navigate among folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192
To create a new folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192
To delete folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .193
To open a folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .193
To change the name of a folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
To compress a folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
To share a folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195
To add a share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
xv
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
To remove a share and all its protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197
To remove specific protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197
To modify share properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197
To set the user limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198
To set user or group permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198
To add a new NFS client or client group to a share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199
To add an existing NFS client or client group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199
To remove an NFS client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
To allow clients permission to an FTP share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
To log client visits to an FTP share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .201
To allow clients permission to a Web share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .201
To set NetWare sharing properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203
To enable a sharing protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205
To disable sharing protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206
To configure network protocol properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206
To configure the NFS protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
To add an NFS client group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
To add members to an NFS client group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
To remove members to an NFS client group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
To remove an NFS client group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
To manage NFS locks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210
To map NFS users and groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
To configure for using an NFS server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
To configure for using password and group files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
To enable simple NFS maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212
To create explicit user NFS maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
To set one of the NFS mappings as primary for a given user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214
To delete explicit user maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214
To create explicit group maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215
To set one of the mappings as the primary maps for a given group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216
To delete explicit group maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216
To enable FTP logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217
To enable FTP Anonymous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217
To disable FTP anonymous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218
To add custom messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218
To configure Web (HTTP) sharing properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220
O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
To add a user account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224
To enable the guest account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .225
To remove user accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .225
To set the user password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .226
To access user properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .226
To add a group account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .228
To remove a user account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229
To set or modify a group name or description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .230
xvi
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
To set or modify group membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .230
To add a new member: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .230
To remove a member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .231
O/S 2.0 - Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
To update the software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233
To set the date, time, and time zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233
To shut down or restart the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .234
To schedule a shutdown or restart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .234
To remove a program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .235
To add a program or driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .235
To change the automatic backup schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .236
To disable the automatic backup schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .236
To immediately back up the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
To set the session timeout interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239
To set the alert e-mail feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239
To back up or restore the OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .240
To connect to Terminal Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .241
To check the Terminal Services Client version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242
To use shortcut keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242
To disconnect without ending a session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .244
To log off and end a session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
To manage application logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .246
To manage FTP logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .246
To manage NFS logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .247
To manage system logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .247
To manage security logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248
To manage Web (HTTP) shares logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248
To manage Web administration logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .249
To clear application, NFS, security, or system logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .249
To clear FTP, Web administration, or Web (HTTP) shares logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .249
To download application, security or system logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
To download NFS logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
To download FTP, Web administration, or Web (HTTP) shares logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .251
To modify the properties of a log file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .251
To view the details of a log file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .252
To start the Global Array Manager: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253
Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
Appendix - SNMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
To configure the SNMP service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272
Appendix - Disk Drive Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
To change an error code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .282
xvii
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Preface
Who Should Use This Guide
This Administration Guide is designed as a comprehensive technical reference for the
MaxAttach NAS 6000 system including hardware and software. It assumes that you are
highly familiar with networking and system administration basics, that you have read
through the Installation and configuration Guide, and that you have your MaxAttach NAS
6000 running on your network.
The primary purpose of this guide is to support you in performing long term
administration, configuration, and maintenance on your MaxAttach
How to Use This Guide
Use this guide to provide reference material for installation and administration specific
issues.
The first chapter covers rack mount installation details.
The next three chapters provide an in-depth overview description of the MaxAttach NAS
6000 hardware, operating system, and disk arrays.
The balance of the regular chapters each focus on specific O/S functions such as
Networking or User and Groups.
This guide concludes with appendices that cover disk array basics, SNMP, and additional
reference information for the RAID controller.
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Documentation
Other documentation available on your CD-ROM disk includes the documents described
below.
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
xviii
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Typographical Conventions
Quick Start Card
This document is especially targeted towards single MaxAttach NAS 6000 Base Unit
cabinet mounted or rack-mountable systems where quick plug and play is the goal.
Getting Started Documents
The Getting Started series of documents are longer than the Quick Start Card, but strive to
provide you with the minimum necessary information to unpack, assembly, install, launch,
and disk array configure a specific MaxAttach NAS 6000 system configuration.
Each document is targeted at different system and provides just the information required to
get it on your network and ready for use or advanced configuration. If needed, the
document includes quick step-by-step instructions on how to configure the disk arrays into
the factory default configuration. Each document includes all the information needed to get
a specific configuration installed and running. The Getting Started series documents are:
n
Getting Started for Cabinet Systems
n
Getting Started for Base Only Rack Mount Systems
n
Getting Started for Base Plus Systems
n
Getting Started for 48” Cabinet Rack Systems
n
Getting Started for 84” Cabinet Rack Systems
n
Getting Started for Disk Array Configuration
Installation and Configuration Guide
The Installation and Configuration Guide is targeted at getting your NAS 6000 rack installed,
cabled, identified on the network, and available on your network with a minimum of
configuration steps. It concludes with disk array management suggestions and instructions
on how to configure your disk arrays into the factory suggested RAID 5 arrays.
Release Notes
For the latest in developments on your MaxAttach NAS 6000, be sure to review the
Release Notes document (in paper) that was included with your shipment.
Typographical Conventions
The following typographical conventions are used in this guide to help you locate and
identify information:
n
Italic text is used for emphasis and book titles.
n
Bold text like this identifies menu names, menu options, items you can click on the
xix
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Observing Notes, Cautions, and Warnings
n
screen, and keyboard keys.
Courier font identifies file names, folder names, text that either appears on the
screen or that you are required to type in, or listings of programs or output reports.
Observing Notes, Cautions, and Warnings
The following text types call out special attention to important parts of this manual. They
always appear before the actual text.
Notes
Notes provide extra information, tips, and hints regarding the topic.
NOTE
Notes provide extra information, tips, and hints regarding the topic.
Cautions
Cautions identify important information about actions that could result in damage to data
or loss of data or could cause the system to behave in unexpected ways.
CAUTION
Cautions identify important information about actions that could result in damage to data or loss of
data or could cause the system to behave in unexpected ways.
Warnings
Warnings identify critical information about actions that cold result in unexpected
equipment failure, loss of critical operating system files, or potential bodily injury.
WARNING
Warnings identify critical information about actions that cold result in unexpected equipment failure,
loss of critical operating system files, or potential bodily injury.
xx
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack
Mounting Your NAS 6000
NOTE
If you have a cabinet-mounted version of the MaxAttach NAS 6000, skip this section and continue
with the next chapter.
Chapter Outline
This chapter provides an in depth description of installation requirements for MaxAttach
NAS 6000 rack-mountable systems. It also describes how to get your MaxAttach NAS
6000 mechanically ready by performing the following tasks:
n
Install the user-supplied equipment rack.
n
Install the user-supplied AC power strips.
n
Install all MaxAttach equipment enclosure shelves into the rack.
n
Install the MaxAttach SCSI connector cables for the hard disk drives.
n
Install the MaxAttach Serial Port connector cables for the Environmental Monitoring
Unit (EMU).
n
Install the Ethernet Network Interface Card (NIC) cables between the MaxAttach
NICs and your network.
n
Prepare the MaxAttach for power up.
1:
User-Supplied Materials and Services
The following user-supplied materials are required:
n
A standard 19” equipment rack.
n
The minimum rack vertical size depends on the configuration of your
MaxAttach.
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
1
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
A Single Base Unit Enclosure requires four rack spaces (4U) with a size of 7”H
x 19”W x 22”D - 17.7cmH x 48.2cmW x 55.8cmD.
n
A Base Unit Enclosure and one Expansion Enclosure requires 8U with a size of
14”H x 19”W x 22”D - 35.5cmH x 48.2cmW x 55.8cmD.
n
A Base Unit Enclosure with two Expansion Enclosures requires 12U with a size
of 21”H x 19”W x 22”D - 53.3cmH x 48.2cmW x 55.8cmD.
Two standard AC power strips.
n
At least three power outlets per strip are required.
n
More sockets per strip are recommended.
n
Minimum rating for US installations is 120 VAC at 15 Amps.
At least two network cables of sufficient length to reach from the MaxAttach to your
network.
n
Two cables are required if you only want to use the card cage mounted
Ethernet Gigabit NICs.
n
An additional CAT-5 cable is required if you also want to use the CPU
Motherboard Ethernet port.
n
At least one network connection is required.
n
n
n
2:
Install the Equipment Rack
Follow the manufacturer’s installation recommendations for rack installation. Make sure
the unit is securely fastened to permanent fixtures such as the floor or overhead support.
3:
Install the AC Power Strips
Install the AC power strips on either side of the rack. They must be close enough to the
rack for the Maxtor-supplied power cords to reach from the enclosure power supply.
4:
Mount the MaxAttach NAS 6000 Equipment Enclosures
Mount the Base Unit and any equipped Expansion Units into your rack.
1.
Mount the base unit enclosure shelf in the rack at the bottom of the stack and tighten
all hardware.
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
2
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
5:
2.
If equipped, add the first Expansion Unit enclosure above the Base Unit and tighten
all hardware.
n
There should be no gap between the two enclosures.
3.
If equipped, add the second Expansion Unit enclosure above the first expansion
enclosure and tighten all hardware.
n
There should be no gap between the two enclosures.
Re-Seat All Hard Disk Drive Carrier Assemblies
Shipping vibration may have disconnected individual hard drives from their back plane
connectors. One drive at a time, pull the drive out of its Drive Bay, record its size and serial
number information, and replace it in its as-shipped Drive Bay location.
CAUTION
REPLACE DRIVE IN ORIGINAL DRIVE BAY SLOT AND SHELF: Be sure to replace the drive in its
original as-shipped Drive Bay. If you mix the drive and Drive Bays locations up, you will probably
have to reconfigure the disk RAID arrays.
6:
1.
For each drive, push down on the Ejector Tab, and then lift up on the Ejector Lever.
n
The drive releases from its Drive Bay connector.
2.
Pull the drive out of its Drive Bay.
n
This is a good time to record the drive type and serial number.
3.
Replace the drive in its Drive Bay until it begins to engage the connector.
4.
Make sure the Ejector Lever is free of the Ejector Tab and place your thumbs on
either side of the drive LEDs and press gently into the bay.
5.
Lower the Ejector Lever to latch the drive into place and then lock the Ejector Lever
on the Ejector Tab.
Review the Connector Locations
You will make connections on and between all installed enclosures The connections are for
the:
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
3
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
n
n
n
n
Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) bus
Environmental Monitoring Unit (EMU) serial port daisy chain
NIC cables
AC power.
Note that the base unit is on the bottom, the first expansion unit in the middle, and the
second expansion unit on the top.
Figure #2
7:
NAS 6000 Rack Mount System Back Panel Connectors
Install the External SCSI Cables
In this section, you will install SCSI drive cables between the Base Unit and your
Expansion Units.
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
4
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
Cabinet-Mount System or Single Base Unit Rack Mount System
1.
Process Branch Point:
n
If your system has a Base Unit and one or two Expansion Units, perform the
next step in this process immediately below in the section titled SCSI
Connections Between Base Unit and First Expansion Unit on page 5.
n
If you have a cabinet-mounted stem or a single Base Unit rack-mount system,
no SCSI cabling is required. Skip ahead below to the section titled Install
EMU Cables on page 7.
Figure #3
NAS 6000 SCSI Cable Connections
SCSI Connections Between Base Unit and First Expansion Unit
2.
Connect a SCSI cable from the Mylex upper left Port 0 connector to the right side
SCSI Connector Board.
3.
Connect a second SCSI cable from the Mylex upper right Port 1 to the center SCSI
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
5
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
Connector Board.
4.
Connect a third SCSI cable from the Mylex lower right Port 3 to the left side SCSI
Connector Board.
5.
Process Branch Point:
n
If your system only has a single Expansion Unit, your next step below is Step
#6.
n
If your system has an additional Expansion Unit to install, skip below to Step
#8.
6.
Add SCSI Terminator Plugs to the upper connector on each SCSI Connector Board.
7.
Your SCSI Cabling is complete. Skip ahead below to section #8: - Install EMU
Cables on page 7.
SCSI Connections Between the First and Second Expansion Units
8.
Connect the two left side SCSI Connector Cards with a first SCSI Cable.
n
Use the lower SCSI connector for all cable runs.
9.
Connect the two center SCSI Connector Cards with a second SCSI Cable.
10.
Connect the two right side SCSI Connector Cards with a third SCSI Cable.
11.
Add SCSI Terminator Plugs to the upper connector on each SCSI Connector Board.
NOTE
If you ordered two Expansion Units, you may end up with an extra set of unused SCSI Connector
Cards.
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
6
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
8:
Install EMU Cables
In this section, you will connect the Base Unit CPU to the Environmental Monitor Unit
(EMU) mounted in each enclosure unit.
Figure #4
NAS 6000 EMU Cable Connections
EMU Cable on Base Unit Installation
1.
Install the Base Unit EMU Cable.
n
Short Male/Male (M/M) serial cable
n
Start at EMU left side EXT1 port
n
Connect to CPU I/O Panel Serial Port 1.
n
Connect Base Unit to First Expansion Unit
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
7
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
9:
DECISION POINT - Are there Expansion Units to Install?
n
n
10:
1.
11:
EMU Cable Between Base Unit and First Expansion Unit
Install the Base Unit to First Expansion Unit EMU Cable
n
Longer M/F serial cable.
n
Start at the Base Unit EMU EXT2 port.
n
Connect to EMU EXT1 port on the first Expansion Unit.
DECISION POINT - One or Two Expansion Units
n
n
12:
If your system has only a single Base Unit, skip ahead to Step #13 - Install
Network and AC Power Cables on page 9 below.
If you system has a Base Unit and one or two Expansion Units, to continue
with the step immediately below.
If your system has only a single Base Unit, skip ahead to Step #13 - Install
Network and AC Power Cables on page 9 below.
If you system has a Base Unit and two Expansion Units, to continue with the
step immediately below.
EMU Cable Between First and Second Expansion Unit
2.
Install first Expansion Unit to second Expansion Unit EMU cable.
n
Longer M/F serial cable.
n
Start at first Expansion Unit EMU EXT2 port.
n
Connect to EMU EXT1 port on the second Expansion Unit.
3.
Your EMU cabling is complete.
NOTE
There is no terminator on the last EMU EXT2 port.
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
8
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
13:
Install Network and AC Power Cables
In this section, you will connect your Network Interface Cards (NICs) to your network
hub with user-supplied NIC cables. You will also connect the AC power cords to the
equipment shelves and connect them to user-supplied AC power strips.
Network Connections
Connect the appropriate NIC cables as follows:
1. Between each NIC and network hub or ports.
2.
At least one network connection is required.
3.
You can also add a network connection from the CPU I/O panel network port to
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
9
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
your network for administrative functions.
Figure #5
NAS 6000 Network Cable Connections
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
10
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
Figure #6
NAS 6000 Network Interface Card Connector Options
AC Power Connections
1. Connect each AC power strip cord to the local AC power source.
n
Recommend that each AC power strip be on a separate circuit.
2.
Connect the NAS 6000 Expansion Unit enclosure to the user-supplied AC power
strips.
3.
Install two AC power cords in each enclosure shelf.
4.
Route the left side cords to the left side AC power strip.
5.
Route the right side cords to the right side AC power strip.
6.
Make sure all the power supply back panel ON/OFF rocker switches are in the OFF
or “O” position.
n
There are two back panel switches on each enclosure shelf.
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
11
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
7.
Your MaxAttach NAS 6000 is ready to be powered up.
Figure #7
14:
NAS 6000 AC Power Connections
International AC Power Strip Solutions for Rack Mount
Systems
For MaxAttach NAS 6000 installations in locations outside of North America, localized
AC power strips are required.
Localized Internal AC Power Cords
For international locations, the MaxAttach NAS 6000 ships with the correct AC power
cord for connection between each Base and Expansion Unit equipment shelf and the
user-supplied AC power strips.
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
12
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
Localized AC Power Strips/Blocks
Maxtor has identified four power strip solutions for the following countries and world
areas:
n
Australia
n
Europe
n
Japan
n
United Kingdom
n
United States
The specifications of these strips plus a US approved power strip is detailed below.
Australia
Vendor:
n
Panel Components Corporation
n
Address: PO Box 115, Oskaloosa, IA 52577, USA
n
Email: info@panelcomponents.com
n
Web Site: http://www.panelcomponents.com
Photo:
AC Power Strip Specifications:
n
Vendor’s Part Number: 85010050
n
Socket Type: AS3112
n
Number of Sockets: 6
n
Cord Length: 1.04 meters
n
Cable Plug: AS3112
n
Case: Plastic, includes circuit breaker
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
13
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
n
n
Color: White
Rating: 250VAC / 10A
Agency Approvals:
n
Australia DFT 15632
Europe
Vendor:
n
Panel Components Corporation
n
Address: PO Box 115, Oskaloosa, IA 52577, USA
n
Email: info@panelcomponents.com
n
Web Site: http://www.panelcomponents.com
Photo:
AC Power Strip Specifications:
n
Vendor’s Part Number: 85003040
n
Socket Type: CEE 7
n
Number of Sockets: 4
n
Cord Length: 2.5 meters
n
Cable Plug: CEE 7/7
n
Case: Metal, includes rocker switch
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
14
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
n
n
Color: Orange
Rating: 250VAC / 16A
Agency Approvals:
n
Germany, VDE, 15970
Japan
Vendor:
n
Wirecom Corporation
n
3PL, No. 290, Sec 4., Yen Ping North Road, Taipei, Taiwan
n
Telephone: 886-2-2597-6617
n
FAX: 886-2-2597-6625
n
Email: Not available
n
Web Site: Not available
AC Power Strip Specifications:
n
Vendor’s Part Number: SLW6, SP6, or CK6
n
Socket Type:
n
Number of Sockets: 6
n
Cord Length: 0.61 meters to 7.6 meters
n
Cable Plug: Mounded-on grounding type attachment plug.
n
Case: Plastic
n
Color: White
n
Rating: 125VAC / 15A
Agency Approvals:
n
UL
United Kingdom
Vendor:
n
Panel Components Corporation
n
Address: PO Box 115, Oskaloosa, IA 52577, USA
n
Email: info@panelcomponents.com
n
Web Site: http://www.panelcomponents.com
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
15
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
Photo:
AC Power Strip Specifications:
n
Vendor’s Part Number: 85010322
n
Socket Type: BS1363
n
Number of Sockets: 4
n
Cord Length: 2.5 meters
n
Cable Plug: BA1363
n
Case: Plastic, includes switch and fuse
n
Color: White
n
Rating: 250VAC / 13A
Agency Approvals:
n
Not available from Panel Components
United States
Vendor:
n
Panel Components Corporation
n
Address: PO Box 115, Oskaloosa, IA 52577, USA
n
Email: info@panelcomponents.com
n
Web Site: http://www.panelcomponents.com
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
16
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
1: User-Supplied Materials and Services
AC Power Strip Specifications:
n
Vendor’s Part Number:
n
Socket Type:
n
Number of Sockets:
n
Cord Length:
n
Cable Plug:
n
Case:
n
Color:
n
Rating:
Agency Approvals:
n
UL
Chapter #1 - Installation - Rack Mounting Your NAS 6000
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
17
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #2 - Overview MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Chapter Outline
This chapter covers the following topics:
n
System features
n
System data storage solutions
n
Hardware features
n
Advanced data protection features
n
System disk drive configuration
n
Enclosure configuration options
n
Major components
n
Base Unit Enclosure description
n
Front panel description
n
Back panel description
n
Expansion Unit Enclosure description
n
Front panel description
n
Back panel description
n
Description of system components
n
Power supplies
n
Disk drive carriers
n
CPU I/O panel
n
Network interface cards
n
Fans and blowers
n
SCSI interface connectors and cabling
n
Environmental monitoring unit connectors and cabling
System Features
n
User data capacities are stated as available disk drive array capacities when factory
configured to RAID 5 arrays across six physical disks.
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
18
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Overview
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
RAID 5 provides cross disk striping with distributed parity for optimal balance of
read/write speed coupled with maximum fault tolerance and recovers in the event of a
disk drive failure.
Usable user data capacities along with relative fault tolerance and read/write speed will
vary if other RAID configuration are used.
Enterprise NAS software powered by Windows operating system
Cross-platform file sharing
Hardware RAID 0, 1, 0+1, 5, and JBOD (just a bunch of disks)
Capability to provide snapshot using Persistent Storage Manager
Hot swappable and redundant hardware:
n
Fans
n
Blowers
n
Power supplies
n
Hard disk drive carrier assemblies.
Up to three NIC connections:
n
10/100-BaseT Ethernet from CPU
n
Gigabit Ethernet with Copper Connections
n
Gigabit Ethernet with Fiber Connections
Three mounting options:
n
Standard rack-mount units for user-provided 19” rack
n
Self-contained roll around 28” cabinet for under-desk installations
n
Chatsworth cabinet racks in 48” and 84” heights for mounting multiple systems
in one location.
Overview
MaxAttach NAS 6000 is an easy to configure, enterprise-class network-attached storage
(NAS) server. This file server provides unparalleled value in data management solutions.
Based on a Microsoft Windows-Powered operating system, the MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
19
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Enclosure Configuration Options
provides a comprehensive suite of storage management tools or can be managed with
existing enterprise management tools. From directory support to security, to backup,
MaxAttach integrates seamlessly into any network environment.
Figure #3
MaxAttach Network Attached Storage 6000 Cabinet System
MaxAttach NAS 6000 is a scalable, reliable, and cost-effective storage solution for
heterogeneous file sharing, archiving and disk-based backups. Based on a Windows
Powered operating system, the MaxAttach NAS 6000 provides a comprehensive suite of
storage management tools and enables easy integration into enterprise network storage
architecture.
Cross-Platform File Sharing
MaxAttach NAS 6000 enables cross-platform file sharing among clients and servers:
Windows, UNIX/Linux, NetWare and Apple Macintosh environments. The support
extends fully into the security and directory infrastructure of these platforms, including
cross-platform file locking.
Enclosure Configuration Options
The MaxAttach NAS 6000 provides the user with highly configurable storage solutions by
varying the enclosure type, its basic capacity, and its available disk space for user data.
The MaxAttach NAS 6000 is available in two basic enclosure types of rack-mount ready in
a standard 19” rack or assembled in a roll around self-contained cabinet. The rack mount
version takes 4 rack space units (4U) per disk drive enclosure (4U, 8U or 12U).
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
20
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Enclosure Configuration Options
The available user storage space depends on the number of expansion enclosures that are
use with the system and the drive array selected by the user.
Rack Mount Systems
The Max Attach NAS 6000 can be mounted in a user-supplied EIA standard 19” rack for
installation in equipment rooms and wiring closets. Each equipment enclosure only
requires 4U. The base unit is mounted on the bottom, and up to two expansion enclosures
may be mounted above it.
Cabinet Mounted System
MaxAttachNAS 6000 systems may also be ordered mounted into a roll-around, lockable
cabinet for installation in office environments
n
The basic cabinet system has a small footprint and measures 28.5” H x 21.75”
W x 26” D - 72.4cmH x 55.2cmW x 66cm D.
n
The cabinet-mounted system can be user-lowered an extra 0.5 inches - 13mm
to accommodate under cabinet storage locations.
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
21
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Major Components of the Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000
Major Components of the Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000
The Base Unit and the Expansion Unit enclosures are the two major assemblies in the
MaxAttach NAS 6000. Within these two assemblies are the sub-assemblies described
below.
Figure #4
Exploded View of a Base Unit
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
22
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Major Components of the Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000
Base Unit Front Panel
The Base Unit is required for every MaxAttach NAS 6000 and contains the system CPU,
two power supplies, the fans, the necessary SCSI and Environmental Controllers, and 12
Disk Drive Carrier Assemblies. The Base Unit front panel provides local system control,
LED indicators for key system parameters, and an LCD panel for a summary of status
alerts.l
Figure #5
NAS 6000 Base Unit Front Panel Photo
The base unit front panel contains LED indicators for drive, power supply, and system
status and a power switch.
Figure #6
NAS 6000 Base Unit Front Panel Diagram
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
23
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Overview
Base Unit Front Panel Status LEDs
The figure below shows the location of the LEDs on the Base Unit front panel.
Figure #7
Base Unit Status LEDs
Figure #8
Base Unit LCD Panel
Overview
The MaxAttach NAS 6000 provides a wide range of alerts to inform the system
administrator about system status. There are five categories of alerts:
n
LED Alerts: Front panel LEDs indicate status of disk drives, power supplies, and other
system components.
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
24
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Front Panel LEDS
n
n
LCD Alerts: Messages are displayed on a small liquid crystal display (LCD) on the
MaxAttach front panel.
Web UI Alerts: Error messages and condition alerts that you access from the device's
LED Status Indicators
LED (light emitting diode) status indicators are available on the front panels of the base unit
and each installed expansion unit and provide general information about:
n
Activity and condition of the hard disk drive modules (on all enclosures)
n
Status of the unit's power supplies (on all enclosures)
n
Over-all system status (only on the Base Unit enclosure).
Figure #9
NAS 6000 LED Locations and Functions
Front Panel LEDS
There are three LED indicators in the lower right-hand corner of the main front panel that
indicate general system status. These are the System Status Alarm indicator, the Power On
indicators, and the Drive Status indicator.
n
BLUE System Status Alarm Indicator - Normally OFF.
n
This is a blue lamp which reports overall system status. The lamp remains off
unless there is an alarm from a source below.
n
Blower or fan alarm - the blower or a fan is indicating an underspeed condition.
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
25
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Hard Disk Drive Module Status LEDs
Power supply voltage alarm - a power supply indicates that one or more
voltages are out of limits.
n
Temperature alarm - temperature inside the enclosure has exceeded
programmed limits.
n
HDD alarm - one or more HDDs are failing. The failed drive will have its
Drive Status (yellow) indicator on
GREEN Unit Power-On Indicator - Normally ON
n
This is a green lamp indicating that power is on.
n
The lamp will flash (indicating not ready) until the system has completed its
boot-up sequence and is ready for operation.
YELLOW Drive Status Indicator - Normally OFF.
n
This is a yellow lamp indicates there is a HDD problem.
n
If there is a HDD problem this lamp will be lit.
n
If any HDD module status lamp is on, this lamp will also be on.
n
n
n
NOTE
Expansion units indicate their own status and activity. However, you must start the base unit to
enable the expansion unit status indicators. The base unit's soft power switch controls the start-up
of the expansion units.
Hard Disk Drive Module Status LEDs
Each Hard Disk Drive (HDD) Module has two LED indicators on its front panel:
n
A green Drive Activity indicator.
n
This indicator flashes in response to drive accesses
n
A yellow Drive Status indicator.
n
This indicator is off during normal operation.
n
It lights if there is an HDD module failure.
n
When the unit's back panel AC power switch is on and the front-panel soft
power switch is off, all drive status indicators are on.
n
As the unit powers up, the indicators go off as each drive becomes ready.
Power Supply Status LEDs
The MaxAttach 6000 is equipped with dual power supplies. Should one supply fail, the
other takes over. Each power supply has a green AC-OK indicator and a green DC-OK
indicator.
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
26
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
LCD Alert Panel
n
n
AC-OK Indicators
n
These indicators remain lit as long as AC power is supplied to the power
supplies.
n
If a lamp is off, it indicates that the AC power has been interrupted to the
power supply. This could indicate the supply's power cord is detached, the
power supply is turned off, the supply's circuit breaker has opened, or that there
is an open in the internal AC wiring harness.
DC-OK Indicators
n
These indicators remain lit as long as the supply's DC voltages are normal.
n
If a lamp is off, it indicates either the AC power is off (check the supply's
AC-OK indicator) or one or more of the DC voltages is out of its normal
range.
NOTE
If a single DC-OK indicator is off, the system may still function properly using the other power
supply. However, you should take corrective action as soon as possible.
LCD Alert Panel
The front-panel LCD (liquid crystal display) alert panel is a small 2.25”W x 1.25”H 57mmW x 37mmH display with a resolution of 128 pixels W x 64 pixels H.
Figure #10
NAS 6000 LCD Front Panel Location and Display Areas
NOTE
When the MaxAttach unit is housed in a system cabinet, each unit's alert messages can be sent to
the LCD panel on the cabinet. Up to three MaxAttach servers can be supported by the cabinet LCD
alert panel.
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
27
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
LCD Alert Panel
The LCD alert panel displays summary status messages about the state of the MaxAttach.
The display is divided into three separate status display areas:
n
Logo and Alert Message Area - Top display area
n
128 W x 36H pixel area - 2.25”W x 0.7”H - 57mmW x 18mmH.
n
Displays a Microsoft Windows-Powered logo during normal operation.
n
It displays an alert name and title when the system generates an alert.
n
Network Information Area - Middle display area
n
128W x 12H pixel area - 2.25”W x 0.26”H - 57mmW x 7mmH
n
Alternately displays the unit's host name and IP address.
n
Status Icon Display Area - Bottom display area
n
128W x 16H pixel area - 2.25”W x 0.3”H - 57mmW x 8mmH
n
Normally displays three standard icons indicating the status of the system, disk,
and network.
n
During alert conditions, the system may display multiple error condition icons.
Logo and Alert Message Display Area
The Logo and Alert Message display area is on the top of the LCD display. Under normal
operation, the logo and message display area shows a Microsoft Windows-Powered logo.
During alert conditions, the LCD panel shows an alert name and title and a message
counter that consists of the message number, a slash, and the total number of pending
messages (e.g. 1/20 for message number one of twenty total messages). If multiple messages
have been generated, the panel displays the most recent message until it is cleared at the
Web user interface.
The LCD panel reports alerts from the following systems:
Environmental Monitoring Unit (EMU)
The LCD panel displays specific information about a subsystem problem:
n
Disk failure
n
Power supply failure
n
Fan failure
n
Disk backplane voltage error
n
Abnormal temperature
TCP/IP and NetBT
The LCD panel displays a network-related system problem:
n
Network interface card (NIC) failure
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
28
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
LCD Alert Panel
n
n
Duplicate IP address
Duplicate computer name (NetBT)
GAMevlog
The LCD panel displays HDD-related problems and directs users to the Web user interface
to obtain more detailed information.
Mylex RAID Controller
Mylex RAID controller-generated event are also displayed. If appropriate, the LCD panel
will also display an alert icon (described below). For example, during a Fan Failure alert,
the icon display area will show a Fan Error icon.
Figure #11
NAS 6000 Fan Failure Icon
Network Information Display Area
The Network Information display area is the middle display area on the LCD panel. Every
five seconds, the display alternates between the MaxAttach NAS 6000’s IP address and its
server name. Only the first 20 to 25 letters of the server name will be displayed; longer
names will be truncated.
Status Icon Display Area
The Status Icon Display area is the bottom display area on the LCD panel. There are 12
icons that display either transitional status such as the start-up process, normal status such as
system availability, or alert status such as disk or network problems. Multiple icons can be
displayed at the same time. During normal operation, the icon display shows a system
starting icon, a disk normal icon, and a network normal icon.
Figure #12
NAS 6000 LCD Panel Normal Operation System Icons
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
29
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
LCD Alert Panel
The available system icons are:
Table #1 - LCD Icons and Definitions
Icon
Icon Definition
Icon
Icon Definition
System starting (OS Starting)
System normal and ready (OS Ready)
System halted (OS Halted)
System shutting down (Shutdown)
Disk normal and in good condition (Disk OK)
Disk error
Waiting
Local area network normal and in good condition
(LAN OK)
Local area network error (LAN Error)
Fan error, problem, or fan inoperative
Over temperature detected
Voltage out of acceptable tolerance range
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
30
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Expansion Unit
Base Unit Back Panel
The back panel of the base unit provides I/O connection for inter-enclosure SCSI and
EMU cabling, connections for the NICs and Ethernet Port, and system hard power
switches. In addition, access to the hot swappable fans and blower is provided. Other than
on the NICs, there are no status indicators.
Figure #13
Base Unit Back Panel
Expansion Unit
Up to two Expansion Units may be added above a single MaxAttach NAS 6000 Base Unit.
Each Expansion Unit provides 12 disk drives mounted in their Hard Disk Driver carrier
Assemblies. In normal default RAID configuration, each unit is divided into two six-disk
RAID 5 arrays. RAID 5 is striping across multiple drives with distributed parity for an
optimum balance between fault tolerance and recovery, maximum disk drive space, and
I/O read/write speeds.
Expansion Unit Front Panel
The Expansion Enclosure front panel is similar to the Base Unit front panel with the
following exceptions:
n
No System Status LED
n
No Power On LED
n
No Drive Status LED
n
No front panel power rocker switch.
The Power Supply LEDs and the Hard Disk Drive Carrier Assembly LEDs are the same.
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
31
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Description of System Components
Expansion Unit Back Panel
The Expansion Enclosure Back Panel is similar to the Base Unit with the following
exceptions:
n
No CPU I/O Panel
n
Three SCSI Connector Cards mounted in the card cage instead of a single RAID
Controller Card.
n
No NICs
n
The Power Supply Switches, Fans, and Blowers are the same.
Description of System Components
Major MaxAttach NAS 6000 Base Unit components:
n
Power Supply Modules - hot swappable - two per Base Unit enclosure
n
Hard Disk Drive Carrier Assemblies- hot swappable - 12 per Base Unit enclosure
n
Standard network Ethernet port mounted on the CPU I/O Panel - one per Base Unit
enclosure
n
High performance Gigabit Ethernet Network Interface Card (NIC) with copper
connections - one per Base Unit enclosure
n
High performance Gigabit Ethernet NIC with fiber optic connections - one per Base
Unit enclosure
n
Cooling Fans - hot swappable - two per Base Unit enclosure
n
Cooling Blower - hot swappable - one per Base Unit enclosure
n
SCSI RAID Controller Card -- connection to and management of disk arrays in the
Base Unit and any attached Expansion Units - one per Base Unit enclosure
n
Environmental Monitoring Unit (EMU) Card -- monitoring system environmental
conditions such as temperature and power consumption - one per Base Unit enclosure
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
32
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Description of System Components
Power Supply Modules
There are two hot swappable power supplies per Base Unit cabinet enclosure. Each power
supply is capable of running the system independently and can be hot swapped with
another assembly at any time. Each power supply has three fans on its front panel to help
with system cooling.
Figure #14
Hot Swappable Power Supply Three-Quarters View
Disk Drive Carriers
The system disk drives are enclosed in individual disk drive carriers 12 per enclosure.
Individual failed drives can be hot swapped while the system is running. In the default
RAID-5 configuration, a RAID-5 array will continue to function with slightly degraded
service in the event of a drive failure.
However, prompt action should be initiated to replace the failed drive. When a drive fails
in a fault tolerant RAID array, the arrays is put into a “critical” state where the failure of a
second drive in the array will lead to non-recoverable data loss. After the user replaces the
failed drive, the system administrator must initiate the RAID volume rebuild in the
background, a process which can take several hours.
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
33
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Description of System Components
Optionally, an administrator can modify the default RAID configuration and leave one or
two drives available as hot spare drives. These are drives that are powered up, but unused in
any array. In the event of a drive failure, the failed drive drops offline and is replaced
automatically by the hot standby drive. The RAID rebuild process starts automatically and
immediately.
Figure #15
Hot Swappable Hard Disk Drive Carrier Diagram and Photo
CPU I/O Panel
The CPU I/O Panel is located on the Base Unit’s Back Panel and it is the primary
diagnostic and administration interface into the MaxAttach NAS 6000.
Figure #16
CPU I/O Panel Above the EMU Connector Panel
It provides connections for:
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
34
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Description of System Components
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
Mouse (used only for diagnostics)
Keyboard - used only for diagnostics
USB ports - two - not used
Parallel I/O port - not used
Serial port 1 - used by the Environmental Monitoring Unit (EMU)
Serial port 2 - not used
Ethernet port from the CPU motherboard
CPU Ethernet Port
Every system is equipped with a standard IEEE 802.3/IEEE 802.3U-LAN-compliant
10BaseT/100BaseTX Ethernet port on the CPU motherboard of the MaxAttach NAS
6000 Base Unit chassis. Located on the CPU I/O Panel, the LAN connector for this port is
a standard RJ-45 type, compatible with standard CAT 3, 4, and 5 UTP cabling for
10BaseT operation (10 Mb/s) and Cat-5 UTP cabling for 100BaseTX operation (100
Mb/s).
The CPU Ethernet Port is only replaceable by replacing the CPU motherboard.
Network Interface Cards (NICs)
The Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 is equipped with two high performance NICs in
addition to the Ethernet port on the CPU I/O Panel. The default configured NICs are:
n
A gigabit Ethernet NIC with copper wire connections
n
A gigabit speed Ethernet NIC with fiber optic connections
Clients attached to a particular network type (10BaseT/100BaseTX, Gigabit copper,
Gigabit fiber-optic) access the MaxAttach NAS 6000 at the IP address assigned to each
LAN adapter.
The software drivers for Windows 2000 have been pre-installed at the factory and there is
no user configuration required other than entering local network parameters such as IP
address.
All set up operations for the installed network interfaces are automatic. Once the cables are
attached, there are no user controls or adjustments. The devices automatically detect the
network speed and configure themselves for optimum throughput.
All of the card cage NICs are field replaceable units, although system down time is required
to access the system internal components.
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
35
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Description of System Components
Determining Your System's NIC Configuration
There is a five-slot card cage in the MaxAttach NAS 6000 Base Unit. The card cage holds
a video card, a RAID Controller Card, and a SCSI connector. The two remaining slots
hold the NICs. To determine which NICs are installed in your system, locate the card cage
at the back of the MaxAttach NAS 6000 and identify the three standard system cards by
their connectors (these may occupy any slot):
n
The Video Card has a 15-pin DSUB connector.
n
The RAID Disk Controller Card has 4 high-density 68-pin SCSI connectors.
n
The SCSI Connector Card has a single 68-pin connector.
n
In the remaining two card cage slots, look at the connectors and compare them to the
examples shown in the following diagram.
Figure #17
Network Interface Cards I/O Ports Diagram
The manufacturer and configuration of the NICs may differ from your system’s
conjuration.
Hot Swappable Fans and Blower
To provide maximum system life, each chassis enclosure comes with two Back Panel fans
and a single Blower. In the event of a failure, each unit is hot swappable with no loss of
system up time.
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
36
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Description of System Components
In addition, the Base Unit enclosure comes with a a fan on each CPU microprocessor.
These units are cold swappable, requiring approximately 30 minutes to access and change
out.
Fans
Figure #18
Back Panel Fan Locations
Figure #19
Fan Assembly
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
Blower
37
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Description of System Components
Figure #20
Blower Assembly Diagram Three Quarter View
CPU Fans
Figure #21
CPU Fan Location With Covers Off
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
38
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Description of System Components
SCSI Interface Connectors to Optional Expansion Enclosures
If your system has an optional expansion enclosure/s, the SCSI Interface Connectors from
the Mylex SCSI RAID controller card mounted in the PC card cage are used to
interconnect the base unit to the next expansion enclosure. There are four SCSI Ports on
the card, only Ports 0, 1, and 3 are used.
The Mylex RAID Controller Card is a field replaceable unit.
Figure #22
RAID Controller SCSI Connections Diagram and Photo - Channel 2 Not Used
Environmental Monitoring Unit (EMU) Connectors
The EMU is responsible for gathering the environmental status of the connected Base and
Expansion Units and then routing the information to the CPU O/S for action. Typical
monitoring conditions include temperature, fan rotation, and voltages that are both in and
out of specification. These environmental signals in turn generate alerts which are
distributed to some combination of LCD panel, LED indicators, email to administrators,
web user interface, and SNMP actions.
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
39
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
Description of System Components
The EMU is a field replaceable unit.
Figure #23
Base Unit Rear View Diagram with EMU
Chapter #2 - Overview - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Hardware
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
40
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft
Windows O/S Version 2.0
Chapter Outline
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
Overview of operating system (O/S)
Navigation overview
Home and welcome screens
Initial system setting screens
System status screens
Network configuration screens
Disks and volumes screens
Users and groups screens
Folders and shares screens
Maintenance screens
Services for UNIX screens
Services for NetWare screens
NOTE
For detailed information and instructions about using the Microsoft Windows-Powered Max
Operating System Version 2.0, consult the O/S chapters following on each topic such as Network,
Folders and Shares, and Maintenance.
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
41
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
O/S Overview
O/S Overview
This chapter provides you with a quick
overview of the Microsoft
Windows-Powered Max Operating
System Version 2.0, its screens, and
their major functions.
Navigation Overview
The navigation user interface provides both a top of screen two level navigation bar as well
as clickable hot links on every page. The figure below shows the primary navigation
settings for each top level option.
Figure #4
O/S Navigation Bar Tab Settings
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
42
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Welcome Page
Welcome Page
The Welcome page is displayed when you connect to the MaxAttach NAS 6000NAS from
a client computer on the network. The navigation bars described above allow you full
access to all O/S functions.
The links on the page provide specific access to”
n
Take a tour of major O/S features
n
Set Administrator Password
n
Set Server Appliance Name
n
Set Default Page
Figure #5
Welcome Page Screen
Take a Tour
Take a Tour shows you how easy it is to use the MaxAttach NAS 6000 and provides an
overview of the O/S features and functions.
Figure #6
Take a Tour Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
43
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Initial System Settings
Initial System Settings
Set Server Appliance Name
The Set Server Appliance Name page allows you to:
n
Set the name of the server appliance
n
Set the DNS suffix
n
Become a member of a NT 4 or Active Directory domain or remain a member of a
workgroup.
n
Set the AppleTalk name.
n
Set the NetWare server name.
Figure #7
Set Server Appliance Name Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
44
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Initial System Settings
Set Administrator Password
The Set Administrator Password page allows you to change the password of the MaxAttach
NAS 6000 administrator account.
Figure #8
Set Administrator Password Screen
Set Default Page
The Set Default Page allows you to set what page the MaxAttach NAS 6000 displays first.
You can display either the Status or Welcome page.
Figure #9
Set Default Page Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
45
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
System Status Summary
System Status Summary
Status Page
From the Status page, you have access to real-time operational and management data for
the administration of the MaxAttach NAS 6000. The Status selection options on the
secondary menu bar provide access to specialized subsets of system status information:
n
System summary
n
System health
n
Installed software elements
n
Windows system files
n
Export system information
Figure #10
System Status Page Screen
System Summary Page
The Summary Status page provides a quick overview of system configuration information
and includes:
n
Computer name
n
Processor type, manufacturer, and model
n
BIOS version and date
n
System TCP/IP address
n
Total physical memory
n
Operating system and version
n
Data and time for local system, install date, and last boot up date
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
46
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
System Status Summary
n
Number of physical disks, total space, and available free space.
Figure #11
System Summary Page Screen
System Health Page
The System Health page provides performance and health metrics for system hardware and
major subassemblies including:
n
Motherboard
n
Processor
n
Memory
n
Drives
n
BIOS
n
Network configuration and network adapter cards.
Figure #12
System Health Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
47
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
System Status Summary
Installed Software Elements
The Installed Software Elements page lists all installed software modules with typically over
100 listed packages or elements. The listing provides information fields of:
n
Name of the software package or element
n
Version number
n
State of the software:
n
For normal operation, the software state is listed as Local, meaning the software
is installed on the local machine.
n
Other possible software states include Absent, Error, Bad Configuration, Not
Used, or Source Absent.
n
Directory location of the software package or element.
Figure #13
Installed Software Elements Screen
Windows System Files Page
The Windows System Files page lists all the Windows DLL (dynamic linked library) files
and all of the Windows SYS (system) files. Within each type of system file, the files are
listed alphabetically by file name. Typically several hundred files are listed. The listing
provides information fields of:
n
File name and DLL or SYS file extension.
n
File version
n
Size in bytes
n
Created date
n
Last modified date
n
Last access date
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
48
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
n
Directory location.
Figure #14
Windows System Files Screen
Export SysInfo Page
The Export SysInfo page, allows the administrator to export either the system’s current
status or its original as-shipped status data via e-mail to the Administrator’s mailbox.
Figure #15
Export SysInfo Screen
Network Configuration
NOTE
For detailed procedures within O/S Network Configuration, see Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network
Configuration on page 131.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
49
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
Network Page
The Network page allows you configure the following network-related properties of the
MaxAttach NAS 6000:
n
Identification
n
Global Settings
n
Interfaces
n
Administrator
n
Administration Web Site
n
SNMP Service Configuration
n
Telnet
n
NIC Configuration
.
Figure #16
Network Page Screen
Identification Page
The Identification page allows you to:
n
Set the name of the server appliance
n
Set the DNS suffix
n
Become a member of a NT 4 or Active Directory domain or remain a member of a
workgroup
n
Set the AppleTalk name
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
50
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
n
Set the Netware name.
Figure #17
Server Appliance Identify Identification Page Screen
Server Appliance Name
The server appliance name is the name of the server appliance on a network. The server
appliance name must be unique and must meet certain requirements. The new server
appliance name cannot be the same as another computer or the name of a Microsoft
Windows domain.
It is recommended that you use names that are 15 characters or fewer. The server appliance
name can be a maximum of 63 characters but should only contain the numbers 0-9, the
uppercase letters A-Z, the lowercase letters a-z, or hyphens. You may use other characters,
but doing so may prevent other users from finding your computer on the network. If your
network is using the Microsoft DNS server, you can use any characters except periods.
If other networking protocols are installed without TCP/IP, the server appliance name is
limited to 15 characters.
If you specify a server appliance name longer than 15 characters and you want longer
names to be recognized by the Microsoft Active Directory domain, the domain
administrator must enable registration of DNS names that are 16 characters or longer
DNS Suffix
Domain-name system (DNS) suffixes have the following two primary purposes:
1.
When appended to the server appliance host name, DNS suffixes constitute the fully
qualified server appliance name.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
51
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
2.
To resolve IP addresses. If your server appliance is a member of Windows NT 4
domain, a Microsoft Active Directory, or a workgroup, the DNS suffix is dependent
upon the domain environment.
Including hyphens and periods, a DNS suffix may contain up to 155 characters.
The MaxAttach NAS 6000 supports automatic DNS entry into an ADS domain. If you are
using a Windows NT 4.0 DNS server, you will need to manually enter the MaxAttach
NAS 6000 into the DNS database.
Domain
Your server appliance can be in a workgroup, active directory environment, or Windows
NT 4 domain. In Microsoft Windows NT 4 and Microsoft Active Directory
environments, a domain is a collection of computers defined by the administrator of a
network that share a common directory database.
Utilized for Windows user and group information, Windows domains have a unique name
and provide access to the centralized user accounts and group accounts maintained by the
domain administrator. Each domain has its own security policies and security relationships
with other domains, and each domain represents a single security boundary of a Windows
computer network. Active Directory is made up of one or more domains, each of which
can span more than one physical location.
For DNS, a domain is any tree or subtree within the DNS name space. Although the
names for DNS domains often correspond to Active Directory domains, DNS domains
should not be confused with Microsoft Windows and Active Directory networking
domains.
By default a domain user must enter domain\user name when logging into a Web server
appliance or a MaxAttach NAS 6000 with a browser.
Workgroup
A workgroup is a simple grouping of computers, intended only to help users find such
things as printers and shared folders within that group. Your server appliance can be in a
workgroup, active directory environment, or Windows NT 4 domain. Workgroups in
Microsoft Windows 2000 do not offer the centralized user accounts and authentication
offered by domains.
A workgroup name must not duplicate the computer name. A workgroup name can have
as many as 15 characters, but cannot contain any of the following characters: ; : “ < > + =
\|?,.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
52
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
AppleTalk Name
By default, the AppleTalk name will be the same as the standard server name. If you change
the server name, the AppleTalk name will automatically change.
NetWare Name
The NetWare name must be different from the server appliance name. By default, the
NetWare name will be the server appliance name with _FPNW appended to it.
Global Settings Page
The Global Settings page allows you to change the overall network settings for your server
appliance by configuring the IPX settings as well as specifying the DNS suffixes and the
LMHOSTS and HOSTS file to use. These files can be used to resolve the names of any
computer or device.
Figure #18
Global Network Settings - DNS Resolution Tab
DNS Name Resolution Tab
So that people can reach your Web site on an intranet or the Internet, you must have a
unique IP address that identifies your computer on the network. This address consists of a
long string of numbers separated by dots, for example, 172.16.255.255. Because a numeric
address is difficult for people to remember, text names, or friendly names, are used to
provide visitors with an easy-to-remember address, such as www.microsoft.com. Name
resolution involves supplying the correct numerical address from the friendly name that was
typed into a client browser.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
53
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
Name Resolution Systems
Windows networking components rely on the NetBIOS naming convention. In contrast,
TCP/IP components rely on a naming convention known as the Domain Name System
(DNS). Under Windows, the DNS host name of your server appliance defaults to the same
name as the NetBIOS computer name. The mapping of computer names to IP addresses
can be accomplished using one of the following two methods:
n
Static
n
The system administrator creates either a text file for DNS names, called a
HOSTS file, or an LMHOSTS file for NetBIOS names, and enters each
computer’s name and IP address.
n
The file is then distributed on the network.
n
When a request for a connection to another computer is made, the file is used
to resolve the name to the correct IP address.
n
This system works well for simple networks that change infrequently.
n
Dynamic
n
When a client computer connects to a network with a DHCP server, the
DHCP server assigns an address and sends the IP address assignment to a
Windows Internet Name Service (WINS) server.
n
The WINS server registers the computer’s name, and when a request is made
for a NetBIOS computer name, the WINS server resolves the name to the
correct IP address.
n
This automatic recognition and mapping of computer names and addresses eases
the administrative burden of large or frequently changing networks.
DNS names are typically resolved using static information. The DNS server contains a
portion of the static database listing host names and addresses. If the requested name is not
in the DNS server’s portion of the database, it sends a query to other DNS servers to get
the requested information. The DNS server that runs on Windows can be configured to
query a WINS server for name resolution of the lower levels of the DNS hierarchical
naming structure. Because WINS assigns computer names dynamically, this effectively
changes DNS from a static system to a dynamic system.
TCP/IP Hosts Tab
Windows networking components rely on the NetBIOS naming convention. In contrast,
TCP/IP components rely on a naming convention known as the Domain Name System
(DNS). Under Windows, the DNS host name defaults to the same name as the NetBIOS
computer name. The mapping of computer names to IP addresses can be accomplished
using one of the following two methods:
n
Static
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
54
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
The system administrator creates either a text file for DNS names, called a
HOSTS file, or an LMHOSTS file for NetBIOS names, and enters each
computer's name and IP address. The file is then distributed on the network.
When a request for a connection to another computer is made, the file is used
to resolve the name with the correct IP address. This system works well for
simple networks that change infrequently.
Dynamic
n
When a client computer logs on, a DHCP server assigns an address and sends
the IP address assignment to a Windows Internet Name Service (WINS) server.
The WINS server registers the computer's name, and when a request is made
for a NetBIOS computer name, the WINS server resolves the name to the
correct IP address. This automatic recognition and mapping of computer names
and addresses eases the administrative burden of large or frequently changing
networks.
n
n
Figure #19
Global Network Settings - TCP/IP Hosts Tab
If you are setting up multiple Web or FTP sites on a single server, each with its own IP
address, you might encounter problems with automatic DNS registration. To ensure
correct IP binding and DNS registration, disable Windows 2000 Server automatic DNS
registration and manually configure DNS registration for the Web sites. For more
information about disabling automatic DNS registration and manually configuring DNS
registration, see the Windows 2000 Server documentation.
If you want to assign multiple names to one server appliance, you must use a static name
assignment for the server appliance. On one computer you can map multiple names to one
IP address or you can use multiple names, each one mapped to its own IP address.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
55
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
NetBIOS LMHOSTS Tab
The use of an LMHOSTS file is optional. If an LMHOSTS file is not used, however, you
cannot use friendly text names. Instead, you must use IP addresses. This can be a
disadvantage because Web sites on the Internet usually use the DNS. If you register a
domain name for your Web site, users can contact your Web site by typing its domain
name in a browser.
Figure #20
Global Network Settings Screen - NetBIOS LMHOSTS Tab
The LMHOSTS file is read when WINS or broadcast name resolution fails and resolved
entries are stored in a system cache for later access. When the computer uses the replication
service and does not use WINS, LMHOSTS file entries are required on import and export
servers for any computers on different subnetworks participating in the replication.
IPX Settings Tab
Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX) is the native NetWare protocol used on many earlier
Novell networks.
To be accessible from clients running NetWare, your server appliance must provide an IPX
address.
Figure #21
Global Network Settings Screen - IPX Settings Tab
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
56
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
Interfaces Page
The Interfaces page allows you to configure the local network settings on the MaxAttach
NAS 6000 device. From this page, you can:
n
Change the name of the connection.
n
Set or change the Internet Protocol (IP) and gateway addresses, subnet masks, and
metrics.
n
Set or change how the server appliance resolves DNS names.
n
Set or change the configuration of the Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS)
clients.
n
Configure AppleTalk.
Figure #22
Interfaces Page Screen
Interfaces Page - Rename Link
The Rename page allows you to change the name of the connection.
Figure #23
Rename Page Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
57
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
Interfaces Page - IP Link
Each computer on the network must have a unique IP address to send and receive data.
You can use the IP Address Configuration page to have your server appliance automatically
obtain the IP address configuration from the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
(DHCP) server. Alternately, you can configure the IP address(es) manually.
Figure #24
IP Address Configuration Screen - General and Advanced Tabs
In addition, you can use the IP Address Configuration page to specify one or more gateway
addresses. A gateway address is the address of a local IP router residing on the same network
as the server appliance that is used to forward traffic to destinations beyond the local
network. The value in each field must be a number from 0-255.
NOTE
CHANGING IP ADDRESSES: Changing the IP address may cause the client to lose its connection
with the server appliance. To reconnect, the user must either use the new IP address or wait until
the DNS server is updated.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
58
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
Interfaces Page - DNS Link
The domain-name system (DNS) is a static, hierarchical name service for TCP/IP hosts.
The network administrator configures the DNS with a list of host names and IP addresses.
This allows users on the network to query the DNS to specify remote systems by host
names rather than IP addresses.
Figure #25
DNS Servers Configuration Screen
NOTE
DNS PAGE PURPOSE: The purpose of this property page is to allow you to enter the addresses of
EXTERNAL DNS servers. The MaxAttach NAS 6000 does not contain a DNS server.
Interfaces Page - WINS Link
WINS clients attempt to register their names with a WINS server when they start or join
the network. Thereafter, WINS clients query the WINS server as needed to resolve remote
names.
WINS-enabled clients are computers that can be configured to make direct use of a WINS
server. Most WINS clients typically have more than one NetBIOS name that they must
register for use with the network. These names are used to publish various types of
network service, such as the Messenger or Workstation Service, that each computer can
use in various ways to communicate with other computers on the network. WINS-enabled
clients communicate with the WINS server to:
n
Register client names in the WINS database.
n
Renew client names with the WINS database.
n
Release client names from the WINS database.
n
Resolve names by obtaining mappings from the WINS database for user names,
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
59
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
NetBIOS names, DNS names, and IP addresses.
Figure #26
WINS Servers Configuration Screen
Clients that are not WINS-enabled can use WINS proxies to participate in these processes
in a limited way. If you are using a DHCP server to allocate WINS server IP addresses, you
do not need to add WINS server addresses.
Keep in mind that the Web UI only allows you to manipulate two WINS addresses, and
even then only if you statically assign the IP address for the adapter. If you have DHCP
enabled, you can remove one or two existing addresses and add different addresses, but you
will not be able to remove all WINS servers from a DHCP-enabled adapter. If you remove
two WINS addresses and do not add at least one, DHCP will automatically assign WINS
addresses.
NOTE
WINS PAGE PURPOSE: The purpose of this property page is to allow you to enter the addresses of
EXTERNAL WINS servers. The MaxAttach NAS 6000 does not contain a WINS server.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
60
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
Interfaces Page - AppleTalk Link
Use the AppleTalk Configuration page to specify which network adapter can receive
inbound AppleTalk connections and in which AppleTalk zone the MaxAttach will appear.
Only one AppleTalk adapter per system can be configured to receive inbound traffic.
Figure #27
AppleTalk Configuration Page
Administrator Account Page
The MaxAttach NAS 6000 server appliance comes with a set of default accounts. Only the
administrator account has administrative privileges.
Figure #28
Administrator Account Screen
NOTE
DOMAIN ACCOUNTS AND ADMINISTRATORS: If an administrator adds a domain account to the
local administrators group, the domain user may access and administer the server appliance.
However, the administrator cannot use the Change Administrator Password page to change his
domain account password. This page can only be used to change the local administrator’s account
password.
When you change the administrator password, there is no explicit confirmation page.
However, the password is successfully changed if no error message appears after you have
submitted the change.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
61
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
NOTE
CHANGING THE ADMINISTRATOR PASSWORD: You cannot change the administrator password if
you are logged on as a domain user as it is outside the scope of the server appliance Web UI to
make changes to domain user accounts. Domain user accounts are stored on the domain controller,
not on the server appliance.
In this context, administrator relates to the user account that is a member of the local
administrators group and is used by a current user to log on. It does not refer to the default
administrator account, called administrator.
If you receive the error message “The password cannot be changed for this
domain account” or “The account name cannot be changed for this
domain account” when trying to change the administrator password or account name,
you are logged on as a domain user. You must be logged on as the server appliance
administrator to change the administrator password.
Administration Web Site Properties Page
This feature allows you to change the IP address and port that can be used to access the
administration Web site on the server appliance.
The default IP address to which the server appliance responds, or listens, is typically
changed when the server appliance is only managed on a certain subnet or a separate
management network.
The default listen ports for both encrypted and non-encrypted access can be modified as
needed to work with existing network software and configurations, for example, when no
traffic above a given port number is allowed.
Figure #29
Administration Web Server Properties
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
62
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
SNMP Service Configuration Page
From the SNMP Service Configuration page, you can edit the values as needed on the
Agent, Traps and Security tabs. Double-click SNMP Service to access the SNMP Service
Properties page.
Figure #30
SNMP Service Configuration Screen
Related Topics
•
See the Appendix - SNMP Management System for
detailed information about SNMP features and
functions.
Telnet Page
The Telnet page allows you to administer your Windows-Powered server appliance from a
remote system using the Telnet protocol. You can log onto the system from a remote
Telnet client and run character-mode applications on the server appliance. The Telnet
server included with your server appliance supports a maximum of two Telnet clients at
any time, unless otherwise specified by your server appliance hardware manufacturer.
Figure #31
Telnet Administration Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
63
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
NIC Configuration Page
n
The Network Interface Card (NIC) adapters supplied with the MaxAttach NAS 6000
can vary, depending on which adapters were ordered and whether the system has been
upgraded.
Figure #32
NIC Configuration Screen
In addition to the Base Unit chassis 10/100 Mb/s Ethernet adapter network port on the
CPU I/O panel, the system is equipped with two additional NICs
n
a a gigabit Ethernet NIC with copper wire connections
n
a gigabit speed Ethernet NIC with fiber optic connections
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
64
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
To determine which NICs are installed in your system, locate the card cage at the back of
the MaxAttach NAS 6000 and match the connector patterns with those shown in the
diagram.
Figure #33
Base Unit Back Panel NIC Identification
Base Unit Network Port
Every system is equipped with a standard IEEE 802.3/IEEE 802.3U-LAN-compliant
10BaseT/100BaseTX Ethernet port. It is supplied on the CPU I/O Panel of the Maxtor
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Base Unit chassis.
The LAN connector for this port is a standard RJ-45 type, compatible with standard CAT
3, 4, and 5 UTP cabling for 10BaseT operation (10 Mb/s) and Cat-5 UTP cabling for
100BaseTX operation (100 Mb/s).
Standard NIC Configuration
The software drivers for each NIC have been pre-installed at the factory. There is no user
configuration required other than entering local area network parameters (IP address, server
name, domain and workgroup, etc.).
Every installed NIC should be connected to a separate subnet and be assigned a unique IP
address. The architecture of the network permitting, clients can access the MaxAttach with
any of its IP addresses.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
65
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
All NICs are initially configured as DHCP clients at the factory so that they will get their
IP addresses and other network parameters from a DHCP server. If there is no DHCP
server on your network, the administrator must assign fixed network parameters to each
NIC.
When you start the Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 for the first time and it does not find a
DHCP server, it assigns itself a temporary IP address (169.254.nn.mm, where nn and mm are
random integers in the range of 0 - 255). Use MaxNeighborhood Discovery and Setup
Wizard to discover the MaxAttach NAS 6000's temporary IP address, then use Internet
Explorer running on a client computer to access the Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 at its
temporary IP address and follow the steps of the O/S First Time Setup Wizard to set the
required network parameters.
NOTE
Initially, connect only one MaxAttach NIC to the network. MaxNeighborhood should be run on a
client computer attached to the same network subnet, since it may not see a MaxAttach (with IP
169.254.nn.mm) across a network router or switch.
All other setup operations for the installed network interfaces are automatic. There are no
other user controls or adjustments. The devices automatically detect the network speed and
configure themselves for optimum throughput.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
66
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
Gigabit Ethernet NIC with Copper Connections
The gigabit network interface card is a full-duplex gigabit Ethernet interface that is fully
compliant with IEEE 802.3z for UTP and fully compliant with IEEE 802.3ab and IEEE
802.3u. The interface is compatible with all 10/100/1000BaseT hubs, switches and routers.
It can provide sustained throughput of up to 1 Gb/s.
LED #A is ON when the adapter is at 10 Mbits/second.
LED #B is ON when set to 100 Mbits/second.
LED #C is ON when set to 1000 Mbits/second.
LED steady ON for an established valid network link.
LED slow blinking during transmit or receive network activity.
Figure #34
Gigabit NIC with Copper Connections Status LEDs
The gigabit Ethernet NIC has an RJ-45 connector for connection of Category 5 or 5E
copper cabling. The maximum cable length is 100 meters or 328 feet.
There are three LEDs on the gigabit NIC connector plate, one for each port speed option:
10 Mbps (Ethernet), 100 Mbps (Fast Ethernet), and 1000 Mbps (Gigabit Ethernet).
n
The A LED is ON when the adapter is at 10 Mb/s.
n
The B LED is ON when the adapter is at 100 Mb/s.
n
The C LED is ON when the adapter is at 1000 Mb/s.
n
A LED is ON when there is a valid network link established.
n
A LED flashes slowly during network activity (transmit or receive).
The required software drivers have been pre-installed at the factory and there is no user
configuration required.
Gigabit Ethernet NIC with Fiber Optic Connections
The gigabit Ethernet NIC with fiber optic connections connects the MaxAttach NAS 6000
to a gigabit Ethernet network via a standard fiber interface. It is fully interoperable with
existing Ethernet equipment and operates at 1 gigabit per second (Gb/s) in full-duplex
mode when connected to a gigabit Ethernet port.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
67
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
The NIC supports standard Ethernet minimum and maximum frame sizes (64 to 1518
bytes), frame format, and IEEE 802.2 LLC specifications. The underlying NIC technology
ensures high performance and maximum bandwidth availability to prevent server
congestion and complies with the IEEE 802.3z full-duplex gigabit Ethernet fiber interface
standard and with the IEEE 802.3x frame-based flow control standard.
Two status LEDs are located above the cable connector on the
MaxAttach NAS 6000 back panel. They indicate the link status as
follows:
Data LED
- ON or FLASHING: NIC is detecting network data. The frequency of
the flashes varies with the amount of network traffic.
- OFF: No connection between the NIC and the switch.
Link LED
- ON: Connection between the NIC and the switch is established.
- FLASHING: Software has disabled the port.
Figure #35
Gigabit Ethernet NIC with Fiber Optic Connections Status LEDs
The gigabit Ethernet NIC with fiber optic connections connects to the network via
standard SC/MMF cabling. Compliant cabling types and maximum transmission distances
are shown in the table below.:
Table #1 - Cabling Types and Distances
Connecto
r
Type
Cable
Type
Cable
Diameter
(Microns)
Modal
Bandwidth
(MHz*km)
Maximum
Length
Feet (Meters)
1000BASE-SX
SC
MMF
62.5
160
722 (220)
Short wavelength
(850 nm)
SC
MMF
62.5
200
902 (275)
50
400
1641 (500)
50
500
1805 (550)
Signal Type
Two status LEDs are located above the cable connector on the MaxAttach NAS 6000 back
panel. They indicate the link status as follows:
n
Data LED
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
68
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Network Configuration
On or flashing: NIC is detecting network data. The frequency of the flashes
varies with the amount of network traffic.
n
Off: No connection between the NIC and the switch.
Link LED
n
On: Connection between the NIC and the switch is established.
n
Flashing: Software has disabled the port.
n
Off: No connection between the NIC and switch.
n
n
The required software drivers have been pre-installed at the factory and there is no user
configuration required.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
69
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Disks and Volumes
Disks and Volumes
NOTE
For detailed procedures within O/S Disks and Volumes Configuration, see Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 Disk and Volume Properties on page 168.
Disks Page
From the Disks page, you can:
n
Configure the properties of individual disks and volumes residing on the MaxAttach
NAS 6000.
n
Configure disk quotas for volumes on the MaxAttach NAS 6000.
n
Use Persistent Storage Manager to take point-in-time snapshots of selected volumes.
n
Defragment the disks
n
Configure the disk array using the Mylex GAM software.
Figure #36
Disks Page Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
70
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Disks and Volumes
Disks and Volumes
From the Disks and Volumes page, you can choose to configure the disks or volumes on
the server appliance. To manage disks and volumes on the server appliance you need to log
on to Terminal Services Advanced Client.
Figure #37
Disks and Volumes Page Screen
Terminal Services Advanced Client
Terminal Services Advanced Client is a general purpose tool that gives you full access to
your server appliance. When accessed using the Disks and Volumes page, the Terminal
Services Advanced Client assumes a dedicated mode and can only be used to manage disks
and volumes on your server appliance.
Terminal Services Advanced Client supports only two concurrent connections.
Additionally, if you navigate to another page during an open session, the client will be
disconnected but the session will be preserved.
Disk Quotas Page
Disk quotas track and control disk space use in volumes. You can configure the volumes on
your server appliance to perform the following tasks:
n
Prevent further disk space use and log an event when a user exceeds a specified disk
space limit.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
71
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Disks and Volumes
n
Log an event when a user exceeds a specified disk space warning level.
Figure #38
Disk Volumes and Quotas Page Screen
Disk Quota Page - Quota Link
When you enable disk quotas, you can set both the disk quota limit and the disk quota
warning level. The disk quota limit specifies the amount of disk space a user is allowed to
use. The warning level specifies the point at which a user is nearing his or her quota limit.
For example, you can set a user’s disk quota limit to 50 megabytes (MB), and the disk
quota warning level to 45 MB. In this case, the user can store no more than 50 MB on the
volume. If the user stores more than 45 MB on the volume, you can have the disk quota
system log a system event.
Figure #39
Default Quota Page Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
72
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Disks and Volumes
In addition, you also can specify that users can exceed their quota limit. Enabling quotas
and not limiting disk space use is useful when you do not want to deny users access to a
volume, but want to track disk space use on a per-user basis. You can also specify whether
or not to log an event when users exceed either their quota warning level or their quota
limit.
When you enable disk quotas for a volume, volume usage is automatically tracked from
that point forward, but existing volume users have no disk quotas applied to them. You can
apply disk quotas to existing volume users by adding new quota entries on the Quota
Entries page.
Disk Quotas Page - Quota Entries
When you enable disk quotas on a volume, every user’s disk volume usage is monitored
and treated differently depending on the quota management settings for the specific user.
For example, users who have write access to the volume and who have not exceeded their
quota limit can store data on the volume. The first time a user writes data to a
quota-enabled volume, default values for the disk space limit and the warning level are
automatically assigned by the quota system.
Figure #40
Quota Entries Page Screen
The Quota Entries page allows you to add, delete, or configure disk quotas for any server
appliance user. Quotas are managed using the Object/Task Selector, which has the
following columns:
n
Logon Name - This column displays the logon name of each user with registered access
to the server appliance.
n
Status - This column indicates whether or not the user has exceeded the assigned quota
limit.
n
Amount Used - This column indicates the amount of disk space currently being used
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
73
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Disks and Volumes
n
n
by a given user.
Quota Limit - This column indicates the maximum amount of disk space that a user
can occupy on a volume.
n
How the server appliance behaves when the quota limit is exceeded depends on
the settings on the Quota property page, accessible through the Disk Quota tab.
n
If the Deny disk space to users exceeding quota limit check box is selected, the
user will not be able to exceed this limit.
n
If the Log event when a user exceeds their quota limit check box is selected, an
event log message will be logged.
n
If neither option is selected, no action is taken.
Warning Level - This column indicates the maximum amount of disk space that a
particular user can use before a warning appears indicating that the quota has nearly
been reached.
NOTE
QUOTA LIMIT WARNING: A warning will only be generated if the user exceeds the warning limit
specified on the Quota Entries page, and if a Log event is selected on the Default Quota page. If the
Log event check box is not selected, no warning will be generated and this column will remain
empty. Typically the Warning Limit value is set slightly fewer than the Quota Limit value.
Persistent Storage Manage Page
Persistent Storage Manager allows you to create snapshot images of volumes on the server
appliance. These snapshots, called persistent images, preserve data on selected volumes in
case of a system or power failure. Each persistent image is saved as a volume on the file
system to allow clients read-only or read/write permission. You can create a persistent
image immediately through this configuration system or schedule it as a one-time or
recurring event.
The Persistent Storage Manager page allows you to:
n
Set the global parameters
n
Configure each volume
n
Create one-time or recurring persistent image schedules of scheduled volumes
n
Create or view persistent images and their properties
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
74
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Disks and Volumes
n
Use existing persistent images to recover data
Figure #41
Persistent Storage Manager Home Page Screen
Once created, a persistent image of a volume appears as a directory on the original volume.
The image inherits permission rights from the original volume. Images are used the same as
conventional system volumes. However, unlike conventional volumes, persistent images
can be restored to the precise content of the original volume at the time the snapshot was
created.
Persistent Storage Manager is fully integrated with Microsoft Windows Scheduler, allowing
complete unattended management of persistent image creation and rotation on a periodic
basis.
Use Persistent Storage Manager to control system resource usage, optimization, and
Persistent image management.
Persistent Storage Manager Global Settings Page
The Global Settings page allows you to modify overall settings for the Persistent Storage
Manager. Some options will be disabled if there are already active persistent images. The
Restore Defaults button will reset the system defaults.
Figure #42
Persistent Storage Manager Image Global Settings Page Screen
You can view or change the following global settings:
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
75
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Disks and Volumes
Maximum Persistent Images
Specifies the maximum number of active persistent images the server will support to a
maximum of 250. If adding another persistent image would exceed this number, the system
will delete the oldest existing persistent image.
Inactive Period
Specifies the amount of time a volume must be dormant before a persistent image is
created. Prior to starting a persistent image, the system will wait for the volume to be
imaged to become inactive. The default value will allow systems to start an image with a
consistent file set and a minimal time-out. Administrators can change this value for system
optimization. Reducing the inactive period will allow you to create persistent images even
on busy systems, but with possible synchronization problems within applications which are
concurrently writing to multiple files.
Inactive Time Out
Specifies how long the server should try to create a persistent image. A persistent image will
not begin until a period of relative inactivity set by the Inactive period has passed. If an
interval passes that is longer than the Inactive timeout period, the persistent image will not
be created and a notice generated to the system event log.
Image Directory
Specifies the root directory used for the persistent image. Each persistent image appears as a
subdirectory of the volume that is being imaged. The entire content of the volume as it
existed at the moment the persistent image was created will appear under this directory.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
76
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Disks and Volumes
Persistent Storage Manager Volume Settings Page
The Volume Settings page allows you to view the Persistent Storage Manager attributes for
each volume and change the volume settings using the Tasks list.
Figure #43
Persistent Storage Management Volume Configuration Screens
This page displays the following information:
n
Available Volume - Lists each volume that can support persistent images. You can
select the volume you want to configure.
n
Size - Displays the size of the volume.
n
Free Space - Displays the available storage size of the volume.
n
Cache Size - Specifies the amount of space allocated to the cache file. Increasing this
value will allow more and larger persistent images to be maintained.
n
Usage - Displays the current cache file use as a percentage of the Cache Size.
Persistent Storage Management Configure Volume Settings Page
The Configure Volume Settings page, allows you to modify the various aspects of the
Persistent Storage Manager volume attributes. Some of the fields will appear read-only if
there are active persistent images. The Restore Defaults button will re-establish the system
defaults.
You can view or change the following settings:
n
Warning threshold reached when - Defines the percentage of cache space which, when
consumed, will trigger warning messages to the system event log.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
77
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Disks and Volumes
n
n
Begin deleting images when - Defines the percentage of cache space which, when
consumed, will trigger the automatic deletion of the oldest persistent image on the
system. Automatic persistent image deletions are recorded in the system log.
Cache size - Specifies the amount of space allocated to the cache file. Increasing this
value will allow more and larger persistent images to be maintained. Make sure that
adequate space is available on the drive where persistent images are stored.
Persistent Storage Management Schedules Page
The Schedules page displays a list of scheduled persistent images and associated tasks.
Each scheduled persistent image contains information such as its scheduled time, day,
frequency, starting date, and group name.
The Schedules page allows you to create new schedules, delete existing schedules, and edit
schedule properties.
Figure #44
Persistent Storage Manager Image Schedule Screens
Create Schedule
To create a new schedule, you must supply a starting time, repeat period, starting day,
volume, and the number of persistent images to make available to users.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
78
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Disks and Volumes
Persistent Images Page
The Persistent Images page allows you to create, delete, edit properties and undo changes
made to the persistent image.
Figure #45
Persistent Storage Manager Images Page Screen
The page displays the following information:
n
Time Stamp - Displays date and time the image was created.
n
Image Name - Displays the name of the image.
n
Attributes - Displays the read-only or read/write attribute of the image.
n
Weight - Displays the relative retention weight of the image.
n
Volumes - Displays the volume that was imaged.
Restore Persistent Images
The Persistent Images to Restore page displays a list of all persistent images. You can
choose to view an image or restore your server appliance to an image you have previous
created.
Figure #46
Persistent Storage Manager Restore Images Page Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
79
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Disks and Volumes
Disk Defragmenter Page
The Disk Defragmenter allows access to the native Windows 2000 disk defragmenter
through the Web UI. Select the disk you want to defragment and click Defragment.
Figure #47
Disk Defragmenter
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
80
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Users and Groups
Users and Groups
NOTE
For detailed procedures within O/S Users and Groups Configuration, see Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 Users and Groups on page 222.
Users Page
From the Users page you can create, edit, and delete local users and groups. You can also
change the members of each group. If the MaxAttach NAS 6000 is a member of a domain,
you will not want to create any users on the MaxAttach NAS 6000 itself. The primary
purpose of this page is to add one or more domain members to the local group.
You may also want to use domain user and group accounts to control access to resources
on the MaxAttach NAS 6000. You may also want to use domain management tools to
manage domain users and domain groups.
Figure #48
Users Page Screen
Local Users Page
The Local Users on Server Appliance page displays an Object/Task Selector, which has the
following parts:
n
Name - This column lists the local user name. To delete, set password or configure the
properties of a user, click the radio button next to the user name you want to modify.
n
Full Name - This column lists the local user’s full name.
n
Account is disabled - This column indicates whether or not the local user account is
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
81
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Users and Groups
disabled.
Figure #49
Local Users On Server Appliance Page Screen
A local user account is an account that exists on the server appliance itself and grants users
access to its resources. The MaxAttach NAS 6000 can also be configured to grant access to
domain users and groups. Domain users and groups are those that exist in a Microsoft
Windows NT 4 or Microsoft Active Directory™ domain
Users are important in Microsoft Windows Powered security because you can assign
permissions to limit the ability of users to perform certain actions. A permission is a rule
associated with an object, usually a file, folder, or share, that regulates which users, and in
what manner those users can access the object.
Please remember the following when creating local users on the MaxAttach NAS 6000:
n
A user name cannot be identical to any other user or group name on the computer
being administered.
n
A user name can contain up to 20 uppercase or lowercase characters except for the
following: “ / \ [ ] : ; | = , + ? < >.
n
A user name cannot consist solely of periods (.) or spaces.
Passwords
You can type a password containing up to 127 characters. However, if you are using
Microsoft® Windows® 2000 on a network that also has computers using Microsoft
Windows 95 or Microsoft Windows 98, consider using passwords that contain fewer than
14 characters. Windows 95 and Windows 98 support passwords that contain up to 14
characters. If your password is longer, you may not be able to log on to your network from
those computers.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
82
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Users and Groups
Enabling the Guest Account
By default, the guest account is disabled. For workgroups that have Windows 95 and
Windows 98 client computers, enabling the guest account is the quickest way to provide
access to resources on a server appliance. By enabling the guest account, however, any user
connected to the network will have access to resources on the appliance. An alternative is
to create a user account for every user on the network
Local Groups Page
The Local Groups on Server Appliance page displays an Object/Task Selector, which has
the following parts:
n
Name - This column lists the local group name. To delete or configure the properties
of a group, click the radio button next to the group name you want to modify.
n
Description - This column lists the description of the group.
Figure #50
Local Groups on Server Appliance Page Screen
A local group account is an account that exists on the MaxAttach NAS 6000 itself and
grants groups access to its resources. The MaxAttach NAS 6000 can also be configured to
grant access to domain groups. Domain groups are those that exist in a Microsoft Windows
NT® 4 or Microsoft Active Directory™ domain. You can add local users, domain users,
and domain groups to local groups.
Groups are important in Microsoft Windows Powered security because you can limit the
ability of groups to perform certain actions by assigning them permissions. Any local or
domain user who is a member of the local administrator group on the MaxAttach NAS
6000 has administrative privileges for the MaxAttach NAS 6000. Likewise, any member of
a group that has been assigned to the administrator group on the local computer has
administrative privileges for that computer. For example, you could assign the TeamLeads
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
83
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Users and Groups
group, consisting of Tom, Mary, Hazel, and Jim to the administrative group on the
MaxAttach NAS 6000. Each of these TeamLeads group members would then have
administrative privileges on the MaxAttach NAS 6000.
Local Groups Members Page
The Members page allows you to add local or domain users to the local group.
Figure #51
User Group Properties Page Screen - Members Tab
NOTE
ADDING TO LOCAL USER GROUP: Local users created through the Web UI are not automatically
added to the Local Users group. You will need to add these users manually.
NOTE
ADDING DOMAIN GROUPS: You cannot add domain groups to local groups via the Web UI. You
can add them through Terminal Services.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
84
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Folders and Shares
Folders and Shares
NOTE
For detailed procedures within O/S Folders and Shares Configuration, see Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 Folders and Shares on page 184.
Shares Page
From the Shares page, you can:
n
Create folders, manage attributes and set permissions.
n
Create, delete and edit the properties of each share exported by the MaxAttach NAS
6000.
n
Enable, disable and configure the file sharing protocols.
Figure #52
Shares Page Screen
Volumes Page
The Volumes page allows you to open, or share, a number of network volumes.
Figure #53
Folders Volumes Page Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
85
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Folders and Shares
The page displays an Object/Task Selector that has the following columns:
n
Volume Name
n
Lists each volume by name.
n
To create, open, delete, or configure the properties of a given volume, select
the check box next to the name of the volume you want to modify.
n
Total Size-Shows the total size of the volume.
n
Free Space-Shows the amount of free space available on the volume.
n
Share Type-Indicates the type of sharing in effect for the folder:
n
- W = Windows (CIFS) Sharing
n
- U = UNIX (NFS) Sharing
n
- F = FTP Sharing
n
- H = HTTP Sharing
n
- A = AppleTalk Sharing
n
- N = NetWare Sharing
Folders Page
The Folders page allows you to create, open, delete, or configure folders.
Figure #54
Shared Folders Page Screen
The Object/Task Selector displays the following columns:
n
Name - This column lists each folder by name. To create, open, delete, or configure
the properties of a given folder, click the radio button next to the name of the folder
you want to modify.
n
Modified - This column shows the date the folder was last modified.
n
Attributes - This column shows the folder attributes:
n
- R = Read only
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
86
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Folders and Shares
n
n
n
n
- A = Ready for archiving
- H = Hidden
- C = Compressed
- S = System folder
When the page is initially displayed, the Object/Task Selector contains a list of root folders
for each volume. Use the Object/Task Selector to select a folder, then click on the task to
perform from the Tasks list to perform the appropriate task.
Navigating Among Folders
The Object/Task Selector lists up to the first 100 folders found. To navigate among the list
of folders using the Object/Task Selector, you can search by the fields available in the
Search list, and then enter the search criteria in the box to the left of the Go button, or you
can scroll through the list. In addition, if there are more than 100 folders, you can view
folders in batches of 100 using the Page Up and Page Down buttons to the right of the Go
button.
Shared Folders Page
The Shared Folders allows you to create, delete or configure shares on the MaxAttach NAS
6000.
Figure #55
Shared Folders Page Screen
The Object/Task Selector displays the following columns:
n
Shared Folder - This column lists each shared folder by name. To create, open, delete,
or configure the properties of a given share, click the radio button next to the name of
the share you want to modify.
n
Shared Path - This column displays the share path.
n
Type - This column indicates the share type:
n
- W = Windows (CIFS)
n
- U = UNIX (NFS)
n
- F = FTP
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
87
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Folders and Shares
- H = HTTP
n
- A = AppleTalk
n
- N = Netware
Description - This column displays a brief description of the share, if one has been
provided.
n
n
Use the Object/Task Selector to select a share, then click the task you want to perform
from the Tasks list.
Shared Properties - General Tab
To create a share, you must supply a share name that is unique across all shares and the
share path. Some protocols also support the inclusion of a comment or brief description of
the share. The Microsoft Windows (CIFS) is automatically enabled.
Figure #56
Share Properties Page Screen - General Tab
While a single user interface is provided to create a share for all protocols, in actuality, a
separate share is created for each protocol. You can remove individual sharing protocols
from a share, without removing the share itself. However, removing all sharing protocols
from a share will delete all versions of the share.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
88
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Folders and Shares
Shared Properties - CIFS Sharing Tab
The CIFS Sharing page is used to change the number of users who have access to a share,
change the caching options relative to the share, and set or change user permissions.
Figure #57
Share Properties Page Screen - CIFS Tab
The types of permissions that can be set on CIFS shares are:
n
Read. Read permission allows you to:
n
- View file and subfolder names.
n
- Traverse to subfolders.
n
- View data in files.
n
- Run program files.
n
Change/Read. The Change/Read permission allows all of Read permissions, plus:
n
- Adding files and subfolders.
n
- Changing data in files.
n
- Deleting subfolders and files
n
Full Control. Full Control is the default permission applied to any new shares you
create. It allows all Change/Read permissions plus:
n
- Changing permissions (NTFS files and folders only).
n
- Taking ownership (NTFS files and folders only).
n
Change and None. The Change and None permission allow you to view the share.
When you try to access the share, you will receive an “access denied” error message. It
is recommended that you don’t use the Change option.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
89
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Folders and Shares
Shared Properties Page - NFS Sharing Tab
The NFS Sharing page is used to specify which NFS clients are granted access to each
share. Access can be granted or denied on the basis of client host name. Access can also be
granted or denied on the basis of client groups, where a client group contains one or more
client host names.
Figure #58
Share Properties Page Screen - NFS Tab
Shared Properties Page - FTP Sharing Tab
The FTP Sharing page is used to specify the share access permission granted to FTP clients.
Figure #59
Share Properties Page Screen - FTP Tab
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
90
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Folders and Shares
Shared Properties Page - Web Sharing Tab
The Web Sharing page is used to specify the share access permission granted to HTTP
clients.
Figure #60
Share Properties Page Screen - Web Sharing Tab
Shared Properties Page - NetWare Sharing Tab
NetWare Sharing is set via Terminal Services.
Figure #61
NetWare Share Properties Via Terminal Services
The types of permissions that can be set on NetWare shares are:
n
Read. Read permission allows you to:
n
- View file and subfolder names.
n
- Traverse to subfolders.
n
- View data in files.
n
- Run program files.
n
Change. The Change permission allows all of Read permissions, plus:
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
91
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Folders and Shares
- Adding files and subfolders.
n
- Changing data in files.
n
- Deleting subfolders and files
Full Control. Full Control is the default permission applied to any new shares you
create. It allows all Change/Read permissions plus:
n
- Changing permissions (NTFS files and folders only).
n
- Taking ownership (NTFS files and folders only).
n
n
Shared Properties Page - AppleTalk Sharing Tab
AppleTalk Sharing is set via Terminal Services..
Figure #62
AppleTalk Share Properties Via Terminal Services
On the General tab of the share’s properties page, you can:
n
Set the maximum number of users allowed to simultaneously access the share
n
Set the volume password
n
Select read/write or read-only status
n
Choose whether guest users can use the volume. (If you enable the Guests can use
this volume checkbox, you may also need to enable the Guest user account. If the
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
92
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Folders and Shares
Guest user account is disabled, there will be no Guest to access your share.)
On the Security tab, you can:
n
Add or remove users and groups who have permission to access the share
n
Assign permission rules for selected users and groups
n
Access advanced security options including permission inheritance rules
Sharing Protocols Page
The Sharing Protocols page allows you to enable, disable, stop, or configure relevant
network protocols.
Figure #63
File Sharing Protocols Page Screen
The Sharing Protocol page displays the Object/Task Selector with the following columns:
n
Name-Lists each protocol by name. To enable, disable, or change the properties of a
given protocol, select the button next to the protocol you want to modify.
n
Status-Indicates that the protocol is Running, Stopped, or Paused.
n
Startup Type-Indicates whether the protocol should start automatically when the server
appliance boots, be invoked manually, or be disabled.
n
Description-Displays a brief description of the protocol.The Tasks list is located next to
the Object/Task Selector. Use the Name column of the Object/Task Selector to select
a protocol. To perform a task, choose the appropriate task from the Tasks list.
AppleTalk Service Properties Page
Microsoft Windows 2000 Server AppleTalk network integration allows you to share files
and printers among the MaxAttach NAS 6000 and any Apple Macintosh clients that are
connected to your network.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
93
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Folders and Shares
With AppleTalk network integration, Macintosh computers need only the Macintosh OS
software to function as clients; no additional software is required.
AppleTalk network integration simplifies administration by maintaining just one set of user
accounts instead of separate user accounts, for example, one on the Macintosh server and
another on the computer running Windows 2000 Server.
Figure #64
AppleTalk Service Properties Page Screen
FTP Service Properties Page
The File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is integrated with the Windows security model. Users
connecting using FTP are authenticated based on the user accounts on the Windows
Powered server appliance. They receive access based on those user profiles. Keep in mind,
however, that the FTP server relies on the ability to send user passwords over the network
without data encryption. As a result, a user with physical access to the network could
examine user passwords during the FTP validation process.
FTP supports all Microsoft Windows FTP client commands, when a server appliance is
running FTP, other computers using the FTP utility can connect to the server and transfer
files. On the other hand, non-Microsoft versions of FTP clients might contain commands
that are not supported by the FTP server protocol.
Figure #65
FTP Service Properties Page Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
94
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Folders and Shares
Enabling FTP Logging
You can log incoming FTP connections to the FTP log by enabling FTP Logging. By
default, FTP logs are stored by in %windir%\system32\logfiles\msftpsvc1.
Administrators can access these files from their workstation by either accessing an
administrative share-for example, \\appliancename\admin$\winnt\system32 or
by creating a new share for this folder.
FTP Anonymous Access
Allowing anonymous access to the FTP server enables users to connect with the user name
anonymous-or ftp, which is a synonym for anonymous. A password is not necessary, but
the user is prompted to supply an e-mail address as the password. By default, anonymous
connections are allowed.
NOTE
ACCESSING THE FTP SERVER: You cannot access the FTP server from a Microsoft Windows
Powered user account with the name anonymous. The anonymous user name is reserved in the
FTP server for the anonymous logon function. Users logging on to the server with the user name
anonymous receive permissions based on the FTP server configuration for anonymous logons.
After the FTP protocol software is installed on your computer, you must configure the
software to operate. Your FTP server protocol settings will result in one of the following
configurations:
n
No anonymous FTP connection to the server allowed. In this case, each user must
provide a valid Windows user name and password. To configure the FTP server
protocol for this setting, clear the Enable anonymous connection check box on the
FTP Protocol Properties page.
n
Allow both anonymous and Windows users to connect to the FTP server. This
configuration allows a user to use either an anonymous connection or a Windows user
name and password. To configure the FTP server protocol for this setting, select only
the Enable anonymous connection check box in the FTP Protocol Properties page.
n
Allow only anonymous FTP connections to the server. In this case, a user cannot
connect to the FTP server using a Windows user name and password. To configure the
FTP server protocol for this setting, select both the Enable anonymous connections and
the Allow only anonymous access check boxes in the FTP Protocol Properties page.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
95
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Folders and Shares
If anonymous connections are allowed, you must supply the Windows user name and
password that will provide anonymous access to the FTP server. When an anonymous FTP
transfer occurs, Windows verifies the user name assigned in this dialog box to determine
whether access is allowed to the files.
Adding Custom FTP Messages
You can create customized welcome and exit messages that are sent to users when they
connect or disconnect from the server appliance.
HTTP - Hypertext Transfer Protocol Service Properties Page
The HTTP is the Internet protocol used by World Wide Web browsers and servers to
exchange information. The protocol defines what actions Web servers and browsers should
take in response to various commands, thus making it possible for a user to use a client
program to enter a URL, or choose a hyperlink, and retrieve text, graphics, sound, and
other digital information from a Web server. All URLs of files on Web servers begin with
http://.
Figure #66
HTTP Service Properties Page Screen
Web HTTP Protocol
The hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) is a communications protocol designed to transfer
hypertext documents between computers over the Web. HTTP defines what actions Web
servers and browsers should take in response to various commands.
World Wide Web Server
The commands used by the Web are defined in HTTP.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
96
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Folders and Shares
To specify the location of a resource, HTTP uses Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).
URLs follow a naming convention that uniquely identifies the location of a computer,
directory, or file on the Internet. The URL also specifies the Internet protocol-FTP,
HTTP, for example- needed to retrieve the resource. If you know the URL of a resource,
you can provide the URL, or you can link to it from a document you want to make
available to Web users.
The HTTP protocol supports anonymous access, as well as basic and Windows
authentication.
NetWare Protocol Service Properties Page
The MaxAttach NAS 6000 Implements File and Print Services for NetWare (FPNW).
FPNW emulates a NetWare 3.12 server, enabling the MaxAttach NAS 6000 to seamlessly
integrate into an existing NetWare-based network requiring no changes to the NetWare
clients. The NetWare clients do not know they are accessing the MaxAttach NAS 6000.
NFS Protocol Properties Page
With the NFS protocol, the MaxAttach NAS 6000 can act as a Network File System (NFS)
server. Users can then share files in a mixed environment of computers, operating systems,
and networks.
Users on computers running NFS client software can access shares on the server appliance
by connecting, or mounting, those shares to their computers.
UNIX computers follow advisory locking for all lock requests. This means that the OS
does not enforce lock semantics on a file, and applications that check for the existence of
locks can use these locks effectively. However, the NFS Protocol implements mandatory
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
97
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Folders and Shares
locks even for those locking requests that are received through NFS. This ensures that locks
acquired through NFS are visible through the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol and
to applications accessing the files locally. The O/S enforces mandatory locks.
Figure #67
NFS Service Page Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
98
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Maintenance Page
Maintenance Page
NOTE
For detailed procedures within O/S Maintenance Operations, see Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 Maintenance on page 232.
From the Maintenance page, users can perform the following general MaxAttach NAS
6000 maintenance tasks:
n
Update software
n
Change date and time
n
Shutdown the system
n
Examine, store, and print system logs
n
Backup the system
n
Use Terminal Services to access the server console and desktop
n
Set and configure alert email
n
Set the language used by the Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000
n
Add and remove programs
n
Manage local or remote computers with a single desktop tool
n
Specify how the MaxAttach NAS 6000 is to respond to a boot failure
n
Set the maintenance session time out period
n
Re-image the system drive
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
99
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Maintenance Page
n
Re-image the system drive after a failure.
Figure #68
Maintenance Page Screen
Software Update Page
The Software Update page is used to apply software updates to the MaxAttach NAS 6000.
You should only apply software upgrades that have been approved by Maxtor.
Figure #69
Software Update Wizard Page Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
100
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Maintenance Page
Date and Time
The Date and Time page is used to set the date, time, and time zone for the MaxAttach
NAS 6000.
Figure #70
Data and Time Page Screen
Shutdown
The Shutdown page is used to shut down, restart, or to schedule a shutdown or restart of
the MaxAttach NAS 6000. The restarting page checks periodically to determine whether
the appliance is back online. If the restarting page detects that the MaxAttach NAS 6000 is
online, it automatically returns to the default page.
Figure #71
Shutdown Page Screen
Logs
A log file is a file that stores messages, or event logs generated by an application, service, or
Microsoft Windows. These messages are used to track the operations performed in the
server appliance.
You can use the Logs feature to view, clear, download, and configure the following types
of event logs provided by the system:
n
Application Logs: nThe application log contains events logged by applications or
programs. For example, a word-processing program might record a file error in the
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
101
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Maintenance Page
n
n
n
n
n
n
application log. The events that are recorded are dependent upon the application.
FTP Logs: nThe FTP log contains events logged by the FTP server.
NFS Logs: nThe NFS log contains events logged by the NFS server.
System Log : nThe system log contains events logged by the Microsoft Windows
2000 system components. For example, the failure of a driver or other system
component to load during startup is recorded in the system log.
Security Log: nThe security log can record security events such as valid and invalid
logon attempts as well as events related to resource use such as creating, opening, or
deleting files. An administrator can specify what events are recorded in the security log.
Web (HTTP) Shares Logs: nThe Web (HTTP) shares log contains events logged
by the Web server related to accessing HTTP shares.
Managing Web Administration Logs: nThe Web administration log contains
events logged by the Web server related to accessing the administration Web site.
Figure #72
Logs Screen Page
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
102
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Maintenance Page
Backup Page
The Backup page is used to backup or restore MaxAttach NAS 6000 volumes or logical
drives and is use primarily for backing up and restoring drives with user data rather than
O/S images.
Figure #73
Backup Page Screen
NOTE
BACKUP SCHEDULE: You must specify a backup schedule. Do not select the On Demand backup
as it will time-out and not perform its backup.
Related Topics
•
•
For summary information on O/S backup and recovery,
see any of the following sections below:
- Add/Remove Programs
- System Recovery Options
- Re-Image System Drive
For detailed information and procedures, see Chapter
#10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance on page 232.
Terminal Services
The MaxAttach NAS 6000 comes with Terminal Services for Remote Administration
(TSRA). It allows two concurrent connections and provides functionality similar to a
terminal-based, centralized host, or mainframe, environment in which multiple terminals
connect to a host computer. Each terminal provides a conduit for input and output
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
103
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Maintenance Page
between a user and the host computer. A user can log on at a terminal, and then run
applications on the host computer, accessing files, databases, network resources, and so on.
Each terminal session is independent, with the host operating system managing conflicts
between multiple users contending for shared resources. In summary, TSRA provides
remote access for administering the MaxAttach NAS 6000 from virtually anywhere on
your network, giving system administrators a method of remotely managing the MaxAttach
NAS 6000 from any client.
Figure #74
Terminal Services - MaxAttach
NAS 6000 Desktop After Log In
Terminal Services Advanced Client (TSC) is the component running on the client
machine; in the case of a MaxAttach NAS 6000, the TSC ActiveX component is
automatically installed when the user selects this task.
The primary difference between TSC and the traditional mainframe environment is that
the dumb terminals in a mainframe environment only provide character-based input and
output. A TSC or emulator provides a complete graphical user interface, including a
Microsoft Windows desktop and support for a variety of input devices (such as keyboard
and mouse).
In the Terminal Services environment, an application runs entirely on the terminal server.
The TSC performs no local processing of application software. The terminal server
transmits the graphical user interface to the client, and the client transmits your input back
to the server.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
104
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Maintenance Page
With TSC, you have full access to the MaxAttach NAS 6000 desktop and can manage it as
if you are sitting in front of a monitor attached to the MaxAttach NAS 6000. All Microsoft
Windows management tools can be used, and the Windows 2000 online Help can be
accessed.
When a user opens TSC, she or he connects to the MaxAttach NAS 6000 and starts a
session. When he or she is finished, he or she can either disconnect, and leave the session
running (to enable connecting to this session again later) or log off, which will terminate
the session and disconnect the client. Only two simultaneous sessions are allowed. Leaving
a session running takes up one license and can affect other users. If two sessions are already
running, new users will be denied access. Finally, TSC requires all connecting users to be
authenticated, which is why users must log on each time they start a session.
NOTE
CLOSING TERMINAL SERVICES SESSION: Using the X in the upper right hand corner of the screen
to close the TSC does not free up the TSC session. To correctly close a TSC, go to Start >
Shutdown > Log off Administrator.
Alert Email
When an error condition occurs, the MaxAttach NAS 6000 can send an alert email
message to a designated email address. You can enable or disable alert emails, and you can
select which category of alert email you want the system to send.
Figure #75
Alert Email Configuration Page Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
105
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Maintenance Page
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Web UI Alerts
The MaxAttach NAS 6000 Web UI provides alert messages to warn you of conditions that
may require your intervention. At the top of the interface, under the server name, is a
Status line that tells you the alert level of the highest current level. There are three types of
alerts and three alert levels:
n
Information: Message regarding a condition that does not require any immediate
intervention.
n
Warning: Message regarding a condition that may require some administrator
attention.
n
Critical: Message requiring immediate administrator action to insure proper
functionality of the MaxAttach NAS 6000 unit.
The MaxAttach NAS 6000 Web UI messages can also be sent as E-mail messages. You can
specify which level(s) of messages should be sent, the E-mail address, and the SMTP server
name, FQDN or IP address. Also, you need to make sure that the Exchange server you are
using has the Internet Mail Connector running.
LED Alerts
The MaxAttach 6000 has front-panel LED indicators that provide a quick-look status of
the major system components, including:
n
Activity and condition of the hard disk drive modules
n
Status of the unit's power supplies
n
Over-all system status
For information about LED alerts, see the MaxAttach online Help.
Language Page
n
The Language page is used to set the language of the Web UI. At this time, only
English and Japanese are available. Future releases of the Windows Powered software
will include French, German and Spanish.
Figure #76
Set Language Page Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
106
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Maintenance Page
System Recovery Option Page
Boot failover recovery consists of writing a new copy of the O/S to the C:\ drive from a
backup O/S copy located on drive D:\. You can set this to occur manually or
automatically in the event of a corrupt O/S.
Figure #77
System Recovery Option Screen
Session Timeout Options Page
This screen allows you to set the length of time in minuted before a web or Terminal
Services management session times out. You are given the option of having a session never
time out, which is especially useful during initial system set up and configuration.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
107
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Maintenance Page
NOTE
BEST PRACTICES RECOMMENDATION: After initial setup, keep the time out value low to prevent
unauthorized administrator privileges access.
Figure #78
Session Timeout Options Page
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
108
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Maintenance Page
Re-Image System Drive Page
Allows you to re-image the system boot or C:\ drive with either the default factory
configuration or with the most recently saved image along with its configuration settings
including users, disks, volumes, and shares.
WARNING
LOSS OF ALL BOOT DRIVE DATA: This procedure will destroy all data on the boot C:\ drive.
Figure #79
Re-Image System Drive Screen and Options
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
109
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Services for UNIX
Services for UNIX
Overview
The MaxAttach NAS 6000 implements Services for UNIX. This allows the MaxAttach
NAS 6000 to act as an NFS server. When the MaxAttach NAS 6000 is configured as an
NFS server, file access and administrative tasks are performed through the Web UI.
You can use the NFS Service to manage
n
Client Groups
n
Locks
n
User and Group Mappings
Figure #80
NFS Configuration Page Screen
NOTE
CREATING NFS SHARES: NFS shares are created from the Folders and Shares section of the Web
UI.
NFS Client Groups
The NFS Client Groups page allows you to create, delete and edit client groups
Figure #81
NFS Client Groups Configuration Page Screen
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
110
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Services for UNIX
NFS Locks
NFS locks allows a process to have exclusive access to all or part of a file. File locking is
implemented both on the MaxAttach NAS 6000 and the client. When a file is locked, the
buffer cache is not used for that file, and each write request is immediately sent to the
server.
After a system failure, when the MaxAttach NAS 6000 is restarted, the MaxAttach NAS
6000 attempts to restore the file lock status to the previous condition. If the client fails, the
MaxAttach NAS 6000 releases the file lock. However, after the client restarts, it has a short
period of time to reclaim the file lock.
Figure #82
NFS Locks Configuration Page Screen
User & Group Mappings
In order to provide security for MaxAttach NAS 6000 files accessed from a UNIX
environment, the NFS service requires the system administrator to map UNIX user or
group accounts to their twin accounts on the MaxAttach NAS 6000. Users then have
equivalent access rights under UNIX as they have under Microsoft Windows.
User and Group Mappings lets you create maps between Windows and UNIX user and
group accounts even though the user and group names in both environments may not be
identical.
In addition to one-to-one mapping between Windows and UNIX user and group
accounts, User and Group Mappings permits one-to-many mapping. This lets you associate
multiple Windows accounts with a single UNIX account or vice-versa.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
111
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Services for UNIX
To use the User and Group Mappings, you need to obtain UNIX user, password and
group information from one or more NIS servers, or from imported password and group
files from a single UNIX client (PCNFS).
Figure #83
User and Group Mappings Page Screen - General Tab
The types of mappings that can be set up are:
n
Simple Maps
n
Explicit User Maps
n
Explicit Group Maps
Simple Maps
Simple maps create automatic mappings between the MaxAttach NAS 6000 and UNIX
users that both share the same user name. In a simple user map, users on the MaxAttach
NAS 6000 are implicitly mapped one-to-one to UNIX users on the basis of user name.
Figure #84
User and Group Mappings Page Screen - Simple Mapping Tab
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
112
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Services for UNIX
Explicit Maps
Explicit user and group maps allows you to create inter- and cross-platform maps among
the MaxAttach NAS 6000 and UNIX user and group accounts, even when the user and
group names in both environments are not identical. This lets you associate multiple
UNIX accounts with a single MaxAttach NAS 6000 account or vice-versa.
Figure #85
User and Group Mapping Page Screen - Explicit User & Explicit Group Tabs
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
113
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Services for Netware
Services for Netware
Overview
The MaxAttach NAS 6000 implements File and Print Services for NetWare (FPNW).
FPNW emulates a NetWare 3.12 server, enabling the MaxAttach NAS 6000 to seamlessly
integrate into an existing NetWare-based network requiring no changes to the NetWare
clients. The Netware clients do not know they are accessing the MaxAttach NAS 6000.
NetWare Users
When you try to access shares on the MaxAttach NAS 6000, you will be prompted to
enter a user name and password. The default user name is supervisor with a blank password.
However, you can create users on the MaxAttach NAS 6000 and synchronize them with
the NetWare users.
Figure #86
NetWare Users Configuration Screens
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
114
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
Help Pages
Help Pages
The O/S Web UI comes with a comprehensive help system available as a tab on the
navigation bar. In addition, clicking the “?” link on the right side of the navigation bar will
provide you with context-sensitive help for every screen. The starting page for the help
system is shown below.
Figure #87
Help Page Screen
In addition to the online help system, you are also provided with a standalone version of
the help files on your MaxNeighborhood Software and Documentation CD that came
with your MaxAttach NAS 6000. The standalone version is designed to either run from the
CD or be installed on a client workstation.
Chapter #3 - Overview - Microsoft Windows O/S Version 2.0
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
115
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000
Disk Array
Chapter Outline
n
n
n
n
n
n
Standard configuration disk drive array
Benefits
Optional user-defined drive configurations
Drive organization: logical, physical, SCSI, and raid
Role of the Mylex Global Server and Client Array Manager
Best practices, notes, warnings, and cautions
NOTE
If you need additional information on disk and RAID arrays, see Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk
Array RAID Concepts on page 254.
Standard Disk Array Configuration
A fully equipped Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 consists of a Base Unit and two Expansion
Unit equipment shelves. Each shelf is filled with 12 hard disk drives for a maximum system
configuration of 36 hard disk drives. Depending on the type of drive used and the RAID
configuration of the system, storage capacities starting at over 5 Terabytes (Tbytes) can be
obtained.
Use the web user interface to find you system’s exact capacity and current disk space
utilization.
To see total system space and total space used
1.
Log into the system.
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
116
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
Standard Disk Array Configuration
2.
At the Welcome page, click on the Status tab on the main navigation bar.
3.
At the Status menu, click the System Status tab.
4.
The system displays the following information:
n
Number of physical disks:
• This is actually the number of Volumes or Logical Drives
available in the system.
• In default RAID configuration, it will be four drives for
a Base Unit only; six drives for a Base and one Expansion
Unit;, eight drives for a Base and two Expansion Units.
n
Total hard disk drive space:
• The amount of space in your system in GB (Gigabytes or
Gbyte - 1,000 Gbytes = 1 Tbyte).
n
Total free hard drive space:
• The amount of free space in your system in GB.
To see total system space for each volume or logical drive
1.
Log into the system.
2.
At the Welcome page, click on the Status tab on the main navigation bar.
3.
At the Status menu, click the System Health tab.
4.
Scroll down about a two pages to the status Drives section.
5.
The system displays the following information in a table:
n
Device ID:
• The volume or logical drive identification starting with
C:\.
• A fully factory-default configured system will have C:\,
D:\, E:\, F:\ G:\, H:\, I:\ and J:\ drives.
n
Drive capacity:
• The total drive capacity per drive in GB.
n
Free space:
• The total drive free space in GB.
n
Used space:
• Used space as a percentage of total space.
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
117
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
Disk Drive Array Organization
Disk Drive Array Organization
In order to fully understand the operation and capabilities of the MaxAttach disk drive
array, the disks should be viewed in their logical, physical, SCSI, and RAID configurations,
each of which provides additional insight into the system capabilities.
Throughout this section, the emphasis is on the “factory default configuration.” This refers
to the “as-shipped” configuration the Base Units in all systems, and, if equipped, the
recommended factory default configuration for Expansion Unit/s.
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
118
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
Disk Drive Array Organization
Logical Drive Organization
A fully equipped MaxAttach consisting of a Base Unit and two Expansion Units has the
following logical drives available in its default configuration The size of each volume or
logical drive is dependent on the disk drives shipped with the system.
Table #1 - MaxAttach NAS 6000 Logical Drives
Logical Drive Name &
Location
Function
Base Unit Logical Drives / Volumes
Drive C:\ - Base Unit
Primary operating system (O/S) logical drive. Drive C:\ is not available for user data.
Through a drive partition, its physical disks are shared with drives D:\ and E:\.
Drive D:\ - Base Unit
Mirror of O/S logical drive. Drive D:\ is not available for user data. Through a drive partition,
its physical disks are shared with drives C:\ and E:\
Drive E:\ - Base Unit
User data logical drive. Through a drive partition, its physical disks are shared with drives
C:\ and E:\. The RAID configuration of this user logical cannot be changed.
Drive F:\ - Base Unit
User data drive. Can be reconfigured to other RAID or JBOD types.
First Expansion Unit
Drive G:\ - First Expansion Unit
User data drive. Can be reconfigured to other RAID or JBOD types.
Drive H:\ - First Expansion Unit
User data drive. Can be reconfigured to other RAID or JBOD types.
Second Expansion Unit
Drive I:\ - Second Expansion Unit
User data drive. Can be reconfigured to other RAID or JBOD types.
Drive J:\ - Second Expansion Unit
User data drive. Can be reconfigured to other RAID or JBOD types.
The exact system storage capacity depends on the number of expansion enclosures used,
number of user data logical drives and drive arrays created, the RAID array used in each
array, and if hot standby disks have been implemented.
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
119
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
SCSI Channel Structure
SCSI Channel Structure
The figure below shows the relationship between the physical drives and the underlying
SCSI bus communication system, along with the identification of each drive as to SCSI
Channel, SCSI ID, and shelf mounting location.
Figure #5
SCSI Bus Components and ID Number Assignments
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
120
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
SCSI Bus and Target LUN IS Assignments
Notes on SCSI Channels
1.
SCSI Channel 2 is only used on the Base Unit.
2.
SCSI cable runs to Base Unit drives are all internal within the chassis.
3.
SCSI cable runs between the Base and the Expansion Units are all external cabling.
4.
The last Expansion Unit also has one SCSI Terminator Plug for each Channel.
SCSI Bus and Target LUN IS Assignments
The SCSI drive assignments for the system disks are:
Table #2 - Disk Array Components by SCSI Bus & ID Number (Sheet 1 of 2)
SCSI
Bus:ID
Component Name
Component Location - Drive Number from
Left
0-0
Hard disk drive
Base Unit, Drive 4
0-1
Hard disk drive
Base Unit, Drive 3
0-2
Hard disk drive
Base Unit, Drive 2
0-3
Hard disk drive
Base Unit, Drive 1
0-4
Channel-0 SCSI Bridge Board
All Units - ID shared by all Channel 0 Bridge Boards
0-5 & 0-6
Not Used
0-7
SCSI Controller Card - Channel 0
Mylex SCSI RAID Controller is located in the Base Unit card cage. ID 0-7
controls all devices on Bus 0.
0-8
Hard Disk Drive
First Expansion Unit, Drive 4
0-9
Hard Disk Drive
First Expansion Unit, Drive 3
0-10
Hard Disk Drive
First Expansion Unit, Drive 2
0-11
Hard Disk Drive
First Expansion Unit, Drive 1
0-12
Hard Disk Drive
Second Expansion Unit, Drive 4
0-13
Hard Disk Drive
Second Expansion Unit, Drive 3
0-14
Hard Disk Drive
Second Expansion Unit, Drive 2
0-15
Hard Disk Drive
Second Expansion Unit, Drive 1
1-0
Hard Disk Drive
Base Unit, Drive 8
1-1
Hard Disk Drive
Base Unit, Drive 7
1-2
Hard Disk Drive
Base Unit, Drive 6
1-3
Hard Disk Drive
Base Unit, Drive 5
1-4
Channel-1 SCSI Bridge Board
All Units - ID shared by all Channel 0 Bridge Boards
1-5 & 1-6
Not Used
1-7
SCSI Controller Card - Channel 1
Mylex SCSI RAID Controller is located in the Base Unit card cage. ID 1-7
controls all devices on Bus 1
1-8
Hard Disk Drive
First Expansion Unit, Drive 4
1-9
Hard Disk Drive
First Expansion Unit, Drive 3
1-10
Hard Disk Drive
First Expansion Unit, Drive 2
1-11
Hard Disk Drive
First Expansion Unit, Drive 1
1-12
Hard Disk Drive
Second Expansion Unit, Drive 4
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
121
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
RAID Array Organization
Table #2 - Disk Array Components by SCSI Bus & ID Number (Sheet 2 of 2)
SCSI
Bus:ID
Component Name
Component Location - Drive Number from
Left
1-13
Hard Disk Drive
Second Expansion Unit, Drive 3
1-14
Hard Disk Drive
Second Expansion Unit, Drive 2
1-15
Hard Disk Drive
Second Expansion Unit, Drive 1
2-0
Hard Disk Drive
Base Unit, Drive 12
2-1
Hard Disk Drive
Base Unit, Drive 11
2-2
Hard Disk Drive
Base Unit, Drive 10
2-3
Hard Disk Drive
Base Unit, Drive 9
2-4 to 2-6
Not Used
2-7
SCSI Controller Card - Channel 2
Mylex SCSI RAID Controller is located in the Base Unit card cage. ID 2-7
controls all devices on Bus 2.
2-8 to 2-15
Not Used
3-0 to 3-3
Not Used
3-4
Channel-3 SCSI Bridge Board
3-5 & 3-6
Not Used
3-7
SCSI Controller Card - Channel 3
Base Unit - Mylex SCSI RAID Controller is located in the Base Unit card
cage. ID 3-7 controls all devices on Bus 3.
3-8
Hard Disk Drive
First Expansion Unit, Drive 12
3-9
Hard Disk Drive
First Expansion Unit, Drive 11
3-10
Hard Disk Drive
First Expansion Unit, Drive 10
3-11
Hard Disk Drive
First Expansion Unit, Drive 9
3-12
Hard Disk Drive
Second Expansion Unit, Drive 12
3-13
Hard Disk Drive
Second Expansion Unit, Drive 11
3-14
Hard Disk Drive
Second Expansion Unit, Drive 10
3-15
Hard Disk Drive
Second Expansion Unit, Drive 9
Base and Expansion Units. ID shared by all Channel 3 Bridge Boards.
One Channel 3 Bridge board is located on each Expansion Unit. There is
no Channel 3 Bridge board in the Base Unit.
RAID Array Organization
The system logical drives are default configured as Redundant Arrays of Independent Disks
(RAID). the RAID methodology and technique used varies with the function of the
logical drive. The RAID techniques used in each logical drive are:
Base Unit Drive C:\ - System O/S:
n
Factory configured
n
A first RAID 1 striped across a partition on three drives with a second RAID 1 striped
across another partition on three different drives.
n
The two RAID 1 arrays above are combined into a RAID 0 mirrored array.
n
This array cannot be changed without damaging the O/S image.
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
122
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
RAID Array Organization
Base Unit Drive D:\ - System Backup O/S:
n
Factory configured
n
The array setup is identical to drive C:\
n
A first RAID 1 is striped across a partition on three drives with a second RAID 1
striped across another partition on three different drives.
n
The two RAID 1 arrays above are combined into a RAID 0 - Mirrored array.
n
This array cannot be changed without damaging the O/S image.
Base Unit Drive E:\ - User Data:
n
Factory configured
n
A RAID 5 striping with parity check array.
n
Drive E:\ is set across the same six disk drives used by Drives C:\ and D:\ but in
separate partitions.
n
This array cannot be changed without damaging the O/S images.
Base Unit Drive F:\ - User Data:
n
Factory configured
n
Default configuration is a RAID 5 - Striping with parity check array.
n
Drive F:\ is set across the remaining six drives in the Base Unit enclosure.
n
The drive configuration can be modified to suit user needs.
n
Drives can be set to any combination of RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 0+1, RAID 3,
RAID 5, JBOD, and/or a Hot Standby Drive.
First Expansion Unit Drive G:\ - User Data:
n
User configured at installation
n
Drive G:\ configuration and options are as drive F:\ above.
First Expansion Unit Drive H:\ - User Data:
n
User configured at installation
n
Drive H:\ configuration and options are as drive G:\ above.
Second Expansion Unit Drive I:\ - User Data:
n
User configured at installation
n
Drive I:\ configuration and options are as drive G:\ above.
Second Expansion Unit Drive J:\ - User Data:
n
User configured at installation
n
Drive J:\ configuration and options are as drive G:\ above.
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
123
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
Base Unit Operating System Arrays
Base Unit Operating System Arrays
The MaxAttach NAS 6000 operating system is Microsoft Windows-Powered Max
Operating System Version 2.0 and is located on drive C:\. An duplicate backup O/S image
located on drive D:\. The diagram below illustrated the O/S drive mapping.
Figure #6
Base Unit OS Drive Arrays
Drive C:\
Each C:\ drive OS image is made up of partitions across three drives (RAID-0 Striping)
which are mirrored on three other drives (RAID-1 Mirroring). The combination of these
two techniques is called RAID 0+1.
Drive D:\
Similarly, the D:\ drive OS back up image is also made of up or partitions across three
drives which are also mirrored on three other drives.
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
124
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
Base Unit User Data Arrays
Base Unit User Data Arrays
The remainder of the MaxAttach NAS 6000 Base Unit disk space is for user data arrays.
The array for drive E:\ cannot be changed because it shares physical disks with the
operating system logical drives. Drive F:\ can be changed.
Figure #7
Base Unit User Data Drive Arrays
Drive E:\
Drive E:\ is available for user data but cannot be changed in size or configuration from the
factory configured RAID 5 - Striping with distributed parity.
Drive F:\
Drive F:\ is available for user data and CAN be changed in size or configuration from the
factory configured RAID 5. Possibilities include RAID 0 - Striping, RAID 1 - Mirroring,
RAID 0+1 - Striping with mirroring, RAID 3 - striping with dedicated drive parity, or set
to JBOD (just a bunch of disks), or create smaller arrays with one or more Hot Standby
Drives.
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
125
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
First Expansion Unit User Data Arrays
First Expansion Unit User Data Arrays
n
n
n
The first Expansion Unit comes unconfigured from the factory.
At the end of the installation process, the drives are configured using the Mylex Global
Array Manager (GAM) software that comes with the MaxAttach NAS 6000.
The figure below shows the drives in the recommended default RAID 5 configuration.
Figure #8
Expansion Unit One User Data Drive Arrays
Drive G:\ and Drive H:\
Drives G:\ and H:\ are available for user data. The recommended default configuration for
both drives RAID 5. The RAID 5 arrays for both or either drives can changed to other
RAID configurations.
Second Expansion Unit User Data Arrays
The configuration recommendations and options for the second Expansion Unit are
identical to those for the first Expansion Unit.
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
126
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
Second Expansion Unit User Data Arrays
n
n
n
The second Expansion Unit is The second Expansion Unit comes unconfigured from
the factory.
At the end of the installation process, the drives are configured using the GAM.
The figure below shows the drives in the recommended default RAID 5 configuration
Figure #9
Expansion Unit Two User Data Drive Arrays
Drive I:\ and Drive J:\
Drives I:\ and J:\ are available for user data. The default configuration for both drives is
RAID 5. The RAID 5 arrays for both drives can changed to other RAID configurations.
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
127
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
Re-Configuring Your MaxAttach NAS 6000 Drive Arrays
Re-Configuring Your MaxAttach NAS 6000 Drive Arrays
WARNING
Any change to your RAID configuration can lead to loss of all user data, system lock up, or both.
Before considering any RAID changes, completely read the appropriate sections of this manual.
Before performing any RAID re-configuration, ALWAYS back-up your data.
The RAID array configuration can be changed in all logical drives except C:\ and D:\
which are reserved for Max OS 2.0 and drive E:\ which shares the same physical drives in
a separate partition.
Best Practices
System disk management best practices recommend several key tips for optimizing your
disk arrays:
n
Identify as many of your major disk uses as possible before allowing users on the system.
n
If necessary, consider areas for high performance read/write operations where RAID 0
+ 1 arrays may be appropriate.
n
If necessary, consider areas for maximum reliability where RAID 1 arrays may be
appropriated.
n
To minimize the time an array is in a critical state due a single array disk drive failure,
consider freeing up one or two physical hard disk drives and designating them as Hot
Standby Drives. This is especially important if the system is located a long distance from
the administration personnel. When an array is in a critical state, the failure of any
additional array drive member will lose all user data in the array. With Hot Standby, the
failed drive will be replaced and the rebuild process started immediately.
n
If largest possible disk volume size is required, consider RAID 5 for optimum solutions.
For absolute solutions, consider RAID 0.
n
For additional security where absolute maximum size is not required, you may need
JBOD.
n
Regardless of the RAID configuration selected, make the arrays as large as possible so
that they don’t have to be changed.
n
If you know that some arrays will be changed in the future, make them the last arrays to
be configured. The GAM requires a LIFO approach to decommissioning drives and
disassembling arrays. The last array built must be the first to be decommissioned. If you
must reconfigure your first array, you will have to decommission all higher arrays
before working on the first array.
n
Think long term. Configure your arrays as large as possible and then leave them alone.
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
128
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
Re-Configuring Your MaxAttach NAS 6000 Drive Arrays
From there on, use the web user interface and the O/S to administer user needs.
To re-configure the disk RAID arrays
1.
Read the Administration Guide for the MaxAttach NAS 6000.
2.
Understand disk array concepts and the benefits and limitations of each disk array
option.
3.
Define your data volume needs as well as those of your users.
4.
Read and understand the entire reconfiguration procedure.
5.
Back up all your data.
6.
Perform a test data recovery to make sure your back up image is correct and
functional.
7.
Load the GAM Client software onto your administrative workstation desktop.
8.
Use the GAM Client software to modify the arrays to suit your needs.
WARNING
You cannot reconfigure the Max O/S drives on C:\ and D:\. In addition, you should not attempt to
reconfigure the RAID 5 array on logical drive E:\. These three drives share the same physical disks
on separate partitions. To do so would destroy the O/S image making the system non-functional
and require a certified field representative to reimage the system.
DO NOT CONSIDER USING any portion of C:\ or D:\ for local application or user data.
9.
Allow ample time for the de-configuration and re-configuration process.
n
Each new array takes approximately six hours to rebuild. Time to completion
varies with the size of the array, the number of physical disks involved, the total
system load for background rebuilds, and whether the rebuild is running a
background or foreground process.
10.
Always consider the configuration and use of at least one Hot Standby Drive.
11.
Arrays must be disassembled on a last in first out basis.
n
For example, consider a system where you a factory configured system with
two Expansion Units providing user data on drives E:\, F:\, G:\, H:\, and I:\,
and J:\.
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
129
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
Re-Configuring Your MaxAttach NAS 6000 Drive Arrays
n
n
n
n
12.
If you want to reconfigure drive H:\, you must first disassemble drive J:\, then
drive I:\, and finally drive H:\. The disassembly process takes the drives out of
their previous arrays and leaves them in the system with an “unconfigured
status.”
During this process, all user data on the array is destroyed.
At this point, you can now reconfigure drive H:\ into a new configuration.
Then you would have to reconfigure drive I:\ to its original configuration
followed by reconfiguring drive J:\.
Once the drive arrays have been reconfigured, use the Max O/S Web User Interface
(UI) to reconfigure network, users, group, folder, and share option.
Chapter #4 - Overview - NAS 6000 Disk Array
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
130
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network
Configuration
Chapter Outline
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
Network initial setup
Identification
n
Server Appliance Name
n
Global settings
n
DNS Name Resolution
n
TCP/IP Hosts
n
NetBIOS LMHOSTS file
n
IPX Settings
Network adapter interfaces
n
Renaming a Connection
n
Apple Talk Local Area Network Connection
n
IP Address Configuration
n
DNS Configuration
n
WINS Configuration
Change administrator password
Administration web site
Telnet
Server configuration
Network Interface Cards
Network Configuration Overview
From the Network page, you can choose which of the following network-related
properties of the server appliance to configure:
n
Identification: Set the name and domain membership of the server appliance.
n
Global Settings: Configure network settings that apply to all network adapters on
the server appliance.
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
131
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Network Identification
n
n
n
n
Interfaces: Configure the properties of each network adapter on the server appliance.
Administrator: Change the password of the user account you are using to access the
server appliance administration Web site.
Administration Web Site: Specify which IP address(es) and port are used to access
the administration Web site.
Telnet: Configure Telnet to administer the server appliance.
Network Identification
The server appliance must be given a name. Client computers use this name to access the
file shares that reside on this server appliance.
The server appliance can be configured as a member of one of the following groups:
n
Microsoft® Windows NT® 4 domain
n
Microsoft Active Directory™ domain
n
Workgroup
If no workgroups exist on the network, for example, if this is a UNIX environment, the
workgroups option should be selected and any arbitrary name used.
User accounts may also be created locally on the server appliance; however, using a domain
or directory eliminates the need to create local user accounts for every user of the server
appliance.
A good practice after joining a domain is to add one or more domain users to the local
administrators group, then reconnect under those user names to administer the server
appliance.
To set the name and domain membership of the server appliance
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Identification.
3.
In the boxes provided, type the appropriate server appliance name and Domain
Name System (DNS) suffix. The DNS suffix is appended to the host name to create
the fully qualified machine name.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
132
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Network Identification
NOTE
Adding a DNS suffix is optional; however, if you want to set or change the name of your server
appliance, this is the only box from which you can do so.
4.
Select whether the client computer will be part of a workgroup or a domain.
5.
If the machine will be part of a domain, type the user name and password of the
person who has permission to add client computers to the domain.
6.
If the server appliance is accessible to AppleTalk or NetWare clients, type the
AppleTalk or NetWare name in the appropriate box.
7.
By default:
n
The AppleTalk name of your server appliance will be the same as the standard
server appliance name
n
The NetWare name must be different from the server appliance name.
n
The NetWare name will be the server appliance name with _NW appended to
it.
8.
Any changes to the server appliance name will update the Netware and AppleTalk
names as well.
9.
Choose OK.
10.
When prompted to reboot the server appliance, you may either accept or cancel the
reboot.
n
If you choose OK, the server appliance will reboot and the Restarting page will
appear. When the server appliance has restarted, the Home Page of the Web
user interface (UI) will display and your changes will be in effect.
n
If you choose Cancel, the changes to the server appliance identity will not take
effect until the next reboot.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
•
DNS Name Resolution
DNS Suffixes
Domain
Server Appliance Name
Workgroup
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
133
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Server Appliance Name
Server Appliance Name
The server appliance name is the name of the MaxAttach NAS 6000 on a network. The
server appliance name must be unique and must meet certain requirements. The new
server appliance name cannot be the same as another computer or the name of a Microsoft
Windows domain.
Server names recommendations are:
n
It is recommended that you use names that are 15 characters or fewer.
n
The server appliance name can be a maximum of 63 characters but should only contain
the numbers 0–9, the uppercase letters A–Z, the lowercase letters a–z, or hyphens.
n
You may use other characters, but doing so may prevent other users from finding your
computer on the network. If your network is using the Microsoft DNS server, you can
use any characters except periods.
n
If other networking protocols are installed without TCP/IP, the server appliance name
is limited to 15 characters.
n
If you specify a server appliance name longer than 15 characters and you want longer
names to be recognized by the Microsoft Active Directory domain, the domain
administrator must enable registration of DNS names that are 16 characters or longer
Domain
Your server appliance can be in a workgroup, active directory environment, or Windows
NT 4 domain. In Microsoft Windows NT 4 and Microsoft Active Directory
environments, a domain is a collection of computers defined by the administrator of a
network that share a common directory database.
Utilized for Windows user and group information, Windows domains have a unique name
and provide access to the centralized user accounts and group accounts maintained by the
domain administrator. Each domain has its own security policies and security relationships
with other domains, and each domain represents a single security boundary of a Windows
computer network. Active Directory is made up of one or more domains, each of which
can span more than one physical location.
For DNS, a domain is any tree or subtree within the DNS name space. Although the
names for DNS domains often correspond to Active Directory domains, DNS domains
should not be confused with Microsoft Windows and Active Directory networking
domains.
By default a domain user must enter domain\username when logging into a Web server
appliance or a NAS with a Netscape browser.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
134
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Server Appliance Name
To set the default domain used for logon
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Terminal Services.
3.
Log onto Terminal Services.
4.
Right-click My Computer and choose Manage.
5.
Open Internet Information Services (IIS).
6.
Right-click Administration Web site and choose Properties.
7.
Select Directory Security.
8.
In the Anonymous access and authentication control area, choose Edit.
9.
In the Basic Authentication area, choose Edit.
10.
Type the default domain name you want to use for authentication.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
Identification
Server Appliance Name
Workgroup
UNIX (NFS)
Workgroup
A workgroup is a simple grouping of computers, intended only to help users find such
things as printers and shared folders within that group. Your server appliance can be in a
workgroup, active directory environment, or Windows NT 4 domain. Workgroups in
Microsoft Windows 2000 do not offer the centralized user accounts and authentication
offered by domains.
A workgroup name must not duplicate the computer name. A workgroup name can have
as many as 15 characters, but cannot contain any of the following characters:
;:"<>+=\|?,.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
135
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Network Global Settings
To set or change the workgroup membership of the server appliance
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Identification.
3.
Select the Workgroup button and type the name of the workgroup to join.
n
If the server appliance belonged to a domain before you joined the workgroup,
the server appliance will be disjoined from the domain and the computer
account will be disabled.
4.
Choose OK.
5.
You will be asked to reboot the server appliance.
6.
Choose whether to reboot the server appliance.
n
If you choose OK, the server appliance will reboot and a page will appear
indicating that the server appliance is restarting.
n
When the server appliance is back online, the default page of the Web UI will
display and your changes will be in effect.
n
If you choose Cancel, the changes to the server appliance identity will not take
effect until the next reboot.
Network Global Settings
From this page, you can change the overall network settings for your server appliance by
configuring the IPX settings as well as specifying the DNS suffixes and the LMHOSTS and
HOSTS file to use. These files can be used to resolve the names of any computer or device.
Note that the DNS suffix used here applies when the server appliance is trying to resolve a
host or domain name.
To automatically set or change DNS suffixes
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Global Settings.
3.
Select the DNS Resolution tab.
4.
Select the Append primary DNS suffix button.
5.
Optional: you may choose to Append parent suffixes of the primary DNS suffix by
selecting the check box.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
136
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
DNS Name Resolution
6.
Choose OK.
To manually add specific DNS suffixes
1.
On the Network page, choose Global Settings.
2.
Select the DNS Resolution tab.
3.
Select the Append the following DNS suffixes, in order of use button.
4.
In the Domain suffix box, type the DNS suffix you want to add, and then choose
Add.
5.
Choose OK.
To manually remove specific DNS suffixes
1.
On the Network page, choose Global Settings.
2.
Select the DNS Resolution tab.
3.
Select the Append the following DNS suffixes, in order of use button.
4.
Use the Up and Down buttons to scroll through the list of domain suffixes. Select the
suffix you want to delete, and then choose Remove.
5.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
DNS Configuration (below
DNS Name Resolution (above)
DNS Suffixes (above)
NetBIOS LMHOSTS File (below
DNS Name Resolution
So that people can reach your Web site on an intranet or the Internet, you must have a
unique IP address that identifies your computer on the network. This address consists of a
long string of numbers separated by dots, for example, 172.16.255.255. Because a numeric
address is difficult for people to remember, text names, or friendly names, are used to
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
137
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
DNS Configuration
provide visitors with an easy-to-remember address, such as www.microsoft.com. Name
resolution involves supplying the correct numerical address from the friendly name that was
typed into a client browser.
Name Resolution Systems
Windows networking components rely on the NetBIOS naming convention. In contrast,
TCP/IP components rely on a naming convention known as the Domain Name System
(DNS). Under Windows, the DNS host name of your server appliance defaults to the same
name as the NetBIOS computer name. The mapping of computer names to IP addresses
can be accomplished using one of the following two methods:
n
Static: The system administrator creates either a text file for DNS names, called a
HOSTS file, or an LMHOSTS file for NetBIOS names, and enters each computer's
name and IP address. The file is then distributed on the network. When a request for a
connection to another computer is made, the file is used to resolve the name to the
correct IP address. This system works well for simple networks that change
infrequently.
n
Dynamic: When a client computer connects to a network with a DHCP server, the
DHCP server assigns an address and sends the IP address assignment to a Windows
Internet Name Service (WINS) server. The WINS server registers the computer's
name, and when a request is made for a NetBIOS computer name, the WINS server
resolves the name to the correct IP address. This automatic recognition and mapping of
computer names and addresses eases the administrative burden of large or frequently
changing networks.
DNS names are typically resolved using static information. The DNS server contains a
portion of the static database listing host names and addresses. If the requested name is not
in the DNS server's portion of the database, it sends a query to other DNS servers to get the
requested information. The DNS server that runs on Windows can be configured to query
a WINS server for name resolution of the lower levels of the DNS hierarchical naming
structure. Because WINS assigns computer names dynamically, this effectively changes
DNS from a static system to a dynamic system.
DNS Configuration
The domain name system (DNS) is a static, hierarchical name service for TCP/IP hosts.
The network administrator configures the DNS with a list of host names and IP addresses.
This allows users on the network to query the DNS to specify remote systems by host
names rather than IP addresses.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
138
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
DNS Configuration
NOTE
The purpose of this property page is to allow you to enter the addresses of external DNS servers.
The server appliance does not contain a DNS server.
For example, a workstation configured to use DNS name resolution could use the
command ping remotehost rather than ping 1.2.3.4 if the mapping for the system named
remotehost was contained in the DNS database. DNS domains should not be confused
with Microsoft Windows domains.
In the DNS client-server model, the server containing information about a portion of the
DNS database, the portion that makes computer names available to clients, queries for
name resolution across the Internet.
To set the server appliance to automatically obtain DNS server
information from a DHCP server
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Interfaces.
3.
Select the network connection you want to modify.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose DNS.
5.
Select the Obtain configuration from DHCP server button.
6.
Choose OK.
To manually set the DNS servers to be used by the server appliance
1.
On the Network page, choose Interfaces.
2.
Select the network connection you want to modify.
3.
In the Tasks list, choose DNS.
4.
Select the Configure manually button.
5.
Type the appropriate IP address in the box next to the Add button, and then choose
Add.
6.
To add another DNS server, repeat step 5.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
139
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
TCP/IP Hosts
7.
When you are finished adding DNS servers, choose OK.
NOTE
If you set the IP address to be obtained from DHCP, and you set DNS manually, the system will
accept the manual input, and the properties on the server appliance will automatically be set to
Configure manually. However, the Current Configuration column of the Object/Task Selector on the
Interfaces page will still show DHCP as the source of the IP address. You can go back into the DNS
settings properties page to confirm that the manual configuration has been saved.
Related Topics
•
•
DNS Suffixes.
DNS Name Resolution.
TCP/IP Hosts
Windows networking components rely on the NetBIOS naming convention. In contrast,
TCP/IP components rely on a naming convention known as the Domain Name System
(DNS). Under Windows, the DNS host name defaults to the same name as the NetBIOS
computer name. The mapping of computer names to IP addresses can be accomplished
using one of the following two methods:
n
Static: The system administrator creates either a text file for DNS names, called a
HOSTS file, or an LMHOSTS file for NetBIOS names, and enters each computer's
name and IP address. The file is then distributed on the network. When a request for a
connection to another computer is made, the file is used to resolve the name with the
correct IP address. This system works well for simple networks that change
infrequently.
n
Dynamic: When a client computer logs on, a DHCP server assigns an address and
sends the IP address assignment to a Windows Internet Name Service (WINS) server.
The WINS server registers the computer's name, and when a request is made for a
NetBIOS computer name, the WINS server resolves the name to the correct IP
address. This automatic recognition and mapping of computer names and addresses
eases the administrative burden of large or frequently changing networks.
DNS names are typically resolved using static information. The DNS server contains a
portion of the static database listing host names and addresses. If the requested name is not
in the DNS server's portion of the database, it sends a query to other DNS servers to get the
requested information. The DNS server that runs on Windows can be configured to query
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
140
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
NetBIOS LMHOSTS File
a WINS server for name resolution of the lower levels of the DNS hierarchical naming
structure. Because WINS assigns computer names dynamically, this effectively changes
DNS from a static system to a dynamic system.
If you are setting up multiple Web or FTP sites on a single server, each with its own IP
address, you might encounter problems with automatic DNS registration. To ensure
correct IP binding and DNS registration, disable Windows 2000 Server automatic DNS
registration and manually configure DNS registration for the Web sites. For more
information about disabling automatic DNS registration and manually configuring DNS
registration, see the Windows 2000 Server documentation.
If you want to assign multiple names to one server appliance, you must use a static name
assignment for the server appliance. On one computer you can map multiple names to one
IP address or you can use multiple names, each one mapped to its own IP address.
To edit the Hosts file
1.
On the Network page, choose Global Settings.
2.
Select the TCP/IP Hosts tab. By default, the Hosts file box contains the current
Hosts file configuration.
3.
Change the Hosts file by clicking in the box and editing the information.
4.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
NetBIOS LMHOSTS File
DNS Configuration
DNS Name Resolution
DNS Suffixes
NetBIOS LMHOSTS File
For people to reach your Web site, you must have a unique IP address that identifies your
computer on the network. This address is a long string of numbers separated by dots, for
example, 172.16.255.255. Because a numeric address is difficult for people to remember,
text names or friendly names, are used to provide visitors with an easy-to-remember
address, such as \\MyStoredFiles. Name resolution involves interpreting the correct
numerical address from the friendly name a user types into a client browser. This section
describes different name resolution systems.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
141
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
NetBIOS LMHOSTS File
The use of an LMHOSTS file is optional. If an LMHOSTS file is not used, however, you
cannot use friendly text names. Instead, you must use IP addresses. This can be a
disadvantage because Web sites on the Internet usually use the DNS. If you register a
domain name for your Web site, users can contact your Web site by typing its domain
name in a browser.
The LMHOSTS file is read when WINS or broadcast name resolution fails and resolved
entries are stored in a system cache for later access. When the computer uses the replication
service and does not use WINS, LMHOSTS file entries are required on import and export
servers for any computers on different subnetworks participating in the replication.
You can use Microsoft Notepad or any text editor to edit the sample LMHOSTS.sam file
that is automatically installed in the Windows directory. The following rules apply for
entries in the LMHOSTS file:
n
Each entry should be placed on a separate line.
n
The IP address should begin in the first column, followed by the corresponding
computer name. Entries in the LMHOSTS file are case-insensitive.
n
The address and the computer name should be separated by at least one space or tab.
n
The number (#) sign is typically used to mark the start of a comment. However, this
character can also be used to designate special keywords, as described in this section.
n
The keywords listed in the following table can be used in the LMHOSTS file. Notice,
however, that LAN Manager 2.x treats these keywords as comments.
Table #1 - LMHOSTS Keywords and Definition
LMHOST
Keywords
Keyword Definitions
#PRE
Causes an entry to be preloaded into the name cache. This keyword is added after an entry. The
#PRE keywords in the LMHOSTS file are looked up and cached prior to WINS lookup. #PRE must
be appended for entries that also appear in #INCLUDE statements; otherwise, the entry in
#INCLUDE is ignored.
#DOM:domain
Associates an entry with the domain specified by domain. This keyword is added after an entry,
and it affects how the browser and logon services behave in routed TCP/IP environments. To
preload a #DOM entry, you must also add the #PRE keyword to the line.
#INCLUDE filename
Forces the system to seek the specified filename and parse it as if it were local. Specifying a
universal naming convention (UNC) filename allows you to use a centralized LMHOSTS file on a
server. You must map the server before its entry in the #INCLUDE section, and also append #PRE
to ensure that it is preloaded (otherwise the #INCLUDE will be ignored).
#BEGIN_ALTERNATE
Groups multiple #INCLUDE statements. Any single successful #INCLUDE statement causes the
group to succeed.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
142
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
NetBIOS LMHOSTS File
Table #1 - LMHOSTS Keywords and Definition
LMHOST
Keywords
Keyword Definitions
#END_ALTERNATE
Marks the end of an #INCLUDE grouping.
\0xnn
Supports nonprinting characters in NetBIOS names. Enclose the NetBIOS name in quotation
marks and use \0xnn hexadecimal notation to specify a hexadecimal value for the character. This
allows custom applications that use special names to function properly in routed topologies.
However, LAN Manager TCP/IP does not recognize the hexadecimal format, so you surrender
backward compatibility if you use this feature.
Notice that the hexadecimal notation applies only to one character in the name. The name should
be padded with blanks so the special character is placed as the last, or 16th, character in the
string).
The following example below shows how these keywords are used.
102.54.94.98
localsrv
#PRE
102.54.94.97
trey
#PRE #DOM:networking #net group's PDC
102.54.94.102
"appname......\0x14" #special app server
102.54.94.123
popular
#PRE
#source server
#BEGIN_ALTERNATE
#INCLUDE \\localsrv\public\LMHOSTS
#adds LMHOSTS files from this server
#INCLUDE \\trey\public\LMHOSTS
#adds LMHOSTS files from this server
#END_ALTERNATE
Note the following points from the example above:
n
The servers named localsrv and trey are preloaded so they can be used later in an
#INCLUDE statement in a centrally maintained LMHOSTS file.
n
The server named "appname \0x14" contains a special character after the 15th
character, including blanks, in its name, so its name is enclosed in quotation marks.
n
The server named popular is preloaded, based on the #PRE keyword.
Guidelines for LMHOSTS Files
When you use a host table file, be sure to keep it up-to-date and organized. Use the
following guidelines:
n
Update the LMHOSTS file whenever a computer is changed or removed from the
network.
n
Use #PRE statements to preload popular entries into the local computer's name cache.
Also use #PRE statements to preload servers that are included with #INCLUDE
statements.
n
Because LMHOSTS files are searched from the beginning one line at a time, you can
increase the search speed for the most commonly-used entries by placing statements for
the most frequently-used servers near the top of the file. Follow these with statements
for less frequently-used servers, and then follow these server statements with remote
#INCLUDE statements. Type the #PRE entries at the end of the file because these
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
143
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
IPX Settings
statements are preloaded into the cache at system startup time and are not accessed later.
Remember that comment lines add to parsing time because each line is processed
individually.
To edit the LMHOSTS file
1.
From the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Global Settings.
3.
Select the NetBIOS LMHOSTS tab.
4.
Select the Enable LMHOSTS lookup check box.
n
By default, the box below the check box contains the current LMHOSTS file
configuration; however, if there are no entries to be seen, the box will be
empty.
5.
Edit the LMHOSTS file by clicking in the box and changing the information.
6.
Choose OK.
IPX Settings
Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX) is the native NetWare protocol used on many earlier
Novell networks.
To be accessible from clients running NetWare, your server appliance must provide an IPX
address.
To configure the IPX address
1.
From the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Global Settings.
3.
Select the IPX Settings tab.
4.
Enter a value in the Internal network number box, or leave the parameter's default
value at 00000000.
5.
Choose OK.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
144
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Network Adapter Interface
Network Adapter Interface
A network adapter provides the physical interface, or connector, and the hardware to let a
computer access a network. A network adapter is also called an adapter card, a network
interface card (NIC), or simply a card.
From the Interfaces page of the server appliance Web UI, you can perform one of the
following tasks:
n
Change the name of the connection.
n
Set or change the Internet Protocol (IP) addresses, gateway addresses, subnet masks, and
metrics.
n
Set or change how the server appliance resolves DNS names.
n
Set or change the configuration of the Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS)
clients.
n
Configure AppleTalk, if enabled by your server appliance manufacturer.
Configuring a Network Adapter
To configure a network adapter
1.
Select the adapter you want from the Description column.
2.
Select the task you want from the Tasks list.
3.
On the Task page, use the tabs in the left pane to display the configuration of the
network adapter you chose.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
•
IP Address Configuration
DNS Configuration
WINS Configuration
Initial NAS Server Appliance Configuration
Initial Web Server Appliance Configuration
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
145
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
AppleTalk Local Area Network Connection
Renaming a Connection
To rename an interface connection
1.
From the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Interfaces.
3.
Select the interface connection you want to rename.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Rename.
5.
In the New connection name box, type the new name of the interface connection.
6.
Choose OK.
AppleTalk Local Area Network Connection
Use the AppleTalk LAN Connection page to specify which network adapter can receive
inbound AppleTalk connections and in which AppleTalk zone the MaxAttach will appear.
Configuring an AppleTalk Network Connection
To configure a network interface for AppleTalk
1.
Log in to the MaxAttach as administrator.
2.
Click Network on the main menu bar.
3.
Select Interfaces. The Interfaces page displays.
4.
Select the interface you want to configure by clicking a radio button in the
Description column.
5.
On the Tasks list, click AppleTalk. The AppleTalk Configuration page displays.
6.
Set the Enable inbound AppleTalk connections on this adapter checkbox to
permit the adapter to accept inbound AppleTalk traffic. Note that only one adapter
per system can be so enabled. If another adapter is already enabled for inbound
AppleTalk traffic, it will be automatically disabled.
7.
If your network is organized into AppleTalk zones, use the pull-down list to select
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
146
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
IP Address Configuration
the zone in which this system will appear.
Related Topics
•
•
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
AppleTalk Service Properties
IP Address Configuration
Each computer on the network must have a unique IP address to send and receive data.
You can use the IP Address Configuration page to have your server appliance
automatically obtain the IP address configuration from the Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol (DHCP) server. Alternately, you can configure the IP address/es manually.
In addition, you can use the IP Address Configuration page to specify one or more
gateway addresses. A gateway address is the address of a local IP router residing on the same
network as the server appliance that is used to forward traffic to destinations beyond the
local network. The value in each field must be a number from 0–255.
NOTE
Changing the IP address may cause the client to lose its connection with the server appliance. To
reconnect, the user must either use the new IP address or wait until the DNS server is updated.
Changing IP General Tab Settings
To set or change the IP settings on the General tab
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Interfaces.
3.
Select the network connection you want to modify.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose IP.
5.
Select the General tab.
6.
Select whether to obtain the configuration automatically from the DHCP server, or
to statically configure the IP address(es).
7.
If you choose to obtain the configuration from the DHCP server, choose OK.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
147
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
IP Address Configuration
8.
If you have chosen to use static IP settings, enter the IP address, Subnet mask, and
Default gateway in the boxes provided.
Changing IP Settings on the Advanced Tab
To set or change the IP settings on the Advanced tab
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Interfaces.
3.
Select the network connection you want to modify.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose IP.
5.
Select the Advanced tab.
6.
In the IP address box on the right, type the IP address, and then choose Add.
7.
If you have a local area connection, type the appropriate mask information in the
Subnet mask box.
n
A subnet mask is a 32-bit number that is notated by using four numbers from
0–255, separated by periods.
n
Typically, default subnet mask numbers use either 0 or 255 as values, such as
255.255.255.0.
n
However, other numeric values can appear, indicating that the subnet is
configured for a single TCP/IP network.
n
This number, with a value other than 0 or 255, is combined with the IP address
number to identify the network on which your computer resides.
8.
If necessary, update the IP Connection Metric.
n
The metric indicates the cost of using the routes associated with this connection
and becomes the value in the Metric column for those routes in the IP routing
table.
n
If there are multiple routes to a destination the route with the lowest metric is
used. The default value is 1.
9.
Repeat steps 1–3 for any other IP addresses you wish to add.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
148
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
DNS Configuration
Changing Gateway Address Settings
To set or change the gateway address settings
1.
In the Gateway and Metric boxes, type the IP address of both the default gateway
and the metric, and then choose Add.
2.
Repeat step 1 for each default gateway you want to add.
3.
When you are finished modifying the configurations on this screen, choose OK.
n
at the subnet is configured for a single TCP/IP network.
n
This number, with a value other than 0 or 255, is combined with the IP address
number to identify the network on which your computer resides.
4.
If necessary, update the IP Connection Metric.
n
The metric indicates the cost of using the routes associated with this connection
and becomes the value in the Metric column for those routes in the IP routing
table.
n
If there are multiple routes to a destination the route with the lowest metric is
used.
n
The default value is 1.
5.
Repeat steps 1–3 for any other IP addresses you wish to add.
DNS Configuration
The domain name system (DNS) is a static, hierarchical name service for TCP/IP hosts.
The network administrator configures the DNS with a list of host names and IP addresses.
This allows users on the network to query the DNS to specify remote systems by host
names rather than IP addresses.
NOTE
The purpose of this property page is to allow you to enter the addresses of external DNS servers.
The server appliance does not contain a DNS server.
For example, a workstation configured to use DNS name resolution could use the
command ping remotehost rather than ping 1.2.3.4 if the mapping for the system named
remotehost was contained in the DNS database. DNS domains should not be confused
with Microsoft Windows domains.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
149
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
DNS Configuration
In the DNS client-server model, the server containing information about a portion of the
DNS database, the portion that makes computer names available to clients, queries for
name resolution across the Internet.
Obtaining IP Address from DHCP Server
To set the server appliance to automatically obtain DNS server
information from a DHCP server
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Interfaces.
3.
Select the network connection you want to modify.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose DNS.
5.
Select the Obtain configuration from DHCP server button.
6.
Choose OK.
Manually Setting DNS Server to Use
To manually set the DNS servers to be used by the server appliance
1.
On the Network page, choose Interfaces.
2.
Select the network connection you want to modify.
3.
In the Tasks list, choose DNS.
4.
Select the Configure manually button.
5.
Type the appropriate IP address in the box next to the Add button, and then choose
Add.
6.
To add another DNS server, repeat step 5.
7.
When you are finished adding DNS servers, choose OK.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
150
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
WINS Configuration
NOTE
If you set the IP address to be obtained from DHCP, and you set DNS manually, the system will
accept the manual input, and the properties on the server appliance will automatically be set to
Configure manually. However, the Current Configuration column of the Object/Task Selector
on the Interfaces page will still show DHCP as the source of the IP address. You can go back into
the DNS settings properties page to confirm that the manual configuration has been saved.
Related Topics
•
•
For more information about DNS suffixes, see DNS
Suffixes.
For more information about DNS name resolution, see
DNS Name Resolution.
WINS Configuration
This property page allows you to enter the addresses of external WINS servers. The server
appliance does not contain a WINS server. For the purpose discussed here, the server
appliance is a WINS client.
WINS-enabled client computers can be configured to make direct use of a WINS server.
Most WINS client computers typically have more than one network basic input/output
system (NetBIOS) name that they must register with the network. These names are used to
publish various types of network service, such as the Messenger or Workstation Service that
each computer can use in various ways to communicate with other computers on the
network.
WINS-enabled clients communicate with the WINS server to allow you to complete the
following tasks:
n
Register client names in the WINS database.
n
Renew client names with the WINS database.
n
Release client names from the WINS database.
n
Resolve names by obtaining mappings from the WINS database for user names,
NetBIOS names, DNS names, and IP addresses.
Clients that are not WINS-enabled can use WINS proxies to participate in these processes
in a limited way. If you are using a DHCP server to allocate WINS server IP addresses, you
do not need to add WINS server addresses.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
151
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Administrator Account and Password
Keep in mind that the Web UI only allows you to manipulate two WINS addresses, and
even then only if you statically assign the IP address for the adapter. If you have DHCP
enabled, you can remove one or two existing addresses and add different addresses, but you
will not be able to remove all WINS servers from a DHCP-enabled adapter. If you remove
two WINS addresses and do not add at least one, DHCP will automatically assign WINS
addresses.
WINS clients attempt to register their names with a WINS server when they start or join
the network. Thereafter, WINS clients query the WINS server as needed to resolve remote
names.
Changing WINS Settings
To change the WINS settings
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Interfaces.
3.
Select the network connection you want to modify.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose WINS.
5.
In the WINS servers list, select the IP address of the WINS server you want to
delete, and then choose Remove.
6.
In the WINS server address box, type the IP address of the WINS server, and then
choose Add.
7.
Repeat steps 4 and 5 for each WINS server IP address you want to add.
8.
Choose OK.
Administrator Account and Password
The server appliance comes with a set of default accounts. Only the administrator account
has administrative privileges.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
152
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Administrator Account and Password
NOTE
If an administrator adds a domain account to the local administrators group, the domain user may
access and administer the server appliance. However, the administrator cannot use the Change
Administrator Password page to change his domain account password. This page can only be
used to change the local administrator's account password.
When you change the administrator password, there is no explicit confirmation page.
However, the password is successfully changed if no error message appears after you have
submitted the change.
NOTE
You cannot change the administrator password if you are logged on as a domain user as it is outside
the scope of the server appliance Web UI to make changes to domain user accounts, which are
stored on the domain controller, rather than on the server appliance.
In this context, administrator relates to the user account that is a member of the local
administrators group and is used by a current user to log on. It does not refer to the default
administrator account, called administrator.
If you receive the error message The password cannot be changed for this domain
account or The account name cannot be changed for this domain account when
trying to change the administrator password or account name, you are logged on as a
domain user. You must be logged on as the server appliance administrator to change the
administrator password.
Changing Administrator Account Password
To change the administrator account password
1.
Log on to the server appliance as Administrator.
2.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
3.
Choose Administrator.
4.
Type the current administrator password in the Current password box.
5.
Type the new administrator password in the New password box.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
153
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Administration Web Site
NOTE
The new administrator password must conform to any password complexity rules in effect for the
domain to which the server appliance belongs.
6.
Retype the new administrator password in the Confirm new password box.
7.
Choose OK.
Changing Administrator Account Name
To change the administrator account name
1.
Log on to the server appliance as Administrator.
2.
Choose Network.
3.
Choose Administrator.
4.
Type the new name for the administrator account in the User name box.
5.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
Configuring Network Attached Storage
Configuring a Web Server Appliance
Administration Web Site
This feature allows you to change the IP address/es and port that can be used to access the
administration Web site on the server appliance.
The default IP address to which the server appliance responds, or listens, is typically
changed when the server appliance is only managed on a certain subnet or a separate
management network.
The default listen ports for both encrypted and non-encrypted access can be modified as
needed to work with existing network software and configurations, for example, when no
traffic above a given port number is allowed.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
154
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Telnet
Changing Administration Web Site Properties
To change the administration web site properties
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Administration Web Site.
3.
On the Administration Site Properties page:
4.
Specify whether to use All IP addresses or Just this IP address.
5.
If you choose to use Just this IP address, use the list to select the IP address you
want to use.
6.
If changing the port for non-encrypted access, type the new port number in the Port
for non-encrypted access box.
7.
If changing the port for encrypted access, type the new port number in the Port for
encrypted (SSL) access box.
8.
Choose OK.
Telnet
The Telnet Administration Configuration feature allows you to administer your
Windows® Powered server appliance from a remote system using the Telnet protocol.
You can log onto the system from a remote Telnet client and run character-mode
applications on the server appliance. The Telnet server included with your server appliance
supports a maximum of two Telnet clients at any time, unless otherwise specified by your
server appliance hardware manufacturer.
Configuring System for Telnet Administration
To configure the MaxAttach NAS 6000 for Telnet administration
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Telnet.
3.
Select the Enable Telnet access to this appliance check box.
4.
Choose OK.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
155
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Network Adapter Interfaces
Network Adapter Interfaces
A network adapter provides the physical interface, or connector, and the hardware to let a
computer access a network. A network adapter is also called an adapter card, a network
interface card (NIC), or simply a card.
From the Interfaces page of the server appliance Web UI, you can perform one of the
following tasks:
n
Change the name of the connection.
n
Set or change the Internet Protocol (IP) addresses, gateway addresses, subnet masks, and
metrics.
n
Set or change how the server appliance resolves DNS names.
n
Set or change the configuration of the Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS)
clients.
n
Configure AppleTalk, if enabled by your server appliance manufacturer.
Configuring Network Adapters
To configure a network adapter
1.
Select the adapter you want from the Description column.
2.
Select the task you want from the Tasks list.
3.
On the Task page, use the tabs in the left pane to display the configuration of the
network adapter you chose.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
•
IP Address Configuration
DNS Configuration
WINS Configuration
Initial NAS Server Appliance Configuration
Initial Web Server Appliance Configuration
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
156
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Network Adapter Interfaces
Renaming a Connection
To rename an interface connection
1.
From the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Interfaces.
3.
Select the interface connection you want to rename.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Rename.
5.
In the New connection name box, type the new name of the interface connection.
6.
Choose OK.
Apple Talk Local Area Network Connection
Use the AppleTalk LAN Connection page to specify which network adapter can receive
inbound AppleTalk connections and in which AppleTalk zone the MaxAttach will appear.
To configure a network interface for AppleTalk
1.
Log in to the MaxAttach as administrator.
2.
Click Network on the main menu bar.
3.
Select Interfaces. The Interfaces page displays.
4.
Select the interface you want to configure by clicking a radio button in the
Description column.
5.
On the Tasks list, click AppleTalk. The AppleTalk Configuration page displays.
6.
Set the Enable inbound AppleTalk connections on this adapter checkbox to permit
the adapter to accept inbound AppleTalk traffic. Note that only one adapter per
system can be so enabled. If another adapter is already enabled for inbound AppleTalk
traffic, it will be automatically disabled.
7.
If your network is organized into AppleTalk zones, use the pull-down list to select
the zone in which this system will appear.
Related Topics
•
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
157
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Network Adapter Interfaces
•
AppleTalk Service Properties
IP Address Configuration
Each computer on the network must have a unique IP address to send and receive data.
You can use the IP Address Configuration page to have your server appliance automatically
obtain the IP address configuration from the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
(DHCP) server. Alternately, you can configure the IP address(es) manually.
In addition, you can use the IP Address Configuration page to specify one or more gateway
addresses. A gateway address is the address of a local IP router residing on the same network
as the server appliance that is used to forward traffic to destinations beyond the local
network. The value in each field must be a number from 0–255.
NOTE
Changing the IP address may cause the client to lose its connection with the server appliance. To
reconnect, the user must either use the new IP address or wait until the DNS server is updated.
To set or change the IP settings on the General tab
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Interfaces.
3.
Select the network connection you want to modify.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose IP.
5.
Select the General tab.
6.
Select whether to obtain the configuration automatically from the DHCP server, or
to statically configure the IP address(es).
7.
If you choose to obtain the configuration from the DHCP server, choose OK.
8.
If you have chosen to use static IP settings, enter the IP address, Subnet mask, and
Default gateway in the boxes provided.
To set or change the IP settings on the Advanced tab
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
158
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Network Adapter Interfaces
2.
Choose Interfaces.
3.
Select the network connection you want to modify.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose IP.
5.
Select the Advanced tab.
6.
In the IP address box on the right, type the IP address, and then choose Add.
n
If you have a local area connection, type the appropriate mask information in
the Subnet mask box.
n
A subnet mask is a 32-bit number that is notated by using four numbers from
0–255, separated by periods.
n
Typically, default subnet mask numbers use either 0 or 255 as values, such as
255.255.255.0.
n
However, other numeric values can appear, indicating that the subnet is
configured for a single TCP/IP network.
n
This number, with a value other than 0 or 255, is combined with the IP address
number to identify the network on which your computer resides.
7.
If necessary, update the IP Connection Metric.
n
The metric indicates the cost of using the routes associated with this connection
and becomes the value in the Metric column for those routes in the IP routing
table.
n
If there are multiple routes to a destination the route with the lowest metric is
used.
n
The default value is 1.
8.
Repeat steps 1–3 for any other IP addresses you wish to add.
To set or change the gateway address settings
1.
In the Gateway and Metric boxes, type the IP address of both the default gateway and
the metric, and then choose Add.
2.
Repeat step 1 for each default gateway you want to add.
3.
When you are finished modifying the configurations on this screen, choose OK.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
159
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Network Adapter Interfaces
DNS Configuration
The domain name system (DNS) is a static, hierarchical name service for TCP/IP hosts.
The network administrator configures the DNS with a list of host names and IP addresses.
This allows users on the network to query the DNS to specify remote systems by host
names rather than IP addresses.
NOTE
The purpose of this property page is to allow you to enter the addresses of external DNS servers.
The server appliance does not contain a DNS server.
For example, a workstation configured to use DNS name resolution could use the
command ping remotehost rather than ping 1.2.3.4 if the mapping for the system named
remotehost was contained in the DNS database. DNS domains should not be confused
with Microsoft Windows domains.
In the DNS client-server model, the server containing information about a portion of the
DNS database, the portion that makes computer names available to clients, queries for
name resolution across the Internet.
To set the server appliance to automatically obtain DNS server
information from a DHCP server
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Interfaces.
3.
Select the network connection you want to modify.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose DNS.
5.
Select the Obtain configuration from DHCP server button.
6.
Choose OK.
To manually set the DNS servers to be used by the server appliance
1.
On the Network page, choose Interfaces.
2.
Select the network connection you want to modify.
3.
In the Tasks list, choose DNS.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
160
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Network Adapter Interfaces
4.
Select the Configure manually button.
5.
Type the appropriate IP address in the box next to the Add button, and then choose
Add.
6.
To add another DNS server, repeat step 5.
7.
When you are finished adding DNS servers, choose OK.
NOTE
If you set the IP address to be obtained from DHCP, and you set DNS manually, the system will
accept the manual input, and the properties on the server appliance will automatically be set to
Configure manually. However, the Current Configuration column of the Object/Task Selector on the
Interfaces page will still show DHCP as the source of the IP address. You can go back into the DNS
settings properties page to confirm that the manual configuration has been saved.
Related Topics
•
•
DNS Suffixes.
DNS Name Resolution.
WINS Configuration
This property page allows you to enter the addresses of external WINS servers. The server
appliance does not contain a WINS server. For the purpose discussed here, the server
appliance is a WINS client.
WINS-enabled client computers can be configured to make direct use of a WINS server.
Most WINS client computers typically have more than one network basic input/output
system (NetBIOS) name that they must register with the network. These names are used to
publish various types of network service, such as the Messenger or Workstation Service that
each computer can use in various ways to communicate with other computers on the
network.
WINS-enabled clients communicate with the WINS server to allow you to complete the
following tasks:
n
Register client names in the WINS database.
n
Renew client names with the WINS database.
n
Release client names from the WINS database.
n
Resolve names by obtaining mappings from the WINS database for user names,
NetBIOS names, DNS names, and IP addresses.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
161
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Change Administrator Password
Clients that are not WINS-enabled can use WINS proxies to participate in these processes
in a limited way. If you are using a DHCP server to allocate WINS server IP addresses, you
do not need to add WINS server addresses.
Keep in mind that the Web UI only allows you to manipulate two WINS addresses, and
even then only if you statically assign the IP address for the adapter. If you have DHCP
enabled, you can remove one or two existing addresses and add different addresses, but you
will not be able to remove all WINS servers from a DHCP-enabled adapter. If you remove
two WINS addresses and do not add at least one, DHCP will automatically assign WINS
addresses.
WINS clients attempt to register their names with a WINS server when they start or join
the network. Thereafter, WINS clients query the WINS server as needed to resolve remote
names.
To change the WINS settings of the server appliance
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Interfaces.
3.
Select the network connection you want to modify.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose WINS.
5.
In the WINS servers list, select the IP address of the WINS server you want to delete,
and then choose Remove.
6.
In the WINS server address box, type the IP address of the WINS server, and then
choose Add.
7.
Repeat steps 4 and 5 for each WINS server IP address you want to add.
8.
Choose OK.
Change Administrator Password
The server appliance comes with a set of default accounts. Only the administrator account
has administrative privileges.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
162
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Change Administrator Password
NOTE
If an administrator adds a domain account to the local administrators group, the domain user may
access and administer the server appliance. However, the administrator cannot use the Change
Administrator Password page to change his domain account password. This page can only be used
to change the local administrator's account password.
When you change the administrator password, there is no explicit confirmation page.
However, the password is successfully changed if no error message appears after you have
submitted the change.
NOTE
You cannot change the administrator password if you are logged on as a domain user as it is outside
the scope of the server appliance Web UI to make changes to domain user accounts, which are
stored on the domain controller, rather than on the server appliance.
In this context, administrator relates to the user account that is a member of the local
administrators group and is used by a current user to log on. It does not refer to the default
administrator account, called administrator.
If you receive the error message “The password cannot be changed for this
domain account” or “The account name cannot be changed for this
domain account” when trying to change the administrator password or account name,
you are logged on as a domain user. You must be logged on as the server appliance
administrator to change the administrator password.
To change the administrator account password
1.
Log on to the server appliance as Administrator.
2.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
3.
Choose Administrator.
4.
Type the current administrator password in the Current password box.
5.
Type the new administrator password in the New password box.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
163
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Administration Web Site
NOTE
Note The new administrator password must conform to any password complexity rules in effect for
the domain to which the server appliance belongs.
6.
Retype the new administrator password in the Confirm new password box.
7.
Choose OK.
To change the administrator account name
1.
Log on to the server appliance as Administrator.
2.
Choose Network.
3.
Choose Administrator.
4.
Type the new name for the administrator account in the User name box.
5.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
Configuring Network Attached Storage
Configuring a Web Server Appliance
Administration Web Site
This feature allows you to change the IP address(es) and port that can be used to access the
administration Web site on the server appliance.
The default IP address to which the server appliance responds, or listens, is typically
changed when the server appliance is only managed on a certain subnet or a separate
management network.
The default listen ports for both encrypted and non-encrypted access can be modified as
needed to work with existing network software and configurations, for example, when no
traffic above a given port number is allowed.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
164
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Telnet
To change the administration web site properties
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Administration Web Site.
3.
On the Administration Site Properties page:
4.
Specify whether to use All IP addresses or Just this IP address.
5.
If you choose to use Just this IP address, use the list to select the IP address you
want to use.
6.
If changing the port for non-encrypted access, type the new port number in the Port
for non-encrypted access box.
7.
If changing the port for encrypted access, type the new port number in the Port for
encrypted (SSL) access box.
8.
Choose OK.
Telnet
The Telnet Administration Configuration feature allows you to administer your
Windows® Powered server appliance from a remote system using the Telnet protocol.
You can log onto the system from a remote Telnet client and run character-mode
applications on the server appliance. The Telnet server included with your server appliance
supports a maximum of two Telnet clients at any time, unless otherwise specified by your
server appliance hardware manufacturer.
To configure your NAS 6000 appliance for Telnet administration
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Network.
2.
Choose Telnet.
3.
Select the Enable Telnet access to this appliance check box.
4.
Choose OK.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
165
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Network Interface Cards
Network Interface Cards
The MaxAttach can support up to three network interface ports. In addition to the Base
Unit Network Port, the system is configured with two additional network interface cards
(NICs):
n
a gigabit Ethernet NIC with copper wire CAT-5E connections
n
a gigabit Ethernet NIC with fiber optic connections.
Standard Configuration
Every installed NIC must be assigned a unique IP address. Clients attached to a particular
network type (10BaseT/100BaseTX, Gigabit copper, Gigabit fiber) access the MaxAttach
at the IP address assigned to each LAN adapter.
The software drivers for each NIC have been pre-installed at the factory. There is no user
configuration required other than entering local area network parameters (IP address, etc.).
All setup operations for the installed network interfaces are automatic. Once the cables are
attached, there are no user controls or adjustments. The devices automatically detect the
network speed and configure themselves for optimum throughput.
Base Unit Network Port
Every system is equipped with a standard IEEE 802.3/IEEE 802.3U-LAN-compliant
10BaseT/100BaseTX Fast Ethernet port. It is supplied on the CPU motherboard of the
MaxAttach Base Unit. the port is accessible on the Base Unit Back Panel in the CPU I/O
Panel area.
The LAN connector for this port is a standard RJ-45, compatible with standard CAT 3, 4,
and 5 UTP cabling for 10BaseT operation (10 Mb/s) and Cat-5 UTP cabling for
100BaseTX operation (100 Mb/s).
Simple Network Management Protocol - SNMP
NOTE
For detailed information on Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) and is use with the
MaxAttach NAS 6000, see Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP on page 270.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
166
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
Simple Network Management Protocol - SNMP
The Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 SNMP service provides SNMP (Simple Network
Management Protocol) agents that can participate in remote, centralized management via
SNMP management consoles.
Chapter #5 - O/S 2.0 - Network Configuration
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
167
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 - Disk and
Volume Properties
Chapter Outline
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
Disks and volumes
Disk quota
Establish default quotas
Enabling quota management
Quota entries
Adding quota entries
Removing quota entries
Modifying quota properties
Persistent storage manager and images
Disks and Volumes
Log on to use Windows 2000 Disk Management Snap-in. When you are finished, close the
snap-in window. This will automatically close the Terminal Services Client Session
Disk Quota Management
Disk quotas track and control disk space use in volumes. You can configure the volumes on
your server appliance to perform the following tasks:
n
Prevent further disk space use and log an event when a user exceeds a specified disk
space limit.
n
Log an event when a user exceeds a specified disk space warning level.
When you enable disk quotas, you can set both the disk quota limit and the disk quota
warning level. The disk quota limit specifies the amount of disk space a user is allowed to
use. The warning level specifies the point at which a user is nearing his or her quota limit.
For example, you can set a user's disk quota limit to 50 megabytes (MB), and the disk quota
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
168
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties
Disk Quota Management
warning level to 45 MB. In this case, the user can store no more than 50 MB on the
volume. If the user stores more than 45 MB on the volume, you can have the disk quota
system log a system event.
In addition, you also can specify that users can exceed their quota limit. Enabling quotas
and not limiting disk space use is useful when you do not want to deny users access to a
volume, but want to track disk space use on a per-user basis. You can also specify whether
or not to log an event when users exceed either their quota warning level or their quota
limit.
When you enable disk quotas for a volume, volume usage is automatically tracked from
that point forward, but existing volume users have no disk quotas applied to them. You can
apply disk quotas to existing volume users by adding new quota entries on the Quota
Entries page.
Related Topics
•
•
Enabling Quota Management.
Quota Entries.
Enabling Quota Management
When you enable disk quotas on a volume, every user’s disk volume usage is monitored
and treated differently depending on the quota management settings for the specific user.
For example, users who have write access to the volume and who have not exceeded their
quota limit can store data on the volume. The first time a user writes data to a
quota-enabled volume, default values for the disk space limit and the warning level are
automatically assigned by the quota system.
To enable or disable quota management on a volume
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Disks.
2.
Choose Disk Quota.
3.
Select the volume you want to manage.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Quota.
5.
On the Quota for Volume (volume) page, select or clear the check box for Enable
quota management.
6.
Select the default quota limit for new users on this volume
Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
169
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties
Disk Quota Management
7.
Specify which quota events should be logged.
8.
Choose OK.
Quota Entries
The Quota Entries page allows you to add, delete, or configure disk quotas for any server
appliance user. Quotas are managed using the Object/Task Selector, which has the
following columns:
n
Logon Name: This column displays the logon name of each user with registered
access to the server appliance.
n
Status: This column indicates whether or not the user has exceeded the assigned
quota limit.
n
Amount Used: This column indicates the amount of disk space currently being used
by a given user.
n
Quota Limit: This column indicates the maximum amount of disk space that a user
can occupy on a volume.
n
How the server appliance behaves when the quota limit is exceeded depends on
the settings on the Quota property page, accessible through the Disk Quota tab.
n
If the Deny disk space to users exceeding quota limit check box is selected, the
user will not be able to exceed this limit.
n
If the Log event when a user exceeds their quota limit check box is selected, an
event log message will be logged. If neither option is selected, no action is
taken.
n
Warning Level: nThis column indicates the maximum amount of disk space that a
particular user can use before a warning appears indicating that the quota has nearly
been reached.
NOTE
A warning will only be generated if the user exceeds the warning limit specified on the Quota
Entries page, and if a Log event is selected on the Default Quota page. If the Log event check box
is not selected, no warning will be generated and this column will remain empty. Typically the
Warning Limit value is set slightly fewer than the Quota Limit value.
To set or change quota entries on the server appliance
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Disks.
2.
Choose Disk Quota.
3.
Select the volume you want to manage.
Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
170
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties
Disk Quota Management
4.
From the Tasks list, choose Quota Entries.
Adding Quota Entries
To add a new quota entry
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Disks.
2.
Choose Disk Quota.
3.
Select the volume you want to manage.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Quota Entries.
5.
In the Tasks list, choose New.
6.
Select a local user from the list, or type the name of a domain account in the box,
using the <domain name\user name> format.
To allow unlimited disk use
1.
Select the Do not limit disk usage button.
To limit disk space
1.
Select the Limit disk space to button.
2.
In the box, type a numerical value to specify the amount of disk space to assign to a
particular user or group. Use the list to indicate kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB),
gigabytes (GB), terabytes (TB), petabytes (PB), or exabytes (EB).
3.
Type the amount of disk space which, when filled, will trigger a warning to the user
or group member that she is near her disk capacity limit. Use the list to indicate KB,
MB, GB, TB, PB, or EB.
4.
Choose OK.
Removing Quota Entries
To remove a quota entry
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Disks.
Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
171
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties
Disk Quota Management
2.
Choose Disk Quota.
3.
Select the volume you want to manage.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Quota Entries.
5.
From the Quota Entries page, select the logon name from which you want to remove
the quota entry.
6.
In the Tasks list, choose Delete.
7.
Choose OK.
Modifying Quota Properties
To modify the properties of a quota entry
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Disks.
2.
Choose Disk Quota.
3.
Select the volume you want to manage.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Quota Entries.
5.
On the Quota Entries page for the selected volume, select a user account.
6.
In the Tasks list, choose Properties.
7.
On the Quota entry for user page, perform one of the following tasks:
To allow unlimited disk use
1.
Select the Do not limit disk usage button.
—OR—
To limit disk space
1.
Select the Limit disk space to button.
2.
In the box, type a numerical value to specify the amount of disk space to assign to a
particular user or group. Use the list to indicate KB, MB, GB, TB, PB, or EB.
3.
Type the amount of disk space which, when filled, will trigger a warning to the user
Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
172
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties
Disk Quota Management
or group member that she is near her disk capacity limit. Use the list to indicate KB,
MB, GB, TB, PB, or EB.
4.
Choose OK.
To modify the properties of multiple quota entries
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Disks.
2.
Choose Disk Quota.
3.
Select the volume you want to manage.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Quota Entries.
5.
On the Quota Entries page for the selected volume, select multiple user accounts.
6.
In the Tasks list, choose Properties.
7.
On the Quota entry for user page, perform one of the following tasks:
To allow unlimited disk use
1.
Select the Do not limit disk usage button.
—OR—
To limit disk space
1.
Select the Limit disk space to button.
2.
In the box, type a numerical value to specify the amount of disk space to assign to a
particular user or group. Use the list to indicate KB, MB, GB, TB, PB, or EB.
3.
Type the amount of disk space which, when filled, will trigger a warning to the user
or group member that she is near her disk capacity limit. Use the list to indicate KB,
MB, GB, TB, PB, or EB.
4.
Choose OK.
Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
173
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties
Persistent Storage Manager and Images
Persistent Storage Manager and Images
The Persistent Storage Manager allows the creation and preservation of persistent images,
“point-in-time” volume snapshots for the server appliance. Each persistent image
(snapshot) is mounted as a volume on the file system to allow read-only or read-write
access by clients. A persistent image can be created immediately through this configuration
system or scheduled as a one time only or regularly repeated event.
Related Topics
•
Although a part of the Disks and Volume navigation
page, this topic is covered in the next chapter. For more
information, see Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage
Manager on page 175.
Chapter #6 - O/S 2.0 - Disk and Volume Properties
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
174
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage
Manager
Chapter Outline
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
Persistent Storage Manager Overview
Persistent Image Manager Overview
Using Persistent Storage Manager
Setting up Persistent Storage Manager
Managing Persistent Storage Manager Schedules
Managing Persistent Image Schedules
Restoring a Volume Set from a Persistent Image
Persistent Storage Manager Introduction
Persistent Storage Manager (PSM) allows you to create “snapshot” images of volumes on
your Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000. These snapshots, called persistent images, preserve
data on selected volumes in case of a system or power failure. Each persistent images is
saved as a volume on the file system to allow clients read-only or read/write access to the
data and volume set. You can create a persistent image immediately through configuration
system of schedule it as a one-time or a recurring event.
Once created, a persistent image of a volume appears as a directory on the original volume
and can be used the same as the original source volume. However, unlike conventional
volumes, persistent images can be restored to the precise content of the original volume at
the time the snapshot was created.
PSM is fully integrated with Microsoft Windows Scheduler, allowing complete unattended
management of persistent image creation and rotation of a periodic basis.
Use the Persistent Storage Manager page under the Disks and Volumes page to control
system resource usage, optimization, and persistent image management.
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
175
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
Persistent Storage Manager and Images
Persistent Storage Manager and Images
The Persistent Storage Manager allows the creation and preservation of persistent images,
“point-in-time” volume snapshots for the server appliance. Each persistent image
(snapshot) is mounted as a volume on the file system to allow read-only or read-write
access by clients. A persistent image can be created immediately through this configuration
system or scheduled as a one time only or regularly repeated event.
Using Persistent Storage Manager
Once created, a persistent image (snapshot) of a volume appears as a directory on the
original volume. Access rights and permissions from the original volume are inherited by
the image. Images are used exactly the same as conventional system volumes. Unlike
conventional volumes, persistent images can record or be restored to the precise content of
the originating volume at the time the snapshot was created.
Persistent Image Scheduling
The Persistent Storage Manager is fully integrated with the Windows scheduler allowing
complete unattended management of persistent image creation on a periodic basis.
Disaster Recovery
If the need arises, any Persistent Image may be instantly restored to the originating
volumes.
Administration
Configuration elements relating to system resource usage and optimization and persistent
image management are controlled through this system.
Detailed help is available for each of the Persistent Storage Manager control panels and
topics.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
•
Persistent Storage Manager Overview
Setting Up Persistent Storage Manager
Managing Persistent Images
Creating New Images
Deleting Existing Images
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
176
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
Setting Up Persistent Storage Manager
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Undoing Writes on Read-Write Images
Viewing and Changing Image Read-Write Attributes
and Retention Weight
View image context within a Schedule Group.
Managing Persistent Image Schedules
Creating New Image Schedule Items
Deleting Existing Schedule Items
Viewing and Changing Schedule Item Properties
Using Disaster Recovery
Restoring a Volume set Image
Setting Up Persistent Storage Manager
Persistent Storage Manager Configuration
From this page, you can modify the various aspects of the Persistent Storage Manager using
pull-down selectors. Some of the options will be display-only if any persistent images are
active. The Restore Defaults button will re-establish the system defaults.
Configuration Fields
The following fields allow you to configure the timing and characteristics of your persistent
image snapshot.
n
Maximum Persistent Images: Specifies the maximum number of active persistent
images supported by the server, up to a maximum of 250. If starting another persistent
image would exceed this number the system will delete an old persistent image.
n
Quiescent Period: Prior to starting a persistent image, the system will wait for a
period of relative inactivity on the volume being imaged. The default value will allow
systems to start an image with a consistent file set and a minimal time-out. This value
may be reduced or increased by experienced administrators for system optimization.
Reducing the Quiescent Period will allow persistent images to begin on systems where
disk inactivity is rare, at the possible expense of synchronization problems within
applications which are concurrently writing to multiple files.
n
Quiescent Time-Out: Specifies the amount of time the server should retry starting
a persistent image. A persistent image won't start until a period of relative inactivity, set
by the Quiescent Period. If an interval longer than Quiescent Time-Out passes before
the persistent image can begin it will be abandoned.
n
Cache Full Warning Threshold: Defines the percentage of cache space which,
when consumed, will trigger warning messages to the system event log.
n
Begin Persistent Image Deletions: Defines the percentage of cache space which,
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
177
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
Managing Persistent Storage Manager Schedules
n
n
n
when consumed, will trigger automatic deletion of the oldest persistent image on the
system. Automatic persistent image deletions are recorded in the system log.
Cache Size: Specifies the amount of space allocated to the cache file. Increasing this
value will allow more and larger persistent image to be maintained. Ensure that
adequate space is available on the drive where persistent images are stored.
Persistent Image Files Location: Specifies the server appliance volume which will
contain the persistent image data. This file contains an exact image of all data file values
which have been preserved as part of a persistent image. This should only altered from
the default value if the number, type, or capacity of storage disks has been altered.
Persistent image directory name: Specifies the directory name which will be
used for the persistent image mount point. Each persistent image appears as a
subdirectory of a volume which is being imaged. The entire content of the volume as it
existed at the moment the persistent image was created will appear under this directory.
Managing Persistent Storage Manager Schedules
The Persistent Image List displays all current active persistent images (snapshots). Each
entry identifies the date and time the persistent images was created, the Read-Only,
Read-Write attribute, preservation weight and the volume it preserves.
Working with Persistent Images
Select an individual persistent image by clicking the radio button to the left of the
description. After selecting the persistent image click:
n
New to create a new persistent image,
n
Delete to delete the image from the system,
n
Undo Writes to undo changes to a read-write image,
n
Properties to view or change the image read-write attribute or retention weight,
n
or Context to view the image context within a schedule group.
Creating a New Persistent Image
Persistent images may be created directly through this page or scheduled for later or
repeated execution using the Persistent Image Schedules page.
To create a new persistent image
1.
From the Menu bar, click Disks and Volumes, then click Persistent Images.
2.
From the Task List list on the Images page, click New...
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
178
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
Managing Persistent Storage Manager Schedules
3.
Using the pull-down select one or more Volumes to preserve,
4.
Select the Read Only or Read/Write attribute,
5.
Select the Retention weight,
6.
Enter the Persistent image name.
7.
Click OK to create the persistent image or Cancel to abort the operation.
Deleting a Persistent Images
To delete a persistent image (snapshot), you must select an item from the Persistent Image
List then click the Delete button.
To delete a persistent image
1.
From the Menu bar, click Disks and Volumes, then click Persistent Images.
2.
On the Persistent Image List page, click the selector next to the persistent image to be
deleted.
3.
Click OK to delete the persistent image or Cancel to leave it intact.
Undoing Persistent Image Writes
To undo writes to a persistent image (snapshot), you must select an item from the Persistent
Image List then click the Undo Writes button.
To undo persistent image writes
1.
From the Menu bar, click Disks and Volumes, then click Persistent Images.
2.
On the Persistent Image List page, click the selector next to the persistent image to be
restored to its original state.
3.
Click OK to restore the image or Cancel to leave it intact.
Editing Persistent Image Properties
To change the read only attribute or preservation weight of an image select an image from
the Persistent Image List then click Properties in the task list.
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
179
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
Context of Persistent Image Groups
To edit persistent image properties
1.
From the Menu bar, click Disks and Volumes, then click Persistent Images,
2.
From the Task List list, click Properties,
3.
Select the Read Only or Read/Write attribute,
4.
Select the Retention weight,
5.
Click OK to update the persistent image or Cancel to abort the operation.
Context of Persistent Image Groups
Persistent images which are created from a Schedule Item are members of image groups.
The members of the group are all the images which were triggered by a particular schedule
item. This page displays the various attributes of the group.
Group Page Field Definitions
n
Image Name and Location on Volume: Displays the name of the image and
associated volume list
n
Persistent Image Group Name: Displays the name associated with this group
n
Number of Images in Group: Displays the maximum number of images to be
included in the group
n
Volume(s) Included in This Image: Display the drive volumes in the image
n
Image Attributes: Displays the read only attribute of the image
n
Retention Weight: Displays the relative retention weight of the image
n
Most Recent Image in Group: Displays the date and time of the image most
recently added for the group
n
Oldest Image in Group: Displays the chronologically oldest image in the group
n
Next Image in Group to be Deleted: Displays the date and time of the image
which will be deleted next in order to stay within the Number of Images in group limit
Managing Persistent Image Schedules
The Persistent Image Schedule screen displays a list of all scheduled persistent images
(snapshots) and associated tasks.
Each scheduled persistent image is identified by the scheduled time, day, frequency, starting
date, and group name.
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
180
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
Managing Persistent Image Schedules
To work with schedule items
1.
Select an individual item by clicking the radio button to the left of the description.
2.
After selecting the item you may Add, Delete, or edit item Properties.
Adding Persistent Image Schedule Items
To add a schedule item you must supply a starting time, repeat period, starting day,
volume, and number of persistent images to keep on-line.
To add a persistent image to the schedule
1.
From the Menu bar, click Disks and Volumes, then click Persistent Storage Manager.
2.
From the Task List list on the Schedule page, click Add...
3.
Select or enter the
n
Starting time,
n
Repeat every frequency,
n
Beginning day,
n
Volume,
n
Read Only attribute,
n
number of images to Keep count, and
n
persistent image name.
4.
Click OK to save or Cancel to discard the new item.
Deleting a Persistent Image Schedule
To delete a persistent image schedule select an item from the Schedule List then click the
delete task.
To delete a persistent image schedule
1.
From the Menu bar, click Disks and Volumes, then click PSM Schedules.
2.
On the Schedule page, click the selector next to the item to be deleted.
3.
From the Task List on the Schedule page, click Delete.
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
181
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
Disaster Recovery
4.
Click OK to delete the item or Cancel to leave the item intact
Editing Persistent Image Schedule Properties
To edit persistent image schedule properties select an item from the Schedule List then
click Properties in the task list.
To edit persistent image schedule properties
1.
From the Menu bar, click Disks and Volumes, then click PSM Schedules.
2.
From the Task List list on the Schedule page, click Properties
3.
Select or enter the
n
Starting time,
n
Repeat every frequency,
n
Beginning day,
n
Volume,
n
Read Only attribute,
n
number of images to Keep count,
n
and persistent image name.
4.
Click OK to save the changes or Cancel to discard the changes.
Disaster Recovery
The Disaster Recovery screen displays a list of all persistent images (snapshots).
Each scheduled persistent image is identified by the group name, date and time, age, and
protected volumes.
Using disaster recovery
1.
Select an individual item by clicking the radio button to the left of the description.
2.
After selecting the item you may view:
n
Its group Context, or
n
Select it for Restore.
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
182
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
Restoring a Volume Set from a Persistent Image
Restoring a Volume Set from a Persistent Image
To restore a volume(s) from a persistent image (snapshot), you must select the image to be
restored.
To restore volumes from a persistent image
1.
From the Menu bar, click Disks and Volumes, then click Disaster Recovery.
2.
On the Disaster Recovery page, click the selector next to the persistent image to be
restored.
3.
Click OK to restore the volumes protected by the persistent image or Cancel to leave
it intact.
Chapter #7 - Persistent Storage Manager
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
183
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and
Shares
Chapter Outline
n
n
n
n
Overview of Supported Protocols
n
Windows CIFS
n
Network File System (NFS)
n
File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
n
Web Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP)
n
Netware Sharing Protocol
n
AppleTalk Protocol
Managing Folders
n
Sharing Folders
n
Navigating Folders
n
Adding a Folder
n
Removing a Folder
n
Opening a Folder
n
Modifying Folder Properties
n
Sharing a folder
Managing Shares
n
Overview
n
Adding a Share
n
Removing a Share
n
Modifying Share Properties
n
Setting Windows CIFS Share Properties
n
Setting NFS Share Properties
n
Setting FTP Share Properties
n
Setting Web HTTP Share Properties
n
Setting NetWare Share Properties
n
Setting Apple Talk Share Properties
Managing Sharing Protocols
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
184
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Overview of Supported Protocols
Enabling Sharing Protocols
n
Disabling Sharing Protocols
n
Configuring Sharing Protocol Properties
Setting NFS Sharing Protocols
n
Adding NFS client Groups
n
Editing NFS client groups
n
Removing NFS client groups
n
Setting NFS Locks
n
Setting NFS User and Group Mappings
n
Enabling NFS Simple Maps
n
Configuring NFS Explicit User Maps
n
Configuring Explicit Group Maps
n
Setting FTP Sharing Protocol
n
Setting Web HTTP Sharing Protocol
n
Setting Netware Sharing Protocol
n
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Protocol
n
n
Overview of Supported Protocols
A folder on your MaxAttach NAS 6000 can be shared with others on the network,
whether those computers are running a Microsoft Windows operating system (OS) or a
UNIX OS.
Supported Protocols
The MaxAttach NAS 6000 can support the following protocols:
n
Windows (CIFS): The Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol is used by
clients running a Windows OS.
n
NFS: The Network File System protocol is used by clients running UNIX.
n
FTP: The File Transfer Protocol is an alternative way of accessing a file share from
any OS.
n
HTTP: The Hypertext Transfer Protocol is the protocol for accessing a file share
from Web browsers.
n
NetWare: The protocol for accessing a file share from clients running NetWare.
n
AppleTalk: The protocol for accessing a file share from Macintosh clients.
When you create a share on the MaxAttach NAS 6000, you can enable any or all of the
listed protocols currently enabled or installed on your server appliance.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
185
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Microsoft Windows File Sharing Overview
Microsoft Windows File Sharing Overview
When you share a folder, you can choose permissions that will allow or deny other
network users access to the files in that folder. For client computers running Microsoft
Windows, you can also specify whether other Windows users will be able to make the
shared folder available offline.
To make a shared network file available offline, a version of the file is stored in a reserved
portion of client computer disk space called a cache. The computer can access this cache
regardless of whether the computer is connected to the network. When sharing files, you
can use three caching options:
Manual Caching for Documents
Manual caching for documents provides offline access to only those files that someone
using your server appliance shared folder specifically, or manually, identifies. This caching
option is ideal for a shared server appliance folder containing files that are to be accessed
and modified by several people. This is the default option when a shared folder is set up to
be used offline.
Automatic Caching for Documents
Automatic caching for documents makes every file in your shared server appliance folder
available offline to others who open the files.
Automatic caching makes the contents of a folder available offline whether someone using
your shared server appliance folder specifically chooses to make them available or not.
Documents, drawings, program files, and other files will all be available to users.
Only those files that someone opens in your shared server appliance folder will continue to
be available to that person when working offline.
Automatic Caching for Programs
Automatic caching for programs provides read-only offline access to shared folder files.
This caching option is ideal for making files available offline that are referenced, run, or
read, but that should not be changed in the process. Automatic caching for programs
reduces network traffic because offline files are opened directly, without accessing the
network versions in any way, and generally start and run faster than the network versions.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
186
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Network File System (NFS) Overview
CAUTION
When you use automatic caching for programs, be sure to restrict permissions on the shared folder
files to read-only access.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Managing Folders.
Managing Shares.
Adding a Share
Removing a Share
Modifying Share Properties
Setting Windows (CIFS) Sharing Properties
Setting NFS Sharing Properties
Setting FTP Sharing Properties
Setting Web Sharing Properties
Setting NetWare Sharing Properties
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
Network File System (NFS) Overview
With the NFS protocol, a server appliance can act as a Network File System (NFS) server.
Users can then share files in a mixed environment of computers, operating systems, and
networks.
Users on computers running NFS client software can access shares on the server appliance
by connecting, or mounting, those shares to their computers.
UNIX computers follow advisory locking for all lock requests. This means that the OS
does not enforce lock semantics on a file, and applications that check for the existence of
locks can use these locks effectively. However, the NFS Protocol implements mandatory
locks even for those locking requests that are received through NFS. This ensures that locks
acquired through NFS are visible through the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol and
to applications accessing the files locally. The OS enforces mandatory locks.
Related Topics
•
Adding a Share
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
187
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
File Transfer Protocol (FTP) Overview
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Removing a Share
Modifying Share Properties
Setting Windows (CIFS) Sharing Properties
Setting NFS Sharing Properties
Setting FTP Sharing Properties
Setting Web Sharing Properties
Setting NetWare Sharing Properties
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
File Transfer Protocol (FTP) Overview
File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is used to copy files between two computers on the Internet.
Both computers must support their respective FTP roles: one must be an FTP client and
the other an FTP server.
You can configure your server appliance to act as an FTP server. Client computers can
then access the server appliance with Windows® Explorer or an FTP command line
program, such as ftp.exe, by typing the URL in the address bar in the format
ftp://sitename/.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Adding a Share
Removing a Share
Modifying Share Properties
Setting Windows (CIFS) Sharing Properties
Setting NFS Sharing Properties
Setting FTP Sharing Properties
Setting Web Sharing Properties
Setting NetWare Sharing Properties
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
Web Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) Overview
The HTTP is the Internet protocol used by World Wide Web browsers and servers to
exchange information. The protocol defines what actions Web servers and browsers should
take in response to various commands, thus making it possible for a user to use a client
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
188
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
NetWare Sharing Protocol Overview
program to enter a URL, or choose a hyperlink, and retrieve text, graphics, sound, and
other digital information from a Web server. All URLs of files on Web servers begin with
http://.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Adding a Share
Removing a Share
Modifying Share Properties
Setting Windows (CIFS) Sharing Properties
Setting NFS Sharing Properties
Setting FTP Sharing Properties
Setting Web Sharing Properties
Setting NetWare Sharing Properties
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
NetWare Sharing Protocol Overview
You can use the NetWare sharing protocol to share volumes on your server appliance
powered by Microsoft® Windows® with NetWare clients.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
•
•
Setting Windows (CIFS) Sharing Properties
Setting NFS Sharing Properties
Setting FTP Sharing Properties
Setting Web Sharing Properties
Setting NetWare Sharing Properties
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
AppleTalk Protocol Overview
Microsoft Windows 2000 Server AppleTalk network integration allows you to share files
and printers among your server appliance and any Apple Macintosh clients that are
connected to your network.
With AppleTalk network integration, Macintosh computers need only the Macintosh OS
software to function as clients; no additional software is required.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
189
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Folders
AppleTalk network integration simplifies administration by maintaining just one set of user
accounts instead of separate user accounts, for example, one on the Macintosh server and
another on the computer running Windows 2000 Server.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
•
•
Setting Windows (CIFS) Sharing Properties
Setting NFS Sharing Properties
Setting FTP Sharing Properties
Setting Web Sharing Properties
Setting NetWare Sharing Properties
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
Managing Folders
The Volumes page allows you to open, or share, a number of network volumes. The page
displays an Object/Task Selector that has the following columns:
n
Volume Name: Lists each volume by name. To create, open, delete, or configure
the properties of a given volume, select the check box next to the name of the volume
you want to modify.
n
Total Size: Shows the total size of the volume.
n
Free Space: Shows the amount of free space available on the volume.
n
Share Type: Indicates the type of sharing in effect for the folder:
n
W = Windows (CIFS) Sharing
n
U = UNIX (NFS) Sharing
n
F = FTP Sharing
n
H = HTTP Sharing
n
A = AppleTalk Sharing
n
N = NetWare Sharing
The Object/Task Selector lists up to the first 100 folders found. To navigate among the list
of folders using the Object/Task Selector, you can search by the fields available in the
Search list, and then enter the search criteria in the box to the left of the Go button, or you
can scroll through the list. In addition, if there are more than 100 folders, you can view
folders in batches of 100 using the Page Up and Page Down buttons to the right of the Go
button.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
190
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Folders
Sharing Folders
To share folders
1.
From the Shares page, choose Folders.
2.
Select the volume(s) for which you want to share folders, and then choose Share in
the Tasks list.
3.
Type the information indicated by the prompts. For more information on completing
the property page for a particular file sharing method, see the specific Help file for
that sharing protocol.
To manage folders
1.
From the Shares page, choose Folders.
2.
Select the volume(s) for which you want to view or manage folders or shares, and
choose Open from the Tasks list.
3.
The Folders page allows you to create, open, delete, or configure a number of
network folders. The page displays an Object/Task Selector that has the following
columns:
n
Folder Name—Lists each folder by name.
n
Date Modified—Shows the date the folder was last modified.
n
Attributes—Shows any of the following folder attributes:
• R = Read only
• A = Ready for archiving
• H = Hidden
• C = Compressed
• S = System folder
n
Share Type—Indicates the type of sharing in effect for the folder.
4.
Select a folder, and then choose the task you want to perform in the Tasks list.
Navigating Through Folders
You have the following folder navigation options:
n
To navigate to the subdirectories of a root folder, select the root folder and then choose
Open in the Tasks list.
n
To navigate from a subdirectory to its parent, choose Up in the Tasks list.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
191
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Folders
If the root folders are already displayed in the Object/Task Selector, there is no
parent folder to choose.
To navigate among folders, use the Object/Task Selector to navigate among folders.
n
For every folder that has subfolders, there will be an Open task in the Tasks list.
n
For every folder that has a parent folder, there will be an Up task in the Tasks
list.
n
n
To navigate among folders
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Folders.
3.
Select the volume with which you want to work, and then choose Open.
4.
Select the folder you want.
5.
In the Tasks list, choose Open.
6.
Select the folder you want to navigate within, and then choose Open from the Tasks
list.
—OR—
7.
In the Tasks list, choose Up to return to the volume's root directory.
Adding a Folder
You can create as many new folders as you need on the server appliance.
To create a new folder
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Folders.
3.
Select the volume in which you want to work, and then choose Open.
4.
Select the folder to which you want to add a subfolder.
5.
Choose New in the Tasks list.
6.
On the General tab, type the name of the new folder in the Name box.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
192
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Folders
7.
Set the access attributes by selecting the appropriate check box.
8.
Optional: If you want to compress the contents of the new folder to save space, select
the Compress tab.
9.
Choose OK.
10.
The Object/Task Selector now includes the folder you added. If your new folder is
not immediately apparent in the table, scroll through the list to find it.
Removing a Folder
You can remove any folder(s) you have created on the server appliance.
To delete folders
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Folders.
3.
Use the Object/Task Selector to navigate to the folder from which you want to
remove the subfolder.
4.
Select the folder(s) you want to delete.
5.
In the Tasks list, choose Delete.
6.
Verify the folder indicated is the one you want to remove.
7.
Choose OK.
Opening a Folder
To open a folder
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Folders.
3.
Select the volume in which you want to work, and then choose Open.
4.
Select the folder you want to open.
5.
In the Task list, choose Open.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
193
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Folders
Modifying Folder Properties
From the Folder Properties page, you can set or change the folder name, get details about
the folder type, size, and location, as well as compress the data in a folder.
To change the name of a folder
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
From the Shares page, choose Folders.
3.
Use the Object/Task Selector to navigate to the directory containing the folder you
want to modify.
4.
Select the check box for the folder you want.
5.
In the Tasks list, choose Properties.
6.
Select the General tab, and then type the new folder name in the Name box.
7.
Choose OK.
To compress a folder
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
From the Shares page, choose Folders.
3.
Use the Object/Task Selector to navigate to the directory to which you want to add
the new folder.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Properties.
5.
Select the Compress tab, and then select the Compress contents of this folder to save
disk space check box.
6.
Select whether to either Apply changes to this folder only, or to Apply changes to this
folder, subfolders, and files.
7.
Choose OK.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
194
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Folders
Sharing a Folder
To share a folder
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Folders.
3.
Select the volume with which you want to work, and then choose Open.
4.
Navigate to the directory containing the folder you want to share.
5.
Select the folder to share.
6.
In the Tasks list, choose Share.
n
If the folder has not already been shared the New Share page will display.
n
If the folder has been shared, the Share Properties page will display.
n
If the folder has been shared under multiple names, select the Manage Share
task.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Adding a Folder
AppleTalk Sharing
FTP Sharing
Modifying Folder Properties
Navigating Among Folders
NetWare Sharing
NFS Sharing
Opening a Folder
Removing a Folder
Sharing a Folder
Sharing a Folder
Modifying Folder Properties
Web (HTTP) Sharing
Windows (CIFS) Sharing
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
195
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Shares
Managing Shares
The Shares management page allows you to create, open, delete, or configure a variety of
file shares. The Shares page displays an Object/Task Selector that has the following
columns:
n
Share Name: Lists each shared folder by name. To create, open, delete, or configure
the properties of a given share, select the check box next to the name(s) of the share
you want to modify or delete.
n
Share Path: Displays the share path.
n
Type: Indicates one of the following share types:
n
W = Windows (CIFS)
n
U = UNIX (NFS)
n
F = FTP
n
H = HTTP
n
Comment: Displays a brief description of the share, if you have provided one.
Use the Object/Task Selector to select a share, and then choose the task you want to
perform from the Tasks list
Adding a Share
To create a share, you must supply a share name that is unique across all shares and the
share path. Some protocols also support the inclusion of a comment or brief description of
the share. Additionally, you must enable at least one of the available protocols.
While a single user interface is provided to create a share for all protocols, in actuality, a
separate share is created for each protocol. You can remove individual sharing protocols
from a share, without removing the share itself. However, removing all sharing protocols
from a share will delete all versions of the share.
To add a share
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
On the Shares page, choose Shares.
3.
In the Tasks list, choose New.
4.
On the General tab, type the share name and share path.
5.
Select the appropriate check box(es) to specify which types of protocols you want to
enable.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
196
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Shares
6.
Use the protocol tabs to configure the specific properties of each type of share. CIFS
Share Properties
Removing a Share
You can remove shares entirely, or you can simply disable a given protocol. The result is
that access to the share is removed, yet the actual files remain on the server appliance.
To remove a share and all its protocols
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
On the Shares page, choose Shares.
3.
Select the share you want to remove.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Delete.
5.
Choose OK.
To remove specific protocols
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
On the Shares page, choose Shares.
3.
Select the share for which you want to modify properties.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Properties.
5.
Clear the check box(es) for the protocol(s) you want to remove from the share.
6.
Choose OK.
Modifying Share Properties
Use the Shares page to view and modify share properties.
To modify share properties
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
On the Shares page, choose Shares.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
197
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Shares
3.
Select the share for which the properties will be modified.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Properties. For instructions about how to set the sharing
properties for each protocol, select a link in the Related Topics list, below.
5.
Choose OK.
Setting Windows CIFS Share Properties
Windows client computers use the Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol to share
files. Use this page to change the number of users who have access to a share, change the
caching options relative to the share, and set or change user permissions.
In the User Limit section, you may choose to allow the maximum number of users, or you
may specify the number of connections that can be made at a given time.
To set the user limit
1.
Select the Maximum allowed button to allow as many people to log on to the server
appliance as it can handle.
—OR—
1.
Select the Allow users button, and then specify the number of users to allow.
2.
If you allow files to be cached in the shared folder, use the Setting list to specify the
caching option to use. The caching options are described in Windows (CIFS).
To set user or group permissions
You may also set permissions for users or groups who are granted or denied access to the
server appliance.
1. In the Add a user or group box, type the name of a user or group to add to the list of
permissions, or select a user from the list below it.
2.
You can select local users or local groups from the list.
n
To add domain users or domain groups you must type the account as <domain
name\user name> or <domain name\group name>.
3.
Choose Add.
4.
Use the Allow list to set the degree of control the users who are selected in the
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
198
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Shares
Permissions list will have over files on the server appliance.
n
Users may have no control, read-only access, change access, change and read
access, or full control.
5.
Use the Deny list to deny a level of control to the selected users and groups in the
Permissions list.
6.
To remove a user or group from the Permissions list, select the user or group in the
list, and then choose Remove.
7.
Choose OK.
Setting NFS Share Properties
Use this page to specify which NFS clients are granted access to each share. Access can be
granted or denied on the basis of client host name. Access can also be granted or denied on
the basis of client groups, where a client group contains one or more client host names.
To add a new NFS client or client group to a share
1.
Create a new client group as described in Adding NFS Client Groups.
2.
Follow the steps described in the following procedure to add an existing client or
client group.
To add an existing NFS client or client group
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
On the Shares page, choose Shares.
3.
Select the share for which you want to add an NFS client or client group.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Properties.
5.
Select the General tab.
6.
Select the Unix (NFS) check box.
7.
Select the NFS Sharing tab.
8.
Select the desired machine or group from the list on the left, or type an NFS client
computer name or IP address in the box on the right, and then choose Add.
9.
Select the degree of control the specified client can exercise over files in the share
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
199
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Shares
from the Type of access list.
10.
Choose OK.
To remove an NFS client
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
On the Shares page, choose Shares.
3.
Select the share for which you want to remove an NFS client or client group.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Properties.
5.
Select the General tab.
6.
Select the Unix (NFS) check box.
7.
Select the NFS Sharing tab.
8.
Select the desired client appliance or client group from the list in the center of the
page, and then choose Remove.
9.
Choose OK.
Setting FTP Share Properties
Use this page to specify which FTP clients are granted access to each share. Access can be
granted or denied on the basis of client host name.
To allow clients permission to an FTP share
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
On the Shares page, choose Shares.
3.
Select the share for which you want to add FTP client access, and then choose
Properties.
4.
Select the FTP tab, and then:
n
Select the Read check box to allow read access.
—OR—
n
Select the Write check box to allow write access.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
200
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Shares
•
5.
You may choose to allow read-only, write-only, or
read/write permissions.
Choose OK.
To log client visits to an FTP share
1.
On the primary navigation bar, Choose Shares.
2.
On the Shares page, choose Shares.
3.
Select the share for which you want to add FTP client access, and then choose
Properties.
4.
Select the FTP Sharing tab.
5.
Select the Log visits check box.
6.
Choose OK.
Setting Web HTTP Share Properties
Use this page to specify which HTTP clients are granted access to each share. Access can be
granted or denied on the basis of client host name. Access can also be granted or denied on
the basis of client groups, where a client group contains one or more client host names.
To allow clients permission to a Web share
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
On the Shares page, choose Shares.
3.
Select the share for which you want to add HTTP client access, and then choose
Properties.
4.
From the General tab, select the Web (HTTP) check box.
5.
Select the HTTP Sharing tab, and then:
n
Select the Read check box to allow read access.
—OR—
n
Select the Write check box to allow write access.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
201
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Shares
6.
Choose OK.
Setting NetWare Share Properties
Use these instructions to specify sharing properties for an existing Novel NetWare Share.
NOTE
If the share does not yet exist, create the share first by following the procedures in Adding A Novell
NetWare Share.
To set NetWare sharing properties
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
On the Shares page, choose Shares.
3.
Select the share for which you want to add NetWare client access, and then choose
Properties from the Tasks list. The Share Properties of user page appears.
4.
Click the NetWare Sharing tab. This opens a Terminal Services window.
5.
Click Yes to clear the warning message.
6.
Log into Windows 2000. The Shared Folders dialog box appears.
7.
In the Shared Folder pane, locate the share you wan to modify.
NOTE
Note that if a share is enabled for more than one protocol, there will be multiple shares with the
same name. Be sure to select the share for NetWare as shown in the Type column.
8.
Double click the share you want to modify. The </share name> Properties dialog box
appears.
9.
On the General tab, set the limit to the number of users.
10.
If you want to limit access, select the Share Permissions tab and either remove the
everyone group or modify its permissions (the default permission levels for
everyone allows full control of the share). Then add any users or groups for whom
you want to grant access.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
202
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Shares
11.
Click OK to accept the changes.
12.
Exit the Terminal Services session.
13.
Click OK on the Shared Folders page to complete your changes.
Setting AppleTalk Share Properties
Use these instructions to specify sharing properties for an existing AppleTalk share.
NOTE
Note that if the share does not exist, create the share first by following the procedures in Adding an
AppleTalk Share.
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
Use these instructions to specify sharing properties for an existing AppleTalk share.
NOTE
If the share does not yet exist, create the share first by following the procedures in Adding an Apple
Talk Share.
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
On the Shares page, choose Shares.
3.
Check the checkbox of the share for which you want to add AppleTalk client access,
and then choose Properties from the Tasks list. The Share Properties of
<sharename> page displays.
4.
Click the AppleTalk Sharing tab. This opens a Terminal Services window.
5.
Click Yes to clear the warning message.
6.
Log into Windows 2000. The Shared Folders dialog box displays.
7.
In the Shared Folder pane, locate the share you want to modify.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
203
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Shares
NOTE
If a share is enabled for more than one protocol, there will be shares with the same name. Be sure
to select the share for Macintosh (AppleTalk), as shown in the Type column.
8.
Double-click the share you want to modify. The <sharename> Properties dialog box
displays.
9.
On the General tab, set the User Limit to specify how many users can access the
share at one time.
10.
Set the SFM Volume Security Password if you want password authentication to
limit access to this share.
11.
Set the This volume is read-only checkbox to prohibit writing to this share.
12.
Set or clear the Guests can use this volume checkbox to enable or disable guest
access to this.
NOTE
If you enable the Guests can use this volume checkbox, you may also need to enable the Guest
user account. If the Guest user account is disabled, there will be no Guest to access your share.
13.
To set user and group access rights, select the Security tab and either remove the
everyone group or modify its permissions (the default permission levels for
everyone allows full access to the share). Then add any users or groups for whom
you want to grant access. For detailed Help, use the “?” help button at the top of the
dialog box.
14.
Click OK to accept your changes.
15.
Exit the Terminal Services session.
16.
Click OK on the Shared Folders page to complete your changes.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
Adding a Share
AppleTalk LAN Connection
AppleTalk Service Properties
Modifying Share Properties
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
204
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Sharing Protocols
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Removing a Share
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
Setting FTP Sharing Properties
Setting NetWare Sharing Properties
Setting NFS Sharing Properties
Setting UNIX (NFS) Sharing Properties
Setting Web Sharing Properties
Setting Windows (CIFS) Sharing Properties
Sharing Properties
Managing Sharing Protocols
The Sharing Protocols page allows you to enable, disable, stop, or configure relevant
network protocols. The Sharing Protocol page displays the Object/Task Selector with
the following columns:
n
Name: Lists each protocol by name. To enable, disable, or change the properties of a
given protocol, select the button next to the protocol you want to modify.
n
Status: Indicates that the protocol is Running, Stopped, or Paused.
n
Startup Type: Indicates whether the protocol should start automatically when the
server appliance boots, be invoked manually, or be disabled.
n
Description: Displays a brief description of the protocol.
n
Tasks: The Tasks list is located next to the Object/Task Selector. Use the Name
column of the Object/Task Selector to select a protocol. To perform a task, choose
the appropriate task from the Tasks list.
Enabling Sharing Protocols
Microsoft recommends that you enable only the necessary network protocols. Limiting the
number of enabled network protocols will enhance the performance of other network
protocols. Additionally, if a problem is encountered with a network or dial-up connection,
the system will attempt to establish connectivity by using every network protocol that is
installed and enabled. By only enabling the protocols that your system can use, the server
appliance can conserve resources and perform better.
To enable a sharing protocol
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
205
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Managing Sharing Protocols
3.
Select the protocol you want to enable.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Enable.
Related Topics
•
•
Configuring Protocol Properties
Disabling Protocols
Disabling Sharing Protocols
To disable sharing protocols
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select the protocol you want to disable.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Disable.
Related Topics
•
•
Configuring Protocol Properties
Enabling Protocols
Configuring Sharing Protocol Properties
Use the property page of the designated protocol to configure the desired network
protocols.
To configure network protocol properties
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select the protocol you want to configure.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Properties.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
206
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
NFS Sharing Protocol
NFS Sharing Protocol
Setting NFS Sharing Protocol
You can use the NFS Protocol option to configure the MaxAttach NAS 6000 to act as an
NFS server. The NFS Protocol allows users to share files in a mixed environment of
computers, operating systems, and networks.
You can use the NFS Protocol to manage NFS Client Groups, NFS Locking, and
NFS User and Group mappings. NFS Shares, however, are created from the Shares
section of the Web UI.
From the NFS Client Group page, you can create, delete, or edit NFS client groups.
To configure the NFS protocol
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select NFS Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Select the NFS configuration task you want.
Adding NFS Client Groups
To add an NFS client group
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select NFS Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Choose Client Groups.
5.
In the Tasks list, choose New.
6.
On the New NFS Client Group page, type the group name you want to add in the
Group name box.
7.
In the Client name or IP address box, type the computer name or IP address you
want to add to the group.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
207
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
NFS Sharing Protocol
8.
Choose Add.
9.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
Editing NFS Client Groups
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
Editing NFS Client Groups
To add members to an NFS client group
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select NFS Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Choose Client Groups.
5.
Select the group you want to edit.
6.
In the Tasks list, choose Edit.
7.
On the Edit NFS Client Group page, type the IP address or computer name of the
member to add to the group.
8.
Choose Add.
9.
Choose OK.
To remove members to an NFS client group
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select NFS Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Choose Client Groups.
5.
Select the group you want to edit.
6.
In the Tasks list, choose Edit.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
208
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
NFS Sharing Protocol
7.
On the Edit NFS Client Group page, select the IP address or computer name of
the member to remove from the group.
8.
Choose Remove.
9.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
Adding NFS Client Groups
Removing NFS Client Groups
Removing NFS Client Groups
To remove an NFS client group
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select NFS Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Choose Client Groups.
5.
Select the NFS Client Group(s) you want to remove.
6.
In the Tasks list, choose Delete.
7.
On the Delete NFS Client Group page, choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
Adding NFS Client Groups
Editing NFS Client Groups
Setting NFS Locks
NFS locks allow a process to have exclusive access to all or part of a file. File locking is
implemented both on the server appliance and the client. When a file is locked, the buffer
cache is not used for that file, and each write request is immediately sent to the server.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
209
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
NFS Protocol with User and Group Mappings
After a system failure, when the server appliance is restarted, the server appliance attempts
to restore the file lock status to the previous condition. If the client fails, the server
appliance releases the file lock. However, after the client restarts it has a short period of
time to reclaim the file lock.
To manage NFS locks
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select NFS Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Choose Locks.
5.
Optional: In the Current locks list, select the client whose locks you want to
release.
6.
Optional: In the Wait period box, type the number of seconds after restarting that
the server appliance waits to re-establish a file lock with a client.
7.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
NFS Client Groups
Managing NFS Locks
User and Group Mappings
Shares
NFS Protocol with User and Group Mappings
Setting NFS User and Group Mappings
To provide security for server appliance files accessed from a UNIX environment, the NFS
protocol requires the system administrator to map UNIX user or group accounts to their
twin accounts on the server appliance. Users then have equivalent access rights under
UNIX as they have under Microsoft Windows. Alternatively, Web sites with less stringent
security needs can bypass the mapping procedure and treat all UNIX users as anonymous
users.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
210
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
NFS Protocol with User and Group Mappings
User And Group Mappings lets you create maps between Windows and UNIX user and
group accounts even though the user and group names in both environments may not be
identical. Perhaps most important, User and Group Mappings lets you maintain a single
mapping database for the entire enterprise.
You can use simple maps, which map Windows and UNIX accounts with identical names.
You can also create advanced maps to associate Windows and UNIX accounts with
different names, which you can use in conjunction with simple maps. Furthermore, with
User and Group Mappings, you can obtain UNIX user, password, and group
information from one or more network information protocol (NIS) servers, or from
imported password and group files.
To map NFS users and groups
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select NFS Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Choose User and Group Mappings.
To configure for using an NFS server
1.
On the General tab, select the Use NIS server button.
2.
In the NIS domain box, type the name of the domain from which the UNIX user
and group information is obtained.
3.
Optionally: in the NIS server (optional) box, type the name of the server you want
to map.
4.
To specify the length of time the server appliance waits to refresh the user and group
information, type the time in the Hours and Minutes boxes.
5.
Choose OK.
To configure for using password and group files
1.
Select the Use password and group files button.
2.
In the Password file box, type the name of the password file to use.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
211
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
NFS Protocol with User and Group Mappings
3.
This is a passwd format file from a UNIX system containing all the UNIX user
accounts that could be mapped.
4.
In the Group file box, type the name of the group file you want to use.
5.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
•
Enabling Simple Maps
Configuring Explicit User Maps
Configuring Explicit Group Maps
Enabling Simple NFS Maps
If enabled, simple maps create automatic mappings between UNIX users and Microsoft
Windows users that share the same user name. In a simple user map, users in a Windows
domain are implicitly mapped one-to-one to UNIX users on the basis of user name. When
the Windows domain and the UNIX passwd and group files or NIS domain are identified,
the simple maps function maps users who have the same name in the Windows and UNIX
or NIS domain. If no match exists for a user name in either place, that user is not mapped.
NOTE
To access this page you must have typed a valid NIS server name on the General tab.
To enable simple NFS maps
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select NFS Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Choose User and Group Mappings.
5.
Select the Simple Maps tab.
6.
Select the Enable simple maps check box.
7.
On the Windows domain list, select the server appliance name, or the domain to
which the server appliance belongs.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
212
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
NFS Protocol with User and Group Mappings
8.
If you select the server appliance name, the local users and groups will be mapped.
9.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
Related Topics
Configuring User and Group Mappings
Configuring Explicit User Maps
Configuring Explicit Group Maps
Configuring Explicit User NFS Maps
User and Group mapping lets you create inter-platform and cross-platform maps among
Microsoft Windows and UNIX user and group accounts, even when the user and group
names in both environments are not identical.
User and Group mapping also lets you set up one-to-one inter-platform and
cross-platform mappings among Windows and UNIX users and groups. For example, a
Windows user name could be mapped to a UNIX user name, or a UNIX group could be
mapped to one or more Windows user accounts. Explicit user maps can also be used when
the same person has different user names on Windows and UNIX accounts. Using the
Explicit User Maps option lets you maintain a single mapping database for the entire
enterprise.
To create explicit user NFS maps
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select NFS Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Choose User and Group Mappings.
5.
Fill out the General tab, making sure you have either supplied a NIS Domain or
PCNFS passwd and group files.
NOTE
For more information on filling out the General tab, see Configuring User and Group Mappings.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
213
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
NFS Protocol with User and Group Mappings
6.
Select the Explicit User Mapping tab.
7.
Optionally: Enter the name of the NIS server to map to in the NIS domain field.
8.
Choose the List UNIX Users button to populate the Unix users box.
9.
Select a user from each group, and then choose Add.
The mapped users will appear in the Explicitly mapped users box. If you wish to map to
a DOMAIN user, you must enter the DOMAIN\user name, select a UNIX user, and then
the add button next to the DOMAIN\user entry box
NOTE
You can map users from one Windows domain to more than one UNIX domain, but cannot map a
UNIX user to multiple Windows users.
To set one of the NFS mappings as primary for a given user
1.
Select the mapping from the Explicitly mapped users list.
2.
Choose Set primary.
3.
Choose OK.
To delete explicit user maps
1.
Follow steps 1-4 in the To create explicit user maps procedure to navigate to the
Explicit User Maps page.
2.
In the Explicitly mapped users list, select the user mapping you want to delete.
3.
Choose Remove.
4.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
•
Configuring User and Group Mappings
Enabling Simple Maps
Configuring Explicit Group Maps
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
214
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
NFS Protocol with User and Group Mappings
Configuring Explicit Group Maps
User and Group mapping lets you create inter-platform and cross-platform maps among
Microsoft Windows and UNIX user and group accounts even when the user and group
names in both environments are not identical.
User and Group mapping also lets you set up one-to-one mappings between Windows
users and UNIX users and groups. For example, a Windows user name could be mapped to
a UNIX user name, or a UNIX group could be mapped to one or more Windows user
accounts. Explicit maps can also be used when the same person has different user names on
Windows and UNIX accounts. Using the Explicit Group Maps option lets you maintain
a single mapping database for the entire enterprise.
To create explicit group maps
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select NFS Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Choose User and Group Mappings.
5.
Fill out the General tab, making sure you have either supplied a NIS Domain or
PCNFS passwd and group files.
n
For more information on filling out the General tab, see Configuring User and
Group Mappings.
6.
Select the Explicit Group Maps tab.
7.
Optionally: Enter the name of the NIS server to map to in the NIS domain field.
8.
To populate the UNIX groups list, choose the List UNIX Groups button.
9.
Select a group from each group, and then choose Add.
10.
The mapped groups will appear in the Explicitly mapped groups box. If you wish
to map to a DOMAIN group, you must enter the DOMAIN\group name, select a
UNIX group, and then the add button next to the DOMAIN\group entry box
NOTE
You can map groups from one Windows domain to more than one UNIX domain, but not the
reverse.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
215
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
FTP Sharing Protocol
To set one of the mappings as the primary maps for a given group
1.
Select the mapping from the Explicitly mapped groups list.
2.
Choose Set Primary.
3.
Choose OK.
To delete explicit group maps
1.
Follow steps 1-4 from the To create explicit group maps procedure to navigate
to the Explicit Group Maps page.
2.
In the Explicitly mapped groups list, select the group mapping you want to delete.
3.
Choose Remove.
4.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
•
Configuring User and Group Mappings
Enabling Simple Maps
Configuring Explicit User Maps
FTP Sharing Protocol
Setting FTP Sharing Protocol
File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is used to copy files between two computers on the Internet.
Both computers must support their respective FTP roles: one must be an FTP client and
the other an FTP server.
You can configure your server appliance to act as an FTP server. Client computers can
then access the server appliance with Windows® Explorer or an FTP command line
program, such as ftp.exe, by typing the URL in the address bar in the format
ftp://sitename/.
The File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is integrated with the Windows security model. Users
connecting using FTP are authenticated based on the user accounts on the Windows
Powered server appliance. They receive access based on those user profiles. Keep in mind,
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
216
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
FTP Sharing Protocol
however, that the FTP server relies on the ability to send user passwords over the network
without data encryption. As a result, a user with physical access to the network could
examine user passwords during the FTP validation process.
FTP supports all Microsoft Windows FTP client commands, when a server appliance is
running FTP, other computers using the FTP utility can connect to the server and transfer
files. On the other hand, non-Microsoft versions of FTP clients might contain commands
that are not supported by the FTP server protocol.
Enabling FTP Logging
You can log incoming FTP connections to the FTP log by enabling FTP Logging. By
default, FTP logs are stored by in %windir%\system32\logfiles\msftpsvc1.
Administrators can access these files from their workstation by either accessing an
administrative share—for example, \\appliancename\admin$\winnt\system32—or by
creating a new share for this folder.
To enable FTP logging
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select FTP Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Select the Logging tab.
5.
Select the Enable logging check box, and then choose OK.
Related Topics
•
For more information about FTP anonymous access, see
FTP Anonymous Access. For more information about
adding FTP messages, see Adding
Enabling FTP Anonymous Access
To enable FTP Anonymous
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
217
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
FTP Sharing Protocol
3.
Select FTP Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Select the Anonymous Access tab.
5.
Select the Enable Anonymous Access check box, and then choose OK.
Disabling FTP Anonymous Access
To disable FTP anonymous
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select FTP Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Select the Anonymous Access tab.
5.
Clear the Enable Anonymous Access check box, and then choose OK.
Adding Custom FTP Messages
You can create customized welcome and exit messages that are sent to users when they
connect or disconnect from the server appliance.
To add custom messages
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select FTP Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Select the Messages tab.
5.
In the Welcome message box, type the message that will greet users when they
connect to the server appliance.
6.
In the Exit message box, type the message that will appear when users disconnect
from the server appliance.
7.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
218
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
Web HTTP Sharing Protocol
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
FTP Anonymous Access
Adding a Share
Removing a Share
Modifying Share Properties
Setting Windows (CIFS) Sharing Properties
Setting NFS Sharing Properties
Setting FTP Sharing Properties
Setting Web Sharing Properties
Setting NetWare Sharing Properties
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
Web HTTP Sharing Protocol
Setting Web HTTP Sharing Protocol
The HTTP is the Internet protocol used by World Wide Web browsers and servers to
exchange information. The protocol defines what actions Web servers and browsers should
take in response to various commands, thus making it possible for a user to use a client
program to enter a URL, or choose a hyperlink, and retrieve text, graphics, sound, and
other digital information from a Web server. All URLs of files on Web servers begin with
http://.
The hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) is a communications protocol designed to transfer
hypertext documents between computers over the Web. HTTP defines what actions Web
servers and browsers should take in response to various commands.
The commands used by the Web are defined in HTTP.
To specify the location of a resource, HTTP uses Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).
URLs follow a naming convention that uniquely identifies the location of a computer,
directory, or file on the Internet. The URL also specifies the Internet protocol—FTP,
HTTP, for example— needed to retrieve the resource. If you know the URL of a
resource, you can provide the URL, or you can link to it from a document you want to
make available to Web users.
The HTTP protocol supports anonymous access, as well as basic and Windows
authentication.
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
219
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
NetWare Sharing Protocol
To configure Web (HTTP) sharing properties
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Shares.
2.
Choose Sharing Protocols.
3.
Select HTTP Protocol, and then choose Properties.
4.
Choose to allow all IP address to access data shares on the server appliance, or select a
single IP address from the list.
5.
Type the port number that can be used to access data shares on the appliance. The
default port number is 80.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
For more information about HTTP, see Web (HTTP).
For more information about HTTP share properties, see
Web (HTTP) Sharing.
Adding a Share
Removing a Share
Modifying Share Properties
Setting Windows (CIFS) Sharing Properties
Setting NFS Sharing Properties
Setting FTP Sharing Properties
Setting Web Sharing Properties
Setting NetWare Sharing Properties
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
NetWare Sharing Protocol
Setting NetWare Sharing Protocol
You can use the NetWare sharing protocol to share volumes on your server appliance
powered by Microsoft® Windows® with NetWare clients.
Related Topics
•
•
Setting Windows (CIFS) Sharing Properties
Setting NFS Sharing Properties
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
220
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
AppleTalk Sharing Protocol
•
•
•
•
Setting FTP Sharing Properties
Setting Web Sharing Properties
Setting NetWare Sharing Properties
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
AppleTalk Sharing Protocol
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Protocol
Microsoft Windows 2000 Server AppleTalk network integration allows you to share files
and printers among your server appliance and any Apple Macintosh clients that are
connected to your network.
With AppleTalk network integration, Macintosh computers need only the Macintosh OS
software to function as clients; no additional software is required.
AppleTalk network integration simplifies administration by maintaining just one set of user
accounts instead of separate user accounts, for example, one on the Macintosh server and
another on the computer running Windows 2000 Server.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
•
Enabling Protocols
Setting NFS Sharing Properties
Setting FTP Sharing Properties
Setting NetWare Sharing Properties
Setting AppleTalk Sharing Properties
Chapter #8 - O/S 2.0 - Folders and Shares
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
221
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and
Groups
Chapter Outline
n
n
Manage Local Users
n
Adding a User Account
n
Enabling the Guest Account
n
Removing a User Account
n
Setting a User Password
n
Modifying User Properties
Manage Local Groups
n
Adding a Group Account
n
Removing a Group Account
n
Modifying Group Properties
Users and Groups
From this page you can create, edit, and delete local users and groups on the server
appliance. You can also change the members of each group. If the server appliance is a
member of a domain, you will not want to create any users on the server appliance itself.
The primary purpose of this page is to add one or more domain members to the local
group.
You may also want to use domain user and group accounts to control access to resources
on the server appliance. You may also want to use domain management tools to manage
domain users and domain groups.
Related Topics
•
•
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
Manage Local Users
Manage Local Groups
222
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
Manage Local Users
Manage Local Users
A local user or group account is an account that exists on the server appliance itself and
grants users or groups access to its resources. The server appliance can also be configured to
grant access to domain users and groups. Domain users and groups are those that exist in a
Microsoft® Windows NT® 4 or Microsoft® Active Directory™ domain. You can add
local users, domain users, and domain groups to local groups.
Users and groups are important in Microsoft Windows® Powered security because you can
assign permissions to limit the ability of users and groups to perform certain actions. A
permission is a rule associated with an object, usually a file, folder, or share, that regulates
which users, and in what manner those users can access the object. Any local or domain
user who is a member of the local administrator group on the server appliance has
administrative privileges on the server appliance. Likewise, any user who is a member of a
group that has been assigned to the administrator group on the local computer has
administrative privileges for that computer. For example, you could assign the TeamLeads
groups, consisting of Tom, Mary, Hazel, and Jim to the administrative group on the server
appliance. Each of the TeamLeads group members would then have administrative
privileges on the server appliance.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
Adding a User Account
Removing a User Account
Setting a User Password
Modifying User Properties
Adding a User Account
When you add a user account, you should include a user name, the user's full name, a brief
description of the account, and an account password.
Keep in mind that user names must be unique, and must not duplicate the name of any
existing group.
Other limitations exist on user names:
n
A user name cannot be identical to any other user or group name on the computer
being administered.
n
A user name can contain up to 20 uppercase or lowercase characters except for the
following: " / \ [ ] : ; | = , + ? < >.
n
Additionally, a user name cannot consist solely of periods (.) or spaces.
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
223
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
Manage Local Users
In the Password and Confirm password boxes, you can type a password containing up to
127 characters.
NOTE
If you are using Microsoft® Windows® 2000 on a network that also has computers using Microsoft
Windows 95 or Microsoft Windows 98, consider using passwords that contain fewer than 14
characters. Windows 95 and Windows 98 support passwords that contain up to 14 characters. If
your password is longer, you may not be able to log on to your network from those computers.
The only new users you should add to the administrators group are those that will be solely
performing administrative tasks.
To add a user account
1.
From the primary navigation bar, choose Users.
2.
From the Users page, choose Local Users.
3.
In the Tasks list, choose New.
4.
Type the information for the new user account.
5.
The Home Directory field specifies a new directory which will be created, and to
which the user will have exclusive access permission. The directory name is the same
as user name defined above, and will be located in the path specified.
6.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
•
Removing a User Account
Setting a User Password
Modifying User Properties
Enabling the Guest Account
By default, the guest account is disabled. For workgroups that have Windows 95 and
Windows 98 client computers, enabling the guest account is the quickest way to provide
access to resources on a server appliance. By enabling the guest account, however, any user
connected to the network will have access to resources on the appliance. An alternative is
to create a user account for every user on the network.
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
224
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
Manage Local Users
To enable the guest account
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Users.
2.
Choose Local Users.
3.
In the Name column, select Guest.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Properties.
5.
On the General tab, clear the Disable this user account check box.
6.
Choose OK.
Removing a User Account
With the exception of the last remaining account and your personal account, you can
remove all user accounts that you have created on the Microsoft Windows Powered
appliance. In addition, you can remove multiple user accounts at once. However, if you
remove the only user account on the server appliance, security is disabled.
When removing user accounts, keep the following guidelines in mind:
n
Built-in users cannot be deleted.
n
A deleted user cannot be recovered.
If you delete a user account and then create another user account with the same user name,
you must set new permissions for the new user; the new user will not inherit the
permissions that were granted to the old user.
To remove user accounts
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Users.
2.
Choose Local Users.
3.
Select the user account(s) you want to remove.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Delete.
5.
Verify you want to delete the indicated user account(s), and then choose OK.
Related Topics
•
Adding a User Account
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
225
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
Manage Local Users
•
•
Setting a User Password
Modifying User Properties
Setting a User Password
This allows you to change the user’s password for their account, usually in cases where they
have lost or forgotten it.
To set the user password
1.
From the primary navigation bar, choose Users.
2.
Choose Local Users.
3.
Select the user account for which you want to change the password.
4.
In the Tasks List, choose Set a Password.
5.
Type the new password, and then confirm it in the boxes provided.
6.
The new password must conform to any password complexity rules in effect for the
domain to which the server appliance belongs.
7.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
•
Adding a User Account
Removing a User Account
Modifying User Properties
Modifying User Properties
User properties include the user name, full name, and description. From the user's
Properties page, you can also enable or disable a user account. Furthermore, you can also
change the properties of several user accounts at once by selecting all the accounts you wish
to modify before opening the Properties page.
To access user properties
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Users.
2.
Choose Local Users.
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
226
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
Manage Local Users
3.
Select the user account(s) you want to modify.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Properties.
5.
Change the user properties you want.
n
The Home Directory field specifies a new directory which will be created, and
to which the user will have exclusive access permission.
n
The directory name is the same as user name defined above, and will be located
in the path specified.
6.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
•
Adding a User Account
Removing a User Account
Setting a User Password
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
227
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
Manage Local Groups
Manage Local Groups
A local user or group account is an account that exists on the server appliance itself and
grants users or groups access to its resources. The server appliance can also be configured to
grant access to domain users and groups. Domain users and groups are those that exist in a
Microsoft® Windows NT® 4 or Microsoft® Active Directory™ domain. You can add
local users, domain users, and domain groups to local groups.
Users and groups are important in Microsoft Windows Powered security because you can
limit the ability of users and groups to perform certain actions by assigning them
permissions. A permission is a rule associated with an object, usually a file, folder, or share,
that regulates which users can access the object and in what manner. Any local or domain
user who is a member of the local administrator group on the server appliance has
administrative privileges for the server appliance.
Likewise, any member of a group that has been assigned to the administrator group on the
local computer has administrative privileges for that computer.
For example, you could assign the TeamLeads group, consisting of Tom, Mary, Hazel, and
Jim to the administrative group on the server appliance. Each of these TeamLeads group
members would then have administrative privileges on the server appliance.
Related Topics
•
•
•
Adding a Group Account
Removing a Group Account
Modifying Group Properties
Adding a Group Account
To add a group account
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Users.
2.
Choose Local Groups.
3.
In the Tasks list, choose New.
4.
On the General tab, type the name and description of the group you want to add.
5.
On the Members tab:
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
228
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
Manage Local Groups
n
To add members to the group, select a user or group to add from the Add user
or group box, and then choose Add.
NOTE
Note Only local users are displayed in the list. To enter a domain user account, type the domain and
user name (<domain\user name>)
n
6.
To remove members from the group, select a member or group from the
Members box, and then choose Remove.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
Removing a Group Account.
Modifying Group Properties.
Removing a Group Account
You can remove any group account that you have created. A group account that has been
removed, however, cannot be re-created. Notably, you can remove several group accounts
at once by selecting all the group account prior to launching the Delete task.
To remove a user account
1.
From the primary navigation bar, choose Users.
2.
Choose Local Groups.
3.
Select the group account(s) you wish to remove.
4.
In the Tasks list, choose Delete.
5.
Verify that the group identified is the group account you want to delete, and then
choose OK.
Related Topics
•
For more information about adding a group account, see
Adding a Group Account.
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
229
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
Manage Local Groups
•
For more information about modifying group properties,
see Modifying Group Properties.
Modifying Group Properties
The Group Properties page displays the General tab and the Members tab. Use the General
tab to set or modify the group name and description. Use the Members tab to add or
remove users and groups.
To set or modify a group name or description
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Users.
2.
Choose Local Groups.
3.
Select the group account you want to modify.
4.
In the Tasks list, Choose Properties.
5.
On the General tab, type a name and description of the desired group.
6.
Choose OK.
To set or modify group membership
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Users.
2.
Choose Local Groups.
3.
Select the group account you want to modify.
4.
In the Task list, choose Properties, and then select the Members tab.
To add a new member:
1.
In the Add user or group box, select a local user or group from the list, and then
2.
Choose the Add button.
—OR—
1.
Type the domain and group name (<domain\group name>) of a domain group, or a
domain user account (<domain\user name>) and then
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
230
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
Manage Local Groups
2.
Choose Add.
NOTE
If you are adding Domain\Group, however, you must also enter credentials that will allow for the
addition from that domain.
To remove a member
1.
Select a user name from the Members list, and then
2.
Choose Remove.
3.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
Adding a Group Account.
Removing a Group Account.
Chapter #9 - O/S 2.0 - Users and Groups
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
231
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 Maintenance
Chapter Outline
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
Updating software
Setting date and time
Shutdown
Logs
n
Managing application logs
n
Managing FTP logs
n
Managing NFS logs
n
System log
n
Security log
n
Managing Web HTTP shares logs
n
Managing web administration logs
n
Clear log files
n
downloading log files
n
Modifying log properties
n
View log entry details
Backup
Terminal services
Alert email
Language
Add/remove programs
Computer management
System recovery option
Session timeout
Re-image system drive
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
232
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Software Update
Software Update
Use this page to apply software updates to your server appliance.
To update the software
1.
From the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Software Update.
3.
Follow the Software Update Wizard prompts
Setting Date and Time
Using the Date/Time page, you can set the date, time, and time zone used by the server
appliance.
To set the date, time, and time zone
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Date/Time.
3.
Type the date and time in the format defined by the default language selected in your
browser.
4.
Select the appropriate time zone from the list.
5.
You can also automatically adjust the server appliance for daylight saving changes,
which is recommended.
6.
Choose OK.
Shutting Down the System
Use this page to shut down, restart, or to schedule a shutdown or restart of the server
appliance.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
233
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Add or Remove Programs
To shut down or restart the system
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Shutdown.
3.
Choose the task you want to perform.
4.
Choose OK to confirm your decision.
5.
If you have chosen to restart the server appliance, the Restarting page will display.
NOTE
The Restarting page checks periodically to determine whether the appliance is back online. If the
Restarting page detects that the appliance is online, it automatically returns to the default page.
To schedule a shutdown or restart
1.
From the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Shutdown.
3.
Choose Scheduled Shutdown.
4.
Choose the scheduled shutdown settings you want.
5.
Choose OK.
NOTE
To cancel a currently-scheduled event, select the No scheduled shutdown or restart button.
Add or Remove Programs
The MaxAttach provides Web user interface access to the Windows 2000 Add/Remove
Programs applet in the Control Panel. You can use this applet to install or remove a
program or driver.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
234
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Add or Remove Programs
NOTE
Do not remove or change any system software that was provided with the server by Maxtor unless
directed to do so by Maxtor Customer Support.
To remove a program
1.
Using Internet Explorer, log in to the MaxAttach NAS 6000 as administrator.
2.
Click Maintenance.
3.
Select Add/Remove Programs. This opens a terminal services session.
4.
Log in to Windows 2000. The Add/Remove Programs dialog box displays.
5.
Select the program you want to remove from the list. Note: do not remove system
programs provided by Maxtor unless directed to do so by Maxtor Customer Support.
6.
Click the Change/Remove button for the chosen program.
7.
The Add/Remove applet removes the program. Follow the on screen instructions to
complete your task.
To add a program or driver
1.
From Internet Explorer, log in to your MaxAttach NAS 6000 as administrator.
2.
Create a share on a convenient drive. This share will hold your new software (when
creating the share, check to see if there is enough disk space to hold the contents of
the new software). For convenience, you can map this share to a drive on your client
machine.
3.
On your client machine, insert the new program’s CD or floppy into the appropriate
drive.
4.
Copy the contents of the CD or floppy to the share you created on the MaxAttach.
5.
Using Internet Explorer, log in to the MaxAttach as administrator.
6.
Click Maintenance on the main menu bar.
7.
Select Terminal Services. This starts a terminal services session.
8.
Log in to Windows 2000.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
235
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Automatic System Backup Schedule
9.
Navigate to the share that has the new software.
10.
Run the new program’s Setup (or do whatever is required to install the new
program).
11.
When the installation program is finished, you can remove the share that you created,
as it is no longer needed.
Automatic System Backup Schedule
By default, automatic system backup is scheduled for once each week, beginning at 2:00
AM on Saturdays. The backup copy can be used to recover from a boot failover. To
change this schedule or to disable automatic system backup, see Automatic System Backup
Schedule.
Changing the Automatic Backup Schedule
To change the automatic backup schedule
1.
Log in to the Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 as administrator.
2.
Click Maintenance on the main menu bar.
3.
Select Terminal Services. A terminal services session starts.
4.
Log in to Windows 2000.
5.
On the Windows Start menu, select Settings > Control Panel. The control panel
displays.
6.
Double-click the Scheduled Tasks icon. This opens the scheduler.
7.
Right-click BackupMaxAttach6000.bat and select Properties.
8.
On the Schedule tab, enter the new schedule parameters
9.
Click OK.
Disabling the Automatic Backup Schedule
To disable the automatic backup schedule
1.
Log in to the MaxAttach NAS 6000 as administrator.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
236
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Manual Back Up
2.
Click Maintenance on the main menu bar.
3.
Select Terminal Services. A terminal services session starts.
4.
Log in to Windows 2000.
5.
On the Windows Start menu, select Settings > Control Panel. The control panel
displays.
6.
Double-click the Scheduled Tasks icon. This opens the scheduler.
7.
Right-click BackupMaxAttach6000.bat and select Properties.
8.
On the Schedule tab, clear the Enabled (scheduled task runs at specified time)
checkbox.
9.
Click OK.
Manual Back Up
You can back up the MaxAttach NAS 6000 system before its scheduled time, for example,
if you are about to make changes to the system and want to make a backup before you
begin.
To immediately back up the system
1.
Log in to the MaxAttach NAS 6000 as administrator.
2.
Click Maintenance on the main menu bar.
3.
Select Terminal Services. A terminal services session starts.
4.
Log in to Windows 2000.
5.
On the Windows Start menu, select Run.
6.
Type the following in the Run field: D:\backupmaxattach6000. The backup
program runs, displaying various dialog boxes and messages. No user intervention is
required.
7.
When the program completes, exit from terminal services.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
237
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Re-Image System Drive
Re-Image System Drive
The Re-Image System Drive page lets you copy a backup image of the operating system to
the boot drive, restoring the operating system and other system software to an earlier state.
WARNING
Using this feature will overwrite the current operating system and will erase all current
configuration information. Use this feature with care!
In the Select an image to write to the system (boot) drive section, select an option by
clicking its radio button:
n
Original factory-shipped image - select this option to restore the system software from a
copy of the original system that was shipped from the factory. Note that all changes
made since the system was first put into service will be lost.
n
Most recently saved system image - select this option to restore the system software
from its most recent backup copy. In the default configuration, the backup copy of the
system on drive D: is automatically refreshed from the C: drive once per week. Note
that this copy may be up to one week old and may not reflect recent changes.
n
Click OK to write the selected image to the system (boot) drive.
Set Session Timeout
The session timeout feature is designed to prevent unauthorized access to the server if the
administrator leaves his or her computer unattended while logged on to the MaxAttach.
When the timeout interval expires, the user is automatically logged out.
NOTE
This feature requires Internet Explorer 5.5 or later on the client computer.
You can set the timeout interval to a longer interval to prevent unwanted time-outs while
you are performing server maintenance or configuration, or a shorter interval to improve
security.
Maxtor recommends that you keep the interval as short as practical to enhance system
security. If you set a long time interval temporarily, remember to return it to a low value to
restore its protective function. The default timeout is 10 minutes.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
238
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Setting Alert E-Mail
To set the session timeout interval
1.
Using Internet Explorer, log in to the MaxAttach as administrator.
2.
Click Maintenance.
3.
Select Session Timeout. This opens the Session Timeout page.
4.
In the Session Timeout Interval field, type the number of minutes you want to the
system to wait before it automatically logs out. The timeout range is from 1 minute
to 1440 minutes (one day). If you want to deactivate the timer, enter 0.
5.
Click OK.
Setting Alert E-Mail
Your server appliance can be configured to generate an automatic e-mail notification when
an alert is raised. You can choose to be notified when any type of alert is raised or only for
specific alert types, such as informational, warning, or critical alerts.
This feature uses the SMTP service in the server appliance to send e-mail. In a normal
Internet environment, you do not need to configure an SMTP gateway. However, to send
e-mail to Microsoft® Exchange Server or Lotus Notes, you need to provide the name of
the specific SMTP gateway. You must put the SMTP gateway server name, or IP address,
in the SMTP server field in the Web user interface (UI). Contact your Microsoft Exchange
administrator for the server name of the SMTP gateway.
To set the alert e-mail feature
1.
From the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Alert E-Mail.
3.
Select the Disable sending alert e-mail button.
- OR 1.
Select the Enable sending alert e-mail button, and then select the check boxes for the
circumstances under which you want alert e-mail to be sent.
2.
In the To box, type the system administrator’s e-mail address.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
239
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Backing up and Restoring the O/S
n
You may have alert e-mail sent to multiple addresses, simply type the addresses
into the To box, separated by a comma.
3.
In the With box, type the SMTP gateway name or IP address of the SMTP server.
4.
To test the settings, choose Test.
n
After clicking the Test button, test e-mail will be sent.
n
If the SMTP service is not installed on your computer, or there is no network
cable, you will receive the error message “Test e-mail cannot be sent out.”
n
If you do not receive the test e-mail at all, even though the message “Test
e-mail has been sent out. Please check administrator’s mailbox” has been
displayed in the Web UI, the error has most likely been caused by the SMTP
server.
n
To clear this error, reset the SMTP server name.
5.
Choose OK.
Backing up and Restoring the O/S
From this page you can choose to back up or restore the operating system (O/S).
To back up or restore the OS
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Backup.
3.
Logon to Terminal Services Advanced Client. The backup application will start
automatically.
4.
When you are finished, close the application by clicking the X in the upper right
hand corner. This will log you off from the Terminal Services Advanced Client.
NOTE
It may take a few moments for the session to log off when closing the application.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
240
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Terminal Services Client
Terminal Services Client
Terminal Services Client is the tool used to back up and restore the server appliance
operating system. It supports only two concurrent connections. Additionally, if you
navigate to another page during an open session, the client will be disconnected but the
session will be preserved. This can prevent other users from accessing a Terminal Services
session.
With the 32-bit Terminal Services Client you can access a server running Terminal
Services and do any of the following:
n
Connect to Terminal Services.
n
Check the Terminal Services Client number.
n
Use short cut keys
n
Cut and paste from the Terminal Services Client window into an application running
locally.
n
Print to your local printer from applications running on the Terminal server.
n
Cut and paste from the Terminal Services Client window into an application running
locally.
n
Print to your local printer from applications running on the Terminal server.
n
Disconnect without ending a session.
n
Disconnect and end a session.
NOTE
Once connected to Terminal Services, additional help is available on the server. Click Start and then
click Help. In the table of contents, click Client Services and then click Terminal Services.
To connect to Terminal Services
1.
Click Start, point to Programs, point to Terminal Services Client, and click Terminal
Services Client.
2.
In Server, type a Terminal server name or TCP\IP address or select a server from the
list of Available servers.
3.
In Screen area, select the screen resolution for the Terminal server window.
4.
If you are connecting using a modem or a slow network, click Use data compression.
5.
If you would like to have commonly used bitmaps stored on your local hard drive,
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
241
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Terminal Services Client
select Cache bitmaps to disk.
6.
Click Connect.
7.
The Log On to Windows dialog box will appear within the Terminal Services Client
window.
8.
Type your user name, password, and domain (if required).
NOTE
If you previously disconnected from a Terminal server without ending the session, the Terminal
Services Client reconnects to that session (if the connection is configured for the re-connection of
disconnected sessions).
To check the Terminal Services Client version
1.
Click Start, point to Programs, point to Terminal Services Client, and click Terminal
Services Client.
2.
Click About.
To use shortcut keys
The following shortcut keys are available from a Terminal Services Client:
n
CTRL+ALT+END: Opens the Windows Security dialog box.
n
ALT+PAGE UP: Switches between programs from left to right.
n
ALT+PAGE DOWN: Switches between programs from right to left.
n
ALT+INSERT: Cycles through the programs in the order they were started.
n
ALT+HOME: Displays the Start menu.
n
CTRL+ALT+BREAK: Switches the client between a window (if applicable) and a
full screen.
n
ALT+DELETE: Displays the window’s pop-up menu.
n
CTRL+ALT+Minus (-): The minus symbol on the numeric keypad places a
snapshot of the active window, within the client, on the Terminal server clipboard
(provides the same functionality as pressing ALT+PrintScrn on a local computer.)
n
CTRL+ALT+Plus (+): The plus symbol on the numeric keypad places a snapshot
of the entire client window area on the Terminal server clipboard (provides the same
functionality as pressing PrintScrn on a local computer.)
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
242
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Terminal Services Client
Using the Clipboard During Terminal Server Sessions
Using Terminal Services provides seamless clipboard sharing, making clipboard contents
available to applications locally on a user computer and within a Terminal Services session.
The shared clipboard synchronizes its contents with the local clipboard and can be viewed
using the Windows Clipbook Viewer (clipbrd.exe). You can copy and paste text or
graphics from a document within the client window, and paste it into a document on your
local machine. You cannot, however, copy and paste files and folders.
When you cut or copy information from an application, it is moved to the Clipboard and
remains there until you clear the Clipboard or until you cut or copy another piece of
information. The Clipboard window in ClipBook Viewer shows the contents of the
Clipboard. You can paste the information from the Clipboard into any document as often
as you like. However, the information is only stored on the Clipboard temporarily.
Local Printing During Terminal Server Sessions
Terminal Services provides printer redirection which routes printing jobs from the
Terminal server to a printer attached to your local computer. There are 2 ways to provide
access to local printers: automatic and manual printer redirection. Use manual redirection
when your local printer requires a driver that is not available on Windows 2000 Server.
Automatic Printer Redirection
Printer redirection is automatic when the local printer uses a driver that is installed on the
Windows 2000 server. When you log on to a session on the Terminal server, any local
printers attached to LPT, COM and USB ports that are installed on the client computer are
automatically detected and a local queue is created on the server. The client computer
printer settings for the default printer and some properties (such as printing on both sides of
the page) are used by the server.
When a client disconnects or ends the session, the printer queue is deleted and any
incomplete or pending print jobs are lost. Information about the clients local printers and
settings are saved on the client computer. On subsequent logons, the printer queue is
created using the information stored on the client computer.
If a printer driver is not found on the server, an event is logged and the client printer is not
created. To make the printer available, the driver must be manually installed on the server.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
243
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Terminal Services Client
Manual Printer Redirection
Printers attached to LPT and COM ports on the clients local computer can be manually
redirected, although manual redirection of printers connected through USB ports is not
supported.
To manually redirect a client printer, contact your administrator and provide the name of
your computer (or IP address for a Windows-based Terminal). The client must be
connected to the Terminal server during manual redirection.
After the initial manual redirection, printers will be automatically redirected during
subsequent logons.
NOTE
Redirected printers are available for use with applications running on the server. Redirected printers
appear in the Printers folder in Control Panel and are named in this format: Client Printer
Name/Client Computer Name/Session Number.
NOTE
When you disconnect or log off from a session, the printer queue is deleted and incomplete or
pending print jobs are lost.
To Close the Client
You have the option of disconnecting with or without ending the session.
Disconnecting without ending the session reconnects to this session the next time you
connect to this Terminal server (if the connection is configured for the re-connection of
disconnected sessions). Logging off ends the session and the next time you log on, a new
session will be started.
To disconnect without ending a session
1.
In the Terminal Services Client window, click Start and then click Shut Down.
n
The Shut Down Windows dialog box appears.
n
The dialog box asks you “What do you want the computer to do?”
2.
Select Disconnect.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
244
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Logs
NOTE
The Terminal Services Client reconnects to this session the next time you connect to this server (if
the connection is configured for the re-connection of disconnected sessions).
To log off and end a session
1.
In the Terminal Services Client window, click Start and then click Shut Down.
n
The Shut Down Windows dialog box appears.
n
The dialog box asks you “What do you want the computer to do?”
2.
Select Log Off.
Logs
A log file is a file that stores messages, or event logs generated by an application, service, or
Microsoft® Windows®. These messages are used to track the operations performed in the
server appliance.
You can use the Logs feature to view, clear, download, and configure the following types
of event logs provided by the system:
n
Managing Application Logs
n
Managing FTP Logs
n
Managing NFS Logs
n
Managing Security Logs
n
Managing System Logs
n
Managing Web (HTTP) Shares Logs
n
Managing Web Administration Logs
n
Clearing Log Files
n
Downloading Log Files
n
Modifying Log Properties
n
Viewing Log Details
Managing Application Logs
The application log contains events logged by applications or programs. For example, a
word-processing program might record a file error in the application log. The events that
are recorded are dependent upon the application.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
245
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Logs
To manage application logs
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Logs.
3.
Choose Application Log.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
Clearing Log Files
Downloading Log Files
Modifying Log Properties
Viewing Log Details
Managing FTP Logs
The FTP log contains events logged by the FTP server.
To manage FTP logs
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Logs.
3.
Choose FTP Log.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
Clearing Log Files
Downloading Log Files
Modifying Log Properties
Viewing Log Details
Managing NFS Logs
The NFS log contains events logged by the NFS server.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
246
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Logs
To manage NFS logs
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Logs.
3.
Choose NFS Log.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
Clearing Log Files
Downloading Log Files
Modifying Log Properties
Viewing Log Details
System Log
The system log contains events logged by the Microsoft® Windows® 2000 system
components. For example, the failure of a driver or other system component to load during
startup is recorded in the system log.
To manage system logs
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Logs.
3.
Choose System Log.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
Clearing Log Files
Downloading Log Files
Modifying Log Properties
Viewing Log Details
Security Log
The security log can record security events such as valid and invalid logon attempts as well
as events related to resource use such as creating, opening, or deleting files. An
administrator can specify what events are recorded in the security log.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
247
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Logs
To manage security logs
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Logs.
3.
Choose Security Log.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
Clearing Log Files
Downloading Log Files
Modifying Log Properties
Viewing Log Details
Managing Web HTTP Shares Logs
The Web HTTP shares log contains events logged by the Web server related to accessing
HTTP shares.
To manage Web (HTTP) shares logs
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Logs.
3.
Choose Web (HTTP) Shares Log.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
Clearing Log Files
Downloading Log Files
Modifying Log Properties
Viewing Log Details
Managing Web Administration Logs
The Web administration log contains events logged by the Web server related to accessing
the administration Web site.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
248
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Logs
To manage Web administration logs
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Logs.
3.
Choose Web Administration Log.
Related Topics
•
•
•
•
Clearing Log Files
Downloading Log Files
Modifying Log Properties
Viewing Log Details
Clear Log Files
From this page you can clear specific log files. When you clear application, NFS, security,
or system logs, all log content is cleared, however, when you clear FTP, Web
administration, or Web (HTTP) shares logs, you may select the specific log files you want
to clear.
To clear application, NFS, security, or system logs
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Logs.
3.
Select the type of log you want to clear.
4.
Select Clear Log.
5.
Choose OK.
To clear FTP, Web administration, or Web (HTTP) shares logs
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Logs.
3.
Select the type of log you want to clear.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
249
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Logs
4.
Select one or more log files to clear.
5.
Choose Clear Log.
6.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
•
Downloading Log Files
Modifying Log Properties
Viewing Log Details
Download Log Files
From this page you can download specific log files to your server appliance.
To download application, security or system logs
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Logs.
3.
Choose the type of log you wish to download.
4.
Choose Download.
5.
Select Save this file to disk
6.
Click OK to download the file.
To download NFS logs
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Logs.
3.
Choose NFS Logs.
4.
Choose Download.
5.
Select Save this file to disk.
6.
Choose OK.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
250
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Logs
To download FTP, Web administration, or Web (HTTP) shares logs
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Logs.
3.
Select the log to download.
4.
Select the log file to download.
5.
Choose Download.
6.
Select Save this file to disk.
7.
Choose OK.
Related Topics
•
•
•
Clearing Log Files
Modifying Log Properties
Viewing Log Details
Modify Log Properties
You can configure the properties for application, system, and security logs. From this page
you can specify the maximum log size and determine how the system will handle log
entries when the maximum capacity of the server appliance is reached.
To modify the properties of a log file
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Logs.
3.
Choose the Application, System, or Security log you wish to configure.
4.
Select the log you want to configure.
5.
Choose Properties.
6.
In the Maximum log size box, type the maximum size of the log, in kilobytes.
7.
Select the button that best represents how you want to handle log entries once the
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
251
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Global Array Manager Overview
maximum log size is reached.
Related Topics
•
•
•
Clearing Log Files
Downloading Log Files
Viewing Log Details
View Log Entry Details
You can view the log entry details for application, system, and security logs. From this page
you can view the date, time, source, event identifier, description, and data of specific log
files.
To view the details of a log file
1.
On the primary navigation bar, choose Maintenance.
2.
Choose Logs.
3.
Choose the type of log you wish to view.
4.
Select the log entry you want to view.
5.
Choose Details.
6.
Choose Up and Down to scroll through the log files.
7.
Choose Back to return to the Object/Task Selector for the specific log type you've
chosen.
Related Topics
•
•
•
Clearing Log Files
Downloading Log Files
Modifying Log Properties
Global Array Manager Overview
The Global Array Manager (GAM) is a utility that administrators can use to monitor,
maintain, and configure the MaxAttach RAID subsystem.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
252
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
Global Array Manager Overview
Administrators can use the GAM to:
n
Run routine system tests (e.g.: drive consistency check, patrol reads, device health
monitoring)
n
View drive statistics and logs (e.g.: disk and controller information, controller log file,
NVRAM error tables)
n
Monitor real-time disk array read/write statistics
n
Configure or initialize the MaxAttach RAID arrays
n
Replace a failed drive
WARNING
The Global Array Manager is a powerful utility that must be used properly to prevent data loss. The
utility provides many cautions and warnings. Read these carefully before acting.
To start the Global Array Manager:
1.
Using Internet Explorer, log in to the MaxAttach as administrator.
2.
Click Disks on the main menu bar.
3.
Select RAID Configuration. This starts a terminal services session.
4.
Log in to Windows 2000. The GAM displays.
5.
To log in to the GAM for the first time, use gamroot as the username. Leave the
password field blank.
The Global Array Manager has its own help system. Click the Help icon to find out more
about GAM features.
Chapter #10 - O/S 2.0 - Maintenance
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
253
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk
Array RAID Concepts
Chapter Outline
n
n
n
n
n
Introduction to RAID
n
RAID basic comparison
n
RAID benefits
n
RAID limitations
n
RAID verses performance
Primary RAID concepts
n
Striping
n
Fault tolerance
n
Array
n
Mirroring
n
Hot Standby
n
Hot Swappable
n
Spanning
n
Parity checking
RAID array type definitions
n
RAID 0
n
RADI 1
n
RAID 0+1
n
RAID 5
n
JBOD
RAID Array comparisons: performance, data capacity, access speed.
Considerations for creating different types of arrays:
n
RAID 0
n
RAID 1
n
RAID 0+1
n
RAID 5
n
JBOD
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
254
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
Introduction
n
Managing RAID Arrays with Mylex RAID Controller and GAM
n
RAID Controller
n
SCSI Bus
n
GAM Server
n
GAM Client
n
Typical operations: create new arrays, add drives to new, add drives to existing,
free up drives from existing, create hot spare, reconfigure last in array,
reconfigure middle array
Introduction
Your Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 Base unit comes configured with a set of standard
RAID 5 disk arrays that are ready to go after physical installation. If you want to configure
the system into other available configurations to suite your unique local needs, you should
have a understanding of disk array concepts including RAID or Redundant Arrays of
Independent Disks which forms the key methodology in the MaxAttach NAS 6000 system.
RAID - Redundant Array of Independent Disks
RAID Introduction and Overview
RAID is an acronym for Redundant Array of Independent Disks which was developed to
optimize groups of hard disk drives to provide various combinations of:
n
greater storage capacity than a single physical disk,
n
better fault tolerance and data recovery capabilities in the event of a disk failure, and
n
faster transfer of the data to and from the disks.
A RAID array is a collection of drives which collectively act as a single storage system,
which can tolerate the failure of a drive without losing data, and which can operate
independently of each other.
Each level is a different way to spread data across multiple drives--a compromise between
cost and speed. Understanding these levels is important, because each level is optimized for
a different use.
The common RAID specifications are numbered from 0 to 5, although only RAID 0,
RAID 1, and RAID 5 are in current common use with current high performance disk
technology.
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
255
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
Key RAID Technical Methods
The user data arrays in the Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 Base Unit are factory configured
as RAID 5 arrays, or although RAID 0 or RAID 1 arrays may be used along with another
common disk drive configuration method called JBOD (Just a Bunch of Disks).
Key RAID Technical Methods
These key technical methods are used in varying combinations in most RAID/JBOD
configurations and will help you understand how a disk array works and why you want one
type as opposed to another type for your application.
Hardware RAID and Software RAID
RAID is also divided by the way it is implemented. In the MaxAttach, the disk arrays are
implemented as “Hardware RAID” and controlled by a RAID Controller card located in
the system Base Unit. In some systems, software drivers are used to control RAIDs or
“Software RAID.”
In hardware RAID, an array of disk drives is controlled by a RAID controller which
administers the data I/O to the disks based on the type of RAID configuration. Using
today’s disk drives, RAID controllers use combinations of striping, spanning, mirroring and
parity checking techniques to obtain an optimum balance of increased disk size, improved
data safety, and increased read/write I/O performance.
Striping
Striping is the underlying concept behind most RAID levels. A stripe is a contiguous
sequence of data blocks that is written to one or more disk drives. A stripe may be as short
as a single data block, or may consist of thousands. The RAID controllers split up their
component disk partitions into stripes; the different RAID levels differ in how they
organize the stripes, and what data they put in them. The interplay between the size of the
stripes, the typical size of files in the file system, and their location on the disk is what
determines the overall performance of the RAID subsystem. The effect is to allow larger
data volumes than those provided by a single physical disk. Striping is also called Spanning.
Mirroring
Mirroring is creating an exact copy of data from one drive or array on a second drive or
array. The entire read/write procedure is done in parallel. Mirroring is the highest level of
fault tolerance with 100% of the data backed up as it is created and written. Mirroring is
also the most expansive fault tolerance technique where 50% of you disk space is spent on
providing fault tolerance,
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
256
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
Key RAID Technical Methods
Parity Checking
Parity checking is creating a parity check sum for the writes to drives in an array, and then
writing the parity information to a dedicated parity drive (called dedicated parity) or
writing the parity information as the next striped data block to the next drive in the
array.separate data block (called distributed parity). The parity check sum allows the system
to recover missing data in the event of the failure of a single member of RAID array.
By combining these techniques in various combinations, different system capabilities are
provided to met a users unique local needs.
RAID and JBOD Types
The common RAID types are as follows and all area available to most user data drives on
the NAS 6000:
n
RAID 0 - Striping
n
RAID 1 - Mirroring
n
RAID 0+1 - Mirrored sets of Striped Disks
n
RAID 5 - Striped Disks with Parity Check
n
JBOD - An additional non-RAID option for single disk control, also called Just a
Bunch Of Disks
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
257
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
RAID 0 Striping
RAID 0 Striping
Description
RAID 0 is a performance oriented striped data mapping technique across two or more
drives.
Uniformly sized blocks of storage are assigned in regular sequence to all of an array's disks.
The controller divides incoming data into as many chunks as there are drives and then
writes that data across independent disks. The writing technique is called “striping.” Since
all disk write heads work independently, RAID 0 provides the fastest performance RAID
configuration.
Fault Tolerance Cost
RAID 0 arrays have no fault tolerance characteristics beyond that provided by each
individual disk. As such, there is no utilization space cost. 100% of the drive capacity is
available for user data.
Performance
RAID 0 provides high I/O performance at low inherent cost as no additional disks are
required and the entire array disk space is used for user data. Fault Tolerance Provided
Application Focus
RAID 0 is often used in managing transient data that has to be processed quickly and then
deleted.
The extremely high data throughput rates are especially valuable for applications using large
files.
Array Size
The array can be from 2 to 16 drives.
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
258
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
RAID 1 Mirroring
RAID 1 Mirroring
Description
In RAID 1 mirroring, the RAID controller totally duplicates the data writes on two drives
at once, providing 100% data redundancy. If one drive fails, the second drive carries on as
before with reads and writes until a replacement drive can be added for a data restore.
RAID 1 has been used longer than any other form of RAID.
Depending on the system, either the drives, or the drives and their controllers are
duplicated.
Fault Tolerance Cost
RAID 1 is fully fault tolerance but carries a 50% disk space cost to implement.
Performance
RAID 1 arrays may use parallel access for high transfer rate when reading. More
commonly, RAID 1 array disks operate independently and improve performance for
read-intensive applications, but at relatively high inherent cost. If one drive drops offline,
read/write performance is the same until the rebuild process starts. During restores,
performance can be degraded as the drive controller rebuilds the replacement disk drive.
Application Focus
RAID 1 practical use is usually limited to applications where fault tolerance is required,
regardless of cost. This is used primarily in high reliability systems where constant
availability is required.
Array Size
RAID 1 array disks are always in pairs. Two disk arrays can be mirrored using a common
technique, described below, called RAID 0 + 1 where a stripped array of multiple disks is
then mirrored. This technique is used in the MaxAttach NAS 6000 O/S images on drive
C:\ and D:\.
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
259
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
RAID 0 +1 Mirrored Sets of Striped Drives
RAID 0 +1 Mirrored Sets of Striped Drives
Description
RAID 0+1 is a dual level array that utilizes multiple RAID 1 mirrored sets into a single
array. Two arrays of striped disks are created. The controller then creates a mirror of the
striped array. This technique is used in the MaxAttach NAS 6000 O/S images on drives
C:\ and D:\. The resultant array is 100% fault tolerant with an two exact images. The
failure of one image usually causes the system to automatically failover to the remaining
image.
Fault Tolerance Cost
The fault cost, like RAID 1 is 50% of total available disk space.
Performance
Each drive in the array is duplicated or mirrored. This eliminates the overhead and delay of
parity. A RAID 0 + 1 array offers high data transfer advantages of striped arrays and
increased data accessibility or reads.
Performance is better than RAID 3, striping with dedicated parity, and RAID 5, striping
with distributed parity.
System performance during a drive rebuild is also better than that of parity based arrays,
since data does not need to be regenerated from parity information, but copied from the
other mirrored drive.
Application Focus
High performance applications where absolute data availability is a must.
Array Size
A minimum of three disks is required to implement RAID 0 + 1, although in practical
terms, most RAID 0 + 1 arrays start at four disks. The maximum number of disks is 16.
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
260
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
RAID 5 Multiple Disk Striping with Distributed Parity
RAID 5 Multiple Disk Striping with Distributed Parity
Description
RAID 5 is the default user data disk array configuration used in the NAS 6000 in arrays of
six disks and is probably the most popular RAID technique in the world. The factory
configured user drives in the Base Unit are configured as six disk RAID 5 arrays. RAID 5
in six disk arrays is also the recommend user configuration for Expansion Units.
This level is commonly referred to as striping with distributed parity. No single disk is
devoted to parity. The controller strips blocks of data across all drives in the array and then
the last data block is written as a parity check of the current write.
On a single drive failure, the parity and remaining data can be used to recreate the missing
drive data set. During the time of a drive failure, the array is in a “critical” state, where the
data is still safe and array operation continues. However, the failure of any additional drive
will cause the loss of all array data.
When a failed drive is replaced either manually or by a hot standby drive, the array rebuild
process starts, ultimately fully restoring the fault tolerant nature of the array. In the Maxtor
MaxAttach NAS 6000, a Hot Spare drive can be optionally configured that will
automatically take over for any failed drive.
A replacement disk or disks can be added to the array so that the system can carry on with
user access and full I/O operations even while the rebuild process takes place. The system
uses the parity information to recalculate the missing data elements. There is some
degradation of service during an online rebuild.
Fault Tolerance Cost
The fault tolerance cost is a function of the number of drives in the array where the
equivalent of one array drive’s disk space is used for parity.
In RAID 0, there is no fault tolerance, and hence, no fault tolerance cost.
In RAID1, there is fault tolerance as 50% of the drives are used for data backup.
In RAID 5, the cost is approximately the equivalent of one drive per array. In a four drive
array, the cost is 25%. In a six disk array, the cost is 17%. In a ten disk array, the cost is 10%.
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
261
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
RAID 5 Multiple Disk Striping with Distributed Parity
Performance
Each of the drives is used to store the parity bit, greatly reducing any impact on
performance. This can speed small writes in multiprocessing systems. By distributing parity
across all of the array's member disks, RAID 5 reduces but does not eliminate the write
bottleneck. The performance for reads tends to be lower than for other RAID options.
The result is asymmetrical performance, with reads substantially outperforming writes.
Although arrays can be from three to 16 drives in size, longer arrays require longer write
times.
Array Size
RAID 5 can use a minimum of 3 drives and can be as large as 16 drives. In practical terms,
the optimum combination of performance and fault tolerance is usually at six drive. Larger
arrays are slower but with lower fault tolerance cost. Smaller arrays faster but are more
expensive. RAID-5 is currently viewed as the most appropriate implementation of RAID
or large systems.
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
262
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
JBOD Just a Bunch of Disks Single Disk Control
JBOD Just a Bunch of Disks Single Disk Control
Description
JBOD is not a RAID methodology, but simply single drive control. The controller treats
each drive as a standalone disk and provides a high-performance cache.The limitations of
JBOD are volume size limited to physical disk size, decreased performance because striping
is not present for performance enhancements, and there is no recovery from a disk drive
failure.
Fault Tolerance Cost
There is no fault tolerance with JBOD and hence no associated cost.
Performance
The benefits are speed and discrete volume availability. The cache reduces the amount of
time the computer waits for a disk to get to the right place to read or write data. The
individual disk drive volumes allows for increased data security and permits easy removal of
sensitive confidential material to secure physical storage.
Array Size
JBOD is a single disk at the physical disk level. File server O/S can group single JBOD
drives into larger multi-drive volumes, but without any striping nor with any fault
tolerance.
RAID Benefits Comparison
The tables below summarize and compare the general benefits and functions of each type
of RAID configuration.
Table #1 - RAID Comparison
RAID Level
Description
RAID 0
Disk Striping
RAID 1
Mirroring
RAID 2
Striping with ECC (hamming) - Synchronous-
RAID 3
Striping with dedicated parity and synchronized disks
RAID 4
Striping with dedicated parity and non synchronized disks
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
263
I/O
Advantage
Fault
Tolerance
YES - Fastest
NO
NO
YES
YES
No
YES
YES
YES
YES
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
RAID Functional Comparison
Table #1 - RAID Comparison
RAID Level
Description
RAID 5
Striping and parity distributed across ALL disks
Volume Set
No Striping No Parity
I/O
Advantage
Fault
Tolerance
YES
NO
YES
NO
RAID Functional Comparison
The table below summarizes the strengths and limitations of each RAID and JOBD
configuration.
Table #2 - RAID Level Comparison
RAID
Level
Description
RAID 1
All data copied onto 2
separate disks
RAID 2
Data
Reliability
Data Transfer and
I/O Request Rate
Very high.
Can withstand
selective multiple
disk failures
Data transfer rate is higher than
single disk for reads, but does
not offer load balancing. Twice
that of a single disk for reads.
Slightly slower than single disk
for writes
Application
Strength
Cost
General
Very high.
Requires twice
as many disks
for redundancy
Data striped across
Very high.
multiple disks with parity Can withstand
on multiple disks
selective multiple
disk failures
High if error correcting codes are General
computed by hardware Similar
to twice that of a single disk
High. Requires
multiple disks
for redundancy
RAID 3
Data striped across all
data disks with
dedicated parity disk
Much higher than
single disk.Can
withstand single
disk failure
Highest of all types listed here
for reading and writing Faster
than a single disk, owing to
parallel disk accesses
Low. Requires
only one disk
for redundancy
RAID 4
Data striped across
some data disks with
dedicated parity disk
Much higher than
single disk.
High compared to single disk for Predominantly
reads but significantly lower than read-oriented with
single disk for writes*.
few writes
Video, prepress,
medical imaging,
and other large file
applications
Low.
Can withstand
single disk failure
RAID 5
Data and parity striped
across multiple disks
Much higher than
single disk.
Can withstand
single disk failure
High compared to single disk for Low. Requires only
read but generally lower than
one disk for
single disk for writes*
redundancy
Transaction processing with high
read to write ratio.
*Write operations are slow in these cases because the controller must read parity information from a disk and recompute parity
information for the disk before it writes information to the disk array
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
264
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
RAID Fault Tolerance Characteristics
RAID Fault Tolerance Characteristics
Table #3 - RAID Level Availability & Fault Tolerance Characteristics
RAID
Level
0
Availability & Fault Tolerance Characteristics
No fault tolerance. Data is striped across a set of multiple disks. If a disk in the set ceases to function, all data
contained on the set of disks is lost. (If fault tolerance is needed, this configuration is not recommended). Excellent
for all types of I/O activity.
00
1
Spanned RAID 0
Mirrored fault tolerance. Data is written to one disk, and then the same data is written to another disk. If either disks
fails, the other one in the pair is automatically used to store and retrieve the data. Excellent for write-intensive
applications
10
3
Spanned RAID 1
30
5
Spanned RAID 3
50
0+1
Spanned RAID 5
Striped fault tolerance with dedicated drive parity. Data and parity are striped across a set of multiple (at least three)
drives. If any of the drives fail, the data (or parity) information from the failed drive is computed from the information
from the remaining drives.
Striped fault tolerance. Data and parity are striped across a set of multiple (at least three) drives. If any of the drives
fail, the data (or parity) information from the failed drive is computed from the information from the remaining drives.
Excellent for sequential or random reads and sequential writes
Mirrored and striped fault tolerance. Data and parity information is striped across multiple drives and written to a
mirrored set of drives. This arrangement can survive multiple drive failures and continue to operate.
0+1+0
JBOD
Spanned RAID 0+1
Just a Bunch of Disks. JBOD offers no redundancy and is not recommended for applications requiring fault tolerance.
RAID and Obtaining Maximum Performance
To see the advantages of the RAID levels as they apply to performance, see the table
below.
Table #4 - RAID Level Access Profile Characteristics
RAID Level
0
1
3
5
0+1
JBOD
Access Profile Characteristics
Excellent for all types of I/O activity.
Excellent for write-intensive applications.
Good for sequential or random reads and sequential writes.
Excellent for sequential or random reads and sequential writes.
Excellent for write-intensive applications.
Mimics normal, individual disk performance characteristics.
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
265
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 RAID Operations and the GAM
Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 RAID Operations and the GAM
Within the MaxAttach NAS 6000, the disk arrays are controlled by the Mylex Disk Array
Controller card mounted in the Base Unit. Administrators control the functions and
configuration of the disk arrays using the Global Array Manager (GAM) Server/Client
application.
The GAM provides several features that can provide added fault tolerant to NAS 6000
systems that are described below.
Normal Array Status
During normal operations, all drives in the array are healthy and functions. From the
perspective of the user and the O/S, all the drive members of the array represent a single
local drive or volume.
Critical Array Status
A drive array is in a “critical state” whenever one and only one of it member drives have
failed. This only applies to RAID types where a drive failure can be tolerated; typically
RAID 1, RAID 3, RAID 5, and RAID 0+1. While the array is critical, it continues to
work, but the failure of any second drive in the array will result in the loss of all array data.
Hot Swap Drives
The term “Hot Swap” refers to the common practice of either inserting or removing disk
drives in an operating bus. In the MaxAttach NAS 6000, this specifically refers to the ability
to remove defective or failing drive from the system, insert new unformatted drives, and
then have the system rebuild and repair the array while maintaining normal system
operation and user access to their data.
In practical terms, this means that drives can be removed whenever they are quiescent, or
not involved in the write operation. For best results and to eliminate the possibility of
losing data, use the GAM to make the disk off line so that the amber Disk Status LED
lights. with the disk unavailable, all read/writes are canceled and the disk can be safely
exchanged.
WARNING
READ/WRITE I/O OPERATIONS: When ever the disk green LED is blinking, the disk is undergoing
some sort of I/O operation. Never remove a disk drive during an I/O operation or data loss will occur.
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
266
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 RAID Operations and the GAM
After the failed drive has been exchanged for a new drive, the administrator must use the
GAM to rebuild the affected array and incorporate the new drive. Once initiated by the
administrator, the rebuild process will proceed in the background with some load on
system performance. A full rebuild of a six disk array takes between five and seven hours.
Hot Spare Drives
Hot Spare Drives (also called Hot Standby Drives) are one or more drives that are not
assigned to any RAID array nor being used as a JBOD disk. These are available in reserve
to take over in case of the failure of any array drive. Controlled by the Mylex RAID
Controller card, a hot spare drive is powered-on but idle during normal array operation. If
a failure occurs on a disk in a fault-tolerant RAID array, the hot spare drive takes over for
the failed drive and the array rebuild process begins as described above.
After completing an automatic rebuild cycle, the array continues to function in a fully
fault-tolerant mode. The rebuild cycle for a six disk RAID 5 array takes between five and
seven hours. After the rebuild cycle completes, the array is returned to full fault tolerance
and normal I/O operations. the array can now safely suffer a second drive failure and
continue to function before any disks are replaced.
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
267
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
Comparison of Terms
Comparison of Terms
A variety of terms are used to define disks and volumes. One problem exists in that
Microsoft, Mylex, and common terminology use slightly differing definitions of these
terms. The table below summarizes the various terms with additional discussion below.
Table #5 - Comparison of Disk and Array Terms
Microso
ft Term
Term Definition
Folder
File collection on a volume
Partition
Partition: Basic, Simple, Dynamic
When you format a hard drive, you can assign the number of partitions you want on a physical
hard disk. The computer will recognize each partition as a separate drive, and they will show up as
different drives under most operating systems; a logical drive.
Volume
The name given to a disk partition, or group of partitions, that is available to network users as a
single designated drive. A drive may cover several volumes and a volume may span several
physical drives under some operating systems.
Physical Drive A hardware RAID controller’s presentation of a disk to the O/S. Identified as standard drive
letters: C:\, D:\, E:\, etc.
Mylex
Term
Logical Drive
A list of physical drives that store one or more logical drives. An array must contain at least one
logical drive although multiple logical drives can be made from within one array. Array types are
RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 0+1, RAID 5, and JBOD.
Array of disks
The physical disk drives inserted into the MaxAttach NAS 6000 Base or Expansion Unit drive
bays. Each drive is identified by its SCSI Channel and LUN ID. (e.g. drive 0:03 is drive LUN 03 on
SCSI channel 0.)
Physical Drive SCSI Address
There are 12 drives per shelf and 36 drives in a fully configured system. Physical naming
convention labels the Base Unit as BU; the first Expansion Unit as EU1, and the second
Expansion Unit as EU2. Drives are identified as 1 to 12 from left to right when viewed from the
front.
Physical Drive Equipment
Shelf and
Physical
Position
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
268
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
Comparison of Terms
Volume Set
n
A volume set is an additional storage type, not included in the RAID specifications but
supported by Windows NT is a VOLUME SET.
n
A volume set simply allows the logical drive to be extended to an additional physical
drive.
n
It offers no additional performance or fault tolerance and is in fact quite dangerous since
the failure of one of the members of the volume will destroy the entire volume.
Logical (System) Drives
After all physical drive groups are defined and arranged, one or more logical drives must be
created. Logical drives are the drives presented to the operating system.
A logical drive's capacity may encompass any portion of a drive group (up to the total
capacity of that Drive Group), or the capacity of more than one drive group. Up to 8
(below PCI firmware version 2.6, and all External Controller firmware) or 32 (PCI
firmware version 2.6 and above) logical drives may be created. The following illustration
shows a RAID 0+1 configuration with three mirrored logical drives created in a drive
group containing three disk drives.
System Drives
Each System Drive has a defined RAID Level (0, 1, 5, 0+1, etc.) based on the number of
drives in the Drive Group from which it is created. If a Drive Group has enough drives to
support several different RAID levels, the System Drive can be assigned any available
levels. However, a System Drive may have only one RAID level.
Chapter #11 - Appendix - Disk Array RAID Concepts
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
269
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP
Chapter Outline
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
Overview of MaxAttach NAS 6000 SNMP capabilities
SNMP Alerts
Overview
Management System
Agent
Management Information Base
Specifications
MIB File Locations
Windows 2000 Server SNMP MIB
Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 SNMP MIB
Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 SNMP MIB Tree
Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 SNMP MIB Variables
MaxAttach SNMP Traps
Overview
MaxAttach NAS 6000 and SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) monitors and
traps report alert conditions, which are then accessible at an SNMP management system.
MaxAttach SNMP Alert Overview
MaxAttach SNMP service provides SNMP agents that can participate in remote,
centralized management via SNMP management consoles.
Using SNMP requires two components: an SNMP management system and an SNMP
Agent.
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
270
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP
SNMP Management System
SNMP Management System
The SNMP management system, also called the management console, sends information and
update requests to an SNMP agent across the network. Any computer running SNMP
management software is an SNMP management system. The management software
application does not need to run on the same host as the SNMP agent.
The SNMP management system requests information from a managed computer, such as
the amount of hard disk space available or the number of active sessions. The SNMP
management system can also initiate a change to the configuration of an SNMP agent.
However, this is rare because most clients have read-only access.
SNMP Agent
MaxAttach and Windows 2000 as SNMP Agents
Any computer running SNMP agent software is an SNMP agent. As such, the Maxtor
MaxAttach NAS 6000 thus also functions as an SNMP agent. The SNMP agent responds
to SNMP management system requests for information. The Windows 2000 SNMP
service, which is also an SNMP agent, responds to information requests from one or more
management systems. The SNMP service can be configured to specify which statistics are
tracked and which management systems are authorized to request information.
Respond Only To Queries
In general, SNMP agents do not originate messages, but only respond to queries. The
exception is the trap message. The agent originates a trap message when an alarm-triggering
event occurs, such as a system reboot or illegal access. By monitoring trap events, managers
can provide enhanced system security.
SNMP Community
Management hosts and agents belong to an SNMP community, which is a collection of hosts
grouped together for administrative purposes. Defining communities provides security by
allowing only management systems and agents within the same community to
communicate.
Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
271
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP
Management Information Base
Management Information Base
SNMP agents collect information in a database called a Management Information Base, or
MIB. Microsoft has defined database structures for its servers in which its SNMP services
collect a wide variety of information. In addition, MaxAttach NAS units have an additional
set of unique MIB variables developed specifically for the MaxAttach NAS system. The
MaxAttach NAS SNMP services support variables from both the Microsoft server MIBs
and its own MIB.
For a list of supported variables, see the MaxAttach SNMP Specification section below.
Configuring SNMP Service
To configure the SNMP service
1.
On the primary menu bar, select Network Setup.
2.
Select the SNMP Service Configuration option.
3.
Follow the prompts and re-enter your User name and Password.
4.
Double-click SNMP Service in the list of services.
5.
Edit values as needed on the Agent, Traps, and Security tabs. Do not alter values
on the other tabs.
6.
For information on specific fields in the tabs, right-click a field to view “What's
This?” help (or select a field and press F1).
7.
Click OK.
8.
Close the Services window.
MaxAttach SNMP Specifications
The SNMP agent support for the Maxtor MaxAttach NAS 6000 consists of various SNMP
extension agents provided by the Windows 2000 Server and by the MaxAttach SNMP
extension agent. Taken together, they provide the necessary management information and
event traps for remote network management. The collection of management information
and event traps is called the management information base or MIB.
Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
272
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP
MIB File Locations and Types
MIB File Locations and Types
All of the SNMP MIB extension agent files are stored on the MaxAttach in the
C:/Winnt/System32 directory. A system's SNMP MIBs come from two sources:
n
Windows 2000 Server SNMP extension agents
n
MaxAttach NAS 6000 MIB
Windows 2000 Server SNMP MIBs
The Microsoft Windows 2000 Server supports the following SNMP MIBs:
n
mib_ii.mib: The standard MIB 2 which provides the NAS server's general system
and network information:
n
hostmib.mib: The standard host resources MIB which provides information on the
NAS server's storage and devices.
n
msft.mib, inetsrv.mib, ftp.mib, http.mib: The Microsoft-defined FTP and
HTTP MIBs which provide FTP and HTTP server statistics.
Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
273
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP
MIB Specifications
MIB Specifications
MaxAttach NAS 6000 SNMP MIB
n
The MaxAttach NAS 6000 MIB is mxtr6000.mib.
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Series MIB Variables
The MaxAttach SNMP agent supports the following unique MaxAttach system
information:
n
SysProdName: NAS system product name
n
SysProdVersion: NAS system product version
n
SysManufacturer: NAS system manufacturer’s name
n
SysComputerName: NAS system computer name
n
sysCPUName: NAS system processor name
n
sysBIOSVersion: NAS system BIOS version
n
sysUPtime: The time (in hundredths of a second) since the NAS system was last
brought on line
n
sysDate: NAS System local time in display format as follows: year/month/day
hour:minutes:seconds:milliseconds
n
sysPhysMemLoad: The approximate percentage of physical memory in use in the
NAS system
n
SysTotalPhysMem: The amount of total physical main memory in Kbytes
contained in the NAS system
n
SysFreePhysMem: The amount of available physical main memory in Kbytes
contained in the NAS system
n
SysTotalVirtualMem: The amount of total virtual memory in Kbytes contained in
the NAS system
n
SysFreeVirtualMem: The amount of available virtual memory in Kbytes contained
in the NAS system
Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
274
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP
MIB Specifications
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Series MIB Tree
The following table is the MIB tree for the MaxAttach NAS 6000 Series servers. The map
starts with 1.3.6.1.4.1, followed by the Maxtor Enterprise ID, 4693. Under the
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Series servers there is currently a single product, MaxAttach NAS
6000. The following table defines the system's information, objects, and trap definitions.
NOTE
All the defined objects have Read-Only access. This is indicated by the R in the MIB description.
4693
Maxtor Enterprise ID
6
NAS 6000 Series
1
NAS 6000 (OID = 1.3.6.1.4.1.4693.6.1)
10
Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
System Information
1
R - sysProdName
2
R - sysProdVersion
3
R - sysManufacturer
4
R - sysComputerName
5
R - sysCPUName
6
R - sysBIOSVersion
7
R - sysUPtime
8
R - SysDate
9
R - SysPhysMemLoad
10
R - SysTotalPhysMem
11
R - sysFreePhysMem
12
R - sysTotalVirtualMem
13
R - sysFreeVirtualMem
901
R - errorEventLogSummary
902
R - errorEventLogString
275
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP
MIB Specifications
MaxAttach SNMP Traps
The MaxAttach supports all of the standard Microsoft Windows 2000 events, and a
number of these events pertinent to the functioning of the MaxAttach are sent as SNMP
traps. The following event categories are supported as SNMP traps:
n
Disk Events (ATAPI, Disk, DiskPerf, Dmboot, Dmio, LDM)
n
Power (UPS)
In addition, the MaxAttach also provides traps for its internal environmental monitoring
unit (EMU).
Table #1 - Environmental Monitoring Unit Traps
Trap
Event ID
Description
Trap
Event ID
Description
Power Supply Status
2110 Information
2310 Error
Present, Over temp, AC fail, DC fail
Fan Status
2120 Information
2320 Error
Fan running, Fan Stalled
Disk Drive Present Status
2130 Information
2330 Error
Present, Not Present
Temperature Status
2150 Information
2350 Error
Temperature Levels 1, 2, or 3, where 3 is hottest
Disk Backplane Voltage Status
2160 Information
2360 Error
Voltages Nominal (+/- 5%), Out of tolerance
Intrusion Status
2180 Information
2380 Error
Intrusion Detected
Chapter #12 - Appendix - SNMP
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
276
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #13 - Appendix - Disk
Drive Error Codes
Mylex Disk Drive Failure Error Codes
These error codes indicate the cause of the drive failure:
Table #1 - Disk Device Error Codes (Sheet 1 of 3)
Error Code
Error Code Cause
00 – NoCause
No error code or drive not DEAD
01 – WrtRecov01
Write recovery failed
02 – WrtRecov02
Write recovery failed
03 – WrtRecov03
Write recovery failed
04 – WrtRecov04
Write recovery failed
05 – WrtRecov05
Write recovery failed
06 – WrtRecov06
Write recovery failed
07 – WrtRecov07
Write recovery failed
08 – WrtRecov08
Write recovery failed
09 – WrtRecov09
Write recovery failed
0A – WrtRecov10
Write recovery failed
0B – WrtRecov11
Write recovery failed
0C – WrtRecov12
Write recovery failed
0D – WrtRecov13
Write recovery failed
0E – WrtRecov14
Write recovery failed
0F – WrtRecov15
Write recovery failed
10 – WrtRecov16
Write recovery failed
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
277
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #13 - Appendix - Disk Drive Error Codes
Mylex Disk Drive Failure Error Codes
Table #1 - Disk Device Error Codes (Sheet 2 of 3)
Error Code
Error Code Cause
11 – WrtRecov17
Write recovery failed
12 – WrtRecov18
Write recovery failed
13 – WrtRecov19
Write recovery failed
20 – StartDev01
New drive state is DEAD
21 – StartDev02
Standby rebuild bit set
22 – StartDev03
State is DEAD
23 – StartDev04
Failed
30 – BusReset01
Bus reset did not clear (dead channel)
31 – BusReset02
Bus reset did not clear
40 – MaxConsecBusy
Max consecutive busy status count exceeded
41 – DoubleCc
Check condition status on request sense command
42 – MaxSelTimeout
Max consecutive selection timeout count exceeded
43 – CcDeferred
Check condition with sense data deferred error
44 – MaxPerr
Max consecutive/accumulated parity error count exceeded
45 – MaxResCnflct
Max consecutive reservation conflict status count exceeded
46 – MaxCcUatten
Max consecutive unit attention count exceeded
47 – MaxCmdTmout
Max accumulated command timeout count exceeded
50 – DevStatus01
New state is DEAD
51 – DevStatus02
Start device failed
60 – Restart01
Failed restart
61 – Restart02
Failed restart
62 – Restart03
Failed restart
63 – NewCfigFail
Failed to start after writing new configuration
70 – ScanSelTmo
Bus scan: selection timeout
71 – ScanMaxCc
Bus scan: max check conditions exceeded
72 – DevInsertFail
Device insertion: failed to spin device
73 – DevInsertOffl
Device insertion: system drive went offline
74 – UncfigDev01
Unconfigured device failed inquiry
Chapter #13 - Appendix - Disk Drive Error Codes
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
278
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #13 - Appendix - Disk Drive Error Codes
Mylex Disk Drive Failure Error Codes
Table #1 - Disk Device Error Codes (Sheet 3 of 3)
Error Code
Error Code Cause
75 – UncfigDev02
Unconfigured device found
76 – UncfigDev03
Unconfigured device found
77 – BadCodId01
Device COD ID does not match selected COD ID
78 – BadCodId02
Device COD ID does not match selected COD ID
79 – DevRoamDead
Drive roaming: dead device moved
7A – DevRoamFail
Drive roaming: failed
7B – DevRoamRplcd
Drive roaming: replaced drive
7C – ScanInqFail
Bus scan: inquiry failed
80 – RbldOffline
System drive went offline during rebuild start
81 – RbldTooSmall
Drive too small for rebuilding
82 – RbldFailed
Rebuild failed and drive not already marked DEAD
83 – RbldTerminated
Rebuild terminated, move rebuilding drive to DEAD
84 – RbldOffline02
System drive went offline during rebuild start
A0 – NoSpareTrack
Drive reported 04/32/00 sense - no spares available
Chapter #13 - Appendix - Disk Drive Error Codes
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
279
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk
Array Error Codes
Error Codes Overview
A full list of Error Codes, descriptions, and severity levels can be obtained by opening and
reading the EVENTDEF.TXT file inside the folder C:\ GAM on the Base Unit.
This information is also available in below in Table #1 - Mylex Error Codes. The table
displays error descriptions and related messages from the Mylex RAID Controller Card.
Mylex Severity Levels
The Severity Levels are defined by default as follows:
n
Critical (0)
n
Serious (1)
n
Error (2)
n
Warning (3)
n
Informational (4)
O/S Error Processing
The O/S processes the Mylex Errors based on instructions located in the
SupportedEvents.Inf file. This file instructs the system when to turn on and off the
amber Drive Status LED.
Revision 2.0.03A - 11/07/01
280
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
Listing of SupportedEvents.Inf
Listing of SupportedEvents.Inf
In its default factory setting, the SupportedEvents.Inf listing is as follows:
[Version]
Signature=”$Windows NT$”
Provider=”Maxtor”
[ONEVENT]
ONEVENT=10,12,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50,54,57
[OFFEVENT]
OFFEVENT=1,2
Instructions to Turn Amber Disk Status LEDs Off
The SupportedEvents.Inf file instructs the system to turn the amber Disk Status LED
OFF whenever the following events occur. The information in parenthesis stands for
Gam_event number, User_event number, Priority level, and Severity level.
n
A hard disk has been placed online (1, 1, 4, Information)
n
A hard disk added as hot spare (2, 2, 4, Information)
Instructions to Turn Amber Disk Status LEDs On
The SupportedEvents.Inf file instructs the system to turn the amber Disk Status LEDs
ON whenever the described event occurs. The information in parenthesis stands for
Gam_event number, User_event number, Priority level, and Severity level.
n
Rebuild stopped with error. New device failed. (10, 10, 2, Error)
n
A hard disk has failed. (12, 12, 1, Serious)
n
A hard disk failed because write recovery failed. (33, 33, 1, Serious)
n
A hard disk failed because SCSI bus reset failed. (34, 34, 1, Serious)
n
A hard disk failed because double check condition occurred. (35, 35, 1, Serious)
n
A hard disk failed because device is missing. (36, 36, 1, Serious)
n
A hard disk failed because of gross error on SCSI processor. (37, 37, 1, Serious)
n
A hard disk failed because of bad tag from the device. (38, 38, 1, Serious)
n
A hard disk failed because command to the device timed out. (9, 39, 1, Serious)
n
A hard disk failed because of the system reset. (40, 40, 1, Serious)
n
A hard disk failed because of busy status or parity error. (41, 41, 1, Serious)
n
A hard disk set to failed state by host. (42, 42, 1, Serious)
n
A hard disk failed because access to the device met with a selection time out. (43, 43, 1,
Serious)
n
A hard disk failed because of a sequence error in the SCSI bus phase handling. (44, 44,
1, Serious)
n
A hard disk failed because device returned an unknown status. (45, 45, 1, Serious)
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
281
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
Viewing and Changing Error Codes
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
A hard disk failed because device is not ready. (46, 46, 1, Serious)
A hard disk failed because device was not found on start up. (47, 47, 1, Serious)
A hard disk failed because write operation of the ‘Configuration On Disk’ failed. (48,
48, 1, Serious)
A hard disk failed because write operation of ‘Bad Data Table’ failed. (49, 49, 1,
Serious)
Physical device status changed to offline. (50, 50, 3, Warning)
Physical device failed to start. (54, 54, 3, Warning)
Physical drive missing on startup. (57, 57, 1, Serious)
Viewing and Changing Error Codes
You can view Error Codes individually, and change Error Codes using the Event Editor.
To change an error code description
1.
Select Administration > Settings and then select the Event Editor Tab.
2.
In the Event ID Field, select the event number.
3.
In the User Event ID Field, enter the ID number.
4.
In the Severity Field, select the severity level.
5.
Use the check boxes to configure your error event at to:
n
Alarm Sound
n
Pager Notification
n
Email Notification
n
Fax Notification
n
Launch Application.
6.
If required, in the Event Message Text Field, edit the message.
7.
If you make a mistake, click on the Default All button to reset the message to the
default settings.
8.
To commit your changes, click on the OK button.
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
282
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
Error Codes - EVENTDEF.TXT
Error Codes - EVENTDEF.TXT
The Mylex RAID Controller Error Codes are used to generate the error messages related
to the RAID Controller and its attached disk drives.
Mylex Error Codes Table
Table #1 - Mylex Error Codes (Sheet 1 of 8)
Gam_ev User_ev
ent
ent
Number Number
Priority
Number
Severity
Level
Description
1
1
4
Information
A hard disk has been placed online.
2
2
4
Information
A hard disk added as hot spare.
3
3
3
Warning
Hard disk error found.
4
4
3
Warning
Hard disk PFA condition found, this disk may fail soon.
5
5
4
Information
An automatic rebuild has started.
6
6
4
Information
A rebuild has started.
7
7
4
Information
Rebuild is over.
8
8
4
Information
Rebuild is cancelled.
9
9
2
Error
Rebuild stopped with error.
10
10
2
Error
Rebuild stopped with error. New device failed.
11
11
2
Error
Rebuild stopped because logical drive failed.
12
12
1
Serious
13
13
4
Information
A new hard disk has been found.
14
14
4
Information
A hard disk has been removed.
15
15
4
Information
A previously configured disk is now available.
16
16
4
Information
Expand Capacity Started.
17
17
4
Information
Expand Capacity Completed.
18
18
2
Error
19
19
4
Information
SCSI command timeout on hard device.
20
20
4
Information
SCSI command abort on hard disk.
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
A hard disk has failed.
Expand Capacity Stopped with error.
283
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
Mylex Error Codes Table
Table #1 - Mylex Error Codes (Sheet 2 of 8)
Gam_ev User_ev
ent
ent
Number Number
Priority
Number
Severity
Level
Description
21
21
4
Information
22
22
3
Warning
Parity error found.
23
23
3
Warning
Soft error found.
24
24
3
Warning
Misc error found.
25
25
4
Information
SCSI device reset.
26
26
4
Information
Active spare found.-
27
27
4
Information
Warm spare found.-
28
28
4
Information
Request Sense Data available.
29
29
4
Information
Initialization started.
30
30
4
Information
Initialization completed.
31
31
3
Warning
32
32
4
Information
33
33
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because write recovery failed.
34
34
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because SCSI bus reset failed.
35
35
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because double check condition occurred.
36
36
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because device is missing.
37
37
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because of gross error on SCSI processor.
38
38
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because of bad tag from the device.
39
39
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because command to the device timed out.
40
40
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because of the system reset.
41
41
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because of busy status or parity error.
42
42
1
Serious
A hard disk set to failed state by host.
43
43
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because access to the device met with a selection time out.
44
44
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because of a sequence error in the SCSI bus phase handling.
45
45
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because device returned an unknown status.
46
46
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because device is not ready.
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
SCSI command retried on hard disk.
Initialization failed.
Initialization canceled.
284
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
Mylex Error Codes Table
Table #1 - Mylex Error Codes (Sheet 3 of 8)
Gam_ev User_ev
ent
ent
Number Number
Priority
Number
Severity
Level
Description
47
47
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because device was not found on start up.
48
48
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because write operation of the ‘Configuration On Disk’
failed.
49
49
1
Serious
A hard disk failed because write operation of ‘Bad Data Table’ failed.
50
50
3
Warning
Physical device status changed to offline.
51
51
3
Warning
Physical device status changed to Hot Spare.
52
52
3
Warning
Physical device status changed to rebuild.
53
53
3
Warning
Physical device ID did not match.
54
54
3
Warning
Physical device failed to start.
55
55
3
Warning
Physical device negotiated different offset than config.
56
56
3
Warning
Physical device negotiated different bus width than config.
57
57
1
Serious
Physical drive missing on startup.
58
58
3
Warning
Rebuild startup failed due to lower disk capacity.
59
59
3
Warning
Physical drive is switching from a channel to the other channel.
60
60
2
Error
61
61
4
Information
96
96
1
Serious
128
128
4
Information
Consistency check is started.
129
129
4
Information
Consistency check is finished.
130
130
4
Information
Consistency check is cancelled.
131
131
2
Error
Consistency check on logical drive error.
132
132
2
Error
Consistency check on logical drive failed.
133
133
4
Information
134
134
1
Serious
135
135
2
Error
136
136
4
Information
Logical drive has been placed online.
137
137
4
Information
An automatic rebuild has started on logical drive.
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
Temporary-Dead physical drive is automatically made online.
A standby rebuild has started.
Device Loop Id Conflict (Soft Addressing) Detected.
Consistency check failed due to physical device failure.
Logical drive has been made offline.
Logical drive is critical.
285
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
Mylex Error Codes Table
Table #1 - Mylex Error Codes (Sheet 4 of 8)
Gam_ev User_ev
ent
ent
Number Number
Priority
Number
Severity
Level
Description
138
138
4
Information
A rebuild has started on logical drive.
139
139
4
Information
Rebuild on logical drive is over.
140
140
4
Information
Rebuild on logical drive is cancelled.
141
141
2
Error
Rebuild stopped with error.
142
142
2
Error
Rebuild stopped with error. New device failed.
143
143
2
Error
Rebuild stopped because logical drive failed.
144
144
4
Information
Logical drive initialization started.
145
145
4
Information
Logical drive initialization done.
146
146
4
Information
Logical drive initialization cancelled.
147
147
2
Error
Logical drive initialization failed.
148
148
4
Information
A logical drive has been found.
149
149
4
Information
A logical drive has been deleted.
150
150
4
Information
Expand Capacity Started.
151
151
4
Information
Expand Capacity Completed.
152
152
2
Error
153
153
4
Information
Bad Blocks found.
154
154
4
Information
System drive size changed.
155
155
4
Information
System drive type changed.
156
156
1
Serious
Bad data blocks found. Possible data loss.
157
157
3
Warning
System drive LUN mapping has been written to config.
158
158
1
Serious
Attempt to read data from block that is marked in Bad Data Table
159
159
2
Error
Data for Disk Block has been lost due to Logical Drive problem
160
160
2
Error
Temporary-Offline RAID5/RAID3 array is available to the user again with the
possibility of data loss in the array.
161
161
2
Error
Temporary-Offline RAID0+1/RAID1/RAID0/JBOD array is available to the user
again.
162
162
4
Information
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
Expand Capacity stopped with error.
An standby rebuild has started on logical drive.
286
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
Mylex Error Codes Table
Table #1 - Mylex Error Codes (Sheet 5 of 8)
Gam_ev User_ev
ent
ent
Number Number
Priority
Number
Severity
Level
Description
256
256
1
Serious
257
257
4
Information
258
258
1
Serious
259
259
4
Information
272
272
1
Serious
273
273
4
Information
274
274
1
Serious
275
275
4
Information
288
288
1
Serious
Over temperature. Temperature is above 70 degrees Celsius.
289
289
3
Warning
Temperature is above 50 degrees Celsius.
290
290
4
Information
291
291
1
Serious
292
292
4
Information
304
304
1
Serious
Storage Works enclosure reported failure state.
305
305
3
Warning
Storage Works enclosure reported critical state.
306
306
4
Information
Storage Works enclosure reported normal state.
307
307
4
Information
Uninterruptable Power Supply Disabled.
308
308
4
Information
Uninterruptable Power Supply AC Failed.
309
309
3
Warning
Uninterruptable Power Supply Battery Low.
310
310
1
Serious
Uninterruptable Power Supply Failed.
311
311
4
Information
320
320
1
Serious
321
321
4
Information
Fan has been restored.
322
322
4
Information
Fan is not present.
323
323
1
Serious
324
324
4
Information
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
Fan failure.
Fan has been restored.
Fan failure.
Storage cabinet fan is not present.
Power supply failure.
Power supply has been restored.
Power supply failure.
Storage cabinet power supply is not present.
Normal temperature has been restored.
Over temperature.
Storage cabinet temperature sensor is not present.
Uninterruptable Power Supply Normal.
Fan failure.
Power supply failure.
Power supply has been restored.
287
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
Mylex Error Codes Table
Table #1 - Mylex Error Codes (Sheet 6 of 8)
Gam_ev User_ev
ent
ent
Number Number
Priority
Number
Severity
Level
Description
325
325
4
Information
326
326
1
Serious
Temperature is over safe limit. Failure imminent.
327
327
3
Warning
Temperature is above working limit.
328
328
4
Information
Normal temperature has been restored.
329
329
4
Information
Temperature sensor is not present.
330
330
3
Warning
331
331
4
Information
332
332
1
Serious
Enclosure access is offline.
333
333
1
Serious
Enclosure Soft Addressing Detected.
334
334
4
Information
Enclosure services ready
384
384
4
Information
Array management server software started successfully.
385
385
2
Error
386
386
3
Warning
388
388
0
Critical
389
389
3
Warning
390
390
4
Information
391
391
0
Critical
392
392
4
Information
393
393
3
Warning
BBU Power Low.
394
394
4
Information
BBU Power OK.
395
395
0
Critical
396
396
4
Information
Controller powered on
397
397
4
Information
Controller is online.
398
398
0
Critical
399
399
3
Warning
400
400
4
Information
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
Power supply is not present.
Enclosure access critical.
Enclosure access has been restored.
Write back error.
Internal log structures getting full, PLEASE SHUTDOWN AND RESET THE
SYSTEM IN THE NEAR FUTURE.
Controller is dead. System is disconnecting from this controller.
Controller has been reset.
Controller is found.
Controller is gone. System is disconnecting from this controller.
BBU Present.
Controller is gone. System is disconnecting from this controller.
Controller is gone. System is disconnecting from this controller.
Controller’s partner is gone, controller is in failover mode now.
BBU reconditioning is started.
288
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
Mylex Error Codes Table
Table #1 - Mylex Error Codes (Sheet 7 of 8)
Gam_ev User_ev
ent
ent
Number Number
Priority
Number
Severity
Level
Description
401
401
4
Information
BBU reconditioning is finished.
402
402
4
Information
BBU reconditioning is canceled.
403
403
1
Serious
Installation aborted.
404
404
1
Serious
Controller firmware mismatch.
405
405
3
Warning
BBU removed.
406
406
1
Serious
WARM BOOT failed.
411
411
3
Warning
Controller entered Conservative Cache Mode.
412
412
3
Warning
Controller entered Normal Cache Mode.
413
413
3
Warning
Controller Device Start Complete.
414
414
3
Warning
Soft ECC error Corrected.
415
415
3
Warning
Hard ECC error Corrected.
416
416
1
Serious
BBU Recondition Needed.
417
417
3
Warning
Controller’s Partner Has Been Removed.
418
418
2
Error
419
419
3
Warning
Updated partner’s status.
420
420
3
Warning
Relinquished partner.
421
421
3
Warning
Inserted Partner.
422
422
3
Warning
Dual Controllers Enabled.
423
423
3
Warning
Killed Partner.
424
424
3
Warning
Dual Controllers entered Nexus.
425
425
1
Serious
Controller Boot ROM Image needs to be reloaded.
426
426
0
Critical
Controller is using default non-unique world-wide name.
512
512
4
Information
System started.-
513
513
4
Information
Size table full.-
514
514
4
Information
User logged in.-
515
515
4
Information
User logged out.-
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
BBU out of service.
289
000001628
MaxAttach NAS 6000 Administration Guide
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
Mylex Error Codes Table
Table #1 - Mylex Error Codes (Sheet 8 of 8)
Gam_ev User_ev
ent
ent
Number Number
Priority
Number
Severity
Level
Description
516
516
4
Information
517
517
1
Serious
518
518
4
Information
640
640
3
Warning
Channel Failed.
641
641
3
Warning
Channel Online.
642
642
1
Serious
Back End SCSI Bus Dead.
643
643
4
Information
Back End SCSI Bus Alive.
644
644
1
Serious
Back End Fibre Dead.
645
645
4
Information
Back End Fibre Alive.
700
700
3
Warning
Event Log Empty.
701
701
3
Warning
Event Log Entries Lost.
702
702
3
Warning
Request Sense
703
703
3
Warning
Set Real Time Clock.
800
800
3
Warning
New Configuration Received.
801
801
3
Warning
Configuration Cleared.
802
802
3
Warning
Configuration Invalid.
803
803
3
Warning
Configuration On Disk Access Error.
804
804
3
Warning
Configuration On Disk Converted.
805
805
3
Warning
Configuration On Disk Import Failed.
806
806
4
Information
A Debug Dump exists on this system.
807
807
4
Information
A Debug Dump exists on this system.
896
896
1
Serious
Internal Controller is in the hung state.
897
897
1
Serious
Internal Controller has encountered a Firmware breakpoint.
912
912
1
Serious
Internal Controller has encountered i960 processor specific error.
928
928
1
Serious
Internal Controller has encountered Strong-ARM processor specific error
4294967
295
0
Critical
Unknown
Chapter #14 - Appendix - Disk Array Error Codes
11/07/01 -- Revision 2.0.03A
Server alive.
Lost connection to server, or server is down.
Automatic reboot count has changed.
290
000001628