Guitar Resonator GR-Junior II User Manual

Guitar Resonator
GR-Junior II
User Manual
Copyright © by Vibesware, all rights reserved.
www.vibesware.com
Rev. 1.0
Contents
1 Introduction ...............................................................................................1
1.1 How does it work ? ...............................................................................1
1.2 Differences to the EBow and well known Sustainers ............................2
2 Fields of application .................................................................................3
2.1 Feedback playing everywhere / composing / recording ........................3
2.2 On stage ...............................................................................................3
2.3 New ways of playing .............................................................................4
3 Start-Up of the GR-Junior .........................................................................5
4 Playing techniques ...................................................................................5
4.1 Basics ...................................................................................................5
4.2 Harmonics control by positioning the Resonator ...................................6
4.3 Changing harmonics by phase shifting .................................................6
4.4 Some string vibration basics .................................................................6
4.5 Feedback of multiple strings .................................................................9
4.6 Limits of playing, pickup selection, and power setting ...........................9
5 Frequently asked questions and troubleshooting ................................10
1 Introduction
Thanks for choosing Vibesware ! Enjoy gorgeous sustaining feedback and have
lots of enjoyment and experimentation with your GR-Junior, the new compact
Guitar Resonator.
How does it work ?
Vibesware Guitar Resonators generate an alternating magnetic field from the
guitar pickup signal. The string vibration is amplified when positioning the
Resonator head near the strings. This vibration feeds back through the pickup so
that a closed loop occurs:
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With the GR you can create amazing feedback sounds, that sound very natural
because they come directly from the strings. Thus the sound is not as 'false' as
electronically generated feedback gadgets. The GR sounds totally natural, just like
a turned up amplifier, where the string feedback comes from the sound waves.
The usage of Guitar Resonators has many advantages:
●
Feedback is possible at any sound volume, even if playing with headphones.
●
The GR works fine with crunch or even clean sounds. It would take extreme
amplifier gain to get the same feedback tones with sound wave feedback.
●
The transition from normal tones into feedback can be controlled precisely
and is always reproducible. You don't need any time wasting experiments
with amplifier gain or loudspeaker distance.
●
With the strong magnetic field, you can generate extreme feedback
harmonics that cannot be generated with normal amplifier/speaker feedback.
1.1 Differences to the EBow and other Sustainers
The most popular magnetic string vibration device is the EBow developed in 1976.
This ingenious gadget is a hand-held device built for making single string
vibrations. Although lots of interesting tone effects can be produced with it, the
typical EBowTM playing is a bow like movement rather than a striking of the
strings. You don't use a plectrum for playing these desired effects. With this
technique cello like sounds can be produced. The Ebow is used all over the world
for special effects in dedicated lead phrases.
Next, Sustainers entered the guitar world, which can be found on special guitars
or they can be built into existing guitars. This is done by replacing the original
neck pickup by a so called Sustainer pickup. Unlike the EBow you can play with
both hands and you can play feedback with more than one string at the same
time. Another difference to the EBow is that the sound cannot be controlled by the
playing technique, because its position is fixed on the guitar. Both, the EBow and
Sustainers run with batteries.
By contrast Guitar Resonators provide the following features:
●
You can use both hands for normal playing. Feedback is created by
positioning the guitar neck to the Resonator. This is similar to the speaker
positioning for regular guitar to amplifier feedback techniques. However, the
onset of feedback and harmonics can be controlled much better by the
Resonator positioning. This feature alone is one of the main differences to
that of built in Sustainers. Plus, unlike the EBowTM you can get feedback
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with more than one string !
●
Electric guitars can be used without modification. You do not need a special
guitar nor any additions to your beloved guitar. Guitar Resonators are just
added to the equipment you are familiar with.
●
All Guitar Resonators have an external power supply, whereby the magnetic
field is much stronger than battery powered devices. This gives you the
ability to get feedback with very high or low strings too.
●
All Guitar Resonators have an external power supply, whereby the magnetic
field is much stronger than battery powered devices. This gives you the
ability to get great feedback with the high or low strings.
●
Built in Sustainers are connected to the bridge pickup, whereas the
Resonator is driven by the selected pickup(s). Feedback playing with
different pickups offers many different feedback sounds. This feature is
similar to real amplifier/speaker feedback.
In a nutshell, Guitar Resonators are all-purpose feedback machines. You can
keep your own equipment and natural playing style when adding the GR to your
set-up. It is easy to learn how to use and will give you a new dimension to your
guitar playing without any modification of your guitar or guitar sound. You can use
it as a reliable tool for placing precise feedback harmonics whenever you want
them. But this is just the beginning of your GR journey. Exploring further, you will
find new ways of playing guitar. And, as all classic effects show, it interacts
seamlessly with every player, because the sound comes not only from the device
but also from your playing technique.
2 Fields of application
2.1 Feedback playing everywhere / composing / recording
●
GR is the ideal device for home recording; playing into the PC for example.
Here you can directly record feedback at low volumes,even at night with
headphones. You get rich, sustained sound just like a loud amplifier going
into feedback and beautiful textured harmonics at any volume. Together with
PC recording tools (e.g. Guitar Rig) professional recordings with feedback
can be produced with a minimum effort and maximum playability.
●
In recording studios you can get the desired feedback sounds directly in the
control room. Precisely and always reproducible. No matter where your
roaringly loud amplifier is placed. There are no time wasting experiments
required for getting the desired feedback.
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2.2 On Stage
●
Perfect for total control and always reproducible feedback on stage.
Independent from monitor settings and amplifier gain. This makes fantastic
results possible on large or small stages. Even if using head sets instead of
stage monitors.
●
There is no need to turn away from the audience to your amp speaker for
getting feedback. Simply move the neck of your guitar towards the
Resonator for instant feedback. You can also fix the Resonator together with
a microphone on the same stand. Extensive feedback sounds are possible
whilst facing your audience.
●
If you plug your guitar directly into the PA, feedback from the monitor never
sounds as warm and rich as natural feedback from the guitar speaker. With
Guitar Resonators you will always get the same amazing sound, even in this
configuration.
2.3 New ways of playing
With a little practice, you will explore many new ways of feedback playing:
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Lead notes passing into feedback harmonics instantly make your playing
much more powerful and exciting. The sound is very fluid and expressive
when feedback is made whilst bending strings. During sustained feedback
the harmonics can be changed by moving the Resonator to another neck
position. This total control of feedback is delightful and cannot be achieved
with normal amplifier feedback techniques. Generally, it is a matter of luck
when searching for the desired harmonics, often your feedback is out of
control when using high distortion sounds or extensive sound volumes. This
is probably one of the reasons, why exact feedback tones are rarely
embedded in lead compositions. In most cases, there is no time in lead
phrases to wait for the feedback.
●
Feedback tones create a more atmospheric playing style. The GR can be a
most effective therapy for taming high speed players and encouraging
tasteful sustaining passages. Following the less is more principle, sustaining
notes with vibrato and variations of harmonics yield important points of
interest between speed phrases. These points of interest give the guitarist
total freedom for expression by using feedback together with vibrato,
bending and tremolo !
●
Outstanding feedback can be generated from clean/crunch sounds !
Feedback from high gain settings is to be expected but feedback with
crunch or clean sounds is out of this world ! Cleaner guitar sustain
transitioning into feedback is more distinctive and interesting within the
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overall band sound. We noticed that players start reducing distortion after
using the GR for a while, they got outstanding sustained tones with less
distortion which considerably improves punch and clarity. However, more
distortion makes finding great feedback sounds even easier. Someone told
us he never had any problems in creating feedback. He simply cascades
two distortion pedals and thereby gets feedback whenever he wants. Ok,
thats fine but it's a simple and crude solution. We all love tube sounds going
smoothly into distortion and sustain without unnecessary colouring from
distortion boxes. A feedback tone is much more than an oscillation which
sustains the tone, it colours the sound depending on the individual playing
technique !
●
If you like playing with pitch shifting devices like the Whammy pedal you
really should work on several voice feedback sounds giving amazing results,
unlike any regular guitar or synthesizer sound. And of course it is interesting
to use the Resonator together with other effects. Note that the Resonator
should be connected directely to your guitar. Other effects should always
plugged behind the Resonator Box. Delay effects in general sound good
with feedback. But WahWah pedals and bottlenecks are well suited as
additional effects too, since hands and foots are ready for control while
using the Resonator. There are no limits for new ideas and settings at all.
●
In general it is interesting to use the GR together with other effects (Note
that the Resonator should be connected directly to your guitar, other effects
should always plugged behind the Resonator Box). Delay effects in general
sound good with feedback. But also WahWah, modulation pedals and
bottlenecks are well suited as additional effects too. Hand and feet are free
for controlling your performance while using the Resonator. There simply
are no limits your imagination, ideas or settings, none at all.
●
Last but not least, amazing sounds can be created with piezo / transducer
equipped guitars that have steel strings ! This is ideal for creating very clean
acoustic type feedback sounds. Note that there is no direct feedback with
piezo pickups which allows a free positionig of the resonator head along the
strings.
3 Start-Up of the GR-Junior
After connecting to the power supply, directly plug your guitar to the input. Guitar
input and output are directly connected in order to output the pure guitar signal.
This output can be connected as usual with effects, PC or the guitar amplifier.
Control Elements:
a) The volume sets the power of the magnetic field. High power means
you don't need to go too close to the strings. But more power also
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increases the sensitivity towards undesired direct feedback from the
Resonator to the pickup (whistling).
b) Slider switch for changing harmonic modes.
4 Playing techniques
4.1 Basics
It works easily and effectively. Just hold the Guitar Resonator near the strings in
the neck area. The closer the resonator is, the stronger the string(s) are agitated
by the magnetic field. Feedback start and end points can be easily controlled with
the distance. The best way is to put the Resonator head close, without touching
the strings and to hold the Resonators Head at right angles to the guitar neck.
The blue lights intensity grows depending on the signal that drives the Resonator.
The brightness decreases when the string vibration dies away. Moving the
Resonator closer to the strings amplifies the vibration whereby the brightness
indicates increases in gain. To drive the Resonator sufficiently, the gain at your
guitar should be turned up to maximum. If you like playing with reduced gain this
must be compensated with the gain of the Resonator Box. However, this will
increase the unwanted pickup feedback sensitivity at full guitar volume, so a
reasonable compromise has to be found. The Resonator volume can also be
easily adpated while playing.
4.2 Changing harmonics by phase shifting
Phase shifting allows to switch between feedback harmonics (slider switch at the
Resonator Head).
4.3 Harmonics control by positioning the Resonator
The nice thing is that you get different harmonics depending on the Resonator
Head position along the neck. This is done by moving the guitar neck with your
body or with a direct arm movement. Players with low hanging guitars prefer
moving up the guitar neck to the Resonator (typical Hendrix like position). Players
with higher hanging guitars just need to move their body to the Resonator.
However, the important thing is to position the guitar near enough without
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touching the strings. By the way: As we all know, new strings are essential for rich
string harmonics. This holds true particularly with feedback harmonics !
4.4 Some string vibration basics
Perhaps you would like to understand more about the dependencies of driven
feedback harmonics, Resonator position, phase and pickup selection ? In that
case, the theory of stationary waves might help.
The fundamental tone has one antinode with a maximum amplitude at the half
length. Then the first octave occurs which has two antinodes, showing maximums
at 1/4 and 3/4. At 1/3 we can see three antinodes which can be found in the tone
as the quintal from the first octave. The second octave shows at 1/4 length and
the third from the second octave at 1/5. The third octave has six antinodes. The
overall tone is given by the superposition of key tone and all these harmonics. The
percentages of the key tone and the harmonics depend on the guitar
characteristics (body, bridge etc.), the string(s), the notes played and also the way
you strike the strings. The quality of the strings (old or new) also affects the
harmonics mix. These pictures also show the phase shifting along the string
length (the dashed lines mean the backward string movement). The first octave
for example can move in the opposite direction to the key tone along the neck.
This explains why the feedback turns from the key note to the first octave when
shifting the Resonators phase.
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The Resonators oscillating magnetic field offers a spectrum of frequencies from
which only string vibrations in phase are amplified. Finally, the frequency with the
largest amplitude is the winner. This frequency falls into feedback. At the same
time, reverse phase vibrations are damped. The amplitudes of the harmonics
change from zero to maximum along the guitar neck. However, phase and
amplitude changes along the guitar neck are the reason for the different feedback
harmonics on different Resonator positions.
If you like to go into more detail, you can see that the pickup selection has an
influence on the feedback harmonics too. Since the Resonator input comes from
the selected pickup, amplitude and phase of the magnetic oscillation depend on
the pickup position. The neck pickup for example shows much more key tone
amplitude than the bridge pickup where the amplitude of the first octave is much
smaller. As a consequence, the pickup selection also controls the feedback
harmonics. You can check this out simply by pickup switching while playing
feedback.
Last but not least the frequency characteristics of the pickups itself influence the
feedback harmonics. All this together makes clear why the Guitar Resonator
sounds individual depending on both, your instrument and your playing style.
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4.5 Feedback of multiple strings
Up to three strings can be agitated at the same time. This can be used for
feedback with power chords. It is normal here, that the feedback of one string
dominates. This is similar to amplifier feedback but with the difference that the
dominating string can be forced by the Resonators head position. This can be
done by moving the Resonator from the lower to the upper strings or the other
way round. By this the dominating string can be changed while playing.
4.6 Limits of playing, pickup selection and power setting
The Resonator has been designed for positioning in the neck area. Near the
activated pick-up undesired direct feedback from the Resonator to the selected
pickup may occur. The minimum distance depends on the Resonator volume
(70% is a good starting point). Begin playing with the bridge pickup. Normally, the
overall neck area can be used with it. The sensitivity not only depends on the
Resonator power but also on the pickup. In general humbuckers show less
sensitivity than single coils. With some practice you play closer by the strings
which enables you to reduce the Resonator power. Then, you can also play with
the neck/middle pickup. You should aim to work it out, because the feedbacks you
can achieve are truly rich and amazing !
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5 Frequently asked questions and troubleshooting
Problem
Solution
The light intensity at the
Resonator Head is poor and
the string agitation is weak
The guitar gain or Resonator gain is to low.
Another reason might be that pickup tone
control cuts the high frequencies which
downgrades the string agitation particular on
higher strings.
Pickup wheezing / impure tone
caused by magnetic
interference to the pickup(s)
The distance between the selected pickup and
the Resonator Head is too small or the gain of
the Resonator Box is too high. Single coils are
more sensitive than humbuckers. The
sensitivity also depends a little bit on the phase
setting. In most cases it is possible to find a
gain setting where the overall neck area can be
played.
Another possible reason might be that there is
another effect placed between the guitar and
the Resonator box. In general, effect boxes
should be connected after the Guitar
Resonator.
I am used to play with reduced
guitar pickup gain and would
like to use the Resonator also
with this setting.
As a simple solution, you could use a volume
pedal after the Resonator. If you dont want this,
there is another workaround: Try to split the
guitar signal with a splitter box. One signal goes
to the amplifier and the other goes to a
compressor/Sustainer pedal and then to the
Resonator. By this the Resonator gets a
stronger signal. If the sensitibity at turned up
guitar volume becomes too high, the
compressor pedal can be bypassed
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