MaxNAS R8
Owner’s Guide
February 2010
www.MicroNet.com
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Table of Contents ................................................................................................................................................. 2
FCC Compliance Statement ................................................................................................................................ 4
Warranty Information .......................................................................................................................................... 5
Welcome Note ..................................................................................................................................................... 6
Chapter 1- Getting Started .................................................................................................................................. 7
1. Features and Benefits ............................................................................................................................... 7
2. System Requirements and Compatibility . ................................................................................................ 7
3. Safety Warnings ........................................................................................................................................ 8
4. What’s Included ......................................................................................................................................... 8
5. Unpacking your MaxNAS R8...................................................................................................................... 8
6. Installing your MaxNAS in a rack.............................................................................................................. 8
7. The MaxNAS R8 Interface Components.................................................................................................. 10
8. Visual and Audible Indicators . ............................................................................................................... 11
9. Hot Plug Drive Replacement .................................................................................................................. 11
Chapter 2- Connecting the MaxNAS R8 ........................................................................................................... 12
1. Connections.............................................................................................................................................. 12
2. Accessing the System Administration for the first time . ....................................................................... 13
2.1 Wizard Installation and Usage ...................................................................................................... 13
2.2 Launching the GUI, DHCP Environment ...................................................................................... 14
2.3 Static IP Environment .................................................................................................................... 14
2.4 Logging In ...................................................................................................................................... 14
3. LCD Operation.......................................................................................................................................... 15
3.1 USB Copy......................................................................................................................................... 15
3.2 Management Mode ........................................................................................................................ 15
4. Attaching External Disks.......................................................................................................................... 16
Chapter 3- Administering the MaxNAS R8 ....................................................................................................... 17
The Navigation Tree .................................................................................................................................... 19
1. System Information ................................................................................................................................. 20
1.1 System Information ........................................................................................................................ 20
1.2 System Services Status ................................................................................................................... 20
1.3 System Logs ................................................................................................................................... 20
2. System Management ............................................................................................................................... 21
2.1 System Time ................................................................................................................................... 21
2.2 Remove Notifications ..................................................................................................................... 21
2.3 Firmware Upgrade ......................................................................................................................... 21
2.4 Power On/Off Schedule Control ................................................................................................... 21
2.5 UPS Monitoring .............................................................................................................................. 22
2.6 Wake on LAN ................................................................................................................................. 22
2.7 SNMP .............................................................................................................................................. 22
2.8 Utilities ........................................................................................................................................... 22
2.8.1 Change Admin password ...................................................................................................... 22
2.8.2 Save/Restore Configuration .................................................................................................. 22
2.8.3 Reset to Factory Default ....................................................................................................... 22
2.8.4 Reboot/Shutdown ................................................................................................................. 23
2.8.5 File System Check ................................................................................................................. 23
3. Network Configuration ........................................................................................................................... 23
3.1 LAN1 (“WAN”) Configuration ........................................................................................................ 23
3.2 LAN2 (“LAN”) Configuration ......................................................................................................... 25
3.3 Network Services Configuration ................................................................................................... 25
3.3.1 SMB/CIFS .............................................................................................................................. 26
3.3.2 Apple File Protocol (AFP) . ................................................................................................... 26
3.3.3 NFS ........................................................................................................................................ 26
3.3.4 FTP Services .......................................................................................................................... 26
3.3.5 DLNA Media Streaming Server ............................................................................................. 27
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
2
Table of Contents
3.3.6 Web Access Control . ............................................................................................................. 27
3.3.7 UPNP Discovery .................................................................................................................... 27
3.3.8 Nsync/Rsync Target Configuration ....................................................................................... 28
4. Storage Configuration ............................................................................................................................. 28
4.1 Disk Information . .......................................................................................................................... 28
4.2 RAID Menu .................................................................................................................................... 29
4.3 iSCSI Space Allocation ................................................................................................................... 32
4.4 Shared Folder Management ........................................................................................................... 34
4.5 iSCSI Stacking Configuration ........................................................................................................ 34
5. User and Group Configuration ............................................................................................................... 38
5.1 ADS Authentication configuration . ............................................................................................... 38
5.2 Group administration .................................................................................................................... 38
5.3 Local user configuration ................................................................................................................ 39
5.4 Batch user and group creation ..................................................................................................... 40
6. Application Service Controls .................................................................................................................. 41
6.1 Print Server Management .............................................................................................................. 41
6.2 iTunes Server Management ........................................................................................................... 41
7. Module Management ............................................................................................................................... 41
8. Backup and Synchronization Services ................................................................................................... 42
8.1 Creating a backup task .................................................................................................................. 43
8.2 Setting Up an Nsync Target on an Nsync Device ........................................................................ 44
8.2 Setting Up an Nsync Target on Another Device . ......................................................................... 44
8.4 Resoting from Backup ................................................................................................................... 44
8.5 Editing an existing backup task .................................................................................................... 44
8.6 Deleting a backup task . ................................................................................................................ 44
Chapter 4- Connecting Users ............................................................................................................................ 45
1. SMB/CIFS User Access Configuration .................................................................................................... 45
1.1 Mapping a Network Drive (Windows) .......................................................................................... 45
1.2 Mapping a Newtork Drive (OS-X) ................................................................................................ 46
2. Using Webdisk ......................................................................................................................................... 47
3. Using The Photo Server .......................................................................................................................... 49
4. Using iSCSI .............................................................................................................................................. 51
4.1 Windows 2000 and newer.............................................................................................................. 51
4.2 Mac OS X ....................................................................................................................................... 53
5. Connecting to a MaxNAS R8 Attached Printer ...................................................................................... 55
5.1 Windows XP ................................................................................................................................... 55
5.2 Windows Vista/Windows 7 ............................................................................................................ 55
5.3 Mac OS X ....................................................................................................................................... 57
Chapter 5- Understanding RAID ...................................................................................................................... 58
Chapter 6- Troubleshooting .............................................................................................................................. 61
Daily Use Tips ............................................................................................................................................. 61
General Use Precautions ............................................................................................................................. 61
Resetting the MaxNAS R8............................................................................................................................. 62
Frequently Asked Questions ....................................................................................................................... 62
Appendix A- Getting Help ................................................................................................................................ 64
Appendix B- RAID Level Comparison Table . .................................................................................................. 65
Appendix C- Active Directory............................................................................................................................ 66
Appendix D- Supported UPS List ..................................................................................................................... 67
Appendix E- Glossary ....................................................................................................................................... 70
Appendix F- Product Specifications .................................................................................................................. 77
Appendix G- Licence and Copyrights .............................................................................................................. 79
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
3
FCC Compliance Statement
Federal Communications Commission
Radio Frequency Interference Statement
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to
part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference
in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not
installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio or television
reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on. The user is encouraged to try to
correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by the party responsible for compliance could void the user’s
authority to operate the equipment.
Only use shielded cables, certified to comply with FCC Class B limits, to attach this equipment. Failure to install
this equipment as described in this manual could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
Canadian Department of Communications Compliance: This equipment does not exceed Class B limits per radio
noise emissions for digital apparatus set out in the Radio Interference Regulation of the Canadian Department of
Communications. Operation in a residential area may cause unacceptable interference to radio and TV reception
requiring the owner or operator to take whatever steps are necessary to correct the interference.
Conformite aux regiements du Department Canadien de Communications: Cet equipement n’excede pas les
limites de Classe B concernaut les bruits des emissions de radio pour le dispositif digital etablies par le Reglement
d’Interference de Radio du Departement Canadien de Communications. L’operation de cet equipement dans un
quartier residential peut occasionner des parasites inacceptables dans la reception de la radio ou de la television
exigeant le proprietaire ou l’operateur de faire routes les necessaires pour corriger cet interference.
FTZ/BTZ German Postal Service Notice: We hereby certify that the ADV, SB, SBS, SS, SBX, SBT, MO, MS, MR, MT,
MD, CPK, CPKT, CPKD, DD and DDW products are in compliance with Postal Regulation 1046/1984 and are RFI
supclicked. The marketing and sale of the equipment was reported to the German Postal Service. The right to
retest this equipment to verify compliance with the regulation was given to the German Postal Service.
Bescheinigung des Herstellers/Importeurs: Hiermit wird bescheinigt, daB der/die/das: SB, SBS, SS, SBX, SBT,
MO, MS, MR, MT, MD, CPK, CPKT, CPKD, DD, DDW in Ubereinstimmung mit den Bestimmungen der: VFG1046,
VFG243 funk-enstort ist. Der Deutschen Bundespost wurde das Inverkehrbringen dieses Gerates angezeigt
and die Berechtigung zur Uberprdfung der Serie auf Einhaltung der Bestimmungen eingeraumt MicroNet
Technology, Inc.
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
4
Warranty
Limitations of Warranty and Liability
MicroNet Technology has tested the hardware described in this manual and reviewed its contents. In no event
will MicroNet or its resellers be liable for direct, indirect, incidental, or consequential damage resulting from any
defect in the hardware or manual, even if they have been advised of the possibility of such damages. In particular, they shall have no liability for any program or data stored in or used with MicroNet products, including the
costs of recovering or reproducing these programs or data.
During the specified warranty period, MicroNet guarantees that the product will perform according to specifications determined by the manufacturer, and will be free of defects. Parts and labor of the received product, and
replacement parts and labor are guaranteed during the specified warranty period. The warranty covers defects
encountered in normal use of the product, and does not apply when damage occurs due to improper use, abuse,
mishandling, accidents, sand, dirt, excessive dust, water damage, or unauthorized service. The product must be
packed in its original packing material when shipped, or the warranty will be void. In all cases, proof of purchase must be presented when a warranty claim is being made.
This manual is copyrighted by MicroNet Technology. All rights are reserved. This documentation may not, in
whole or part, be copied, photocopied, reproduced, translated, or reduced to any electronic medium or machine
readable form without prior consent in writing from MicroNet.
MicroNet and the MicroNet logo are registered trademarks of MicroNet Technology. FireWire, the FireWire logo,
Macintosh, and the MacOS Logo are trademarks of Apple Computer Inc. Microsoft Windows and the Windows
Logo are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Technical Support Policy
If you have a problem installing your system or suspect it is malfunctioning, please contact the Authorized
MicroNet Reseller from whom you purchased the system. If the reseller fails to resolve the problem, call
MicroNet’s Help Desk for assistance at (310) 320-0772. Please have the model, serial number, date of purchase,
and the reseller’s name available before calling. If possible, call from a telephone near the system so we can
more readily direct you to make any necessary system corrections, should they be required.
Returning Materials
If a reseller or MicroNet Technician finds it necessary to have the system returned for testing or servicing, a
Return Materials Authorization (RMA) number will be issued. The RMA number must be placed on the outside
of the carton in large, visible letters near the address label. Return the complete system including all cables
and software. The system must be packed in the original packing materials and shipped prepaid. MicroNet will
repair the system and return it prepaid by similar common carrier and priority. Please record the RMA number
and make reference to it when inquiring on the status of the system. A returned unit found to be fault-free will
carry a $65.00 charge for service and repackaging.
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
5
Welcome
Welcome From MicroNet Technology
We are pleased that you have chosen the MaxNAS R8. Our systems are designed for speed,
reliability, compatibility, and performance. We think you will find the system easy to install,
and a productive addition to your computer system. Please take a moment to register your
product online at www.MicroNet.com.
This manual presumes that you are familiar with standard computer operations; this includes
copying files, opening documents, clicking with the mouse, and organizing files or folders
within other folders. If you are unfamiliar with these operations, please consult the User’s Guide
that was supplied with your computer system. Your computer dealer and local user’s groups
are also good sources of information. After you are comfortable with the operation of your
computer, continue reading this manual which describes hardware installation and operation.
Your comments assist us in improving and updating our products. Please feel free to share
them with us. Please send comments to:
MicroNet Technology
Attn: Customer Service
20525 Manhattan Place
Torrance, CA 90501
Internet: http://www.MicroNet.com
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
6
1-Getting Started
Chapter 1- Getting Started
Thank you for purchasing The Micronet MaxNAS R8 storage solution. With speed, high
capacity, ease of use, and support for numerous applications, MaxNAS R8 is the ideal solution
for all of your data storage needs.
Please take advantage of the information contained within this manual to ensure easy setup
and configuration. If at any time you require technical assistance, Micronet’s Help Desk is
available at 310-320-0772 or email us at support@micronet.com
1. Features and Benefits
MaxNAS R8 is a versatile and powerful storage solution, allowing it to be utilized in several
different roles:
•
•
•
•
As
As
As
As
a
a
a
a
shared storage device for multiple PCs, Macs, and UNIX/Linux workstations
central, fault tolerant data server for a workgroup or network
central backup station
central hub for print services, media streaming, and unattended downloading
Benefits:
•Easy-to-use for non-MIS personnel
•SATA (Serial ATA) disk channel interface
•Networked Storage on Gigabit Ethernet
•Easy to use Graphical User Interface
Networking Features:
•2x 10/100/1000 auto-sensing Ethernet ports
•Ethernet link aggregation with failover and
load balancing
•iSCSI services concurrent with NAS
Data Reliability Features:
•RAID Level 0, 1, 5, 6, Span
•Multiple LUN support
•RAID Auto Rebuild
•Network Backup
•Hot Swap/Hot Spare disk support
•Disk Roaming
Network Services:
•Windows Client Support with Active
Directory integration
•UNIX/Linux Client Support
•Apple OS X Client Support
•FTP, Webdisk, Secure Webdisk
•DLNA streaming server
• Attach and share USB and eSATA devices
2. System Requirements and Compatibility
The MaxNAS R8 is designed for universal compatibility. It features SMB/CIFS, NFS, FTP, iSCSI,
USB direct attachment, as well as Webdisk/Secure Webdisk http-based connectivity for host
access. This manual will address Windows XP and newer, and Macintosh OS X 10.4 and
newer hosts only but the concepts and connectivity features are available to other operating
environments as well.
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
7
1-Getting Started
3. Safety Warnings
For your safety, please read and follow the following safety warnings:
• Read this manual thoroughly before attempting to set up your MaxNAS R8.
• DO NOT attempt to repair your MaxNAS R8 under any circumstances. In the case of
malfunction, turn off the power immediately and have it repaired at a qualified service
center. Contact Micronet Technical Support for details.
• DO NOT allow anything to rest on the power cord and DO NOT place the power cord in
an area where it can be stepped on. Carefully place connecting cables to avoid stepping
or tripping on them.
• Your MaxNAS R8 can operate normally under temperatures between 0°C and 40°C, with
relative humidity of 20% – 85%. Using the MaxNAS R8 under extreme environmental
conditions could damage the unit.
• Ensure that the MaxNAS R8 is provided with the correct supply voltage (AC 100V ~ 240V,
50/60 Hz, 3A). Plugging the MaxNAS R8 to an incorrect power source could damage the
unit.
• Do NOT expose the MaxNAS R8 to dampness, dust, or corrosive liquids.
• Do NOT place the MaxNAS R8 on any uneven surfaces.
• DO NOT place the MaxNAS R8 in direct sunlight or expose it to other heat sources.
• DO NOT use chemicals or aerosols to clean the MaxNAS R8. Unplug the power cord and
all connected cables before cleaning.
• DO NOT place any objects on the MaxNAS R8 or obstruct its ventilation slots to avoid
overheating the unit.
• Keep packaging out of the reach of children.
• If disposing of the device, please follow your local regulations for the safe disposal of
electronic products to protect the environment.
4. What’s Included
Your MaxNAS R8 comes with the following items:
1
8
1
1
1
2
2
2
MaxNAS R8 unit
Disk Drive Modules
Set of drive locking keys
MaxNAS R8 Product CD
Quick Install Guide
power cord
Cat5e Gigabit Ethernet cable
Racking Rails
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
8
5. Unpacking the MaxNAS R8
Please unpack your MaxNAS R8 in a static free environment, carefully making sure not to
damage or discard any of the packing material. If the RAID subsystem appears damaged, or
if any items of the contents listed below are missing or damaged, please contact your dealer
or distributor immediately.
In the unlikely event you may need to return the MaxNAS R8 for repair or upgrade, please
use the original packing material to ensure safe transport.
6. Installing your MaxNAS R8 in a rack
Your MaxNAS R8 includes fixed mount racking rails. In order to install the MaxNAS R8 with
the included rails, please remove any side covers of the racking cabinet before proceeding.
1. Affix the rails to the rear racks 1
1
2. Affix the front ears to the front racks 2
3. Affix the rails to the MaxNAS 3
3
1
2
3
2
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
9
1-Getting Started
7. The MaxNAS R8 interface components
The following figures illustrate the connector locations for the RAID subsystems.
FRONT VIEW
Power Switch
Power Indicator LED
System Reset Switch
Fan Fault LED Indicator
Alarm Mute Button
USB Ports
LCD Control Navigation Keys
System Display Screen
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Drive Power LED
Drive Activity/Fault Indicator LED
Canister Lock
Canister Release Latch
Canister Handle
REAR VIEW
Reset Button
Power Connectors (2)
Hot Swappable Power Supplies (2)
Master Power Switches (2)
eSATA Expansion Port
USB Expansion Ports (2)
UPS Communication Port (serial)
LAN 2 RJ45 Connector
LAN 1 RJ45 Connector
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
10
1-Getting Started
8. Visual and Audible Indicators
The MaxNAS R8 has an LCD panel, LEDs, and a buzzer to inform the user of the overall health
and function of the unit. The following chart describes the various conditions indicated:
Indicator
Normal Status
Problem Indication
System Error LED
Off
Glows red to indicate system fault. Log into the
management GUI for further information
Blinks green when there is network
activity on the LAN 1 port. A steady
LAN1 LED
green glow means there is a link but
no activity.
Blinks green when there is network
activity on the LAN 1 port. A steady
LAN2 LED
green glow means there is a link but
no activity
Glows blue on Power Up
Power Button LED
Blinks blue on eSATA access
Disk drive power LED Glows blue
Disk Activity/Fault
LED
Off/blinks green during hard drive
read and write activity
LED does not light up (no link)
LED does not light up (no link)
LED does not light up on power
LED does not light up
Blinks red to indicate disk drive error
9. Hot plug Drive Replacement
In the event of a drive failure, the RAID subsystem supports the ability to hot-swap drives
without powering down the system. A disk can be disconnected, removed, or replaced with a
different disk without taking the system off-line. In a fault tolerant array, the RAID rebuilding
will proceed automatically in the background (see chapter 5, “Understanding RAID” for more
information.)
A drive failure will illuminate amber the Disk Activity/Fault LED on the affected drive canister.
To replace a drive, please follow these steps:
1.Make sure the disk canister locking mechanism (see page 9, “The MaxNAS R8 Interface
components”) is in the up-down position (use the included key to turn the mechanism.)
2.Click down on the disk canister release latch (see page 9, “The MaxNAS R8 Interface
components”) to release the drive tray.
3.Gently pull out the disk drive tray handle and slide out the drive tray.
4. To replace: Slide in the replacement drive tray with the tray handle open. When the tray is
slid all the way into the MaxNAS R8, push the tray handle closed.
!
IMPORTANT: NEVER remove a drive tray without replacing it. Operating the RAID with a drive tray
missing will disrupt airflow and may cause the MaxNAS R8 to fail.
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
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2-Connecting the MaxNAS R8
Chapter 2- Connecting the MaxNAS R8
1. Connect Your MaxNAS R8
Before you begin, please install your MaxNAS R8 in a properly ventilated rack (please see
“Installing your MaxNAS in a rack, page 8)
Step 1. Remove the disk canisters from the packing material and carefully insert into the MaxNAS R8.
Step 2. Secure each canister into position and push the latch until it snaps into place.
Step 3. Connect the provided power cords into the power sockets on the back panel. Plug the
other end of the cords into power sockets. Make sure the power switches are in the
on position (“-”)
Step 4. Connect an Ethernet cable from your network to LAN1 (DHCP environment) or LAN2
(static IP) port on the back panel.
Step 5. Press the power button on the front panel. The MaxNAS R8 will boot. The Power
indicator light should glow blue, and the LAN LED corresponding to the connected
interface will glow or blink green. All the HDD Power LEDs on each HDD tray should
glow blue.
!
IMPORTANT! If Any LED glows red and the system emits a continuous beeping sound, then the system is
reporting fault. Refer to Appendix A: Troubleshooting for further information.
2. Accessing System Administration for the first time
The MaxNAS R8 comes pre-configured with the LAN1 Ethernet port set to DHCP (Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol) and the LAN2 Ethernet port set to a static IP address, 192.168.2.100.
The current IP addresses are displayed on the LCD panel. The default WINS (Windows Internet
Naming Service) for the MaxNAS R8 is “MaxNAS”. Included with your MaxNAS R8 is a discovery
wizard for Mac and PC, which allows clickIMPORTANT! If you are adding a MaxNAS R8 to a
and-select simplicity; simply install the wizard
network with existing MaxNAS products, please make
software, launch it, and the wizard discovers
sure to assign each unit a different name. See Chapter
3, Section 2.3 for more information.
your MaxNAS R8 for administration.
!
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
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2-Connecting the MaxNAS R8
2.1 Wizard Installation and Usage
!
IMPORTANT! The setup wizard uses TCP port 10000 and UDP ports 11000-11001 For communication. If you
are using a software firewall, please make sure to unblock those ports in order for the wizard to get access to
the MaxNAS R8.
2.1.1 Macintosh OS X
The wizard application for Mac OS X is located on your MaxNAS R8 CD in the
“wizards” folder. You may launch the wizard directly from the CD, or you
can copy it to your Applications directory. Launch the wizard by double
clicking the “Setup Wizard” Icon.
2.1.2 Microsoft Windows
The wizard installation files for Windows are located on your MaxNAS R8 CD in the “wizards”
folder. Install the wizard by double clicking
the file named “setup.exe” and follow the
instructions on the screen. Once complete,
you may launch the MicroNet setup wizard
by clicking the “Setup Wizard” shortcut (by
default the shortcut is installed to “StartAll Programs- MicroNet- MicroNet Setup
Wizard- Setup Wizard”.)
2.1.3 Using the Wizard
When the wizard is launched, it will briefly
display a welcome window followed by
the main application Interface (Illustrated
right) at the Device Discovery Stage. All
discovered MicroNet MaxNAS devices will
appear in the main discover window, including the following details:
DNS domain
IP Address
MAC Address LAN port connected
Gateway
Firmware revision
Netmask
Addressing Mode
(DHCP/Static)
To administer a MaxNAS R8, select the unit
desired in the device discovery window click
Start Browser to launch the web administration
interface. If the MaxNAS R8 is outside
your subnet and unreachable, click Next to
change the IP address assignment.
2.1.3.1 Logging in- Enter the administrative
password (default is “admin”) and click
Next
.
2.1.3.2 In the Network Configuration screen you
may change the hostname, enable/disable DHCP or set static IP addressing. Click “Next” to
continue. No changes need be made to continue. For more information regarding Network
configuration, please see Chapter 3, Section 3. Click Next to proceed to the Change
Password screen or click Exit to end the wizard session.
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
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2-Connecting the MaxNAS R8
2.1.3.3 You may change the password by entering a new “New Password” field, and re-enter
the password (case sensitive) in the “Confirm Password” field. Click End to conclude
the wizard session.
2.2 Launching the IP Storage Administration GUI, DHCP Environment
!
Windows hosts can access the MaxNAS R8 via WINS. Mac OS X and *nix based workstations may not support
WINS and would require your network administrator to provide the newly assigned IP address before accessing
the MaxNAS R8.
2.2.1 Make sure your MaxNAS R8 is connected via LAN1 to a hub or a switch that is
connected to the DHCP server
2.2.2 (Windows hosts) Point your browser to “http://
MaxNAS R8”
2.2.3 (Windows UPNP enabled hosts) Windows XP
and newer support UPNP discovery. To enable
UPNP, navigate to “My Network Places” and select
“Show icons for networked UPnP devices.” Confirm
the operation in the confirmation dialog box. Once
UPnP is enable, a Remote UPnP device icon should
appear. Double Click the UPnP icon for the MaxNAS
R8, and a browser session will automatically launch.
2.3 Launching the IP Storage Administration GUI,
Static IP Environment
2.3.1 Make sure your MaxNAS R8 is connected via
LAN2 to a hub or a switch that is connected to
Note:
your workstation
The UPNP Icon for MaxNAS R8 may
2.3.2 Configure the IP address of your workstation blink in the
explorer windows. This is normal
to 192.168.2.101, subnet mask 255.255.255.0. behavior.
Refer to your operating system’s documentation
for more information on this procedure.
2.3.3 Point your browser to “http://192.168.2.100”
2.4 Logging In
The default administrative User ID and password on the
MaxNAS R8 are:
UserID: admin
Password: admin
click the “Admin” button, and enter the userID and
password. You are now ready to administer and
customize your MaxNAS R8.
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
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2-Connecting the MaxNAS R8
3. LCD Operation
The MaxNAS R8 is equipped with an LCD on the front for easy status display and setup. There
are four buttons on the front panel to control the LCD functions: Up (▲), Down (▼), Enter
(↵) and Escape (ESC) keys. The following table illustrates the keys on the front control panel:
Icon
▲
▼
↵
ESC
Function
Up Button
Down Button
Enter
Escape
Description
Select the previous configuration settings option.
Select the next configuration settings option.
Enter the selected menu option, sub-menu, or parameter setting.
Escape and return to the previous menu.
During normal operation, the LCD will be in Display Mode. The following information will
rotate every two seconds on the LCD display.
Item
Host Name
WAN
LAN
Link Aggregation
Disk Info
RAID
System Fan
CPU Fan
2008/06/16 12:00
Description
Current host name of the system.
Current WAN IP setting.
Current LAN IP setting.
Current Link Aggregation status
Current status of disk slot has been installed
Current RAID status.
Current system fan status.
Current CPU fan status
Current system time.
3.1 USB Copy
The USB Copy function enables you to copy files stored on USB devices such as USB disks
and digital cameras to the MaxNAS R8 with a press of a button. To use USB copy, Plug your
USB device into the front USB port, and press the Down Button (▼). The LCD will display
MicroNet MaxNAS R8
USB Copy?
Press Enter (↵) to initiate the process. All of data on the external disk will be copied into
system share named “USBcopy”.
3.2 Management Mode
To enter into front panel management mode,
press Enter (↵). An “Enter Password” prompt will
show on the LCD. The default LCD password is
“0000”. Enter the system password followed by
Enter (↵).
Item
LAN Setting
WAN Setting
Link Agg. Setting
Change Admin Passwd
Reset to Default
Exit
Note:
You can also change the admin password
using the Web Administration Interface (“System”
-> “Administrator Password.”) For more on the Web
Administration Interface, see Chapter 3: System
Management.
Description
IP address and netmask of your LAN1 port.
IP address and netmask of your LAN2 ports.
Select Load Balance or Failover.
Change administrator’s password for LCD operation.
Reset system to factory defaults.
Exit Management Mode and return to Display Mode.
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4. Adding External Disks
The MaxNAS R8 has two rear USB ports, two front USB ports, and one eSATA port for attaching
external storage devices such as the Fantom Drives G-Force Megadisk lines of products,
formatted in FAT32 or NTFS. Please note that NTFS volumes will be available in read only mode.
The MaxNAS R8 supports up to 6 external storage devices. Attached disks are accessible by
navigating to \\[MaxNAS R8]\usbhdd\sd[x]\[y]
IMPORTANT: The MaxNAS R8 cannot format
Where: [MaxNAS R8] is the netbios name or
external disks. In order to access external disks
IP address of the MaxNAS R8, [x] refers to the
over the network, make sure your external disk is
port the disk is attached to, and [y] refers to the
formatted as FAT32 or NTFS. The MaxNAS R8
can access NTFS partitions for reading only.
partition number. See chapter 4, Connecting Users,
for more information on accessing shared data.
!
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Chapter 3- Administering the MaxNAS R8
This chapter describes the menu and control structure for your MaxNAS R8. The configuration
is firmware-based and its operation is independent of host computer type or operating system.
Connecting to the MaxNAS R8 web interface is as easy as typing its IP address or WINS name
into the navigation bar of an Internet browser window. Once you have done so, you will be
presented the initial login screen. There are three options on this page: System Administration,
Web Disk and Photo Server.
Note: The MaxNAS R8 can be configured to require SSL encrypted connections only. If Web Access
Control was configured in this manner, the webUI will be accessible by using HTTPS://[MaxNAS
address]. For more information on setting web access control, see section 3.3.6 of this chapter.
In this chapter we will explore the Administration section of the web interface. The Web Disk
and Photo Server pages will be discussed in later chapters.
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To log in to the MaxNAS R8 administration interface, click “Admin” and enter the Administrator
password.
By default, the Administrator
IMPORTANT! Only one administrator login
password is “admin”.
!
may be logged in to the web interface at a time.
At initial login, the user will be greeted with
the Product Information Screen:
The administration user interface utilizes a paned desktop motif, and is organized in three
sections:
1. The navigation pane (left)
2. The Detailed Transaction pane (right)
3. System Health Indicator pane (bottom)
All Functions are accessible from the navigation pane, which is organized as illustrated in the
table on the next page:
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The Main Menu Navigation Tree
1. System information
1.1 Product Information
1.2 System / Service Status
1.3 System Logs
2. System Management
2.1 Time Settings
2.2 System Notification Settings
2.3 Firmware Upgrade
2.4 Scheduled power on/off
2.5 UPS Settings
2.6 Wake on LAN settings
2.7 SNMP configuration
2.8 Utilities
2.8.1 Administrator Password
2.8.2 Configuration Management
2.8.3 Factory Restoration
2.8.4 Reboot & Shutdown
2.8.5 File System Check
3. Network Services Management
3.1 WAN Configuration
3.2 LAN Configuration
3.3 Samba / CIFS configuration
3.4 AFP configuration
3.5 NFS configuration
3.6 FTP configuration
3.7 Media Server configuration
3.8 HTTP / Web Disk configuration
3.9 UPnP configuration
3.10 Nsync Target configuration
3.11 Bonjour (Discovery service for iTunes streaming)
4. Storage Settings
4.1 Disk Information
4.2 RAID configuration
4.3 Space Allocation
4.4 Shared Folder management
4.5 iSCSI Stacking configuration
4.6 ISO Mounting management
5. User and Group Authentication
5.1 Active Directory Services configuration
5.2 Local Users and Groups
5.3 Batch Input management
6. Application Server
6.1 Print Server
6.2 iTunes Music Server
7. Module Management
8. Backup
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1. System Information
1.1 System Information
This page is the first page you see when you enter the MaxNAS R8 web interface. On this
page you will see basic information about the RAID subsystem including the firmware version
and the current uptime.
1.2 System and Services Status
This page displays information about the current status of the MaxNAS R8 including CPU load,
Fan Speed and the current status of each supported network service.
1.3 System Logs
The MaxNAS R8 keeps logs for all system events, major or minor. For your convenience log
entries are color-coded and categorized by importance.
Black indicates minor status or
updates including administrator logins, reboots and
normal system activity.
including RAID subsystem events, status
Blue indicates a warning indication or
updates and minor errors.
including RAID system failure, degradation and failed
Red indicates serious errors or
administrator login attempts.
For your convenience there are filter buttons across the top of the System Logs page- clicking
one of these filter buttons will display only those errors that match that category. Beneath
the filter buttons are some additional features. Clicking the “Download Log File” button will
allow you to download the currently displayed list of log entries, and “Truncate Log File” will
remove all of the currently displayed log entries.
Beneath the Logs are the page controls and the refresh button.
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2. System Management
The System Management Configuration menu contains basic system settings and configuration
options. It is strongly suggested that you go through each of these menus at least once to
ensure that you are taking advantage of everything the MaxNAS R8 has to offer.
2.1 Time
This settings page is where you would go to set the date and time for your MaxNAS R8. You
can also configure the MaxNAS R8 to act as your local NTP server or to connect to one of a
list of popular NTP servers.
2.2 Notification
This menu has all of the system controls for error event notification. By Default the system
buzzer is the only enabled error indicator, but you can add e-mail notification here by enabling
this feature. You can set the MaxNAS R8 to e-mail up to four separate e-mail accounts.
Enable or Disable system beeper
Enable or Disable e-mail notification of system problems.
Enter your network’s SMTP server’s IP address and port (commonly 25)
Set SMTP Authentication type and SMTP account ID and password (if required). login
credentials may be required to authenticate the MaxNAS R8 to the SMTP serverConsult your network administrator for more information.
Email Sender address
Recipients’ (up to 4) e-mail addresses for notification of system events.
2.3 Firmware Upgrade
MicroNet strives to continually improve our products, and from time to time will release
firmware updates for the MaxNAS R8. Firmware will either be made available on MicroNet’s
website or provided by MicroNet Technical Support. To update the firmware, click the browse
icon to the right of the ‘firmware’ dialog and navigate to the firmware file that you have
downloaded. To initiate the firmware update process click ‘Apply’. After the firmware update
has completed the web interface will prompt you
IMPORTANT: Make sure all user data and
to restart the MaxNAS R8. Do NOT under any
system settings are backed up before updating
circumstances restart or power off the MaxNAS R8
firmware!
until you are prompted to do so.
!
2.4 Scheduled Power On/Off
This page allows you to schedule operating hours for the NAS. To set a weekly schedule for
the MaxNAS R8, first enable this feature. Choose a day and select the action (power on or
off) and the time you’d like the NAS to turn off or on. Click Apply to confirm your settings
changes.
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2.5 UPS Settings
The MaxNAS R8 will monitor and respond to UPS status messages from a compatible attached
UPS (for a list of compatible devices see Appendix D). To use this feature you must first
connect the UPS to the NAS via the serial port on the back of the NAS. Then, on the web
interface you must enable UPS Monitoring and select the make/model of the UPS you are using
from the dropdown boxes (UPS models with an asterisk beside them have been confirmed to
work with the MaxNAS R8). When you are done, click ‘Apply’. The Battery Status and Power
fields will read and display the information about your UPS’ current status.
Below the Battery and Power Status indicators are response controls. The first setting
determines how long the NAS will wait before notifying the NAS administrator of a power
failure. The second option controls how often it will continue to notify the NAS administrator
of a power failure. The third option sets what battery level the NAS will ultimately shut down.
2.6 Wake on LAN
Wake on LAN (WoL) is a networking standard that allows a computer or network storage
appliance such as the MaxNAS R8 to be turned on by a remote host. Waking the MaxNAS
R8 remotely requires special software and knowledge of the target machine’s MAC address.
Note:
The MaxNAS R8 will only wake in response to a special network command specific to the Wake on LAN
protocol called “Magic Packet.” For more information on how to generate a magic packet as well as WOL, consult your
operating system documentation or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wake-on-LAN
2.7 SNMP Configuration
SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) is a protocol used to monitor and in some
cases manage network computers. The MaxNAS R8 will forward critical error states to an
SNMP monitoring agent. To enable SNMP monitoring support, enter your SNMP community,
administrator, location, and SNMP agent IP and click “Apply”. You may verify a successful
handshake by reviewing your SNMP agent logs- Consult your SNMP monitoring software or
your system administrator for more details.
2.8 Utilities
2.8.1 Administrator Password
This menu is where you would go to change the administrative password. There are separate
passwords for the web interface and the LCD panel.
2.8.2 Configuration Management
This page allows you to back up and restore any NAS system configuration changes you might
have made. To back up your settings, simply click “download” and select a location for the
file. To restore a previously saved settings file click the browse button, locate the settings file
you want to restore and click “Upload.”
2.8.3 Factory Default
To restore your MaxNAS R8 to its factory default
configuration simply click “apply” on the Factory
Default page in the web interface.
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WARNING: Resetting to factory default will
erase all data!
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2.8.4 Reboot & Shutdown
You can reboot or shut down the MaxNAS R8 from this page.
2.8.5 File System Check
This menu is where you go to initiate a file system check on the RAID system. Normally
this is not required unless the RAID subsystem was shut down unexpectedly or otherwise
disconnected without warning.
3. Network Configuration
This Configuration menu contains settings and control panels for all of the network features
of the MaxNAS R8. This includes Network IP addresses, connectivity settings and Service
controls.
3.1 LAN1 (“WAN”) Configuration
The LAN Configuration screen for the LAN1 Interface allows for the following controls:
The following table lists the menu items on the LAN1 (“WAN”) Configuration page:
Host Name
This is the WINS name of the MaxNAS R8. The default WINS name is “MaxNAS”.
Domain Name
The Domain Name refers to your DNS network suffix. This value is necessary for
proper DNS or Active Directory network participation. Consult your network administrator for more information regarding this value.
WINS Servers 1 & 2
These are the WINS server fields. If you have WINS server(s) on your network you
can specify them here.
MAC Address
This field displays the Media Access Control (MAC) address of the WAN/LAN1 port.
This value is not modifiable.
Link Detected
This indicates whether or not the link to your network is currently live
Link Speed
This field displays the current speed of your LAN 1 network link.
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Jumbo Frame Support
Jumbo frame support is a feature which allows Ethernet hardware to send, receive or
transport Ethernet frames greater than the default 1518 bytes packet size (Also
referred to as MTU). The MaxNAS R8 supports jumbo frames of up to 9000 bytes.
Jumbo frames will only
function if all of your network
WARNING: Make sure all your client devices,
hubs, switches, and gateways can support Jumbo
devices support the same
frames of the proper size before enabling this
size packets, please verify
feature. Failure to do so may render the network
that all of your client devices,
port of your MaxNAS R8 inaccessible!
hubs, switches and gateways
support this feature before
enabling it.
!
IP Sharing Mode
The MaxNAS R8 has the ability to route IP traffic from LAN2 to LAN1 using IP forwarding. When used in conjunction with DHCP services on LAN2, the MaxNAS R8
can act as a router between two subnets. Please note that the MaxNAS R8 is not
a security appliance and is not intended to be used as your network gateway/
router. This feature is provided as a means of adding functionality only
Link Aggregation
The MaxNAS R8 supports IEEE 802.3ad link aggregation, which defines a method
for using multiple Ethernet interfaces in parallel to increase the link speed beyond
the limits of any single interface
Note: In order to enable Link Aggregation
and to add redundancy in case of
the MaxNAS R8 must have a static IP.
switch or router failure. There are
three operating modes supported
by the MaxNAS R8:
• Load Balancing: Ethernet traffic will be directed over both ports for maximum
throughput and reliability
• Failover: In this mode, the
IMPORTANT: 802.3ad link aggregation requires
MaxNAS R8 will activate
the use of a link aggregation capable router.
LAN2 should the link on
Consult your switch documentation to assure
LAN1 be interrupted for any
compatibility and configuration instructions.
reason. Choose this option
for maximum availability
• 802.3ad: This mode will link both ports to operate in tandem, increasing overall
throughput.
!
IP Address Configuration By default, the LAN 1 “WAN” port is configured to obtain an IP address from your
DHCP server. This IP will be displayed at the bottom of the WAN Configuration page.
To assign a static IP to the MaxNAS R8, click the “Static” tab on this page. Set the IP,
Subnet Mask, Gateway,
and DNS server.
Note: After changing its IP, the MaxNAS R8 will
reboot, when it comes back up you will need to
The IP address, Netmask,
connect to the new IP in order to complete any
Gateway, and DNS Servers
additional settings changes.
are only required if DHCP is
disabled. Consult your network administrator for more information on these values as
they are unique to your network.
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3.2 LAN2 Configuration
The LAN Configuration screen for the LAN2 (“LAN”) Interface allows for the following controls:
The following table lists the menu items on the LAN2 (“LAN”) Configuration page:
MAC Address
This field displays the MAC address of the LAN port
Jumbo Frame Support
Like WAN, this port also supports Jumbo Frames. (For more information about Jumbo
Frames see section 4.1.1)
IP Address
LAN2 port requires static addressing, and
does not support DHCP.
Netmask
This is where you assign a new subnet mask
Gateway
This is where you assign a new gateway
Link Detected
This indicates whether or not the link to your network is currently live
Link Speed
This field displays the current speed of your LAN 1 network link.
DHCP Configuration
The MaxNAS R8 can act as your DHCP server. To enable this feature simply click
enable and assign a range for the DHCP server to work within.
Note: The MaxNAS R8 web interface
will not allow you to assign an IP
within the same subnet to both ports
3.3 Network Services Configuration
The MaxNAS R8 offers the following network services:
•SMB/CIFS (Server Message Block) or “Windows” Networking
• Web Access Control
•UPNP (Universal Plug and Play) automatic detection and configuration
•Apple File Protocol Service
• NFS Service
• (S)FTP Service
• Synchronization Services
• DLNA Streaming
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It is recommended that you disable services you will not require for security purposes.
See Chapter 4 for details on how to use these technologies in Windows and Macintosh
environments.
3.3.1 SMB/CIFS
The Server Message Block network protocol is the most widely used network protocol. It
is used by all variants of the Microsoft Windows operating system, Apple Macintosh OS X,
and most Unix and Linux variants include support for it even if using a different networking
protocol. You may enable or disable SMB/CIFS support by navigating to “System Network” ->
“Samba/CIFS.” The Samba/CIFS setup page has four key settings:
Samba Service
Use this option to enable or disable the Samba/CIFs service. This option is enabled by
default.
File Access Cache
File Access Cache improves performance on Samba shares. This option is enabled by
default.
Samba Recycle bin
When this enabled, the Samba Recycle Bin is a final resting place for files deleted from
your SMB/CIFS shares. When this option is enabled deleted files/folders will be deposited
in the hidden “.recycle” folder in each share.
Samba Anonymous Enable this feature if you intend to require anonymous users to enter a user name and
Login Authentication password to access to your Samba shares. This setting supersedes any shared security
settings.
Click
Apply
to complete the operation.
3.3.2 Apple File Protocol Services
The AFP protocol is used by Apple Mac OS 9.x and prior for networking and is supported by
all Mac OS-X hosts as well. To enable AFP support navigate to “System Network” -> “AFP.” You
may enable, disable, set the character language set, and specify zone (optional). Click Apply
to complete the operation.
3.3.3 NFS Services
NFS (Network File System) is a network file system protocol originally developed by Sun
Microsystems in 1983 allowing a user on a client computer to access files over a network as
easily as if the network devices were attached to its local disks. It is most commonly used on
Unix and Linux based networks. You may enable or disable NFS server support by navigating
to “System Network” -> “NFS.” Click Apply to complete the operation.
3.3.4 FTP Services
FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is a commonly used, open standard protocol for exchanging files
over any network that supports the TCP/IP protocol (such as the Internet or an intranet).
Virtually every computer platform supports the FTP protocol. This allows any computer
connected to a TCP/IP based network to manipulate files on another computer on that
network regardless of which operating systems are involved (if the computers permit FTP
access.) There are many existing FTP client and server programs, and many of these are free.
You may enable or disable FTP server support as well as related service options by navigating
to “System Network” -> “FTP.” The following table describes the available settings:
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FTP
Use this option to enable or disable the FTP service on your MaxNAS R8. This setting is
disabled by default.
Secure FTP (Explicit) In some FTP environments it is a good idea to enable FTP security. Be sure that your
FTP client also supports Secure FTP connectivity.
Port
Use this setting to define a port for your MaxNAS R8 FTP traffic. The default port is 21.
FTP Encode
If your FTP client or operating system does not support Unicode (e.g., WinME, MaxOS
9.x or older) it is suggested that you select an encoding method that your OS supports.
Otherwise this setting should remain at UTF-8.
Allow Anonymous This option determines security settings for anonymous FTP users. There are three
FTP Access:
possible settings:
• Upload/Download: This setting allows anonymous users to upload or download files
to and from public folders.
• Download: This setting only allows anonymous users to download from public folders
• No Access: This setting blocks anonymous FTP traffic entirely.
Auto Rename
If checked, this option will automatically rename files that are uploaded with a duplicate
file name. The renaming scheme is [filename].# where “#” corresponds to which iteration
of the file was renamed.
Upload Bandwidth
This option allows you to cap maximum upload bandwidth. By default this option is set
to ‘unlimited’
Download Bandwidth This option allows you to cap maximum download bandwidth. By default this option is
set to ‘unlimited’
Click
Apply
to complete the operation.
3.3.5 DLNA Media Server
The MaxNAS R8 provides media streaming service to standalone networked home media
adapters that support the UPnP-AV protocol or are Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA)
standard compliant. This allows shared digital media such as music, pictures, and movies
with any compatible device throughout your entire home. For more information and a list
of compatible devices please visit www.dlna.org. To enable the media server navigate to
“System Network” -> “Media Server”. Click the “enable” radio button and Apply . Next, click
the check box beside folder(s) that you’d like to share over your network. The service will
index and share all compatible media files in these shares. The media server will appear to
your compatible DMA (digital media adapter) as “MaxNAS:Macrovision Media Server.”
3.3.6 Web Access Control
The web access control specifies the supported mode of
connection for the web interface including administration,
webdisk functionality, and the photo server. The MaxNAS
can communicate over unsecured (cleartext) http
communication and secured (SSL) https communications,
or both. You may choose the communication options as
well as user definable TCP ports by navigating to “System
Network” -> “HTTP/Webdisk.” Click Apply to complete
the operation.
3.3.7 UPNP Universal Plug and Play
UPNP allows automatic discovery of the MaxNAS R8 Administration Interface by clients that
support the protocol. With this option enabled, UPNP-enabled users will be able to see the
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MaxNAS R8 in the “Network Places” dialog on their computers. You may enable or disable
UPNP support by navigating to “System Network” -> “UPnP.” Click Apply to complete the
operation.
3.3.8 nSync/rSync Target Configuration
The MaxNAS R8 supports remote synchronization through the nSync and Rsync target backup
features. Both protocols work through the use of advanced algorithms, which allow the
MaxNAS R8 to compare files from the source and target volumes and move only the portions
of the files that have been changed since the last scheduled backup.
• nSync: nSync is an FTP-compatible synchronization method that allows backup and
restoration of a share folder to another MaxNAS R8 target or any FTP server. When using
nSync between two MaxNAS units, the synchronization also enables secure encryption.
Configuring an nSync backup task is covered in section 9 of this chapter.
• Rsync: Rsync is an open source synchronization protocol with widely supported
implementation. Rsync synchronizes files and directories from one location to another
while minimizing data transfer using delta encoding when appropriate. The mirroring
takes place with only one transmission in each direction yielding high efficiency and
speed. Rsync can copy or display directory contents and copy files, optionally using
compression and recursion. For more information about rSync and its capabilities refer
to: http://rsync.samba.org
To enable one or both of these services, navigate to “System Network” -> “Nsync Target.” Click
Apply
to complete the operation.
4. Storage Configuration
The Storage Settings menu is where you configure and maintain the various storage settings and
features of the MaxNAS R8. The storage configuration menu contains the following submenus:
• Disks (Informational)
• RAID
• Space Allocation
• Share Control
• iSCSI stacked target host control
• ISO disk image mounting service
4.1 Disks (Info)
The disks menu displays the current capacity, the disk firmware revision, and current status,
including SMART (Self-Monitoring, Analysis, and Reporting Technology) status of each disk
drive mechanism. To view the Disk Info screen, navigate to “Storage” -> “Disks”.
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The column, “Status,” will display the most recent SMART reported health status for each disk
mechanism. To view the SMART results, click on the smart status indication next to the
specified disk mechanism, and the detailed information will appear. To manually trigger a
SMART health test, click Test
Note: Under normal circumstances manually running a SMART
in the SMART Info window. Blank
scan on your drive is not necessary as the MaxNAS R8 will
rows indicate that a drive is not perform this test periodically on its own. If you suspect a disk of
installed in the corresponding becoming faulty or if directed by Micronet support to scan a disk,
click on the “Warning” or “OK” Status indicator for the hard disk you
drive bay. The status indicator on would like to test. Choose a long or short test and click the Test
this page will display a warning button at the bottom of the window. A test can be stopped at any
should one your hard disks begin time while it is running by clicking the same button again. Test status
and results will be displayed on the “Test Results” line of this window.
to show signs of failure.
The MaxNAS R8 can power down the disks when they are not accessed to save power.
To enable disk power management, specify the idle time in minutes in the “Disk Power
Management” Field and click Apply .
4.2 RAID Menu
The RAID configuration page is used to create, manage and maintain RAID sets on the
MaxNAS R8. This page is divided into two sections. The first is the list of RAID sets available
on the MaxNAS R8 and the second is a graphical representation of the storage space on the
RAID system and how it has been allocated.
4.2.1 Creating a RAID Set
In this section we cover how to create a new RAID set on the MaxNAS R8. The MaxNAS R8
comes with a RAID 6 volume already configured. To create a new RAID set click the
button on the top left of the RAID Configuration menu page.
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The Create RAID window allows you to configure your MaxNAS R8 into a wide range of
possible RAID configurations. Follow the steps below to create a new RAID system on the
MaxNAS R8:
1. To begin the RAID creation process click the check box in the “Used” column for each of
the drives you want to use as a part of the RAID system. When using a parity-based RAID
configuration it is advisable to configure at least one drive as the hot spare for that RAID
set. To set up a hot spare check the box in the “Spare” column for the disk you’d like to
act as a hot spare.
2. Choose your RAID Level ( JBOD, RAID 0, 1, 5, 6 or 10). For a detailed discussion of RAID,
RAID levels and techniques please see Chapter 5, Understanding RAID.
Master RAID
By default, the first RAID set defined will be designated as the Master RAID volume. The Master RAID volume
will store all installed modules and system settings. If the Master RAID is changed to another location (i.e. assigning
HDD 2 to be the Master RAID volume after HDD 1 had been previously assigned), then all modules must be reinstalled.
In addition, all system folders that were contained on the Master RAID volume will be invisible. Reassigning this volume
to be the Master RAID will make these folders visible again.
3. Select the percentage of the resulting volume to be used for network access. Any remaining
space may be allocated for iSCSI targets.
4. RAID ID (optional): This is the name of the RAIDset, This has no effect on the use of the
volume except as an organizational tool. Each new RAID set must have a unique RAID ID.
5. Encryption (optional): The MaxNAS R8 supports volume level encryption. Enable
encryption with this checkbox and assign a user name and password to protect your files.
Encryption can reduce performance.
6. Stripe size. The default stripe size is 64k. You can assign different stripe sizes based on
your own particular requirements. Smaller stripe sizes will yield better performance for
filesystems with many small files such as databases, while larger stripe sizes will yield
better performance on large file and streaming applications.
7. File System: You can also choose from a number of file systems (EXT3, ZFS or XFS). The
default setting is EXT3. For detailed discussion of the three options please consult the
glossay. Please note the following considerations for file system choice:
• The maximum EXT3 volume size supported is 8TB
• NFS Shares are supported on EXT3 and XFS filesystems only.
• ZFS offers the best data integrity as it performs copy-on-write clones, continuous
integrity checking and automatic file system repair. As a result, ZFS will yield higher
data integrity but lower performance. ZFS does not require file system checks.
8. Click Apply to complete the operation.
!
•
•
IMPORTANT:
• Only one RAID Set may be formatting at a time.
• You cannot create shares or allocate space while a RAIDset is rebuilding or during initial formatting.
Allocating space to data can be expanded later, but not reduced. Be sure to plan your space utilization
before allocating space to the network file system.
All active services are temporarily disabled when creating, deleting or modifying a RAID set. It is advised
that any RAID set procedure be done only during off-peak hours or in a non-production environment.
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4.2.2 Expanding NAS volumes
To expand the network accessible space of a RAIDset to take over unused space, select the
on the RAID information screen (see above, section 4.2.)
desired RAIDSet and click
The RAID Configuration page will
appear. Select the “Expand” tab in the
tab bar (see illustration.) The Expand
RAID Space screen will appear. Select
the new percentage of the resulting
volume to be used for network access.
Remaining space may be allocated for
iSCSI targets. Click Apply to complete the operation.
4.2.3 Migrating RAIDSet
The MaxNAS R8 allows RAIDsets to migrate on to unused disk modules as well as change the
RAID level to fully utilize resources or to afford user flexibility. Online RAID level/stripe size
migration can prove helpful during performance tuning activities as well as at the addition of
physical disks to the MaxNAS R8. For example, in a system using two drives in RAID level 1,
you could add capacity and retain fault tolerance by adding one drive. With the addition of third
disk, you have the option of adding this disk to your existing RAID logical drive by migrating
from RAID level 1 to 5. The result would be parity fault tolerance and double the available
capacity without taking the system offline. To migrate a RAID 0, RAID 1, or RAID 5 volume,
on the RAID information screen (see above, section
Select the desired RAIDSet and click
4.2.) The RAID Configuration page will appear. Select the “Migrate RAID” tab. A list of possible
RAID migration configurations will be listed. Check
Note: You can only migrate ‘up’ either in
the “available disk” checkboxes corresponding to the
capacity, RAID configuration or both. E.g.,
disk(s) you wish to add, Select the desired migration
It is not possible to migrate from RAID 5 to
scheme and click Apply . Not all migration options RAID 0, but it is possible to migrate from RAID 0
will be available depending on the current RAID on two hard disks to RAID 5 on three hard disks.
configuration.
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4.2.4 Delete RAIDSet
on the RAID information
To edelete a RAIDset, select the desired RAIDSet and click
screen (see above, section 4.2.) The RAID Configuration page will appear. Click Remove RAID and
confirm the operation in the following confirmation dialog.
4.3 iSCSI Space Allocation
The MaxNAS R8 has the ability to create special volumes for use via iSCSI. iSCSI volumes are
logical block devices that appear to an attached host as if they were locally attached SCSI
devices- For more information regarding iSCSI please visit the Internet Engineering Task Force
(IETF) at http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3720. You may create, modify and delete existing iSCSI
target volumes by navigating to “Storage” -> “Space Allocation”
4.3.1 Creating an iSCSI volume
The following steps describe the procedure to create and allocate space to an iSCSI volume:
1. Select the RAID set you
wish to use from the
drop-down field at the
top (circled above.)
in the
2. Click
iSCSI Target tab under
Volume Allocation List.
3. Assign a capacity to
the volume.
4. Select “Enable” under
iSCSI Target Volume
(You can also enable a volume in the future should you
wish to create the volume for future use)
5. Assign a target name. This name will used as a part of
the iSCSI Qualified name (IQN)- The MaxNAS R8 will
create the IQN based target name, month and year, and LUN ID specified.iSCSI Qualified
Names follow a iqn.yyyy-mm.{reversed domain name} nomenclature (e.g. iqn.2001-04.com.
acme:storage.tape.sys1.xyz). iSCSI Target Names must be unique and can contain only
lower case and numeric characters.
6. Set the current year and month.
7. Set a unique LUN ID. Each iSCSI volume on the MaxNAS R8 must have a unique LUN ID
number. The menu will automatically increment the LUN ID for each new volume created.
8. If you wish to enable CHAP authentication you can do so under “Authentication” and
assign a user name and password here. CHAP (Challenge Handshake Authentication
Protocol) is a standard security mechanism used by iSCSI to ensure authenticated access
between host and target.
Note: The MaxNAS R8 supports
9. Click OK to save any settings changes here.
up to 5 iSCSI volumes.
4.3.2 Modify an existing iSCSI Volume.
To modify an existing iSCSI volume, select the volume you wish to modify and click
in the top-bar. The Modify menu is very similar to the create menu, except that some menu
items are unavailable. You can also go to this menu after a target volume has been created
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to discover the iqn of your new volume. In the Modify iSCSI Volume menu you can enable/
disable the volume, change the date, LUN ID number, enable/disable CHAP and/or change the
user name and password. If there is an attached initiator, its IQN will be displayed.
4.3.3 Expanding an iSCSI volume
The MaxNAS R8 has the ability to expand an existing iSCSI Target Volume into unused space
.
on the same RAID set. To do so, select the iSCSI volume you wish to expand and click
In the Space Allocation menu that pops up, set the
Note: The iSCSI service is temporarily
Expand Capacity slider to the desired amount and
disabled while expanding an existing
iSCSI Target volume. It is advised that
click Expand . This process is reversible.
you to do this only during off-peak hours.
4.3.4 iSCSI Thin-provision configuration
Studies show that most users do not exploit their allotted storage capacity to its fullest. Even
with extremely large volumes, much of the space may remain unused. Thin-provisioning
is a means whereby a network administrator can assign large “virtual” storage spaces that
consume only the capacity actually utilized. To create thin provisioned iSCSI volumes follow
these instructions:
1. Select the “iSCSI ThinProvision Target” tab in the
Volume Allocation List on the
Space Allocation menu. Click
. Set the maximum capacity
that you wish to use as a thinprovisioned iSCSI Volume. You
can only use unused space for
this volume- storage capacity
already assigned to Data or
other iSCSI Targets is not eligible for use as an iSCSI Thin-Provision volume. Click OK to
create the volume.
2. Once the iSCSI Thin-Provision Volume is created, the provisioning menu will appear beneath
. The “Create
the volume. In the iSCSI Thin-Provision list at the bottom of this page, click
iSCSI Thin-Provision” menu is identical to the Create iSCSI Target menu except that instead
of allocating a specific capacity of the drive for this iSCSI volume you are allocating a “Virtual
Size” to this volume. The virtual size of this iSCSI volume will be the size of the drive as
reported to the Initiator. The maximum virtual size for a Thin-Provisioned iSCSI Target is
sixteen terabytes. Please consult section 4.3.1, Create iSCSI Volume of this Chapter for further
information.
4.3.5 Advanced iSCSI Options
On the Advanced iSCSI Options page you can modify the iSCSI Block size and enable CRC/
Checksum verification for all iSCSI volumes. When using volumes of larger than 2tb on
system that do not support 64-bit LBA (i.e., Windows XP or older) you would set the block
size to 4k. For almost every other application it is best to leave the block size set to 512 Bytes.
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4.4 Shared Folder Management
The Shared Folder Management menu lists all of your shared folders and contains controls for
folder/share management, ZFS snapshots, NFS access controls and Samba user access rights.
4.4.1 Creating a new folder
To create a new folder click
. The Add
Folder menu will appear.
• Choose the RAID ID that corresponds to
the RAID set that you want the folder to
reside on.
• Assign a name to the folder.
• Optional: Assign a description to the folder.
• If you would like users to be able to locate
the share in their network browser set
“Browseable” to Yes. If you intend to allow public access to this folder, set “Public” to Yes.
• Optional: You may also choose to restrict the maximum size of this share. To do so you
would assign a share folder storage limit here.
Click
Apply
to save any settings here and create the shared folder.
Note: You must set the ACL for each folder to allow access by specific users and groups; otherwise the folder will not be accessible. Remember to set ACLs whenever a new group or user are added to the MaxNAS R8.
4.4.2 Editing an existing folder
To edit an existing folder simply click on the shared folder you wish to modify and click
.
The Modify Folder menu has the same options as the Add Folder menu, however you cannot
change the RAID ID setting. You can change the folder name, description, browseable/public
status and the maximum storage capacity of the shared folder in this menu. Click Apply to
save any changes.
4.4.3 Removing a shared folder
To remove a shared folder click on the folder and then click
of the default folders.
. You cannot remove any
4.4.4 NFS Access Control
To configure NFS Access rights to a share,
click on the shared folder you want to modify
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and then click
. The NFS Config menu has two tabs, pictured below. The “NFS” tab
lists every host for which you’ve assigned NFS access rights, as well as edit or remove host
access rights.
to control host access rights to the NFS share, select the “Add” tab. The following is a
description of the access controls:
• Put the host name or IP in the Host
Name field.
• Set Read Only or Writable privileges
for that host.
• Choose the OS Support setting that
best matches your needs
• Set the ID Mapping you desire.
Apply
• Click
to save any settings
changes.
4.4.5 ZFS Snapshots
The MaxNAS R8 has the ability take
snapshots of any ZFS volume on the
RAID system. A Snapshot is a read-only copy of a volume that can be created almost instantly.
Each snapshot contains the state of the file system at the time of its creation. The MaxNAS
R8 stores snapshots in a hidden shared folder that can be accessed by pointing your network
explorer to \\[MaxNAS name or IP]\snapshot\
To access the Snapshot menu, click the relevent ZFS share and click
menu has two tabs.
snapshot
. The Snapshot
The Snapshot tab displays a list of past snapshots
along with a date and time-stamp. You can create
and remove snapshots at any time by clicking the
“Take shot” and “Remove” buttons on this menu.
The Schedule tab allows you schedule, monthly,
weekly or daily snapshots for this folder. You also
have the option of configuring the MaxNAS R8 to delete the oldest Snapshot in the list when
a new one is created (This does not apply to Snapshots
Note: There can be a maximum of 16
that are manually created, through the Snapshot tab).
snapshots per ZFS share volume.
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4.4.6 Access Control
ACLs, or Access Control Lists are how you manage SMB/CIFS and FTP rights to your shared
folders and sub-folders on the MaxNAS R8. To open the ACL menu,
Note: ACLs cannot be
click on a shared private folder (a folder that is not set to public)
set for public folders
and then click the ACL button.
To add or remove permissions for your chosen share simply click on the User or Group name
on the left and click the plus or minus sign for the permission level you wish to assign.
Deny
Read Only
Denies all access to the share for that user or group
Allows a user or group access, but not modify files on this share.
Writable
Allows a user or group full access for both read and write to the share in question
You may also set all user and group rights to be recursive, and the permissions will apply to
all sub-folders within the share.
4.5 iSCSI Stacking Configuration
The MaxNAS R8 can aggregate up to five external iSCSI targets and offer all networking
services to those targets, regardless of where the storage is physically located. The “Stackable”
menu is where the Stack Host Target list can be found.
Other functions of this menu include removing, formatting, reconnecting and permissions
management (ACL) of the attached iSCSI volumes.
4.5.1 Adding an iSCSI Stack Target.
To create a new iSCSI Stack Target, click
on
this page. In the “Add iSCSI Target” menu that
pops up, add the Target IP and click Discovery .The
MaxNAS R8 will automatically populate the IQN
drop-down list with the IQNs of any relevant
iSCSI Targets on that host. Select the IQN that
corresponds to the iSCSI volume you want to
attach. If CHAP is enabled on the target, enter the
username and password to the target.
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You must assign an export share name, and a share folder with the corresponding name will
be created on the MaxNAS R8. You may also enter any additional information such as a
description and set browsable and public share attributes
IMPORTANT: The Export Share
for the share (optional). Click Apply to mount the iSCSI
Name for each new Stackable
iSCSI volume must be unique.
volume and create the export share.
!
4.5.2 Setting Access Controls for iSCSI targets
Access List controls are managed through the Share Management interface available by clicking
ACL . Please review section 4.4 of this chapter for information on using access control lists.
4.5.3 Formatting Foreign iSCSI Targets
Foreign iSCSI Targets are treated as a locally attached file
system, and must have a supported file system in order to
usable by the MaxNAS R8. To prepare an iSCSI target, you
.
may format it by clicking
!
WARNING: Formatting an iSCSI
target will erase all existing data on
the volume!
4.5.4 Editing iSCSI Target Properties
on this page. the
To edit an existing iSCSI Stack Target, select the desired target and click
“Edit iSCSI Target” menu that pops up is identical to the “Add iSCSI Target” menu as described
in section 4.5.1. Here you may edit the export share name and any additional information such
as a description and set browsable and public share attributes for the share (optional). All
other access list controls are managed through the Share Management interface (See section
4.4 of this chapter for more information.) Click Apply to mount the iSCSI volume and create
the export share.
4.5.5 Removing iSCSI Targets
To remove an existing iSCSI Stack Target, select the desired
target and click
on this page. Confirm the operation
in the subsequent dialog box to complete the operation.
Note: Removing an iSCSI target will
not erase any data on it. If you wish to
remove all data make sure to format
the volume before removing it.
4.5.6 Reconnect an offline iSCSI target
In case of lost connectivity between the MaxNAS R8 and the iSCSI target shared, it may be
necessary to manually reconnect. Please make sure that the iSCSI target device is online and
. The connection should
accessible, select the desired iSCSI mount point and click
be re-established.
4.6 Mount and Share ISO disk image
The MaxNAS R8 can mount ISO disk images and present them as networked shares. To access
the ISO mount control, navigate to “Storage” -> “ISO Mount” and the ISO Mount List screen
will appear. In this screen you can add, edit existing or remove ISO image shares.
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4.6.1 Adding a new ISO image share
To add a new ISO image share, select the
sharepoint where the ISO image resides
to launch the
from the pulldown
Mount Table window. In the Mount Table
menu that appears you will see any valid
*.iso files listed and the folder(s) within
which they reside. Select the ISO you
want to mount in the “Current Directory”
list. Mounted ISOs will appear as a new folder in the shared folder that originally held the
ISO file. The default name of the ISO will be the name of the ISO file, i.e., TestISO.iso would
become a folder named “TestISO”). You may assign a user chosen folder name to this ISO
mount in the “Mount as” field. Click Add to complete the process. Mounted ISO folders will
be subject to the parent share ACLs.
4.6.2 Removing ISO image shares
To remove ISO image shares, check the checkbox(es) next to the mounts desired and click
No data will be lost by this operation.
.
5. User and Group Configuration
Account Configuration allows for users and groups creation and integration into a Microsoft
Windows Active Directory or domain. Account Configuration is accessible from the “User and
Group” menu.
5.1 ADS Authentication Configuration
The MaxNAS R8 can authenticate with and use Microsoft server
resources such as WINS (Windows Internet Naming Service,)
Workgroup or Domain assignment, and ADS. The Microsoft Support
configuration screen is accessible from “Accounts” -> “Authentication.”
This screen displays the directory support parameters of the system
as follows:
• Workgroup/Domain Name: Specifies the SMB/CIFS Work Group,
NT Domain name, or Compatibility (Pre 2000) Name.
IMPORTANT: Active Directory
integration is supported on LAN 1
• ADS Support: Enabled to join a Microsoft domain/AD or
only. Make sure DNS is set to your
disabled for workgroup support.
Active Directory Integrated DNS server.
• ADS Server Name: Specifies the AD fully qualified Improper DNS settings will cause the
authentication to fail!
domain controller name or NT PDC.
• ADS/NT Realm: Specifies the fully qualified (fqdn) ADS
realm or NT Domain name.
• Administrator ID/password: Domain administrator credentials- required for permission to
join an Active Directory.
!
Consult your network administrator for assistance with joining the MaxNAS R8 to an Active
Directory. When all fields have been entered, click Apply to begin the authentication process.
See “Appendix C- Active Directory” for more information.
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5.2 Group Administration
When providing shares to non Active Directory
clients, the MaxNAS R8 provides its own
user and group administration. Permissions
and authorization for users and groups are
assigned to each folder shared. To access
group control please navigate to “Local Users
and Groups” -> “Local” -> “Groups.”
5.2.1 Creating Groups
in the Local
To create a new group, click
Group Configuration screen. In the following
screen (illustrated right) enter the new group
name and assign users by selecting the
desired users from the “User List” pane (right,)
and click and drag them to the “Member List”
pane (left.) to remove any users, selecting
the desired users from the “Member List” pane (left,) click and drag them to the “User List”
pane (right.) Please note that spaces, slashes or commas are not valid for group names. Click
Apply
to finalize the action.
5.2.2 Removing Groups
To remove a group, select the group in the Local Group Configuration Screen to remove and
.
click
5.2.3 Modifying Existing Group Membership
. The
You may modify any groups’ user membership by selecting the group and clicking
Local Group Setting dialog will appear (see section 5.2.1 above.) Assign users by selecting the
desired users from the “User List” pane (right,) and click and drag them to the “Member List”
pane (left.) to remove any users, selecting the desired users from the “Member List” pane
(left,) click and drag them to the “User List” pane (right.) Please note that spaces, slashes or
commas are not valid for group names. Click Apply to finalize the action.
5.3 Local User Configuration
When providing folder access to non Active
Directory clients, the MaxNAS R8 provides
its own user and group administration.
Permissions and authorization for users and
groups are assigned to each folder shared. To
access group control please navigate to “Local
Users and Groups” -> “Local” -> “Users.”
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5.3.1 Creating Local Users
in the Local
To create a new user, click
User Configuration screen. In the following
screen (illustrated right) enter the new user
name and password, and assign to groups by
selecting the desired groups from the “Group
List” pane (right,) and click and drag them
to the “Member List” pane (left.) to remove
any users, selecting the desired users from
the “Member List” pane (left,) click and drag
them to the “Group List” pane (right.) Please note that spaces, slashes or commas are not
valid for user names. Click Apply to finalize the action.
5.3.2 Removing Local Users
To remove a user, select the user in the Local Group Configuration Screen to remove and click
.
5.3.3 Modifying Existing Group Membership
.
You may modify any user’s group membership by selecting the user and clicking
The Local User Setting dialog will appear (see section 5.2.1 above.) You may change
the user’s password, and reassign to groups by selecting the desired groups from the
“Group List” pane (right,) and click and drag them to the “Member List” pane (left.) To
remove group association, select the groups to remove from the “Member List” pane
(left,) click and drag them to the “Group List” pane (right.) Please note that spaces,
slashes or commas are not valid for group names. Click Apply to finalize the action.
5.4 Batch User and Group Creation
The MaxNAS R8 can import lists of users and groups for batch user and group creation. The
list must be a comma-separated plain text file ([filename].txt) in this line format:
[USERNAME], [PASSWORD], [GROUP]<CR>
To import a user list for batch creation, navigate to “Local Users and Groups” -> “Local” ->
“Batch Input”. Select the text file previously created and click Import . You may edit the loaded
file or input user entries manually in the entry box. Click Apply to complete the operation.
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6. Application Service Controls
The Application Server Configuration menu contains controls for managing the built in print
server and the Digital Audio Access Protocol streaming media server (used primarily by
Apple’s iTunes)
6.1 Print Server Management
The MaxNAS R8 Can share a USB attached
printer to your network. The Print Server page
displays information about the USB printer for
identification purpose. To see the printer details,
navigate to “Application Server” -> “Printer. In
this page (illustrated right) the MaxNAS will
report the make, model, and current status of
the printer attached. You may remove documents
from the print queue by clicking
. If the
print service becomes unresponsive and
documents are not printing, you may reset the
printer service by clicking
.
6.2 iTunes Server Management
The MaxNAS R8 can stream audio to
Digital Audio Access Protocol remote
network players such as iTunes, Roku
Soundbridge, and others. When enabled,
the service will create and share a
network folder called “itunes_music.” All
supported music files in this folder will
be indexed and shared to iTunes and
other compatible players. The “itunes_
music” share is set to public by default
but you may assign ACLs as to any other
share using the MaxNAS folder controlsplease see section 4.4 of this chapter for
more information. To access iTunes streaming controls, navigate to “Application Server” ->
“iTunes.” The following table describes the controls on this page:
iTunes Service
Enable or disable the iTunes server
Server Name
The name used to identify the MaxNAS R8 to the network players
Password
Enter a password if you’d like to limit access to the shared music.
Rescan Interval
MP3 Tag
Encode
Determines how often the MaxNAS R8 scans the Music directory for new updates.
This option specifies the metatag encoding format for MP3 files stored on the
MaxNAS R8. All ID3 tags will be broadcast in UTF-8 format.
7. Module Management
The Micronet MaxNAS R8 is capable of integrating additional functionality through the use of
encapsulated precompiled applications. From time to time MicroNet may release new features,
or modules, for the MaxNAS R8. Modules offer additional functionality without replacing the
base operating code or firmware. Modules will either be made available on MicroNet’s website
or provided by MicroNet Technical Support. The module format and structure is compatible
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with Thecus modules, and you may wish to create your own or add other user created
modules as well; There is a Thecus community with many various modules available at their
website http://onbeat.dk/thecus. Please note that Micronet offers no support or endorsement
for any content on this site.
All installed modules will be listed in one of the two sections of the Module Menu. To access
the module management, navigate to “System” -> “Module Management.”
• To install a new module, click
next to the module file entry box. Navigate and select the
module file. Click Install to begin the upload, and confirm the operation in the following
confirmation dialog.
• To enable, disable, or uninstall a module, click the respective function to the module in
to enable, to disable, and
to remove the module completely.
the action column• Modules that install a user interface will be accessible by navigating to their respective
menu item that will appear in “System” -> “Module Management” -> “User Modules.”
8. Backup and Synchronization Services
The Backup menu contains all of the status updates and configuration options for the nSync
and rSync services. To access the backup feature controls, navigate to “System” -> “Backup”
-> “Nsync”.
The nSync menu lists all of the nSync or rSync jobs that have been created. The table on this
page displays the name of the synchronization task, the destination server, the share folder
being backed up, the last time the synchronization was performed, whether or not the task
was completed successfully, if the task has a schedule assigned and the current status of the
backup job. You can also set a universal
Note: You can start or stop a
bandwidth limit on all tasks using the “Bandwidth
synchronization job at any time by clicking
beside that task in the “Action” column
Setting” drop-down to limit the bandwidth used
for synchronization tasks.
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8.1 Creating a backup Task
To create a new nSync/rSync task click
window will appear.
on the nSync menu and the “Add nSync Task”
The options in this menu are as follows:
Task Name
Target Server Type
nSync Mode
Target IP
Share Folder
Username/Password
Test Connection
Schedule
This is the name your nSync/rSync task.
This option refers to the type of nSync/rSync server you want to connect to:
• NAS: Select this option if you are connecting to another MaxNAS or nSynccompatible network device.
• Legacy FTP Server: Use this option if you intend to back up to an FTP server.
• Native rSync Server: Select this option to use rSync.
• Synchronize will compare source and destination files and only copy new files or
files that show signs of having been changed since the last backup.
• Incremental will perform a complete backup each and every time the backup is
performed.
Enter the IP of the server/system you intend to back up to.
Select which Shared Folder you’d like to synchronize in this drop-down menu.
Where necessary, enter a User Name or Password.
Click this button to test your connection.
This sub-menu allows you to schedule a backup task. To use this feature, enable it,
set a time and select the interval. If you select weekly or Monthly a drop-down menu
will appear which allows you to select the day that the backup will be performed.
After inputting all of the information in this menu click
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8.2 Setting Up an Nsync Target on an Nsync Device
In order for the target Nsync server to accept the Nsync backup job, please ensure that
the following are conditions are met. Consult the target server device documentation for
instructions:
• Make sure that the Nsync server service is enabled.
• A user account matching the username and password specified in the Nsync job
• The user account has write access to the nsync folder.
• If the target device is firewalled, make sure to accept connections for TCP port 1194
8.3 Setting Up an Nsync Target on Another Device
If you selected “Other Device” when setting up your Nsync task, the MaxNAS R8 will use the
FTP protocol to back up the share folder. On the remote storage device, make sure there is a
folder named “nsync”, and the Auth ID has writable permission in that folder.
8.4 Restoring from backup
To restore a share to a previously created backup, select the desired task and click
on the
nSync menu. A confirmation dialog will appear. Depending on the size of the archive and delta
of changes, this process can take a long time.
8.5 Editing an existing backup Task
To edit an existing backup task, select the desired task and click
on the nSync menu and
the “edit nSync Task” window will appear. Please refer to section 8.1 for details on these fields.
8.6 Deleting a backup Task
To delete an existing backup task, select the desired task and click
Confirm the operation in the subsequent confirmation dialog.
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4-Connecting Users
Chapter 4- Connecting Users
Once the MaxNAS R8 has been configured with storage, shares, users, groups, and permissions
it is ready to accept user connections. The MaxNAS R8 supports SMB/CIFS network services as
well as Webdisk/Secure Webdisk user connections. This chapter includes discussion on both of
those services and connection methods.
1. SMB/CIFS User Access Configuration
SMB shares are accessible from Windows 95 and newer, OS-X 10.2 and newer, and most Unix/
Linux based workstations. Instructions are included for Windows and Macintosh based hosts. *nix
users should consult the specific distribution and/or SAMBA documentation for usage instruction.
1.1 Mapping a Network Drive (Windows)
To access the MaxNAS R8 from a Windows based host, open “My Network Places” (Windows
XP) or “Network Neighborhood” on Windows 98/2000. The MaxNAS R8 is called “MaxNAS R8”
in workgroup “Workgroup” by default. Double click to see the available shares. Alternatively,
you may use Window’s search function to look for computers named “MaxNAS R8.”
You can map share folders on the MaxNAS R8 so you can access them through the My Computer
folder in Windows. Connect to the shared network folders on the MaxNAS R8 as follows:
1.1.1 Double click “My Computer”
1.1.2 In the menu bar select “Tools” -> “Map Network Drive”
1.1.3 The Map Network Drive… window appears.
• Select the desired drive letter in the “Drive” field
• Use the Browse button to find the folder over your network,
or enter the share manually as “\\[MaxNAS R8]\[sharename]”
where [MaxNAS R8] is the name or IP address of the MaxNAS
R8 and [sharename] is a specific share being mapped.
•Check the “Reconnect at Logon” checkbox to
make the share reconnect on reboot.
•Click Finish. If the share is not public a
“Connect As…” window appears. Enter an
authorized User name and Password.
•Click OK. The share folder appears as the
drive you assigned in your My Computer
window. You can now access this folder as
though it were a drive on your computer.
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1.2 Mapping a Network Drive (OS-X)
The simplest method to locate and connect your MaxNAS R8 to an OS-X workstation is by using
the Finder Network browser.
If you can’t locate the computer or server within the network browser, you may be able to find
it by typing its network address in the Connect to Server dialog, accessible from the “Go” ->
“Connect to Server” Finder menu option.
In the server address field, enter
“smb://[MaxNAS R8]/[sharename]” where
[MaxNAS R8] is the name or IP address
of the MaxNAS R8, and [sharename] is a
specific share being mapped, and click
the “Connect” button.
If the share is not public a “SMB/CIFS File
System Authentication” window appears.
Enter an authorized User name and
Password, and click OK .
OK
. The
Select a share and click
selected share will appear on your
desktop.
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2. Using Webdisk
The MaxNAS R8 provides a WebDisk function that allows you to access the system over the
Internet from any browser.
!
IMPORTANT: Make sure that WebDisk Support or Secure WebDisk Support is enabled in the Service Support screen
in the system’s Network menu. Please see chapter 3, section 3.3.6 for more information
2.1 Logging In
Note:
Webdisk can operate normally (unsecured) The When initially logging in to secure webdisk,
or in secured mode. To access Webdisk you may see this dialog (illustrated below.) Accept the
normally, navigate to the MaxNAS R8 SSL certificate to allow access to the secure Webdisk.
Accepting the certificate permanently will prevent this
home page in your web browser using window from appearing in subsequent logins.
http://[MaxNAS R8]:[optional port],
where [MaxNAS R8] is either the WINS name or
IP address of your MaxNAS R8. To access Webdisk
securely, navigate to the MaxNAS R8 home page
in your web browser using https://[MaxNAS
R8]:[optional port] where [MaxNAS R8] is either
the Netbios name or IP address of your MaxNAS
R8, and the [optional port] is the port specified in
the HTTP operating mode control (see Chapter
3, Section 3.7 for more information.) In the Login
page type in the assigned User ID and password
previously created.
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The WebDisk page will appear showing folders made currently available to you via the Access
Control List (ACL) in the Folder item under Storage menu. Click on a folder name to enter the
folder. The folder’s page will appear, displaying files and folders.
2.2 The Webdisk control interface
The webdisk interface follows a traditional explorer multipane layout. The left pane displays
the directory structure, and the right pane displays the files in the selected directory. User may
perform file operations in the file pane, and move files by drag and drop from the file pane to
the directory pane. File operations are controlled by the operation bar in the file pane:
The following are the controls description:
Button
Description
Return from the current directory to the root level directory.
Refresh the current directory listing.
Search files in the current web disk directory (complete match only)
Creates a new folder or directory in the current directory
Deletes selected files or folders.
Rename the selected directory or file.
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Download a file to your computer
Upload file from your computer to the current directory.
Change user password
Logout
Displays directories in the file browser pane
Displays files matching the filter only.
3. Using the Photo Browser
The MaxNAS R8 includes a fully functional Photo Server, which allows users to view, share
photos, and even create their own albums right without any software required. The Photo Server
has its own separate interface, accessible by selecting it at login as illustrated:
Every user controls his or her own Photo Gallery, and can view public photo albums owned by
other users on the MaxNAS R8. Once logged in, the interface shows all available albums.
3.1 Creating Albums
Add
Users may create albums in their respective user section. To create an album, click the
button to create a new album. Enter a name for the album, and enter a description if you wish.
Click Create Album to confirm the operation. To set an image as the folder cover, check the radio
“Set Gallery Cover.”
box next to the image desired in the album and click
3.2 Uploading Pictures to Albums
To upload pictures to an album, click the album desired to access the upload controls. Click
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4-Connecting Users
the
“Add” button to upload pictures into the album. The Upload Photos screen will appear,
as illustrated:
Click Browse... to navigate and select the desired image to upload. In the respective entry boxes
to the right, enter a short subject and description as desired. Up to 8 images can be uploaded at
.
a time. When all images were selected and the description fields entered, click
3.3 Deleting and Modifying Pictures in an Album
“edit.”
• To edit picture descriptions, check the radio button by the picture desired and click
You may change or enter subject and description, and click Modify Photo .
• To delete a picture, check the radio button by the picture desired and click
“delete.”
• While viewing pictures, you can display the EXIF information for each photo- Simply click
the EXIF button to the right of the image. To hide this information, click the EXIF button
again.
3.4 Slide Shows
Slide shows are a great way to enjoy pictures stored on your MaxNAS R8. To engage a slideshow,
click on the
“Start Slide Show” button on the top right hand corner. To stop the slide show,
click on
“Stop Slide Show” button at the top right hand corner.
3.5 Controlling Album Properties
Albums can have individual descriptions and may be password
protected. To edit album properties, check the radio button
next to the album and click
“Edit” button, and the Album
Edit screen will appear (illustrated right.) The owner of the
album can enter an album password to protect the album, so
that only people with the correct password can view the album.
When all desired values have been entered, click Modify Album to
complete the operation.
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4. Using iSCSI
iSCSI allows two devices to negotiate and then exchange SCSI commands using IP networks.
iSCSI takes a popular high-performance local storage bus and emulates it over wide-area
networks, creating a storage area network (SAN). Unlike some SAN protocols, iSCSI requires no
dedicated cabling; it can be run over existing switching and IP infrastructure. As a result, iSCSI
is often seen as a low-cost alternative to Fibre Channel which requires dedicated infrastructure.
A Note about iSCSI performance
iSCSI performance is completely dependent on the Ethernet hardware (HBAs, switches, routers, and cabling at every hop
between the MaxNAS R8 and the initiator) network load, system load, and initiator computing power and load. For optimal results,
use a dedicated network for iSCSI with jumbo frames enabled, low latency switches with jumbo frames and 802.3ad support, dual
TCP Offload Engine NICs, and qualified gigabit Ethernet cabling throughout. Finally, iSCSI performance can be improved through
separation of iSCSI traffic and ordinary Ethernet user traffic. Mixing traffic not only impairs SAN performance, but also creates
a potential security risk since storage data is accessible on the user LAN. The most common means of separation is creating a
new LAN segment physically separate from your LAN and keeping that segment isolated from other regular Ethernet segments.
Alternatively, create a virtual LAN (VLAN) on your switch, limiting iSCSI traffic to the virtual LAN and keeping regular traffic out.
Consult your network administrator for more information on best practices for your environment.
!
SIMULTANEOUS iSCSI VOLUME MAPPING ON MULTIPLE HOSTS
The MaxNAS R8 can accept multiple host initiators simultaneously for clustering and SAN environments. Never attempt to
mount the same volume on both channels without proper clustering software.
Mounting the same volume on both channels without proper software can result in data corruption or loss!
4.1 iSCSI on Microsoft Windows 2000 and newer
4.1.1 (Windows 2000/XP) Download and install the iSCSI Initiator from the Microsoft iSCSI
technology site at http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/technologies/storage/iscsi/
default.mspx
4.1.2 (All Versions) Start the iSCSI Initiator by double-clicking its icon on the desktop
or start menu. The iSCSI Initiator properties window will appear.
4.1.3 Select the Discovery tab. Under Target Portals, click Add. Enter the IP
address or the netbios name of the MaxNAS
R8 Click OK .
4.1.4 On the iSCSI Initiator Properties
window, select the Targets tab. With the
iSCSI target highlighted, click Log On . The
Log On to Target dialogue will appear.
To enable a persistent connection, check
the “Automatically restore this connection”
checkbox. If you have not enabled CHAP
authentication on the MaxNAS R8 click OK
. If you have enabled CHAP, click Advanced .
Under Advanced Settings check the CHAP
login information checkbox and enter your
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4-Connecting Users
username and password. Click
iSCSI Initiator properties window.
OK
to commit CHAP authentication, and
OK
on the
Enable CHAP
4.1.5. Open the disk management console. A list of the
attached drives and their respective volumes will appear.
Each Volume set will appear as an individual disk in the
management console. Upon the first time the MaxNAS
R8 iSCSI volume is connected, an “Initialize and Convert
Disk Wizard” should appear when the disk management
console is run. You may use the Wizard to set up the
volume or follow the next steps for manual configuration.
Note:
The Disk Management Console
can be found under \Windows\
System32\diskmgmt.msc on your
system drive. For an illustrated guide,
please see http://www.fantomdrives.
com/support/faqs/hdfaqpc.php4#8
4.1.6 Right-click on the iSCSI volume. If it’s not initialized a red “No Entry” logo will cover the disk
icon. Right click on the disk and
select “Initialize Disk.” Follow the
on-screen instructions.
4.1.7 Right click the initialized
volume (The area right of the
disk icon.) In the context menu
select “New Partition.” Follow the
on screen instructions. In the File
System pop-up menu, select NTFS.
The default formatting option is
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3.1.7
52
4-Connecting Users
Full format. A Quick format will take just a few minutes but will do less verifying of the drive
than a full format. Click Start. Once the format process is complete your iSCSI volume is ready
to use.
4.2 OS-X >10.4.10 Host Setup
The MaxNAS R8 has been tested and qualified for use with the GlobalSAN initiator from Studio
Network Solutions. It can be obtained from their web site at http://www.studionetworksolutions.
com.
!
Before you begin please make sure you are logged in with administrative privileges.
If you are unsure about your privilege level, please consult your Macintosh OS-X
user manual or with your system administrator.
4.2.1 Download and install the GlobalSAN initiator. Follow the installation
instructions provided on the website.
4.2.2 Launch the globalSAN iSCSI initiator control from the System Preference
Pane (/Applications/System Preferences.app)
4.2.3 Click
(illustrated below). In the IP Address entry box enter the IP address of the
MaxNAS R8 and the iSCSI Qualified Name
(IQN) in the target name field. The IQN is
listed in the MaxNAS R8 iSCSI target page
(see Chapter 3, section 2.2.6 for more
information). Click OK to continue.
4.2.4 Select the MaxNAS R8 IQN from
the target list and click Log On . The iSCSI
connection screen will appear. If you
enabled CHAP, enter your CHAP username
and password in the CHAP security area
(ss illustrated). Click Connect to complete
the operation.
4.2.5 Launch the “Disk Utility” application
located under Applications/Utilities folder.
4.2.6 Highlight your new drive and select the “Partition” tab
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4.2.7 Select the new partition map type.
4.2.8 Select the desired file system format and volume name for each partition in the volume
scheme (optional.)
4.2.9 Click
4.2.10Click
Options
Apply
. Select “Apple Partition Map” or “GUID” in the dialog box and click
OK
.
. Your MaxNAS R8 iSCSI volume is ready to use!
3.2.6
3.2.7
3.2.8
3.2.6
3.2.9
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4-Connecting Users
5. Connecting to MaxNAS R8 Attached Printers
With a USB Printer attached, the MaxNAS R8 can offer central network printing to all your
networked computers.
!
IMPORTANT! Before you begin, please make sure the driver for your printer is properly
installed on your computer. Please consult your printer manufacturer for up to date drivers
for your host operating system
5.1 Windows XP SP2
To set up the Printer Server in Windows XP SP2, follow the steps below:
1. Go to Start > Printers and Faxes.
.
2. Click
3. The Add Printer Wizard appears on
your screen. Click Next .
4. Select “A network printer, or a printer
attached to another computer” option.
5. Select “Connect to a printer on the
Internet or on a home or office
network”, and enter “http://<MaxNAS
R8>:631/printers/usb-printer
in the entry box, where <MaxNAS R8>
is the IP address or Netbios name of the
MaxNAS R8. Click Next .
6. Your Windows system will ask you to install drivers for your printer. Select correct
driver for your printer.
7. Your Windows system will ask you if you want to set this printer as “Default Printer”. Select
Yes and all your print jobs will be submitted to this printer by default. Click Next .
8. Click Finish . Your printer is ready to use!
5.2 Windows Vista/7
To set up the Printer Server in Windows Vista, follow the steps below:
5.2.1 Open Printer Folder from the
Control Panel.
5.2.2 Click
.
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5.2.3 Select Add a network, wireless or
Bluetooth printer.
5.2.4 Select The printer that I want isn’t listed. You can press The printer that I want isn’t
listed to go into next page without waiting for Searching for available printers to finish.
5.2.5 Click Select a shared printer by name.
In the address entry box, type http://<MaxNAS
R8>:631/printers/usb-printer in the
box, where <MaxNAS R8> is the IP address or
Netbios name of the MaxNAS R8. Click Next .
http://<MaxNAS R8_IP_Address>:631/printers/usb-printer
5.2.6 Select or install a printer click OK .
You can choose to set this printer as the default
printer by checking the Set as the default
Next
to continue.
printer box. Click
Click
Finish
. Your printer is ready to use!
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4-Connecting Users
5.3 MacOS X
The following instructions are based on printer installation on a Mac OS X 10.5 based host. Other
Mac OS X hosts are configured similarly.
5.3.1 Access the printer control panel, located in System Preferences.
5.3.2 Click the in the “Print & Fax” control panel (illustrated right.)
5.3.3 In the Printer Browser that follows, Select the “IP” option (circled in the bottom illustration,)
and enter the following values:
Protocol
Internet Printing Protocol - IPP
Address
[MaxNAS R8 IP Address]:631
Queue
/printers/usb-printer
Name
User defined
Location
User defined
Print Using Select your printer driver
to complete the
5.3.4 Click
installation. The printer is ready to use.
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5-Understanding RAID
Chapter 5- Understanding RAID
The MaxNAS R8 controller subsystem is a high-performance SATA drive bus disk array controller.
When properly configured, the RAID subsystem can provide non-stop service with a high degree
of fault tolerance through the use of RAID technology and advanced array management features.
The RAID subsystem can be configured to RAID levels 0, 1 (0+1), 5, and 6. RAID levels other
than 0 are able to tolerate a hard disk failure without impact on the existing data, and failed
drive data can be reconstructed from the remaining data and parity drives. RAID configuration
and monitoring can be done through the LCD front control panel or serial port. The MaxNAS
R8 features the following high availability functions:
• RAID Levels 0,1,5,6 and Span support
• Global Online Spare
• Automatic Drive Failure Detection
• Automatic Failed Drive Rebuilding
• Hot Spare Disk Drives
• Instant Availability/Background
Initialization.
FYI:
The Berkeley RAID levels are a family of disk array
data protection and mapping techniques described by
Garth Gibson, Randy Katz, and David Patterson in papers written
while they were performing research into I/O subsystems at the
University of California at Berkeley. There are six Berkeley RAID
Levels, usually referred to by the names RAID Level 1, etc., through
RAID Level 6.
This section will help you gain
understanding of how these functions can serve your needs best.
RAID
RAID is an acronym for Redundant Array of Independent Disks. It is an array of multiple
independent hard disk drives that provide high performance and fault tolerance through
support of several levels of the Berkeley RAID techniques. An appropriate RAID level is
selected when the volume sets are defined or created, and is based on disk capacity, data
availability (fault tolerance or redundancy), and disk performance considerations. The RAID
subsystem controller makes the RAID implementation and the disks’ physical configuration
transparent to the host operating system, which means that the host operating system drivers
and software utilities are not affected regardless of the RAID level selected.
RAID 0 (Striping)
This RAID algorithm writes data across multiple
disk drives instead of just one disk drive. RAID
0 does not provide any data redundancy, but
does offer the best high-speed data throughput.
RAID 0 breaks up data into smaller blocks and
then writes a block to each drive in the array.
Pros: Disk striping enhances both read and
write performance because multiple drives
are accessed simultaneously,
Cons: The reliability of RAID Level 0 is less than any of its member disk drives due to its lack of redundancy.
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5-Understanding RAID
RAID 1 (Disk Mirroring)
RAID 1, also known as “disk mirroring”,
distributes duplicate data simultaneously to
pairs of disk drives.
Pros: RAID 1 offers extremely high data reliability
as all the data is redundant. If one drive
fails, all data (and software applications)
are preserved on the other drive.
Read performance may be enhanced as the
array controller can access both members
of a mirrored pair in parallel.
Cons: RAID 1 volume requires double the raw data storage capacity
Performance penalty when compared to writing to a single disk.
RAID 10
RAID 10 is a combination of RAID 0 and RAID
1, combing striping with disk mirroring. RAID
Level 10 combines the fast performance of
Level 0 with the data redundancy of Leve1 1.
In this configuration, data is distributed across
several disk drives, similar to Level 0, which are
then duplicated to another set of drive for data
protection. RAID 10 provides the highest read/
write performance of any of the Hybrid RAID
levels, but at the cost of doubling the required
data storage capacity.
Pros: Fastest read/write performance of any of the Hybrid RAID levels
High data reliability as all the data is redundant
Cons: Requires double the raw data storage capacity
RAID 5
RAID 5 is sometimes called striping with parity
at byte level. In RAID 5, the parity information
is written to all of the drives in the subsystems
rather than concentrated on a dedicated parity
disk. If one drive in the system fails, the parity
information can be used to reconstruct the data
from that drive. All drives in the array system
can be used to seek operation at the same time,
greatly increasing the performance of the RAID
system. RAID 5 is the most often implemented
RAID algorithm in RAID arrays.
Pros: Very good general transfer performance
Fault tolerant
Cons: Can be slow at large size file transfers
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5-Understanding RAID
RAID 6
Also known as dual parity, RAID 6 is similar to
RAID 5, but offers double the fault tolerance
by performing two parity computations on
overlapping subsets of the data. RAID 6 offers
fault tolerance greater that RAID 1 or RAID
5 but only consumes the capacity of 2 disk
drives for distributed parity data. RAID 6 is
an extension of RAID 5 that uses a second
independent distributed parity scheme. Data is
striped on a block level across a set of drives,
and then a second set of parity is calculated
and written across all of the drives.
Pros: Very good general transfer performance
Fault tolerant
Cons: Can be slow at large size file transfers
Hot Swappable Disk support
Your MaxNAS R8 has a built in protection circuit to support replacement of disk drives
without having to shut down or reboot the RAID. In case of drive failure, the failed drive can
be removed from the MaxNAS R8 and replaced with a new drive without disrupting dataflow
to the host computer.
Hot Spare Drives
A hot spare drive is an unused online available drive, which is ready for replacing a failed
disk drive. In a RAID level 1 or 5 RAID set, any unused online available drive installed but not
belonging to a RAID set can be defined as a hot spare drive. Hot spares permit you to replace
failed drives automatically without powering down your MaxNAS R8. When your MaxNAS
R8 detects a drive failure, the system will automatically and transparently rebuild using any
available hot spare drive(s). The RAID set will be reconfigured and rebuilt in background,
while the RAID subsystem continues to handle system requests. During the automatic rebuild
process, system activity will continue as normal, but system performance and fault tolerance
will be affected.
Hot-Swap Disk Rebuild
A Hot-Swap function can be used to rebuild disk drives in arrays with data redundancy such
as RAID level 1(0+1), 3, and 5. If a hot spare is not available at time of drive failure, the failed
disk drive must be replaced with a new disk drive so that the data on the failed drive can
be rebuilt. If a hot spare is available, the rebuild starts automatically when a drive fails. The
RAID subsystem automatically and transparently rebuilds failed drives in the background with
user-definable rebuild rates. The RAID subsystem will automatically restart the system and
the rebuild if the system is shut down or powered off abnormally during a reconstruction
procedure condition. Please note that the system may no longer be fault tolerant during
degraded operation or the rebuild process- Fault tolerance will be lost until the damaged drive
is replaced and the rebuild operation is completed.
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6-Troubleshooting
Chapter 6- Troubleshooting
Daily Use Tips
• Read this User’s Guide carefully. Follow the correct procedure when setting up the device.
• Additional application software may have been included with your drive. Please review the
documentation included with this software for information on the operation and support
of this software. The documentation can usually be found in an electronic format on the
included CD.
• Always operate your drive on a steady, level surface. Do not move the unit while it is turned on.
• Plug your drive into a grounded electrical outlet. The use of “ground-defeating” adapters
will cause damage not covered by your warranty.
• Do not open your MaxNAS R8 or attempt to disassemble or modify it. Never insert any
metallic object into the drive to avoid any risk of electrical shock, fire, short-circuiting or
dangerous emissions. If it appears to be malfunctioning, please contact MicroNet Support.
• Do not power off the MaxNAS R8 from the power button, as it may cause data loss.
General Use Precautions
• Do not expose the MaxNAS R8 to temperatures outside the range of 5°C (41°F) to 45°C
(104°F). Doing so may damage the drive or disfigure its casing. Avoid placing your drive
near a source of heat or exposing it to sunlight (even through a window.)
• Never expose your device to rain, or use it near water, or in damp or wet conditions. Doing
so increases the risk of electrical shock, short-circuiting, fire or personal injury.
• Always unplug the hard drive from the electrical outlet if there is a risk of lightning or if it
will be unused for an extended period of time.
• Don’t place the drive near sources of magnetic interference, such as computer displays,
televisions or speakers. Magnetic interference can affect the operation and stability of your
MaxNAS R8.
• Do not place heavy objects on top of the drive or use excessive force on it.
• Never use benzene, paint thinners, detergent or other chemical products to clean the outside
of the MaxNAS R8. Instead, use a soft, dry cloth to wipe the device.
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6-Troubleshooting
Resetting the MaxNAS R8
Should the MaxNAS R8 become inaccessible (blinking fault light, forgotten password) or if
directed by MicroNet support, please follow the below procedure to reset the MaxNAS R8 to
factory default:
Using the front panel, press this sequence:
1. Press [↵] button 5 times
2. Press [▼] button 2 times
3. Press [↵] button 1 times
4. Press [▼] button 2 times
5. Press [↵] button 1 times
the WAN IP will revert to default IP 192.168.1.100, and the admin PW will revert to default
admin “.
Frequently Asked Questions
Q: I Forgot the Login or Password
A: If you forget your network IP address or your password, you can reset the MaxNAS R8 to
its default settings. Please see “Resetting your MaxNAS R8” in the troubleshooting section.
Q: I forgot my IP Address/I can’t find the MaxNAS R8 on the network!
A: The current IP Address for both LAN1 and LAN2 will be displayed on the LCD screen. If
you do not have physical access to the MaxNAS R8, you may use the MaxNAS R8 Setup
wizard on the MaxNAS R8 product CD. You may also download the wizard from MicroNet’s
support site at www.micronet.com/support
Q: I’m having trouble map a network share in Windows
A: Windows only allows connection to a network resource using a single set of user credentials.
The network resource you are trying to acces may have already been accessed using a
different user name and password. To
connect using a different user name and
password, first disconnect any existing
mappings to this network share. To check
out existing network connections, open a
command prompt and type “net use”;
You may then disconnect the sessions by
typing
“net use <session> /DELETE”
where <session> is the session revealed above (illustrated right.) Alternatively, the most sure
way to clear all existing network connection is to log out and back in to your Windows session.
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6-Troubleshooting
Q: There is a fault light and/or the buzzer is beeping!
A: Do not turn off or reset the unit! Follow these steps to identify and correct the alarm:
1. Refer to Chapter 1, Section 7 to identify the alert., and login to the MaxNAS R8
administration user interface.
2. Go to the System menu and choose Logs item.
3. The System Log screen appears.
4. Click the Error button and all recorded errors appear. The log entries will help you
diagnose the problem. If there is a failed hard drive, see Chapter 1, section 8- “Replace
Hard Drives”
5. If you are unable to solve the problem, please contact MicroNet Support.
Q:Can I increase my MaxNAS R8’s volume capacity?
A: Larger drive modules may be available for your Model. Consult your MicroNet reseller for
more information.
Q:Can I have more than one MaxNAS R8 in the network?
A: Yes. Please call MicroNet Help Desk if you have questions about your particular
configuration.
Q: What is the warranty period for MaxNAS R8?
A: MaxNAS R8 standard warranty is One-year limited. Optional extended warranty and
overnight exchange programs are available, consult your MicroNet dealer or visit www.
MicroNet.com for additional information.
Q: My Stackable Share is empty! Where’s my data?
A: The connectivity between the MaxNAS R8 and the iSCSI target shared may have been
disrupted, and has not been re-established automatically. Ensure that the target iSCSI
device is online and accessible, and perform reconnected as described in Chapter 3, Section
2.5.5.
Q: I have my MaxNAS R8 configured as a RAID5, which means it can sustain a disk failure. This
means I don’t need to worry about backing up my data, right?
A: Although RAID5 does provide tolerance for disk failure, it does not prevent damage due to
fire, flood, or other types of disaster, nor can it prevent virus damage or accidental deletion.
ALWAYS BACK UP YOUR DATA.
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A-Getting Help
Appendix A: Getting Help
If you experience problems with your MaxNAS R8, please contact your Authorized MicroNet
Reseller for assistance. If the reseller is unable to resolve your issue, please contact MicroNet’s
Help Desk for assistance. Please have the model, serial number, date of purchase, and
reseller’s name available before making contact. If possible, call from a telephone near the
system so we can direct you in any necessary system corrections.
How To Contact MicroNet Technology, Inc.
Mail: Phone: Web:
email: MicroNet Technology, Inc.
20525 Manhattan Place
Torrance, CA 90501
(310) 320-0772 Help Desk & Customer Service
http://www.MicroNet.com/help
support@MicroNet.com
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B-RAID Level Comparison Table
Appendix B: RAID Level Comparison Table
RAID
Level
Span
0
1
10
5
6
Description
Min. Max. Capacity Data
Drives Drives
Reliability
Also known as disk spanning. Data 1
4
(N)
No data protection
is distributed sequentially to all
Disks
drives. There is no data protection.
Also known as striping
1
4
(N)
No data
Data distributed across multiple
Disks
Protection
drives in the array simultaneously.
There is no data protection
Also known as mirroring
2
4
1/(N ) Lower than RAID 6,
All data replicated on N Separated
Disks Higher than RAID 5
disks. N is always a multiple of 2.
This is a high availability Solution,
but due to the 100% data duplication,
it is also a costly solution.
4
1/2 (N) Lower than RAID 6,
Also known as striped mirroring. Data 4
Disks higher than RAID 5
and parity information is subdivided
and distributed across all disks. This
is a high availability Solution, but
due to the 100% data duplication, it
is also a costly solution.
5
(N-1) Lower than RAID 1, 10
Also known Block-Interleaved 3
Disks
distributed Parity. Data and parity
Higher than a single
information is subdivided and
drive
distributed across all disk. Parity
must be the equal to the smallest
disk capacity in the array. Parity
information normally stored on a
dedicated parity disk.
5
(N-2 Highest Reliability
Also known as dual parity. Similar 4
Disks)
to RAID 5, but does two different
parity computations or the same
computation on overlapping subsets
of the data. The RAID 6 can offer
fault tolerance greater that RAID
1 or RAID 5 but only consumes
the capacity of 2 disk drives for
distributed parity data reliability
similar to RAID 0.
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
Data
I/O
Transfer Rate
Request Rates
Same as a single disk same as a single disk
Very High
Very High for
Both Reads and Writes
Reads are higher
Than a single disk;
Reads are twice faster
than a single disk;
Writes similar to a sin- Write are similar to a
gle disk
single disk.
Reads are similar to Reads are similar to
RAID 0
RAID 0
Writes are similar to Writes are similar to single disk
single disk
Reads are similar to
RAID 0;
Reads are similar to
RAID 0;
Writes are slower than Writes are slower than a
RAID 0
single disk.
Reads are similar to
RAID 0;
Reads are similar to
RAID 0;
Writes are slower than Writes are slower than a
single disk.
RAID 5
65
C-Active Directory
Appendix C: Active Directory
With Windows 2000, Microsoft introduced Active Directory (ADS), which is a large database/
information store. Prior to Active Directory the Windows OS could not store additional information in
its domain database. Active Directory also solved the problem of locating resources; which previously
relied on Network Neighborhood, and was slow. Managing users and groups were among other issues
Active Directory solved.
What is Active Directory?
Active Directory was built as a scalable, extensible directory service that was designed to meet
corporate needs. A repository for storing user information, accounts, passwords, printers, computers,
network information and other data, Microsoft calls Active Directory a “namespace” where names can
be resolved.
ADS Benefits
ADS lets the MaxNAS R8 easily integrate with the existing ADS in an office environment. This means
the MaxNAS R8 is able to recognize your office users and passwords already on the ADS server, and
allow the network administrator to seamlessly control the MaxNAS R8 as another network resource.
This feature significantly lowers the overhead of the system administrator. For example, corporate
security policies and user privileges on an ADS server can be enforced automatically on the MaxNAS
R8.
!
IMPORTANT: the MaxNAS R8 respects active directory users and groups only for purposes of initial access. User
ACLs will only propagate for the writing account.
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D- Support UPS List
Appendix D: Supported UPS List
The MaxNAS R8 can support UPS communication with the following UPS communication protocols:
SEC protocol
Generic RUPS model
Generic RUPS 2000 (Megatec M2501 cable)
PhoenixTec protocol
Safenet software
The following Models have been tested and approved for compatibility:
Brand
Series
Model
Notes
Ablerex
MS-RT
ActivePower
1400VA
MiniGuard UPS 700 M2501 cable
Back-UPS Pro
Matrix-UPS
Smart-UPS
Back-UPS
940-0095A/C cables, 940-0020B/C cables, 940-0023A cable
AEC
APC
Belkin
Best Power
Back-UPS Office
940-0119A cable
Masterswitch Not a UPS - 940-0020 cable
Back-UPS RS 500 custom non-USB cable
Regulator Pro serial
Resource
Home Office
F6H350-SER, F6H500-SER, F6H650-SER
Universal UPS
F6C800-UNV, F6C120-UNV, F6C1100-UNV, F6H500ukUNV
Fortress (newer)
Fortress Telecom
Axxium Rackmount
Patriot Pro
Patriot Pro II
Patriot INT51 cable
Micro-Ferrups
Fortress/Ferrups f-command support
Centralion
Blazer
Clary
ST-800
Compaq
T1500h
Deltec
PowerRite Pro II
320AVR, 500AVR, 650AVR, 700AVR, 800AVR 850AVR, 900AVR, 1250AVR,. 1500AVR, Power99 550SL, 725SL, CPS825VA, 1100AVR, 1500AVR-HO
Dynex
975AVR
Cyber Power
Systems
Effekta
MI/MT/MH 2502 cable
(various)
ETA
mini+UPS WinNT/Upsoft cable
ETA
mini+UPS PRO UPS Explorer cable
NET *-DPC
AP *-PRO
625/1000
NetUPS SE
Energy Sistem
Ever UPS
Ever-Power
Exide
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67
D- Support UPS List
Brand
Series
PowerPal P-series
Fenton
Technologies
Fairstone
Fideltronik
Fiskars
Gamatronic
Gemini
HP
INELT
Model
Notes
PowerPal L-series
PowerOn
PowerPure
L525/L625/L750
Ares 700 and larger
Other Ares models
PowerRite MAX
PowerServer
10, 30
All models with alarm interface
MP110/210
MS-T
MS
µPS3/1
UPS625/UPS1000
R3000 XR
R5500 XR
Monolith 1000LT
Infosec
iPEL
350, 500, 750, 1000
Ippon
(various)
Liebert
UPStation GXT2 contact-closure cable
(various)
HF Line
1..4 boards, /2 5..8 boards
HF Millennium
810, 820
HF TOP Line
ECO
910, 920, 930, 940, 950, 960, 970, 980
750, M1000, M1050, M1500, M1800 M2000, M2100, M2500, M3000
305, 308, 311, 511, 516, 519, 522
ally HF
800, 1000, 1250, 1600, 2000, 2500
Megaline
1250, 2500, 3750, 5000, 6250, 7500, 8750, 10000
NOVA AVR 600 Serial
NOVA AVR 1100 Serial
Pulsar Ellipse
USBS Serial cable, S, Premium USBS Serial cable, Premium S
Masterguard
Meta System
MGE UPS
SYSTEMS
ECO Network
Microsol
Ellipse Office
600 Serial cable, 750 Serial cable, 1000 Serial cable, 1500 Serial cable
Pulsar EXtreme C / EX RT
Comet EX RT
Serial port, 3:1 Serial port
Pulsar Esprit
Evolution S
1250, 1750, 2500, 3000
Serial Port
Pulsar M
2200, 3000, 3000 XL
Serial Port
Pulsar
MicroDowell
700, 1000, 1500, 1000 RT2U, 1500 RT2U, MX 4000 RT, MX 5000 RT
Evolution, EXtreme C, ES+, ESV+, SV, ESV, EX, EXL, PSX, SX, Extreme
Serial Port
Comet EXtreme
Comet / Galaxy (Serial)
Utalk Serial Card (ref 66060), HID COM Serial Card (ref 66066)
B.Box BP
500, 750, 1000, 1500
Solis
1.0 1000VA, 1.5 1500VA, 2.0 2000VA, 3.0 3000VA
Rhino
6.0 6000VA, 7.5 7500VA, 10.0 10000VA, 20.0 20000VA
Various
Nitram
Elite
400VA Plus, 600VA Plus, 800VA Pro 1000VA Plus, 1400VA Plus, 2000VA USB
500, 2002
Oneac
EG/ON Series advanced interface
Online
P-Series
OnLite
AQUA 50
Mustek
Powermust
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
68
D- Support UPS List
Brand
Orvaldi
Powercom
Powercom
PowerGuard
PowerKinetics
PowerTech
Power Walker
Series
SMK-800A
ULT-1000
TrustTrust 425/625
BNT-1000AP
Advice Partner/King Pr750
BNT-2000AP
PG-600
9001
Comp1000 DTR cable power
Line-Interactive VI1000
3110, 3115, 5119, 5125, 5119 RM, PW5115 PW5125PW9120, PW9125, 9120, 9150, 9305
Powerwell
PM525A/-625A/-800A/-1000A/-1250A
SMS (Brazil)
SOLA
SOLA/BASIC
Mexico
Socomec
Sicon
Soltec
Soyntec
SquareOne
Power
SuperPower
Notes
Powerware
Repotec
Model
various not 400 or 600
RPF525/625/800/1000
RPT-800A
RPT-162A
Manager III
325, 520, 610, 620, 330
various ISBMEX protocol
Egys 420 VA
Winmate 525/625/800/1000
Sekury C
500, 800
QP1000
HP360, Hope-550
500/1000 smart - shipped with SafeNet
500/1000 contact closure - shipped with
UPSmart
BC100060 800VA
Sysgration
UPGUARDS Pro650
Tecnoware
Easy Power 1200
SmartUPS
SmartOnline
(various) Lan 2.2 interface - black 73-0844
cable
UPS 1000 Management PW-4105
Alpha
500 IC, 1000is, 500 ipE
LAN Saver 600
Power Guardian
Sweex
Tripp-Lite
Trust
UNITEK
UPSonic
Victron/IMV
(various)
Lite crack cable
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E-Glossary
Appendix E: Glossary
Active Directory an implementation of LDAP directory services by Microsoft for use in
Windows environments. Active Directory allows administrators to assign enterprise wide
policies, deploy programs to many computers, and apply critical updates to an entire
organization. An Active Directory stores information and settings relating to an organization
in a central, organized, accessible database. Active Directory networks can vary from a small
installation with a few hundred objects, to a large installation with millions of objects. Active
Directory was released first with Windows 2000.
ATA Acronym for “AT Bus Attachment” - a standard interface to IDE hard disks. Western
Digital’s IDE disk interface was standardized by ANSI to form the ATA specification using a
16-bit ISA bus.
Cache cache is a fast-access memory bank that serves as an intermediate storage for data that
is read from or written to secondary storage. Typically, high-speed caches are implemented in
RAM, though they can also be implemented on disk when speed is not a critical requirement.
Caches generally improve the efficiency of read operations due to the principles of “spatial
and temporal locality of data”. They can also improve the efficiency of write operations. See
also: Write Back Cache, Write Through Cache
Common Internet File System (CIFS) a network protocol for sharing files, printers, serial
ports, and other communications between computers. CIFS is based on the widely-used SMB
protocol.
Degraded Mode All RAID schemes with the exception of RAID 0 are designed to handle
disk failures. However, there is limit on the number of hard disks that can fail before the
array is rendered inoperative. For instance, this limit value is 1 for RAID 1, 3, and 5. In the
case of RAID 10 or 50, the upper bound is equal to the number of parity groups. When the
number of disk failures occurring in an array are less than or equal to this upper bound, the
array is denoted to be in a degraded state. The failure of the disks does not impair reading
from or writing to the array. However, it impairs the efficiency of throughput in all RAID
types (with the exception of RAID 1) since data requested by read operations may have to be
“reconstructed” using parity. In the case of RAID 1 the throughput of read operations is cut in
half if a drive fails. Operating in degraded mode is considered an acceptable alternative only
for short durations. Generally this duration should span no more time than that required to
inform the user of the failures and to replace the failed disks with suitable spares.
Device Driver A piece of software that controls a hardware device. Typically drivers provide
an interface by which applications can use the device in a uniform and hardware-independent
manner.
Dirty Data data that has been written to a cache but has not been “flushed,” or written to its
final destination, typically some secondary storage device.
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E-Glossary
Disk Array A Disk Array is a logical disk comprised of multiple physical hard disks. The number
of hard disks in an disk array is dictated by the type of the array and the number of spares that
may be assigned to it. Furthermore, whether a disk array can be built using part of the space on
a disk (as opposed to being forced to use the whole disk) depends upon the implementation.
Disk Arrays are typically used to provide data redundancy and/or enhanced I/O performance.
Disk Block Data is stored on disks in blocks that are generally of a predefined size. This size
is typically a value such as 512 bytes, 1 KB, 2 KB, etc. When a record is written to a disk, the
blocks used for that record are dedicated to storing the data for that record only. In other
words two records are not permitted to share a block. Consequently, a block may be only
partially used. For instance, assume a disk has a block size of 1 KB and a user record written
to it has a size of 3148 bytes. This implies that the user record will be written into 4 blocks,
with the contents of one of the blocks being only partially filled with (3148 – 3072) 76 bytes
of data.
DNS (Domain Name Server) A system that stores information associated with domain names
in a distributed database on networks, such as the Internet. The domain name system (domain
name server) associates many types of information with domain names, but most importantly,
it provides the IP address associated with the domain name. It also lists mail exchange servers
accepting e-mail for each domain. In providing a worldwide keyword-based redirection
service, DNS is an essential component of contemporary Internet use.
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) a client-server networking protocol. A
DHCP server provides configuration parameters specific to the DHCP client host requesting,
generally, information required by the client host to participate on an IP network. DHCP
also provides a mechanism for allocation of IP addresses to client hosts. DHCP emerged as a
standard protocol in October 1993.
Ethernet A local-area network standard that is currently the most prevalent with an estimated
80% of desktops connected using this standard. It was developed jointly by Xerox, DEC and
Intel and employs a bus or star topology.
File System A file system is a layer between applications and the disks to which their I/O
is directed. File systems serve to hide the details of the physical layout of files on the disk,
allowing applications to address files as a contiguous logical area on disk accessible by a
name regardless of their physical location on the storage device.
FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is a commonly used, open standard protocol for exchanging
files over any network that supports the TCP/IP protocol (such as the Internet or an intranet).
Virtually every computer platform supports the FTP protocol. This allows any computer
connected to a TCP/IP based network to manipulate files on another computer on that network
regardless of which operating systems are involved (if the computers permit FTP access.)
There are many existing FTP client and server programs, and many of these are free.
Hot Spare One or more disks in a RAID array may fail at any given time. In fact, all RAID
types with the exception of RAID 0 provide methods to reconstruct the array in the event of
such an occurrence. A commonly used tactic is to earmark a hard disk that is not being used
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E-Glossary
by any RAID array as a backup. In the event a hard disk in a RAID array fails, this backup
is automatically mobilized by the RAID controller to step in place of the failed hard disk.
The data in the failed hard disk is “reconstructed” and written into the new hard disk. In the
case of a RAID 1, data is reconstructed by simply copying the contents of the surviving disk
into the spare. In the case of all other RAID types, reconstruction is performed using parity
information in the working hard disks of that RAID array. This backup hard disk is known as
a “hot” spare since the fail-over process is performed dynamically on a server within the same
session i.e., without the necessity for re-booting or powering down.
IDE Acronym for “Integrated Device Electronics”. A hard disk drive interface standard
developed by Western Digital and introduced. Also knows as Parallel ATA.
IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation a method for using multiple Ethernet network cables/
ports in parallel to increase the link speed beyond the limits of any one single cable or port,
and to increase the redundancy for higher availability. The following modes of operation are
available:
• Failover: When one port fails, the other one will take over.
• Load Balance: Ethernet traffic will flow along both Ethernet ports.
• 802.3ad: Linkage two Ethernet ports in parallel to increase throughput.
Logical Drive A logical drive is comprised of spaces from one or more physical disks and
presented to the operating system as if it were one disk.
iSCSI (“Internet SCSI”) a protocol allowing clients (called initiators) to send SCSI commands
(CDBs) to SCSI storage devices (targets) on remote servers. It is a popular Storage Area
Network (SAN) protocol.
MAC (Media Access Control) Address In computer networking a Media Access Control
address (MAC address) is a unique identifier attached to most forms of networking equipment.
All Ethernet devices have unique MAC addresses.
NFS (Network File System) a network file system protocol originally developed by Sun
Microsystems in 1983, allowing a user on a client computer to access files over a network
as easily as if the network devices were attached to its local disks. NFS, like many other
protocols, builds on the Open Network Computing Remote Procedure Call (ONC RPC) system.
The Network File System protocol is specified in RFC 1094, RFC 1813, and RFC 3530
Online Capacity Expansion The ability to add space to an existing RAID array within a
session while preserving the RAID type and data within the array is known as online capacity
expansion. The availability of this feature enables the user to add space to a RAID array as and
when required without rebooting, thereby obviating the need for precise forecasts of capacity
requirements for the future.
Parity A mathematical function that serves as a method for error verification and correction.
In strict technical terms the parity of a group is set to 1 if the number of bits in the group that
are set to 1 is odd, and 0 otherwise. For instance, the parity of N bytes of data is obtained by
determining the number of ith bits in the N bytes that are set to 1. If that number is odd, then
the ith bit of the result is set to 1. This may sound complicated, but in reality the result can
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E-Glossary
be obtained by simply evaluating the XOR of the N bytes. Parity allows one error in a group
(of bytes) to be corrected.
Partition The space contributed to each array on a physical drive is referred to as a
partition.
PCI An acronym for “Peripheral Component Interconnect”. It is Intel’s local bus standard
that supports up to four plug-in PCI cards per bus. Since PCs can have two or more PCI
buses, the number of PCI cards they can support are a multiple of four. The current PCI
bus implementation (version 2.2) incorporates two 64-bit slots at 66 MHz. Consequently, the
highest throughput achievable using such a bus is 528 MB/sec.
PCI Express (Peripheral Component Interconnect Express) officially abbreviated as PCI-E or
PCIe, is a computer host bus interface format introduced by Intel in 2004. PCI Express was
designed to replace the general-purpose PCI expansion bus, the high-end PCI-X bus and the
AGP graphics card interface. Unlike previous PC expansion interfaces, rather than being a bus
it is structured around point-to-point serial links called lanes. Each lane is capable of 250MB/S
in each direction (PCIe 1.1) or 500MB/S in each direction (PCIe 2.0)
PCI-X An enhanced version of PCI version 2.2. It supports one PCI slot per bus when running
at 133 MHz, two slots when running at 100 MHz and four slots when running at 66 MHz.
It is intended to provide throughputs in excess of 1 GB/sec using a 64-bit wide 133 MHz
implementation.
Physical Drive A single tangible drive is referred to as a physical drive.
Primary Storage Main memory i.e., RAM is frequently referred to as primary storage.
RAID Abbreviation of Redundant array of independent disks. It is a set of disk array
architectures that provides fault-tolerance and improved performance.
RAID Type There are a number of RAID formats that are widely used. Some of the well-known
uni-level types are RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 3, RAID 5 and RAID 6. The prevalent complex types
are RAID 10 and RAID 50. ,
RAID 0 RAID 0 utilizes simple striping, with the data being distributed across two or more
disks. No data redundancy is provided. The figure below illustrates a purely hypothetical
RAID 0 array comprised of three disks – disks A, B, and C – with four stripes – each uniquely
colored – across those disks. Advantage: Striping can improve the I/O throughput by allowing
concurrent I/O operations to be performed on multiple disks comprising the RAID 0 array.
However, this RAID type does not provide any data redundancy.
RAID 1 An array that uses a single pair of disks. Both disks in the pair contain the same
data It provides the best data protection but can’t improve system performance. And storage
space for the same data capacity should be double than in general cases. Hence storage cost
doubles. The capacity of RAID 1 will be the size of the smaller HDD, so we suggest you
connect HDDs of the same sizes to save HDD space. Advantage: RAID 1 ensures that if one
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E-Glossary
of the disks fails, its contents can be retrieved from the duplicate disk. Furthermore, a RAID
1 array can also improve the throughput of read operations by allowing separate reads to be
performed concurrently on the two disks.
RAID 5 A RAID 5 array is similar to a RAID 4 array in that, it utilizes a striped set of three
or more disks with parity of the strips (or chunks) comprising a stripe being assigned to the
disks in the set in a round robin fashion. The figure below illustrates an example of a RAID
5 array comprised of three disks – disks A, B and C. For instance, the strip on disk C marked
as P(1A,1B) contains the parity for the strips 1A and 1B. Similarly the strip on disk A marked
as P(2B,2C) contains the parity for the strips 2B and 2C. Advantage: RAID 5 ensures that if
one of the disks in the striped set fails, its contents can be extracted using the information on
the remaining functioning disks. It has a distinct advantage over RAID 4 when writing since
(unlike RAID 4 where the parity data is written to a single drive) the parity data is distributed
across all drives. Also, a RAID 5 array can improve the throughput of read operations by
allowing reads to be performed concurrently on multiple disks in the set.
RAID 10 A RAID 10 array is formed using a two-layer hierarchy of RAID types. At the lowest
level of the hierarchy are a set of RAID 1 arrays i.e., mirrored sets. These RAID 1 arrays in
turn are then striped to form a RAID 0 array at the upper level of the hierarchy. The collective
result is a RAID 10 array. The figure below demonstrates a RAID 10 comprised of two RAID
1 arrays at the lower level of the hierarchy – arrays A and B. These two arrays in turn are
striped using 4 stripes (comprised of the strips 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B etc.) to form a RAID 0 at the
upper level of the hierarchy. The result is a RAID 10. Advantage: RAID 10 ensures that if one
of the disks in any parity group fails, its contents can be extracted using the information on
the remaining functioning disks in its parity group. Thus it offers better data redundancy
than the simple RAID types such as RAID 1, 3, and 5. Also, a RAID 10 array can improve the
throughput of read operations by allowing reads to be performed concurrently on multiple
disks in the set.
Read Ahead Motivated by the principle of “spatial locality”, many RAID controllers read
blocks of data from secondary storage ahead of time, i.e., before an application actually
requests those blocks. The number of data blocks that are read ahead of time is typically
governed by some heuristic that observes the pattern of requests. The read-ahead technique
is particularly efficient when the spatial distribution of an application’s requests follows a
sequential pattern.
RAID Rebuild When a RAID array enters into a degraded mode, it is advisable to rebuild the
array and return it to its original configuration (in terms of the number and state of working
disks) to ensure against operation in degraded mode
SATA Acronym for “Serial ATA”. A hard disk drive interface standard developed to enhance
connectivity and speed over the IDE, or Parallel ATA disk interface. Current generation SATAII
supports speeds up to 300MB/S.
SCSI This is an acronym for “Small Computer System Interface”. It is a high-speed parallel
communication scheme permitting data transfer rates of up to 320 MB/sec using the Ultra320
specification. The current specification supports up to 15 devices per channel with domain
validation and CRC error checking on all transferred data.
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E-Glossary
Secondary Storage Mass storage devices such as hard disks, magneto-optical disks, floppy
disks and tapes are frequently referred to as secondary storage.
Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) is a cryptographic protocol which provide secure communications
on the Internet. SSL provides endpoint authentication and communications privacy over the
Internet using cryptography. In typical use, only the server is authenticated (i.e. its identity is
ensured) while the client remains unauthenticated; mutual authentication requires public key
infrastructure (or PKI) deployment to clients. The protocols allow client/server applications to
communicate in a way designed to prevent eavesdropping, tampering, and message forgery.
Secure Webdisk uses SSL. Also known as: Transport Layer Security (TLS)
Server Message Block (SMB) a network protocol mainly applied to share files, printers,
serial ports, and miscellaneous communications between nodes on a network. It also provides
an authenticated Inter-process communication mechanism. SMB and its successor, CIFS, are
the native network protocol used by the Microsoft Windows family, and is also used by Apple
MacOS X and is available for virtually every UNIX and Linux operating system.
Stripe A stripe is a logical space that spans across multiple hard disks with each constituent
hard disk contributing equal strips (or chunks) of space to the stripe.
Stripe Set A stripe set is a set of stripes that spans across multiple hard disks. In the figure
below, the displayed stripe set has 4 stripes, with strip number 1 comprised of the purple
strips 1A, 1B and 1C. Stripe number 2 is comprised of the green strips 2A, 2B and 2C etc.
Stripe Size This is the size of the strips that constitute each stripe. This term is a misnomer –
though prevalent – since it should appropriately be called strip size or chunk size.
TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) A pair of communications
protocols that implement the protocol stack on which the Internet and most commercial
networks run. TCP is a peer-to-peer connection oriented protocol that guarantees the delivery
of data packets in the correct sequence between two peers. IP is the protocol that defines and
governs addressing, fragmentation, reassembly and time-to-live parameters for packets.
UPnP AV (UPnP Audio+Video) Networked Device Interoperability Guidelines, part of the
UPnP standards supervised by the DLNA (Digital Living Network Alliance), a forum of vendors
and manufacturers who work in the home entertainment industry.
Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS) is Microsoft’s implementation of NetBIOS
Name Server (NBNS) on Windows, a name server and service for NetBIOS computer
names. Effectively, it is to NetBIOS names what DNS is to domain names - a central store
for information, However the stores of information have always been automatically (e.g. at
workstation boot) dynamically updated so that when a client needs to contact a computer
on the network it can get its update normally DHCP allocated address. Networks normally
have more than one WINS server and each WINS server should be in push pull replication,
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E-Glossary
the favoured replication model is the HUB and SPOKE, and thus the WINS design is not
central but distributed, each WINS server holds a full copy of every other related WINS system
records. There is no hierarchy in WINS (unlike DNS) but like DNS its database can be queried
for the address to contact rather than broadcasting a request for which address to contact.
The system therefore reduces broadcast traffic on the network, however replication traffic can
add to WAN / LAN traffic.
Write-back Cache When a cache is operating in write-back mode, data written into the cache
is not immediately written out to its destination in secondary storage unless the heuristics
governing the flushing of dirty data demands otherwise. This methodology can improve the
efficiency of write operations under favorable circumstances. However, its use can potentially
lead to incoherencies in a system that is not protected from power fluctuations or failures.
Write-through Cache When a cache is operating in write-through mode, data written into the
cache is also written to the destination secondary storage devices. Essentially write completion
does not occur until the data is written to secondary storage. Thus the contents of the cache
and the secondary storage are always consistent. The advantage is that the possibility of data
corruption is greatly reduced. The disadvantage is that write-through operations are more time
consuming
ZFS A combined file system and logical volume manager designed by Sun Microsystems,
a subsidiary of Oracle Corporation. The features of ZFS include support for high storage
capacities, integration of the concepts of filesystem and volume management, snapshots
and copy-on-write clones, continuous integrity checking and automatic repair, RAID-Z and
native NFSv4 ACLs. ZFS is implemented as open-source software, licensed under the Common
Development and Distribution License (CDDL). The ZFS name is a trademark of Sun
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F-Product Specifications
Appendix F: Product Specifications
System Architecture
CPU:
Intel® Core2® Architecture, 1.86GHz
System RAM:
1GB DDR
NVRAM:
On-board non volatile memory for firmware
Disk Interface:
8 channel SATA2-300 with NCQ drive controller
Network Interface: Dual Gigabit Ethernet host controllers
Expansion Ports: 3x USB 2.0 Type A Ports for external disk and printer hosting
1x eSATA port for external disk hosting
1x USB 2.0 Type B target port
System Displays: LCD Control Panel For basic configurations and status display
5 x LED (DOM, Network Activity x 2, USB Copy, System Busy)
8 x Disk status LED monitors
Disk Mechanisms: 8 hot swappable, 7200 RPM SATA2-300 NCQ enabled disk drives
Network Services
Dual Channel Gigabit Ethernet with multiple subnet support
Fixed/Dynamic IP Assignment
802.3ad based failover and link aggregation
Platforms supported:
Windows 98/ME/NT/2000/XP
Apple OS X
UNIX/Linux/BSD
Any web enabled platform via ftp or webdisk
Services Provided:
SMB/CIFS Common Internet File System
Apple File Protocol (AFP 3.1)
Network File System (NFS v3)
Microsoft NT Domain Controller (PDC) Integration
Microsoft Active Directory Authentication (AD) Integration
iSCSI Target supporting the following initiators:
Microsoft iSCSI Initiator v2.0.4
StarPort Initiator V3.5.2
MAC OS: globalSAN iSCSI initiator version 3.0 (1150)
Linux: open-iscsi 2.0-865
UPNP Universal Plug and Play for easy detection and configuration
NFS v3
Webdisk (HTTP/SHTTP) web storage support
Photo Server
FTP File Transfer Protocol
USB Storage Server
USB Print Server
Nsync Backup and Synchronization service
Rsync Backup and Synchronization service
Disk Quotas per share
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F-Product Specifications
System Features
RAID level 0, 1, 5, 6, 10 and Span configurations
Multiple RAID and LUN support
Automatically and transparently rebuilds hot spare drives
Hot swappable, lockable disk drive modules
Disk S.M.A.R.T. status monitoring
Instant availability and background initialization
Disk Roaming
RAID Level Migration
Automatic drive insertion / removal detection and rebuilding
2x350W Hot swappable redundant Power Supplies
Field-upgradeable firmware in flash ROM
Firmware-embedded management via web browser-based RAID management
UPS monitoring via RS-232 and system shutdown on low battery
Wake-on-LAN and Scheduled Power On/Off
Fault Notification: Email notification
Buzzer notification
LCD
MaxNAS R8 Dimensions:
Height
2U/87 mm/3.5”
Width
430 mm/19”
Depth
600 mm/23 5/8”
Weight:
60 lbs with drives.
Power Requirements:
Internal Auto-sensing power supplies (100-220vac, 50-60Hz)
Environmental Specifications:
Operating Temperature: 5ºC ~ 40ºC (32ºF - 104ºF)
Humidity:
20% ~ 85% RH (Non-condensing)
Certifications:
CE, FCC, BSMI, C-Tick, RoHS Compliant
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
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G-Licence and Copyright
Appendix G: Licence and Copyright
This product included copyrighted third-party software licensed under the terms of GNU
General Public License. Please see THE GNU General Public License for extra terms and
conditions of this license.
Source Code Availability
Micronet has exposed the full source code of the GPL licensed software. For more information
on how you can obtain our source code, please visit http://www.micronet.com
Copyrights
•This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com).
•This product includes software developed by Mark Murray.
•This product includes software developed by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com).
•This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit (http://www.
openssl.org/).
•This product includes PHP, freely available from (http://www.php.net/).
•This product includes software developed by the University of California, Berkeley and its contributors.
•This product includes software developed by Winning Strategies, Inc.
•This product includes software developed by the Apache Group for use in the Apache HTTP server project
(http://www.apache.org/).
•This product includes software developed by Softweyr LLC, the University of California, Berkeley, and its
contributors.
•This product includes software developed by Bodo Moeller.
•This product includes software developed by Greg Roelofs and contributors for the book, "PNG: The Definitive
Guide," published by O'Reilly and Associates.
•This product includes software developed by the NetBSD Foundation, Inc. and its contributors.
•This product includes software developed by Yen Yen Lim and North Dakota State University.
•This product includes software developed by the Computer Systems Engineering Group at Lawrence Berkeley
Laboratory.
•This product includes software developed by the Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan and its contributors.
•This product includes software developed by the Nick Simicich.
•This product includes software written by Tim Hudson (tjh@cryptsoft.com).
•This product includes software developed by Christopher G. Demetriou for the NetBSD Project.
CGIC License Terms
Basic License
CGIC, copyright 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 by Thomas Boutell and Boutell.Com, Inc.
Permission is granted to use CGIC in any application, commercial or noncommercial, at no cost. HOWEVER, this
copyright paragraph must appear on a "credits" page accessible in the public online and offline documentation
of the program. Modified versions of the CGIC library should not be distributed without the attachment of a clear
statement regarding the author of the modifications, and this notice may in no case be removed. Modifications
may also be submitted to the author for inclusion in the main CGIC distribution.
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
79
G-Licence and Copyright
GNU General Public License
Version 2, June 1991
Copyright © 1989, 1991 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
51 Franklin St, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110-1301 USA
Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this license document, but changing it is not
allowed.
PREAMBLE
The licenses for most software are designed to take away your freedom to share and change it. By contrast, the
GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and change free software--to make
sure the software is free for all its users. This General Public License applies to most of the Free Software
Foundation's software and to any other program whose authors commit to using it. (Some other Free Software
Foundation software is covered by the GNU Library General Public License instead.) You can apply it to your
programs, too.
When we speak of free software, we are referring to freedom, not price. Our General Public Licenses are designed
to make sure that you have the freedom to distribute copies of free software (and charge for this service if you
wish), that you receive source code or can get it if you want it, that you can change the software or use pieces of
it in new free programs; and that you know you can do these things.
To protect your rights, we need to make restrictions that forbid anyone to deny you these rights or to ask you to
surrender the rights. These restrictions translate to certain responsibilities for you if you distribute copies of the
software, or if you modify it.
For example, if you distribute copies of such a program, whether gratis or for a fee, you must give the recipients
all the rights that you have. You must make sure that they, too, receive or can get the source code. And you must
show them these terms so they know their rights.
We protect your rights with two steps: (1) copyright the software, and (2) offer you this license which gives you
legal permission to copy, distribute and/or modify the software.
Also, for each author's protection and ours, we want to make certain that everyone understands that there is no
warranty for this free software. If the software is modified by someone else and passed on, we want its recipients
to know that what they have is not the original, so that any problems introduced by others will not reflect on the
original authors' reputations.
Finally, any free program is threatened constantly by software patents. We wish to avoid the danger that
redistributors of a free program will individually obtain patent licenses, in effect making the program proprietary.
To prevent this, we have made it clear that any patent must be licensed for everyone's free use or not licensed at
all.
The precise terms and conditions for copying, distribution and modification follow.
TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COPYING, DISTRIBUTION AND MODIFICATION
0.
This License applies to any program or other work which contains a notice placed by the copyright
holder saying it may be distributed under the terms of this General Public License. The "Program", below, refers
to any such program or work, and a "work based on the Program" means either the Program or any derivative
work under copyright law: that is to say, a work containing the Program or a portion of it, either verbatim or with
modifications and/or translated into another language. (Hereinafter, translation is included without limitation in
the term "modification".) Each licensee is addressed as "you".
Activities other than copying, distribution and modification are not covered by this License; they are outside its
scope. The act of running the Program is not restricted, and the output from the Program is covered only if its
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
80
G-Licence and Copyright
contents constitute a work based on the Program (independent of having been made by running the Program).
Whether that is true depends on what the Program does.
1.
You may copy and distribute verbatim copies of the Program's source code as you receive it, in any
medium, provided that you conspicuously and appropriately publish on each copy an appropriate copyright
notice and disclaimer of warranty; keep intact all the notices that refer to this License and to the absence of any
warranty; and give any other recipients of the Program a copy of this License along with the Program.
You may charge a fee for the physical act of transferring a copy, and you may at your option offer warranty
protection in exchange for a fee.
2.
You may modify your copy or copies of the Program or any portion of it, thus forming a work based on
the Program, and copy and distribute such modifications or work under the terms of Section 1 above, provided
that you also meet all of these conditions:
a)
You must cause the modified files to carry prominent notices stating that you changed the files and the
date of any change.
b)
You must cause any work that you distribute or publish, that in whole or in part contains or is derived
from the Program or any part thereof, to be licensed as a whole at no charge to all third parties under the terms
of this License.
c)
If the modified program normally reads commands interactively when run, you must cause it, when
started running for such interactive use in the most ordinary way, to print or display an announcement including
an appropriate copyright notice and a notice that there is no warranty (or else, saying that you provide a warranty)
and that users may redistribute the program under these conditions, and telling the user how to view a copy of
this License. (Exception: if the Program itself is interactive but does not normally print such an announcement,
your work based on the Program is not required to print an announcement.)
These requirements apply to the modified work as a whole. If identifiable sections of that work are not derived
from the Program, and can be reasonably considered independent and separate works in themselves, then this
License, and its terms, do not apply to those sections when you distribute them as separate works. But when
you distribute the same sections as part of a whole which is a work based on the Program, the distribution of the
whole must be on the terms of this License, whose permissions for other licensees extend to the entire whole,
and thus to each and every part regardless of who wrote it.
Thus, it is not the intent of this section to claim rights or contest your rights to work written entirely by you;
rather, the intent is to exercise the right to control the distribution of derivative or collective works based on the
Program.
In addition, mere aggregation of another work not based on the Program with the Program (or with a work based
on the Program) on a volume of a storage or distribution medium does not bring the other work under the scope
of this License.
3.
You may copy and distribute the Program (or a work based on it, under Section 2) in object code or
executable form under the terms of Sections 1 and 2 above provided that you also do one of the following:
a)
Accompany it with the complete corresponding machine-readable source code, which must be distributed
under the terms of Sections 1 and 2 above on a medium customarily used for software interchange; or,
b)
Accompany it with a written offer, valid for at least three years, to give any third party, for a charge no
more than your cost of physically performing source distribution, a complete machine-readable copy of the
corresponding source code, to be distributed under the terms of Sections 1 and 2 above on a medium customarily
used for software interchange; or,
c)
Accompany it with the information you received as to the offer to distribute corresponding source code.
(This alternative is allowed only for noncommercial distribution and only if you received the program in object
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
81
G-Licence and Copyright
code or executable form with such an offer, in accord with Subsection b above.)
The source code for a work means the preferred form of the work for making modifications to it. For an
executable work, complete source code means all the source code for all modules it contains, plus any associated
interface definition files, plus the scripts used to control compilation and installation of the executable. However,
as a special exception, the source code distributed need not include anything that is normally distributed (in
either source or binary form) with the major components (compiler, kernel, and so on) of the operating system
on which the executable runs, unless that component itself accompanies the executable.
If distribution of executable or object code is made by offering access to copy from a designated place, then
offering equivalent access to copy the source code from the same place counts as distribution of the source code,
even though third parties are not compelled to copy the source along with the object code.
4.
You may not copy, modify, sublicense, or distribute the Program except as expressly provided under
this License. Any attempt otherwise to copy, modify, sublicense or distribute the Program is void, and will
automatically terminate your rights under this License. However, parties who have received copies, or rights, from
you under this License will not have their licenses terminated so long as such parties remain in full compliance.
5.
You are not required to accept this License, since you have not signed it. However, nothing else grants
you permission to modify or distribute the Program or its derivative works. These actions are prohibited by law
if you do not accept this License. Therefore, by modifying or distributing the Program (or any work based on
the Program), you indicate your acceptance of this License to do so, and all its terms and conditions for copying,
distributing or modifying the Program or works based on it.
6.
Each time you redistribute the Program (or any work based on the Program), the recipient automatically
receives a license from the original licensor to copy, distribute or modify the Program subject to these terms and
conditions. You may not impose any further restrictions on the recipients' exercise of the rights granted herein.
You are not responsible for enforcing compliance by third parties to this License.
7.
If, as a consequence of a court judgment or allegation of patent infringement or for any other reason (not
limited to patent issues), conditions are imposed on you (whether by court order, agreement or otherwise) that
contradict the conditions of this License, they do not excuse you from the conditions of this License. If you cannot
distribute so as to satisfy simultaneously your obligations under this License and any other pertinent obligations,
then as a consequence you may not distribute the Program at all. For example, if a patent license would not
permit royalty-free redistribution of the Program by all those who receive copies directly or indirectly through
you, then the only way you could satisfy both it and this License would be to refrain entirely from distribution of
the Program.
If any portion of this section is held invalid or unenforceable under any particular circumstance, the balance of
the section is intended to apply and the section as a whole is intended to apply in other circumstances.
It is not the purpose of this section to induce you to infringe any patents or other property right claims or
to contest validity of any such claims; this section has the sole purpose of protecting the integrity of the free
software distribution system, which is implemented by public license practices. Many people have made generous
contributions to the wide range of software distributed through that system in reliance on consistent application
of that system; it is up to the author/donor to decide if he or she is willing to distribute software through any
other system and a licensee cannot impose that choice.
This section is intended to make thoroughly clear what is believed to be a consequence of the rest of this
License.
8.
If the distribution and/or use of the Program is restricted in certain countries either by patents or by
copyrighted interfaces, the original copyright holder who places the Program under this License may add an
explicit geographical distribution limitation excluding those countries, so that distribution is permitted only in or
among countries not thus excluded. In such case, this License incorporates the limitation as if written in the body
of this License.
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
82
G-Licence and Copyright
9.
The Free Software Foundation may publish revised and/or new versions of the General Public License
from time to time. Such new versions will be similar in spirit to the present version, but may differ in detail to
address new problems or concerns.
Each version is given a distinguishing version number. If the Program specifies a version number of this License
which applies to it and "any later version", you have the option of following the terms and conditions either of
that version or of any later version published by the Free Software Foundation. If the Program does not specify
a version number of this License, you may choose any version ever published by the Free Software Foundation.
10.
If you wish to incorporate parts of the Program into other free programs whose distribution conditions
are different, write to the author to ask for permission. For software which is copyrighted by the Free Software
Foundation, write to the Free Software Foundation; we sometimes make exceptions for this. Our decision will be
guided by the two goals of preserving the free status of all derivatives of our free software and of promoting the
sharing and reuse of software generally.
NO WARRANTY
11.
BECAUSE THE PROGRAM IS LICENSED FREE OF CHARGE, THERE IS NO WARRANTY FOR THE PROGRAM,
TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW. EXCEPT WHEN OTHERWISE STATED IN WRITING THE
COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND/OR OTHER PARTIES PROVIDE THE PROGRAM "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF
ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES
OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE ENTIRE RISK AS TO THE QUALITY
AND PERFORMANCE OF THE PROGRAM IS WITH YOU. SHOULD THE PROGRAM PROVE DEFECTIVE, YOU
ASSUME THE COST OF ALL NECESSARY SERVICING, REPAIR OR CORRECTION.
12.
IN NO EVENT UNLESS REQUIRED BY APPLICABLE LAW OR AGREED TO IN WRITING WILL ANY
COPYRIGHT HOLDER, OR ANY OTHER PARTY WHO MAY MODIFY AND/OR REDISTRIBUTE THE PROGRAM AS
PERMITTED ABOVE, BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR DAMAGES, INCLUDING ANY GENERAL, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE PROGRAM (INCLUDING
BUT NOT LIMITED TO LOSS OF DATA OR DATA BEING RENDERED INACCURATE OR LOSSES SUSTAINED BY
YOU OR THIRD PARTIES OR A FAILURE OF THE PROGRAM TO OPERATE WITH ANY OTHER PROGRAMS),
EVEN IF SUCH HOLDER OR OTHER PARTY HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
END OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS
MaxNAS Owner’s Manual
83
MicroNet Techology
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02-08-2010 Rev 2
The material in this document is for information only and is subject to change without notice. While reasonable efforts have been made in the preparation of
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information contained herein. Some definitions and terminology are provided courtesy of Wikipedia contributors from Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia.
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