Canon EOS-D60 Review: 1. Introduction: Digital Photography Review

Canon EOS-D60 Review: 1. Introduction: Digital Photography Review
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Canon EOS-D60 Review, Phil Askey, March 2002
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Review based on a production EOS-D60, Firmware Version 1.0.0
Canon announced the EOS-D60 two days before PMA 2002. That's exactly two years since the EOSD30 was first announced, although that seems like a long time ago the D30 didn't hit the streets until
the end of 2000 (early 2001 in some countries) and so remained a tempting enigma for most of
2000. The D60's launch was mostly anticipated by D30 owners (and those who follow sites like ours)
and most appear to be relatively happy with the majority of improvements made.
The biggest and most obvious difference of course being the new six megapixel sensor, and that
drags the D30 'system' into the major league as far as digital SLR resolution is concerned (at the time
of writing this review). Although the D60 made an impact at PMA it wasn't the only new kid on the
block, just a day before Canon's announcement of the EOS-D60 Nikon announced their consumer
level D100 six megapixel digital SLR, with a slightly better feature set and otherwise a similar market
target the D100 and EOS-D60 are set to go head to head this year.
The battle started early, with neither manufacturer announcing an official price for the cameras at
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneosd60/ (1 of 3)3/2/2005 3:19:15 AM
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 1. Introduction: Digital Photography Review
PMA, instead began a game of poker with many rumours and price changes for almost two weeks
after the show. Things, though have both calmed down and taken a very attractive turn. Canon
announced that the new EOS-D60 would be priced (in the US) at US$2,199 for the full kit (includes
battery, charger, DC kit) and just US$1,999 for the basic body (no battery etc.). This appears to have
undercut the rumoured US$2,500 for the D100. Nikon haven't as yet announced their official pricing.
At this stage we don't have a D100, it looks like it will definitely be more than a month away and thus
at this time I'm not in a position to use it for comparison in this review. HOWEVER, when I review the
D100 I'll definitely use a D60 for comparison purposes, and that will serve to be the head to head
between the two cameras.
Please support this site if you decide to buy
If you make a decision to order the EOS-D60 you can help to support this site and future articles /
reviews by buying directly from one of our official retail partners:
Order the Canon EOS-D60 Kit (battery, charger, DC coupler) online from our
approved retailer partner State Street Direct - $2,199
Order the Canon EOS-D60 Body only (no battery or charger etc.) online from our
approved retailer partner State Street Direct - $1,999
If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before
diving into this review (it may help you understand some of the terms used).
Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you
should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.
Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the
bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (normally
960 x 720 or smaller if cropped) image in a new window.
To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a
particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the
navigation bar at the top.
DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well
accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out
the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We
recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference
(at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.
This review is Copyright 2002 Phil Askey and the review in part or in whole may NOT be reproduced
in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author. For information on
reproducing any part of this review (or any images) please contact: Phil Askey.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 1. Introduction: Digital Photography Review
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 2. Specifications: Digital Photography Review
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About
Type
Type
Digital AF SLR (Single plate CMOS sensor /Direct Imaging)
Price
US: US$2,199 (Full Kit) or US$1,999 (Body only, no battery, charger etc.)
Recording medium
Type I and II CF card
Image format
22.7 x 15.1 mm
Compatible lenses
Canon EF lenses (all) (due to max. aperture metering, stopped-down
shooting not possible)
Lens mount
Canon EF mount
FOV crop
Approx. 1.6x (also known as focal length multiplier)
Imaging Element
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 2. Specifications: Digital Photography Review
Type
High-sensitivity, high-resolution, large single-plate CMOS sensor
Pixels
Effective pixels: Approx. 6.3 megapixels
Total pixels: Approx. 6.52 megapixels (3152 x 2068)
Sensor size
24.9 x 18.1 mm
Effective size
22.7 x 15.1 mm
Pixel size
7.4 x 7.4 µm
Aspect ratio
2:3
Color filter system
RGB primary colors
Low-pass filter
Built-in, fixed, in front of the sensor
Recording System
Recording format
Design rule for Camera File system
Image format
RAW and JPEG
RAW+JPEG
Simultaneous recording; a JPEG-Middle/Fine file is also simultaneously
recorded within the (.crw) file. The JPEG-Middle/Fine file can be
extracted from the RAW file and saved (.jpg) with the dedicated driver
(provided).
Provided File size
• Large/Fine: approx. 2.5MB (3072x2048 pixels)
• Large/Normal: approx. 1.3MB (3072x2048 pixels)
• Middle/Fine: approx. 1.4MB (2048x1360 pixels)
• Middle/Normal: approx. 0.7MB (2048x1360 pixels)
• Small/Fine: approx. 0.9MB (1536x1024 pixels)
• Small/Normal: approx. 0.5MB (1536x1024 pixels)
• RAW: approx. 7.4MB (3072x2048 pixels)
Exact file sizes depend on the subject and ISO speed.
Folders setting
Automatic
File numbering
Image-processing
• Consecutive numbering
• Auto reset
Besides the standard processing parameters applied by the camera
automatically during the image recording, the user can create and
register up to three sets of parameters (contrast, sharpness, color
saturation, color tone).
* The parameters can be set with the on-screen menu (not with the
dedicated software).
External interface
Digital terminal
USB Ver. 1.1
Video output terminal
NTSC/PAL
Remote control terminal N3-type terminal
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 2. Specifications: Digital Photography Review
PC termninal
Provided
Color temperature
White Balance
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Auto
Daylight
Cloudy
Tungsten light
Fluorescent light
Flash
Manual
Auto white balance
Auto white balance with the CMOS sensor
Custom white balance
1 custom white balance settings can be registered
White balance
bracketing
Not provided
Viewfinder
Type
SLR type, eye-level type with eyesight correction (fixed pentaprism and
no condenser lens)
Coverage
Approx. 95% vertically and horizontally with respect to the effective pixels
Magnification
0.88x (-1 diopter with 50mm lens at infinity)
Eyepoint
20 mm
Built-in dioptric
correction
-3.0 - +1.0 diopter
Focusing screen
Fixed, New Laser Matte screen
Mirror
Quick-return half mirror (Transmission: reflection ratio of 40:60 (no
mirror cut-off with EF 600mm f4 or shorter lens)
Viewfinder information
• On the screen
• AF points
• Partial metering circle (6.1 mm dia., approx. 9.5%)
• Below the screen
• Numerals and letters displayed by 7-segment LCD (yellowish-green)
• Shutter speed (If unsuitable, it blinks at 2 Hz as a warning.), bulb, FEL
indicator
• Aperture (If unsuitable, it blinks at 2 Hz as a warning.)
• Max. burst during continuous shooting: Max. 8
• Shots remaining (Displayed when the CF card has room for 8 or fewer
images)
• Busy (buSY)
• CF card full warning (FuLL CF)
• CF card error warning (Err CF)
• No CF card warning (with C.Fn-15-1/CF)
• LCD mask (yellowish-green) display
• AE lock/FE lock icon, AEB in-progress indicator (blinks at 2 Hz)
• Exposure level (+/-2 stops in 1/3- or 1/2-stop increments)
• 1: AE exposure compensation amount
• 2: Manual exposure level
• 3: AEB level
• 4: Red-eye reduction lamp on time display
• 5: Flash exposure compensation amount
• Flash exposure compensation icon
• Flash icon on: Flash ready
• Flash icon blinking: Flash exposure beyond range warning during FE
lock
• High-speed sync (FP flash)
• AF focus confirmation light (blinks at 2 Hz when focus cannot be
achieved), MF focus confirmation light
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 2. Specifications: Digital Photography Review
* Not possible to turn off the viewfinder information display.
Depth-of-field preview
Enabled with depth-of-field preview button
Eyepiece shutter
None
Autofocus
Type
Multi-Basis, TTL-CT-SIR (TTL secondary phase difference detection)
AF points
3
AF working range
EV 0.5-18 (at normal temperature and ISO 100, with the standard chart)
Focusing modes
•
•
•
•
One-Shot AF
Predictive AI Servo AF
One-Shot/Predictive AI Servo AF switching
Manual focusing (MF)
AF point selection
• Automatic selection
• Manual selection
Selected AF point
display
Superimposed in viewfinder and indicated on top LCD panel
AF-assist beam
• Beam emission: Lamp
Effective range: Approx. 3.8 m (at center), beam coverage: 28mm (135
equivalent) lens angle covered
• Conditions for emission: Emitted automatically under low light (EV 4 or
lower at ISO 100)
• Emitted in shooting modes except Landscape and Sports.
• Emission can be disabled with C.Fn-5 (including external Speedlite).
• Emissions: 6 times in three bursts
• Emission stops when focus is achieved.
• Light source: Halogen krypton lamp
• With EX-, EZ-, and E-series Speedlites
• With 550EX, 540EZ, and ST-E2: The external Speedlite's AF-assist
light will be emitted regardless of AF point selection mode (automatic or
manual).
• With other EOS-dedicated Speedlites: When the center AF point has
been selected, the external Speedlite's AF-assist light will be emitted. If a
peripheral AF point is selected, the camera's AF-assist light will be
emitted.
Exposure
Exposure Control
TTL full aperture metering with 35-zone SPC. Three metering modes
provided:
1) Evaluative metering
2) Partial metering at center (approx. 9.5% of viewfinder)
3) Centerweighted average metering
* In Full Auto and Programmed Image Control modes: 1) is set
automatically. (1) and 2) cannot be set)
* In the Creative Zone modes, 1), 2), or 3) can be set.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 2. Specifications: Digital Photography Review
Shooting modes
•
•
•
•
•
•
Intelligent Program AE (shiftable)
Shutter-priority AE (No safety shift)
Aperture-priority AE (No safety shift)
Depth-of-field AE (A-DEP, shiftable)
Full Auto (Intelligent Program AE/non-shiftable)
Programmed Image Control modes (5)
• Portrait
• Landscape
• Close-up
• Sports
• Night Scene
• Manual
• E-TTL autoflash program AE
• High-speed flash (FP flash), FE lock
• No A-TTL/TTL autoflash program AE
ISO speed range
The following ISO speeds are selectable with the on-screen menu:
• ISO 100 (Default)
• ISO 200
• ISO 400
• ISO 800
• ISO 1000
Exposure compensation
• AEB (Auto Exposure Bracketing) +/- 2 stops in 1/2- or 1/3-stop
increments
• Manual exposure compensation
• Flash exposure compensation
Bracketing methods
Shutter speed or aperture
AE lock
• Auto AE lock – works in One-Shot AF mode with evaluative metering.
AE lock takes affect when focus is achieved.
• Manual – By AE lock button
• Sets AE lock at any time.
• AE lock button does not work in the Full Auto and Programmed
Image Control modes.
• Regardless of the metering mode, center partial metering will be
used.
• During AE lock, pressing the AE lock button again renews the AE
lock.
• When the built-in flash or an external Speedlite is used, the AE lock
button works as an FE lock button.
Shutter
Type
Shutter speeds
Vertical-travel, mechanical, focal-plane shutter with all speeds
electronically controlled
• 1/4000 to 30 sec. (1/3- and 1/2-stop increments),
• Bulb
• X-sync at 1/200 sec
Shutter release
Soft-touch electromagnetic release (No cable-release socket)
Noise reduction
None
Self-timer
Electronically-controlled 10-sec. delay
Remote control
Remote Switch N3-type terminal provided.
Flash (built-in)
Type
Auto pop-up, retractable, built-in flash in the pentaprism with serial
control, E-TTL autoflash
Guide No.
Guide No. 12 (at ISO 100 in meters)
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 2. Specifications: Digital Photography Review
Recycling time
Approx. 3 sec.
Flash ready indicator
Flash-ready icon lights on in viewfinder
• When the flash is not ready, the flash-ready icon is off and the shutter
release is locked.
Flash coverage
Up to 18mm lens angle (equivalent to 28mm in 135 format)
Flash button
Provided
Firing conditions
• In P, Tv, Av, A-DEP, M modes:
• Press the flash button to pop-up and fire the flash for all shots.
• In Full Auto, Portrait, Close-up, and Night Scene modes:
• Pops up and fires automatically in low light or backlit conditions.
Flash sync speed
Max. X-sync speed 1/200 sec.
Flash metering system
E-TTL autoflash (preflash metering and linked to AF points)
Flash exposure compen. Up to +/-2 stops in 1/3- or 1/2-stop increments.
* Flash exposure compensation can be set with the camera for built-in
and external Speedlite.
Red-eye reduction
With the built-in flash, the flash is fired after the red-eye reduction lamp
lights.
External Speedlite
Flash sync contacts
• Hot shoe: X-sync contacts
• Lower side terminal: PC terminal (JIS B-type socket)
• Screw lock and shock protection feature provided on the hot shoe.
Flash auto
Enabled with the camera's Program AE mode
• With EX-series Speedlites: E-TTL autoflash
• With built-in flash: E-TTL autoflash
• With EZ-, E-, EG-, ML-, and TL-series Speedlites: Autoflash not
possible.
Wireless flash
Enabled with the 550EX, 420EX, MR-14EX, MT-24EX, or ST-E2
Flash exposure compen. Settable with the camera or external Speedlite
FEB
Settable with the 550EX, MR-14EX, or MT-24EX.
Modeling flash
With the 550EX, 420EX, MR-14EX, or MT-24EX, press the depth-of-field
preview button (fires at 70 Hz for 1 sec.).
PC terminal
Provided
Drive System
Drive modes
• Single frame
• Continuous
• Self-timer (10 sec)
Continuous
Approx. 3 fps (at 1/250 sec or faster shutter speed)
Max burst
8 shots
LCD Monitor
Type
TFT Color, liquid-crystal monitor
Monitor size
1.8 in
Pixels
Approx. 114,000 pixels
Coverage
Approx. 100% (effective pixels)
Brightness control
2-level adjustment provided
Image Playback
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 2. Specifications: Digital Photography Review
Image display format
Highlight alert
•
•
•
•
•
Single image
Single image (with info)
9-image index
Magnified
Auto play
In the single image (Info.) display mode, the highlight portions which do
not contain image information will blink.
Image Protection and Erase
Protection
A single image can be protected or unprotected
Erase
One image or all images in the CF card can be erased (except protected
images) at one time.
Menus
Menu categories
24 menus (8 shooting menus, 4 playback menus, 12 setup menus)
LCD monitor language
Japanese, English, French or German can be selected.
Firmware update
Updating by the user is not possible (??)
Custom functions
14 Custom Functions with 38 settings settable with the camera.
Personal functions
None
Power source
Battery
One Battery Pack BP-511 (lithium ion rechargeable battery)
Number of shots
At 20°C/68F: Approx. 620 (When a fully charged battery pack, EF 50mm
f/1.4 USM, image review ON, image review time of 2 sec., and Large/
Fine recording format
Battery check
Automatic battery check when the main switch is turned on. The battery
level is indicated by one of three levels on the LCD panel.
Dimensions and Weight
Dimensions
150 x 107 x 75 mm (5.9 x 4.2 x 3.0 in)
Weight (inc. battery)
855 g (1.9 lb) - body only
Operating Conditions
Operating Conditions
Working Temperature range 0°C to 40°C
Operating Humidity
85% or less
Major accessories
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Battery Pack BP-511
Compact Power Adapter CA-PS400
DC Coupler DR-400
Interface Cable IFC-200PCU
Video Cable VC-100
Battery Grip BG-ED3
Dedicated strap
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 2. Specifications: Digital Photography Review
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 3. What's New: Digital Photography Review
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Canon EOS-D60 - What's New
Below you'll find a quick reference to what's new and what has been improved since the EOS-D30.
This page is really intended for existing EOS-D30 owners.
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6.3 megapixel CMOS sensor (3072 x 2048
final image size)
Canon are fairly unique in the D-SLR arena
(apart from Fujifilm) in that they design and
produce their own sensors. The D30 and now
D60 are unique in being the only D-SLR's to use
a CMOS sensor (although Sigma's SD9 will soon
be using a Foveon X3 CMOS sensor).
Maintained 3 fps, 8 images max
Assuming a 12-bit ADC the D30 produced 4.64
MB of data every time you pressed the shutter
release. The D60 takes that to 9.32 MB for each
shot, so it's impressive that (at this price point)
Canon has managed to maintain a three frames
per second shooting speed and a buffer large
enough to hold a maximum of eight frames.
Improved buffer
The D60 now displays the status of the buffer
on the viewfinder status bar. It also uses it
more smartly and allows you to take photos as
quickly as you can press the shutter release,
even in single shot drive mode.
Improved low-light auto-focus
Canon described this as "AF performance in low
light environments has been improved". This, it
turns out actually relates to the way the AF
lamp operates in conjunction with the camera's
AF system.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 3. What's New: Digital Photography Review
Shorter shutter release lag
This is noticeable, the camera seems more
'keen' immediately after the click of the shutter
release button. It's interesting because it's not
something I'd particularly noticed with the D30
but the D60 does feel faster.
Highlighted AF points in viewfinder view
(works for AF and MF and point selection)
This feature was delivered inside the pentaprism
below the flash unit and can be seen as a small
rectangular bump below the Canon logo on the
front of the camera. When selecting AF points
the selected point glows in red. When autofocusing the selected (or automatically selected)
AF point glows and when manually focusing the
point glows when manual focus matches the
detected AF distance.
Reduced maximum sensitivity - ISO 1000
(D30 supports ISO 1600) - It does seem a
shame that we've lost the ISO 1600 of the D30.
Looking at ISO 1000 images from the D60 I see
no image quality reason for not having ISO
1600 so this must be a technical limitation.
New laser matte focusing screen
Just slightly noticeable as the viewfinder seems
a little brighter.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 3. What's New: Digital Photography Review
Parameters can be set in-camera (contrast,
sharpness, saturation, color tone)
This was one of the complaints from my D30
review and it's a welcome addition, it makes
setting and experimenting with the cameras
internal processing parameters far easier. It's a
shame though that in doing so Canon didn't
expand the range by which you can adjust each
parameter, still only +/-1 level (which is hardly
noticeable).
New 'Color tone' parameter
The color tone option enables you to make a
subtle adjustment to the default white balance.
The EOS-D60 manual describes -1 as shifting
towards red and +1 as shifting towards yellow.
This appears to be intended at producing a
more natural skin tone for models with different
coloured skin.
Top LCD panel has LED illuminator
I can hear the sighs of relief on the Canon SLR
Talk forum already. When enabled the top panel
illuminates when ever the SET button on the
rear of the camera is pressed. Illumination is
provided via bluish green LED's. (Shot above
taken in complete darkness)
Improved LCD monitor
Although the same physical unit as last year
Canon has applied a new surface and improved
the overall brightness of the screen, it's easier
to see off-axis and appears to be overall much
brighter.
Tweaked image display gamma
This makes it easier to see the darker areas of
the image and helps to show a more
representative view of the image (sometimes
the D30 playback looks a little dark).
Tweaked daylight white balance
The cameras daylight (sunny) white balance has
been shifted slightly (from 5500 K on the D30 to
5200K on the D60). This, apparently after
Canon's own analysis of images shot by owners.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 3. What's New: Digital Photography Review
New long exposure noise reduction
Instead of having to wait double the length of
time of the original exposure (as with the D30)
the D60 has cleaned the image in just a second
or so. Gone also is the long exposure custom
function, it's now permanently enabled.
Firmware version displayed on menu
A small tweak but one which could be useful
where several D60's are in use it quickly allows
you to see what firmware version is loaded on
the camera.
New Medium image size
Large: 3072 x 2048
Medium: 2048 x 1360
Small: 1536 x 1024
New RAW conversion software
Improved workflow, faster RAW conversion
times "and about time to", gone is the woefully
inadequate RAW converter from the D30 to be
replaced with the improved application we first
saw on the EOS-1D. You can now also extract
2048 x 1360 JPEG's from RAW files at very high
speed.
Shooting RAW (3072 x 2048) also captures a
2048 x 1360 which is embedded WITHIN the
RAW file.
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneosd60/page3.asp (4 of 5)3/2/2005 3:20:58 AM
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 3. What's New: Digital Photography Review
Attached rubber covers for flash sync
terminal and remote terminal
You won't lose these because they're attached
to the camera.
Silver mode dial
I personally don't like this, it detracts from the
rest of the camera and simply looks odd. I
suppose it makes the D60 easier to recognize
from a distance (?).
Improved power switch
The D30's power switch was always criticized for
its difficult operation. The new switch is similar
but the simple extension of the center ridge of
the switch makes it a lot easier to operate.
'Digital' logo on camera front
Canon's new standard D-SLR logo the 'Digital'
label we first saw on the EOS-1D now appears
on the EOS-D60.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 4. Body & Design: Digital Photography Review
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Canon EOS-D30 owners will immediately feel at home looking at the pictures above. That's because
very little has changed on the exterior. Indeed the only visible changes are the new 'Digital' logo on
the front, an additional bump under the flash unit (contains the LED's for the illuminated AF points),
the silver mode dial, improved power switch and new rubber covers on the side of the camera.
Everything else (on the exterior) stays the same.
For those who don't own or haven't handled a D30, the D60 is designed to look and feel like a
traditional 35 mm EOS. About the only noticeable difference is the stubbier right hand side of the
camera (from the back) because there's no film. The D60 has a completely metal chassis with a
plastic outer skin. The camera feels robust, despite not having a solid metal body and has no creaks
or flex. Experience of the D30 (and the many knocks it's taken) have proven that it's pretty tough for
a 'consumer' camera.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 4. Body & Design: Digital Photography Review
As you can see in this shot the D60 without the optional battery grip is fairly small and compact (for a
digital SLR), indeed this is the configuration most people will use. However, add the optional battery
grip and you can see how the position of my grip changes. The base of the battery grip rests against
the palm of your hand and makes holding the camera even more comfortable. Of course the battery
grip does much more than this, it provides an additional battery slot (run two batteries together) and
a portrait (vertical) grip, controls and shutter release.
Rear LCD Display
The D60's 1.8" LCD is a standard 114,000 pixel
type with a protective screen covering it. With
the D60 Canon has tweaked the image
brightness and increased the display gamma up
a little. This has the effect of making shadow
detail more visible and overall review brightness
higher. This helps to avoid making images look
underexposed when reviewing in well lit
situations. Unfortunately there's still no antireflective coating.
For those who are new to digital SLR's you have to understand that they don't provide a live preview
image like consumer digital cameras. This is because of the reflex mirror, mechanical shutter and
design of the sensor (which can't be used to provide a video feed). The LCD is only "On" if you have
image review enabled (after taking the shot either 2, 4, 8 seconds or hold on the shutter release),
when you're navigating menus or reviewing images in playback. The only exception to this is
Olympus's E-10/E-20 which uses a semitransparent prism to send an image both up into the
viewfinder and back into the CCD.
Notable improvement: Display gamma is now much lighter, improves visual exposure checking.
Top Information LCD
The information LCD on the top of the D60 provides a wide array of information, notably different to
other D-SLR's the D60 provides both digital and photographic information on the one LCD panel. Here
you get everything from the exposure, white balance, image size / quality, drive mode, exposure
remaining, battery status, etc. Plenty of information to operate the camera without having to dig
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 4. Body & Design: Digital Photography Review
through the menu.
New to the D60 is that this panel is now backlit (if you enable it). The blue backlight comes on
whenever you press the SET button (center of the rear 'quick control dial'). Typically the SET button
isn't programmed to perform any function in record mode but you can set it (via a custom function)
to change image quality, ISO speed (my preference) or parameter set. The new backlight is a
godsend and existing D30 owners will wonder how they ever coped without it.
It's probably worth noting that this isn't ALL the information the LCD displays, when changing
settings the LCD changes mode, for example the exposure meter doubles up to display bracketing
information, the shutter speed can display ISO when it's being changed etc.
Notable improvement: Information LCD Backlight.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 4. Body & Design: Digital Photography Review
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Viewfinder
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The D60's viewfinder is clear and accurate, it
has a comfortable removable rubber eye piece
and a dioptre adjustment wheel. Although the
view is good anyone who's used an EOS-1D will
tell you that the D30/D60's view size isn't as
big. With the D60 Canon has used a new laser
matte focusing screen which is a little brighter
and a little easier to use when manually
focusing.
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The rubber surround can be removed and the supplied eyepiece cover (on the shoulder strap) can be
slipped over to stop stray light from entering the chamber during long exposures. The eyepiece will
also take E-series dioptric adjustment lenses to further expand the dioptric correction range.
Viewfinder view
Through the viewfinder you'll see the partial metering circle and three focus points, unlike the D30
the D60 now highlights the selected / in use focus point with a red outline. This also means that the
previous three-dot AF point indicator has gone from the status bar LCD which has left some space for
a buffer space indicator (number of frames which can be shot in a single burst), this indicator also
doubles as the number of frames remaining on the CF card once you get down to just eight frames of
space.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 5. Body & Design: Digital Photography Review
Again, as with the top information LCD the status bar also changes its view to show other information
such as data being processed, Redeye countdown, errors and "Busy" warnings. Below is an example
of what you would see through the viewfinder (shutter release half-pressed). Note the highlighted AF
point, displayed exposure, remaining burst frames (8) and focus confirmation.
Notable improvements: New laser matte focusing screen, highlighted AF points and modified status
bar LCD display.
Battery Compartment
The battery compartment on the D60 is in the base of the hand grip, behind a simple clip locked
door. The door itself is removable (to make way for the optional battery grip). The D60 takes Canon's
powerful BP-511 Lithium-Ion battery packs (7.4V 1100mAh, 8.1 Wh). There's a tiny door on the
inside edge of the hand grip where the cable from the supplied dummy battery exits (for running the
D60 off the AC adapter). There's also the backup battery (CR2025) (circular compartment in the
camera base) which keeps the clock running and camera settings when the camera is without a main
battery.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 5. Body & Design: Digital Photography Review
Battery Charger / AC Adapter
The supplied CA-PS400 battery charger (100 - 240 V AC) has slots for two batteries and can charge
one battery at a time, automatically switching to charging the second battery once the first is
charged. A red LED above each battery indicates the current charge status; either one, two, three
blinks or steady light to indicate a full charge. A full charge (from completely flat) takes approximately
90 minutes. Also supplied is a dummy battery on a 2 m cable which fits into the battery compartment
of the D60 to provide a tethered power supply. Note that when the battery charger is providing DC
power for the camera it can not simultaneously charge batteries.
Battery Grip (optional)
The optional BG-ED3 battery grip (the same as for the D30) provides the D60 the capacity to take
two BP-511 batteries (the camera automatically switches to the second battery when the first is flat).
The grip also provides a portrait (vertical) grip, shutter release, command wheel on the front and AE/
AF-lock and focus point buttons on the back. It's attached to the D60 by removing the battery
compartment door (simple push of a sprung clip on the hinge), insert the connector into the battery
compartment and screw the grip into the cameras tripod mount.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 5. Body & Design: Digital Photography Review
It's worth noting that the grip makes it considerably easier and quicker to change batteries (unless
the camera is on a tripod in which case the door won't open fully). One slight oddity is that the tripod
mount on the base of the grip doesn't exactly line up with the tripod screw on the top of the grip
which means that the lens will be offset on a tripod when using the battery grip.
Adding the grip gives the D60 a more professional look and makes it easy to switch from landscape
to portrait shooting. The added bonus is that the normal grip becomes extended and makes that
more comfortable. It's well built with a metal (yet lightweight) substructure, a metal tripod mount
and a hand strap attachment in the base. The grip and two batteries adds 380 g (13 oz) to the
weight of the D60 with one battery.
CompactFlash Compartment
The CompactFlash compartment on the D60 is one the rear corner of the hand grip, the door itself
has a small hole at the top through which the red CF activity light shines. Opening the door (pull back
and flip open) you immediately notice the metal hinge structure and the fact that there's plenty of
room around the CF card once it's ejected (easy to insert and remove). The D60 takes either Type I
or Type II CompactFlash cards and supports the IBM Microdrive.
Something nice about the door is how easy it is to close. Pop a new card in, put your hand on the
grip as though you're about to hold the camera and the door will clip shut then slide securely to it's
fully closed position.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 5. Body & Design: Digital Photography Review
I was disappointed to see that Canon hadn't addressed what is a potentially serious flaw with the
operation of the CF door. That is if the camera is still writing to the card (as it may be after a burst of
images, especially RAW's) when you open the door the camera will power down the instant you open
the door and any images remaining in the cameras internal buffer are lost. I still don't understand
why opening the door immediately powers the camera off, better design would be to hold the camera
power on until all images have been stored (this is what happens if you turn the power dial to OFF).
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Connections
On the left side of the camera you'll find all of the camera's connections. Canon have done away with
the individual screw caps over the flash sync and remote terminals (I know most D30 owners lost
them within the first month). They have instead simply extended and remoulded the existing USB /
Video rubber cover to also cover the flash sync and remote terminals. Behind all this rubber you'll find
the custom USB terminal (cable supplied), Video Out (cable supplied), flash sync and remote terminal
(N3).
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Notable improvement: Improved connector covers.
Tripod Mount
On the bottom of the camera you'll find the
metal tripod socket which is aligned exactly
with the center line of the lens.
While there are no major complaints about the
base of the D60 it would have been nice to see
a rubberized foot plate (D1 style) which is
always useful for firm tripod mounting and
steadying the camera against lamp posts....
Internal Flash
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 6. Body & Design: Digital Photography Review
The D60 has a built-in powered pop-up flash with approx. ranges as defined below (Wide / Tele refer
to recommended EF 28 - 85 mm lens):
ISO speed
Wide-angle: 24 mm
Telephoto: 85 mm
100
1 - 3.4 m (3.3 - 11.2 ft)
1 - 2.6 m (3.3 - 8.5 ft)
200
1 - 4.8 m (3.3 - 15.7 ft)
1 - 3.7 m (3.3 - 12.1 ft)
400
1 - 6.8 m (3.3 - 22.3 ft)
1 - 5.3 m (3.3 - 17.4 ft)
800
1 - 9.6 m (3.3 - 31.5 ft)
1 - 7.5 m (3.3 - 24.6 ft)
1000
1 - 10.8 m (3.3 - 35.4 ft)
1 - 8.4 m (3.3 - 27.6 ft)
The built-in flash unit uses Canon's E-TTL system to meter flash output. It does this by firing a low
power pre-flash just milliseconds before the main flash. The built-in flash can sync up to 1/200s. The
flash pop-up is motorized, that is pressing the flash button pops the flash up using a motorized
release mechanism. In AUTO exposure the flash will automatically pop-up when required. The redeye
reduction system is attached to the AF assist lamp (below).
The D60 also allows for FE-Lock (Flash Exposure Lock) which can be used to take a meter reading of
the subject using the flash before taking the shot. This can be useful for recomposing the scene, with
the flash up (or an EX flash attached) simply aim the center of the frame at the subject to be
metered, press the * button and the camera will fire the flash and take a meter reading, the next
shot you take will use this locked exposure.
AF Assist Lamp
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 6. Body & Design: Digital Photography Review
The AF assist lamp on the D60 will
automatically illuminate the subject if light
levels are too low for the AF system to make a
good focus. It has an approximate range of
3.8m (12.5ft).
The lamp also doubles as a redeye reduction
system, when redeye reduction is enabled the
lamp will light for up to 1.5 seconds while you
half-press the shutter release (countdown is
displayed in the viewfinder).
Flash Hot-shoe
The D60's hot-shoe can be used with Canon
and third party flash units (although features
are limited with third party units).
It features Canon's latest flash technology, ETTL (Evaluative TTL metering, a pre-flash just
before the main flash). Supported E-TTL flash
units: 220EX, 380EX, 420EX, 550EX. Autoflash
(E-TTL) is not supported by EZ, E, EG, ML or TLseries speedlights.
Additional features enabled by the 550EX Speedlight: E-TTL (as described above), High Speed Sync
(sync from 1/200 sec to 1/4000 sec), Flash Exposure Compensation (+/-2EV in 0.5 EV steps), Flash
Exposure Bracketing (bracket three shots +/-3EV in 0.5 EV steps), Modelling Flash (a 70hz strobe of
light for checking shadows - press the DOF preview button), Wireless Multi-Light E-TTL Autoflash.
Lens Mount
The D60 has a metal EF mount and thus
supports all Canon EF group lenses (plus some
older as manual focus and compatible third
party lenses), remember that because the
sensor is smaller than a 35 mm frame all lenses
are subject to a field of view crop (focal length
multiplier) of 1.6x, thus a 28 mm lens provides
the same field of view of a 44.8 mm.
Supplied In the Box
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 6. Body & Design: Digital Photography Review
Note that the EOS-D60 will be available in two different options: the standard 'kit' which is described
below and a body-only deal which won't include the battery, charger or DC coupler. Note this time
there is no CompactFlash card included with the camera.
The contents of the retail box (full kit) are:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Canon EOS-D60 SLR Digital Camera
BP-511 Lithium-Ion battery
CA-PS400 AC adapter/charger (110-240V)
DC Coupler DR-400
Strap (with eyepiece cover)
USB cable (IFC-200 PCU)
Video cable (VC-100)
Canon Solutions CD-ROM (PC/Mac)
❍
Zoom Browser / ImageBrowser
❍
Photo Stitch
❍
Photo Record (PC only)
❍
Remote Capture
❍
TWAIN / WIA drivers / USB mounter / Photoshop plug-in
❍
RAW Image Converter
Adobe Photoshop 5.0 LE
User Manual (which is excellent)
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 7. Operation & Controls: Digital Photography Review
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Top of camera controls (left) - Exposure Modes
Galleries
Top of the camera on the left hand side is
situated the exposure mode dial. This dial
controls the manner of exposure operation be it
fully automatic, a pre-programmed scene
composition, flexible program or a range of
manual and semiautomatic options.
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In the user manual Canon breaks these
exposure modes into groups. Each of these
exposure modes are described below.
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The first six modes (referred to as "Easy Photography") below are all based on Full Auto exposure
where the following options are disabled: Image size/Quality selection (locked to Large/Fine JPEG),
Custom Functions, AE-lock, Focus Point selection, White Balance (locked to Auto), Exposure
Compensation, Flash Compensation, Metering Mode (locked to evaluative). If blur will occur because
of camera shake the shutter speed will blink on the viewfinder status bar and on the top LCD.
Icon
Mode
AF mode
Drive mode
Flash
Fully Automatic Exposure
• AI Focus
• Single
• Self-Timer
• Automatic pop-up
• One Shot
• Continuous
• Self-Timer
• Automatic pop-up
• One Shot
• Single
• Self-Timer
• Disabled
• One Shot
• Single
• Self-Timer
• Disabled
Camera has complete control
over exposure, point-and-shoot
operation.
Portrait
Apertures are kept as large as
possible (small F number) to
produce a shallow Depth of
Field (blurred background).
Landscape
Apertures are kept as small as
possible (large F numbers) to
produce the largest possible
depth of field.
Close-up (Macro)
Aperture is kept to a medium
setting to ensure the subject
DOF is deep enough but the
background is blurred.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 7. Operation & Controls: Digital Photography Review
Sports
• AI Servo
• Continuous
• Self-Timer
• Disabled
• One Shot
• Single
• Self-Timer
• Manual
Shutter speed is kept as high as
possible to ensure capture of
fast moving objects.
Night Scene
Allows for slow shutter speeds
combined with flash to
illuminate foreground and
background.
The five exposure modes will be more familiar (and preferred) by most prosumer / professionals. All
menu functions and settings are available in these modes and can be used in any combination.
Icon
Mode
Program Auto Exposure (Flexible)
P
Very similar to AUTO exposure but you have access to all the normal manual controls, can set
the ISO, exposure compensation, use AE lock, bracketing etc. The Program AE on the D60 is
flexible, that means that you can select one of a variety of equal exposures by rolling the main
dial (top of camera).
Example:
• 1/30 F2.8 (metered)
• 1/20 F3.2 (roll left one click)
• 1/15 F4.0 (roll left two clicks) etc.
Shutter Priority Auto Exposure
Tv
In this mode you select the shutter speed and the camera will attempt to select the best
aperture for a proper exposure (based on the current metering mode). Shutter speed is
displayed on the viewfinder status bar and on the top LCD, roll the main dial to select different
shutter speeds. A half-press of the shutter release causes the cameras exposure system to
calculate the aperture, if it's outside of the cameras exposure range (for instance trying to take a
shot at 1/500s in darkness) the aperture will blink. Available shutter speeds below represent 1/3
stop increments (52 total), 1/2 stop increments can be selected through custom function 4.
1/4000, 1/3200, 1/2500, 1/2000, 1/1600, 1/1250, 1/1000, 1/800, 1/640, 1/500, 1/400, 1/320,
1/250, 1/200, 1/160, 1/125, 1/100, 1/80, 1/60, 1/50, 1/40, 1/30, 1/25, 1/20, 1/15, 1/13, 1/10,
1/8, 1/6, 1/5, 1/4, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8, 1, 1.3, 1.6, 2, 2.5, 3.2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 13, 15, 20, 25,
30 sec
Aperture Priority Auto Exposure
Av
In this mode you select the aperture and the camera will attempt to select the best shutter
speed for a proper exposure (based on the current metering mode). Aperture is displayed on the
viewfinder status bar and on the top LCD, roll the main dial to select different apertures. A halfpress of the shutter release causes the cameras exposure system to calculate the shutter speed,
if it's outside of the cameras exposure range the shutter speed will blink. Available apertures will
differ depending on the lens used, the list below represent 1/3 stop increments (40 total), 1/2
stop increments can be selected through custom function 4.
F1.0, F1.1, F1.2, F1.4, F1.6, F1.8, F2.0, F2.2, F2.5, F2.8, F3.2, F3.5, F4.0, F4.5, F5.0, F5.6, F6.3,
F7.1, F8.0, F9.0, F10, F11, F13, F14, F16, F18, F20, F22, F25, F29, F32, F36, F40, F45, F51,
F57, F64, F72, F81, F91 (exact range depends on lens used)
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 7. Operation & Controls: Digital Photography Review
Full Manual Exposure
M
In this mode you select the aperture and the shutter speed from any combination of the above
(plus BULB for shutter speed, apertures limited by the lens used). Top dial selects shutter speed,
rear dial selects aperture. Half-press the shutter release and the meter on the viewfinder status
bar and top LCD will reflect the exposure level compared to the calculated ideal exposure, if it's
outside of +/- 2EV the indicator bar will blink either + or -.
Automatic Depth-Of-Field AE
A-DEP
This mode, seen before on other Canon EOS cameras automatically controls the depth of field to
ensure that all the subjects covered by the focusing points, from those close to the camera to
those far away from the camera remain sharply defined (are within the depth of field).
Top of camera controls (right)
Top of the camera on the right side is the main
information LCD, directly above it the "main
dial" and shutter release. To the left of the LCD
are three buttons, top is metering / flash
compensation, middle drive mode and bottom
AF mode / white balance.
These settings buttons are press once (you
don't have to hold them), roll a dial to change
setting value and then half-press the shutter
release to return to shooting mode.
The table below shows the relationship between each of the three buttons and the parameters
changed by either rolling the main dial (top) or quick control dial (rear).
Button
Main Dial
Metering Mode
• Evaluative (35 zone)
• Partial (9.5% of screen)
• Center Weighted Average
Quick Control Dial
Flash Compensation
+/-2 EV in 1/2 or 1/3 EV steps
Drive Mode
• Single shot
• Continuous (approx. 3 fps max 8 images @ Large/Fine JPEG)
• Self-Timer
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 7. Operation & Controls: Digital Photography Review
White Balance Mode
Auto Focus Mode
• One Shot (focus lock on half-press)
• AI Servo (continuous predictive focus)
AI Focus mode (camera will automatically
choose between One Shot and AI Servo) is
only available in Full Auto.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Auto (3000 - 7000 K)
Daylight (approx. 5200 K)
Cloudy (approx. 6000 K)
Tungsten (approx. 3200 K)
Fluorescent (approx. 4000 K)
Flash (approx. 6000 K)
Custom (2000 - 10000 K)
It's worth commenting that both the main dial and quick control dial have a very definite click and
quality feel to them, stiff enough not to be accidentally knocked (you can disable the quick control
dial too). Note also that from the D30 to the D60 Canon has tweaked automatic daylight white
balance to be a little cooler.
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Under your thumb
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On the right side of the camera "under your
thumb" are two buttons. The first (*) by default
acts as an AE or FE lock button, it can however
can be reprogrammed through custom function
2 (table below). The second button is for
selecting AF focus area, a single press of this
button then roll either the main dial or quick
command dial to select automatic focus point
selection or a particular focus point. On the D60
the selected AF point(s) are highlighted on the
focus screen.
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Shutter button / AE lock button function (custom function 2), most sports photographers will prefer to
use setting 1 or 3 where you can control WHEN the camera AF kicks in, a simple press of your thumb
will start AF, then you can fire off as many shots as you like (more quickly obviously) without the
camera refocusing, plus you can manual focus once the AF has completed.
Custom Function 2
Setting
Shutter button half-press
AE Lock button
0
AE, AF
AE lock
1
AE lock *
AE, AF
2
AE, AF
AF lock (no AE lock)
3
AE *
AE, AF (no AE lock)
* With these settings the shutter release button takes on a shooting priority rather than focus
priority, it will fire even without a good focus lock.
Rear of camera controls
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 8. Operation & Controls: Digital Photography Review
On there rear of the D60 we'll find an array of controls, slightly confusing there are two On/Off
switches. The second On/Off switch (above the quick control dial) is actually a lock for the dial, I
suggest it should have been labelled 'Lock'. The top On/Off switch is the main power switch for the
camera, on the D60 it's been slightly tweaked by extending the protruding part, this actually makes it
far easier to turn the camera on and off.
The large wheel with the button in the center of it is called the Quick Control Dial. By default in
shooting mode the dial is used to set exposure compensation (which will only work when there's an
exposure reading on the viewfinder status bar or top LCD). Compensation can be made in 1/2 or 1/3
EV steps (custom function 4).
By default the SET button has no action (other than lighting the top information LCD backlight).
However it is possible to reprogram the SET button to enable you to quickly change other camera
settings (your preference):
Custom Function 12
Setting
SET button function when shooting
0
Not assigned
1
Change quality
2
Change ISO (my preference)
3
Select parameters
Otherwise the Quick Control Dial and SET button are used in conjunction with the LCD menu system
for navigation and selecting options. The rest of the buttons on the rear of the camera are associated
more with playback and the LCD. One disappointment is that when changing the ISO the currently
selected ISO is not displayed on the viewfinder status LCD (a logical way to do it), instead you have
to take your eye away from the viewfinder, look at the top status LCD panel and then change ISO.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 8. Operation & Controls: Digital Photography Review
Button
MENU
Operation
Enter / Leave the Record Menu
Record menu is described on the following pages of this review.
Information
INFO
JUMP
With no playback image displayed the INFO button displays camera information (example on
the next page). With an image displayed INFO switches between full LCD view of the image
and a quarter sized image with histogram and exposure information.
Jump
Jump through playback images by 9 frames forward or backward.
Thumbnail / Zoom
With an image displayed (PLAY pressed first) toggles between:
• Full image display
• 3 x 3 thumbnail images (9)
• 2 x zoomed image playback (use Quick Command Dial to scroll around zoomed image)
Play
Displays the last image shot (the last image on the card). The D60 is a "shooting priority"
camera, that means that no matter what is displayed on the rear LCD this will be cancelled if
any of the cameras photographic functions (example half-pressing the shutter release) are
accessed.
Erase
• Image preview (immediately after taking the shot): Erases the currently displayed image,
requires a confirmation OK / Cancel.
• Image review (Play pressed first): Displays the option to delete the current image or all
images.
Notable improvement: Improved power On/Off switch.
Lens mount controls
On the side of the lens mount are the final set
of camera controls. First is the flash open
button, a press of this (assuming the exposure
mode allows flash) will pop-up the onboard
flash (this is motorized).
Below the lens release button is the depth of
field preview button (positioned just right for a
tap from your thumb when supporting the
lens), press this and the lens stops down to the
indicated aperture to give a preview of the
depth of field through the viewfinder.
Sensor Cleaning
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneosd60/page8.asp (3 of 5)3/2/2005 3:20:31 AM
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 8. Operation & Controls: Digital Photography Review
The D60 has a dedicated "Sensor Cleaning"
mode (custom function 13) which must be used
in conjunction with the provided dummy
battery / AC adapter (you can't do this on the
battery). When enabled the mirror flips up and
shutter opens. Canon recommend using a non
compressed-air blower (the normal lens
cleaning pump type without a brush).
Here's what the manual warns about sensor
cleaning:
■
■
■
■
Never disconnect the camera power during cleaning. If the power is cut off, the shutter will
close and possibly damage the shutter curtain.
Use a blower without a brush attached. Using a brush to remove dust from the image element
can damage the element.
Do not insert a dust blower into the camera beyond the lens mount. If the power shuts off
and the shutter closes, this may damage the shutter curtains.
Never use cleaning sprays or blower sprays. The pressure and freezing action of the spray gas
may damage the surface of the imaging element.
Why do the D30 and D60 have far less of a dust problem?
It's worth noting that both the D30 and D60 don't have as much of a problem with dust spots on the
sensor as some of their counterparts. In almost 18 months use of our own D30 I've only ever cleaned
it five times, and never with a swab.
It turns out that the reason for this is in the distance between the sensor and the low pass / dichroic
mirror filter. If dust / dirt collect on the sensor surface or near to it they are 'in focus' when the image
is captured, further away and dust is less visible. In addition to the low pass filter (indicated by the
red arrow on the left hand image below) the D60 also has an infrared filter which is sandwiched with
the low pass filter.
This from Canon marketing material:
"and to maximize image quality in the EOS D60,a hybrid infrared filter was added to
absorb and effectively suppress the digital phenomena of red ghosting that can occur
from bright light sources.This,combined with an RGB primary color filter for highly
accurate and vivid colors,delivers truly superior digital imaging."
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 8. Operation & Controls: Digital Photography Review
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 9. Displays: Digital Photography Review
News
Reviews
Cameras
9. Displays
Timeline
Buying Guide
Side-by-Side
Camera INFO display
Galleries
Camera information, pressing the INFO
button with no reviewed image displays a
quick view of current camera
configuration. In this example:
Forums
Search
Learn
Glossary
Auto power off (8 mins), Review mode &
time (On, 8 secs), Parameters (Standard),
Custom functions (4:1, 5:2, 6:1, 11:2,
12:2), Flash compensation (0), Bracketing
mode / Exposure compensation (+1.0
EV), Frames available at current quality/
size setting (67), Remaining CF space
(220 MB), current sensitivity (ISO 1000).
Feedback
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About
Review after shutter release
If enabled the D60 will provide an instant review of the image taken immediately after the shutter
release. This can be either a single full screen image or a smaller image with histogram and exposure
information (as described below). As the D60 is a 'shooting priority' camera a half or full press of the
shutter release will immediately cancel this display and the camera is ready to shoot.
If you have the Review option set to On this
is the kind of display you'll get after taking a
shot, a simple full screen image with no
information.
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneosd60/page9.asp (1 of 4)3/2/2005 3:20:29 AM
If you have the Review option set to On
(Info) then this is what you'll see. A smaller
version of the image with overexposed
areas highlighted (blinking), a histogram
and exposure information.
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 9. Displays: Digital Photography Review
During this instant review you can choose to
delete the image before it's "saved" by
pressing the erase button ( ) directly
below the LCD monitor.
Play mode
The play button ( ) is used to enter the D60's play mode, from here you can browse through your
images (roll the quick control dial), examine under magnification or organize (delete) your images. As
with record review a half or full press of the shutter release immediately cancels play mode and the
camera is ready to shoot.
Press the play button ( ) to display the
last image taken (or the last image on the
CF card). The D60 uses a 'rough image'
technique to provide you with a very quick
impression of the image, it then takes
approximately two seconds to replace this
with a finer detailed image.
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneosd60/page9.asp (2 of 4)3/2/2005 3:20:29 AM
Press the info button (INFO.) to switch to
the detailed histogram and exposure
information view. Note that overexposed
areas of the image are highlighted (blinking).
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 9. Displays: Digital Photography Review
Press the thumbnail / mag button (
)
once to switch to a 3 x 3 thumbnail index
view of the images.
)
Press the thumbnail / mag button (
once more to switch to a magnified view,
use the quick control dial to flip around the
image (nine positions).
In single view or thumbnail view modes
pressing the jump button (INFO.) allows you
to scroll quickly through a page (9 images)
at a time.
Again, in either view mode press the erase
button ( ) to display the erase options,
select Erase to delete the selected image or
All... to display an OK / Cancel dialog to
erase all images on the CF card (apart from
those with a protect flag).
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 9. Displays: Digital Photography Review
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 10. Menus: Digital Photography Review
News
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10. Menus
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Glossary
Camera Menus
The D60's menu takes on the same form as we first saw on the D30, menu options are split into
three coloured sections (Red, Blue and Yellow), your location within the camera menu is indicated on
the right hand scroll bar by the highlighted dot.
Shooting Section (Red)
Feedback
Newsletter
Links
Support Us
About
Option
Values / Actions
Large / Fine *
Large / Normal
Medium / Fine
Medium / Normal
Small / Fine
Small / Normal
RAW
Notes
Quality
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Red-eye on/off
• Off *
• On
Auto Exposure
Bracket
• 0 EV *
Configures auto exposure bracketing
• Up to +/-2.0 EV in 0.5 or 0.3 EV steps steps
ISO speed
•
•
•
•
•
ISO
ISO
ISO
ISO
ISO
100 *
200
400
800
1000
3072
3072
2048
2048
1536
1536
3072
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
2048
2048
1360
1360
1024
1024
2048
JPEG approx. 2.5 MB
JPEG approx. 1.3 MB
JPEG approx. 1.4 MB
JPEG approx. 0.7 MB
JPEG approx. 0.9 MB
JPEG approx. 0.5 MB
RAW approx. 7.4 MB
Enables the use of the AF / red-eye
lamp just before a flash shot.
Set sensor sensitivity.
This setting can also be programmed
onto the SET button via custom
function 12.
LCD illumination • Off *
• On
Enables the new top information
panel blue illumination LED's.
Beep
Enables auto focus confirmation
beep. Also used for self timer.
• On *
• Off
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 10. Menus: Digital Photography Review
Custom WB
• Set custom WB
Select image for custom WB. [clip]
Parameters
•
•
•
•
•
Configure and select up to three sets
of image process parameters
(contrast, sharpness, saturation and
colour tone). [clip of Set up menu]
Standard *
Set 1
Set 2
Set 3
Set up
* Default setting
Notable improvement: Ability to set image processing parameters in-camera. Although, my personal
opinion is that there should be more latitude of change for each parameter, one step of change
seldom makes a noticeable difference.
Playback Section (Blue)
Option
Values / Actions
Protect
Enter protect mode, allows you to
[clip of protect in thumbnail view]
browse images either in a single image
or thumbnail view and mark each image
as protected (or un-protect). This
simply sets the read-only flag on the CF
card filesystem.
Rotate
[clip of rotate in single image view]
Enter rotate mode, again, this can be
performed in either single image or
thumbnail index view. This option
allows you to rotate an image on-screen
by 90 or 270 degrees. Doesn't actually
rotate the JPEG file, but marks its
orientation.
Print Order
Allows you to create a DPOF print order [clip of print order set up]
file, this defines which images will be
[clip of print order selection]
printed, how many copies of each, what
format etc. For use with compatible
printers or photo finishers.
Auto playback
Start an automated slideshow of images
on the CF card, delay between each
image is preset at four seconds.
Setup Section (Yellow)
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Notes
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 10. Menus: Digital Photography Review
Option
Values / Actions
1 min *
2 min
4 min
8 min
15 min
30 min
Off
Notes
Auto power off
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Review
• Off
• On *
• On (Info)
Enables or disables instant record
review (image shown immediately
after taking a shot). Info adds
histogram, highlight and exposure
information.
Review time
•
•
•
•
Defines the amount of time that the
review image (described above) is
shown on the LCD monitor. If this
option is set to Hold then the image
is displayed until the shutter release
is half-pressed.
LCD Brightness
• Normal *
• Bright
Sets the LCD backlight strength.
Date/Time
• Set Date & Time
• Set Date format
[clip of set date & time screen]
File numbering
• Continuous *
• Auto reset
Controls the numbering method
used for filenames.
Language
•
•
•
•
Select menu language.
Video system
• NTSC
• PAL
2 sec *
4 sec
8 sec
Hold
English *
Deutsch
Francais
Japanese
Sets camera power off time, this is
the amount of "idle time" before the
camera powers itself off. In the
power off state the camera can be
woken by half or fully depressing the
shutter release (or turning the power
switch to Off and back to On).
Select video system for video out
connector.
Format
Format the CF card
[clip of format CF card screen]
C.Fn
Set up custom functions
(See below)
C.Fn default
setting
Reset all custom functions to factory
default settings
Firmware ver.
Displays current firmware version
* Default setting
Notable improvement: Display of firmware version on menu.
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneosd60/page10.asp (3 of 5)3/2/2005 3:20:25 AM
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 10. Menus: Digital Photography Review
Custom Functions
The D60's menu takes on the same form as we first saw on the D30, menu options are split into
three coloured sections (Red, Blue and Yellow), your location within the camera menu is indicated on
the right hand scroll bar by the highlighted dot.
Option
Values
02: Shutter button / AE lock button
0:
1:
2:
3:
03: Mirror lockup
0: Disable (normal)
1: Enable (first press of shutter release flips mirror up,
second press takes exposure - reduces vibration) *
* When enabled camera's self-timer reduces to 3 secs
04: Tv/Av and exposure level
0: 1/2 stop increments
1: 1/3 stop increments
05: AF-assist beam / Flash firing
0:
1:
2:
3:
06: Shutter speed in AV mode with
flash
0: Automatic (slow sync)
1: Fixed at 1/200 sec (when using flash)
07: AEB sequence / auto cancel
0:
1:
2:
3:
08: Shutter curtain sync
0: 1st curtain sync (flash fires after shutter opens)
1: 2nd curtain sync (flash fires before shutter closes)
09: Lens AF stop button
(Only certain lenses)
0: Stop AF while button is pressed
1: Operate AF while button is pressed
2: Press button to start AE lock
10: Auto reduction of fill flash
0: Enable
1: Disable (best for strong backlight situations)
11: Menu button return position
0: Always show first menu item
1: Previous (top if camera is powered off)
2: Previous (memorized)
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Shutter half-press: AE, AF. <*>: AE lock
<*>: AE, AF. Shutter half-press: AE lock
Shutter half-press: AE, AF. <*>: AF lock (no AE lock)
<*>: AE, AF (no AE lock). Shutter half-press: AE
Emits / Fires
Does not emit / Fires
Only ext. flash emits / Fires
Emits / Does not fire
00-0
-0
+
+
+
+
/
/
/
/
Enable
Disable
Enable
Disable
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 10. Menus: Digital Photography Review
12: SET button func when shooting
0:
1:
2:
3:
Default (no function)
Change quality
Change ISO speed
Select parameters
13: Sensor cleaning
0: Disable
1: Enable (must be connected to DC coupler)
14: Superimposed display
0: On (highlight AF points on focusing screen)
1: Off
15: Shutter release w/o CF card
0: Possible to take a shot without the CF card
1: Not possible
Notable improvement: Custom function 01 (enable long exposure noise reduction) has been
removed, this is handled differently on the D60. Custom function 05: Updated to also control internal
flash or external flash (allows you to use external flash just for AF assist beam). Custom function 14 enables highlighting of AF point on focusing screen. Custom function 15 - stop shutter release if no
CF card is inserted.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 11. Timings & Sizes: Digital Photography Review
News
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11. Timings & Sizes
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Glossary
Timings & File Sizes
Overall the EOS-D60 is a fast digital SLR, especially considering the additional data (six megapixels)
it's having to deal with. Review timings, the area where I thought the camera would suffer are either
the same or just slightly slower. About the only times I found myself urging the camera to hurry up
were during buffered writes of multiple images which clearly took longer than the D30 and at startup
where two seconds can sometimes feel like an eternity. The D60's use of its internal buffer has been
significantly improved, read 'Smart buffering' below.
Feedback
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About
Timing Notes: All times calculated as an average of three operations. Unless otherwise stated all
timings were made on a 3072 x 2048 Large / Fine JPEG image (approx. 2,500 KB per image).
The media used for these tests were:
■
■
■
512 MB SimpleTech Type II Compact Flash card
512 MB Lexar 16x Pro Type I Compact Flash card
1 GB IBM Microdrive Type II Compact Flash card
Action
Details
Power: Off to On
Power: On to Off *1
Time, seconds
(SimpleTech
CF)
Time, seconds
(Lexar 16x CF)
Time, seconds
(Microdrive)
2.1
2.3
2.0
<0.1
<0.1
<0.1
Record: Review *2
JPEG
1.6
1.6
1.6
Record: Review *2
RAW
1.7
1.8
1.8
Record: Review (Info) *2
JPEG
1.8
1.8
1.8
Record: Review (Info) *2
RAW
2.0
2.1
2.0
Play: Image to Image *3
JPEG
1.8
2.0
2.7
Play: Image to Image *3
RAW
1.3
1.3
2.2
Play: Thumbnail view 3 x
3
0.9
1.0
2.1
Play: Magnify to x3.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
*1
Assuming all buffered images have been written out to storage card, otherwise camera
displays a "count down" bar on the top information LCD panel to indicate the buffer being
emptied to the CF card. Once complete the camera will power off fully.
*2
Time taken from the shutter release being pressed to the review image being displayed on the
LCD monitor.
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneosd60/page11.asp (1 of 6)3/2/2005 3:20:22 AM
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 11. Timings & Sizes: Digital Photography Review
*3
This timing is the amount of time it takes the camera to load the 'finer' image, this is required
for a histogram or for magnification. However, browsing quickly through the images using the
quick control dial is virtually instant.
Smart buffering
With the advent of the D60 comes a larger internal
buffer, it's large enough to hold up to eight six
megapixel unprocessed images. The amount of free
space in the buffer is displayed on the far right side of
the viewfinder status bar as a single numeric digit
(buffer space indicator).
But that's not the end of the story, Canon have done something very clever with the D60's buffer and
that has improved both continuous and single shot drive modes. The D60 uses its internal buffer for
two purposes: buffer data is it comes from the CMOS sensor (call this the unprocessed data) and
buffer converted image files before they are written to the CF card.
Image processing sequence:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Record data as it comes off the CMOS sensor, unprocessed data (approx. 9.3 MB per shot)
Store this unprocessed data in the SDRAM buffer
Process this data into image files (JPEG or compressed RAW)
Buffer these converted image files (JPEG approx. 2.5 MB or RAW approx. 7.0 MB)
Write JPEG / RAW image files to CF card
This means that although the buffer can be filled with a continuous burst of eight shots it quickly
regains buffer space as the unprocessed images are converted into the JPEG or RAW image files. In a
real life situation it's easy to believe that the stage 2 runs concurrently to new unprocessed data
being buffered.
I discovered this when I noticed that the camera will not write to the CF card while the shutter
release was half-pressed but that the buffer space counter would count back up to eight after a burst
of shots.
Take eight shots in a continuous burst, keep your finger half-pressed on the shutter release and
despite the fact that nothing is being written to the CF card you will see the buffer space indicator
fairly quickly count back up again. Remove your finger from the shutter release and the counter
doesn't change but you can observe data being written to the CF card (indicator light on the CF
compartment door flickers).
Repeating this test for both JPEG Large/Fine and RAW I discovered that the buffer has space for:
■
■
8 x JPEG Large/Fine images and approx. 6 seconds later indicates space to shoot 8 more
8 x RAW images and approx. 8 seconds later indicates space to shoot 5 more
This means that the D60 takes just approx. 640 ms to turn the unprocessed data a JPEG Large / Fine
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneosd60/page11.asp (2 of 6)3/2/2005 3:20:22 AM
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 11. Timings & Sizes: Digital Photography Review
file and approx. 1600 ms for a compressed RAW file.
Low Light Auto Focus
This test is designed to measure the minimum amount of light under
which the camera can still focus. The focus target is our lens distortion
test chart (shown here on the right), camera is positioned exactly 2 m
(6.6 ft) away.
Light levels are gradually dropped until the camera can no longer focus. Before the shutter release is
half pressed the lens is manually focused to the closest subject distance (typically 0.5 m) to "throw
the focus out". This test target is the optimum type of subject for most AF systems (as it has a
vertical line at its center).
Lens
Focal
len.
Aperture
AF
Lowest light focus Time to focus
at focal len. lamp?
from near *1
EF 28 - 70 mm F2.8 L
70 mm
F2.8
Yes
Complete darkness
2.8 sec
EF 28 - 70 mm F2.8 L
70 mm
F2.8
No
1.7 EV
3.3 sec
EF 28 - 135 mm F3.5 - 5.6
28 mm
F3.5
Yes
Complete darkness
2.9 sec
EF 28 - 135 mm F3.5 - 5.6
28 mm
F3.5
No
2.2 EV*2
4.5 sec
EF 28 - 135 mm F3.5 - 5.6
135 mm
F5.6
Yes
Complete darkness
6.2 sec
EF 28 - 135 mm F3.5 - 5.6
135 mm
F5.6
No
2.5 EV
4.5 sec
*1
Lens was manually focused to closest subject distance before AF was started. This is the time
for the camera to focus from its closest subject distance to a solid AF lock. If the lens focus
position is already near to the final focus position then focusing is much faster (almost instant
in most cases)
*2
First attempt camera hunted and after 10 seconds gave up, lens was reset to closest subject
distance and second attempt locked.
Light intensity (Lux) = 2.5 x 2^EV (@ ISO 100), 10.76391 Lux = 1 foot-candle (fc)
For reference purposes the 28 - 70 mm L took around 1.5 seconds to do this test in medium light
(about 5.0 EV) and the 28 - 135 mm took between 1.8 and 2.2 seconds. As you can see the more
light that gets to the AF system (the wider the maximum aperture) the better, this is simply common
sense but is backed up by our results. Other factors are the contrast of the subject, clearly our
subject has good contrast but a human face for instance will have a lot less contrast.
With the professional 'L' lens the camera manages to focus down to light levels of 2.7 EV without the
AF assist lamp and complete darkness with it. Either way maximum focus time was just over 3
seconds. With the consumer level 28 - 135 mm results were more mixed, leave AF assist switched on
and you'll be able to focus in darkness, switch it off and you'll need around 3.5 EV of light before
you'll get a solid focus lock and that may takeup to 6 seconds.
Compared to the EOS-D30
The following test was carried out to test the D60's "improved low light auto focus", tests carried out
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 11. Timings & Sizes: Digital Photography Review
without the AF assist lamp. Light levels were dimmed until the D60 could not focus and then very
slightly increased until it could AF lock. This process was repeated for the D30. I measured a very
slight improvement of around 0.5 EV in low light auto focus between the D30 and D60.
■
■
D30 & 28 - 70 F2.8 L: 2.2 EV (lock < 3 sec)
D60 & 28 - 70 F2.8 L: 1.7 EV (lock < 3 sec)
AF Assist Lamp
The D60's AF Assist Lamp now fires up to six times (compared to three times for the D30) which can
improve the cameras abilities of 'catching' the focus in darkness or near darkness. Another
improvement is that Custom Function 5 now allows you to use the AF lamp on an external flash (such
as the 550EX) to assist auto focus (better low light range, speed and accuracy) without actually firing
the flash at the time of exposure.
Single-shot drive mode
There was a problem with the D30 in the way that it used its buffer in Single Shot drive mode, you
couldn't take the next shot until the currently buffered image had been processed (converted into the
JPEG / RAW output file). This meant that after taking a single shot the camera displayed a 'Busy'
warning on the viewfinder LCD (approx. 1.5 seconds) and you couldn't take the next shot until it had
gone.
This limitation has now been removed, with the D60 you can take shots as quickly as either you can
press the shutter release or the camera can auto focus. And because of the way the D60 uses its
buffer (see above) it means that in Single-shot drive mode you will almost NEVER find yourself in a
situation where you can't take the next shot.
Continuous drive mode
To test continuous mode the camera had the following settings: Manual Focus, Manual Exposure
(1/250s, F3.5), ISO 400. It was soon discovered that no matter what image output setting the
shooting rate was always 3.3 fps (+/-0.1 fps). So, instead of testing the shooting rate I instead
measured three different times:
■
■
■
Next shot - How soon after a burst of eight shots you can take the next
Next burst - How soon after a burst of eight shots you can take another eight
Full write - How long a burst of eight shots takes to be processed and written to the CF
The media used for these tests were:
■
■
■
512 MB SimpleTech Type II Compact Flash card
512 MB Lexar 16x Pro Type I Compact Flash card
1 GB IBM Microdrive Type II Compact Flash card
Burst of eight JPEG images
Timing
512 MB SimpleTech
512 MB Lexar 16x
1 GB Microdrive
Next shot
1.1 sec
1.0 sec
1.1 sec
Next burst
6.0 sec
6.2 sec
6.5 sec
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 11. Timings & Sizes: Digital Photography Review
Full write
16.8 sec
18.1 sec
21.5 sec
512 MB SimpleTech
512 MB Lexar 16x
1 GB Microdrive
Next shot
1.7 sec
1.8 sec
1.8 sec
Next burst
23.8 sec
22.8 sec
27.0 sec
Full write
45.9 sec
44.5 sec
55.9 sec
Burst of eight RAW images
Timing
It's fair to say that six seconds isn't a long time to wait before taking the next burst of eight frames.
Clearly once you've done that you're then going to have to wait until the first burst have been fully
written (16 seconds best case) before taking another eight but it's still an impressive performance
when you consider each image has six megapixels of data and weighs in as a 2.5 MB JPEG. From the
results above you can see that the flash storage devices managed to outperform the Microdrive,
although not by huge margins.
File Flush Timing
Timings shown below are the time taken for the camera to process and "flush" the image out to the
storage media. The D60 continues to process images in the buffer and write data out to the storage
media in parallel to you composing (and taking) the next shot. It only pauses this writing if you halfpress the shutter release.
The media used for these tests were:
■
■
■
512 MB SimpleTech Type II Compact Flash card
512 MB Lexar 16x Pro Type I Compact Flash card
1 GB IBM Microdrive Type II Compact Flash card
Store
Time, secs
Time, secs
Time, secs
(SimpleTech) (Lexar 16x) (Microdrive)
Approx. *2
File size
Approx. *2
512 MB card
L 3072 x 2048 RAW
6.4
6.0
7.4
7.4 MB
66
L 3072 x 2048 Fine
2.2
2.2
3.3
2.5 MB
197
L 3072 x 2048 Normal
1.4
1.3
2.3
1.3 MB
375
M 2048 x 1360 Fine
1.4
1.3
2.3
1.4 MB
360
S 1536 x 1024 Fine
0.8
0.8
1.5
0.9 MB
557
*1
Timer was started as soon as the storage compartment light came on and stopped when this
light went off. This was seen as the ACTUAL recording time. Add approximately 1.2
seconds to these times to get the amount of time from moment of shutter release to image
flushed away to the storage card.
*2
At ISO 100. Note that the D60 changes its estimated remaining frame count based on the
current ISO sensitivity (due to the fact that higher ISO images have more noise and will
therefore make larger JPEG files).
These timings are mostly a factor of the media used and the speed of the D60's CF interface. For the
SimpleTech and Lexar 16x cards we approximate a throughput of 1.2 MB/sec. For the Microdrive this
drops to 1.0 MB/sec (probably because of the initial 'spin up' delay). These speeds are virtually
identical to the D30 (except for the Microdrive write speed which does seem to have been improved
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 11. Timings & Sizes: Digital Photography Review
slightly).
Battery life
I raved about the little BP-511 battery pack in my D30 review. Thankfully the D60 maintains the same
power source, it too uses the BP-511 (7.4V, 1100mAh, 8.1 Wh). This small, lightweight Lithium-Ion
battery provides enough power for at least 500 shots, this would last most people all day long. The
great thing about the battery is that it is so small it's no trouble to carry a spare, just in case.
Canon supplied battery life data
Shooting conditions
Temperature
Actions:
No flash use
50% flash use
Normal (20°C / 68°F)
Approx. 620
Approx. 490
Low (0°C / 32°F)
Approx. 480
Approx. 400
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Image Size / File Quality Options
The D60 provides seven different image size / quality combinations. You can choose from image sizes
of 3072 x 2048 (Large), 2048 x 1360 (Medium) or 1536 x 1024 (Small) in combination with either
Fine JPEG or Normal JPEG quality settings. In addition there is of course RAW image format, this
contains a RAW 'dump' of the data directly from the sensor (12-bits per pixel), a RAW file can not be
viewed natively and but must first be converted. Most people consider the RAW format to be the
'digital negative' because it is lossless and has had no image processing applied to it (white balance,
sharpening etc.) all of which can be adjusted at a later date before outputing the final image.
To give an impression of what some of the combinations of image
size and quality produce the table below is a cross reference of
some of them:
About
■
■
■
■
■
3024
3024
3024
2048
1536
x
x
x
x
x
2048
2048
2048
1360
1024
RAW (to TIFF using Canon RAW converter 2)
JPEG Fine
JPEG Normal
JPEG Fine
JPEG Fine
Standard Test Scene
Crops below are of the same 240 x 120 area of each image nearest neighbour magnified 200%.
Settings: ISO 100, Parameters: Normal, EF 28-70 mm F2.8L @ F8.0
3024 x 2048
RAW
As a 2,151 KB JPEG or original 7,832 KB .CRW & .THM (Canon RAW)
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 12. Features: Digital Photography Review
JPEG
FINE
2,893 KB
JPEG
NORM
1,412 KB
2048 x 1360
JPEG
FINE
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 12. Features: Digital Photography Review
1,437 KB
1536 x 1024
JPEG
FINE
882 KB
It's difficult to see very much difference between RAW and JPEG Fine, clearly RAW offers much more
flexibility and for purists would be seen as the absolute 'digital negative', but there is visually very
little difference between the two. JPEG Normal does introduce some visual artifacts, for most
purposes I would recommend people stick to JPEG Fine (at any image size). There is a more detailed
examiniation of the RAW format later in this review.
Obviously having all those additional pixels at your disposal means that smaller size images either
straight out of the camera (Medium / Small sizes) or 'down sampling' Large images at a later date
produces very sharp and very clean images. This is one of the big advantages of having such a large
(pixel count) image.
Parameters
As with the D30 the D60 provides up to three sets of image processing parameters which can be set
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 12. Features: Digital Photography Review
to change the output of the final image, these settings are applied in-camera to JPEG files and are
recorded in the header of RAW files. On the D30 these parameters were programmed (into one of
three sets) via the TWAIN driver and a USB connection, on the D60 the parameters can be
programmed in-camera - a much better solution.
The D60 also adds a new parameter called 'color tone' which the manual describes as "adjusts the
color balance... makes skin tones more red or yellow". In summary the four parameters which may
be adjusted are: Contrast, Sharpness, Saturation and Color Tone.
What the D60 still doesn't have and I'm sure there are a lot of people who would like it is the ability
to shoot in (and select) defined colour spaces. The new EOS-1D allows you to select between sRGB
and Adobe RGB. It would have been nice to have seen this in the D60 (although perhaps that would
bring the D60 a little too close to the 'professional' level).
Parameter: Contrast
Settings: ISO 100, EF 28-70 mm F2.8L @ F8.0, Small/Fine
Contrast: -1
Contrast: 0
Contrast: +1
As you can see there is a visible difference between the three contrast levels. Contrast -1 produces a
very flat low contrast image which maintains shadow and highlight and boosts mid range grey.
Contrast +1 produces a much punchier image which has much blacker blacks and whiter highlights.
Parameter: Sharpness
Settings: ISO 100, EF 28-70 mm F2.8L @ F8.0, Large/Fine
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 12. Features: Digital Photography Review
Sharpness: -1
Sharpness: 0
Sharpness: +1
Adjust the sharpness does seem to have a more visible effect than it did on the D30. I noticed when I
first started shooting with the D60 that its images appeared to need less sharpening straight out of
the camera than the D30 does. The Sharpness +1 setting works well and introduces very few
artifacts, details are more visible and edges are sharper but for me it loses some of that silky
photographic quality we see from the default sharpness setting.
Parameter: Saturation
Settings: ISO 100, EF 28-70 mm F2.8L @ F11.0, Small/Fine, Studio Flash
Saturation: -1
1 Dark skin
Saturation: 0
2 Light skin
13 Blue
Saturation: +1
14 Green
15 Red
16 Yellow
17 Magenta
-1
0
+1
You can see that the differences between each saturation level is very subtle. Compared to the D30
the D60's colours have been tweaked, red is stronger and other colours have been 'tuned down', thus
it by default produces a more neutral balance. This is one setting where I would have liked to have
seen at least a +/-2 level latitude of adjustment, the difference between -1, 0 and +1 is simply too
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 12. Features: Digital Photography Review
subtle to be very useful.
Parameter: Color tone
Settings: ISO 100, EF 28-70 mm F2.8L @ F11.0, Small/Fine, Studio Flash
Color tone: -1 (More red)
Color tone: 0
1 Dark skin
13 Blue
2 Light skin
Color tone: +1 (More yellow)
14 Green
15 Red
16 Yellow
17 Magenta
-1
0
+1
The color tone parameter is new to the D60, it allows you to preset the processing of reds
(specifically those around skin tone levels) to have either slightly more red or slightly more yellow.
There is no specific explanation of the use of this parameter but I'll make a guess that it's designed to
satisfy the use of the camera in different parts of the world where the 'look' of regional models skin
could look better in either modes -1 or +1.
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Flash
The D60 provides plenty of options for flash photography. For casual snapping you have the cameras
built-in E-TTL flash unit, there's also an E-TTL compatible hotshoe for flash units such as the Canon
420EX or 550EX as well as a standard PC Sync terminal for use with studio strobe systems. The
samples below were shot within a few seconds of each other to give a (rough) impression of the
differences between each and to check colour accuracy.
Settings: ISO 100, EF 28-70 mm F2.8L, Large/Fine
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Studio strobes (1/200 sec, F10)
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Built-in flash (1/200 sec, F5)
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 13. Features: Digital Photography Review
Canon 550EX Direct (1/200 sec, F5)
Canon 550EX Bounced (1/200 sec, F5)
Studio setup: 2 x Elinchrom 300W strobes (1 x 70 cm softbox).
Long Exposure noise reduction / Night shots
Gone is custom function 1. What's the significance of that I here you cry? Well, on the D30 custom
function 1 controlled the dark frame long exposure noise reduction system. When enabled the D30
would take a second 'dark frame' exposure immediately after the main exposure and subtract
detected noise from the original shot. This would mean that a 5 second exposure took 10 seconds.
On the D60 Canon are handling long exposure noise reduction differently. There's no dark frame
shot, as soon as the exposure has finished it's displayed on the LCD monitor which kind of hints that
some how the CMOS sensor itself is detecting / removing noise as the shot progresses. What's even
more remarkable is that the D60 produces far cleaner long exposures that the D30 ever could.
Typical night exposure
The (not particularly level) exposure of Tower Bridge below was taken with a fairly conservative four
second exposure at ISO 100. As you can see the D60 manages to capture good detail and cope well
with the bright lights on the bridge. Best of all there's no noise in sight, and certainly no 'stuck pixels'.
Settings: ISO 100, EF 28-70 mm F2.8L, Large/Fine, 4 sec, F8.0
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 13. Features: Digital Photography Review
The four minute exposure
This isn't a particularly interesting subject, however it was a quick test shot I performed using a
remote release the D60 in Bulb mode. The exposure below was for an amazing 243 seconds (4
minutes and 3 seconds). This was long enough for the London skyline to turn into daylight (thanks to
light pollution) and for the terrace opposite which was impossible to see with the naked eye to
suddenly spring out of the image. What's fundamentally more impressive about this shot however is
when you zoom in and look around the image. There is simply no visible noise, and this is a four
minute exposure! There are a couple of stuck pixels, but nothing I'd get worried about. An absolutely
stunning performance. Amateur astronomy look out, here comes the D60.
Settings: ISO 100, EF 28-70 mm F2.8L, Large/Fine, 243 sec, F8.0
The moon
This probably doesn't belong in this category as it was a 1/15 sec exposure, but I did shoot it at night
and I was so happy with the shot that I just had to include it. The image below is a crop of the center
of a D60 shot taken from a tripod using the EF 100-400 mm L lens @ 400 mm, no additional
extenders. Click on the image below for the full size crop.
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400 mm, ISO 100, 1/15 sec, F10
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 14. Software: Digital Photography Review
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About
Software
Note: this page is based on pre-production software, I should be receiving full production software
soon and will update this page shortly after that.
Remote Capture
The D60 is supplied with the latest version of Canon's Remote Capture software. This allows you to
control the camera remotely via a PC, you can shoot, review and even take time-lapse shots all
through a USB connection. At the time of writing this review the copy of Remote Capture in early
software pack I had with the D60 wasn't working reliably. For more detail on Remote Capture read
my extensive look at this application in my EOS-1D review.
RAW Image Converter
The D60 is now provided with both a TWAIN module for image transfer and conversion from RAW
format as well as the latest version of the Canon RAW Image Converter. Both applications now have
a virtually identical interface and both support advanced features such as digital exposure
compensation and multiple image adjustment in thumbnail mode. The new RAW Image Converter
also allows you to extract 2048 x 1360 JPEG's from RAW files at high speed, this is an excellent way
to get a very fast overview of your RAW files before selecting those to be used for the final shot.
TWAIN / RAW Image Converter features summary
Direct connection to the EOS-D60 (TWAIN via USB)
■
■
■
Set camera owners name, date & time, format CF card
Program camera parameter sets *
Browse, modify, erase and transfer images from CF card in camera
* Unconfirmed as the pre-release software I had wasn't working properly
Browsing images (on camera or local folder - TWAIN or RAW converter)
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
View as a thumbnail index (three sizes of thumbnail)
View as full window preview
Check / Un-check images
Protect / Un-protect images
Transfer images from CF card to local hard disk
Re-save images into different formats (RAW to RAW, JPEG or TIFF)
Acquire images (convert / transfer back to host application - TWAIN only)
Display detailed exposure and camera settings information for each image
Erase image(s)
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 14. Software: Digital Photography Review
■
■
■
Set RAW parameters
❍
Exposure compensation (digital - +/-2.0 EV in 0.1 EV steps)
❍
White balance
❍
Contrast
❍
Saturation
❍
Color Tone
❍
Sharpening (on a global basis)
Convert RAW image
❍
Acquire back to host application (8 or 16 bit or Linear - TWAIN only)
❍
Save as JPEG or TIFF (8 or 16 bit)
JPEG extraction (extract a 2048 x 1360 JPEG from RAW header)
RAW Image Converter interface
The Canon RAW Image Converter application associates itself with the '.CRW' file extension
(Windows). To start the converter simply select one or more CRW files and press ENTER (or doubleclick) or select the RAW Image Converter icon (it's now also a standalone application). A window as
above will be displayed showing a list of images to be converted along with several options. You can
select and remove images from the conversion list (Clear button) or add more images (Add RAW
Image). The Preferences option is the same as for the main interface (below). Click on 'List for
Development Condition Settings'* to enter the Main window and perform more advanced RAW
conversion (see below).
* Pre-production label
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 14. Software: Digital Photography Review
The dialog on the left is the 'Save File' which allows you to convert and save the selected RAW files
as either JPEG or TIFF (8 or 16 bit). You can choose to keep the original filename or create new
unique filenames based on a numeric sequence. The dialog on the right is for the new 'JPEG Extract'
feature which allows you to extract 2048 x 1360 JPEG files from the RAW file (these are stored in the
file header by the camera), again you can output these with the same filename or a new filename.
JPEG Extraction is very fast, on my PC it took just 4 seconds to extract 40 JPEG's.
Main window
The description below is worded to describe the RAW Image Converter but all the same functionality
also exists through the TWAIN interface.
Thumbnail mode
This is the main RAW conversion window. Here we are browsing a folder of RAW (.CRW) as you can
see it is possible to check mark images for conversion, set digital exposure compensation, alter white
balance, contrast, saturation and color tone. All of these settings can be applied to a single image or
multiple images.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 14. Software: Digital Photography Review
Bug or by design?
What's VERY unfortunate is that the settings made (such as white balance, check marking, digital
exposure compensation etc.) are NOT stored in the CRW file. This means that whatever settings
changes you make in one session are lost as soon as you close the RAW Image Converter. I'm not
sure if this is a bug or it's designed to work this way, whichever it's mightily inconvenient and reduces
the usefulness of the RAW Image Converter considerably. The only setting which is stored is the
image orientation.
Preview mode (three possible zoom levels, this is the closest)
Change the view mode to 'Preview' and you get up to 100% zoom, 'JPEG Preview' allows you to
preview the 2048 x 1360 JPEG which is embedded within the RAW file.
Preferences
The preferences dialog is spread across two tabs (as shown below). It allows you to set various
preferences and settings: Display Last Image, Display Filename/Date & Time, Set camera model
name, Set sharpening setting, Choose Linear output, Enable/Disable False Color (moiré) filter, by
default use the JPEG for preview image.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 14. Software: Digital Photography Review
I find it a little odd and slightly disappointing that you can't set the sharpness on a per-image basis,
sharpness is a global setting and is applied here in the preferences dialog rather than being attached
to the selected RAW file.
RAW file manipulation
You can manipulate one image or a multiple selection of images, RAW images can have their white
balance, contrast, saturation, color tone and digital exposure compensation set via a row of dropdown list boxes and the +/- button on the left side of the toolbar.
Digital Exposure Compensation
Digital Exposure Compensation is the ability to change the output exposure of the image +/-2.0 EV
on 0.1 EV steps. The RAW Image Converter can do this because the RAW data from the camera is
stored as linear 12-bit values, there is a degree of latitude possible to adjust images. My tests showed
that the D60 provided approximately 1 stop (1.0 EV) of latitude for negative exposure compensation
(detail which would have been 'blown out' at the original exposure level).
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0.0 EV compen. (Original)
-0.7 EV digital exposure compensation
0.0 EV compen. (Original)
+0.8 EV digital exposure compensation
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Software (contd.)
False color filter
The 'False color filter' automatically removes the moire effect which are a consequence of the Bayer
interpolation which is carried out on the image data. As you can see from the samples below with the
false color filter disabled moiré patterns are clearly visible, when enabled these are virtually invisible.
The side effect is that colour saturation of non-artifact elements can be effected (see the colour of
the yellow rope in the sample below. The false color filter also increases conversion time for RAW
images (it's on by default).
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False color filter disabled
False color filter enabled (default)
Save File
With one or more image selected you can save the images as either JPEG, 8-bit TIFF or 16-bit TIFF.
These images can be saved with the same filename (suffixed with either _RJ, _RT8 or _RT16) or with
new filenames based on a pattern and numeric sequence.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 15. Software: Digital Photography Review
JPEG Extract
A little known (at least at first) secret about the D30's RAW files is that they contained a small JPEG
file. The same is true of the D60's RAW files, except that these are notably larger, 2048 x 1360 to be
exact. The new RAW Image Converter allows you to extract JPEG's from a single or selection of RAW
files (.CRW). This function is VERY fast and enables you to in effect shoot 'RAW + JPEG' at the same
time (although different resolutions). Extracting JPEG's from 40 images took just 4 seconds on my PC.
Note that settings changes such as white balance, digital exposure compensation etc. do not apply to
extracted JPEG's.
Sample JPEG's extracted from RAW files
Image file information (from file header)
The text below is an example of the information available in the bottom right hand pane of the main
TWAIN / RAW converter window. As you can see it covers a wide range of exposure and camera
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 15. Software: Digital Photography Review
setting information as well as a complete set of the custom function settings.
File Name
020321-1152-28.crw
Camera Model Name
Canon EOS D60
Shooting Date/Time
21 Mar 2002 11:52:26
Shooting Mode
Aperture-Priority AE
Tv( Shutter Speed )
1/50
Av( Aperture Value )
5.6
Metering Mode
Evaluative
Exposure Compensation
+2/3
ISO Speed
200
Lens
28.0 - 70.0 mm
Focal Length
47.0 mm
Image Size
3072x2048
Image Quality
RAW
Flash
Off
White Balance
Custom
AF Mode
One-Shot AF
Active AF Points
[ Center ]
Parameters
Contrast
Normal
Sharpness
Normal
Color saturation Normal
Color tone
Normal
File Size
7353KB
Custom Function Settings
02:Shutter button/AE lock button
0:AF/AE lock
03:Mirror lockup
0:Disable
04:TV,AV and exposure level
1:1/3-stop
05:AF-assist beam/Flash firing
2:Only ext. flash emits/Fires
06:Shutter speed in Av mode
1:1/200(fixed)
07:AEB sequence/auto cancellation
0:0 => - => +/Enabled
08:Shutter curtain sync
0:1st-curtain sync
09:Lens AF stop button Fn, switch
0:AF stop
10:Auto reduction of fill flash
0:Enable
11:Menu button return position
2:Previous
12:SET button func, when shooting
2:Change ISO speed
13:Sensor cleaning
0:Disable
14:Superimposed display
0:On
15:Shutter release without CF card
0:Possible without CF card
Drive Mode
Continuous shooting
Owner's Name
dpreview.com
Camera Body No.
0130101038
RAW Conversion Performance
The test machine used was a desktop PC with dual Athlon 1592 Mhz (1900+) CPU's 1 GB of RAM
running Windows XP. Software used was Canon RAW Image Converter 2.0. A group five of RAW
images were selected from the thumbnail window and then the 'Save File' option was used to convert
images directly to the destination format. The conversion process was timed and divided by the
number of images converted.
Conversion
Settings
Time taken
per image
Time for 5
images
RAW -> JPEG (4)
Normal, False Color Filter, No Rotate
22.8 sec
1 mins 54 sec
RAW -> JPEG (4)
Normal, No False Color Filter, No Rotate
19.6 sec
1 mins 38 sec
RAW -> JPEG (4)
Normal, False Color Filter, Rotate 90°
27.2 sec
2 mins 16 sec
RAW -> TIFF
Normal, False Color Filter, No Rotate
18.0 sec
1 mins 30 sec
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 15. Software: Digital Photography Review
RAW -> TIFF 16-bit
Normal, False Color Filter, No Rotate
19.6 sec
1 mins 38 sec
After the vast speed improvements we saw with the EOS-1D I was a little disappointed to find the
D60's RAW files take around 20 seconds a piece to convert. That said the improvements in the RAW
Image Converter interface and the ability to extract JPEG's is very welcome and can make it easier to
identify the image you want without converting everything.
RAW vs. JPEG resolution
Below you can see two 100% crops taken from images shot within seconds of each other. The first
crop is from a Large/FINE JPEG, the second from a TIFF created from a RAW (.CRW) file using Canon
RAW Image Converter. You can click on either image or the links below the image to download a
TIFF version of the crops. As you can see there is no resolution gain between JPEG and RAW using
Canon's standard software. I expect third party RAW conversion packages to appear later which may
be able to produce little more resolution. Lens: 50 mm F1.4 @ F9.0
JPEG
RAW
Click here for TIFF version of crop
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 16. Photographic tests: Digital Photography Review
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ISO Sensitivity / Noise levels
ISO equivalence on a digital camera is the ability to increase the sensitivity of the sensor to enable
faster shutter speeds and/or better performance in low light. The way this works in a digital camera is
by "turning up the volume" on the CCD's signal amplifiers, nothing is without its price however and
doing so also amplifies any noise that may be present and often affects colour saturation.
Just like the EOS-D30 the EOS-D60 provides four
selectable ISO sensitivity equivalence's from ISO 100.
Unlike the EOS-D30 however the D60 doesn't have
ISO 1600, instead it has ISO 1000.
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I decided to use the same system created for our EOS-1D review. This involves shooting a colour
patch chart (a GretagMacBeth ColorChecker) at the full range of ISO sensitivities. To expand this test
a little the patches were shot at both normal daylight levels (10.6 EV) as well as low light levels (6.3
EV).
Each of the comparison crops below are made up of a 90 x 80 crop of patches 19, 22 and 24 of the
ColorChcker chart (as indicated above). This helps to give a better impression of noise at different
light levels within an image. Directly below this you will find the average standard deviation of these
three patches, this is a quantifiable measurement of noise.
Test Notes
■
■
■
■
■
We are now using the GretagMacBeth ColorChecker instead of Kodak Colour patches for a
couple of reasons: (a) The grey patches are larger and are therefore easier to crop / measure
(b) The patches are made from a matte non-reflective material and are therefore easier to
shoot without accidental reflection.
Measurements were taken at normal room temperature of 21°C (~70°F), you should expect
noise to reduce in lower temperatures and increase in higher temperatures.
Performance comparison carried out in RAW mode to remove the effects of JPEG artifacts
skewing the higher ISO results. RAW images were converted to 8-bit TIFF's using Canon RAW
Image Converter v2.0 (default settings).
Camera settings were defaulted before tests carried out (thus default parameters, sharpening
etc.). The visibility of noise will be reduced by decreasing sharpening.
The 'standard deviation' was measured using the histogram feature in Photoshop on 8-bit
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 16. Photographic tests: Digital Photography Review
TIFF or JPEG files (later comparison). Lower figures mean there is less 'deviation' from the
average luminance level, and thus less noise.
Performance of EOS-D60 vs. EOS-D30 in normal and low light
Settings: Parameters: Normal, EF 50 mm F1.4 @ F9.0
Normal light (10.6 EV)
Low light (6.3 EV)
Canon EOS-D60 Canon EOS-D30
Canon EOS-D60 Canon EOS-D30
Sensitivity
ISO 100
ISO 100
Exposure
1/10 s, F9.0
1.0 s, F9.0
Camera
Patch crops
ISO 100
RAW
Standard dev. avg.
0.64
0.93
0.68
0.98
Canon EOS-D60 Canon EOS-D30
Canon EOS-D60 Canon EOS-D30
Sensitivity
ISO 200
ISO 200
Exposure
1/20 s, F9.0
0.5 s, F9.0
Camera
Patch crops
ISO 200
RAW
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Standard dev. avg.
0.94
1.20
0.95
1.20
Canon EOS-D60 Canon EOS-D30
Canon EOS-D60 Canon EOS-D30
Sensitivity
ISO 400
ISO 400
Exposure
1/40 s, F9.0
1/4 s, F9.0
Camera
Patch crops
ISO 400
RAW
Standard dev. avg.
1.37
1.74
1.36
1.78
Canon EOS-D60 Canon EOS-D30
Canon EOS-D60 Canon EOS-D30
Sensitivity
ISO 800
ISO 800
Exposure
1/80 s, F9.0
1/8 s, F9.0
Camera
Patch crops
ISO 800
RAW
Standard dev. avg.
Camera
2.30
2.74
Canon EOS-D60 Canon EOS-D30
2.31
2.76
Canon EOS-D60 Canon EOS-D30
Sensitivity
ISO 1000
n/a
ISO 1000
n/a
Exposure
1/100 s, F9.0
n/a
1/10 s, F9.0
n/a
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 16. Photographic tests: Digital Photography Review
Patch crops
ISO 1000
RAW
Standard dev. avg.
Camera
2.84
n/a
Canon EOS-D60 Canon EOS-D30
2.86
n/a
Canon EOS-D60 Canon EOS-D30
Sensitivity
n/a
ISO 1600
n/a
ISO 1600
Exposure
n/a
1/160 s, F9.0
n/a
1/15 s, F9.0
n/a
4.38
n/a
4.44
Patch crops
ISO 1600
RAW
Standard dev. avg.
Having now removed the element of JPEG artifacts from the test we can see that both the D30 and
D60 manage to maintain relatively low noise levels all the way through the available ISO sensitivities.
Our measurements reveal the D60 to have lower noise levels compared to the D30, however a visual
comparison shows that in effect the differences are hardly noticeable. The fact that Canon's
engineers have managed to slightly reduce noise levels while effectively halving the photosite size is
an impressive achievement. One thing I'm still curious about however is why the D60 doesn't support
ISO 1600, it's clear that noise levels wouldn't have been too bad at that setting. Below is a summary
graph of these results.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 16. Photographic tests: Digital Photography Review
The other thing this comparison shows is that there is also very little difference in noise between fast
and slow shutter speeds. For example, at ISO 800 1/80 sec the D60 measures 2.30 std. dev. average
and almost identically 2.31 at a much slower 1/8 sec. There isn't much point measuring noise levels
at shutter speeds beyond 1 second because here the camera's inbuilt long exposure noise reduction
systems take over and thus results will be skewed.
Performance of RAW vs. JPEG in normal light (EOS-D60)
Finally to confirm what we know of JPEG compression. Below is a graph of noise levels from JPEG
files versus noise levels from the RAW files above. As you can see the JPEG compression algorithm
introduces its own artifacts which can in effect amplify noise at higher sensitivities. Having said that
the trade off between a little more noise (a hardly a visible difference) and the extra storage / write
time expense of a 9 MB RAW file depends totally on the priorities of the photographer.
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White balance
Overall the D60's white balance performed as we'd expected it to, but certainly no better than the
D30. As is fairly typical with most digital cameras auto white balance worked best under natural light
(sunlight, shade, partial cloud etc.) and less well under artificial light. The D60's pre-programmed
white balance settings are useful for getting 'somewhere near' to artificial light but of course because
of the variety of bulb types it's never possible to be exact with these. I was however very impressed
with manual white balance preset which measures white balance from a white / grey card shot (only
uses the area of the image within partial metering circle in the center of the viewfinder).
Settings: ISO 100, EF 50 mm F1.4, Small/Fine
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Daylight: Auto
Daylight: Cloudy
Daylight: Manual
Incandescent: Auto
Incandescent: Incandescent
Incandescent: Manual
Fluorescent: Auto
Fluorescent: Fluorescent
Fluorescent: Manual
Manual preset white balance example
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 17. Photographic tests: Digital Photography Review
Shooting for the samples gallery (at the Victoria & Albert museum, London) many of the exhibits
were behind glass, in particular the Japan section used very dim incandescent lighting. It was almost
impossible for the D60 to automatically measure this. The example below shows the kind of shot
used to first get a 'white sample' which can be used for manual white balance and then the results of
then re-shooting using this manual preset.
Settings: ISO 1000, EF 28-70 mm F2.8L, Large/Fine
Image used for manual white balance
measurement, red circle drawn onto the image
later to indicate the area used by the D60 for
white balance preset measurement.
The result, a perfect white balance under
very difficult lighting. (ISO 1000, F5.0, 1/15
sec)
Overall Image Quality / Specifics
What can I say, when I first got my hands on the D30 back in August 1999 I was stunned at the
superb image quality from this digital SLR. Its excellent resolution, silky smooth noise free images
and colour reproduction were immediately associated with the fact that the camera uses a unique
Canon designed CMOS sensor. Here we are eighteen months after that with twice the number of
pixels and I'm happy to report that the D60 continues the tradition for excellent resolution, silky
smooth noise free images and even better colour reproduction.
Colour
Canon has clearly tweaked colour since the D30 (more of this in the compared to section later), most
notably slightly less saturated blues and greens and stronger reds. One thing notable about the D30
is its preference for blue skies, the D60 can still produce nice blue skies but treats them with a little
more neutrality. Reds are better, more saturated but still handled carefully. Red is the first colour to
become over-saturated (thanks to the sRGB colour space) and Canon appear to have got the balance
just right with the D60. If you want more colour you can simply create a parameter set with a
'saturation +1' setting.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 17. Photographic tests: Digital Photography Review
Less saturated blues but the D60 can still
produce very nice blue skies
Better red saturation but carefully under the
point at which the red channel is 'blown out'
Smooth yet detailed
This is something I first noted with the D30. The D60 has an uncanny smoothness to its images.
Where there should be a smooth panel of colour, there is, not a hint of noise at all. And yet despite
this ability to create beautiful smooth areas of colour / shade there is absolutely no loss in detail. This
smoothness is summed up in the ISO noise level tests earlier in this review, the D60 has very low
noise all the way up to ISO 400, beyond that noise is visible at 100% zoom but is still certainly lower
than most other digital SLR's.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 17. Photographic tests: Digital Photography Review
Diagonal Jaggies
Here's something I only noticed about the D30 after I'd published my review, however I also caught
it in my PowerShot G2 review. This is clearly something to do with the Bayer interpolation algorithm
Canon is using across some of their digital cameras. It occurs like this: if a line of detail is at a certain
angle (within about 10 degrees of a perfect 45 degree line) the line becomes jagged and made up of
multiple 45 degree diagonal lines.
I wouldn't flag this as an 'issue' per-se, it appears only in a certain set of circumstances (quite seldom
in a normal shoot) and typically isn't visible at normal viewing magnifications or in print.
Strange Dots
Just like the D30 the D60 also exhibits the strange 'drop out' pixels sprinkled between high frequency
lines. We're sure this is a CMOS artifact and doesn't seem to occur any more than it did in the D30. I
looked long and hard through our few thousand D60 photos and couldn't find a good example of this
occurring in a 'real life' shot.
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Compared to the Canon EOS-D30
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Canon EOS-D30 (left), Canon EOS-D60 (right)
The EOS-D60 replaces last years EOS-D30, a camera which managed to achieved critical acclaim (not
least of which right here) for its great resolution, low noise and colour and breakthrough pricing. The
following comparison is split into two areas: Colour - specifically the difference in colour reproduction
between the D30 and D60, Scene - the same scene shot within seconds. A summary comparison of
resolution (based on standard ISO resolution charts) can be found in the 'Compared to summary'
section of this review.
Colour
The samples below of a GretagMacbeth ColorChecker Chart were taken in normal daylight with
manual white balance taken from the neutral 6.5 patch (no. 21). Roll your mouse over the image to
see the differences between the D60 and D30.
As you can see Canon has altered the saturation response of reds (more saturated) as well as making
greens slightly more neutral. The overall result (in my eyes) is a more balanced yet more neutral
colour response.
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(Roll your mouse over image to see EOS-D30 sample)
Download originals: EOS-D60 795 KB / EOS-D30 896 KB
Studio scene comparison
This is our standard studio scene comparison shot taken from exactly the same tripod position within
about a minute of each other. Clearly we're not comparing these cameras from a competition point of
view but simply to illustrate the additional resolution and the tweaks made to colour reproduction.
Lighting: 2 x 800W studio lights with dichroic daylight filters bounced off a white ceiling reflector.
Crops magnified 200%.
■
■
Canon EOS-D30: Parameters: Standard, Self-Timer, Mirror-Lockup Enabled,
White balance: Manual Preset, Manual Exposure, Manual Focus, Canon EF 50 mm F1.4 lens,
Large/Fine JPEG
Canon EOS-D60: Parameters: Standard, Self-Timer, Mirror-Lockup Enabled,
White balance: Manual Preset, Manual Exposure, Manual Focus, Canon EF 50 mm F1.4 lens,
Large/Fine JPEG
Canon EOS-D30
Canon EOS-D60
ISO 100, F10, 1 sec
ISO 100, F10, 1 sec
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It's fairly clear to see that (a) the EOS-D60 delivers on its promise of a full six megapixels of
resolution compared to the three megapixel EOS-D30 and (b) the tweaks to colour reproduction has
noticeably improved the colours in the D60 image. There's no doubt that there is a very large
increment in resolution between the D30 and D60.
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Compared to the Nikon D1x
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Nikon D1x (left), Canon EOS-D60 (right) shown with optional BG-ED3 battery pack / portrait grip
On February 21st Nikon announced its D100 six megapixel digital SLR, the very next day Canon
announced the D60. This has set the scene for the biggest Canon vs Nikon showdown for quite some
time. During PMA this showdown took the form of a mini price war, not long after PMA Canon made
its $2199/$1999 price official.
At the time of writing this review Nikon has still not revealed its price for the D100, but we expect it
to be competitive with the D60. Also at the time of writing this review there are no 'reviewable'
D100's available and so I've chosen to compare the D60 to the D100's "bigger brother" the $5000
D1x. I will of also course be using the D60 for direct comparison in my upcoming Nikon D100 review.
Bear in mind that the D1x is a much more robust, professional camera than the D60 (if you want the
ultimate in robust and waterproof bodies look no further than the EOS-1D). The D1x's auto focus
alone is much better than the D60 as well as the additional features and custom functions such as:
third-stop ISO sensitivity (which can be boosted up to ISO 3200), Nikon matrix metering, fine-tunable
white balance, selectable colour space, adjustable metering system etc. Some people may say I'm
comparing apples to oranges, but without a D100 both of these cameras are the current 'top
megapixel' from their respective manufacturers.
Square vs. Rectangular pixel layout
What makes this comparison even more interesting is the way that the D1x captures its six megapixel
image. The D1x has sensor whose pixel layout is rectangular rather than the traditional square, the
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 19. Compared to...: Digital Photography Review
sensor captures 4028 horizontal and 1324 vertical RAW pixels which are then 'translated' into the
final 3008 x 1960 pixel image. This gives the D1x a horizontal resolution advantage of around 900
(raw) pixels over the D60 but a vertical deficit of over 700 pixels. More about the D1x sensor on the
first page of my review.
Colour
The samples below of a GretagMacbeth ColorChecker Chart were taken in normal daylight with
manual white balance taken from the neutral 6.5 patch (no. 21). Roll your mouse over the image to
see the differences between the D60 and the D1x.
The D1x image was shot in sRGB colour space, as you can see it produces far more saturated looking
image, most notably reds. Although the D1x does allow you to adjust tone and sharpening you can
not alter colour saturation. That said the D1x has a definite advantage in being able to shoot in either
sRGB or Adobe RGB colour spaces.
(Roll your mouse over image to see D1x sample)
Download originals: EOS-D60 795 KB / D1x 1,141 KB
Outdoor scene comparison
The following shots of Tower Bridge, London were taken on a typically hazy Spring day. I had to
shoot the D60 first and then walk forward before taking the D1x shot to compensate in the difference
between the D60's 1.6x multiplier and the D1x's 1.5x. Crops magnified 200%.
■
■
Nikon D1x: Tone: Normal, Sharpening: Normal, Colour space: sRGB, White Balance: Sunny,
Manual Exposure, Auto Focus, Nikkor 50 mm F1.4D lens, Large/Fine JPEG
Canon EOS-D60: Parameters: Standard, White Balance: Sunny, Manual Exposure,
Auto Focus, Canon EF 50 mm F1.4 lens, Large/Fine JPEG
Nikon D1x
Canon EOS-D60
ISO 125, F9.0, 1/250 sec
ISO 100, F9.0, 1/250 sec
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A careful examination of the crops above (and the entire images) shows that although the D1x can
occasionally pull out more horizontal detail, overall the D60 appears to have the advantage. The extra
vertical pixels and the fact that the pixels are in a square orientation means that the D60 simply has a
greater ability to resolve detail at a particular pixel location.
Indeed, taking time to look over the D1x image and you can see areas where its lack of vertical
resolution becomes apparent (diagonal wires, curves, finer details). Considering the price difference
between these two cameras the results from the D60 are even more impressive.
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Compared to the Nikon D1x (contd.)
Studio scene comparison
This is our standard studio scene comparison shot taken from exactly the same tripod within about a
minute of each other (tripod was moved closer to the subject to compensate for the difference in
multiplier between the D60 and D1x). Lighting: 2 x 800W studio lights with dichroic daylight filters
bounced off a white ceiling reflector. Crops magnified 200%.
■
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■
Canon EOS-D60: Parameters: Standard, Self-Timer, Mirror-Lockup Enabled,
White balance: Manual Preset, Manual Exposure, Manual Focus, Canon EF 50 mm F1.4 lens,
Large/Fine JPEG
Nikon D1x: Tone: Normal, Sharpening: Normal, Colour space: sRGB, Self-Timer,
Anti Mirror Shock Mode: On, White Balance: Manual Preset, Manual Exposure, Manual Focus,
Nikkor 50 mm F1.4D lens, Large/Fine JPEG
Canon EOS-D60
Nikon D1x
ISO 100, F10, 1 sec
ISO 125, F10, 1 sec
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Both cameras do an excellent job of pulling the detail out of the image, there are several areas of fine
detail where the D1x's additional horizontal resolution is able to better define horizontal elements.
However, the overall conclusion must be that the D60 with it's superior vertical resolution is better
able to resolve the full six megapixels of resolution. Colour balance is more interesting, the D1x
producing a brighter and more vivid image, the D60's image looking more neutral (of course you
could get a more vivid D60 image by creating a parameter set with the 'saturation +1' setting).
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Compared to the Nikon D1x (contd.)
ISO Sensitivity / Noise levels
As with the previous noise comparison between the
EOS-D30 and D60 we simply shoot a colour patch
chart (a GretagMacBeth ColorChecker) at the full
range of ISO sensitivities. These set of tests were
carried out in normal light levels (10.6 EV).
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Each of the comparison crops below are made up of a 90 x 80 crop of patches 19, 22 and 24 of the
ColorChcker chart (as indicated above). This helps to give a better impression of noise at different
light levels within an image. Directly below this you will find the average standard deviation of these
three patches, this is a quantifiable measurement of noise.
Test Notes
■
■
■
■
■
Measurements were taken at normal room temperature of 21°C (~70°F), you should expect
noise to reduce in lower temperatures and increase in higher temperatures.
Performance comparison carried out in RAW mode to remove the effects of JPEG artifacts
skewing the higher ISO results. RAW images were converted to 8-bit TIFF's using Canon RAW
Image Converter v2.0 (default settings) and Nikon Capture 2.0 (default settings).
Camera settings were defaulted before tests carried out (thus default parameters, sharpening
etc.). The visibility of noise will be reduced by decreasing sharpening.
The 'standard deviation' was measured using the histogram feature in Photoshop on 8-bit
TIFF or JPEG files (later comparison). Lower figures mean there is less 'deviation' from the
average luminance level, and thus less noise.
The D1x's lowest sensitivity is ISO 125, so bear this in mind when looking at the first crop.
The D1x's highest normal sensitivity is ISO 800 although it can be boosted to ISO 1600 or
3200 via a custom function.
Performance of Nikon D1x vs. EOS-D60 vs. in normal light
Camera
Sensitivity
Exposure
Nikon D1x
ISO 125
1/13 s, F9.0
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Canon EOS-D60
ISO 100
1/10, F9.0
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 21. Compared to...: Digital Photography Review
Patch crops
ISO 125 / 100
RAW
Standard dev. avg.
Camera
Sensitivity
Exposure
1.21
0.64
Nikon D1x
ISO 200
1/20 s, F9.0
Canon EOS-D60
ISO 200
1/20, F9.0
1.40
0.94
Nikon D1x
ISO 400
1/40 s, F9.0
Canon EOS-D60
ISO 400
1/40, F9.0
Patch crops
ISO 200
RAW
Standard dev. avg.
Camera
Sensitivity
Exposure
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Patch crops
ISO 400
RAW
Standard dev. avg.
Camera
Sensitivity
Exposure
1.97
1.37
Nikon D1x
ISO 800
1/80 s, F9.0
Canon EOS-D60
ISO 800
1/80, F9.0
3.00
2.30
Patch crops
ISO 800
RAW
Standard dev. avg.
As you can clearly see Canon's CMOS sensor technology appears work very well at keeping noise
levels low. Looking at the graph below you can see that the two noise curves are almost identical in
shape (they're both roughly exponential) but that the D60 always has an approximately 30% lower
standard deviation average.
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 21. Compared to...: Digital Photography Review
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Resolution Chart Comparison
Shots here are of the PIMA/ISO 12233 standard resolution test chart (more of which are available in
our comparison database). This resolution chart allows us to measure the actual performance of the
lens and sensor system. It measures the ability of the camera to resolve lines at gradually higher
resolutions and enables us to provide a definitive value for comparison purposes. Values on the chart
are 1/100th lines per picture height. So a value of 8 equates to 800 lines per picture height.
Studio light, cameras set to auto, all settings factory default. Aperture selected for optimum
sharpness. Exposure compensation +0.7 EV or +1.0 EV.
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Canon EOS-D60
Nikon D1x
Canon EOS-1D
Canon EOS-D30
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 22. Compared to...: Digital Photography Review
Canon EOS-D60
Nikon D1x
Canon EOS-1D
Canon EOS-D30
Canon EOS-D60
Nikon D1x
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 22. Compared to...: Digital Photography Review
Canon EOS-1D
Canon EOS-D30
Canon EOS-D60
Nikon D1x
Canon EOS-1D
Canon EOS-D30
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 22. Compared to...: Digital Photography Review
Canon EOS-D60
Nikon D1x
Canon EOS-1D
Canon EOS-D30
Measurable findings (three measurements taken for each camera):
Camera
Canon EOS-D60
Nikon D1x
Canon EOS-1D
Canon
EOS-D30
Measurement
Horiz LPH
Vert LPH
5° Diagonal
Horiz LPH
Vert LPH
5° Diagonal
Horiz LPH
Vert LPH
5° Diagonal
Horiz LPH
Vert LPH
5° Diagonal
LPH
LPH
LPH
LPH
* Visible moiré artifacts
Definition of terms:
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneosd60/page22.asp (4 of 6)3/2/2005 3:19:32 AM
Absolute
Res.
1600
1400
1000
1600
* 1150
900
1400
1200
n/a
1100
1150
1000
Extinction
Res.
* 1800
1800
n/a
>2000
1250
n/a
* 1700
* 1700
n/a
1350
1300
n/a
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 22. Compared to...: Digital Photography Review
LPH
5° Diagonal
Absolute Resolution
Extinction Resolution
n/a
n/v
Lines per Picture Height (to allow for different aspect ratios the
measurement is the same for horizontal and vertical)
Lines set at 5° diagonal
Still defined detail (below Nyquist frequency*)
Detail beyond camera's definition (becomes a solid gray alias)
Not Available (above the capability of the test chart)
Not Visible (not visible on test results)
* Nyquist frequency defined as the highest spatial frequency where the CCD can still faithfully record
image detail. Beyond the Nyquist frequency aliasing occurs
As we derived from our comparison tests the D60 makes full use of its six megapixel potential,
delivering excellent horizontal and vertical resolution. The D1x is capable of the same horizontal
resolution and produces visible detail well beyond 2000 lines/picture height, however its lower vertical
resolution lets it down.
Resolution at other image sizes
The crops (and downloadable samples) below are provided to give an impression of visible resolution
at the other selectable image sizes.
Large (3072 x 2048)
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 23. Lenses: Digital Photography Review
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About
Lenses
For this review I was fortunate enough to have a good selection of Canon EF lenses, everything from
the wide angle zoom of the 17 - 35 mm F2.8 L to the super telephoto 100 - 400 mm F4.5-5.6 L IS.
Those who already know their Canon lenses will know that the 'L' indicates a professional lens which
uses higher quality glass (often made of special materials), special coatings and full metal bodies.
This section of the review is a very quick look at each lens and a measurement of its resolution
performance at different apertures. Below you will find a description of each lens followed by three
crops taken from the horizontal resolution portion of our standard resolution chart. The first crop is at
the lenses maximum aperture, the second at F8.0 and the last at F16.0 (to check for resolution loss
due to refraction).
This is not intended as a detailed review of each lens, I didn't have the time or the testing procedures
to do that properly. There are lots of other factors such as colour response, tone, geometry
(distortion), flare and chromatic aberrations which haven't been tested. For a more detailed review of
lenses I recommend checking the photodo.com website.
To L or not to L?
What can be gleaned from the samples below is that even the non-professional lenses (such as the
28 - 135 mm F3.5 - 5.6 IS) are more than capable of resolving six megapixels. The difference
between them and the professional lenses comes in build quality, maximum aperture, sharpness at
maximum aperture, distortion, contrast, colour response etc. etc.
I would recommend first time Canon lens buyers (looking at the D60) get a good non-professional
lens such as the 28 - 135 mm F4.5 - 5.6 IS or the 24 - 85 mm F3.5 - 4.5. Also don't ignore prime
(non-zoom) lenses, they offer as much sharpness as an L lenses but at a much lower price. If you
can afford it then definitely go for the L zoom lenses, the 16 - 35 mm F2.8 L and 28 - 70 mm F2.8 L
are both excellent lenses.
Equiv. FOV
Because the D60's sensor is smaller than a 35 mm negative it effectively crops a smaller area from
the center of the image projected by the lens. This cropping effect is often referred to as 'focal length
multiplier', on the D60 this is 1.6x. This is a term I really don't like. What is really happening is that a
28 mm lens on a D60 has its field of view cropped to an equivalent focal length of 44.8 mm. In the
descriptions below you'll see me use the notation "Equiv. FOV on D60" (rounded to the nearest equiv.
mm).
Canon EF 17-35 mm F2.8 L USM
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 23. Lenses: Digital Photography Review
The 17-35 mm has recently been updated to a
new model, the 16-35 mm. I personally found
this lens to be a little on the soft side, especially
at apertures larger than F5.0. My experience of
the 16-35 mm on an EOS-1D was much more
satisfying. Because of the D60's FOV crop you'll
need these super-wide angle lenses to get
anywhere near a normal 35 mm wide angle
field of view.
Equiv. FOV on D60: 27 - 56 mm
Weight: 0.9 kg (1.2 lb)
@ 35 mm, F2.8
@ 35 mm, F8.0
@ 35 mm, F16.0
Note: due to the size of the resolution chart it was not possible to test this lens at 17 mm.
Canon EF 28-70 mm F2.8 L USM
The 28-70 mm F2.8 L is heavy for an 'every
day' lens. The weight goes some way to
convincing you that it's a quality piece of
equipment. This lens is very sharp, fast and
makes a good professional quality all round lens
on the D60.
Equiv. FOV on D60: 45 - 112 mm
Weight: 0.9 kg (1.9 lb)
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 23. Lenses: Digital Photography Review
@ 28 mm, F2.8
@ 28 mm, F8.0
@ 28 mm, F16.0
@ 70 mm, F2.8
@ 70 mm, F8.0
@ 70 mm, F16.0
Canon EF 28-135 mm F3.5 - 5.6 IS USM
The 28 - 135 mm is probably the most popular
lens among D30 owners, it's not heavy,
provides a good usable (almost) 5 x zoom, has
image stabilization and provides good sharp
images. Excellent value for money.
Equiv. FOV on D60: 45 - 216 mm
Weight: 0.5 kg (1.2 lb)
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Canon EOS-D60 Review: 23. Lenses: Digital Photography Review
@ 28 mm, F3.5
@ 28 mm, F8.0
@ 28 mm, F16.0
@ 135 mm, F5.6
@ 135 mm, F8.0
@ 135 mm, F16.0
Canon EF 50 mm F1.4 USM
The 50 mm F1.4 is probably the sharpest "nonL" lenses you can buy. It provides superb low
light AF (because if its F1.4 max aperture) as
well as excellent sharpness from about F2.2
upwards (it's relatively soft at F1.4). Focusing is
fast and with the 1.6x FOV crop it works out
well as a light weight portrait lens on the D60.
This is one of my favourite lenses.
Equiv. FOV on D60: 80 mm
Weight: 289 g (10.2 oz)
F1.4
F8.0
Canon EF 70-200 mm F2.8 L IS USM
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F16.0
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 23. Lenses: Digital Photography Review
This big lens offers superb sharpness right
across its zoom range. It has a waterproof seal
at the lens mount (for use with more robust
cameras such as the 1V and 1D) as well as
internal zoom and internal focusing. The 70-200
has dual mode image stabilization and a ball
bearing rotating tripod collar (for quick switches
from landscape to portrait). This is a superb, if
very expensive lens.
Equiv. FOV on D60: 112 - 320 mm
Weight: 1.3 kg (2.8 lb)
@ 70 mm, F2.8
@ 70 mm, F8.0
@ 70 mm, F16.0
Note: due to the size of our studio it was not possible to test this lens at 200 mm.
Canon EF 100-400 mm F4.5-5.6 L IS USM
I'm amazed as to how many people on our
Canon SLR Talk forum own this lens, it's
definetly not a cheap option. However on the
D60 it does provide an amazing 160 to 640 mm
FOV equiv. The 100-400 also has dual mode
image stabilization and a ball bearing rotating
tripod collar. Its zoom is the push-pull type and
extended to 400 mm this is no small lens. Very
sharp (a stop down from max. aperture) and a
huge zoom range.
Equiv. FOV on D60: 160 - 640 mm
Weight: 1.4 kg (3.0 lb)
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneosd60/page23.asp (5 of 6)3/2/2005 3:19:27 AM
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 23. Lenses: Digital Photography Review
@ 100 mm, F4.5
@ 100 mm, F8.0
@ 100 mm, F16.0
Note: due to the size of our studio it was not possible to test this lens at 400 mm.
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Excellent resolution, lives up to the six megapixel label
Improved colour, reds are stronger other colours toned down a little
Noise free 'silky smooth' images (still has the "D30 look")
Noise very low all the way up to ISO 400, manageable noise levels at ISO 800 and 1000
Images not 'over sharpened' or damaged by visible sharpening artifacts
Unrivalled long exposure capability, no more waiting double the exposure time
Reduced shutter release LAG
Very clever 'smart buffering' means you can almost always take the next shot
Good metering
Good manual preset white balance, average automatic white balance
Much less of a 'dust problem' than other competitive cameras (special filter?)
Better low light AF if you enable the AF assist lamp
In-camera programmable 'parameter sets' to control image processing algorithms
RAW mode provides the 'digital negative', about 1 stop of latitude in over exposed images
New RAW Image Converter software provides far more flexibility (digital exp. compen. etc.)
Extraction of 2048 x 1360 JPEG from RAW file provides 'virtual' RAW+JPEG shooting
Remote capture software for studio setups
Full Canon EF lens compatible
Good IBM Microdrive performance (less of a penalty than we have seen on other cameras)
Built as a Digital SLR from the ground up
Easy to use, integrated digital / photographic controls and displays
Good combination of both full auto, scene and manual exposure controls
Highlighted AF points
Top panel LCD illuminated
Improved power switch
Double battery charger (although can only charge one battery at a time)
Custom functions to control camera operation
Excellent battery life, light weight and small batteries
Superb value for money
Conclusion - Cons
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Strange dots ('drop out' pixels) which can appear between high frequency lines
Opening the CF compartment door shuts camera down, loses any buffered images
Overall auto focus performance virtually identical to D30
Viewfinder view is smaller than 'higher end' D-SLR's (such as the EOS-1D)
Not selectable colour space (stuck with sRGB)
Not enough latitude of control over image processing parameters (currently only +/-1 step)
White balance not fine-tunable
Image playback magnification only at one level
ISO sensitivity not displayed on viewfinder status bar while being changed
Slow RAW conversion (20+ seconds per image on a high performance desktop PC)
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneosd60/page24.asp (1 of 3)3/2/2005 3:19:21 AM
Canon EOS-D60 Review: 24. Conclusion: Digital Photography Review
Overall conclusion
When Canon came along at the end of 2000 with the EOS-D30 it took the market by storm, superb
image quality in a digital SLR built as such from the ground up and all for $3,000. But let us not
forget Nikon's contribution, before the D1 it wasn't possible to buy a D-SLR for under $5000.
Here we are a year (and a few months) after the first D30's hit the streets looking at an improved
D30 with a six megapixel sensor which can deliver the same silky smooth noise free images. Best of
all this camera is priced at just $2,200 for the kit. As recently as August 2000 Kodak were selling the
six megapixel Canon SLR based DCS 560 (also known as the D6000) for $16,000 (before that it had
been $25,000). It's amazing to think that eighteen months later we're looking at a six megapixel
Canon D-SLR for a little over $2,000.
For me the D60 outperformed many of my expectations, I didn't expect resolution to be as good as it
is and I didn't expect Canon to be able to keep noise levels down in the way they have. In almost
every respect the D60 has performed flawlessly. There are the diagonal jaggies and 'strange dots' but
these occur very infrequently in every day shots and even then they are hardly visible.
Colour has been tweaked and improved so that reds are stronger but other colours are more equally
balanced, there's no chance of over-exposure of any particular colour before another. If you want the
extra colour 'zing' you have control over the camera's internal processing algorithms. I still would
have liked to have seen a colour space output option (that's still there for third party RAW conversion
tools).
Little touches like the reduced shutter release LAG, illuminated AF points, illuminated top status LCD,
in-camera parameter programming are all welcome improvements and go to show that Canon are
well aware of, and act upon user requests. One area I think a lot of people expected to be improved
is auto focus, and this may be the D60's only achilles heel.
This is the first of the new big four D-SLR's we've had the pleasure to review (Nikon D100, Sigma
SD9, Fujifilm S2 Pro, Canon EOS-D60). I'm looking forward to comparing the EOS-D60 to the other
cameras (especially Nikon's D100).
Highly Recommended
So which one should I buy? A question I get asked several times a day, and I wouldn't like to say. In
a new addition to my reviews (after the amount of feedback I normally get) I've added a link to a
specific forum in which you can discuss the review or ask me specific questions which I've not
answered in these pages.
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Samples Galleries
There are 29 images in the samples gallery. Please do not reproduce any of these images on a
website or any newsletter / magazine without prior permission. I make the originals available for
private users to download to their own machines for personal examination or printing (in conjunction
with this review), I do so in good faith, please don't abuse it.
Unless otherwise noted images taken with no particular settings at 3072 x 2048 resolution. A
reduced size image (720 x 480) is provided to be more easily viewed in your browser. As always the
original untouched image is available by clicking on this reduced image.
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Click here for the Canon EOS-D60 Gallery - Posted 25th March 2002
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