Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

TABLET FUNCTIONALITY IN AN ENTERPRISE ENVIRONMENT:
DELL LATITUDE ST, APPLE IPAD 2, AND SAMSUNG GALAXY TAB 10.1
Tablet computers play an increasingly important role in today’s enterprise workspace as more
and more CIOs embrace them.1 When you consider the capability and the portability of current tablets,
such acceptance makes sense.
Tablets vary considerably in their ability to handle the everyday office tasks. Which tablet is
easiest to use, lets you carry out your workflow most quickly, and offers the most complete functionality
with commonly used applications and file types? To answer these questions, we tested the following
three tablets and their respective operating systems on scenarios that enterprise workers regularly
perform:
 Dell Latitude ST running Microsoft® Windows® 7 Professional
 Apple iPad 2 running iOS 5.0.1
 Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 running Google™ Android™ 3.2
In our tests in the Principled Technologies labs, the Dell Latitude ST running Microsoft Windows
7 Professional outpaced its competitors. Compared to the Apple iPad 2 and the Samsung Galaxy Tab
10.1, the Dell Latitude ST demonstrated the most complete functionality with commonly used
applications and file types, which meant less time and fewer steps were necessary to perform the test
scenarios. The speed and simplicity with which the Dell Latitude ST handled these tasks makes it an
excellent tablet choice for an enterprise worker.
1
Tablet Demand and Disruption: Mobile Users Come of Age http://www.morganstanley.com/views/perspectives/tablets_demand.pdf
A PRINCIPLED TECHNOLOGIES TEST REPORT
Commissioned by Dell Inc. January 2012
LOOKING UNDER THE HOOD
The top selling points of tablets are their compact size and touch-screen interfaces. If you
expect a tablet to tackle many of the same workplace responsibilities your notebook handles with
ease, you need to do your homework. Tablets vary considerably in their ability to handle the
everyday office tasks.
We tested the Dell, Apple, and Samsung tablets from the mindset of an enterprise worker
who needs a tablet that effectively handles the following tasks:





Accessing shared data (common Microsoft Office apps) on a corporate file server
Accessing shared data (common Microsoft Office apps) on a Microsoft SharePoint®
server
Printing files to a pre-existing networked printer
Emailing (and opening attachments) using Microsoft Exchange
Delivering a Microsoft PowerPoint® presentation (including note-taking and
distribution)
Our testing for each tablet addressed whether it could complete each task, the number of
steps and/or amount of time necessary to do so, and the quality of the experience (i.e., ease of use,
readability, etc.). We care about the amount of user steps required because as this number
increases, so does the complexity of the task and the risk of user error.
A BETTER USER EXPERIENCE WITH THE DELL LATITUDE ST
The Dell Latitude ST delivered the most complete functionality and was easier to use in all of
our test scenarios. Figure 1 presents the time in seconds and the number of steps necessary to
complete each scenario on the three tablets we tested. Less time and fewer steps are better.
Initial setup time and step comparison for each scenario
Dell Latitude ST
Apple iPad 2
2 steps
4 steps
Accessing shared data on a file server
00:45
00:52
Accessing shared data on a Microsoft
2 steps
4 steps
SharePoint server
00:48
00:49
10 steps
11 steps
Printing files to a networked printer
1:04
1:26
Connecting to a Microsoft Exchange
7 steps
8 steps
account
00:44
1:28
Connecting to a projector to deliver a
1 step
2 steps
Microsoft PowerPoint presentation
00:09
00:10
Scenario
Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
5 steps
00:43
4 steps
00:52
13 steps
1:19
11 steps
2:56
3 steps
00:14
Figure 1: The time in seconds and number of steps required for each scenario.
Figure 2 presents the number of compatibility issues that each tablet encountered
during our test scenarios. Compatibility issues included the unavailability of applications using
out-of-box configurations, applications not working with full functionality, and more. Fewer
issues are better.
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
A Principled Technologies test report 2
Number of compatibility issues with each scenario
Scenario
Dell Latitude ST
Apple iPad 2
Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
Accessing shared data on a file server
0
9
8
Accessing shared data on a Microsoft
SharePoint server
0
10
9
Printing files to a networked printer
0
15
9
0
9
7
0
2
3
Working with emails and attachments
in Microsoft Exchange
Delivering a Microsoft PowerPoint
presentation
Figure 2: The number of compatibility issues each tablet encountered for each scenario.
ADVANTAGES OF THE DELL LATITUDE ST IN EACH TEST SCENARIO
Accessing shared data on a file server
Accessing data on a company file server is a something enterprise workers do on a daily
basis. To be a viable mobile computing solution, a tablet should allow for easy access of
Microsoft Office files on file servers. In our test scenario, we saw how easily each tablet let us
access a shared data directory and edit the various work-related documents (Word,
PowerPoint®, and Excel® documents) stored on that directory.
The Dell Latitude ST tablet was preconfigured with Microsoft Office Professional 2010
and Adobe® Acrobat Reader® X. The Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 was preconfigured with
Quickoffice® Pro HD. Each tablet started from a powered-on state. As with all our test scenarios,
we were looking for basic compatibility, as well as for the quickest time, fewest steps, and
overall quality of the experience.
Of the three tablets, the Dell Latitude ST delivered the best overall experience. Figure 3
shows the out-of-box results for each tablet.
Dell Latitude ST:
00:45 (2 steps)
1. Open Windows Explorer and type
the path to the shared file
directory.
2. Enter a username and password.
None
Out-of-box file server share results
Apple iPad 2:
Incompatible
Fail
Issues encountered
The Apple iPad 2 was unable to
natively access the file share.
Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1:
Incompatible
Fail
The Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 was
unable to natively access the file
share.
Figure 3: Out-of-box file-server share steps and issues for each tablet.
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
A Principled Technologies test report 3
To enable the Apple iPad 2 to perform this test, we downloaded FileBrowser and
Quickoffice HD Pro. To enable the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 to perform this test, we
downloaded ES File Explorer.
Figure 4 shows the server share results for each tablet, with FileBrowser for the Apple
iPad 2 and ES File Explorer for the Galaxy Tab 10.1. Note that even with these applications, both
the Apple iPad 2 and Galaxy Tab 10.1 encountered difficulties in this scenario, while the Dell
Latitude ST did not.
File server share results
Dell Latitude ST:
00:45 (2 steps)
1. Open Windows Explorer and type
the path to the shared file
directory.
2. Enter username and password.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Apple iPad 2:
00:52 (4 steps)
Open the FileBrowser application.
Click the + icon under Locations.
Enter the path of the shared file
directory and the username and
password, and click Save.
Touch the newly created Location
to open the file share.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
None
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Issues encountered
PPT: Opening the file in Quickoffice
caused the app to crash back to the
Home screen. When viewed in the
native viewer, only the slide deck
pictures were shown. The notes
that accompanied each slide were
not rendered and the file could not
be edited.
PPTX: It was not possible to edit
the file.
PPTX: The slide animations did not
work and were rendered on top of
each other.
DOC: The graphic at the top of the
document did not display.
DOC: The Table of Contents page
links did not work.
DOCX: After the first frame
appeared, it took over three
minutes for the complete
document to load, during which
time the tablet was unresponsive.
DOCX: Comments were not shown.
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1:
00:43 (5 steps)
Open the ES File Explorer
application.
From the top left dropdown
menu, select LAN.
Click New and select Server.
Enter the file server IP address
and enter username and
password.
Touch the newly created location
to open the file share.
1. PPT: Upon opening, only the slide
deck pictures were shown. When
we selected the edit pen, the
notes became visible.
2. PPTX: The slide animations did
not work and were rendered on
top of each other.
3. DOC: The graphic at the top of
the document did not display.
4. DOC: The Table of Contents page
links did not work.
5. DOCX: Comments were not
shown.
6. DOCX: Tracked changes were not
shown.
7. XLSX: Was not able to open file.
We received an “Unable to
display file due to insufficient
memory” message.
8. XLS: The majority of the
spreadsheet failed to render.
1,702 rows filled with data failed
to appear, and there were
A Principled Technologies test report 4
File server share results
Instead of comments, two strange
type characters (gibberish) were
displayed where the comments had
been made.
8. DOCX: Tracked changes were not
shown, but entries, deleted
content, and new content were
shown together.
9. XLSX: The file took over three
minutes to load. During that time,
the tablet was unresponsive.
calculating errors in the
spreadsheet.
Figure 4: Steps and issues each tablet requires to connect to a file server share. Fewer steps are better.
Accessing shared data on a Microsoft SharePoint server
Accessing data on a company or Microsoft SharePoint file server is an everyday
occurrence for enterprise workers. To be a viable mobile computing solution, a tablet should
allow for easy access of Microsoft Office files on file servers. In our test scenario, we evaluated
how well each tablet allowed us to view Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files on a
SharePoint server. As with all our test scenarios, we were looking for basic compatibility, as well
as for the quickest time, fewest steps, and overall quality of the experience.
The Dell Latitude ST tablet was preconfigured with Microsoft Office Professional 2010
and Adobe Acrobat Reader X. The Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 was preconfigured with Quickoffice
Pro HD. Each tablet started from a powered-on state.
Of the three tablets, the Dell Latitude ST delivered the best overall experience. Figure 5
shows the out-of-box results for each tablet.
Out-of-box SharePoint server share results
Dell Latitude ST:
00:48 (2 steps)
1. Open the Web browser, and type
the path to the SharePoint shared
file directory.
2. Enter username and password.
Apple iPad 2:
00:32 (2 steps)
1. Open the Web browser, and type
the path to the SharePoint shared
file directory.
2. Enter username and password.
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1:
Incompatible
Fail
A Principled Technologies test report 5
None
Out-of-box SharePoint server share results
Issues encountered
1. The Apple iPad 2 was unable to edit The Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 was
the files.
unable to natively access the
2. PPT: Only the slide deck pictures
SharePoint share. We received a
were shown. The notes that
“Webpage is not available” message
accompanied each slide were not
when we tried.
rendered.
3. PPTX: The slide animations did not
work and were rendered on top of
each other.
4. DOC: Table of Contents page did
not work properly. We used the
table of contents to skip ahead,
and then when we tried to “go
back” the top of the page was cut
off and formatting became an issue
with a random Microsoft logo
placed on the right hand side
covering part of a word.
5. DOCX: Comments were not shown.
6. DOCX: Tracked changes were not
shown.
7. XLS: The $ sign formatting was lost.
Figure 5: Out-of-box SharePoint server share steps and issues for each tablet.
To enable the Apple iPad 2 to edit the files for this test, we downloaded Quickoffice Pro
HD. To enable the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 to do this test, we downloaded SharePlusSharePoint Client.
Figure 6 shows the SharePoint server share results for each tablet, with Quickoffice Pro
HD and SharePlus Pro for the Apple iPad 2 and SharePlus-SharePoint Client for the Samsung
Galaxy Tab 10.1. Note that even with these applications, the Apple iPad 2 and the Samsung
Galaxy Tab 10.1 encountered difficulties in this scenario. The Dell Latitude ST did not.
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
A Principled Technologies test report 6
Dell Latitude ST:
00:48 (2 steps)
1. Open the Web browser, and type 1.
the path to the SharePoint shared
file directory.
2.
2. Enter username and password.
3.
4.
SharePoint server share results
Apple iPad 2:
00:49 (4 steps)
Open the SharePlus Pro
application.
Click the + to add a SharePoint site.
Enter the SharePoint server
information into the fields, and click
Done.
Click the SharePoint site that was
just created.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1:
00:52 (4 steps)
Open the SharePlus-SharePoint
Client application.
Click the + to add a SharePoint
site.
Enter the SharePoint server
information into the fields, and
click Done.
Click the SharePoint site that was
just created.
Issues encountered
None
1. It was possible to view and open
the files using the SharePlus Pro
application, but editing had to be
done using Quickoffice HD Pro.
2. Opening the file in Quickoffice
caused the app to crash back to the
Home screen. When viewed in the
native viewer, only the slide deck
pictures were shown. The notes
that accompanied each slide were
not rendered and the file could not
be edited.
3. PPTX: We were unable to edit the
file in Quickoffice. When the file
opened in Quickoffice, a message
appeared that said. “Cannot Edit
File. Only viewing and presenting
are currently supported for 2007
and 2010 PowerPoint files.”
4. PPTX: The slide animations did not
work and were rendered on top of
each other.
5. DOC: The Table of Contents page
links did not work.
6. DOC: The graphic at the top of the
document did not display.
7. DOCX: After the first frame
appeared, it took over three
minutes for the complete
document to load, during which
time the tablet was unresponsive.
8. DOCX: Comments were not shown.
Instead of comments, two strange
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
1. It was possible to view the files
using the SharePlus-SharePoint
Client application, but editing had
to be done using Quickoffice HD
Pro.
2. PPT: Upon opening, only the slide
deck pictures were shown. When
we selected the edit pen, the
notes became visible.
3. PPTX: The slide animations did
not work and were rendered on
top of each other.
4. DOC: The Table of Contents page
links did not work.
5. DOC: The graphic at the top of
the document did not display.
6. DOCX: Comments were not
shown.
7. DOCX: Tracked changes were not
shown.
8. XLSX: Was not able to open file.
We received an “Unable to
display file due to insufficient
memory” message.
9. XLS: The majority of the
spreadsheet failed to render.
1,702 rows filled with data failed
to appear, and there were
calculating errors in the
spreadsheet.
A Principled Technologies test report 7
SharePoint server share results
type characters (gibberish) were
displayed where the comments had
been made.
9. DOCX: Tracked changes were not
shown, but entries, deleted
content, and new content were
shown together.
10. XLSX: The file took over three
minutes to load. During that time,
the tablet was unresponsive.
Figure 6: Steps and issues each tablet requires to connect to a SharePoint server share. Fewer steps are better.
Printing files to a networked printer
Printing documents to a networked printer is a basic task that users expect their computers
to handle without difficulty. Here, we tested each tablet’s ability to print documents of common file
types (.pdf and .doc) to a networked Dell 1350cnw printer.
The Dell Latitude ST tablet was preconfigured with Microsoft Office Professional 2010 and
Adobe Acrobat Reader X. The Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 was preconfigured with Quickoffice Pro HD.
Each tablet started from a powered-on state.
The Dell Latitude ST was able to print to a networked printer out of the box, while the Apple
iPad 2 and the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 were unable to do so. Figure 7 shows the out-of-box results
for each tablet.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Out-of-box printing to a networked printer results
Apple iPad 2:
Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1:
Incompatible
Incompatible
Fail
Fail
Dell Latitude ST:
1:04 (10 steps)
Select StartDevices and
Printers.
Select Add a Printer.
Select Add a network, wireless or
Bluetooth printer.
Select the printer that I want isn’t
listed.
Select Add a printer using TCIP/IP
address or a hostname, and click
Next.
Enter the IP address for the
printer, and click Next.
Select the printer, and click Next.
Type a Printer name, and click
Next.
At the Printer Sharing screen,
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
A Principled Technologies test report 8
Out-of-box printing to a networked printer results
leave the default option of sharing
the printer, and click Next.
10. Click Finish when the setup is
complete.
Issues encountered
The Apple iPad 2 was unable to
natively print to the pre-existing
network printer.
None
The Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 was
unable to natively print to the preexisting network printer.
Figure 7: Out-of-box printing to a networked printer steps and issues for each tablet.
To enable the Apple iPad 2 to do this test, we downloaded PrintCentral Pro. To enable the
Galaxy Tab 10.1 to do this test, we downloaded PrinterShare Premium.
Figure 8 shows the printing to a networked printer results for each tablet, with Quickoffice
Pro HD for the Apple iPad 2 and SharePlus-SharePoint Client for the Galaxy Tab 10.1. Note that even
with these applications, the Apple iPad 2 and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 encountered difficulties in
this scenario. The Dell Latitude ST did not.
Printing to a networked printer results
Dell Latitude ST:
1:04 (9 steps)
Apple iPad 2:
1:26 (11 steps)
Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1:
1:19 (13 steps)
1. Select StartDevices and
Printers.
2. Select Add a Printer.
3. Select Add a network, wireless or
Bluetooth printer.
4. Select The printer that I want isn’t
listed.
5. Select Add a printer using TCIP/IP
address or a hostname, and click
Next.
6. Enter the IP address for the
printer, and click Next.
7. Select the printer, and click Next.
8. At the Printer Sharing screen,
leave the default option of
sharing the printer, and click
Next.
9. Click Finish when the setup is
complete.
1. On a pre-existing Windows
computer that has access to the
network printer, go to
http://mobile.eurosmartz.com and
download the WePrint software.
2. Install the WePrint software onto
the Windows machine by doublecllicking the WePrint executable.
3. Click Install.
4. At the license agreement, click
Agree.
5. Click OK, to launch WePrint.
6. When WePrint launches, accept
the default settings, and click OK.
7. Choose a folder to use for file
sharing, and click OK.
8. On the tablet, open the
PrintCentral Pro app.
9. Select and open the Getting
Started-Test Print file.txt.
10. Select the Print button at the top
right.
1. On a pre-existing Windows
computer that has access to the
network printer, go to
www.printershare.com and
download the Windows
PrinterShare software.
2. Install the PrinterShare software
onto the Windows machine, by
double-clicking the PrinterShare
executable.
3. At the Welcome screen, click
Next.
4. Accept the license agreement,
and click Next.
5. Accept the default Setup path,
and click Next.
6. Click Install.
7. Check the box to Start
PrinterShare Console, and click
Finish.
8. Click Next to install Bonjour.
9. Click Finish when Bonjour installs.
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
A Principled Technologies test report 9
Printing to a networked printer results
11. Select the WePrint shared printer
option.
10. Select the printer that is to be
shared from the list shown under
local printers, and click Share.
11. On the tablet, open the
PrinterShare app.
12. Click the list option at the bottom
of the screen, and select Nearby
Printers.
13. When the shared printer is
detected, select it.
Issues encountered
None
1. We were unable to print to the preexisting printer using the built-in
application drivers.
2. To get Print Central Pro to work
with the pre-existing network
printer, it was necessary to install
WePrint software on a pre-existing
Windows machine that could
connect to the network printer.
This meant that it was necessary to
have a separate Windows machine
always running to allow access to
the printer. In our opinion, this is
not ideal for corporate
environments.
3. We had to open and print the
documents out using the Print
Central Pro application. We could
not print from Quickoffice.
4. PDF: Compared to the Dell tablet,
the printed output was smaller.
5. PDF: Compared to the Dell tablet,
the printed output was in portrait
mode instead of landscape mode.
6. DOC: Compared to the Dell tablet,
the colorful top border looked
faded and appeared only on page
1.
7. DOC: Compared to the Dell tablet,
the printed type was much larger.
8. DOC: Compared to the Dell tablet,
many of the footer elements did
not print.
9. DOC: Compared to the Dell tablet,
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
1. We were unable to print to the
pre-existing printer using the
built-in application drivers.
2. To get PrinterShare to work with
the pre-existing network printer,
it was necessary to install
PrinterShare software on a preexisting Windows machine that
could connect to the network
printer. This meant that it was
necessary to have a separate
Windows machine always
running to allow access to the
printer. In our opinion, this is not
ideal for corporate
environments.
3. We had to open and print the
documents out using the
PrinterShare application. We
could not print from Quickoffice.
4. PDF: Compared to the Dell
tablet, the printed output was
slightly smaller.
5. Compared to the Dell tablet, the
printed output was justified to
the left.
6. DOC: Compared to the Dell
tablet, the printed output type
was smaller.
7. DOC: Compared to the Dell
tablet, the Company Logo
footing was missing.
8. DOC: Compared to the Dell
tablet, the Table of Contents was
A Principled Technologies test report 10
Printing to a networked printer results
the Table of Contents ….. lines did
not print.
10. DOC: Compared to the Dell tablet,
the Table of Contents page
numbers did not print properly;
rather than being lined up on the
right side, they were all over the
place.
11. DOC: Compared to the Dell tablet,
the Table of Contents was colored
blue and underlined similar to how
hyperlinks are underlined.
12. DOC: The missing footing appeared
randomly on top of text in the
document.
13. DOC: Page numbers were missing.
14. DOC: Headings were the wrong
size.
15. DOC: There were double spacing
issues inside paragraphs.
colored blue and underlined
similar to how hyperlinks are
underlined.
9. DOC: Some apostrophes and
hyphens were rendered as small
rectangles.
Figure 8: Steps and issues each tablet requires to print to a networked printer. Fewer steps are better.
Working with emails in Microsoft Exchange
The importance of email to corporate communication is obvious. Equally important as
reading, writing, and sending emails is opening the attachments that often accompany them. We
tested the ability of each tablet to read, create, and send with emails using Microsoft Exchange, and
to open common Microsoft Office files as email attachments.
The Dell Latitude ST tablet was preconfigured with Microsoft Office Professional 2010 and
Adobe Acrobat Reader X. The Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 was preconfigured with Quickoffice Pro HD.
Because the Apple iPad2 did not have Quickoffice installed, we were unable to edit email files on it.
For this test, we set up a separate email test system to send and receive emails to and from each
tablet. We created a formatted an email test message that contained a heading, Web site link, bullet
points, and a table with number results and color formatting. Each tablet started from a powered-on
state and was connected to the wireless network through DHCP. The Dell tablet was logged into the
local domain.
The Dell Latitude ST handled this process better than the Apple iPad 2 or the Samsung
Galaxy Tab 10.1. Figure 9 presents the out-of-box results for each tablet.
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
A Principled Technologies test report 11
Out-of-box Email and email attachment results
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Dell Latitude ST:
00:44 (7 steps)
Open Microsoft Outlook.
At Microsoft Outlook 2010
Startup, click Next.
Click Next to configure an E-mail
account.
At Auto Account Setup, click Next.
At the Configuring screen, click
Finish.
Enter Name and Initials, and click
OK.
At the Help Protect and Improve
Microsoft Office screen, select the
Use Recommended Settings radio
button, and click OK. By default,
Outlook 2010 will sync all
messages on the server.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Apple iPad 2:
1:28 (8 steps)
Open the Mail application.
Select Microsoft Exchange.
Manually enter Email address.
Manually enter Domain name.
Manually enter Username.
Manually enter Password, and
click Next.
Manually enter name of Exchange
server, and click Next.
Click Save to sync Mail, Contacts,
Calendars, and Reminders. By
default, Mail will sync messages
up to three days old in the Inbox
folder.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1:
2:56 (11 steps)
Open the Mail application.
Manually enter Email address.
Manually enter Password, and
click Next.
At the What type of account
screen, click Microsoft Exchange
Activesync.
Manually enter Domain name,
and click Next.
At the Setup could not finish
screen, click Edit details.
Modify name of Exchange server,
and click Next.
At Activation, click OK.
At Remote security
administration, click OK.
Select the checkbox next to Send
email from this account by
default, and click Next.
At the Activate device
administrator screen, click
Activate. By default, Mail will sync
messages up to three days old in
the Inbox folder.
Issues encountered
None
1. We were unable to edit the files.
2. PPT: Only the slide deck pictures
were shown. The notes that
accompanied each slide were not
rendered.
3. PPTX: The slide animations did not
work and were rendered on top
of each other.
4. DOC: Table of Contents page did
not work properly. We used the
table of contents to skip ahead,
and then when we tried to “go
back” the top of the page was cut
off and formatting became an
issue with a random Microsoft
logo placed on the right hand side
covering part of a word.
5. DOCX: Comments were not
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
1. PPT: Upon opening, only the slide
deck pictures were shown. When
we selected the edit pen, the
notes became visible.
2. PPTX: The slide animations did
not work and were rendered on
top of each other.
3. DOC: The Table of Contents page
links did not work.
4. DOCX: Comments were not
shown.
5. DOCX: Tracked changes were not
shown.
6. XLSX: Was not able to open file.
We received an “Unable to
display file due to insufficient
memory” message.
7. XLS: The majority of the
A Principled Technologies test report 12
Out-of-box Email and email attachment results
shown.
6. DOCX: Tracked changes were not
shown.
7. DOCX: After the first frame
appeared, it took over three
minutes for the complete
document to load, during which
time the tablet was unresponsive.
8. XLS: Intermittently, the file would
not open, and the iPad would
simply return to the home screen.
9. XLS: The $ sign formatting was
lost.
spreadsheet failed to render.
1,702 rows filled with data failed
to appear, and there were
calculating errors in the
spreadsheet.
Figure 9: Out-of-box email and email attachment steps and issues for each tablet. Fewer steps are better.
Delivering a PowerPoint presentation
Because Microsoft PowerPoint is a popular application for presentations, we tested the
ability of each tablet to deliver a PowerPoint presentation. This process included connecting the
tablet to a Pico projector via HDMI to display the PowerPoint deck, taking notes onscreen, and
distributing these notes to participants.
The Dell Latitude ST tablet was preconfigured with Microsoft Office Professional 2010. The
Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 was preconfigured with Quickoffice Pro HD. Each tablet started from a
powered-on state and with the projector powered on.
The Dell Latitude ST accomplished these tasks better than either the Apple iPad 2 or the
Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1. Figure 10 presents the out-of-box results for each tablet.
Out-of-box PowerPoint presentation results
Dell Latitude ST:
00:09 (1 step)
1. Connect one end of the HDMI
cable into the projector HDMI
port and the other end into the
Dell tablet HDMI port.
Apple iPad 2:
Incompatible
Fail
Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1:
Incompatible
Fail
Issues encountered
None
The Apple iPad 2 was unable to
natively connect via HDMI to the
projector without a separately
purchased adapter.
The Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 was
unable to natively connect via HDMI
to the projector without a separately
purchased adapter.
Figure 10: Out-of-box PowerPoint presentation steps and issues for each tablet.
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
A Principled Technologies test report 13
To enable the Apple iPad 2 and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 to complete the task, we had to
purchase a separate HDMI adapter from Apple and Samsung. We used Quickoffice HD Pro on both
tablets to display the PowerPoint presentation.
Figure 11 shows the results. Even with the HDMI adapter, the Apple iPad 2 and Samsung
Galaxy Tab 10.1 encountered difficulties. The Dell Latitude ST did not.
PowerPoint presentation results
Dell Latitude ST:
00:09 (1 step)
1. Connect one end of the HDMI
cable into the projector HDMI
port and the other end into the
Dell tablet HDMI port.
Apple iPad 2:
00:10 (2 steps)
Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1:
00:14 (3 steps)
1. Connect the Apple Digital AV
Adapter to the tablet.
2. Connect one end of the HDMI cable
into the projector HDMI port and
the other end into the Apple Digital
AV Adapter port.
1. Connect the Samsung HDTV
Adapter to the tablet.
2. Connect the Samsung Galaxy Tab
10.1 power adapter to the
Samsung HDTV Adapter.
3. Connect one end of the HDMI
cable into the projector HDMI
port and the other end into the
Samsung HDTV Adapter port.
Issues encountered
None
1. The slide animations did not work
and were rendered on top of each
other.
2. It was not possible to take notes
during the presentation.
1. The Samsung HDTV Adapter was
required to be plugged into an
external power source to work.
2. The slide animations did not
work and were rendered on top
of each other.
3. It was not possible to take notes
during the presentation.
Figure 11: Steps and issues each tablet requires to deliver a PowerPoint presentation and connect to a Pico projector. Fewer steps
are better.
CONCLUSION
Because the Dell Latitude ST is a Windows 7-based tablet, it had the clear advantage over
the Apple iPad 2 and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 when working with common Microsoft Office
applications. Less need for middleware means fewer user steps, which reduces complexity and the
risk of user error, and also reduces the risk of compatibility problems with common workplace
applications. For enterprise workers hoping to make a seamless transition from a notebook
computer to a tablet to perform their daily tasks, the Dell Latitude ST brings substantial advantages
over its competitors.
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
A Principled Technologies test report 14
APPENDIX A – TEST TABLET CONFIGURATION
Figure 12 provides detailed configuration information for the tablets we tested.
System
General
Number of processor
packages
Number of cores per
processor
Number of hardware
threads per core
System dimensions
(length x width x height)
System weight
CPU
Vendor
Model number
Core frequency (GHz)
L1 cache
L2 cache
Memory module(s)
Amount of RAM
Type
Hard disk
Vendor and model
number
Size (GB)
Operating system
Name
Graphics
Vendor and model
number
Resolution
Display
LCD type
Dell Latitude ST
Apple iPad 2
Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
10.6” x 7.3” x 0.59”
9.5” x 7.3” x 0.34”
10.1” x 6.8” x 0.34”
1 lb. 8 oz.
1 lb. 3 oz.
1 lb. 3 oz.
Intel®
Atom™ Z670
1.5
24 KB + 32 KB
512 KB
Apple
A5
1
32 KB + 32 KB
1 MB
NVIDIA®
Tegra® 2
1
32 KB + 32 KB
1 MB
2 GB
DDR2-800 MHz
512 MB
DDR2-533 MHz
1 GB
DDR2-667 MHz
Samsung PM810 SSD
Flash storage
Flash storage
32
32
32
Microsoft Windows 7
Professional
Apple iOS 5.0.1
Google Android 3.2
Honeycomb
Intel GMA 600
PowerVR SGX543MP2
NVIDIA Tegra 250 T20
1,280 x 800
1,024 x 768
1,280 x 800
LED-backlit glossy
widescreen Multi-Touch
display with IPS technology
WXGA TFT LCD
WXGA Wide Viewing Angle
LED with chemically
strengthened glass, Pen &
Touch Input
10.1
Screen size (inches)
9.7
Battery
Type
Built-in Lithium Ion
Built-in Lithium Ion
Rated Watt hours
30
25
Figure 12: Configuration information for the tablets we tested.
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
10.1
Built-in Lithium Ion
25
A Principled Technologies test report 15
APPENDIX B - TEST PROCESS
Scenario 1: Accessing shared data on a file server
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Open Windows Explorer, and type the path to the shared file directory.
Open the test PowerPoint (PPT) file. Note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Open the test PowerPoint (PPTX) file. Note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Open the test Word (DOC) file. Note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Open the test Word (DOCX) file. Note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Open the test Excel (XLS) file. Note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Open the test Excel (XLSX) file. Note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Open the test Adobe Acrobat (PDF) file. Note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Scenario 2: Accessing shared data on a Microsoft SharePoint server
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Open the Web browser, and type the path to the SharePoint shared file directory.
Open the test PowerPoint (PPT) file. Note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Open the test PowerPoint (PPTX) file. Note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Open the test Word (DOC) file. Note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Open the test Word (DOCX) file. Note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Open the test Excel (XLS) file. Note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Open the test Excel (XLSX) file. Note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Open the test Adobe Acrobat (PDF) file. Note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Scenario 3: Printing to a networked printer
Printing a PDF file
1. From the tablet, open the test PDF file.
2. Print the test PDF file.
3. Note any issues.
Printing a Word Document
1. From the tablet, open the test DOC file.
2. Print the test DOC file.
3. Note any issues.
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
A Principled Technologies test report 16
Scenario 4: Emailing and opening attachments
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
From the tablet, open the mail client.
From the email test system, prepare the formatting test message.
From the email test system, send the formatted email. View the email and note any formatting issues.
From the tablet, click Reply to the formatting message. Enter the text Test message received.
Click Send. When the email appears in email test system’s inbox, view the email and note any formatting issues.
From the email test system, prepare the PowerPoint (PPT) attached file test message.
From the email test system, send the PowerPoint PPT file.
From the tablet, open the test PowerPoint (PPT) file and note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
From the email test system, prepare the PowerPoint (PPTX) attached file test message.
From the email test system, send the PowerPoint (PPTX) file.
From the tablet, open the test PowerPoint (PPTX) file and note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
From the email test system, prepare the test Word (DOC) file.
From the email test system, send the Word (DOC) file.
From the tablet, open the test Word (DOC) file and note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
From the email test system, prepare the test Word (DOCX) file.
From the email test system, send the Word (DOCX) file.
From the tablet, open the test Word (DOCX) file and note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
From the email test system, prepare the test Excel (XLS) file.
From the email test system, send the Excel (XLS) file.
From the tablet, open the test Excel (XLS) file and note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
From the email test system, prepare the test Excel (XLSX) file.
From the email test system, send the Excel (XLSX) file.
From the tablet, open the test Excel (XLSX) file and note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
From the email test system, prepare the test Adobe Acrobat (PDF) file.
From the email test system, send the Adobe Acrobat (PDF) file.
From the tablet, open the test Adobe Acrobat (PDF) file and note any formatting issues.
Close the test file.
Scenario 5: Delivering a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
From the tablet, open the PowerPoint presentation.
Start the presentation.
Click through the first 10 slides and note any formatting issues.
Using the pen option, make notes on one of the PowerPoint slides. Note any issues.
Email the edited slide deck to another test computer. Note any issues.
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
A Principled Technologies test report 17
ABOUT PRINCIPLED TECHNOLOGIES
We provide industry-leading technology assessment and fact-based marketing
services. We bring to every assignment extensive experience with and expertise
in all aspects of technology testing and analysis, from researching new
technologies, to developing new methodologies, to testing with existing and new
tools.
Principled Technologies, Inc.
1007 Slater Road, Suite 300
Durham, NC, 27703
www.principledtechnologies.com
When the assessment is complete, we know how to present the results to a
broad range of target audiences. We provide our clients with the materials they
need, from market-focused data to use in their own collateral to custom sales
aids, such as test reports, performance assessments, and white papers. Every
document reflects the results of our trusted independent analysis.
We provide customized services that focus on our clients’ individual
requirements. Whether the technology involves hardware, software, Web sites,
or services, we offer the experience, expertise, and tools to help our clients
assess how it will fare against its competition, its performance, its market
readiness, and its quality and reliability.
Our founders, Mark L. Van Name and Bill Catchings, have worked together in
technology assessment for over 20 years. As journalists, they published over a
thousand articles on a wide array of technology subjects. They created and led
the Ziff-Davis Benchmark Operation, which developed such industry-standard
benchmarks as Ziff Davis Media’s Winstone and WebBench. They founded and
led eTesting Labs, and after the acquisition of that company by Lionbridge
Technologies were the head and CTO of VeriTest.
Principled Technologies is a registered trademark of Principled Technologies, Inc.
All other product names are the trademarks of their respective owners.
Disclaimer of Warranties; Limitation of Liability:
PRINCIPLED TECHNOLOGIES, INC. HAS MADE REASONABLE EFFORTS TO ENSURE THE ACCURACY AND VALIDITY OF ITS TESTING, HOWEVER, PRINCIPLED
TECHNOLOGIES, INC. SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, RELATING TO THE TEST RESULTS AND ANALYSIS, THEIR ACCURACY,
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AS SET FORTH HEREIN.
Tablet functionality in an enterprise environment:
Dell Latitude ST, Apple iPad 2, and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
A Principled Technologies test report 18