Cisco PRP-1= Specifications

Performance Route Processor
Installation and Configuration
Product Number: PRP-2=, PRP-3=
Document Order Number: OL-17436-01
This hardware installation and configuration note describes the performance route processor (PRP)
PRP-2 and PRP-3 route processors for use in Cisco XR 12000 Series Routers and Cisco 12000 Series
Routers.
Document Contents
This publication includes the following sections:
•
Important Information, page 2
•
Product Overview, page 3
•
Preparing for Installation, page 17
•
Removing and Installing a PRP, page 19
•
Checking the Installation, page 23
•
Upgrading to the PRP, page 31
•
Configuring Interfaces on the PRP, page 41
•
Configuring Interfaces on the PRP-3, page 48
•
Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks, page 59
•
Regulatory, Compliance, and Safety Information, page 84
Americas Headquarters:
Cisco Systems, Inc., 170 West Tasman Drive, San Jose, CA 95134-1706 USA
Important Information
Important Information
This section contains information about the following hardware and software requirements:
•
Router Information, page 2
•
Cisco IOS XR Software Requirements, page 2
•
Hardware Revision Requirements, page 3
Router Information
For hardware installation and maintenance information about the Cisco XR 12000 Series Router, refer
to the installation and configuration guide for your router. This includes information on card slot
locations and other general requirements.
Supported Platforms
The PRP is supported on all Cisco XR 12000 Series Router chassis and can be installed in any available
slot in any chassis; however PRP-3 is supported only on the Cisco XR 128xx and 124xx Series Router
chassis. Also, PRP-1 is only supported on the Cisco 12000 Series Router chassis running Cisco IOS
Software.
PRP Redundancy
When two PRPs are installed in a Cisco XR 12000 Series Router, one PRP is the active PRP and the
other is a backup, or standby, PRP. If the active PRP fails or is removed from the system, the standby
PRP detects the failure and initiates a switchover. During a switchover, the standby PRP assumes control
of the router, connects with the network interfaces, and activates the local network management interface
and system console.
Note
If your system includes redundant PRPs, both PRPs should be of the same type (PRP-3 or PRP-2) and
have the same memory size. We strongly recommend that you avoid configuring your router using mixed
route processor cards.
Cisco IOS XR Software Requirements
For software configuration information, refer to the Cisco IOS XR getting started, configuration, and
command reference publications for the installed Cisco IOS XR software release. Refer to the
CiscoIOSR software release notes for additional information.
Note
PRP-2 is compatible with Cisco IOS XR Software Release 3.2 or later releases, but PRP-3 is compatible
only with Cisco IOS XR Software Release 3.8.0 and later releases. PRP-1 is not supported with any of
the Cisco IOS XR Software Releases. PRP-1 is only supported on Cisco IOS Software Releases.
The show version and show hardware commands display the current hardware configuration of the
router, including the system software version that is currently loaded and running.
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Product Overview
Hardware Revision Requirements
To ensure compatibility with the software, the PRP should have a specific hardware revision level or
greater. The hardware revision number is printed on a label affixed to the component side of the card.
The hardware revision number can also be displayed using the show diags slot-number command.
The minimum hardware revision number for PRP-3 (product number PRP-3=) is 73-10255-02. The
minimum hardware revision number for PRP-2 (product number PRP-2=) is 73-8812-04 Rev. A0.
Product Overview
The following sections provide information about the performance route processor (PRP), its
components, functions, and features, and its use as the main system processor. Figure 1 shows the front
panel view of the PRP-2.
101104
AC
T
SIG
AC
T
SIG
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DA
TA
LIN
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OT LOT
-0 -1
K
PRP-2 Front Panel View
DA
TA
Figure 1
ETH 1
BITS 0
BITS 1
AUX
CONSOLE
ETH 2
T
SE
RE
ETH 0
PERFORMANCE ROUTE PROCESSOR 2
The PRP-2 is available as product number PRP-2 or PRP-2=, which includes one PRP with 1 G of
synchronous dynamic random-access memory (SDRAM) and one 64-MB advanced technology
attachment (ATA) Flash disk. A redundant PRP (product number PRP-2/R) is also available.
272359
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PRP-3 Front Panel View
DA
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Figure 2
RESET
ETH 0
1
Table 1
2
3
ETH 1
BITS 0 BITS 1
AUX CONSOLE PERFORMANCE RP 3
4
5
PRP-3 Front Panel Hardware Component Details
Numeric Callout
Hardware Component
1
Ejector Lever
2
Handle
3
External Compact Flash
4
Reset button
5
Alphanumeric LEDs
PRP-3 is the next-generation route processor for the Cisco XR 124xx and 128xx Router chassis running
Cisco IOS XR Software Release 3.8.0 or a later release. The PRP-3 is available as product number PRP-3
or PRP-3= for a primary route processor and is available as PRP-3/R for a redundant route processor.
PRP-3 has significant improvements over PRP-2. These improvements include increased speed,
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3
Product Overview
improved scalability, higher system memory, faster packet processing. Because PRP-3 does not support
Cisco IOS Software, the bootflash memory no longer exists in PRP-3. PRP-3 ROMMON has software
intelligence to download a Cisco IOS XR image without the support of bootflash memory.
Note
PRP-3 supports Cisco XR 124xx (10 G per slot fabric) and Cisco XR 128xx (40 G per slot fabric) Router
chassis only. PRP-3 does not support Cisco XR 120xx Router chassis (2.5-G low-speed fabric).
PRP Functions
The PRP-2 provides the following additional functions:
Note
•
One IEEE 802.3 10/100/1000-megabits-per-second (Mbps) Ethernet port.
•
Two building integrated timing system (BITS) ports for connecting to an external clock source.
BITS functionality is currently not supported.
In addition to the functionality listed for the PRP-1 and PRP-2, PRP-3 provides the following specific
functions:
•
Reduced boot time.
•
Increased overall scalability.
•
Improved memory access rates and scale.
•
Improved CPU performance through dual 1.3-GHz PPC processor cores.
•
Improved packet processing using hardware-based acceleration.
•
10-G bandwidth backplane connectivity.
•
Support for all Cisco XR 124xx and 128xx Router chassis, except low-speed fabric (2.5G).
•
New ROMMON that supports IPv4 network configuration directly.
PRP Components
The PRP-2 contains the following additional components:
•
Note
4
SDRAM—Up to 4 GB of Cisco-approved synchronous dynamic random-access memory (SDRAM)
on two dual in-line memory modules (DIMMs). 1 GB of SDRAM is the default shipping
configuration. SDRAM is field replaceable only when using Cisco-approved DIMMs.
Software releases prior to 12.0(30)S do not recognize more than 2 GB of SDRAM and will only
use the first 2 GB of the installed memory. This does not affect the functioning of the PRP-2, but
commands such as show version will indicate that only 2 GB of SDRAM are installed.
•
Hard disk drive—40-GB hard disk drive can be optionally installed on the PRP-2 board.
•
CF—1-GB compact flash disk can be optionally installed on the PRP-2 board. It also provides
option to upgrade the compact flash to 4 GB.
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Product Overview
The PRP-3 contains the following components:
Note
•
Power PC Processor—Power PC 8641D Dual Processor Central Processing Unit (CPU) e600 cores
running at 1.3 GHz each.
•
Memory—Default internal and external compactflash of 2 GB each (2 x 2 GB = total 4 GB) and
provides an option for upgrading the compact flash to 8 GB (2 x 4 GB).
•
Hard disk drive—80-GB hard disk drive installed on the PRP-3 board.
•
SDRAM—2 GB each for two DDR2 DRAMs (2 x 2 GB) for a total of 4 GB is the default shipping
configuration. Option to upgrade to 8 GB (2 x 4 GB).
•
NVRAM—2 MB of nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM). NVRAM is not user configurable or field
replaceable.
•
Sensors—Air-temperature sensors for environmental monitoring.
For Cisco IOS XR Release 3.7.0 and later releases, SDRAM and Compact Flash memories require 2 GB
capacity.
Differences Between PRP-2 and PRP-3
Table 2 provides details about hardware or software component differences between PRP-2 and PRP-3.
Table 2
Differences Between PRP-2 and PRP-3
Hardware or
Software
Component
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PRP-2 Specifications
PRP-3 Specifications
Processor
PowerPC 7457 – single core @ 1.3GHz PowerPC 8641D – Dual core @ 1.3GHz
each
Processor Bus
64 bits @ 133 MHz (external)
64 bits @ 533 MHz (internal)
Memory
Up to 4 GB @ 133 Mhz SDR DRAM
Up to 8 GB @ 266 MHz DDRII DRAM
System Controller Discovery GT64260
Embedded within the 8641D
Cache
L1: 32KB
L1: 32KB
L2: 256KB
L2: 1MB
L3: 2MB (external)
(No external cache needed)
Data Processing
Assembler and Chopper FPGAs
Hummer FPGA
Fabric Interface
OC-48 bandwidth (Fusilli + external
serdeses)
OC-192 Bandwidth (SuperFish +
Fishstick)
NVRAM
2 MB
2 MB
Bootflash
64 MB + 1 GB Compact Flash (Option
to upgrade to 4 GB).
2 GB of Internal and External
CompactFlash (An upgrade option is
available for a total of 8 GB memory (4
GB each.)
Boot ROM
4 MB
8 MB
Ethernet
Interfaces
2x 10/100 FE + 1x 10/100/GE
2x 10/100/1000 Mbps
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Product Overview
Table 2
Differences Between PRP-2 and PRP-3
Hardware or
Software
Component
PRP-2 Specifications
PRP-3 Specifications
Flash Disk
2 PCMCIA slots
1 External CompactFlash slot
BITS
2 BITS inputs
2 BITS inputs
Serial Interface
Console + Aux
Console + Aux
Hard Drive
40-GB 2.5” HDD
80-GB 2.5” SATA HDD
Operating System Cisco IOS Releases
Supported
Cisco IOS XR Software Release 3.8.0
and later releases
Chassis Supported Cisco XR 120xx, Cisco XR 124xx, Cisco Cisco XR 124xx and Cisco XR 128xx
XR 128xx Series Router chassis
Series Router chassis
Cisco IOS Software Storage
The Cisco IOS Software images are stored in flash memory. Two types of flash memory ship with the
PRP-1:
•
Onboard flash memory—Ships as a single in-line memory module (SIMM). This flash memory
contains the Cisco IOS boot image (bootflash) and is not field replaceable.
•
Flash disk—The PRP ships with an ATA Flash disk that can be installed in either CompactFlash disk
slot. The CompactFlash disk contains the Cisco IOS software image. Linear flash memory cards are
also supported in the PRP-1.
The PRP-2 provides the following additional flash memory:
•
CompactFlash (CF) disk—Optional 1-GB CF disk can be used for large Cisco IOS images.
Storing the Cisco IOS images in flash memory enables you to download and boot from upgraded
Cisco IOS software images remotely, or from software images that reside in PRP flash memory.
Cisco 12000 Series Internet Routers support downloadable system software for most Cisco IOS Software
upgrades. This enables you to remotely download, store, and boot from a new Cisco IOS software image.
The Cisco IOS software runs from within the SDRAM of the PRP.
Cisco IOS XR Software Storage
The PRP-3 provides the following compact flash memory for storing the Cisco IOS XR software image:
•
Internal CompactFlash (CF) on board—(compact flash:) 2-GB internal compactflash is used for
large Cisco IOS XR software images.
•
External CompactFlash (CF)—(disk0:) 2-GB external compactflash is used for large Cisco IOS XR
software images. The external CompactFlash can be inserted from the front panel of PRP-3.
External CompactFlash replaces the PCMCIA slots of PRP-2.
Storing the Cisco IOS XR images in flash memory enables you to download and boot from upgraded
Cisco IOS XR software images remotely, or from software images that reside in PRP-3 flash memory.
6
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Product Overview
PRP-3 ROMMON Changes
The PRP-3 ROMMON in Cisco IOS XR Software Release 3.8.0 has significant changes and more
software intelligence than the PRP-2 ROMMON of previous releases. The following sections discuss in
detail the changes introduced in PRP-3 ROMMON.
•
Capability of ROM Monitor to Netboot
•
FAT32 File System Support
•
ROMMON Logical Divisions
Capability of ROM Monitor to Netboot
ROMMON is the initial program that loads in Cisco IOS XR software. It loads the mini.vm file into the
RAM, sets up some initial hardware needed, and then hands over control to the CPU. The CPU thereafter
takes on and loads the Cisco IOS XR software to enable the router to come up. The ROMMON in PRP-3
is now more intelligent than the ROMMON in PRP-1 or PRP-2. The ROMMON of PRP-1 and PRP-2
needed a boothelper image to reach TFTP and download the Cisco IOS XR software image. The
boothelper image is stored in bootflash. The PRP-3 ROMMON has more software intelligence, because
it can reach the TFTP server without a boothelper image. PRP-3 ROMMON does not require a
boothelper image to reach the TFTP server. Hence, bootflash memory is also removed from PRP-3.
FAT32 File System Support
PRP-3 ROMMON supports only the FAT32 file system (FS), it does not support FAT12 or FAT16 file
system. PRP-3 ROMMON does the native TFTP netboot and file download over the management ports.
ROMMON Logical Divisions
The PRP-3 ROMMON is split into following three software divisions:
•
Boot Strap Loader (BSL)—BSL thin bootstrap starts one of the two ROMMON images (latest or
golden ROMMON images).
•
Latest ROMMON image—It is the Primary ROMMON image, which sets up the initial hardware.
•
Golden ROMMON image—It serves as a backup ROMMON image, which is used only if the latest
ROMMON image fails to load from upgrade, corruption, or any other issues.
ROMMON Procedure to Boot an Image from TFTP
The following section discusses booting a Cisco IOS XR software image from TFTP using ROMMON.
Certain changes are related to booting from ROMMON.
Before starting to boot an image from TFTP using ROMMON, ROMMON must be initialized. The
output displayed when ROMMON is initialized is displayed below. The output in blue shows the
hardware changes in Cisco IOS XR Software Release 3.8.0.
--- Output details when ROMMON is initialized --Cisco PRP-3 BSL, Version 1.0.0 (bld1) DEVELOPMENT SOFTWARE
Compiled on 04/07/08 at 15:19:11 PDT [BLD-rommon]
Copyright (c) 1994-2008 by cisco Systems, Inc.
OL-17436-01
7
Product Overview
1.330GHz dual-core MPC8641D Rev 2.1, 532MHz MPXclk
Discovering memory in slot DIMM1 .........................
Discovering memory in slot DIMM2 .........................
Pausing between init of DDR1 and DDR2...
Testing low memory .......................................
Loading main ROMMON image ................................
Verifying loaded image ...................................
Load succeeded; launching target .........................
eth0
eth0
eth1
eth1
Found 2GB DIMM
Found 2GB DIMM
OK
OK
OK
OK
auto-negotiation completed in 1581ms
link up and operating in 100BASE-TX full-duplex mode
auto-negotiation completed in 2189ms
link up and operating in 100BASE-TX full-duplex mode
Cisco ROMMON System Bootstrap, Version 1.0.0 (bld1) DEVELOPMENT SOFTWARE
Compiled on 04/07/08 at 15:18:19 PDT [BLD-rommon]
Copyright (c) 1994-2008 by cisco Systems, Inc.
MPC8641D platform with 4GB of main memory
rommon 1 >
Execute the following steps to boot a Cisco IOS XR software image from ROMMON using TFTP.
Step 1
Configure the IP address of the Ethernet interfaces eth0: and eth1: on the router.
rommon 1 > ifconfig eth0 10.12.6.101 255.255.0.0 up
rommon 2 > ifconfig eth1 10.14.6.102 255.255.0.0 up
Step 2
Verify that the IP address is configured properly and the ethernet interface link state is UP.
rommon 3 > ifconfig
eth0
HWaddr: 00:02:17:ea:c3:f1
IPaddr: 10.12.6.101 Netmask: 255.255.0.0
Status: UP Link: UP
eth1
Step 3
Note
HWaddr: 00:02:17:ea:c3:f0
IPaddr: 10.14.6.102 Netmask: 255.255.0.0
Status: UP Link: UP
Save the changes (IP address configuration) to NVRAM.
To save the configuration changes to NVRAM permanently, use the sync command.
rommon 4 > sync
Data successfully written to NVRAM
Step 4
To enable loading of the Cisco IOS XR software image from TFTP server, add the IP address, subnet
mask, and gateway address of the TFTP from which the request is finally sent.
Note
Upon adding the route details of the TFTP server and gateway, a route table is created on ROMMON.
rommon 5 > route add 223.255.254.0 255.255.255.0 10.12.0.1
Route successfully added
Step 5
Verify that the route table with the specified IP address and gateway of the TFTP has been created on
ROMMON.
rommon 6 > route
8
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Product Overview
Destination
10.12.0.0
10.14.0.0
223.255.254.0
Tip
Netmask
255.255.0.0
255.255.0.0
255.255.255.0
Gateway
*
*
10.12.0.1
Metric
0
0
1
Interface
eth0
eth1
eth0
To change the IP Address of the TFTP server or gateway, delete the route details from the route table by
executing the following command.
rommon 7 > route del 223.255.254.0 255.255.255.0
Route successfully deleted
Step 6
Save the changes (route table configuration) to NVRAM.
rommon 8 > sync
Data successfully written to NVRAM
Step 7
Verify that the packets have been from the router to the Ethernet interfaces (eth0 or eth1) on the router,
gateway, and TFTP server by using the ping command. The output indicates that all the packets have
been received and there is no packet loss. Hence, connectivity has been established to load the
CiscoIOSXR software images from the TFTP server.
--- Verifying connectivity to eth0 interface of Router using ping command--rommon 1 > ping 10.12.6.101
!!!!
5 packets transmitted, 5 received, 0% loss, av time 0.167ms
--- Verifying connectivity to gateway using pind command--rommon 2 > ping 10.12.0.1
!!!!!
5 packets transmitted, 5 received, 0% loss, av time 0.289ms
--- Verifying connectivity to telnet server using pind command--rommon 3 > ping 223.255.254.254
!!!!!
5 packets transmitted, 5 received, 0% loss, av time 0.188ms
Step 8
PRP-3 uses internal flash memory (compactflash:) and external compact flash memory (disk0:) to store
the Cisco IOS XR software images. The following command displays the devices on PRP-3 used to store
the Cisco IOS XR software images.
rommon 6 > dev -a
Devices in device table:
id
description state type start size fs access
disk0:
compactFlash ATA disk 0 A Blk 0d 80000000d FAT32 ATA
compactflash:
internal compactFlash A Blk 0d 80000000d FAT32 ATA
Step 9
Enter the following TURBOBOOT command to automate the software installation process in ROM
Monitor mode, format the boot device, and indicate the boot device that can contain internal flash
memory (compactflash:) or external flash memory (disk0:). The image should be stored in internal flash
memory (compactflash:).
rommon 1 > TURBOBOOT=on,compactflash:,format
rommon 2 > sync
Data successfully written to NVRAM
Step 10
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Load the Cisco IOS XR software image from the TFTP server by specifying the TFTP server IP address,
the location of the image, and the filename of the Cisco IOS XR software image. The IOS XR software
image is loaded, and later all the packages and additional software upgrades are stored in the specified
boot device.
9
Product Overview
rommon 3> boot tftp://223.255.254.254/...
Note
During the PRP-3 booting, if you want to go back to the ROMMON prompt, press Ctrl-Break to force it
back into ROMMON. This has to be done in the early stage of booting.
PRP Hardware Components
Figure 3 shows the locations of the various hardware components on the PRP-2. Memory options and
functions for both are listed in Table 3.
PRP-2 (Horizontal Orientation)
FA CE
PL AT
E
800
-24
060
HD -P
-01
RP 2-
REV
__
40 G
Figure 3
TH IS
SI DE
TO
14
1
2
13
12
K
LIN
ETH 0
3
TA
DA
K
LIN
ETH 1
5
TA
DA
SIG
BITS 0
T
AC
SIG
T
AC
BITS 1
6
AUX
7
CONSOLE
8
ETH 2
9
T
SE
RE
-1
OT
SL
-0
OT
SL
PERFORMANCE ROUTE PROCESSOR 2
10 11
101105
T
EC
EJ
4
10
1
Compact Flash disk (optional)
8
Console port
2
Flash SIMM (Socket number P3)
9
Gigabit Ethernet port
3
Ejector lever
10 Handle
4
Flash disk slots (covered)
11 Display LEDs
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Product Overview
5
Ethernet ports
12 SDRAM DIMM: Bank 1 - Socket number U15
6
BITS ports1
13 SDRAM DIMM: Bank 2 - Socket number U18
7
Auxiliary port
14 Hard disk drive (optional)
1. BITS functionality is currently not supported. Support for BITS on the Cisco 12000 Series Router will be provided
through an upgrade to your switch fabric card (SFC) in the future.
Table 3
PRP-2 Memory Components
Type
SDRAM
1
SRAM3
NVRAM
4
HDD
Size
Quantity
Description
Location
2 GB (default)
or 4 GB
(optional)
1 or 2
2-GB or 4-GB DIMMs (based on desired SDRAM
configuration) for main Cisco IOS XR software functions
U15 (bank 1)2
U18 (bank 2)
2 MB (fixed)
—
Secondary CPU cache memory functions
—
2 MB (fixed)
1
System configuration files, register settings, and logs
—
40 GB
1
Contains log and crash information for specific Cisco IOS XR
versions.
—
1
Contains Cisco IOS XR boot image (bootflash), crash
information, and other user-defined files
P3
1
Stores the ROMMON minimum boot image (MBI).
Flash memory 2 GB or 4 GB
(optional)
Compact Flash
4 MB Boot
ROM
Flash disks5 2
1 or 2
GB (default) or
4 GB (optional)
Contains Cisco IOS XR software images, system configuration Flash disk
files, and other user-defined files on up to two flash disks
slot 0 and
slot 1
1 GB CF6
Contains large Cisco IOS XR software images
1
—
1. Default SDRAM configuration is 2-GB for PRP-2. Bank 1 (U15) must be populated first. You can use one or both banks to configure SDRAM
combinations of 2 GB and 4 GB for the PRP-2. 1.5-GB configurations.and DIMM devices that are not from Cisco are not supported.
2. If both banks of the PRP-2 are populated, bank 1 and bank 2 must contain the same size DIMM.
3. SRAM is not user configurable or field replaceable.
4. NVRAM is not user configurable or field replaceable.
5. ATA Flash disks are supported in the PRP-2.
6. Optional PRP-2 hardware. Compact disks that are not from Cisco are not supported.
Note
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If a single DIMM module is installed, it must be placed in bank 1 (U8).
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Product Overview
Figure 4
PRP-3 (Horizontal Orientation)
272360
5
4
1
2
3
12
1
SDRAM DIMM: Bank 1 - Socket number U8
2
SDRAM DIMM: Bank 2 - Socket number U10
3
External Compact Flash
4
Hard Disk (80 GB)
5
Internal Compact Flash
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Product Overview
Table 4
PRP-3 Memory Components
Type
Description
Location
2
2 GB (Default) for each
DDR2 DRAM for a total
system memory of 4 GB,
option for upgrade to total
system memory of 8 GB (4
GB each).
Two 2-GB default DDR2
DRAM for main CiscoIOSXR
software functions. Provision
for optional upgrade to 4 GB
also possible to provide total
system memory of 8 GB.
U8 (bank
1)2
U10 (bank
2)
NVRAM3
2 MB (fixed)
1
System configuration files,
register settings, and logs
—
Flash memory
2 GB (default) or 4 GB
(optional) Flash disks4
2
(Internal
and
External
Compact
Flash)
Contains Cisco IOS XR
software images, system
configuration files, and other
user-defined files on two
CompactFlash.
Internal and
External
Compact
Flash5
Flash boot
ROM
8 MB
1
Flash EPROM for the ROM
monitor program boot image
—
HDD6
80 GB SATA
1
Contains log and crash
information for specific
Cisco IOS XR versions
—
SDRAM
Size
1
Quantity
1. Default SDRAM configuration is a total of 4 GB (2 x 2GB) system memory for PRP-3. Bank 1 (U15) must be populated first.
You can use one or both banks to configure DDR2 DRAM combinations of 2 GB or 4 GB for the PRP-3. DIMM devices that
are not from Cisco are not supported.
2. If both banks of the PRP-3 are populated, bank 1 and bank 2 must contain the same size DIMM.
3. NVRAM is not user configurable or field replaceable.
4. ATA Flash disks are supported in the PRP-3.
5. PRP-3 provides an onboard internal CompactFlash and also an external CompactFlash. The external CompactFlash in PRP-3
replaces the two PCMCIA slots (slot0 and slot1) of PRP-2.
6. Hard disk drives that are not from Cisco are not supported.
SDRAM
SDRAM stores routing tables, protocols, and network accounting applications, and runs the Cisco IOS
software. The default PRP-2 configuration includes 1 GB of ECC SDRAM. DIMM upgrades of 1 GB
and 2 GB are available for the PRP-2. You can mix memory sizes as long as the larger DIMM is placed
in bank 1 (U15).
The PRP-3 provides more system memory than PRP-1 and PRP-2. PRP-3 is shipped with 2 GB system
memory in each DDR2 DRAMs for a total of 4 GB and provides an upgrade option for a total of 8 GB
(4 GB x 2 DRAM).
Caution
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Only Cisco-approved memory is supported. Do not attempt to install other devices or DIMMs in the
DIMM sockets not approved by Cisco. (See Table 26 on page 79.)
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Product Overview
NVRAM
NVRAM provides 2 MB of memory for system configuration files, software configuration register
settings, and environmental monitoring logs. This information is backed up with built-in lithium
batteries that retain the contents for a minimum of 5 years. NVRAM is not user configurable or field
replaceable.
Flash Memory
Flash memory allows you to remotely load and store multiple Cisco IOS software and microcode images.
You can download a new image over the network or from a local server and then add the new image to
Flash memory or replace the existing files. You then can boot the routers either manually or
automatically from any of the stored images.
Flash memory also functions as a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server to allow other servers to
boot remotely from stored images or to copy them into their own Flash memory. The onboard Flash
memory (called bootflash) contains the Cisco IOS boot image, and the Flash disk contains the Cisco IOS
software image.
PRP-3 provides more flash memory than PRP-1 and PRP-2. PRP-3 includes a default internal compact
flash of 2 GB and also has an external compact flash of 2-GB. Compact flash upgrade option is also
available for a total of 8 GB (2 x 4 GB).
Note
PRP-3 external compact flash replaces the two PCMCIA slots of PRP-2. The external compact flash can
be installed or removed from PRP-3 front panel. Internal compact flash is denoted as compactflash:
while external compact flash is denoted as disk0:.
PRP-3 Compact Flash
PRP-3 provides more flash memory than PRP-1 and PRP-2. PRP-3 uses compact flash to store
CiscoIOSXR software images. PRP-3 includes a default internal compact flash of 2-GB and also has an
external compact flash of 2-GB. Compact flash upgrade option is also available for a total of 8-GB (2 x
4-GB).
Note
Table 5
14
PRP-3 external compact flash replaces the two PCMCIA slots of PRP-2. The external compact
flash can be installed or removed from PRP-3 front panel. Internal compact flash is denoted as
compactflash:, while external compact flash is denoted as disk0:.
PRP-3 Compact Flash Disk Sizes
Compact Flash Sizes
Part Numbers
2 GB
FLASH-PRP3-2G(=)
4 GB
FLASH-PRP3-4G(=)
OL-17436-01
Product Overview
PRP LEDs
The following LEDs are used on the PRP:
•
Status LEDs
•
Display LEDs
Status LEDs
The PRP-2 has the following LED indicators:
•
Two Flash disk activity LEDs, one for each Flash disk slot (labeled SLOT-0 and SLOT-1)—Indicate
when the Flash disk slot is accessed.
•
Two Ethernet port LEDs used in conjunction with each of the three RJ-45 Ethernet connectors:
– LINK—Indicates link activity
– DATA—Indicates data transmission or reception
•
Two BITS port LEDs used in conjunction with each of the two BITS ports:
– SIG—Indicates carrier signal available
– ACT—Indicates the interface is active
The PRP-3 has the following LED indicators:
•
Two Ethernet port LEDs used in conjunction with each of the three RJ-45 Ethernet connectors:
– LINK—Indicates link activity
– DATA—Indicates data transmission or reception
•
Two BITS port LEDs used in conjunction with each of the two BITS ports:
– SIG—Indicates carrier signal available
– ACT—Indicates that the interface is active
Note
The BITS feature is not supported in Release 3.8.0.
•
One auxiliary port (AUX) and one console port (CONSOLE) LED:
– AUX—Used as a backup for the command outputs on the Console.
– CONSOLE—Used for configuring the router by connecting an RJ-45 cable to the console
terminal. The router can be configured through the console terminal.
Display LEDs
The alphanumeric display LEDs are organized as two rows of four characters each and are located at one
end of the card. These LEDs provide system status and error messages that are displayed during and after
the boot process. The boot process and the content displayed are controlled by the MBus module
software of the PRP.
At the end of the boot process, the LEDs are controlled by the Cisco IOS software (via the MBus), and
the content displayed is designated by the Cisco IOS software.
OL-17436-01
15
Product Overview
A complete, descriptive list of all system and error messages is located in the Cisco IOS System Error
Messages publications.
The display LEDs indicate the following:
•
Status of the PRP
•
System error messages
•
User-defined status/error messages
Soft Reset Switch
A soft reset switch provides a reset to the processor software on the PRP. You access the soft reset switch
through a small opening in the PRP faceplate. To depress the switch, insert a paper clip or a similar object
into the opening.
Caution
The soft reset switch is not a mechanism for resetting the PRP and reloading the IOS image. It is intended
for software development use. To prevent system problems or loss of data, use the soft reset switch only
on the advice of Cisco service personnel.
Flash Disk Slots
The PRP includes two Flash disk slots on the front panel of the card. Either slot on the PRP-1 can support
an ATA Flash disk or a linear Flash memory card. The Flash disk slots on the PRP-2 can only support
ATA Flash disks.
Note
The PRP only supports +5 VDC Flash disk devices. It does not support +3.3 VDC Flash disk devices.
All combinations of different Flash devices are supported by the PRP-1. You can use ATA Flash disks,
linear Flash memory cards, or a combination of the two.
Each Flash disk slot has an ejector button for ejecting a card from the slot. See the “Using Flash Disks
in the PRP” section on page 67 for more information.
Note
Linear Flash memory cards may not have the capacity to meet the requirements of your configuration.
However, they can be used for emergency file recovery applications.
Asynchronous Serial Ports
The PRP has two asynchronous serial ports, the console and auxiliary ports. These allow you to connect
external serial devices to monitor and manage the system. Both ports use RJ-45 receptacles.
The console port provides a data circuit-terminating equipment (DCE) interface for connecting a console
terminal. The auxiliary port provides a data terminal equipment (DTE) interface and supports flow
control. It is often used to connect a modem, a channel service unit (CSU), or other optional equipment
for Telnet management.
16
OL-17436-01
Preparing for Installation
Ethernet Ports
The PRP includes two 10/100 Mbps Ethernet ports, each using an 8-pin RJ-45 receptacle for either IEEE
802.3 10BASE-T (10 Mbps) or IEEE 802.3u 100BASE-TX (100 Mbps) connections.
The PRP-2 includes a 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet port, which uses the above connections and also a
802.3 Gigabit Ethernet connection.
The PRP-3 includes two 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet port, which also uses the above connections and
also a 802.3 Gigabit Ethernet connection.
Note
The transmission speed of the Ethernet ports is auto-sensing by default and is user configurable.
Hard Disk Drive
The PRP-2 optionally includes a 40-GB hard disk drive (HDD) that is installed on the PRP-2 board.
The PRP-3 provides an 80-GB hard disk drive (HDD) that is installed on the PRP-3 board.
Note
Hard disk drives that are not from Cisco are not supported.
CompactFlash Disk
The PRP-2 optionally includes a 1-GB CompactFlash disk that is installed on the PRP-2 board.
Warning
PRP-2 and PRP-3 compactflashes are not compatible with each other and hence PRP-2 compactflash
cannot be used in PRP-3 and vice versa. PRP-3 uses Multiword DMA to access the compactflash device,
a PRP-2 compactflash does not support this access type.
The PRP-3 board includes a default 2-GB internal CompactFlash and a 2-GB external compact flash. In
PRP-3, the external compact flash replaces the PCMCIA slots of PRP-2.
Note
CompactFlash that are not from Cisco are not supported.
Preparing for Installation
Installation preparation is presented in the following sections:
OL-17436-01
•
Safety Guidelines, page 18
•
Preventing Electrostatic Discharge, page 18
•
Required Tools and Equipment, page 19
•
Working with Electrical Equipment, page 19
17
Preparing for Installation
Safety Guidelines
Before you perform any procedure in this publication, review the safety guidelines in this section to
avoid injuring yourself or damaging the equipment.
The following guidelines are for your safety and to protect equipment. The guidelines do not include all
hazards. Be alert.
Note
Review the safety warnings listed in the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for
Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router publication (Document Number 78-4347-xx) that accompanied your
router before installing, configuring, or maintaining a line card.
•
Keep the work area clear and dust free during and after installation. Do not allow dirt or debris to
enter into any laser-based components.
•
Do not wear loose clothing, jewelry, or other items that could get caught in the router while working
with line cards.
•
Cisco equipment operates safely when it is used in accordance with its specifications and product
usage instructions.
•
If you plan to replace a PRP, back up your current configuration file to a remote server or to Flash
memory before you remove the PRP. This prevents you from having to reenter all your current
configuration information manually. To back up the file, copy your configuration file to a Flash disk
or access a remote server.
Preventing Electrostatic Discharge
Electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage, which can occur when electronic cards or components are
improperly handled, results in complete or intermittent failures. Electromagnetic interference (EMI)
shielding is an integral component of the line card. We recommend using an ESD-preventive strap
whenever you are handling network equipment or one of its components.
The following are guidelines for preventing ESD damage:
Warning
18
•
Always use an ESD-preventive wrist or ankle strap and ensure that it makes good skin contact.
Connect the equipment end of the connection cord to an ESD connection socket on the router or to
bare metal on the chassis.
•
Handle PRPs by the captive installation screws, the provided handle, ejector levers, or the line card
metal carrier only; avoid touching the board or connector pins.
•
Place removed PRPs board-side-up on an antistatic surface or in a static shielding bag. If you plan
to return the component to the factory, immediately place it in a static shielding bag.
•
Avoid contact between the PRPs and clothing. The wrist strap protects the board from ESD voltages
on the body only; ESD voltages on clothing can still cause damage.
For safety, periodically check the resistance value of the ESD strap. The measurement should be
between 1 and 10 megohms.
OL-17436-01
Removing and Installing a PRP
Required Tools and Equipment
You need the following tools and parts to remove and install a PRP:
•
Flat-blade or Phillips screwdriver
•
ESD-preventive wrist strap and instructions
•
Antistatic mat, foam pad, or bag for the removed PRP. Place the removed PRP into an antistatic bag
if you plan to return it to the factory, or on an antistatic mat or foam if you are replacing components
and will reinstall the PRP.
Working with Electrical Equipment
Follow these basic guidelines when working with any electrical equipment:
•
Before beginning any procedure requiring access to the chassis interior, locate the emergency
power-off switch for the room in which you are working.
•
Disconnect all power and external cables before moving a chassis.
•
Do not work alone when potentially hazardous conditions exist; never assume that power has been
disconnected from a circuit; always check.
•
Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to people or makes the equipment unsafe.
•
Carefully examine your work area for possible hazards such as moist floors, ungrounded power
extension cables, and missing safety grounds.
Removing and Installing a PRP
The following sections describe the procedures for removing and installing a PRP as well as removing
and installing other field-replaceable hardware on the PRP-2 board. Before beginning the procedures,
verify that your system meets the minimum requirements as described in the “Preparing for Installation”
section on page 17.
OL-17436-01
•
Removing a PRP, page 20
•
Installing a PRP, page 22
Note
The procedures in the following sections use illustrations of a Cisco 12404 Internet Router to support
the descriptions of installing and removing a route processor card. The card cages of Cisco XR 12000
Series Routers differ in many ways. However, the process of installing and removing a route processor
card are basically the same across the entire chassis line. Therefore, separate procedures and illustrations
for each chassis are not included in this publication.
Caution
We recommend that you do not remove a PRP while the system is operating. Doing so causes the system
to stop forwarding packets and might cause the system to cease network operation. If you are upgrading
your router from a GRP to a PRP, you must first power down the router and then switch out the RP cards.
We strongly recommends that you avoid configuring your router using mixed RP cards. If RP
redundancy is desired, you must install two PRPs.
19
Removing and Installing a PRP
Note
You must remove the PRP-2 before you can install or remove the compact flash disk or the hard disk
drive. See the “Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks” section on page 59 for more
information.
Removing a PRP
When you remove a PRP from a slot, be sure to use the ejector levers, which help to ensure that the PRP
is fully dislodged from the backplane connector. A PRP that is only partially removed from the
backplane can halt the system. (See Figure 7.)
Caution
Before you replace the PRP, back up the running configuration to a TFTP server or a Flash disk so that
you can retrieve it later. If the configuration is not saved, it will be lost and you will have to reenter the
entire configuration manually. This procedure is not necessary if you are temporarily removing a PRP;
lithium batteries will retain the configuration in memory until you replace the PRP in the system.
Figure 5 illustrates the PRP installed in a chassis.
Figure 5
CONNECTOR
CLASS 1 LASER
LASERPRODUKT PRODUCT
PRODUIT LASER DER KLASSE 1
DE CLASSE
1
PRODUCTO LASER
DE CLASSE 1
TX
0
1
RX
2
3
T
EC
EJ
ACTIVE
CARRIER
-1
OT
SL
-0
OT
SL
ETH 0
RX PKT
ETH 1
AUX
RX
EN
PRIMARY
RX
TX
K
LIN
EN
PRIMARY
CONSOLE
75040
CLEAN
WITH ALCOHOL
WIPES
BEFORE
CONNECTING
Installed PRP (Cisco 12404 Shown)
40C48/POS
-SR-SC
TX
K
LIN
RE
SE
T
CR
IT
IC MA MI
AL JO NO
R
R
PERFORMAN
CE ROUTE
PROCESSOR
1
(PRP-1)
MBUS
ALARM
FAIL
FABRIC
ENABLE
CONSOLI
2
1
1
20
PRP
DATED
SWITCH
FABRIC
2
2
Ejector Levers
OL-17436-01
Removing and Installing a PRP
Figure 6
CONNECTOR
CLASS 1 LASER
LASERPRODUKT PRODUCT
PRODUIT LASER DER KLASSE 1
DE CLASSE
1
PRODUCTO LASER
DE CLASSE 1
TX
0
1
RX
2
3
ACTIVE
UP
CARRIER
SIG
BITS 0
ACT
ACT
K
LIN
K
DAT
A
LIN
DAT
A
ETH 1
SIG
RX PKT
ETH 0
40C48/POS
-SR-SC
BITS 1
AUX
CR
IT
272389
CLEAN
WITH ALCOHOL
WIPES
BEFORE
CONNECTING
Installed PRP-3 (Cisco 12404 Shown)
RESET
CONSOLE
PERFORMANC
E
IC MA MI
AL JO NO
R
R
RP3
MBUS
ALARM
FAIL
FABRIC
ENABLE
CONSOLI
DATED
2
SWITCH
1
FABRIC
2
Figure 7 shows the ejector levers in detail.
Figure 7
Ejector Lever Detail (Cisco 12404 shown)
a
CLASS 1 LASER
LASERPROD PRODUCT
UKT DER KLASSE
PRODUIT LASER
DE CLASSE 1
1
PRODUCTO LASER
DE CLASSE 1
CLEAN
CONNECTOR
WITH ALCOHOL
WIPES
BEFORE
CONNECTING
b
TX
0
1
RX
2
3
ACTIVE
CARRIER
RX PKT
EC
SL
SL
-1
OT
-0
OT
ETH 0
40C48/POS-
ETH 1
AUX
RX
EN
PRIMARY
LIN
RX
TX
K
EN
PRIMARY
LIN
SR-SC
CONSOLE
TX
K
RE
CR
ITI MA
CA JO MI
NO
L
R
R
SE
T
PERFORMANC
E ROUTE
MBUS
PROCESSOR
1
ALARM
(PRP-1)
FAIL
FABRIC
75039
EJ
T
ENABLE
CONSOLI
DATED
SWITCH
FABRIC
To remove a PRP, follow these steps:
OL-17436-01
Step 1
If you are replacing the PRP in a system with only one PRP, copy the currently running configuration
file to a TFTP server or to a Flash disk so that you can retrieve it later.
Step 2
Turn off system power.
Step 3
Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap and follow its instructions for use.
21
Removing and Installing a PRP
Step 4
If you are replacing a PRP, disconnect any devices that are attached to the Ethernet, console, or auxiliary
ports. If you are removing a PRP for maintenance and will reinstall the same one, you can leave the
devices attached, provided that doing so will not strain the cables.
Step 5
Using a 3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the two captive screws on the ends of the PRP.
Step 6
Place your thumbs on the ends of each of the ejector levers and simultaneously pull them both away from
the PRP faceplate (in the direction shown in Figure 7a) to release the PRP from the upper card cage slot
and to dislodge the PRP edge connector from the backplane.
Step 7
Grasp the PRP faceplate handle with one hand and pull the PRP straight out of the slot, keeping your
other hand under the PRP to guide it. Keep the PRP edge connector parallel to the backplane.
Caution
Step 8
Avoid touching the PRP printed circuit board, components, or any edge connector pins.
Place the removed PRP on an antistatic mat or foam. If you plan to return the PRP to the factory,
immediately place it in an antistatic bag to prevent ESD damage.
Installing a PRP
When you install a PRP, be sure to use the ejector levers, which help to ensure that the PRP is fully
inserted in the backplane connector. (See Figure 7.) When you push the ejector levers simultaneously
inward (toward the center of the PRP), the ejector levers push the PRP into the slot and ensure that the
PRP backplane connector is fully seated in the backplane.
Caution
A PRP that is only partially connected to the backplane can halt the system.
To install a PRP, follow these steps:
Step 1
Turn off system power.
Step 2
Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap and follow its instructions for use.
Step 3
Grasp the PRP faceplate handle with one hand and place your other hand under the carrier to support and
guide it into an upper card cage slot.
Caution
22
Avoid touching the PRP printed circuit board, components, or any edge connector pins.
Step 4
Place the bus-connector edge of the PRP in the appropriate slot and align the notches along the edge of
the carrier with the grooves at the top and bottom of the slot.
Step 5
While keeping the PRP edge connector parallel to the backplane, carefully slide the carrier into the slot
until the PRP faceplate makes contact with the ejector levers, then stop.
Step 6
Using the thumb and forefinger of each hand to pinch each ejector lever, push both ejectors
simultaneously toward the center of the PRP faceplate until they are perpendicular to the PRP faceplate.
(See Figure 7b.)
Step 7
Using a 3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver, tighten the captive screws on the ends of the PRP. The captive
screws prevent the PRP from becoming partially dislodged from the backplane and ensure proper EMI
shielding. (These captive screws must be tightened to meet EMI specifications.)
OL-17436-01
Checking the Installation
Step 8
If you disconnected cables to remove the PRP, or if you are installing a new PRP, reconnect the cables
to the appropriate ports. (See the “Checking the Installation” section on page 23.)
Step 9
Ensure that the console terminal is turned on.
Step 10
Turn on system power.
Step 11
Attach the network end of your RJ-45 cable to your transceiver, switch, hub, repeater, DTE, or other
external equipment. Be sure to use the appropriate strain relief on cable connections.
Checking the Installation
This section assists you in confirming that the PRP is installed successfully and includes the following
sections:
•
PRP Boot Process, page 23
•
Starting the System and Observing Initial Conditions, page 23
•
Verifying Interface Status, page 30
PRP Boot Process
The following sequence describes a typical PRP boot process:
1.
System power is turned on.
2.
MBus module receives +5 VDC and starts executing MBus software.
3.
PRP determines the system configuration by sending a message over the MBus requesting all
installed devices to identify themselves. The return response provides slot number, and card and
component type. The PRP, line cards, and clock scheduler cards (CSCs) are then powered up.
4.
PRP power-on-reset logic delay, which allows power and both local and CSC clocks to stabilize.
5.
After the power-on reset is released, the PRP begins to execute the ROM monitor software.
6.
If the ROM monitor is configured to autoboot, it loads and boots the Cisco IOS software.
or
If the ROM monitor is not configured to autoboot, you must enter the appropriate b command at the
ROM monitor prompt (Rommon>) to boot the Cisco IOS software.
7.
When the Cisco IOS software boots, it polls all other cards in the system and powers them up,
loading their Cisco IOS software as needed.
Starting the System and Observing Initial Conditions
This section describes the initial system startup processes and procedures.
To start your system, follow these steps:
Step 1
OL-17436-01
Turn on each installed power supply by turning its system power switch to the on (|) position.
23
Checking the Installation
For AC-input power supplies, the green AC OK LED should go on. For DC-input power supplies, the
green input OK LED should go on. For both types of power supplies, the output fail LED should be off.
Step 2
Listen for the system blower modules or fan trays in the router; you should immediately hear them
operating. In a noisy environment, place your hand in front of the exhaust vents to verify that the blower
modules are operating.
Step 3
During the PRP boot process, observe the PRP alphanumeric display LEDs, which are located at one end
of the PRP, near the ejector lever. (See Figure 8.)
The 4-digit displays show system messages and displays a sequence similar to that shown in Table 6.
Figure 8
PRP Alphanumeric Display LEDs (Vertical View)
PROCESSOR 1 (PRP-1)
1
70694
2
1
Upper (or left if horizontal) LED Display
Table 6
24
2
Lower (or right if horizontal) LED Display
PRP Alphanumeric Display LED Sequences
LED Display
Description
MROM
nnnn
PRP microcode loads into MBus random-access memory (RAM); where nnnn
is the microcode version. For example, Microcode Version 1.17 displays as
0117.1
RP
RDY
The ROMMON for this PRP is enabled and recognized by the system.
ACTV
RP
Cisco IOS is enabled and this PRP is the active PRP.
STBY
RP
Cisco IOS is enabled and this PRP is in standby mode.
OL-17436-01
Checking the Installation
1. The version of microcode running on your PRP might be different.
PRP-3 ALphanumeric LEDs
The following section discusses the alphanumeric LED messages and the console output displayed in
sequence for a single PRP-3 and for dual PRP-3s. The alphanumeric LED messages help in identifying
the state of the route processor and accordingly troubleshooting the problems faced.
Single PRP-3 Scenario
Table 7 displays the alphanumeric LED messages and the console output when the chassis is powered
on or when the PRP-3 board is inserted into the slot.
Table 7
Single PRP-3 Alphanumeric Display LED—Chassis Is Powered ON or PRP-3 Board Inserted
LED Display
Description or Console Message
02A8/HW
Immediately when the board is powered on.
OK/RIO
OK/CPU
Displays "1.330GHz dual-core MPC8641D Rev 2.1, 532MHz MPXclk".
SENT/RPT
INIT/MEM
Displays "Discovering memory in slot DIMM1 ......................... Found 2GB
DIMM
Discovering memory in slot DIMM2 ......................... Found 2GB DIMM"
TEST/MEM
Displays "Testing low memory ....................................... OK
Loading main ROMMON image ................................ OK
Verifying loaded image ................................... OK
Load succeeded; launching target ......................... OK"
LNCH/RMON
Displays “Cisco ROMMON System Bootstrap, Version 0.16.0 (bld1)
DEVELOPMENT SOFTWARE
Compiled on 08/27/08 at 15:04:49 PDT [BLD-rommon]
Copyright (c) 1994-2008 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
MPC8641D platform with 4 GB of main memory"
RDY/RP
OL-17436-01
DISPLAYS "Loading disk0:c12k-os-mbi-3.8.0.15I/mbiprp-rp.vm (14809672
bytes)... !!!"
25
Checking the Installation
LED Display
Description or Console Message
RUN/IOX
Displays “RP/0/2/CPU0:Sep 10 15:56:29.018: syslogd_helper: [84]:
dsc_event_handler: Got SysMgr dSC
event : 1
RP/0/2/CPU0:Jan 1 00:00:04.809 : mbus-prp3[58]: mbus-prp3:
mbus_platform_init() failed (0x6).
RP/0/2/CPU0:Sep 10 15:56:07.015 : dumper[53]: No HDD Controller found
by process dumper
RP/0/2/CPU0:Sep 10 15:56:21.538 : sysmgr[85]: %OS-SYSMGR-5-NOTICE
: Card is COLD started
RP/0/2/CPU0:Sep 10 15:56:22.622 : dsc[169]: Memory Sanity Check Enabled
RP/0/2/CPU0:Sep 10 15:56:29.007 : dsc[169]:
%PLATFORM-DSC-3-ERR_I_AM_DSC : Setting myself as DSC
RP/0/2/CPU0:Sep 10 15:57:20.071 : sysldr[370]:
%PLATFORM-POWERMGR-3-ROM_ERROR_STATUS :
Unable to get Mbus ROM status from SYSDB. Error ='sysdb' detected the
'warning' condition 'A SysDB client tried to access a nonexistent item or list an
empty directory'
RP/0/2/CPU0:Sep 10 15:57:25.078 : sysldr[370]: %
PLATFORM-SYSLDR-6-INFO : Waiting for startup config to be applied
before booting LCs
Primary Clock is CSC_1 Fabric Clock is Redundant
Bandwidth Mode : Full Bandwidth”
RP/ACTV
When RP is up and running Cisco IOS XR software.
Table 8 displays the alphanumeric LED messages and the console output when the chassis is loaded from
ROMMON.
Table 8
Single PRP-3 Scenario — Chassis loaded from ROMMON
LED Display
Description or Console Message
INIT/NV
Displays the LED message during the initialization of the NVRAM infra code.
OK/RIO
Displays the LED message immediately when the board is powered ON.
OK/CPU
Displays "1.330GHz dual-core MPC8641D Rev 2.1, 532MHz MPXclk".
CONT...
Dual PRP-3 Scenario
If dual PRP-3s are installed and the chassis is powered on or a board is inserted, all the LED messages
are same as for a single PRP-3, except for an LED message ‘1404/MRAM’ that is displayed on the front
panel when the console display is as follows:
Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is
subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph
(c) of the Commercial Computer Software - Restricted
Rights clause at FAR sec. 52.227-19 and subparagraph
26
OL-17436-01
Checking the Installation
(c) (1) (ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer
Software clause at DFARS sec. 252.227-7013.
cisco Systems, Inc.
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, California 95134-1706
Cisco IOS XR Software for the Cisco XR PRP, Version 3.8.0.15I
Copyright (c) 2008 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
RP/0/2/CPU0:Sep 10 16:34:19.351: syslogd_helper: [84]: dsc_event_handler: Got SysMgr dSC
event : 1
Tip
The LED message “I404/MRAM” is displayed between RDY/RP and RUN/IOX alphanumeric
messages.
Table 9 displays the LED alphanumeric messages on a standby PRP-3, if the current active PRP-3 is
reloaded.
Table 9
Dual PRP-3 Scenario
LED Display
Description or Console Message
INIT/NV
Displays the LED message during the initialization of the NVRAM infra code.
02A8/HW
LED message displayed immediately after the board is powered on.
OK/RIO
OK/CPU
Displays "1.330GHz dual-core MPC8641D Rev 2.1, 532MHz MPXclk".
SENT/RPT
INIT/MEM
Displays "Discovering memory in slot DIMM1 ......................... Found 2GB
DIMM
Discovering memory in slot DIMM2 ......................... Found 2GB DIMM"
TEST/MEM
Displays "Testing low memory ....................................... OK
Loading main ROMMON image ................................ OK
Verifying loaded image ................................... OK
Load succeeded; launching target ......................... OK"
LNCH/RMON
Displays “Cisco ROMMON System Bootstrap, Version 0.16.0 (bld1)
DEVELOPMENT SOFTWARE
Compiled on 08/27/08 at 15:04:49 PDT [BLD-rommon]
Copyright (c) 1994-2008 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
MPC8641D platform with 4 GB of main memory"
RDY/RP
or
PWRD
OL-17436-01
DISPLAYS "Loading disk0:c12k-os-mbi-3.8.0.15I/mbiprp-rp.vm (14809672
bytes)... !!!"
Tip
Instead of RDY/RP, sometimes PWRD is displayed in the normal
booting process.
27
Checking the Installation
LED Display
Description or Console Message
RUN/MBI
Displays “Copyright (c) 2008 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
Install (Node Preparation): Install device root is /disk0/
Install (Node Preparation): Using boot device sequence compactflash: from
rommon
Install (Node Preparation): Trying device disk0:
Install (Node Preparation): Checking size of device disk0:
Install (Node Preparation):
OK
Install (Node Preparation): Checking free space on disk0:
Install (Node Preparation):
OK
Install (Node Preparation): Starting package and meta-data sync
Install (Node Preparation): Cleaning packages not in sync list
Install (Node Preparation):
Complete
Install (Node Preparation): Syncing package/meta-data contents:
/disk0/instdb/ldpath
Install (Node Preparation):
Please Wait...
Install (Node Preparation):
Completed syncing: /disk0/instdb/ldpath
Install (Node Preparation): Syncing package/meta-data
contents: /disk0/instdb/ldpath.committed
Install (Node Preparation):
Please Wait...
Install (Node Preparation): Completed syncing:
/disk0/instdb/ldpath.committed
Install (Node Preparation): Completed sync of all packages and meta-data.”
RP/STBY
Step 4
ios con0/2/CPU0 is in standby
During the line card boot process, which occurs immediately after the PRP boots, observe the
alphanumeric display LEDs on each line card.
The system attempts to boot identical line cards in parallel. Furthermore, the system boots line cards as
soon as they are powered on and become available for a system boot. The physical location of the
alphanumeric display LEDs on the line cards is the same as on the PRP, which is shown in Figure 8.
See the appropriate line card installation and configuration note for complete details on line card display
LED sequences.
You must meet the following criteria to successfully boot the PRP:
•
Flash disk is installed in Flash disk slot 0
•
Flash disk contains a valid Cisco IOS software image
•
Software configuration register is set to 0x2102
The system automatically boots this Cisco IOS software image. The system then enters the setup facility,
where you are prompted to perform a basic configuration of the system.
Otherwise, the system enters the ROM monitor and the appropriate prompt appears (Rommon>).
28
OL-17436-01
Checking the Installation
Step 5
Caution
Caution
If the ROM monitor prompt (Rommon>) appears, you must boot the Cisco IOS software image you want
to use by entering the appropriate b command at the ROM monitor prompt:
•
b—Boots the default system software from onboard Flash memory
(if it is present in onboard Flash memory)
•
b filename [host]—Boots the file filename from the server host using TFTP
•
b flash—Boots the first file in the Flash memory card in Flash card slot 0
To prevent system problems, use the b flash command option carefully; otherwise, you might instruct
the system to boot a non-Cisco IOS software image from Flash memory. This command is not used with
Flash disks.
•
b slot0: filename—Boots the file filename from the Flash memory card in Flash card slot 0
•
b slot1: filename—Boots the file filename from the Flash memory card in Flash card slot 1
•
b flash disk0: filename—Boots the file filename from the Flash disk in Flash card slot 0
•
b flash disk1: filename—Boots the file filename from the Flash disk in Flash card slot 1
The b flash disk0: and b flash disk1: commands are only used from the ROM monitor (Rommon>) prompt
if the system fails to load normally. Do not use these commands from the router (Router>) prompt.
While the system boots, the console screen displays a script and system banner similar to the following:
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) GS Software (PRP-P-MZ), Released Version 12.0(22)S
Copyright (c) 1986-2002 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Sat 10-May-02 06:02a
Step 6
Observe the system startup banner. When you start up an unconfigured system for the first time, the
system automatically enters the setup facility, which determines which interfaces are installed and
prompts you for configuration information for each one.
On the console screen, after the system displays the system banner and hardware configuration, the
following System Configuration Dialog prompt appears:
--- System Configuration Dialog --At any point you may enter a question mark '?' for help.
Use ctrl-c to abort configuration dialog at any prompt.
Default settings are in square brackets '[]'.
Continue with configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
Step 7
You can either proceed with the setup facility or exit from setup and use configuration commands to
configure global (system-wide) and interface-specific parameters.
You do not have to configure the interfaces immediately; however, you cannot enable the interfaces or
connect them to any networks until they are configured.
The interface-specific LEDs on line cards might not go on until after you configure the line card
interfaces. To verify correct operation of each interface, complete the first-time setup procedures and
configuration, then refer to the LED descriptions in the configuration notes for each line card to check
the status of the interfaces.
OL-17436-01
29
Checking the Installation
Verifying Interface Status
The status LEDs on the PRP indicate system and PRP status, which Flash disk slot is active, which
Ethernet connection is in use, and what is occurring on the Ethernet interface. This section provides
functional descriptions of the status LEDs on the PRP-2 (Figure 9) and the processes you should
observe.
ETH 1
BITS 0
AC
T
SI
G
AC
T
BITS 1
ETH 2
101108
ETH 0
SI
G
DA
TA
SL SL
OT OT
-0 -1
LIN
K
DA
TA
PRP-2 LEDs (Partial Front Panel View)
LIN
K
Figure 9
The PRP-2 has the following LED indicators:
•
Two Flash disk activity LEDs, one for each Flash disk slot (labeled SLOT-0 and SLOT-1)—Identify
which of the Flash disk slots is accessed.
•
Two Ethernet port LEDs used in conjunction with each of the three RJ-45 Ethernet connectors:
– LINK—Indicates that link activity
– DATA—Indicates that data transmission or reception
•
Two BITS port LEDs used in conjunction with each of the two BITS ports:
– SIG—Indicates carrier signal available
– ACT—Indicates that the interface is active
T
AC
G
T
BITS 0
SI
AC
G
SI
DA
TA
LIN
ETH 1
BITS 1
AUX
CONSOLE
272388
ETH 0
K
PRP-3 LEDs (Partial Front View)
DA
TA
LIN
K
Figure 10
The PRP-3 has the following LED indicators:
•
Two Ethernet port LEDs used in conjunction with each of the three RJ-45 Ethernet connectors:
– LINK—Indicates link activity
– DATA—Indicates data transmission or reception
•
Two BITS port LEDs used in conjunction with each of the two BITS ports:
– SIG—Indicates carrier signal available
– ACT—Indicates that the interface is active
30
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Note
The BITS feature is not supported in Release 3.8.0.
•
One auxiliary port (AUX) and one console port (CONSOLE) LED:
– AUX—Used as a backup for the command outputs on the console.
– CONSOLE—Used for configuring the router by connecting an RJ-45 cable to the console
terminal. The router can be configured through the console terminal.
Upgrading to the PRP
This section details how to upgrade from the GRP to the PRP. The procedures described are the same
whether you are upgrading to a PRP-1 or PRP-2.
•
Upgrading to the PRP Without Rebooting the Router, page 31
•
Upgrading to the PRP With Rebooting the Router, page 36
•
Differentiating Between PRP-1 and PRP-2, page 38
•
Upgrading from PRP-1 OR PRP-2 to PRP-3, page 38
Upgrading to the PRP Without Rebooting the Router
To upgrade to the PRP from the GRP without interruption of service, you must have support for High
Availability in your router. This means that two GRPs must be installed in the router and the redundancy
must be set to either SSO or RPR+ mode. To configure the redundancy, use the redundancy command
in global configuration mode. To view the redundancy configuration on the RPs, use the show
redundancy command.
To upgrade to the PRP using High Availability, use the following procedure:
Step 1
Verify that there are two GRPs in the router, both running the same Cisco IOS version, and that the router
is configured for SSO or RPR+ redundancy. The show redundancy command indicates the redundancy
mode as well as the Cisco IOS version running on the GRPs. Take note of the Cisco IOS version running
on the GRPs (12.0(26)S in this example).
Router# show redundancy
Redundant System Information :
-----------------------------Available system uptime
Switchovers system experienced
Standby failures
Last switchover reason
=
=
=
=
1 day, 47 minutes
0
0
none
Hardware Mode
Configured Redundancy Mode
Operating Redundancy Mode
Maintenance Mode
Communications
=
=
=
=
=
Duplex
SSO
SSO
Disabled
Up
Current Processor Information :
------------------------------Active Location = slot 3
Current Software state = ACTIVE
Uptime in current state = 1 day, 47 minutes
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31
Upgrading to the PRP
Image Version = Cisco Internetwork Operating System
Software
IOS (tm) GS Software (GSR-P-M), Version 12.0(26)S, EARLY DEPLOYMENT
RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1)
TAC Support: http://www.cisco.com/tac
Copyright (c) 1986-2003 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Mon 25-Aug-03 10:44 by nmasa
BOOT =
CONFIG_FILE =
BOOTLDR =
Configuration register = 0x2102
Peer Processor Information :
---------------------------Standby Location = slot 4
Current Software state = STANDBY HOT
Uptime in current state = 2 hours, 13 minutes
Image Version = Cisco Internetwork Operating System
Software
IOS (tm) GS Software (GSR-P-M), Version 12.0(26)S, EARLY DEPLOYMENT
RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1)
TAC Support: http://www.cisco.com/tac
Copyright (c) 1986-2003 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Mon 25-Aug-03 10:44 by nmasa
BOOT =
CONFIG_FILE =
BOOTLDR =
Configuration register = 0x2102
Step 2
Remove the Flash disk from the PRP card and install it into slot 1 of the active RP. The following
message will be displayed; do not format the disk.
22:21:31: %PCMCIAFS-5-DIBERR: PCMCIA disk 1 is formatted from a different router or PC. A
format in this router is required before an image can be booted from this device
If your router is running an image prior to Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)S2, you are advised to
insert the Flash disk into slot 1 of the standby RP, and not the active RP.
Note
Step 3
Verify the disk contents using the dir disk1: command (or the dir stby-disk1: command if the Flash
disk is in the standby RP).
Router# dir disk1:
Directory of disk1:/
1
-rw-
17329392
Dec 3 2003 11:44:46 +00:00
c12kprp-p-mz.120-27.S
63832064 bytes total (46465024 bytes free)
Step 4
If the Cisco IOS version is not the same as the one running on the GRPs, delete the image from the disk
using the delete disk1: filename command (or the delete stby-disk1:filename command if the Flash disk
is in the standby RP). If the image is correct, continue with Step 7.
Note
32
Before you delete the image, verify that you have a copy of this image on another disk or at
another location.
OL-17436-01
Upgrading to the PRP
Step 5
Use the copy tftp: disk1: command to copy onto the Flash disk a PRP image that is the same as that
currently running on the GRPs (in this example, 12.0(26)S). PRP images are titled c12kprp-<feature
set>-<compression>.120-<release id>. You will receive an error that the PRP image is not executable on
the GRP. When prompted to abort the copy, type n.
Use the copy tftp: stby-disk1: command if the Flash disk is in the standby RP.
Router# copy tftp: disk1:
Address or name of remote host [172.16.16.254]?
Source filename [c12kprp-boot-mz.120-26.S]? c12kprp-p-mz.120-26.S
Destination filename [c12kprp-p-mz.120-26.S]?
Accessing tftp://172.16.16.254/c12kprp-p-mz.120-26.S...
%Warning: File not a valid executable for this system
Abort Copy? [confirm] n
Step 6
To verify that the image has been copied correctly, verify the MD5 hash for the new image on disk1:. To
do this, use the command verify /md5 disk1image-name. The resulting string should be compared
against the MD5 hash value posted on the Software download page on Cisco.com.
Step 7
Place the Flash disk referred to in Step 5 back into the PRP Flash disk drive.
Step 8
Repeat Step 2 through Step 7 for the second PRP to be installed as standby.
Step 9
Remove any existing boot system commands from the running configuration by using the command no
boot system. This will make the PRP boot from the image on the Flash disk.
Step 10
Remove the standby GRP from the router.
Step 11
Insert the PRP into the router in place of the standby GRP. The PRP will now begin to load the Cisco IOS
image contained on the Flash disk. At this stage, even though a GRP and a PRP are in the chassis
simultaneously, the router remains in SSO or RPR+ mode because the RPs are running the same image.
Note
The PRP and GRP must both be running the same Cisco IOS version; otherwise, the redundancy
will revert to RPR mode and there may be traffic disruption.
Step 12
Remove the active GRP. Because the router is configured for High Availability (SSO or RPR+ mode),
the switchover to the PRP will take advantage of the High Availability feature and there will be minimum
disruption in operation.
Step 13
Insert the standby PRP into the chassis, also with the same Cisco IOS image loaded onto its Flash disk.
Now both PRPs will be up and running the same image that was originally running on the GRPs. At this
point you can upgrade the Cisco IOS version on the PRPs to the version shipped with the cards.
Note
Note
You must have the same Cisco IOS image loaded on the Flash disks of the two PRPs. If different
versions are loaded, the redundancy will revert to RPR and there may be traffic disruption.
If a GRP and PRP are running simultaneously in the router chassis and the PRP is active and the GRP
standby, the router will revert to RPR redundancy mode. This is because the upgrade from GRP to PRP
is supported with High Availability, but not the downgrade from PRP to GRP.
After you enter the configuration to load the new Cisco IOS software image, you must upgrade the RP
ROM monitor. Follow the appropriate procedure, depending on which version of Cisco IOS software is
currently running on the RP.
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33
Upgrading to the PRP
Note
•
Upgrading the RP ROM Monitor Using Cisco IOS Release 12.0(24)S or Later, page 34
•
Upgrading the RP ROM Monitor Prior to Cisco IOS Release 12.0(24)S, page 35
The PRP-2 does not require an RP ROM monitor upgrade before Cisco IOS Software Release 12.0(30)S.
If you attempt this upgrade on a PRP-2 using a prior software release, you will receive the following
error message:
Error: Unknown Flash Device type!
GRP ROM monitor upgrade won't continue
Upgrading the RP ROM Monitor Using Cisco IOS Release 12.0(24)S or Later
New functionality was introduced in Cisco IOS Software Release 12.0(24)S that enables the secondary
RP to have its ROM monitor image upgraded while in standby mode, and does not require a reboot of
the router. In order for this to work, the router must already be running Cisco IOS Software Release
12.0(24)S or later.
In the following procedure, RP1 is initially the active RP and RP2 is the standby RP.
Step 1
After you enter the configuration to load the new Cisco IOS software image, reload the standby PRP
(RP2) using the hw-module standby reload command.
Step 2
Once the standby RP (RP2) is available again, use the upgrade rom-monitor slot sec-rp-slot command.
If the routine finds that an upgrade is necessary, the new code will begin to be loaded. When this
command is completed, reload the RP2 using the hw-module standby reload command.
Step 3
Switch over from the active PRP (RP1) to the standby PRP (RP2) using the redundancy
force-switchover command. Once RP2 becomes active, the line cards will be reloaded.
Step 4
Let the router return to full operation with Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) and Exterior Gateway
Protocol (EGP) peers established (this may take a considerable amount of time, depending on the size
and complexity of the router configuration).
Step 5
Check the line card CPU utilization using the execute-on all show proc cpu | inc CPU command. If the
CPU utilization has stabilized at the normal running level, proceed with the next step; otherwise, wait
another five minutes and check again.
Step 6
Upgrade the Mbus-agent-rom using the upgrade mbus-agent-rom all command. Normal forwarding
operation of the line cards will not be affected during the upgrade. The line cards do not need to be
reloaded. If any error messages are displayed (see following example), repeat this step before contacting
Cisco TAC.
MBus agent ROM upgrade failed on slot 7 (rc=5)
MBus agent ROM upgrade failed on slot 8 (rc=6)
Step 7
Use the show version command. If there is an error message at the bottom of the output indicating that
a Fabric-downloader code upgrade is required, use the upgrade fabric-downloader all command.
Normal forwarding operation of the line cards will not be affected during the upgrade. The line cards do
not need to be reloaded. If any error messages are displayed (see following example), repeat this step
before contacting Cisco TAC.
Fabric-downloader upgrade failed on slot 7 (rc=5)
Fabric-downloader upgrade failed on slot 8 (rc=6)
34
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Upgrading to the PRP
Step 8
Upgrade the ROM monitor image in RP1 using the upgrade rom-monitor slot sec-rp-slot command. If
the routine finds that an upgrade is necessary, the new code will begin to be loaded. Once complete,
reload the standby RP using the hw-module standby reload command.
Upgrading the RP ROM Monitor Prior to Cisco IOS Release 12.0(24)S
If your RPs are running a software image prior to Cisco IOS Release 12.0(24)S, you must use the
following procedure to upgrade the RP ROM monitor, which requires a reboot of the router.
In the following procedure, RP1 is initially the active RP and RP2 is the standby RP.
Step 1
After you enter the configuration to load the new Cisco IOS software image, reload the standby PRP
(RP2) using the hw-module standby reload command.
Step 2
Switch over from the active PRP (RP1) to the standby PRP (RP2) using the redundancy
force-switchover command. Once RP2 becomes active, the line cards will be reloaded.
Step 3
As soon as the “Press RETURN to get started!” message appears on the console, enter enable mode and
use the upgrade rom-monitor slot rp-slot command. If the routine finds that an upgrade is necessary,
the new code will begin to be loaded. The router will reload once the ROM monitor upgrade has
completed.
Step 4
RP1 will now be active. As soon as the “Press RETURN to get started!” message appears on the console,
enter enable mode and use the upgrade rom-monitor slot rp-slot command. If the routine finds that an
upgrade is necessary, the new code will begin to be loaded. The router will reload once the ROM monitor
upgrade has completed.
Step 5
RP2 will be primary now. Let the router return to full operation with IGP and EGP peers established (this
may take a considerable amount of time, depending on the size and complexity of the router
configuration).
Step 6
Check the line card CPU utilization using the execute-on all show proc cpu | inc CPU command. If the
CPU utilization has stabilized at the normal running level, proceed with the next step; otherwise, wait
another five minutes and check again.
Step 7
Upgrade the Mbus-agent-rom using the upgrade mbus-agent-rom all command. Normal forwarding
operation of the line cards will not be affected during the upgrade. The line cards do not need to be
reloaded. If any error messages are displayed (see following example), repeat this step before contacting
Cisco TAC.
MBus agent ROM upgrade failed on slot 7 (rc=5)
MBus agent ROM upgrade failed on slot 8 (rc=6)
Step 8
Use the show version command. If there is an error message at the bottom of the output indicating that
a Fabric-downloader code upgrade is required, use the upgrade fabric-downloader all command.
Normal forwarding operation of the line cards will not be affected during the upgrade. The line cards do
not need to be reloaded. If any error messages are displayed (see following example), repeat this step
before contacting Cisco TAC.
Fabric-downloader upgrade failed on slot 7 (rc=5)
Fabric-downloader upgrade failed on slot 8 (rc=6)
OL-17436-01
35
Upgrading to the PRP
Upgrading to the PRP With Rebooting the Router
If for any reason you cannot use High Availability, you should use the following procedure to upgrade
from a GRP to a PRP.
Step 1
Remove the Flash disk from the PRP card and install it into slot 1 of the active GRP. The following
message will be displayed; do not format the disk.
22:21:31: %PCMCIAFS-5-DIBERR: PCMCIA disk 1 is formatted from a different router or PC. A
format in this router is required before an image can be booted from this device
Step 2
Verify the disk contents using the dir disk1: command.
Router# dir disk1:
Directory of disk1:/
1
-rw-
17329392
Dec 3 2003 11:44:46 +00:00
c12kprp-p-mz.120-27.S
63832064 bytes total (46465024 bytes free)
Step 3
If the Cisco IOS version is not the one you need, delete the image from the disk using the delete disk1:
filename command. If the image is correct, continue with Step 6.
Step 4
Use the copy tftp: disk1: command to copy onto the Flash disk the appropriate PRP image. PRP images
are titled c12kprp-<feature set>-<compression>.120-<release id>. You will receive an error that the PRP
image is not executable on the GRP. When prompted to abort the copy, type n.
Router# copy tftp: disk1:
Address or name of remote host [172.16.16.254]?
Source filename [c12kprp-boot-mz.120-26.4.S]? c12kprp-p-mz.120-26.4.S
Destination filename [c12kprp-p-mz.120-26.4.S]?
Accessing tftp://172.16.16.254/c12kprp-p-mz.120-26.4.S...
%Warning: File not a valid executable for this system
Abort Copy? [confirm] n
Step 5
To verify that the image has been copied correctly, verify the MD5 hash for the new image on disk1:. To
do this, use the command verify /md5 disk1image-name. The resulting string should be compared
against the MD5 hash value posted on the Software download page on Cisco.com.
Step 6
Remove any existing boot system commands from the running configuration by using the command no
boot system.
Step 7
Make a note of the image name that is being used on the PRP. You can use the command dir disk1:.
Step 8
Set the boot system command to boot the new IOS image. Note that the reference will be against disk0:.
This is deliberate. Use the command boot system flash disk0: PRP-image-name.
Step 9
Save the running configuration to disk1: by using the command copy running-config disk1:
config-name. You can check the configuration by using the command more disk1: config-name.
Note
36
Do not save the configuration on the GRP. In other words, do not type copy running-config
startup-config or write memory. Not saving the configuration ensures that the GRP maintains
its original configuration, which will enable you to reinstall the GRP in the future if necessary.
Step 10
Confirm that disk1 now contains the IOS image and configuration by using the command dir disk1:.
The Cisco IOS image needs to be the first image on the disk.
Step 11
Turn off the router.
Step 12
Remove the GRP and insert the PRP in its place.
OL-17436-01
Upgrading to the PRP
Step 13
Connect the Ethernet and console cables to the PRP.
Step 14
Remove the Flash disk from slot1: on the GRP and insert the Flash disk into slot0: on the PRP.
Step 15
Boot the router.
Step 16
The router will come up with no configuration and prompt you to enter the Initial Configuration menu.
Abort the Initial Configuration options by entering no when prompted.
Step 17
Copy the configuration file which is stored on disk0: to the startup-configuration on the PRP by using
the command copy disk0: config-name startup-config.
Note
Step 18
Do not copy the configuration file to the running configuration.
Upgrade the Mbus-agent-rom by using the command upgrade mbus-agent-rom all. Line cards do not
need to be reloaded. If any error messages are displayed (see following example), repeat this step before
contacting Cisco TAC.
MBus agent ROM upgrade failed on slot 7 (rc=5)
MBus agent ROM upgrade failed on slot 8 (rc=6)
Step 19
Upgrade the fabric downloader by using the command upgrade fabric-downloader all. The line cards
do not need to be reloaded. If any error messages are displayed (see following example), repeat this step
before contacting Cisco TAC.
Fabric-downloader upgrade failed on slot 7 (rc=5)
Fabric-downloader upgrade failed on slot 8 (rc=6)
Step 20
Make a note of which slot the PRP is installed in the chassis. You can use the show gsr command to view
this information. In the following example, the RP is located in slot 3.
Router# show gsr
Slot 0 type = 3 Port Gigabit Ethernet
state = IOS RUN
Line Card Enabled
Slot 3 type = Route Processor
state = ACTV RP
IOS Running ACTIVE
Slot 17 type = Clock Scheduler Card(6) OC-192
state = Card Powered PRIMARY CLOCK
Slot 18 type = Switch Fabric Card(6) OC-192
state = Card Powered
Slot 19 type = Switch Fabric Card(6) OC-192
state = Card Powered
Slot 20 type = Switch Fabric Card(6) OC-192
state = Card Powered
Slot 24 type = Alarm Module(6)
state = Card Powered
Slot 25 type = Alarm Module(6)
state = Card Powered
Slot 28 type = Blower Module(6)
state = Card Powered
Step 21
Use the command upgrade rom-monitor slot rp-slot.
Step 22
If the routine finds that an upgrade is necessary, the new code will be loaded. The router will reload once
the rom-monitor upgrade has completed, without saving the running configuration.
If the rom-monitor upgrade was not required, you must now reload the router. If you are prompted to
save the system configuration, answer no.
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: no
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37
Upgrading to the PRP
Step 23
The router will now boot with the correct configuration as was previously running on the GRP. Perform
any post-boot checks: verify that the line cards have booted, required interfaces are active, CEF is
operational, IGP adjacencies have formed, and the BGP peerings are established.
Differentiating Between PRP-1 and PRP-2
You can use the software to determine whether you have installed a PRP-1 or a PRP-2. Use the command
show diags prp-slot-number and examine the value in the HW config field. If the value is 0x10, the card
is a PRP-2; if the value is 0x00, the card is a PRP-1. The following example is of a PRP-2 (Note bold
text in output.):
Router# show diags 5
SLOT 5 (RP/LC 5 ): Performance Route Processor
MAIN: type 96, 800-23469-01 rev ;7
Deviation: 0
HW config: 0x10
SW key: 00-00-00
PCA: 73-8812-02 rev 80 ver 2
Design Release 0.0 S/N SAD0734045M
MBUS: Embedded Agent
Test hist: 0x00
RMA#: 00-00-00
RMA hist: 0x00
DIAG: Test count: 0x00000000
Test results: 0x00000000
FRU: Linecard/Module: FRU number not known
Route Memory: MEM-PRP/LC-1024=
MBUS Agent Software version 01.50 (RAM) (ROM version is 02.20)
ROM Monitor version 17302099
Primary clock is CSC 1 Board is analyzed
Board State is IOS Running (ACTV RP )
Insertion time: 00:00:00 (00:31:03 ago)
DRAM size: 1073741824 bytes
Note
Field diagnostics cannot be run on the PRP-2 unless you are using software release 12.0(30)S or higher.
Note
The show version command may display incorrect information for the PRP-2 card in software releases
prior to Cisco IOS Software Release 12.0(30)S.
Upgrading from PRP-1 OR PRP-2 to PRP-3
The upgrade procedure from PRP-1 or PRP-2 to PRP-3 involves two scenarios. The following section
discusses the upgrade procedure, based on whether Cisco IOS or Cisco IOS XR software is installed on
PRP-1 or PRP-2.
•
Upgrading PRP-1 or PRP-2 with Cisco IOS XR to PRP-3
•
Upgrading GRP or PRP-1 or PRP-2 with Cisco IOS Software to PRP-3
Upgrading PRP-1 or PRP-2 with Cisco IOS XR to PRP-3
There are two approaches for upgrading PRP-1 or PRP-2 with Cisco IOS XR software to PRP-3:
38
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Upgrading to the PRP
•
Turboboot Approach
•
Pre-Staging Approach
Turboboot Approach
You can upgrade PRP-1 or PRP-2 with Cisco IOS XR software installed to PRP-3 using route processor
failover (RPFO). RPFO helps to minimize downtime and ensures service availability. To support RPFO
the PRP-1 or PRP-2 must have Cisco IO S XR Software Release 3.8.0 or a later release, which supports
PRP-3. To upgrade PRP-1 or PRP-2 with Cisco IOS XR software to PRP-3 execute the following steps:
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Step 1
Remove the standby PRP-1 or PRP-2.
Step 2
Insert PRP-3 in the slot where standby PRP-2 has been removed.
Step 3
Turboboot PRP-3 with the Cisco IOS XR Software Release 3.8.0 or a later MBI (minimum boot image).
Step 4
After the standby PRP-3 is ready, perform a route processor fail over (RPFO) from PRP-1 or PRP-2 to
PRP-3.
Step 5
Double check if the configuration is correct and traffic resumes.
Step 6
Remove the standby PRP-1 or PRP-2 from the chassis after PRP-3 becomes an active RP.
Step 7
Insert the secondary PRP-3 board in the chassis.
Step 8
Turboboot and make the PRP-3 the new standby RP.
39
Upgrading to the PRP
Pre-Staging Approach
In a pre-staging approach the PRP-3 is loaded with the necessary Cisco IOS XR Software Release 3.8.0
software image, optional PIEs, and SMUs in a standalone chassis. After PRP-3 is in working condition,
insert into PRP-2 chassis. To upgrade PRP-1 or PRP-2 with Cisco IOS XR software to PRP-3, perform
the following steps:
Step 1
Turboboot PRP-3 in a standalone chassis.
Step 2
Install the necessary PIEs, SMUs on the PRP-3.
Step 3
Remove the standby PRP-2 from the working Cisco XR 12000 Series Router.
Step 4
Insert the PRP-3 in the slot from where the standby PRP-2 has been removed. PRP-3 will become the
standby RP.
Step 5
Perform RP fail over from PRP-2 to PRP-3 after the RPs are synchronized. The PRP-3 becomes the
active RP.
Step 6
Confirm all the configurations are correct and traffic resumes.
Step 7
Remove the standby PRP-2.
Step 8
Insert another PRP-3 to form RP redundancy.
Upgrading GRP or PRP-1 or PRP-2 with Cisco IOS Software to PRP-3
This section discusses upgrading GRP or PRP-1 or PRP-2 with Cisco IOS software installed to PRP-3.
There are two approaches for upgrading PRP-1 or PRP-2 with Cisco IOS software to PRP-3:
Caution
•
Turboboot Approach
•
Pre-Staging Approach
The upgrade procedure from Cisco IOS software to Cisco IOS XR software causes service interruption,
because the route processor switchover is not supported while upgrading from Cisco IOS software to
Cisco IOS XR software.
Turboboot Approach
The upgrade procedure for GRP or PRP-1 or PRP-2 with Cisco IOS software installed to PRP-3 is same
as the basic PRP-3 turboboot upgrade procedure.
Caution
The turboboot process causes system downtime.
To upgrade PRP-1 or PRP-2 with Cisco IOS software to PRP-3 execute the following steps:
40
Step 1
Save the Cisco IOS Software configuration to a secured local computer.
Step 2
Convert the Cisco IOS Software configuration to Cisco IOS XR software configuration using the URL
http://sox.ecsforge.cisco.com/twiki/prod/bin/view/Sox/SoxTryOut
Step 3
Verify that the converted Cisco IOS XR software configuration has been successfully converted.
Step 4
Remove all the PRP-2 from the Cisco XR 12000 Series Router chassis.
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Configuring Interfaces on the PRP
Step 5
Insert the PRP-3 into the Cisco XR 12000 Series Router chassis.
Step 6
Turboboot the PRP-3 as indicated in section Turboboot Approach, page 39.
Step 7
After PRP-3 finishes loading Cisco IOS XR Software image, load the converted Cisco IOS XR Software
configuration.
Step 8
Verify that all configurations are properly configured on PRP-3 and if the traffic has resumed.
Pre-Staging Approach
To upgrade PRP-1 or PRP-2 with Cisco IOS Software to PRP-3 execute the following steps:
Step 1
Save the Cisco IOS software configuration to a local computer.
Step 2
Convert the Cisco IOS software configuration to Cisco IOS XR software configuration using the web
tool http://sox.ecsforge.cisco.com/twiki/prod/bin/view/Sox/SoxTryOut
Step 3
Double check the converted Cisco IOS XR software configuration and any missing configurations.
Modify the interface configuration to be pre-configured.
Step 4
Insert PRP-3 into a standalone Cisco XR 12000 Series Router chassis.
Step 5
Turboboot PRP-3 as indicated in section Turboboot Approach, page 39.
Step 6
Load the converted Cisco IOS XR software pre-configuration on PRP-3.
Step 7
Remove the PRP-2 from the working chassis and insert the PRP-3.
Step 8
PRP-3 loads the Cisco IOS XR software image, recognizes LCs in the chassis, and loads the
pre-configuration.
Step 9
Verify that all configurations are properly configured on PRP-3 and the traffic has been resumed.
Configuring Interfaces on the PRP
This section includes configuration and connection information for the Ethernet, console, and auxiliary
interfaces on the PRP, and includes the following sections:
•
Configuring an Ethernet Interface, page 41
•
Configuring the Console Interface, page 46
•
Configuring the Auxiliary Interface, page 48
Configuring an Ethernet Interface
PRP Ethernet interface connection and configuration information is presented in the following sections:
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•
Ethernet Interface Receptacles, Cables, and Pinouts, page 42
•
Ethernet Interface Cable Connection Procedure, page 44
•
Configuring the Ethernet Interfaces, page 45
41
Configuring Interfaces on the PRP
Ethernet Interface Receptacles, Cables, and Pinouts
There are two RJ-45 Ethernet interface receptacles on the PRP and one RJ-45 Gigabit Ethernet interface
receptacle on the PRP-2, providing media-dependent interface (MDI) Ethernet ports. These connections
support IEEE 802.3 and IEEE 802.3u interfaces compliant with 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX standards.
The transmission speed of the Ethernet ports is auto-sensing by default and is user configurable.
Figure 11 shows a PRP RJ-45 receptacle and cable connectors. The RJ-45 connection does not require
an external transceiver. The RJ-45 connection requires Category 5 unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cables,
which are not available from Cisco Systems, but are available from commercial cable vendors. Table 10
lists the pinout for the RJ-45 receptacle.
Figure 11
RJ-45 Receptacle and Plug (Horizontal Orientation)
1
1
Warning
75043
87654321
2
2
RJ-45 receptacle
Category 5 UTP cable with plug
The ports labeled Ethernet, 10BASE-T, Token Ring, Console, and AUX are safety extra-low voltage
(SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits. Because the BRI
circuits are treated like telephone-network voltage, avoid connecting the SELV circuit to the
telephone network voltage (TNV) circuits.
Table 10
RJ-45 Receptacle Pinout
Ethernet Port Pin
Signal
Description
1
TxD+
Transmit data +
2
TxD–
Transmit data –
3
RxD+
Receive data +
4
Termination Network
No connection
5
Termination Network
No connection
6
RxD–
Receive data –
7
Termination Network
No connection
8
Termination Network
No connection
Depending on your RJ-45 cabling requirements, use the cable pinouts shown in Figure 12 or Figure 13.
42
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Configuring Interfaces on the PRP
Straight-Through Cable Pinout (Connecting MDI Ethernet Port to MDI-X Wiring)
MDI wiring
MDI-X wiring
1 TxD+
1 RxD+
2 TxD–
2 RxD–
3 RxD+
3 TxD+
6 RxD–
6 TxD–
Crossover Cable Pinout (for Connecting Two PRPs)
PRP
PRP
1 TxD+
1 TxD+
2 TxD–
2 TxD–
3 RxD+
3 RxD+
6 RxD–
6 RxD–
75431
Figure 13
H11007
Figure 12
Table 11 lists the cabling specifications for 100-Mbps transmission over unshielded twisted-pair (UTP)
cables.
Note
The transmission speed of the Ethernet ports is auto-sensing by default and is user configurable.
Table 11
Specifications and Connection Limits for 100-Mbps Transmission
Parameter
RJ-45
Cable specification
Category 51 UTP, 22 to 24 AWG2
Cable length (max)
—
Segment length (max)
328 feet (100 m) for 100BASE-TX
Network length (max)
656 feet (200 m)3 (with one repeater)
1. EIA/TIA-568 or EIA-TIA-568 TSB-36 compliant. Not supplied by Cisco.
2. AWG = American Wire Gauge. This gauge is specified by the EIA/TIA-568 standard.
3. This length is specifically between any two stations on a repeated segment.
Table 12 lists IEEE 802.3u physical characteristics for 100BASE-TX.
Table 12
IEEE 802.3u Physical Characteristics
Parameter
100BASE-TX
Data rate (Mbps)
100
Signaling method
Baseband
Maximum segment length
100 m between DTE1 and repeaters
Media
Category 5 UTP (for RJ-45)
Topology
Star/Hub
1. DTE = data terminal equipment.
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Configuring Interfaces on the PRP
Ethernet Interface Cable Connection Procedure
The RJ-45 receptacles on the PRP-1 provide two physical connection options for Ethernet interfaces and
three physical connections on the PRP-2. RJ-45 cables are not available from Cisco Systems; they are
available from commercial cable vendors. To connect cables to the PRP Ethernet interfaces (ports
labeled ETH0, ETH1 and ETH2; see Figure 9), attach the Category 5 UTP cable directly to an RJ-45
receptacle on the PRP.
The Ethernet interfaces on the PRP are end-station devices, not repeaters; therefore, you must connect
an Ethernet interface to a repeater or hub.
Note
Caution
Only connect cables that comply with EIA/TIA-568 standards. (See Table 11 and Table 12 for cable
recommendations and specifications.)
The Ethernet ports are used primarily as Telnet ports into the Cisco XR 12000 Series Router and for
booting or accessing Cisco IOS software images over a network to which an Ethernet port is directly
connected. Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) functions are switched off by default for security reasons.
We strongly caution you to consider the security implications of switching on CEF routing functions on
these ports.
Figure 14 shows an example of the functionality of an Ethernet port. In this example, you cannot access
Network 2.0.0.0 via the Ethernet port (ETH0) on the PRP in Router A; you can only access the hosts and
Router C, which are in Network 1.0.0.0. (See dotted arrows in Figure 14.)
To access Network 2.0.0.0 from Router A, you must use an interface port on one of your line cards (in
this example, a Packet-over-SONET [POS] line card in Router A) to go through Router B, through
Router C, and into Network 2.0.0.0. (See solid arrows in Figure 14.)
Figure 14
Using the Ethernet Port on the PRP
Network 1.0.0.0
Router A
(Cisco 12000 series)
Host A
EO
POS
Host B
Network 2.0.0.0
EO
Router B
(Cisco 7500 series)
Router C
(Cisco 7500 series)
44
S6755
Host A
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Configuring Interfaces on the PRP
Configuring the Ethernet Interfaces
The IEEE 802.3 Ethernet interfaces, located on the PRP, allow connections to external Ethernet networks
and are capable of data transmission rates of 10 Mbps and 100 Mbps. The transmission speed of the
Ethernet ports is auto-sensing by default and is user configurable.
Caution
An Ethernet port is used primarily as a Telnet port into the Cisco XR 12000 Series Router or for booting
or accessing Cisco IOS software images over a network to which an Ethernet port is directly connected.
Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) functions are switched off by default for security reasons. Cisco
strongly cautions you to consider the security implications of switching on CEF routing functions on
these ports.
The following sections provide two methods for configuring the Ethernet interface:
•
Using Configuration Mode to Configure an Ethernet Interface
•
Using the Setup Command Facility to Configure an Ethernet Interface
Using Configuration Mode to Configure an Ethernet Interface
To perform a basic configuration of an Ethernet interface in configuration mode, follow these steps:
Step 1
At the privileged-level prompt, enter configuration mode and specify that the console terminal is the
source of the configuration subcommands as follows:
Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#
Step 2
At the configuration mode prompt, specify the Ethernet interface by entering the sub command
interface, followed by the type (ethernet) and port (0) as follows:
Router(config)# interface ethernet 0
Router(config-if)#
Step 3
If IP routing is enabled on the system, you can assign an IP address and subnet mask to the interface with
the ip address configuration sub command, as in the following example:
Router(config-int)# ip address 1.1.1.10 255.255.255.0
Step 4
Add any additional configuration subcommands required to enable or disable routing protocols (such as
the no ip mroute-cache command) and to set other interface characteristics.
Step 5
Change the shutdown state to Up and enable the Ethernet interface as follows:
Router(config-int)# no shutdown
Step 6
After you include all the configuration subcommands necessary to complete the configuration, press
Ctrl-Z to exit configuration mode.
Step 7
Write the new configuration to nonvolatile memory as follows:
Router# write memory
[OK]
Router#
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Configuring Interfaces on the PRP
Using the Setup Command Facility to Configure an Ethernet Interface
In the following example of an Ethernet configuration using the setup command facility, the Ethernet
interface is configured using IP and Connectionless Network Service (CLNS). In this example, you
should use IP, CLNS, and the default RJ-45 Ethernet connection.
Enter the setup facility using the setup command and respond to prompts as appropriate for your needs,
using your own address and mask for the setup prompts.
(Additional displayed text omitted from this example.)
Configuring interface Ethernet0:
Is this interface in use?: yes
Configure IP on this interface?: yes
IP address for this interface: 3.3.1.1
Number of bits in subnet field: 8
Class A network is 3.0.0.0, 8 subnet bits; mask is 255.255.0.0
Configure CLNS on this interface?: yes
Configuring the Console Interface
The system console port on the PRP is a DCE RJ-45 receptacle for connecting a data terminal, which
you must configure. The console port is labeled Console, as shown in Figure 15. Before connecting the
console port, check the documentation for your terminal to determine the baud rate of the terminal you
plan to use.
The baud rate of the terminal must match the default baud rate (9600 baud). Set up the terminal as
follows: 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, and 2 stop bits (9600, 8N2). The console port requires a
straight-through RJ-45 cable.
46
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Configuring Interfaces on the PRP
Figure 15
Console and Auxiliary Port Connections
K
EN
LIN
ETH 0
PRIMARY
-1
OT
SL 0
OT
SL
1
K
EN
LIN
ETH 1
PRIMARY
RX
TX
3
RX
AUX
CONSOLE
5
70692
TX
4
2
Note
1
Modem
4
Auxiliary port
2
Console terminal
5
Console port
3
RJ-45 Ethernet cables
—
The console and auxiliary ports are both asynchronous serial ports; any devices connected to these ports
must be capable of asynchronous transmission. (Asynchronous is the most common type of serial device;
for example, most modems are asynchronous devices.)
The console port on the PRP is a DCE RJ-45 receptacle. Table 13 lists the pinout for this port.
Table 13
Console Port Pinout
Console Port Pin
Signal
Input/Output
Description
—
—
—
2
DTR
Output
Data Terminal Ready
3
TxD
Output
Transmit Data
4
GND
—
Signal Ground
5
GND
—
Signal Ground
6
RxD
Input
Receive Data
DSR
Input
Data Set Ready
—
—
—
1
1
7
8
1
1. These pins are connected to each other.
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Configuring Interfaces on the PRP-3
Configuring the Auxiliary Interface
The auxiliary port on the PRP is a DTE, RJ-45 plug for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such
as a CSU/DSU or another router) to the router. The port is labeled Aux, as shown in Figure 15. The
asynchronous auxiliary port supports hardware flow control and modem control. Table 14 lists the pinout
for this port.
Table 14
Auxiliary Port Pinout
Auxiliary Port Pin
Signal
Input/Output Description
1
RTS
Output
Request To Send
2
DTR
Output
Data Terminal Ready
3
TxD
Output
Transmit Data
4
GND
—
Signal Ground
5
GND
—
Signal Ground
6
RxD
Input
Receive Data
7
DSR
Input
Data Set Ready
8
CTS
Input
Clear To Send
Configuring Interfaces on the PRP-3
This section includes configuration and connection information through the Ethernet, console, and
through the terminal server on the PRP-3. The following sections describe three ways to connect to a
DSC or DSDRSC:
•
Establishing a Connection Through the Console Port, page 48
•
Establishing a Connection Through a Terminal Server, page 50
•
Establishing a Connection Through the Management Ethernet Interface, page 52
Establishing a Connection Through the Console Port
To connect to the router through the console port, perform the following procedure.
SUMMARY STEPS
48
1.
Identify the active RP or DRP.
2.
Connect a terminal to the Console port of the active RP or DRP.
3.
Start the terminal emulation program.
4.
Press Enter.
5.
Log in to the router.
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Configuring Interfaces on the PRP-3
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Step 2
Command or Action
Purpose
Identify the active RP or DRP.
Identifies the RP or DRP to which you must connect in the next step.
Connect a terminal to the Console port
of the active RP or DRP.
•
This step is not required when the router hosts only one RP.
•
On a Cisco CRS-1 router, the active RP or DRP is identified by a
lighted Primary LED on the RP front panel.
•
On a Cisco XR 12000 Series Router, the active RP is identified by the
alphanumeric display: ACTV RP.
Establishes a communications path to the router.
•
During the initial setup, you can communicate with the router only
through the Console port of the active RP.
•
The router Console port is designed for a serial cable connection to a
terminal or a computer that is running a terminal emulation program.
•
The terminal settings are:
– Bits per second: 9600/9600
– Data bits: 8
– Parity: None
– Stop bit: 2
– Flow control: None
Step 3
Step 4
Start the terminal emulation program.
Press Enter.
(Optional) Prepares a computer for router communications.
•
The step is not required if you are connecting through a terminal.
•
Terminals send keystrokes to and receive characters from another
device. If you connect a computer to the Console port, you must use a
terminal emulation program to communicate with the router. For
instructions on using the terminal emulation program, see the
documentation for that program.
Initiates communication with the router.
•
If no text or router prompt appears when you connect to the Console
port, press Enter to initiate communications.
•
If no text appears when you press Enter and the router has been
started recently, give the router more time to complete the initial boot
procedure, then press Enter.
•
If the router has no configuration, the router displays the prompt:
Enter root-system username:
•
If the router has been configured, the router displays the prompt:
Username:
Step 5
Log in to the router.
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Establishes your access rights for the router management session.
•
Enter your username and password, as described in the “Logging In to
a Router or an SDR” section on page 52.
•
After you log in, the router displays the CLI prompt, which is
described in the “CLI Prompt” section on page 53.
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Configuring Interfaces on the PRP-3
Establishing a Connection Through a Terminal Server
A terminal server connection provides a way to access the Console port from a remote location. It is less
expensive to connect to the router through the Management Ethernet interface (because you do not have
the additional cost of a terminal server). However, if you need to perform tasks that require Console port
access from a remote location, a terminal server is the best connection method.
The procedure for connecting to the router through a terminal server is similar to the procedure for
directly connecting through the Console port. For both connection types, the physical connection takes
place through the Console port. The difference is that the terminal server connects directly to the Console
port, and you must use a Telnet session to establish communications through the terminal server to the
router.
To establish a connection through a terminal server, perform the following procedure:
SUMMARY STEPS
50
1.
Install and configure the terminal server.
2.
Connect the terminal server to the Console port of the target RP or DRP.
3.
Power on the router.
4.
Identify the target RP or DRP.
5.
telnet access-server-address port
6.
Press Enter.
7.
Log in to the router.
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Step 2
Command or Action
Purpose
Install and configure the terminal
server.
Prepares the terminal server for communications with the router and with
Telnet clients.
Connect the terminal server to the
Console port of the target RP or DRP.
•
This step is usually preformed once.
•
For router access, users need the Telnet server IP address and port
number for each RP they access.
•
For additional information on configuring terminal services, including
terminal servers and templates, see the Cisco IOS XR System
Management Configuration Guide.
Establishes a communications path between the terminal server and the
router.
•
During the initial router setup, you can communicate with the router
only through the Console port of the primary RP.
•
The router Console port is designed for a serial cable connection to a
terminal or terminal server.
•
The terminal settings are:
– Bits per second: 9600/9600
– Data bits: 8
– Parity: None
– Stop bit: 2
– Flow control: None
•
Step 3
Power on the router.
Starts the router.
•
Step 4
Step 5
Identify the target RP or DRP.
telnet access-server-address port
This step is required only if the router power is not on.
Identifies the RP or DRP to which you connect in the next step.
•
This step is not required when the router hosts only one RP or DRP.
•
On a Cisco CRS-1 router, the active RP or DRP is identified by a
lighted Primary LED on the RP front panel.
•
On a Cisco XR 12000 Series Router, the active RP is identified by the
alphanumeric display: ACTV RP.
•
If you cannot look at the RPs, use a Management Ethernet interface
connection to determine which RP is active, or establish terminal
server connections to both RPs and then try both.
Establishes a Telnet session with the terminal server.
•
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To enable terminal server connections to the Console ports on multiple
RPs and DRPs, install a cable between each Console port and the
terminal server.
Replace access-server-address with the IP address of the terminal
server, and replace port with the terminal server port number that
connects to the target RP Console port.
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Configuring Interfaces on the PRP-3
Step 6
Command or Action
Purpose
Press Enter.
(Optional) Initiates communications with the RP or DRP.
•
If no text or router prompt appears when you start the Telnet session,
press Enter to initiate communications.
•
If the router has no configuration, the router displays the prompt:
Enter root-system username: Enter the root-system username and
password when prompted.
•
If the router has been configured, the router displays the prompt:
Username:
Step 7
Log in to the router.
Establishes your access rights for the router management session.
•
Enter a username and password when prompted.
Establishing a Connection Through the Management Ethernet Interface
The Management Ethernet interface allows you to manage the router using a network connection. Before
you can use the Management Ethernet interface, the interface must be configured, as described in the
“Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface” section on page 56.
Once configured, the network connection takes place between client software on a workstation computer
and a server process within the router. The type of client software you use depends on the server process
you want to use. The Cisco IOS XR software supports the following client and server services:
•
Telnet clients can connect to a Telnet server in the router. The Telnet server is disabled by default
and can be enabled with the telnet ipv4 server or telnet ipv6 server command in global
configuration mode.
•
Secure Shell (SSH) clients can connect to an SSH server in the router. The SSH server is disabled
by default and can be enabled with the ssh server command in global configuration mode. The SSH
server handles both Secure Shell Version 1 (SSHv1) and SSHv2 incoming client connections for
both IPv4 and IPv6 address families.
To start a Telnet network connection, you start the Telnet client software with a command similar to the
following:
telnet ManagementEthernetInterfaceIPaddress
For specific instructions on connecting to the router through a Telnet or SSH client, see the instructions
for that software.
Ask your system administrator for the IP address of the Management Ethernet interface.
When the Telnet session is established, the router prompts you to log in, as described in the “Logging In
to a Router or an SDR” section on page 52.
Logging In to a Router or an SDR
The login process can require users to enter a password or a username and password before accessing
the router CLI. The user groups to which your username is assigned determine which commands you can
use.
If you log in to a router with a single SDR configured (this is the default configuration), you can manage
the entire router. If you log in to the owner SDR on a system with multiple SDRs, you can manage
general features that apply to the entire system and the interfaces assigned to the owner SDR. If you log
in to a named SDR, you can manage only that SDR.
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When you log in, the username and password may be validated by any of the following services:
•
Usernames configured on the router (username command in global configuration mode)
•
Root-system usernames configured on the owner SDR
•
Passwords configured for the router console and auxiliary ports (password or secret command in
line configuration mode)
•
A RADIUS server
•
A TACACS+ server
The username and password validation method that your router uses is determined by the router
configuration. For information on configuring username and password validation methods, see the
Cisco IOS XR System Security Configuration Guide. For information on which username and password
to use, see your system administrator.
To log in to the router, enter your username and password when prompted. For example:
User Access Verification
Username: iosxr
Password: password
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router#
Note
Passwords are case sensitive. If you want to log in to an SDR using a root-system username from the
owner SDR, enter the username in the following format: username@admin. To support admin login,
local database authentication must be enabled with the aaa authentication login remote local
command. For more information, see Cisco IOS XR System Security Configuration Guide.
After you log in, the router displays the CLI prompt, which is described in the “CLI Prompt” section on
page 53. The command set that you can use is determined by the privileges assigned to your username.
For information on how privileges are assigned to usernames, see the Cisco IOS XR System Security
Configuration Guide.
CLI Prompt
After you log in, you see the CLI prompt for the Cisco IOS XR software. This prompt identifies the
router or SDR to which you are issuing commands. The CLI prompt represents the path, through the
router, to the CPU that executes the commands you enter. The syntax for the CLI prompt is:
type/rack/slot/module: router-name#. The CLI prompt is described in Table 15.
Table 15
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CLI Prompt Description
Prompt Syntax Components
Description
type
Type of interface or card with which you are communicating. For
most user communication tasks, the type is “RP.”
rack
Rack number. In a standalone router, the rack number is always “0.”
In a multishelf system, the range for LCC rack numbers is 0 to 255,
and the range for FCC rack numbers is F0 to F7.
53
Configuring Interfaces on the PRP-3
Table 15
CLI Prompt Description (Continued)
Prompt Syntax Components
Description
slot
Slot in which the RP or DRP is installed. In a Cisco CRS-1 router, the
RP physical slot number is “RP0” or “RP1.” In a
Cisco XR 12000 Series Router, the physical slot number can be 0 to
15, and there can be multiple SDRs, each of which is represented by
an RP.
module
Entity on a card that executes user commands or communicates with
a port (interface). For executing commands from the EXEC prompt,
the module is the “CPU0” of the RP. “CPU0” also controls the
forwarding and operating system (OS) functions for the system.
DRPs have two processors: CPU0 and CPU1.
router-name
Hostname of the router or SDR. The hostname is usually defined
during initial configuration of the router.
For example, the following prompt indicates that the CLI commands are executed on the RP in rack 0,
slot RP0, by the “CPU0” module on a router named “router:”
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router#
Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface on PRP-3
The Management Ethernet interface on the PRP-3 is used to connect the router to a network for remote
management using a Telnet client, the Craft Works Interface (CWI), the Simple Network Management
Protocol (SNMP), or other management agents. The following sections provide information on the
Management Ethernet interface:
•
Specifying the Management Ethernet Interface Name in CLI Commands, page 54
•
Displaying the Available Management Ethernet Interfaces, page 55
•
Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface, page 56
Specifying the Management Ethernet Interface Name in CLI Commands
Before you can configure the Management Ethernet interface, you must know the Management Ethernet
interface name, which is defined using the following syntax: typerack/slot/module/port. Table 16
describes the Management Ethernet interface name syntax.
Table 16
54
Management Ethernet Interface Name Syntax Description
Syntax Components
Description
type
Interface type for a Management Ethernet port is “MgmtEth.”
rack
Chassis number of the rack. In a single-shelf system, the rack is always
“0.” In a multishelf system, the LCC rack number range is 0 to 255.
slot
Physical slot of the RP or DRP on which the interface is located. For a
Cisco XR 12000 Series Router, the PRPs may be installed in slots 0
through 15, depending on the router model.
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Table 16
Management Ethernet Interface Name Syntax Description (Continued)
Syntax Components
Description
module
On an RP, the module is “CPU0.” DRPs have two processors, so the
module is either “CPU0” and “CPU1.”
port
On Cisco XR 12000 Series Routers, there are three Ethernet ports on
PRP-2 cards. The Ethernet ports are labeled ETH 0, ETH 1, and ETH 2.
For the ETH 0 port, specify 0, for the ETH 1 port, specify 1, and for the
ETH 2 port, specify 2.
Table 17 provides examples of Management Ethernet interface names for a single-shelf system.
Table 17
Management Ethernet Interface Names for Single-Shelf Systems
Management Interface
Interface Name
Example
Cisco XR 12000 Series Router
PRP-3 in slot 0, port ETH0
MgmtEth0/0/CPU0/0
router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/0/CPU0/0
Cisco XR 12000 Series Router
PRP-3 in slot 0, port ETH1
MgmtEth0/0/CPU0/1
router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/0/CPU0/1
Cisco XR 12000 Series Router
PRP-3 in slot 1, port ETH0
MgmtEth0/1/CPU0/0
router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/1/CPU0/0
Cisco XR 12000 Series Router
PRP-3 in slot 1, port ETH1
MgmtEth0/1/CPU0/1
router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/1/CPU0/1
Displaying the Available Management Ethernet Interfaces
To display the router interfaces, enter the show interfaces brief command in EXEC mode as follows:
RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show interfaces brief
Intf
Intf
LineP
Encap MTU
BW
Name
State
State
Type (byte)
(Kbps)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Nu0
up
up
Null 1500
Unknown
Mg0/0/CPU0/0
up
up
ARPA 1514
100000
Mg0/0/CPU0/1
admin-down
admin-down
ARPA 1514
10000
PO0/3/0/0
admin-down
admin-down
HDLC 4474
155520
PO0/3/0/1
admin-down
admin-down
HDLC 4474
155520
PO0/3/0/2
admin-down
admin-down
HDLC 4474
155520
PO0/3/0/3
admin-down
admin-down
HDLC 4474
155520
PO0/3/0/4
admin-down
admin-down
HDLC 4474
155520
PO0/3/0/5
admin-down
admin-down
HDLC 4474
155520
PO0/3/0/6
admin-down
admin-down
HDLC 4474
155520
PO0/3/0/7
admin-down
admin-down
HDLC 4474
155520
.
.
.
The Management Ethernet interfaces are listed with the prefix Mg in the Intf Name column.
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Configuring Interfaces on the PRP-3
Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface
To use the Management Ethernet interface for system management and remote communication, you must
configure an IP address and a subnet mask for the interface. If you want the interface to communicate
with devices on other networks (such as remote management stations or TFTP servers), you need to
configure a default route for the router.
Tip
For information on additional configuration options for the Management Ethernet interface, see
Cisco IOS XR Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide.
Prerequisites
To configure the Ethernet Management port for network communications, you must enter the interface
network addresses and subnet mask. Consult your network administrator or system planner for this
information.
SUMMARY STEPS
56
1.
configure
2.
interface MgmtEthrack/slot/CPU0/port
3.
ipv4 address ipv4-address subnet-mask
4.
no shutdown
5.
exit
6.
router static address-family ipv4 unicast 0.0.0.0/0 default-gateway
7.
commit
8.
end
9.
show interfaces MgmtEthrack/slot/CPU0/port
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command or Action
Purpose
configure
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
Step 2
interface MgmtEthrack/slot/CPU0/port
Example:
Enters interface configuration mode and specifies the
Management Ethernet interface of the primary RP.
•
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface
MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0
Step 3
ipv4 address ipv4-address subnet-mask
The syntax is
interface typerack/slot/module/port:
The command parameters are described in Table 16.
Assigns an IP address and subnet mask to the interface.
Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address
10.1.1.1 255.0.0.0
Step 4
no shutdown
Places the interface in an “up” state.
Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no shutdown
Step 5
exit
Exits the Management Ethernet interface configuration
mode.
Step 6
router static address family ipv4 unicast
0.0.0.0/0 default-gateway
Configures a default route to use for communications with
devices on other networks.
•
Replace default-gateway with the IP address of the
local gateway that can be used to reach other
networks.
•
This default route applies to all interfaces. You might
need to configure additional static routes to support
your network. For more information on configuring
static routes, see Cisco IOS XR Routing
Configuration Guide.
Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router (config)# router static
address-family ipv4 unicast 0.0.0.0/0 12.25.0.1
Step 7
commit
Commits the target configuration to the running
configuration.
Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# commit
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Configuring Interfaces on the PRP-3
Step 8
Command or Action
Purpose
end
Ends the configuration session and returns to EXEC
mode.
Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# end
Step 9
show interfaces MgmtEthrack/slot/CPU0/port
Displays the interface details to verify the settings.
Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show interfaces
MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0
Examples
In the following example, the Management Ethernet interface on the RP in slot RP1 is configured with
an IP address:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/RP1/CPU0/0
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no shutdown
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router#
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show interfaces mgmtEth 0/RP0/CPU0/0
MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is Management Ethernet, address is 0011.93ef.e8ea (bia 0011.93ef.e8e)
Description: Connected to Lab LAN
Internet address is 10.1.1.1/24
MTU 1514 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit
reliability 255/255, txload Unknown, rxload Unknown
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set,
ARP type ARPA, ARP timeout 04:00:00
Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
375087 packets input, 22715308 bytes, 87 total input drops
0 drops for unrecognized upper-level protocol
Received 297320 broadcast packets, 0 multicast packets
0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles, 0 parity
48 input errors, 43 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
89311 packets output, 6176363 bytes, 0 total output drops
Output 53 broadcast packets, 0 multicast packets
0 output errors, 0 underruns, 0 applique, 0 resets
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
0 carrier transitions
Related Documents
Related Topic
Document Title
Additional information about configuring management
interfaces
Advanced Configuration and Modification of the
Management Ethernet Interface on Cisco IOS XR Software
module of Cisco IOS XR Interface and Hardware Component
Configuration Guide
58
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
This section contains information on the following additional configuration, maintenance, and upgrade
tasks:
•
Understanding the Cisco IOS Software Configuration Register, page 59
•
Understanding the Cisco IOS XR Software Configuration Register, page 63
•
Using Flash Disks in the PRP, page 67
•
Removing and Installing a Compact Flash Disk, page 71
•
Removing and Installing a Hard Disk Drive, page 72
•
Recovering a Lost Password For IOS, page 74
•
Recovering Password for IOS XR, page 76
•
Upgrading PRP Memory, page 78
Understanding the Cisco IOS Software Configuration Register
Configuring the software configuration register is described in the following sections:
•
Description of the Software Configuration Register, page 59
•
Boot Field Settings, page 61
•
Configuring the Software Configuration Register, page 61
•
Bits in the Software Configuration Register, page 62
Description of the Software Configuration Register
The software configuration register is a 16-bit register in NVRAM that you use to define specific system
parameters. You can set or change the contents of this register to accomplish the following tasks:
•
Define the source for the default Cisco IOS software. You can specify any of the following:
– Flash memory card inserted in PCMCIA slot 0
– TFTP server on the network
– Flash memory SIMM (NVRAM) on the RP
– Boot image stored within the operating environment, which you access by using an appropriate
form of the boot command entered at the ROM monitor prompt (rommon>)
•
Define a default boot filename.
•
Enable or disable the Break function.
•
Control broadcast addresses.
•
Set the console terminal baud rate.
•
Recover a lost password.
•
Force an automatic boot using a boot image.
When you first power on the router, a boot image called the RP ROM monitor is executed, resulting
in the display of the ROM monitor prompt (Rommon>). At this prompt, you have access to a limited
set of commands that enable you to set values in the software configuration register and to perform
a number of other tasks.
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
The RP ROM monitor is loaded into the RP Flash ROM when the RP is manufactured. You can use
it to boot the system from local Flash memory devices. The RP ROM monitor software can be
upgraded in the field, if necessary.
Note
All PRP-2 cards shipped prior to the release of Cisco IOS release 12.0(30)S are provided with a
ROM monitor version installed at the factory. This ROM monitor version cannot be changed
while using IOS images older than 12.0(30)S. When using software release 12.0(30)S or later,
the ROM monitor software can be updated normally.
If you attempt to upgrade the ROM monitor software while running a release prior to 12.0(30)S,
you will receive the following error message:
Unknown device (mfg id 0x01, dev id 0xA3
Error: Unknown Flash Device type!
GRP ROM monitor upgrade won't continue
If you are running a PRP-2 on a software release prior to 12.0(30)S and you receive an error
message that you must upgrade the ROM monitor software, ignore this error message.
•
Read boot system commands from the configuration file stored in NVRAM.
Table 18 defines the bits in the software configuration register.
Table 18
Software Configuration Register Bit Meanings
Bit Number1
Hexadecimal Value
Meaning/Function
00 to 03
0x0000 to 0x000F
Comprises the boot field for defining the source of a default
Cisco IOS software image required to run the router
(see Table 19)
06
0x0040
Causes system software to ignore the contents of NVRAM
07
0x0080
Enables the OEM2 bit
08
0x0100
Disables the Break function
09
0x0200
Uses a secondary bootstrap
10
0x0400
Broadcasts Internet Protocol (IP) with all zeros
11 and 12
0x0800 to 0x1000
Defines the console baud rate (the default setting is 9600 bps)
13
0x2000
Boots the default Flash memory software if the network boot
fails
14
0x4000
Excludes network numbers from IP broadcasts
15
0x8000
Enables diagnostic messages and ignores the contents of
NVRAM
1. The factory default value for the software configuration register is 0x0102. This value is a combination of binary bit 8 =
0x0100 and binary bits 00 through 03 = 0x0002.
2. OEM = original equipment manufacturer.
Note
60
Valid software configuration register values may be combinations of settings, rather than the individual
settings listed in Table 18. For example, the factory default value 0x0102 for the software configuration
register is a composite of several settings.
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Boot Field Settings
Bits 00 to 03 of the software configuration register are referred to as the boot field, which defines a
source for booting the default Cisco IOS software image required to run the router. The value of the boot
field is specified as a binary number, as described in Table 19.
Table 19
Definition of Bits in Boot Field of Software Configuration Register
Boot Field
Meaning
00
On power up, the system remains at the ROM monitor prompt (Rommon>), awaiting a user
command to boot the system manually.
01
On power up, the system automatically boots the first system image found in the onboard
Flash memory SIMM on the RP.
02 to 0F
If a valid boot system command is stored in the NVRAM configuration file, the router
boots the Cisco IOS software image as directed by that value.
If no boot system command is present in the configuration file, the router forms a default
boot filename and attempts to acquire that file from a network TFTP server. To compute
the filename of this default image, the router starts with cisco and appends the octal
equivalent of the boot field value, a hyphen, and the processor type (grp or prp). Table 20
lists the range of possible computed default filenames for booting over the network.
The router would use one of these filenames to boot a default system image stored on a
network TFTP server. If the configuration file contains a valid boot system configuration
command, the system uses these instructions to boot the system, rather than using the
filename it computed from the software configuration register settings.
For this setting, it is assumed that the Ethernet port on the RP is configured and
operational.
Note
Note
If a bootable Cisco IOS software image exists in a Flash memory card inserted in
PCMCIA slot 0 or slot 1, the software configuration register boot field setting is
overridden, and the system boots from the Cisco IOS software image in the Flash
memory card, rather than from a network TFTP image.
Cisco 12000 Series Internet Routers are typically delivered from the factory with a mini-Cisco IOS
software boot image in the boot flash and a flash card containing a suitable working Cisco IOS image.
If you need a Cisco IOS upgrade, download the appropriate Cisco IOS image from Cisco.com.
Configuring the Software Configuration Register
To configure the software configuration register, follow these steps:
Command
Purpose
Step 1
Router> enable
Password: <password>
Enters privileged EXEC mode.
Step 2
Router# configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Step 3
Router(config)# config-register 0xvalue
Sets the contents of the software configuration register, where
value is a 4-bit hexadecimal number as described in Table 18.
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Command
Purpose
Step 4
Router(config)# ctrl-Z
Exits global configuration mode.
Step 5
Router# show version
Displays the software configuration register value currently in
effect. This is the value that will be used the next time the router
reloads. The value is displayed on the last line of the display, as
in the following example:
Configuration register is 0x141 (will be 0x102 at next
reload)
Step 6
Router# copy running-config startup-config
or
Router# write memory
Saves the software configuration register settings to NVRAM.
Step 7
Router# reload
Reboots the router. Configuration register changes take effect
only after the system reloads.
Bits in the Software Configuration Register
As described in the “Boot Field Settings” section on page 61, the boot field setting determines the source
of the Cisco IOS software image that is used to boot the router. A detailed description of the bit values
for the boot field and their associated action or filename is given in Table 20
Table 20
Default Boot Filenames
Action/Filename
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Bootstrap mode
0
0
0
0
Default software
0
0
0
1
cisco2-grp or cisco2-prp
0
0
1
0
cisco3-grp or cisco3-prp
0
0
1
1
cisco4-grp or cisco4-prp
0
1
0
0
cisco5-grp or cisco5-prp
0
1
0
1
cisco6-grp or cisco6-prp
0
1
1
0
cisco7-grp or cisco7-prp
0
1
1
1
cisco10-grp or cisco10-prp
1
0
0
0
cisco11-grp or cisco11-prp
1
0
0
1
cisco12-grp or cisco12-prp
1
0
1
0
cisco13-grp or cisco13-prp
1
0
1
1
cisco14-grp or cisco14-prp
1
1
0
0
cisco15-grp or cisco15-prp
1
1
0
1
cisco16-grp or cisco16-prp
1
1
1
0
cisco17-grp or cisco17-prp
1
1
1
1
The remaining bits in the software configuration register are described following:
Bit 8 of the software configuration register controls the console Break key. Setting bit 8 causes the
system to ignore the console Break key. This is the factory default. Conversely, clearing bit 8 causes the
system to interpret a Break keystroke as a command to halt normal system operation and force the system
62
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into ROM monitor mode. Regardless of the setting of the Break enable bit in the software configuration
register, pressing the Break key during approximately the first 5 seconds of booting causes a return to
the ROM monitor.
Bit 9 is not used.
Bit 10 of the software configuration register controls the host portion of the IP broadcast address. Setting
bit 10 causes the processor to use all zeros in the host portion of the IP broadcast address; clearing bit
10 (the factory default) causes the processor to use all ones. Bit 10 interacts with bit 14, which controls
the network and subnet portions of the IP broadcast address.
Table 21 shows the combined effect of bits 10 and 14.
Table 21
Configuration Register Settings for Broadcast Address Destination
Bit 14
Bit 10
Address (<net> <host>)
Off
Off
<ones> <ones>
Off
On
<zeros> <zeros>
On
On
<net> <zeros>
On
Off
<net> <ones>
Bits 11 and 12 of the software configuration register determine the data transmission rate of the console
terminal. Table 22 shows the bit settings for the four available data transmission rates. The factory-set
default data transmission rate is 9600 bps.
Table 22
System Console Terminal Data Transmission Rate Settings
Bit 12
Bit 11
Data Transmission Rate (bps)
0
0
9600
0
1
4800
1
0
1200
1
1
2400
Bit 13 of the software configuration register determines the response of the system to a bootload failure.
Setting bit 13 causes the system to load Cisco IOS software from Flash memory after five unsuccessful
attempts to load a boot file from the network TFTP server. Clearing bit 13 causes the system to continue
attempting to load a boot file from the network TFTP server indefinitely. Bit 13 in the software
configuration register is set to 0 as the default at the factory.
Understanding the Cisco IOS XR Software Configuration Register
The Cisco IOS XR Software configuration register (config-register) is a 16-bit, user-configurable value
that determines how the router functions during initialization. The configuration register can cause the
router to boot normally from the default startup configuration, or to enter ROM monitor mode during a
system reset. Typically, ROM monitor mode is used only for password recovery or for software
maintenance that cannot be performed in Exec mode or global configuration mode.
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
The following sections describes how to change the configuration register settings from EXEC mode and
from the ROM monitor mode:
•
Commonly Used Configuration Register Value Settings
•
Changing the Configuration Register Settings from EXEC Mode
•
Changing the Configuration Register Settings from ROM Monitor Mode
Commonly Used Configuration Register Value Settings
To change the configuration register setting from normal operating mode, enter the config-register value
command. The most commonly used values are described in Table 23.
Table 23
Note
Common config-register Settings
config-register Value
Description
0x0
The router enters ROM monitor (rommon1>) on the next system boot.
0x2
The router boots the Cisco IOS XR software and default configuration on
the next system boot. After logging in, the user can access EXEC mode.
0x102
The router disables the break key.
0x42
The router enters the password recovery mode on the next system boot.
By default, the configuration register value is 0x2, which automatically boots the system to normal
EXEC mode.
Changing the Configuration Register Settings from EXEC Mode
To change the configuration register setting from normal operating mode, enter the config-register value
command.
Note
To display the current configuration register setting, enter the show variables boot command in EXEC
mode.
Perform the following procedure in the order shown to restart the Router in ROM monitor mode:
SUMMARY STEPS
64
1.
Connect a terminal to the primary RP console port and log in to the router.
2.
configure
3.
config-register value
4.
commit
5.
no config-register 0x0
6.
commit
7.
end
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8.
reload
DETAILED STEPS
Command or Action
Purpose
Step 1
Connect a terminal to the primary RP Connects a terminal or PC to the primary RP
console port and log in to the router. console port and logs in to the router
Step 2
configure
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router# configure
Step 3
config-register value
Example:
Router(config)# config-register 0x0
Sets the configuration register to the assigned
value in the running configuration.
•
See the Commonly Used Configuration
Register Value Settings section for more
information.
•
Changes take effect when you reload the
router.
Caution
Step 4
commit
Resetting the configuration register
may change the baud rate for the
console.
Saves the changes to the running configuration.
Example:
Router(config)# commit
Caution
Step 5
no config register 0x0
Example:
Router(config)# no config regsiter
0x0
Step 6
commit
You must commit the setting and enter
the no config-register 0x0 command
for the settings to take effect.
Prevents unwanted changes to the configuration
register at a later point, and guarantees the setting
is the same between the Cisco IOS XR software
and the ROM monitor.
Saves the changes to the running configuration.
Example:
Router(config)# commit
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65
Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Step 7
Command or Action
Purpose
end
Exits global configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config)# end
Step 8
reload
Reloads the system for the changes to take effect.
Example:
Router# reload
Examples
The following example sets the configuration register so that the router will restart in ROM monitor
mode:
Router# configure
Router(config)# config-register 0x0
Router(config)# commit
Router(config)# no config-register 0x0
Router(config)# commit
Router(config)# end
Router# reload
Changing the Configuration Register Settings from ROM Monitor Mode
When the router is in ROM monitor mode, you can change the configuration register by entering the
value manually, or by allowing the ROM monitor to prompt you for the setting. This section describes
how to manually enter the configuration register setting.
To manually change the configuration register setting in ROM monitor mode, enter the confreg
command followed by the new value.
SUMMARY STEPS
66
1.
confreg value
2.
reset
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command or Action
Purpose
confreg value
Sets the configuration register to the assigned
value.
Example:
rommon1> confreg 0x2
•
See the Commonly Used Configuration
Register Value Settings section for more
information.
Caution
Step 2
reset
Resetting the configuration register
may change the baud rate for the
console.
Reloads the system for the changes to take effect.
Example:
rommon1> reset
Examples
The following examples sets the configuration register to load the Cisco IOS XR software and restart in
Exec mode:
rommon1> confreg 0x2
You must reset or power cycle for new config to take effect.
rommon1> reset
Using Flash Disks in the PRP
Procedures for using Flash disks in the PRP are presented in the following sections:
•
About Flash Disks, page 67
•
Removing and Installing a Flash Disk in the PRP, page 68
•
Working with Flash Disks, page 70
About Flash Disks
ATA Flash disks are similar to linear Flash memory cards. Flash disks combine Flash memory
technology with a controller chip to achieve higher capacity and better performance than linear Flash
memory cards. The controller circuitry allows Flash disks to emulate hard disk capabilities, such as
automatically mapping out bad blocks and block erasure. Flash disks also provide the capability to
allocate noncontiguous sectors, eliminating the need for the squeeze command that is required for space
retrieval on linear Flash memory cards.
Flash disks look similar to older Cisco 20-MB linear Flash memory cards. You can install a flash disk
into either flash card slot on the PRP. Table 24 lists the Cisco product numbers for the flash disks that
are available for use with Cisco XR 12000 Series Routers.
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Table 24
Supported Flash Disk Sizes and Product Numbers
Flash Disk Size
Product Number
64 MB
MEM-12KRP-FD64=
128 MB
MEM-12KRP-FD128=
255 MB
MEM-12KRP-FD256=
1 GB
MEM-12KRP-FD1G=
Removing and Installing a Flash Disk in the PRP
The PRP has two Flash disk slots into which you can install ATA Flash disks, linear Flash memory cards,
or a combination of the two. Slot positions are labeled slot 0 and slot 1.
The following generic procedure can be used for a Flash disk in either slot position.
Removing a Flash Disk
To remove a Flash disk, follow these steps:
Step 1
Remove the Flash disk slot cover by loosening the captive screw shown in Figure 16.
Step 2
To eject the card, press the ejector button until the card is free of the connector at the back of the slot.
(See Figure 17.)
Step 3
Remove the card from the slot and place it in an antistatic bag to protect it.
Step 4
Replace the Flash disk slot cover.
Figure 16
CONNECTOR
CLASS 1 LASER
LASERPRODUKT PRODUCT
PRODUIT LASER DER KLASSE 1
DE CLASSE
1
PRODUCTO LASER
DE CLASSE 1
TX
0
1
RX
2
3
T
EC
EJ
ACTIVE
CARRIER
-1
OT
SL
-0
OT
SL
ETH 0
RX PKT
ETH 1
AUX
RX
EN
PRIMARY
RX
TX
K
LIN
EN
PRIMARY
CONSOLE
40C48/POS
-SR-SC
TX
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SE
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CR
IT
IC MA MI
AL JO NO
R
R
PERFORMAN
CE ROUTE
PROCESSOR
1
(PRP-1)
MBUS
ALARM
FAIL
75286
CLEAN
WITH ALCOHOL
WIPES
BEFORE
CONNECTING
Flash Disk Slot Cover Removal and Installation
FABRIC
ENABLE
CONSOLI
68
DATED
SWITCH
FABRIC
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Figure 17
Installing and Removing a Flash Disk
T
EC
EJ
OT
SL 0
OT
1
ETH 0
SL
ETH 1
K
EN
CONSOLE
LIN
PRIMARY
K
TX
PERFORMANCE ROUTE PROCESSOR 1 (PRP-1)
75038
LIN
TX
T
SE
RE
PRIMARY
AUX
RX
RX
EN
Figure 18
PRP-3—Installing and Removing an External CompactFlash
272394
T
EC
EJ
Installing a Flash Disk
To install a flash disk, follow these steps:
Step 1
Remove the flash disk slot cover by loosening the captive screw shown in Figure 16.
Step 2
Facing the PRP front panel, hold the flash disk with the connector end of the card toward the slot and
the label facing to your right. (See Figure 17.)
Note
OL-17436-01
The Flash disk is keyed and cannot be seated the wrong way. The ejector button will not pop out
if the card is not properly inserted.
Step 3
Insert the card into the appropriate slot until the card completely seats in the connector at the back of the
slot and the ejector button pops out toward you.
Step 4
Replace the flash disk slot cover.
69
Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Caution
The Flash disk does not insert all the way inside the PRP; a portion of the card remains outside of the
slot. Do not attempt to force the card past this point.
Working with Flash Disks
A Flash disk contains the Cisco IOS software image you need to boot your router. In some cases, you
might need to insert a new Flash disk and copy images or backup configuration files onto it. Before you
can use a new Flash disk, you must format it.
When using Cisco IOS commands, there is one major difference between using Flash disks and linear
Flash memory cards: When using a linear Flash memory card, the Cisco IOS command to identify and
access the card is slot0: or slot1:, depending on the card slot in use. When using a Flash disk, those
commands are replaced with disk0: or disk1:. Other specific Flash disk information is found in the
remainder of this section.
Note
This publication does not cover all Cisco IOS Flash card commands. For complete Flash card command
descriptions and configuration information, refer to the Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals
Command Reference and to the Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide.
Booting from a Flash Disk
This section describes the commands used to boot from a Flash disk. Flash disks are accessed using
disk0: or disk1:, depending on the card slot location, instead of slot0: or slot1:, which is used with linear
Flash memory cards.
Note
A boot image that supports the ATA Flash disk file system must reside in bootflash.
To enable booting from a Flash disk, set the register bits to 0x2102 and add the boot system command,
as follows:
Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CTRL-Z.
Router(config)# config-reg 0x2102
Router(config)# boot system disk0:c12kprp-p-mz.120-22.S
Router(config)# ^Z
Router# copy running-config startup-config
The boot system command may require a file name when applied to a Flash disk. The format is described
in Table 25.
Table 25
Boot System Command Format
Router(config)# boot system disk0:filename1
Boots the named file from the Flash disk in slot 0.
1
Boots the named file from the Flash disk in slot 1.
Router(config)# boot system disk1:filename
1. Entering a filename is optional. If a filename is not specified, the system attempts to boot the first file located on the
Flash disk.
70
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Removing and Installing a Compact Flash Disk
Note
You must remove the PRP-2 before you can remove or install a compact flash disk. The compact flash
disk is only supported on the PRP-2.
To remove a compact flash disk (CF) from the PRP-2 board, follow these steps:
Loosen the screw fastening the retaining bracket for the CF. (See Figure 19.)
Step 2
Lift the end of the retaining bracket out of the hole that holds it in place flush with the CF, and swivel it
around until it is not in the way of removing the CF. (See Figure 19.)
Step 3
Press lightly on the CF and push it out of its socket in the direction of the retaining bracket. (See
Figure 19.)
Removing the CF from the PRP-2 Board
101106
Figure 19
Step 1
Step 4
Once the CF is released from the socket, pull it completely out of the board.
Step 5
If you are not inserting another CF into the socket on the board, replace the retaining bracket by
swivelling it back around until the end rests in the hole on the PRP-2 board and fastening the screw into
the board.
To install a CF into the PRP-2 board, follow these steps:
OL-17436-01
Step 1
Loosen the screw fastening the retaining bracket for the CF.
Step 2
Lift the end of the retaining bracket out of the hole that holds it in place flush with the CF socket, and
swivel it around until it is not in the way of installing the CF.
Step 3
Guide the CF into the socket with the side with the connectors going into the socket.
Step 4
Push the CF until it snaps into place in the socket.
71
Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Step 5
Swivel the retaining bracket back into place with the end of the bracket resting in the hole on the PRP-2
board.
Step 6
Fasten the screw on the retaining bracket.
Removing and Installing a Hard Disk Drive
Note
You must remove the PRP-3 or PRP-2 before you can remove or install a hard disk drive. The hard disk
drive is only supported on the PRP-2.
To remove a hard disk drive (HDD) from the PRP-3 or PRP-2 board, follow these steps:
Step 1
Loosen the four screws fastening the HDD to the board. The screws will pop out of place when they are
completely loosened.
Step 2
Pull the HDD straight up off the board.
To install an HDD onto the PRP-3 or PRP-2 board, follow these steps:
Step 1
72
Position the HDD over the four screw receptors on the PRP-3 or PRP-2 board so that the two silver guide
pins on the board fit into the two associated holes on the HDD (next to two of the screws) and the arrow
printed on the top of the HDD points toward the faceplate of the card. See Figure 20.
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Installing the Hard Disk Drive
101107
T
H
8
IS
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Figure 20
2
1
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Figure 21
PRP-3—Installing and Removing a Hard Drive
272393
3
2
1
Step 2
1
Screw receptor on a PRP-3 or PRP-2 board
2
Guide pin on PRP-3 or PRP-2 board
3
Screw to fasten HDD to PRP-3 or PRP-2 board
Tighten all four of the screws on the HDD into the PRP-3 or PRP-2 board.
Recovering a Lost Password For IOS
This section provides information on how to recover a lost password.
The following overview describes this process:
74
1.
Use the show version command to note the existing software configuration register value.
2.
Break to the bootstrap program prompt.
3.
Change the configuration register to ignore NVRAM.
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Note
A key to recovering a lost password is to set the configuration register so that the contents of NVRAM
are ignored (0x0040), allowing you to see your password.
4.
Enter privileged level in the system EXEC.
5.
Use the show startup-config command to display the enable password.
6.
Change the configuration register value back to its original setting.
To recover a lost password, follow these steps:
Note
If the enable password is encrypted, the following password recovery procedure will not work and you
will have to reconfigure the system; you will not be able to reboot it. To reconfigure the system, use the
displayed configuration, which is shown using the show startup-config EXEC command. (See Step 11.)
Step 1
Attach an ASCII terminal to the PRP console port.
Step 2
Configure the terminal to operate at 9600 bps, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits (or to the settings at which
the console port is set).
Step 3
Enter the show version command to display the existing configuration register value. Note this value for
later use.
Step 4
If Break is disabled, power cycle the router. (To power cycle, turn off power, wait 5 seconds, then turn
it on again.) If Break is enabled on the router, press the Break key or send a break by holding down the
Control key and pressing the right square bracket key (^]); then proceed to Step 5.
Step 5
Within 5 seconds of turning on the router, press the Break key. This action causes the terminal to display
the bootstrap program prompt as follows:
Rommon 1>
Step 6
Set the configuration register to ignore the configuration file information as follows:
Rommon 1> confreg
Configuration Summary
enabled are:
console baud: 9600
boot: image specified by the boot system command
or default to: cisco2-PRP
do you
enable
enable
enable
enable
enable
enable
change
change
wish to change the configuration? y/n [n]: y
“diagnostic mode”? y/n [n]:
“use net in IP bcast address”? y/n [n]:
“load rom after netbootfails”? y/n [n]:
“use all zero broadcast”? y/n [n]:
“break/abort has effect?” y/n [n]:
“ignore system config info?” [n]: y
console baud rate? y/n [n]:
boot characteristics? y/n [n]
Configuration Summary
enabled are:
console baud: 9600
boot: image specified by the boot system command
or default to: cisco2-PRP
Do you wish to change the configuration? y/n [n]
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
You must reset or power cycle for the new config to take effect
Step 7
Initialize the router by entering the i command as follows:
Rommon 1> i
The router power cycles, the configuration register is set to ignore the configuration file, and the router
boots the boot system image and prompts you with the system configuration dialog as follows:
--- System Configuration Dialog ---
Step 8
Enter no in response to the system configuration dialog prompts until the following system message is
displayed:
Press RETURN to get started!
Step 9
Press Return.
After some interface information displays, the prompt appears as follows:
Router>
Step 10
Enter the enable command to enter enabled mode.
The prompt changes to the following:
Router#
Step 11
Enter the show start-up config EXEC command to display the enable password in the configuration file.
Step 12
Enter the configure terminal command at the EXEC prompt.
You are prompted as follows:
Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#
Change the configuration register value back to its original value (noted from Step 3.)
Change it to a value of 0x0102 (factory default) using the config-register 0x value command.
Step 13
Press Ctrl-Z or type end to exit configuration mode.
Step 14
Reboot the router and enable it using the recovered password.
Recovering Password for IOS XR
If the root password is forgotten, it can be recovered only at the DSC. To recover the password at the
DSC, set the configuration register to 0x42 on the active RP and reboot the router. When the router boots,
a password recovery dialog appears. This dialog prompts you to reset the root-system username and
password. After you save the new password, the configuration register automatically resets to the prior
value (such as 0x102).
This chapter also includes instructions to bypass ksh authentication on a node.
This chapter contains the following sections:
76
•
Recovering the Root Password on Single-RP Routers, page 77
•
Recovering the Root Password on Redundant-RP Routers, page 77
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Recovering the Root Password on Single-RP Routers
Use the following procedure to recover the router password from a router with a single RP.
Step 1
Place the router in ROM Monitor mode.
Step 2
Set the RP configuration register to 0x42 at the ROMMON prompt:
rommon 1 > confreg 0x42
Note
Step 3
The configuration register is not an environment variable like TURBOBOOT (which is described earlier
in this chapter). Do not enter an equal sign when entering the confreg command.
Reset or power cycle the router so that the new setting can take effect:
rommon 2 > reset
Step 4
Press Return at the prompt to enter the password recovery dialog. Then enter the new root-system
username and password and save the configuration.
router con0/0/CPU0 is now available
Press RETURN to get started.
--- Administrative User Dialog ---
Enter root-system username: user
Enter secret:
Enter secret again:
RP/0/0/CPU0:Jan 10 12:50:53.105 : exec[65652]: %MGBL-CONFIG-6-DB_COMMIT :
'Administration configuration committed by system'. Use 'show configuration commit changes
2000000009' to view the changes.
Use the 'admin' mode 'configure' command to modify this configuration.
User Access Verification
Username: user
Password:
RP/0/0/CPU0:router#
Recovering the Root Password on Redundant-RP Routers
Use the following procedure to recover the router password from a router with redundant RPs.
Step 1
Place both RPs in ROM Monitor mode.
Step 2
Set the configuration register of the standby RP to 0x0 so that the standby RP does not take control
during the password recovery:
rommon 1> confreg 0x0
Note
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The configuration register is not an environment variable like TURBOBOOT (which is described earlier
in this chapter). Do not enter an equal sign when entering the confreg command.
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Step 3
Set the active RP configuration register to 0x42:
rommon 1 > confreg 0x42
Step 4
Reset or power cycle the router so that the new setting can take effect:
rommon 2 > reset
Step 5
Press Return at the prompt to enter the password recovery dialog. Then enter the new root-system
username and password and save the configuration, as shown in the following example:
router con0/0/CPU0 is now available
Press RETURN to get started.
--- Administrative User Dialog ---
Enter root-system username: user
Enter secret:
Enter secret again:
RP/0/0/CPU0:Jan 10 12:50:53.105 : exec[65652]: %MGBL-CONFIG-6-DB_COMMIT :
'Administration configuration committed by system'. Use 'show configuration commit changes
2000000009' to view the changes.
Use the 'admin' mode 'configure' command to modify this configuration.
User Access Verification
Username: user
Password:
RP/0/0/CPU0:router#
Step 6
Set the configuration register of the standby RP to 0x102:
rommon 1> confreg 0x102
Step 7
Reset the standby RP so that the new setting can take effect and the standby RP becomes operational:
rommon 2 > reset
Upgrading PRP Memory
This section provides the procedure for increasing the amount of SDRAM on a PRP by replacing up to
two SDRAM DIMMs that reside on the PRP. The SDRAM DIMM sockets are U15 (bank 1) and U18
(bank 2). (See Figure 22.)
The default SDRAM configuration for PRP-2 is 1 GB DIMM in U15. If two memory modules of
different size are installed, the larger DIMM must be installed in bank 1 (U15).
Note
78
The DIMMs in Figure 22 and Figure 26 show a generic representation of the SDRAM DIMMs for your
PRP. To be assured that you are using the correct DIMMs, refer to the specific part numbers for your
SDRAM upgrade kit and to the Cisco part numbers on the DIMMs. (See Table 27.)
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Figure 22
Locations of PRP Components and Memory
1
3
2
1
OTSL 0
OTSL
ETH 0
6
CONSOLE
TX
K
LIN
T
5
AUX
RX
EN
PRIMARY
SE
4
ETH 1
RX
TX
EN
K
LIN
RE
PRIMARY
7 8
PERFORMANCE ROUTE PROCESSOR 1 (PRP-1)
9
10
1
Backplane connector
6
Ethernet ports
2
Flash SIMM (Socket number P3)
7
Auxiliary port
3
SDRAM DIMMs
Bank 1 - Socket number U15
Bank 2 - Socket number U18
8
Console port
4
Ejector lever
9
Handle
5
Flash disk slots
10 Display LEDs
75042
T
EC
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Before proceeding, ensure that you have the proper tools and ESD-prevention equipment available. To
upgrade SDRAM, you will install DIMMs in one or two banks (U15 and U18). Table 27 list the various
available configurations of SDRAM DIMMs, the number of DIMMs for each configuration, and the
SDRAM banks they occupy. Note which banks you should use, given the combinations of available
DIMM sizes and the maximum SDRAM you require.
Note
Depending on the configuration of your router and the protocols and features your system is running,
you might require more than the default SDRAM provided. Upgrade SDRAM based on your
requirements and the information in Table 27.
.
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
.
Table 27
Supported PRP-2 Route Memory Configurations
Total Route Memory
Cisco Product Number
DIMM Modules
SDRAM DIMM Sockets1
1 GB2
MEM-PRP2-1G
1 1-GB DIMM
Bank 1 (U15)
2 GB
MEM-PRP2-1G
1 2-GB DIMM
Bank 1 (U15)
3 GB
MEM-PRP2-3G
1 2-GB DIMM + Bank 1(U15) and Bank 2 (U18)3
1 1-GB DIMM
4 GB
MEM-PRP2-4G
2 2-GB DIMMs
Bank 1 (U15) and Bank 2 (U18)
1. Bank 1 (U15) must be populated first.
2. One 1-GB DIMM is the default SDRAM configuration for PRP-2.
3. The larger DIMM must be placed in Bank 1 (U15).
Note
Figure 23
If your system includes redundant PRPs, both PRPs should have the same memory size. Redundancy is
not supported when using a GRP and a PRP in the same chassis. Cisco strongly recommends that you
avoid configuring your router using mixed route processor cards. Refer to the Route Processor
Redundancy Plus for the Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router publication for more information.
Supported PRP-3 Route Memory Configurations (Continued)
272360
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4
1
2
3
80
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Table 28
Supported PRP-3 Route Memory Configurations
Total Route Memory
Cisco Product Number
DIMM Modules
SDRAM DIMM Sockets1
4 GB
MEM-PRP3-4G=
2 2-GB DIMMs
Bank 1 (U8) and Bank 2 (U10)
8 GB
MEM-PRP3-8G=
2 4-GB DIMMs
Bank 1 (U8) and Bank 2 (U10)
1. Bank 1 (U15) must be populated first.
Caution
Only memory approved by Cisco is supported. Both the DIMMs must be of the same size. Do not attempt
to install other devices or DIMMs not approved by Cisco in the DIMM sockets. (See Table 26 and
Table 27.)
Removing a DIMM
To remove a DIMM from a line card, follow these steps:
Step 1
Attach an ESD-preventive wrist or ankle strap and follow its instructions for use.
Step 2
Place the line card on an antistatic mat so that the faceplate is nearest to you.
Step 3
Locate the DIMM sockets on the line card.
Note
Some line cards use DIMM sockets equipped with dual release levers, as shown in Figure 24;
other line cards use DIMM sockets equipped with a single release lever, as shown in Figure 25.
Both DIMM sockets operate in the same general way.
DIMM Socket with Dual Release Levers
Figure 25
DIMM Socket with Single Release Lever
H6513
24860
Figure 24
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Step 4
Use the socket release levers to eject the DIMM.
•
For a socket with dual release levers (see Figure 24), pull down both levers at the same time to eject
the DIMM.
or
•
For a socket with a single release lever (see Figure 25), pull the lever to eject the DIMM.
Caution
Handle the edges of the DIMM only. Do not touch the integrated circuit devices on the DIMM, the metal
traces, or fingers, along the edge of the DIMM, or the pins in the DIMM socket.
Step 5
As one end of the DIMM is released, grasp the top corners of the DIMM with the thumb and forefinger
of each hand and pull the DIMM completely out of its socket.
Step 6
Immediately place the DIMM in an antistatic bag to protect it from ESD damage.
Step 7
Repeat Step 4 through Step 6 for any remaining DIMMs that you want to remove.
Installing a DIMM
This section contains instructions for installing DIMM memory into a line card.
Note
If you are upgrading packet memory, both DIMM sockets of a given pair (either the transmit buffer or
the receive buffer) must be populated with a DIMM of the same type and size.
To install DIMMs in a line card, follow these steps:
Step 1
Attach an ESD-preventive wrist or ankle strap and follow its instructions for use.
Step 2
Place the line card on an antistatic mat so that the faceplate is nearest to you.
Caution
To prevent router and memory problems, all DIMMs installed in the line card must be 3.3V devices.
Step 3
Remove the new DIMM from its protective antistatic bag.
Step 4
Grasp the edges of the DIMM only. Do not touch the integrated circuit devices on the DIMM, the metal
traces, or fingers, along the edge of the DIMM, or the pins in the DIMM socket. (See Figure 26.)
Step 5
To position the DIMM for insertion, orient it at the same angle as the DIMM socket. The two notches
(keys) on the bottom edge of the module ensure that the DIMM edge connector is registered properly in
the socket. (See Figure 26.)
If necessary, rock the DIMM back and forth gently to align it in the socket.
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Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks
Handling a DIMM
H6507
Figure 26
Key
Caution
When inserting DIMMs into a socket, apply firm, but not excessive, pressure. If you damage a DIMM
socket, you must return the line card for repair.
Step 6
Gently insert the DIMM into the socket and push until the DIMM snaps into place and the release lever
is flush against the side of the socket.
Step 7
Verify that the release lever is flush against the side of the socket. If it is not, the DIMM might not be
seated properly. On a socket with dual release levers, both levers should be flush against the sides of the
DIMM.
If the module appears misaligned, carefully remove it and reseat it, ensuring that the release lever is flush
against the side of the DIMM socket.
Step 8
Repeat Step 3 through Step 7 to install any remaining DIMMs for your memory configuration.
Checking the DIMM Installation
After you install new DIMMs and replace the PRP in the router, the router reinitializes the PRP and
detects the memory change as part of the reinitialization cycle. The time required for the router to
initialize can vary with different router configurations and memory configurations.
If the PRP or the system does not reinitialize properly after you upgrade memory, or if the console
terminal displays a checksum or memory error, verify the following:
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Step 1
Check the packet memory DIMMs to verify that the type, size, and speed of the DIMMs are compatible
with the PRP. DIMMs must operate at 60 ns or faster. The speed of the DIMM is printed along one of
its edges.
Step 2
Ensure that the DIMMs are installed correctly on the PRP. Check the alignment of the DIMMs by
looking at them across the horizontal plane of the card. The DIMMs should be aligned at the same angle
and be fully inserted into their respective sockets. If a DIMM is not correctly aligned, remove it and
reinsert it.
83
Regulatory, Compliance, and Safety Information
Step 3
Reinstall the PRP and perform another installation check.
If the router fails to restart properly after several attempts and you are unable to resolve the problem,
access Cisco.com or contact your Cisco service representative for assistance. Before calling, however,
make note of any console error messages, unusual LED states, or other router indications or behaviors
that might help to resolve the problem.
Regulatory, Compliance, and Safety Information
This section includes regulatory, compliance, and safety information.
•
Translated Safety Warnings and Agency Approvals, page 84
•
Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulatory Statements, page 84
Translated Safety Warnings and Agency Approvals
The complete list of translated safety warnings and agency approvals is available in the Regulatory
Compliance and Safety Information for Cisco 12000 Series Internet Routers publication.
(Document Number 78-4347-xx.)
Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulatory Statements
FCC Class A Compliance
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant
to part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates,
uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this
equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case users will be
required to correct the interference at their own expense.
Modifying the equipment without Cisco’s authorization may result in the equipment no longer
complying with FCC requirements for Class A digital devices. In that event, your right to use the
equipment may be limited by FCC regulation and you may be required to correct any interference to
radio or television communication at your own expense.
You can determine whether your equipment is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference
stops, it was probably caused by the Cisco equipment or one of its peripheral devices. If the equipment
causes interference to radio or television reception, try to correct the interference by using one or more
of the following measures:
84
•
Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops.
•
Move the equipment to one side or the other of the television or radio.
OL-17436-01
Regulatory, Compliance, and Safety Information
•
Move the equipment farther away from the television or radio.
•
Plug the equipment into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio. (That is,
make certain the equipment and the television or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit
breakers or fuses.)
CISPR 22
This apparatus complies with CISPR 22/EN55022 Class B radiated and conducted emissions
requirements.
Canada
English Statement of Compliance
This class A digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
French Statement of Compliance
Cet appareil numérique de la classe A est conforme à la norme NMB-003 du Canada.
Europe (EU)
This apparatus complies with EN55022 Class B and EN55024 standards when used as ITE/TTE
equipment, and EN300386 for Telecommunications Network Equipment (TNE) in both installation
environments, telecommunication centers and other indoor locations.
Class A Notice for Hungary
Warning
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This equipment is a class A product and should be used and installed properly according to the
Hungarian EMC Class A requirements (MSZEN55022). Class A equipment is designed for typical
commercial establishments for which special conditions of installation and protection distance are
used.
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Regulatory, Compliance, and Safety Information
Class A Notice for Taiwan and Other Traditional Chinese Markets
Warning
This is a Class A Information Product, when used in residential environment, it may cause radio
frequency interference, under such circumstances, the user may be requested to take appropriate
countermeasures. Statement 257
VCCI Class A Notice for Japan
Warning
This is a Class A product based on the standard of the Voluntary Control Council for Interference by
Information Technology Equipment (VCCI). If this equipment is used in a domestic environment, radio
disturbance may arise. When such trouble occurs, the user may be required to take corrective
actions. Statement 191
Class A Notice for Korea
Warning
86
This is a Class A Device and is registered for EMC requirements for industrial use. The seller or
buyer should be aware of this. If this type was sold or purchased by mistake, it should be replaced
with a residential-use type. Statement 294
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This document is to be used in conjunction with the installation and configuration guide for your Cisco XR 12000 Series Router.
CCDE, CCSI, CCENT, Cisco Eos, Cisco HealthPresence, the Cisco logo, Cisco Lumin, Cisco Nexus, Cisco Nurse Connect, Cisco Stackpower,
Cisco StadiumVision, Cisco TelePresence, Cisco WebEx, DCE, and Welcome to the Human Network are trademarks; Changing the Way We Work,
Live, Play, and Learn and Cisco Store are service marks; and Access Registrar, Aironet, AsyncOS, Bringing the Meeting To You, Catalyst, CCDA,
CCDP, CCIE, CCIP, CCNA, CCNP, CCSP, CCVP, Cisco, the Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert logo, Cisco IOS, Cisco Press, Cisco Systems,
Cisco Systems Capital, the Cisco Systems logo, Cisco Unity, Collaboration Without Limitation, EtherFast, EtherSwitch, Event Center, Fast Step,
Follow Me Browsing, FormShare, GigaDrive, HomeLink, Internet Quotient, IOS, iPhone, iQuick Study, IronPort, the IronPort logo, LightStream,
Linksys, MediaTone, MeetingPlace, MeetingPlace Chime Sound, MGX, Networkers, Networking Academy, Network Registrar, PCNow, PIX,
PowerPanels, ProConnect, ScriptShare, SenderBase, SMARTnet, Spectrum Expert, StackWise, The Fastest Way to Increase Your Internet Quotient,
TransPath, WebEx, and the WebEx logo are registered trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and certain other
countries.
All other trademarks mentioned in this document or website are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply
a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (0903R)
Copyright © 2009 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
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