Monaco 2008 Knight Owner`s manual

MONACO Limited Warranty - 2008
MONACO® MOTORHOME LIMITED WARRANTY
WHAT THE PERIOD OF COVERAGE IS:
This Limited Warranty provided by Monaco® (“Warrantor”) covers those
components, assemblies and systems of your new motorhome not excluded under the
section “What is Not Covered” and when sold by an authorized dealer, for twelve (12)
months from the original retail purchase date or the first 24,000 miles of use, whichever
occurs first. However, this Limited Warranty provided by Warrantor covers the steel or
aluminum frame structure, only, of the sidewalls (excluding slide outs), roof, and rear
and front walls for sixty (60) months from the original retail purchase date or the first
50,000 miles of use, whichever occurs first.
If you use your motorhome for any rental, commercial or business purposes
whatsoever, the Limited Warranty provided by Warrantor covers your new motorhome
when sold by an authorized dealer for ninety (90) days from the original retail purchase
date or the first 24,000 miles of use, whichever occurs first. In addition, the Limited
Warranty provided by Warrantor covers the steel or aluminum frame structure, only, of
the sidewalls (excluding slide outs), roof, and rear and front walls for twelve (12) months
from the original retail purchase date or the first 24,000 miles of use, whichever occurs
first. A conclusive presumption that your motorhome has been used for commercial
and/or business purposes arises if you have filed a federal or state tax form claiming
any business tax benefit related to your ownership of the motorhome. The above
Limited Warranty coverage applies to all owners, including subsequent owners, of the
motorhome. However, a subsequent owner must submit a warranty transfer form by
filing the form through an authorized Monaco dealer. A subsequent owner’s warranty
coverage period is the remaining balance of the warranty coverage period the prior owner
was entitled to under this Limited Warranty. Warranty transfer forms can be obtained by
contacting the Customer Relations Department. There is no charge for the transfer.
LIMITATION AND DISCLAIMER OF IMPLIED WARRANTIES:
IMPLIED WARRANTIES, IF ANY, ARISING BY WAY OF STATE LAW,
INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY
AND ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE, ARE LIMITED IN DURATION TO THE TERM OF THIS
LIMITED WARRANTY AND ARE LIMITED IN SCOPE OF COVERAGE
TO THOSE PORTIONS OF THE MOTORHOME COVERED BY THIS
LIMITED WARRANTY. WARRANTOR DISCLAIMS ALL IMPLIED AND
EXPRESS WARRANTIES, INCLUDING THE IMPLIED WARRANTY OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND THE IMPLIED WARRANTY OF FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, ON COMPONENTS AND APPLIANCES
EXCLUDED FROM COVERAGE AS SET FORTH BELOW. There is no warranty
of any nature made by Warrantor beyond that contained in this Limited Warranty. No
person has authority to enlarge, amend or modify this Limited Warranty. The dealer is
not the Warrantor’s agent but is an independent entity. Warrantor is not responsible for
any undertaking, representation or warranty made by any dealer or other person beyond
those expressly set forth in this Limited Warranty. Some states do not allow limitations
on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the above limitation may not apply to you.
WHAT THE WARRANTY COVERS:
Warrantor’s Limited Warranty covers defects in the manufacture of your motorhome
and defects in materials used to manufacture your motorhome. “Defect” means the
failure of the motorhome and/or the materials used to assemble the motorhome to
conform to Warrantor’s design and manufacturing specification and tolerances. Also
see the section “What the Warranty Does Not Cover” set out below.
WHAT WE WILL DO TO CORRECT PROBLEMS:
Warrantor’s sole and exclusive obligation is to repair and/or replace, at its option, any
covered defect if: (1) you notify Warrantor or one of its authorized servicing dealers of
the defect within the warranty coverage period and within five (5) days of discovering
the defect; and (2) you deliver your Motorhome to Warrantor or Warrantor’s authorized
servicing dealer at your cost and expense. It is reasonable to expect some service items
to occur during the warranty period. The performance of warranty repairs shall not
extend the original warranty coverage period. Further, any performance of repairs after
the warranty coverage period has expired or any performance of repairs to component
parts and appliances that are excluded from coverage shall be considered “good will”
repairs, which shall not alter the express terms of this limited warranty. If the repair
or replacement remedy fails to successfully cure a defect after Warrantor received a
reasonable opportunity to cure the defect(s), your sole and exclusive remedy shall be
limited to Warrantor paying you the cost of having an independent third party perform
repair(s) to the defect(s).
Warrantor may use new and/or remanufactured parts and/or components of
substantially equal quality to complete any repair.
Defects and/or damage to interior and exterior surfaces, trim, upholstery and other
appearance items may occur at the factory during manufacture, during delivery of
the motorhome to the selling dealer or on the selling dealer’s lot. Normally, any such
defect or damage is detected and corrected at the factory or by the selling dealer during
the inspection process performed by the Warrantor and the selling dealer. If, however,
you discover any such defect or damage when you take delivery of the motorhome, you
must notify your dealer or Warrantor within five days of the date of purchase to have
repairs performed to the defect at no cost to you as provided by this Limited Warranty.
If either three or more unsuccessful repair attempts have been made to correct any
covered defect that you believe substantially impairs the value, use or safety of your
motorhome, or repairs to any covered defect(s) which you believe substantially impairs
the value, use or safety of your motorhome have taken 30 or more days to complete,
you must, to the extent permitted by law, notify Warrantor directly in writing of the
failure to successfully repair the defect(s) so that Warrantor can become directly
involved in exercising a final repair attempt for the purpose of performing a successful
repair to the identified defect(s).
MONACO Limited Warranty - 2008
HOW TO GET SERVICE:
The “Acknowledgement of Receipt of Warranty/Production Information” form must
be returned to Warrantor promptly upon purchase to assure proper part replacement
and repair of your motorhome. Failure to return the “Acknowledgement of Receipt
of Warranty/Production Information” form will not affect your rights under the
Limited Warranty so long as you can furnish proof of purchase. For warranty service
simply contact one of Warrantor’s authorized service centers for an appointment, then
deliver your motorhome (at your expense) to the service center. If you need assistance
in locating an authorized warranty service facility, contact Warrantor’s Warranty
Department (1-877-466-6226). The mailing address is:
91320 Coburg Industrial Way
Coburg, Oregon 97408
In the event the motorhome is inoperative due to malfunction of a warranted part,
Warrantor will pay the cost of having the motorhome towed to the nearest authorized
repair facility provided you notify Warrantor prior to incurring the towing charges to
receive directions to the nearest repair facility.
Because Warrantor does not control the scheduling of service work by its authorized
servicing dealers, you may encounter some delay in scheduling and/or in the
completion of the repairs.
WHAT THE WARRANTY DOES NOT COVER:
This Limited Warranty does not cover: any motorhome sold or registered outside of
the United States or Canada; items which are added or changed after the motorhome
leaves Warrantor’s possession; items that are working as designed but which you
are unhappy with because of the design; normal wear and usage, such as fading or
discoloration of fabrics, or the effects of moisture inside the motorhome; defacing,
scratching, dents and chips on any surface or fabric of the motorhome, not caused by
Warrantor; owner maintenance, including by way of example wheel alignments and
resealing exterior sealant areas; the automotive chassis and power train, including, by
way of example the engine, drivetrain, steering and handling, braking, wheel balance,
muffler, tires, tubes, batteries and gauges; appliances and components covered by
their own manufacturer’s warranty including, by way of example the microwave,
refrigerator, ice maker, stove, oven, generator, roof air conditioners, hydraulic jacks,
VCR, television(s), water heater, furnace, stereo, radio, compact disc player, washer,
dryer, inverter and cellular phone; or flaking, peeling and chips or other defects or
damage in or to the exterior or finish caused by rocks or other road hazards, the
environment including airborne pollutants, salt, tree sap and hail. Component part
and appliance manufacturers issue limited warranties covering those portions of the
motorhome not covered by the Limited Warranty issued by Warrantor. To learn more
on what specific component parts and appliances are excluded from the Limited
Warranty issued by Warrantor please contact your selling dealership or Warrantor
directly or review the warranty packet inside the Motorhome.
EVENTS DISCHARGING WARRANTOR FROM OBLIGATION UNDER
WARRANTY:
Misuse or neglect, accidents, unauthorized alteration, failure to provide reasonable
and necessary maintenance (see Owner’s Manual), damage caused by off road use,
collision, fire, theft, vandalism, explosions, overloading in excess of rated capacities,
and odometer tampering shall discharge Warrantor from any express or implied
warranty obligation to repair any resulting defect.
DISCLAIMER OF CONSEQUENTIAL AND INCIDENTAL DAMAGES:
THE ORIGINAL PURCHASER OF THE MOTORHOME AND ANY PERSON
TO WHOM THE MOTORHOME IS TRANSFERRED, AND ANY PERSON
WHO IS AN INTENDED OR UNINTENDED USER OR BENEFICIARY OF
THE MOTORHOME, SHALL NOT BE ENTITLED TO RECOVER FROM
WARRANTOR ANY CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES
RESULTING FROM ANY DEFECT IN THE MOTORHOME, INCLUDING
BY WAY OF EXAMPLE FUEL AND TRANSPORTATION EXPENSES TO
DELIVER THE PRODUCT TO THE SERVICING DEALER, HOTEL ROOMS,
LOST WAGES AND MOISTURE DAMAGE SUCH AS MOLD AND MILDEW.
THE EXCLUSION OF CONSEQUENTIAL AND INCIDENTAL DAMAGES
SHALL BE DEEMED INDEPENDENT OF, AND SHALL SURVIVE, ANY
FAILURE OF THE ESSENTIAL PURPOSE OF ANY LIMITED REMEDY. Some
states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of consequential or incidental damages,
so the above exclusions may not apply to you.
LEGAL REMEDIES:
THIS LIMITED WARRANTY DOES NOT “EXTEND TO FUTURE
PERFORMANCE.” ANY ACTION TO ENFORCE THIS LIMITED
WARRANTY OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES SHALL NOT BE
COMMENCED MORE THAN 90 DAYS AFTER THE EXPIRATION OF THE
ONE YEAR WARRANTY COVERAGE PERIOD DESIGNATED ABOVE.
IF YOU USE YOUR MOTOR HOME FOR COMMERCIAL OR BUSINESS
PURPOSES, ANY ACTION TO ENFORCE THIS LIMITED WARRANTY
OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES SHALL NOT BE COMMENCED MORE
THAN ONE YEAR AFTER THE EXPIRATION OF THE NINETY (90)
DAY WARRANTY COVERAGE PERIOD DESIGNATED ABOVE. THE
PERFORMANCE OF REPAIRS SHALL NOT SUSPEND THIS LIMITATIONS
PERIOD FROM EXPIRING. Some states do not allow the reduction in the statute of
limitations, so the above reduction in the statute of limitations may not apply to you.
THIS WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS. YOU MAY
ALSO HAVE OTHER RIGHTS, WHICH VARY FROM STATE TO STATE.
LARGER PRINT VERSION AVAILABLE WITHIN THE OWNER’S
MANUAL AND UPON REQUEST ADDRESSED TO YOUR SELLING DEALER
OR WARRANTOR’S WARRANTY DEPARTMENT.
111506
ii
Roadmaster Limited Warranty - 2008
ROADMASTER® CHASSIS LIMITED WARRANTY
WHAT THE PERIOD OF COVERAGE IS:
This Limited Warranty provided by Roadmaster® (“Warrantor”) covers your
Roadmaster Chassis for thirty-six (36) months from the original retail purchase date
or the first 50,000 miles of use, whichever occurs first. If you use the Roadmaster
Chassis that your motorhome is mounted upon for any rental, commercial or business
purposes whatsoever, this Limited Warranty covers your new Roadmaster Chassis for
Ninety (90) days from the original retail purchase date or the first 24,000 miles of use,
whichever occurs first. A conclusive presumption that the Roadmaster Chassis has been
used for commercial and/or business purposes arises if you have filed a federal or state
tax form claiming any business tax benefit related to your ownership of the motorhome.
This Limited Warranty applies to all owners, including subsequent owners, of the
Roadmaster Chassis. However, a subsequent owner must submit a warranty transfer
form. A subsequent owner’s warranty coverage period is the remaining balance of the
warranty coverage period the prior owner was entitled to under this Limited Warranty.
Warranty transfer forms can be obtained by contacting the Customer Relations
Department. There is no charge for the transfer.
LIMITATION AND DISCLAIMER OF IMPLIED WARRANTIES:
IMPLIED WARRANTIES, IF ANY, ARISING BY WAY OF STATE LAW,
INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY
AND ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE, ARE LIMITED IN DURATION TO THE TERM OF THIS
LIMITED WARRANTY AND ARE LIMITED IN SCOPE OF COVERAGE
TO THOSE PORTIONS OF THE MOTORHOME COVERED BY THIS
LIMITED WARRANTY. WARRANTOR DISCLAIMS ALL IMPLIED AND
EXPRESS WARRANTIES, INCLUDING THE IMPLIED WARRANTY OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND THE IMPLIED WARRANTY OF FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, ON COMPONENTS AND APPLIANCES
EXCLUDED FROM COVERAGE AS SET FORTH BELOW. There is no
warranty of any nature made by Warrantor beyond that contained in this Limited
Warranty. No person has authority to enlarge, amend or modify this Limited
Warranty. The dealer is not the Warrantor’s agent but is an independent entity.
Warrantor is not responsible for any undertaking, representation or warranty made by
any dealer or other person beyond those expressly set forth in this Limited Warranty.
Some states do not allow limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the
above limitation may not apply to you.
WHAT THE WARRANTY COVERS:
Warrantor’s Limited Warranty covers defects in the manufacture of the
Roadmaster Chassis and defects in materials used to manufacture the Roadmaster
Chassis. “Defect” means the failure of the Roadmaster Chassis and/or the materials
used to assemble the Roadmaster Chassis to conform to Warrantor’s design and
manufacturing specification and tolerances. Also see the section “What the Warranty
Does Not Cover” set out below.
WHAT WE WILL DO TO CORRECT PROBLEMS:
Warrantor’s sole and exclusive obligation is to repair and/or replace, at its option, any
covered defect if: (1) you notify Warrantor or one of its authorized servicing dealers of
the defect within the warranty coverage period and within five (5) days of discovering
the defect; and (2) you deliver your Roadmaster Chassis to Warrantor or Warrantor’s
authorized servicing dealer at your cost and expense. It is reasonable to expect some
service items to occur during the warranty period. The performance of warranty repairs
shall not extend the original warranty coverage period. Further, any performance of
repairs after the warranty coverage period has expired or any performance of repairs to
component parts and appliances that are excluded from coverage shall be considered
“good will” repairs, which shall not alter the express terms of this limited warranty.
If the repair or replacement remedy fails to successfully cure a defect after Warrantor
received a reasonable opportunity to cure the defect(s), your sole and exclusive remedy
shall be limited to Warrantor paying you the cost of having an independent third party
perform repair(s) to the defect(s). Warrantor may use new and/or remanufactured parts
and/or components of substantially equal quality to complete any repairs. Defects
and/or damage to interior and exterior surfaces, trim, upholstery and other appearance
items may occur at the factory during manufacture, during delivery of the motorhome
to the selling dealer or on the selling dealer’s lot. Normally, any such defect or
damage is detected and corrected at the factory or by the selling dealer during the
inspection process performed by the Warrantor and the selling dealer. If, however, you
discover any such defect or damage when you take delivery of the motorhome, you
must notify your dealer or Warrantor within five days of the date of purchase to have
repairs performed to the defect at no cost to you as provided by this Limited Warranty.
If either three or more unsuccessful repair attempts have been made to correct any
covered defect that you believe substantially impairs the value, use or safety of your
motorhome, or repairs to any covered defect(s) which you believe substantially impairs
the value, use or safety of your motorhome have taken 30 or more days to complete,
you must, to the extent permitted by law, notify Warrantor directly in writing of the
failure to successfully repair the defect(s) so that Warrantor can become directly
involved in exercising a final repair attempt for the purpose of performing a successful
repair to the identified defect(s).
iii
RoadMaster Limited Warranty - 2008
HOW TO GET SERVICE:
For warranty service simply contact one of Warrantor’s authorized service centers
for an appointment, then deliver your Roadmaster Chassis (at your expense) to the
service center. If you need assistance in locating an authorized warranty service facility,
contact Warrantor’s Warranty Department (1-877-466-6226). The mailing address is:
91320 Coburg Industrial Way
Coburg, Oregon 97408
In the event the Roadmaster Chassis is inoperative due to malfunction of a warranted
part, Warrantor will pay the cost of having the motorhome towed to the nearest
authorized repair facility provided you notify Warrantor prior to incurring the towing
charges to receive directions to the nearest repair facility. Because Warrantor does not
control the scheduling of service work by its authorized servicing dealers, you may
encounter some delay in scheduling and/or in the completion of the repairs.
WHAT THE WARRANTY DOES NOT COVER:
This Limited Warranty does not cover: modifications and alterations to the
Roadmaster Chassis by others; the motorhome that is mounted upon the Roadmaster
Chassis, including by way of example the motorhome manufacturer’s design,
manufacture, assembly and/or installation of the side walls, roof, windows, flooring,
electrical system, plumbing system, LP-Gas system, appliances and slide outs; items
that are working as designed but which you are unhappy with because of the design;
normal wear and usage; routine maintenance including by way of example wheel
alignments; component parts covered by their own manufacturer’s warranty, including
by way of example the engine, radiator, transmission, tires, tubes, batteries, exhaust
system and the emission control systems; and, flaking, peeling rusting and chips or
other defects or damage in or to the frame and frame cross members caused by rocks
or other road hazards and the environment including airborne pollutants and salt.
Component part manufacturers issue limited warranties covering those portions of the
Roadmaster Chassis not covered by the Limited Warranty issued by Warrantor. To learn
more on what specific component parts are excluded from the Limited Warranty issued
by Warrantor please contact your selling dealership or Warrantor directly or review the
warranty packet inside the Motorhome.
EVENTS DISCHARGING WARRANTOR FROM OBLIGATION UNDER
WARRANTY:
Misuse or neglect, accidents, unauthorized alteration, failure to provide reasonable
and necessary maintenance (see Owner’s Manual), damage caused by off road use,
collision, fire, theft, vandalism, explosions, overloading in excess of rated capacities,
and odometer tampering shall discharge Warrantor from any express or implied
warranty obligation to repair any resulting defect.
iv
DISCLAIMER OF CONSEQUENTIAL AND INCIDENTAL DAMAGES:
THE ORIGINAL PURCHASER OF THE ROADMASTER CHASSIS
AND ANY PERSON TO WHOM THE ROADMASTER CHASSIS IS
TRANSFERRED, AND ANY PERSON WHO IS AN INTENDED OR
UNINTENDED USER OR BENEFICIARY OF THE ROADMASTER CHASSIS,
SHALL NOT BE ENTITLED TO RECOVER FROM WARRANTOR ANY
CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES RESULTING FROM
ANY DEFECT IN THE ROADMASTER CHASSIS, INCLUDING BY WAY
OF EXAMPLE FUEL AND TRANSPORTATION EXPENSES TO DELIVER
THE PRODUCT TO THE SERVICING DEALER, HOTEL ROOMS, LOST
WAGES AND WATER DAMAGE. THE EXCLUSION OF CONSEQUENTIAL
AND INCIDENTAL DAMAGES SHALL BE DEEMED INDEPENDENT OF,
AND SHALL SURVIVE, ANY FAILURE OF THE ESSENTIAL PURPOSE OF
ANY LIMITED REMEDY. Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of
consequential or incidental damages, so the above exclusions may not apply to you.
LEGAL REMEDIES:
THIS LIMITED WARRANTY DOES NOT “EXTEND TO FUTURE
PERFORMANCE.” ANY ACTION TO ENFORCE THIS LIMITED
WARRANTY OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES SHALL NOT BE
COMMENCED MORE THAN NINETY (90) DAYS AFTER THE EXPIRATION
OF THE THIRTY-SIX (36) MONTH WARRANTY COVERAGE PERIOD
DESIGNATED ABOVE. IF YOU USE YOUR MOTORHOME FOR
COMMERCIAL OR BUSINESS PURPOSES, ANY ACTION TO ENFORCE
THIS LIMITED WARRANTY OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES SHALL NOT
BE COMMENCED MORE THAN ONE YEAR AFTER THE EXPIRATION OF
THE NINETY (90) DAY WARRANTY COVERAGE PERIOD DESIGNATED
ABOVE. THE PERFORMANCE OF REPAIRS SHALL NOT SUSPEND
THIS LIMITATIONS PERIOD FROM EXPIRING. Some states do not allow
the reduction in the statute of limitations, so the above reduction in the statute of
limitations may not apply to you.
THIS WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS. YOU MAY
ALSO HAVE OTHER RIGHTS, WHICH VARY FROM STATE TO STATE.
LARGER PRINT VERSION AVAILABLE WITHIN THE OWNERS MANUAL
AND UPON REQUEST ADDRESSED TO YOUR SELLING DEALER OR
WARRANTOR’S WARRANTY DEPARTMENT.
012507
2008 Knight
Section 1 - General Information...........................3
Section 2 - Driving & Safety.....................................13
Section 3 - Exterior & Interior Care................49
Section 4 - Appliances...................................................73
Section 5 - Equipment....................................................97
Section 6 - Water Systems........................................125
Section 7 - LP-Gas Systems.........................................143
Section 8 - Electrical Systems – House . .......153
Section 9 - Electrical Systems – Chassis.......171
Section 10 - Chassis Information .......................189
Index .....................................................................................237
The information contained in this document is intended to reflect standard and optional
equipment included in a typically equipped model at the time of delivery to the initial retail
owner. Your actual unit may vary from this document as a result of optional equipment that
is not generally offered on this model. In the case that you are not the initial retail owner
of the unit, this document will not reflect modifications that may have been performed by
previous owners.
Product information and specifications are shown herein as of the time of printing.
The motorhome manufacturer reserves the right to change product specifications,
designs and standard equipment without notice and without incurring obligation.
©Copyright Monaco Coach Corporation. All rights reserved. All other trademarks or
registered trademarks are property of their respective holders. Brand name products of
other companies mentioned in this manual are not endorsed by the manufacturer of the
motorhome.
07088JK Rev. 2
1
2008 Knight
general information — Section 1
Warranty InformatIon fIle .............................. 4
reportIng Safety DefectS................................. 4
Safety termS ........................................................ 4
gloSSary of termS ............................................. 5
venDor lISt ........................................................... 7
oWner’S manUal SUrvey: knIgHt 2008 .......... 11
lImIteD Warranty tranSfer applIcatIon/
cHange of oWner InformatIon ....................13
General Information — 1
Warranty Information File
In addition to this Owner’s Manual you will
find a Warranty Information File in your unit.
This file contains valuable documents about
your motorhome’s systems and equipment.
Many of the component manufacturer’s warranty
registration cards can be found in the box. They
will need to be filled out and mailed. Be sure
you read and understand all the information in
this file to help you safely operate, maintain and
troubleshoot those items.
Additional Information:
Changes, additions and supplemental
information in the form of Manual Addendums
and “Tech Tips” can be obtained by visiting our
Web Site at www.monaco-online.com. Select
one of the products from the product lineup. Go
to the Service menu. A submenu will appear.
It may also be helpful to browse the “Tech
Tips” menu for the other product lines. The tips
may not completely apply to your particular
model, but information contained therein can be
useful.
Reporting Safety Defects
If you believe that your motorhome has a
defect which could cause a crash or could
cause injury or death, you should immediately
inform the National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration (NHTSA) in addition to
notifying Monaco Coach. If NHTSA receives
similar complaints, it may open an investigation,
and if it finds that a safety defect exists in a
group of motorhomes, it may order a recall or
remedy campaign. However, NHTSA cannot
become involved in individual problems between
you, your dealer or Monaco Coach. To contact
NHTSA you may call the Auto Safety Hot line
toll-free at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY: 1-800-4249153) (or 1-202-366-0123 in the Washington
D.C. area), visit their websites at www.nhtsa.
gov or www.safercar.gov, or write to:
NHTSA
U.S. Department of Transportation
400 Seventh Street S.W.
Washington, DC 20590
Safety Terms
Many of the safety terms are personal safety
instructions. Definitions for the terms are listed
below. It is important to thoroughly read and
understand the safety instructions displayed
throughout the manual. Failure to comply with
specific instructions may result in personal injury
or death. Many instructions are required by
National Safety Associations.
2008 Kn ig ht
WARNING:
Warnings contain information regarding
personal safety and/or pertaining to potential
extensive or permanent damage to the
motorhome or its components by means of
hazards or improper use.
CAUTION:
Cautions pertain to potential damage to the
motorhome and/or its components.
POISON:
A warning or caution pertaining to safety
and/or use of a poisonous substance or
harmful chemical.
NOTE:
Information and reminders concerning
proper operation of the motorhome and/or its
components.
INSPECTION:
Inspection of the motorhome and/or
its components is required. Additional
instruction may follow.
LUBE:
Lubrication, or addition of a lubricant
product, to the motorhome and/or a specified
component or part is required. Additional
instruction may follow.
ASSEMBLE or REPAIR:
Assembly, disassembly or installation of
a component or part, and/or repair to the
motorhome may be required. Assistance of
Technical Support or Technician may be
necessary.
General Information — 1
INFORMATION:
References to additional information
regarding operation of the motorhome and/or
its components found in additional sources,
other than the Owner’s Manual. Also refers
to the WARRANTY INFORMATION FILE,
found within the Warranty Information Box
in the motorhome.
TIP:
Tips contain information, helpful hints
and/or suggestion for ease of operation of the
motorhome or its components.
Glossary of Terms
Air Compressor - Pumps air to and builds
air pressure in an air system.
Air Dryer - Cools, filters and dries the air
delivered by an air compressor.
Air Governor - Controls the operation of
the air compressor by constantly monitoring
air pressure in the supply tank of the air
system. The air governor initiates the unload
cycle when the cut-out pressure is reached.
Alternating Current (AC) - A current
that varies periodically in magnitude
and direction. A battery does not deliver
alternating current. Also referred to as
shore power, utility power, inverter power,
generator power, etc.
Ampere (Amp) - The unit of measure
of electron flow rate of current through a
circuit.
Ampere-hour (Amp-hr. AH) - A unit of
measure for a battery electrical storage
capacity, obtained by multiplying the current
in amperes by the time in hours of discharge.
Example: A battery which delivers 5
amperes for 20 hours, delivers 5 amperes
times 20 hours, or 100 Amp-Hr. of capacity.
ANSI - American National Standards
Institute.
ASTM - American Society for Testing and
Materials.
Black Water - Term associated with the
sewage holding tank. The toilet drains
directly into this tank.
CCA - Cold Cranking Amperage is the
amount of current a battery can deliver for
30 seconds at 0° F without dropping below a
specified voltage, usually 10.5 Volts DC.
City Water - A term associated with
the water supply that you hook-up to at
campgrounds. It is called city water because
water is pulled from a central source (like in
a city) and not the fresh water tank.
Compressor Load Cycle - The time during
which the air compressor is building air
pressure in an air system.
Compressor Unload Cycle - The time
during which the air compressor is idling
and is not building air pressure in an air
system.
Curbside - This refers to the side of the
motorhome which faces the curb when it
is parked. Often called the door side or the
passenger side.
Current - The rate of flow of electricity
or the movement rate of electrons along a
conductor. It is comparable to the flow of
a stream of water. The unit of measure for
current is the ampere.
Chassis Battery - Powers chassis 12 Volt
accessories and starts engine.
Cut-In Pressure - The pressure level in the
air system supply tank which tiggers the
compressor load cycle.
Circuit - An electric circuit is the path of
an electric current. A closed circuit has a
complete path. An open circuit has a broken
or disconnected path.
Cut-Out Pressure - The pressure level in
the air system supply tank which triggers the
compressor unload cycle.
Cycle - In a battery, one discharge plus one
recharge equals one cycle.
2008 K Nig ht
General Information — 1
Desiccant - A granular substance that has a
high affinity for water and is used to retain
moisture from the air stream flowing through
the air dryer cartridge.
Escape (Egress) Window - The formal
name for the emergency window located in
the rear of the motorhome. Egress windows
can be easily identified by their red handles.
Direct Current (DC) - Power that is
stored in a battery bank or supplied by
photovoltaics, alternator, chargers and DC
generators. Direct current is also known as
battery power. Current only flows one way.
Full Hook-Up Site - A campground that has
city water, shore power and sewer hook-ups
or connections available.
Drain Trap - This is a curve that is in all
drains. Water is trapped in the curve and this
creates a barrier so tank odors cannot escape
through the drain.
Dry Camping - Camping in the motorhome
when there is no city water hook-up or shore
power. In other words, using only the water
and power that is in the motorhome and not
from another source.
Drying Cycle - The time during which the
air dryer cools, filters and removes moisture
from the air delivered by the air compressor.
The drying cycle begins and ends the same
as the compressor load cycle.
Dump Station - A site where the waste
(grey) and sewage (black) tanks can be
drained. In most states it is illegal to drain
waste tanks anywhere other than at a dump
station.
Dump Valve - Another name for the
T-handle valve used to drain the sewage
(black) and waste (grey) tanks.
Grey Water - Term associated with the
waste water holding tank. Water from the
sink drains, the shower and the washer-dryer
(if equipped) go into this tank.
House Battery - Powers 12 Volt DC lights
and accessories inside motorhome.
LED (Light Emitting Diode) - Indicator
light.
Liquid Lead Acid Battery (LLA) A type of battery that uses liquid as an
electrolyte. This type of battery requires
periodic maintenance such as cleaning the
connections and checking the electrolyte
level.
Low Point Drain - The lowest point in the
plumbing. These drains must be closed when
you fill the water tank.
OEM - Term for Original Equipment
Manufacturer.
OHM - A unit for measuring electrical
resistances.
2008 Kn ig ht
Ohm’s Law - Expresses the relationship
between Volt (E), amperes (I) in an
electrical circuit with resistance (R). It can
be expressed as follows: E = IR. If any two
of the three values are known, the third
value can be calculated by using the above
formula.
Potentiometer - A device for measuring
an unknown potential difference or
electromotive force.
Pounds Per Square Inch Gauge (psig) Pressure measured with respect to that of the
atmosphere. This is a pressure gauge reading
in which the gauge is adjusted to read zero at
the surrounding atmospheric pressure. It is
commonly called gauge pressure.
Purge - The initial blast of air
(decompression) from the air dryer purge
valve at the beginning of the air compressor.
Purge Cycle - The time during which the air
dryer is undergoing purge and regeneration.
This cycle starts at the beginning of the
compressor unload cycle and normally ends
well before the beginning of the compressor
load cycle.
Regeneration - The mild backflow of air
through the air dryer and out the purge valve
that begins immediately after the purge
and lasts normally 10 to 15 seconds. This
backflow of air, from the air system and
through the air dryer, removes moisture from
the desiccant cartridge and prepares the air
dryer for the next compressor load cycle.
General Information — 1
Roadside - This refers to the side of the
motorhome which faces the road when it is
parked. Often called the off-door side or the
driver side.
SCA - Term for Supplemental Coolant
Additive. Chemical added to coolant for
diesel engines to help prevent cylinder liner
pitting and internal corrosion.
Shore Line - This is the electrical cord
which runs from the motorhome to the
campground 120/240 Volt AC electrical
supply.
Stinger - An arm attachment on a tow truck
that is used to lift the motorhome slightly for
towing.
Volt - The unit of measure for electric
potential.
Watt - The unit for measuring electrical
power, i.e. the rate of doing work, in moving
electrons by or against an electric potential.
Wet Cell Battery - A type of battery that
uses liquid as an electrolyte. This type
of battery requires periodic maintenance
to clean the connections and check the
electrolyte level.
2008 K Nig ht
Owner’s Manual Survey: KNIGHT 2008
Your suggestions are very important to us and we are continually
striving to improve the quality of our manuals. After becoming familiar
with your new recreational vehicle and the accompanying manual,
please take the time to answer the following questions. When you are
finished please return the survey via mail to our Technical Publications
Department, or you may fax the survey to: (541) 681-8031 Attention:
Technical Publications Department. Feel free to attach an additional
page if you desire.
1. Is this your first recreational vehicle? YES / NO (circle one)
2. If no, what was your previous recreational vehicle brand/model?______
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
3. Was the overall appearance and lay-out of this manual what you
expected to see in your new recreational vehicle?
____________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
5. Were the operating instructions clearly written, and were you able to
follow the steps without any difficulty?
____________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
6. Is there any additional information you would like to see incorporated
within the owner’s manual?
____________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
NAME: ________________________________________________
PHONE: (_____________)________________________________
ADDRESS:__________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
4. Was the information within this manual helpful in acquainting you with
your new recreational vehicle? If not please address any area(s) we need
SERIAL # ____________________________________________________
Tear off page and Mail To:
to expand or improve on.
____________________________________________________________
TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS PLT. 17
____________________________________________________________
MONACO COACH CORPORATION
___________________________________________________________________
91320 COBURG INDUSTRIAL WAY
___________________________________________________________________
COBURG, OR 97408
__________________________________________________________________
Limited Warranty Transfer Application/Change of Owner Information
Mail to:
Submitted By:
Limited Warranty Transfer Monaco Coach Corporation
Warranty Transfer
91320 Coburg Industrial Way
Coburg, OR 97408
Name: Address:
City:
State: Zip:
Please read terms and representations below before signing.
Phone: ( )
A. Current Owner Information:
First Name Initial Last Name
– Vehicle Identification Number
Unit # (15 digits)
(6 digits)
Address Change
Model/Year
B. New Owner Information, Transfer Coverage To:
First Name
Initial Last Name
( )
Phone Number
Street Address
Date of Transfer (If Applicable)
City
State
Odometer Reading at Transfer (If Applicable)
Zip
C. Signatures:
(New) Owner’s Signature Date
Selling Dealer’s Signature (If Applicable) Date
Terms & Representations
By your signature(s) on face side of this form, and in order to induce
Monaco Coach Corporation to transfer its Limited Warranty, you represent
the following:
1. That you have received and read a copy of the Limited Warranty.
2. You understand that the unit is to be used only for family camping and cross
country travel on improved roads.
3. All information provided by you on face side of this form is true and correct.
4. You understand that you are purchasing a pre-owned recreational vehicle
and Monaco Coach Corporation does not make any representation as to its
present condition.
Tear off page and Mail To:
WARRANTY TRANSFER, MONACO COACH CORPORATION,
91320 COBURG INDUSTRIAL WAY
COBURG, OR 97408
2
2008 Knight
Driving & Safety — Section 2
DrIvIng & Safety .............................................. 14
Inspections...................................................... 14
Familiarize.Yourself........................................... 14
Mirror.Adjust.................................................... 14
Safety.Seat.Belts.............................................. 14
DrIvIng tIpS ...................................................... 16
trIp preparatIon ............................................. 19
HItcH................................................................... 20
Using.the.Rear.Receiver................................... 20
Tow.Plug.Connection........................................ 22
rear vISIon SyStem ......................................... 22
BackIng Up a motorHome............................... 23
Set-Up proceDUreS.......................................... 24
Dry campIng ..................................................... 25
BreakIng camp ................................................. 26
emergency roaDSIDe proceDUreS .............. 27
In.Case.of.Flat.Tire........................................... 28
Dead.Chassis.Battery....................................... 28
toWIng proceDUreS ........................................ 29
Disabling.Parking.Brake.................................... 30
tIreS ................................................................... 30
Importance.of.Air.Pressure............................... 31
Tire.Pressure.Inflation.Guideline........................ 31
Tire.Chart.-.Goodyear....................................... 32
Inspecting.&.Pressure...................................... 33
Air.Pressure.Checklist...................................... 34
Tire.Support.When.Leveling............................. 34
Tire.Vibration................................................... 34
Tire.Rotation.................................................... 35
Tread............................................................... 35
Storage.of.Tires.-.Long.Term............................ 35
WHeel moUntIng .............................................. 335
WeIgHIng tHe motorHome.............................. 336
Weight.Terms. ................................................. 336
Weight.Terms.
Weight.Label.................................................... 338
Weight.Label....................................................
Four.Corner.Weighing.(Example)...................... 339
Four.Corner.Weighing.(Example)......................
Cargo.Carrying.Capacity.Flowchart.................. 441
Cargo.Carrying.Capacity.Flowchart..................
Weighing.Procedure.Worksheet........................ 441
Weighing.Procedure.Worksheet........................
Weight.Record.Sheet. ...................................... 443
Weight.Record.Sheet.
Smoke Detector ............................................... 444
Operation......................................................... 444
Operation.........................................................
Testing. ........................................................... 444
Testing.
Maintenance.................................................... 444
Maintenance....................................................
Troubleshooting............................................... 444
Troubleshooting...............................................
carBon monoxIDe Detector .......................... 445
Operation.........................................................
Operation
O
peration.........................................................
......................................................... 445
Alarm.
Alarm
A
larm............................................................... 446
Testing.
TTesting
esting.. ........................................................... 446
Cleaning.&.Maintenance.
Cleaning.&.Maintenance
C
leaning.&.Maintenance.. ................................. 446
ffIre
Ire extIngUISHer ............................................ 446
eeScape
Scape (egreSS) WInDoW ............................... 447
driving & safety — 2
Driving & Safety
Section Two contains information on driving
tips, emergency situations, towing, safety
devices, weighing the motorhome and tires.
NOTE
The motorhome has electronic data
recording devices that may record
information about direction, road speed,
engine speed, brake application, steering
attitude or other vehicle operating data.
Data recording devices can be present
in engines, transmissions, ABS (Antilock
Brake Systems) or other systems
affiliated with operation of the vehicle.
Information from data recording devices
can be examined in case of an accident.
Contact the component manufacturer to
learn more about these devices.
Examine the condition of the motorhome and
the surrounding area. Look high and low when
walking around the motorhome.
Familiarize Yourself
Because the location of the driver’s seat in
the motorhome is higher and farther to the left
than most vehicles, a different perspective of
the roadway is created. Rely on the outside
mirrors to line up with the center of the road
and to check conditions behind the motorhome.
The dashboard may include more gauges and
controls than are normally found in passenger
automobiles. Become familiar with these gauges
and their indications before starting out.
Mirror Adjust
Inspections
Differences between a passenger automobile
and a motorhome are significant. Always be
aware of these differences when traveling.
The key to safely operating a motorhome is
inspection. Undetected problems could cause
problems on the road and may result in lost time
and increased repair costs. Several states require
a special license endorsement and motorhome
inspection prior to registration. Know and
observe the laws of the states in which you will
be traveling. Laws may vary from state to state.
A systematic inspection conducted prior to
moving the motorhome can help ensure nothing
is overlooked and will assist in familiarizing
the owner with the motorhome. Prior to moving
the motorhome perform a general inspection.
14
NOTE
Use the mirror adjust switch located on
the driver’s console to fine tune the view.
Adjust the mirrors prior to
starting out. Have an assistant
help to simplify the mirror
adjustment process.
Mirror Adjusting:
 Tools needed: Allen wrench,
flat blade screw
driver and socket
wrench.
 Adjust the driver
seat to the travel
position.
 Remove plug at
the bottom of the
arm.
Safety Seat Belts
Mirror Adjust
Switch on
Driver’s
Console
080378
031210e
2008 Kn ig ht
Use the socket wrench to loosen the bolt
located at the base of the arm. (See point
A on the drawing.)
 Adjust the mirror for a clear side view of
the coach.
 Tighten the bolt once the proper
adjustment is made.
 Reinstall the plug.
 To adjust the “head” of the mirror, loosen
the set screws located below the mirror
shown as point B. Adjust the head of the
mirror to the left or right.
 Manually adjust the bottom section of the
mirror.
 Tighten set screws once the proper
adjustment is made.
 Repeat procedure for passenger side
mirror.

All occupants must be furnished with and
use seat belts while the motorhome is moving.
The driver’s seat, and all other seats designed
to carry passengers while the motorhome is in
motion, are equipped with safety seat belts. DO
NOT occupy beds or seats that are not equipped
with a safety belt while the motorhome is in
motion. The driver’s seat must be locked in the
forward facing position while motorhome is in
motion. DO NOT use a seat belt on more than
one person.
driving & safety — 2
To fasten the seat belt, pull the belt out of the
retractors and insert the tab into the buckle; a
click will sound when the tab locks into the
buckle. Seat belt lengths automatically adjust to
your size and sitting position. DO NOT route
belts over armrest or under the arm.
WARNING
Safety belts are supplied at affixed
seating positions. DO NOT occupy seats
not equipped with safety belts while the
motorhome is in motion. Seat belts must
only be used on permanently mounted
seats. DO NOT use a single seat belt on
more than one person. Pilot and Copilot seats must be locked in a forward
facing position with seat belts fastened
while the motorhome is in motion. DO
NOT rotate the seat while in transit.
WARNING
Only forward facing booth dinette seats
equipped with seat belts are designed
for occupancy while the motorhome is in
motion.
Child Safety Seat:
General Child Seat Use Information
Always refer to the child seat and vehicle manufacturers’ instructions for proper use and
installation instructions.
Age/Weight
Seat Type/Seat Position
Infants
Birth to at least 1 year and at
least 20 lbs.
Infant-Only Seat/rear-facing
(or )
Convertible Seat/used rear
facing
Less than 1 year/20 to 35 lbs. Convertible Seat/used
rear facing (select one
recommended for heavier
infants)
Children may remain in their
rear-facing seats as long as they
haven’t exceeded the height or
weight requirements.
Seats should be secured to the
vehicle by the safety belts or by
the LATCH system.
Usage Tips
▪ Never use in a front seat where an air bag
is present.
▪ Tightly install child seat in rear seat,
facing the rear.
▪ Child seat should recline at approximately
a 45° angle.
▪ Harness straps/slots at or below
shoulder level (lower set of slots for most
convertible child safety seats).
▪ Harness straps snug on child; harness
clip at armpit level.
Preschoolers/Toddlers
1 to 4 years/at least 20 lbs. to Convertible Seat/forwardapprox. 40 lbs.
facing or forward facing only
(or)
Children may remain in their
Combination Seat with
forward-facing seats as long as Harness
they haven’t exceeded the height
or weight requirements.
▪ Tightly install child seat, facing forward.
▪ Harness straps/slots at or above child’s
shoulders (usually top set of slots for
convertible child safety seats).
▪ Harness straps snug on child; harness
clip at armpit level.
Seats should be secured to the
vehicle by the safety belts or by
the LATCH system.
Young Children
4 to at least 8 years/unless
they are 4’ 9” (57”) tall.
Belt-Positioning Booster
No back or High Back BeltPositioning Booster.
NEVER use with lap-only belts
— belt-positioning boosters
are always used with lap and
shoulder belts.
▪ Booster used with adult lap and shoulder
belt in rear seat.
▪ Shoulder belt should rest snugly across
chest, rests on shoulder; and should
NEVER be placed under the arm or
behind the back.
▪ Lap-belt should rest low, across the
lap/upper thigh area — not across the
stomach.
Stay informed about child safety seat recalls; be sure to fill out the registration card that comes with new child seats.
2008 K Nig ht
15
driving & safety — 2
The child safety seat can be positioned in two
places in the motorhome: the front passenger
(co-pilot) seat and forward facing permanently
mounted booth dinette seat.
WARNING
DO NOT transport children
unrestrained. Infants must be placed in
approved safety seats - small children
must be restrained in child safety seats.
DO NOT use a single seat belt on more
than one child. Failure to comply with
these rules can lead to injury or death.
NOTE
Individual states and Canadian
provinces may have laws that can exceed
the requirements as described in this
section. It is your responsibility to know
and comply with the laws in the state or
province in which you travel.
WARNING
Because many styles of safety and
booster seats are available, refer to the
safety seat manufacturer’s manual for
proper installation and how to properly
install and secure the safety or booster
seat.
NOTE
Use of a safety or booster seat in the
front seat may be prohibited in some
states and Canadian provinces.
Seat Belt Care:
Keep the belt clean and dry. Clean with mild
soap and lukewarm water. DO NOT use bleach,
dye or abrasive cleansers that may weaken the
belt material. Periodically inspect belts for cuts,
frays or loose parts, and replace damaged parts.
DO NOT disassemble or modify the system.
16
Replace the seat belt assembly after a severe
impact, even when damage is not obvious.
DRIVING TIPS
The motorhome is a
complex vehicle that requires
increased driving awareness
because of its size and various
components. Due to the
downhill
motorhome length the turning
radius will be much wider than that of a standard
automobile. Always pay close attention to the
perimeter of the motorhome including front,
sides, rear, roof and undercarriage. Ensure the
surrounding area is clear of obstacles. Utilize
the driving mirrors to observe traffic conditions
as well as the motorhome exterior including
tires, bay doors, blind spots, etc. Use a push-pull
method of steering, with both hands parallel on
the steering wheel.
The motorhome is heavier than an automobile
and has a higher center of gravity, which affects
reaction time of the motorhome. Swerving and
sharp turning, especially performed at high
speeds, could result in loss of control. Keep
the size of the motorhome in mind and drive
with extra caution to avoid situations that might
require quick momentum changes. Increase
reaction time by paying attention to traffic and
road conditions 12 to 15 seconds ahead of the
motorhome’s position.
2008 Kn ig ht
The motorhome will travel safely and
comfortably at highway speed limits. However,
it takes more time to reach highway speed.
When passing another vehicle, allow extra time
and space to complete the pass due to the added
length of the motorhome.
When descending a long hill, manually shift
to a lower gear and begin the descent at a slow
speed. DO NOT allow the motorhome to gain
momentum before trying to slow down. Use the
exhaust brake in conjunction with the service
brakes to help maintain a slow, safe descent.
The transmission and engine will help control
downhill speed and can extend the service life
of the brake lining. Distance required to stop
the motorhome is greater than an automobile.
Practice stopping away from traffic to get the
feel of distance required to stop the motorhome.
Adjusting to road, weather and terrain
conditions is necessary to keep the motorhome
under control. Pay attention to road signs
that advise of local road hazards and driving
conditions. DO NOT operate the motorhome
when road, weather and terrain conditions seem
unsafe.
Keep the windshield clear of humidity in
the form of water or ice. Start the motorhome
and turn on the dash defrost and the overhead
blowers to help remove moisture from inside
the windshield. It may also be necessary to
use a clean cloth to wipe away moisture. Keep
windshield wipers in good working order at all
times. DO NOT operate the motorhome if the
windshield is not clear.
driving & safety — 2
Check tonnage limits of bridges before
crossing to ensure they can support the weight
of the motorhome. Signs should be posted at
bridge entrances. Check the posted height of
all overpasses or situations where overhead
clearance is limited. Keep in mind that road
surfaces may be repaved or packed with snow;
therefore, the actual posted clearance height
would not apply in such conditions.
Driving Cautions:
 Avoid getting too close to the shoulder
of the road, which may be too soft to
support the weight of the motorhome.
 Side spacing is best maintained by
keeping the motorhome centered in the
driving lane.
 Driving lanes in work zones can be
uneven, congested and narrower than
usual.
 Be cautious of road debris that can
damage the undercarriage of the
motorhome or become lodged in the dual
tires and cause damage to the tires, wheel
rims or tow vehicle.
 On back roads and single divided roads,
tree branches and shrubbery can protrude
into the roadway. Watch for low hanging
branches especially during inclement
weather as rain and snow will cause
branches to hang lower than usual.
 Keep in consideration that posted speed
signs are usually passenger automobile
rated. Be extra aware of driving
conditions and use the appropriate
speed for a motorhome when necessary,
especially on corners and mountain
roads.
Downgrade speed should be at least
5 mph less than upgrade speed, or
downgrade speed should be attainable
within three seconds of a brake
application.
 Use a four second rule when following
other vehicles at speeds under 40 mph.
Use a five second rule when following at
speeds over 40 mph.

Right Turns:
Negotiating a right hand turn in a motorhome
can be difficult. Many drivers fear they cannot
make the turn without entering into the other
lane or jumping the curb. Here are a few tips to
make a right hand turn easier:
050250d
As the turn approaches, look into the
mirror to ensure the lane to the left is
clear, then move wide over to the left.
 When making the right turn, the left
rear wheel should touch the center line
of the road and the driver’s hips should
be parallel to the roadside curb of the
corner being turned to aid in avoiding a
premature turn.
 Make the turn slowly.
 Check mirrors frequently. Stay aware
of necessary clearance and space
management of the motorhome while
negotiating the turn.

Left Turns:
 DO NOT proceed with the turn until
the driver’s seat is aligned with the
middle of the intersection. If two lanes
are available, take the right hand lane. A
vehicle or object located on the left-hand
side is easier seen.
Ascending a Grade:
When approaching an uphill grade, assess the
grade and length before beginning the climb.
Prepare early for long climbs. Unlike gasoline
engines, diesels do not necessarily produce more
power by pressing further on the accelerator.
A gasoline engine will operate at full throttle
(at least for a short period of time), but a diesel
usually just wastes fuel at full throttle. The
power output from a diesel engine is dependent
upon the following:

2008 K Nig ht
RPM - Every engine has a range of RPM
that produces power most efficiently.
17
driving & safety — 2

Fuel/Air mixture - At a given RPM,
the engine, even with the help of a
turbo-charger, can only introduce a
given volume of air into the combustion
chamber. This volume of air can
efficiently combine with only so much
fuel; so adding more fuel to the engine
only wastes it.
Determine ranges where the motorhome works
best by driving long grades when temperatures
remain stable for the duration of the climb.
IMPORTANT SAFETY TIP
Turn on the four way flashers if road
speed degrades to the point where the
motorhome is moving significantly
under the posted speed. Use pullouts
if traffic is building. Once in a pullout,
if there is sufficient clearance for
safety, idle the engine for a while to
allow the exhaust and the turbo to
cool. While these are cooling, the
transmission will also cool. Monitor the
gauges while waiting.
Descending a Grade:
Prepare to descend a grade at the crest of the
hill. Observe any signs indicating grade angle
and duration. The sign may suggest maximum
downhill speed according to Gross Combined
Weight (the combined weight of the motorhome
and a trailer/tow car). At the crest of the hill,
manually shift the transmission into a lower
gear. DO NOT allow the motorhome to gain
momentum before slowing down.
18
Use the exhaust brake to help maintain a slow,
safe downhill speed. Located on the Driver Side
console is an exhaust brake switch. When the
exhaust brake switch is on, the exhaust brake
will activate when the throttle is released. With
exhaust brake applied, road speed may increase
until the transmission automatically shifts to
the next higher gear. Apply the brakes using
moderately heavy pressure on the brake pedal
to reduce speed and manually downshift to
maintain a safe, slow speed. DO NOT pump the
brakes, as this can result in a loss of air pressure.
Avoid riding the brakes, as this can cause brakes
to overheat. Either method can result in brake
failure or loss of brake effeciveness.
Night Driving:
 Be well rested and alert while driving. If
necessary, find a safe stopping place to
rest until ready to continue.
 Avoid using interior lights while driving
that create a glare on the windshield and
decrease visibility.
 Dim dash lights to a comfortable level to
reduce glare.
Extreme Heat and Hot Weather Conditions:
 Frequently observe all gauges. Variations
from normal conditions should be
promptly evaluated.
 Check tire pressure before traveling in
hot conditions. Tire air pressure increases
with heat. DO NOT let air out of a hot
tire. When the tires cool down they
will return to the correct/previous tire
pressure.
 Pay extra attention to hoses and belts
that are more susceptible to fatigue in
extreme heat.
2008 Kn ig ht
Winter and Cold Climate Conditions:
 The motorhome should be prepared for
cold weather use.
 Keep speeds slow and steady. Make
moves gradually and increase visual
distance for a gain in reaction time.
 If road or weather conditions are
treacherous, find a safe stopping place
and wait for conditions to improve.
 Avoid downshifting or using the exhaust
brake on wet or slippery surfaces, which
can cause the drive wheels to skid.
 Wiper blades should be in good
condition. Fill the washer reservoir with
antifreeze formula window
washer fluid.
 Use mirror heat to keep mirrors
clear.
 Remove any ice build-up from
the entry step to avoid accidental
slipping.
080498n
Located
on Driver’s
Console
Wet Conditions:
 Worn or improperly inflated tires
can increase the risk of hydroplaning.
 Heavy rain or deep standing water can
cause brakes to apply unevenly or grab.
Refueling:
 Truck stops are good refueling points for
motorhomes.
 Check overhead clearance heights before
pulling through the fuel island.
 Be aware of concrete/steel posts installed
around fuel islands.
driving & safety — 2
Avoid running over the fuel hose as it can
get hung up on the motorhome and cause
body damage.
 Use of gloves is recommended for
refueling. Store gloves in the outside
compartment.
 To prevent grease and fuel deposits from
being tracked into the motorhome when
refueling, change shoes before entering.
Store the extra pair of shoes near the
entry door.

WARNING
LP-Gas and gasoline are highly
flammable and can ignite, resulting
in explosion, fire or death. Ensure
all flames are extinguished, all LPGas appliances are turned off and the
primary LP-Gas valve is off prior to
refueling.
Fuel Economy:
Driving style, wind resistance, terrain, vehicle
weight, and engine-driven accessories are some
of the factors that affect fuel economy.
Guidelines to Help Increase Fuel Efficiency:
 When starting out, apply the throttle
lightly and accelerate gradually. Avoid
using excessive throttle and accelerating
quickly.
 Check the tire pressure. A low tire is not
only a safety hazard, but also increases
rolling resistance and increases fuel
consumption.
 Keep the engine at a low to mid operating
range of 1100 to 1500 RPM. This will
use less fuel than a higher RPM.
Avoid using full throttle when ascending
a long hill. This wastes fuel and increases
engine operating temperature from
incomplete combustion. Manually shift
to a lower gear and use less throttle. Fuel
will burn more efficiently.
 Avoid extended idling to warm-up the
engine. Start the engine and wait for
normal oil pressure to register. Engage
the high idle feature until the engine
coolant temperature gauge raises. The
engine is now ready for travel. Whenever
coolant temperature is below operating
temperature (idling engine) incomplete
combustion occurs, causing carbon
build-up and raw fuel to wash lubricating
oil from the cylinder walls and dilute the
crankcase oil.
 Excessive idling (more than 10 or 15
minutes) can clog fuel injectors, damage
the emission system and eventually
causing piston rings and valves to stick.
 Operate the transmission with the MODE
function set to Economy whenever
possible; this allows for earlier shifts and
enhanced fuel economy.
 Follow the maintenance schedule for the
engine.

Trip Preparation
The following suggestions are general
guidelines to follow when preparing for a trip:
Items to Carry:
 An emergency road kit containing a
flashlight, road flares, warning signs and
a fire extinguisher.
2008 K Nig ht

Local, State and National Maps, as
well as a ‘Motor Carrier’ road atlas (for
refueling station and truck repair facility
locations).
020064b
Tool Box & Emergency Road Supplies
Hand tools, a 12 Volt DC
test light, a 120 Volt
AC polarity tester,
GB
battery hydrometer,
an assortment of
blade fuses, mini
fuses and alternator
020062
belt.
Polarity Tester
 Potable and nonpotable water hoses,
a water pressure
090333f
regulator and
Test Light
various termination
connectors for sewage.

GARDNER BENDER, INC
OPEN
GROUND
OPEN
NUETRAL
OPEN HOT
HOT/GRD
REVERSE
HOT/NEU
REVERSE
CORRECT
Inspection:
 Ensure all exterior items are stowed or
secured (i.e. TV antenna, ceiling vents
and windows).
 Check belts, hoses, battery and engine
fluid levels. Inspect the engine,
transmission and generator per the OEM
manuals.
19
driving & safety — 2
Evenly distribute and secure cargo. Store
heavy items near the rear axle and lighter
items toward the front to prevent uneven
stress and handling problems.
 Check all tires outside the motorhome
for accurate pressure and physical
condition. Look around, above and under
the motorhome for obstruction or leaks.
Test all exterior lighting: headlamps,
taillights, brake and clearance lights.
 Inside the motorhome store and secure
heavier objects in the lower cabinets to
maintain a low center of gravity for sway
reduction. Secure loose items to prevent
weight shifts. Store lighter items in the
overhead cabinets. Close and secure all
cabinet doors and drawers, shower and
pocket doors. Turn off interior lighting.
Adjust exterior mirrors and check dash
gauges for proper operation.

TIPS
Multi-purpose items, versatile clothing
and periodic removal of unused cargo
will streamline cargo storage.
Hitch
Using the Rear Receiver
When using the rear hitch receiver, remember
that the motorhome is intended for towing light
loads and is primarily designed as a recreational
vehicle. Safety and durability of the hitch
receiver requires proper use. Avoid excessive
towing loads or other misuse of the receiver.
Towing will affect fuel economy.
INFORMATION
For chassis maintenance details refer to
the chassis section.
CAUTION
Open the bay doors slowly after a trip as
cargo may shift during travel.
020065f
Weight pushing down on the rear hitch (tongue
weight) must not exceed 10% of maximum
tow capacity. It is recommended to weigh the
motorhome when fully loaded to ensure proper
weight distribution of the GCVW (Gross
Combined Vehicle Weight).
WARNING
To avoid injury, never place
hands or fingers near the
edges of the bay door when
opening or closing. Always
use the latch handle. Apply
pressure with the other
hand just above the latch
handle.
020134h
Typical Latch
020144e
20
2008 Kn ig ht
When weighing the motorhome, add all
passenger weight to the GCVW total. The
motorhome fully loaded, including fresh water,
LP-Gas and any vehicle or trailer towed, must
not exceed the GCWR (Gross Combined
Weight Rating).
WARNING
Most states and Canadian provinces
require trailers and/or towed vehicles
to have adequate auxiliary brakes.
Failure to comply with these State and
Canadian province requirements may
result in fines and/or pose a safety
hazard, which may result in an accident.
WARNING
DO NOT tow a trailer or vehicle that
exceeds the rated capacity of the
hitch receiver. Overloading the hitch
receiver can cause unusual handling
characteristics and overstress the hitch
receiver and chassis. It could also void
the warranty. If there are any questions,
call customer support.
Ball Mount:
Ball mounts come in
various configurations
and weight limitations.
There are three things to
consider when selecting
a ball mount: weight
rating, pin to ball center
length and rise/drop. The
weight rating of the ball
mount, tongue weight and
tow weight must meet
or exceed the total load
weight.
Distance from the
center of the hitch
ball hole to the center
of the pin hole.
Distance from the
shank to the top of
the hitch ball platform.
driving & safety — 2
Pin to ball center should
not exceed 8". Ball mounts
of longer length will
significantly reduce the
020314
weight rating of the hitch
Distance from the
receiver. Observe weight
top of the shank to
the top of the hitch
reduction percentages
ball platform.
that may be listed on ball
mounts longer than 8".
Selecting how much rise or drop a ball mount
will need is relative to hitch receiver height and
height of the towed load with respect to the type
of towing equipment between the motorhome
and towed load.
Safety Chains:
Safety chains are required by law when towing
any load. The chains and any fasteners used to
attach the chains to the hitch receiver must be
rated for the load being towed. Attach chains
so they crisscross under the towing equipment.
Allow just enough slack in the chains to make
sharp corners. Too much slack will allow the
chains to drag on the road surface. If towed load
should become uncoupled from the hitch ball,
the towing equipment will be cradled by the
safety chains. If the towed load does uncouple,
do not attempt to make a sudden stop and
exacerbate the situation. Apply the brakes with
gentle, steady pressure. Pull over to the side of
road at a safe location.
Weight Distributing Hitches:
A weight distributing hitch uses spring bars of
spring steel to compensate for lack of adequate
rear suspension of the tow vehicle. This type
of hitch is generally used for towing heavier
loads as tongue weight and gross tow weight
increases. The spring bars attach to the hitch
head assembly and the trailer frame.
Tow Capacity and Class Ratings:
Several components may comprise a tow
hitch system. The weight rating of individual
components that are part of the towing system
must be greater than the gross weight of the
load being towed.
Hitch Ball:
The hitch ball is what the trailer attaches
to. A hitch ball is available in three common
diameters, 1-7/8", 2" and 2-5/16". The larger the
diameter of the hitch ball, the higher the weight
rating. The diameter of the hitch ball shank also
factors into weight rating. Match shank diameter
with the hole in the ball mount or weight
distributing head. Shank clearance should not
exceed 1/16". There should be at least two
additional threads extending past the nut when
the hitch ball is secure.
Components are classified into weight groups
to help define weight capacity of towing
equipment. Maximum tow capacity is limited
to the component with the lowest weight rating
in the tow hitch system. Example: a ball mount
may have a weight rating of 5,000 lbs. but the
hitch ball is rated 3,500 lbs. Maximum tow
capacity is reduced to 3,500 lbs. Many times
a component will have a Class weight rating.
These groups are shown in chart:
WARNING
Be sure the weight ratings of the ball
mount, tow ball and safety chains are
equal to or greater than the load. The
use of an extension to the receiver or
extended ball mount will significantly
reduce hitch receiver weight ratings.
Modifications to the hitch receiver, or
use of the hitch receiver other than
intended, can void the warranty of the
hitch receiver, chassis or both.
Class I
Weight
Carrying
Hitch
Weight
Distributing
Hitch
Class II
Class III
Class IV
Class V
TW - Up to
200 lbs.
WC TW - Up
to 350 lbs.
TW - Up to
500 lbs.
TW - Up to
750 lbs.
TW - Up to
1,200 lbs.
GTW - Up to
2,000 lbs.
WC GTW - Up
to 3,500 lbs.
GTW - Up to
5,000 lbs.
GTW - Up to
7,500 lbs.
GTW - Up to
12,000 lbs.
---
---
---
TW - Up to
1,200 lbs.
TW - Up to
1,400 lbs.
---
---
---
GTW - Up to
12,000 lbs.
GTW - Up to
14,000 lbs.
GTW = Gross Trailer Weight. Weight of trailer fully loaded.
TW = Tongue Weight. Weight pushing down on Tow Ball.
 WC = Weight Carrying. Weight carrying capacity of the Ball Mount.
 WD = Weight Distributing. Weight carrying capacity of a weight distributing hitch.


2008 K Nig ht
21
driving & safety — 2
Taillight Configuration:
Taillights come in different configurations
referred to as a 2-wire or 3-wire configuration.
A 2-wire configuration has all red lens. A 3wire configuration usually has red and amber
lens. Amber is used for turn signals only and
red for taillight and brake light. These systems
are electrically different. Whenever hooking
a 2-wire system to a 3-wire system, or vice
versa, a converter box must be installed for
correct taillight function. A taillight converter
is available from auto and RV supply stores.
DO NOT attempt to wire a tow plug connector
if unfamiliar with these systems. A trained
technician will install the proper converter so the
taillights and turn signals work correctly on the
motorhome and towed vehicle or trailer when
the tow plug connection is made.
Tow Plug Connection
The motorhome is pre-wired from the factory
with an electrical connection for towing. The
connection is located on the rear cap, near
the hitch receiver. Convoluted tubing protects
the tow harness wires. Current draw should
not exceed ten amps for each designated light
circuit. Within the electrical connection is a
positive terminal for use when towing a trailer
equipped with a battery. The positive terminal
maintains the charge of the trailer battery.
080462f
When preparing a tow plug connection, strip
the wires 3/8". Twist the wire strands and place
under the clip and secure the screw. Make sure
there are no loose strands of wire that could
short against the case or other terminals. DO
NOT accidentally mirror image the trailer
connection.
CAUTION
Positive terminal connection of the tow
plug remains live at all times. When
towing a trailer equipped with a battery,
unplug the electrical tow connection
when parked. Failure to unplug the tow
connection may result in discharged
chassis batteries.
031204c
Rear Vision system
The motorhome can be equipped with either a
rear camera, or an optional three camera vision
system. The rear vision system consists of a
camera with a microphone both located at the
rear of the motorhome. The microphone aids in
22
communication while the camera is designed
to provide the driver with a rear view when
backing up. The rear camera is adjustable up and
down and is controlled by the driver.
On the optional three camera system,
side cameras are located at the front of the
motorhome directly above the front wheels
and are not adjustable. This system provides
the driver with a rear view as well as roadside
and curbside views of the motorhome and a
microphone for audio communication.
Turning the main power switch to ON will
allow continuous operation of the rear vision
system when the ignition key is turned on.
2008 Kn ig ht
Features:
 POWER BUTTON - Press this button
to turn the unit ON or OFF. Turning the
unit ON will allow continuous operation
of the rear vision system when ignition
key is on.
driving & safety — 2




CA. SEL. - Press this button to manually
select desired camera (optional three
camera system).
DAY/NIGHT BUTTON - Press this
button to change setting for daylight
(out) or night time (in) driving
conditions.
TILT UP - Adjust the rear camera up.
TILT DOWN - Adjust the rear camera
down.

CONTRAST KNOB - Turn this knob to
adjust monitor contrast.

BRIGHT KNOB - Turn this knob to
adjust monitor brightness.

VOLUME KNOB - Turn knob to adjust
rear microphone volume.
NOTE
The rear vision system will
automatically turn ON when the gear
selector is placed in reverse.
NOTE
The optional side cameras will display
either the left or right view when a
corresponding turn signal is activated.
When the hazard button is activated the
rear camera will display its view.
INFORMATION
For more detailed instructions,
consult the OEM manual or visit the
manufacturer’s web site at
www.asalectronics.com.
The Voyager monitor is also used with the
(Optional) Aladdin system for displaying upto-date engine data, road and trip monitoring
information.
To Display the Aladdin ™ Using the
Controller:
 Turn the ignition
switch to ACC, On,
or Run position.
 Press the select or
right button to enter a
menu item.
 Press the left button
to return to the
previous menu.
 Press the up or down buttons to scroll
through or change information.
080377f
Backing Up A Motorhome
Whether you are a long time owner of
recreational vehicles, or just starting out,
backing up can be a challenge. Following some
simple guidelines may help to reduce that
challenge. When backing up, the driver (pilot)
should be comfortable using the mirrors, the
back-up camera and the co-pilot’s directions
(ground guide) for assistance. Practice backing
up with the co-pilot’s guidance in a large,
unobstructed parking lot. Backing up is a team
effort.
The backing process should begin while the
motorhome is in forward motion. Maneuver
the motorhome to align with the chosen site.
Aligning the motorhome with the site after the
backing process begins may require more than
2008 K Nig ht
one attempt. When the motorhome is properly
aligned with the site, the parking area will be
visible in both mirrors. Use road markings as
reference points when possible.
When pull-through sites are not available, pick
a solid, level site on the left side for a better field
of vision using the roadside mirror. If the site is
on the right, use the curbside mirror for backing
up, but stay aware of blind spots. Get out and
walk the area prior to backing in. Look for
potential hazards or obstacles that may damage
the motorhome. If the site is satisfactory, prepare
to back in carefully. Have the co-pilot provide
guidance using the five hand signals. Use of
walkie-talkies will also aid in guidance.
The co-pilot will perform just as important a
job as the driver. When guiding the driver, the
co-pilot should be located safely at the left rear
corner of the motorhome, facing forward, while
remaining visible in the roadside mirror at all
times. The co-pilot should make a conscious
effort to maintain sight of the driver through the
roadside mirror as the motorhome maneuvers.
If the driver loses sight of the co-pilot, stop the
backing up process until the co-pilot returns to
view. To avoid mishaps, the co-pilot should be
focused only on what the driver is doing, with
brief observation moments. If necessary, stop
the backing up process to have co-pilot inspect
other areas or angles of concern.
The driver should receive directions only
from the co-pilot. When the co-pilot is guiding
the driver, only five clearly defined signals
should be used, with only one signal given at a
time. Flailing arms with indecisive signals only
confuse the driver. Signals should be given with
purpose and confidence. Directional signals are
directing travel of the rear of the motorhome.
23
driving & safety — 2
If the desired direction is left, the co-pilot
points left. For example: The co-pilot will
use his/her right arm and forefinger pointing
distinctly left with arm and finger held on a
horizontal plane, indicating desired direction
of travel of the rear of the motorhome. The
directional signal given should remain steady
until the desired movement is complete.
Five Directional Signals:
1. Co-pilot uses left hand and arm held
horizontal, with forefinger pointing
right, to direct rear of motorhome to the
right.
2. Co-pilot uses right hand and arm held
horizontal, with forefinger pointing left,
to direct rear of motorhome to the left.
3. Co-pilot uses both arms and hands
parallel with thumbs pointing up and to
rear in a waving vertical motion. This
signals driver to maintain a straight
back direction.
4. Co-pilot holds arms horizontally, hands
open with palms facing one another.
Start with a wide separation, gradually
closing distance of hands in a rate
appropriate to vehicle speed to indicate
amount of distance to the stop point.
5. Closed fists and crossed arms indicate
STOP.
Backing Up Trailers:
Towed vehicles using a tow bar or tow dolly
have more than one pivot point and are not
suitable for backing. Attempting to back up the
motorhome while connected to a tow bar or
tow dolly can jack-knife the tow device causing
the wheels of the towed vehicle to move in
a forward “sideways” motion that will cause
irreparable and expensive damage. If necessary,
disconnect the tow vehicle to avoid a backing up
situation.
Trailers have one pivot point and may be
backed up. The same rules for backing a
motorhome can be applied to backing a trailer.
When preparing to back the trailer into a space,
maneuver the motorhome sweeping wide. Turn
back to the opposite direction to maneuver the
trailer into the space. Keep the bottom of the
steering wheel in the desired direction of travel
for the trailer. For example: If the desired
direction of the trailer is left, rotate the bottom of
the steering wheel left.
If the trailer moves in an undesired direction,
pull forward just far enough to align the trailer
with the space. The co-pilot should stand safely
at the left rear corner of the trailer within view of
the driver in the roadside mirror, using the five
hand signals for guidance.
020083b
24
2008 Kn ig ht
CAUTION
Tow bars or car dollies are generally
made to travel in a forward direction
only. Most towing equipment of this
type is not designed for backing. Never
attempt short back up distances with
a tow bar or tow dolly. Damage to the
motorhome, vehicle or towing device will
result.
Set-Up Procedures
If the site for the
motorhome provides full
hook-ups, use this quick
reference as a guide only.
This information is an
overview on hooking up
the utilities and preparing
appliances for use. Specific
information on slide room,
awning and leveling system
operations is discussed in
detail in other sections.
020125
Typical Power Pedestal
1. Level the motorhome:
 Follow the procedures and guidelines for
“Leveling the Motorhome” in Section
10. If the motorhome is equipped with
hydraulic jacks confirm that the parking
surface will accommodate the weight
placed on the jacks.
2. Hook up utilities and prepare appliances
for use:
 Open the LP-Gas tank primary valve.
driving & safety — 2
Prepare the shore cord for connection.
Uncoil and inspect the cord. Perform
necessary cord maintenance. Install
proper electrical adapters if anything
other than 50 Amp service is provided.
Operate electrical appliances in sequence
when hooked to limited shore power
service. Turn shore power circuit breaker
OFF prior to plugging in the shore cord.
 Begin appliance operation on LP-Gas,
if hooked to less than 50 Amp service,
for the first 60 minutes. Switch the
refrigerator operation to gas, start the
water heater and furnace (if needed).
This will allow time for the inverter to
stabilize the battery charging.
appliances current load prior to turning
on appliances or using interior outlets.

CAUTION
If shore power service is limited to 15
or 20 Amps, use of light duty extension
cords and electrical adapters will
create a voltage loss through the cord
and at each electrical connection. Line
voltage loss and the resistance at each
electrical connection can be a hazardous
combination. Damage to sensitive
electronic equipment may result.
CAUTION
DO NOT remove cover from the shore
power supply to troubleshoot electricity
to the motorhome. Serious personal
injury or death may occur. If there is
no power to the motorhome, inform the
park manager. It is the park manager’s
responsibility to fix any problems with
the shore hook-up at the site.
NOTE
To avoid shore power overload when
hooked to 30 Amp service, determine
If cable service is provided, hook-up
a 75 Ohm RG59 or RG6 cable to the
cable connection in the roadside rear
compartment.
 A phone connection port is provided
in a roadside rear compartment. Phone
utility outlets are placed throughout the
motorhome, including a phone line to be
attached to a satellite receiver for
Pay-Per-View movies and events.
 Hook the potable water hose to the city
water connection in the service center.
 Hook-up the sewer hose. Sewer drain
pipe diameters are generally either
three or four inches. Proper sewer hose
adapters will ensure against leaks or
spillage. With the sewer hose properly
connected open the grey water valve
(liquid waste drain). The black water
valve (solid waste drain) remains closed
until the tank is full or until time of
departure.

Dry Camping
Below are suggestions to follow when staying
at a location that does not have electrical, water
or sewage hook ups. Plan ahead and conserve
resources.
Before arriving at the site, ensure batteries
are fully charged and properly maintained (see
Section 8 in Batteries - House under “Battery
Maintenance”), the fresh water tank and water
heater are full and waste holding tanks are
empty.
2008 K Nig ht
To conserve water and fuel:
 Operate the refrigerator on LP-Gas. Plan
what is needed from the refrigerator prior
to opening. Conserve LP-Gas by cooking
over a campfire.
 Turn the water heater on about twenty
minutes prior to use. Once heated, water
will remain hot for several hours. Turn
the water heater off when not in use.
 Set the thermostat temperature slightly
lower than desired to prevent frequent
cycling of the heating system.
 Know the tank capacities and routinely
check fuel levels, especially during cold
weather.
 Use ventilation fans to reduce roof air
conditioner use.
 Frequently monitor water consumption.
Limit shower usage; turn water off when
soaping down and back on to rinse.
When water conservation is critical,
take a sponge bath or use campground
shower facilities if available. DO NOT
fill the sink with water to wash only a
few dishes. Use disposable dishes when
possible.
 Evacuate waste holding tanks prior to
filling fresh water tank.
To conserve battery power:
 DO NOT allow batteries to fully
discharge before operating the generator.
If possible, run the generator twice a day,
morning and afternoon, to charge the
batteries.
 When not using the inverter for 120 Volts
AC, turn it off.
25
driving & safety — 2

Turn off interior 12 Volt DC power
whenever possible. Refrigerator, battery
charging and inverter operation will not
be affected. Turn off small battery
operated items i.e., porch, bay exterior
step, generator and engine compartment
lights, etc. Turn off the antenna boost
when not watching TV. One light left on
can quickly reduce battery reserves.
Typical Current Draw
Battery Cut-out
1.5 Amps
13" TV
1.7 Amps
Rope Light (10 ft.)
1.3 Amps
Porch Light
2.0 Amps
Fluorescent Bulb (1)
2.1 Amps
Halogen Ceiling Light (1)
.09 Amps
Keep a working flashlight handy for
night trips through the campsite and
inside motorhome. When interior
lighting is desired, use one light in
a central location such as the vanity.
Unscrew all but one or two bulbs.
 Turn on the water pump only when using
water.
 If weather does not permit or no outdoor
table is available, eat at the dinette table
by candlelight.
 Operate the generator when using
microwave/convection oven.

26
Breaking Camp
Preparing the motorhome for travel will
require several small tasks. Properly securing
and storing items will help to prevent them from
getting lost or damaged. Below is a checklist
guide to reference when preparing to break
camp.
Outside Checklist:
 Disconnect the cable TV and lower the
TV antenna.
 Disconnect and stow the
telephone line.
 Retract awnings and secure
040400
them for travel.
Screw the ends of
the hose together
 Close the primary LP-Gas
before storage to
tank valve.
prevent leakage
and to prevent
 Connect the sewer hose.
dust and insects
 Drain and flush holding tanks.
from entering the
hose.
Start by closing the grey
water valve. Run enough
cold water down sink and shower drains
to fill the grey tank at least 50%. Use
caution to avoid overfilling or flooding
the grey tank. Open the black tank valve
and allow adequate time for black tank
to drain. If applicable, connect a nonpotable water hose to the tank flush
fitting and flush the black tank system.
Close black tank valve and open grey
water valve. Water from the grey tank
will help to flush the drain hose. Once
evacuated, close grey water valve.
Disconnect the sewer hose and flush that
hose with clean water from a non-potable
hose. Store the hose. Replace the sewer
cap.
 Fill fresh water tank, then disconnect
2008 Kn ig ht
fresh water hose from the source. Store
hose with end cap in place. If applicable,
remove the hose protection water
pressure regulator from the city water
faucet.
 Turn shore power breaker off and
disconnect shore line. Wind up and store
shore cord. Secure door.
 Check all tire pressures.
 Secure all bay doors.
 Inspect tires and wheels.
 Check for fluid leaks under and around
the motorhome.
Engine Checklist:
 Inspect the engine, transmission and the
engine compartment for fluid leaks.
 Inspect the area under the motorhome
for fluid leaks or puddles.
 Check all fluid levels: oil, antifreeze,
transmission, hydraulic fluid and washer
fluid.
 Inspect belts and hoses for wear.
 Inspect wiring for loose, frayed or
corroded connections.
 Start engine and listen for unusual noise.
 Inspect gauges and controls for proper
operation.
Interior Checklist:
 If applicable, retract leveling jacks
allowing the air suspension to obtain
proper ride height.
 Clear the slide room path, clean the floor
and move the driver seat forward. After
confirming bay doors are closed, retract
the slide room.
NOTE
driving & safety — 2
Emergency Roadside Procedures
To extend/retract the slide-out room,
the ignition must be OFF, park brake
set, jacks retracted and the motorhome
supported by the air suspension.
Confirm the house batteries are fully
charged.
Secure and fasten all interior doors. Lock
the shower door.
 Close roof vents and windows.
 Secure all loose, heavy or sharp objects
in case of a sudden stop.
 Close all cabinet doors and drawers.
 Turn off interior lights.
 Turn off the water pump.
 Check the fuel level gauge and all other
dash gauges for operation and correct
level indications.

Departure Checklist:
 Check items in storage bays to ensure
shifting or damage of items will not
occur.
 Look around, above and under the
motorhome for obstructions. Check for
debris stuck between the rear dual tires.
 Exterior bay doors should be closed and
locked.
 Check operation of all exterior lights,
headlamp, taillamp, brake and clearance
lights.
 Secure all awning and travel locks.
020185b
Ensure jack pad is clear of debris when
retracting hydraulic jacks. Loose rocks,
gravel and debris can be thrown from the
jack pad and can possibly damage the
tow car.
 Secure and lock the entry door for travel.
 Pull forward out of the campsite.
Ensure the site is clean and no items are
forgotten.

EMERGENCY SERVICE PROVIDER
Equipment
Provider
Emergency Number
Motorhome:
Monaco Coach
Monaco Customer Support
1-877-466-6226
Chassis:
Roadmaster
Roadmaster
1-877-466-6226
Engine:
Cummins
Cummins Customer Assistance Center
1-800-343-7357
Allison Transmission
Owner’s Advantage Program
1-800-524-2303
1-877-882-0614
Goodyear
1-877-484-7376
Transmission
Towing
Tires:
Goodyear
If an emergency situation occurs use the
appropriate braking technique and pull off
the roadway a safe distance from traffic (if
possible). Set the parking brake and turn on
the hazard warning flashers, especially when
parked alongside traffic lanes. In the event of an
emergency stop due to a mechanical breakdown
or other motorhome related problems, contact
the manufacturer’s customer support or an
emergency service provider.
Road flares or reflective warning signs should
be displayed if the motorhome is on the side of
the road for any length of time. Guidelines for
placing warning triangles depend upon the road
characteristics and visibility. For example:
The standard placement is 10, 100 and 200
ft. from the rear of the motorhome when on a
divided highway or one-way road. On a two-way
road, with traffic traveling both directions, the
same placement is required at the front of the
motorhome. Roads with curves and hills may
require the placement of the last/furthest triangle
to be 500 ft. behind the motorhome in order to
safely warn approaching traffic.
2008 K Nig ht
27
driving & safety — 2
In Case of Flat Tire
In the event of a flat tire, it
is recommended to call for
roadside assistance. The size
and weight of the motorhome
and its tires require proper
equipment to change the
tire. A professional service
technician will have the
070175
equipment and training needed to
repair or replace the tire. In the case of sudden
tire failure, avoid heavy braking. Hold the
steering wheel firmly and gradually decrease
speed. Slowly move to a safe off-road place,
which should be a firm level spot. Turn the
ignition off and turn the hazard flasher system
ON. Save the old tire for possible warranty
coverage.
WARNING
Do not crawl under the motorhome for
any reason if a wheel has been removed.
Any number of circumstances could
cause the motorhome to suddenly fall,
resulting in severy injury or death.
Dead Chassis Battery
A weak or discharged battery will not supply
the amount of CCA (Cold Cranking Amps)
necessary to initiate the required voltage to start
the engine. If the engine fails to crank, or cranks
slowly due to a weak chassis battery, there are
electrical back-up systems in place that may
increase chassis battery voltage.
28
Battery Boost Switch:
080349
The Battery Boost switch engages a heavyduty solenoid to electrically connect the house
batteries to the engine battery in the event the
engine will not crank or cranks slowly. The
solenoid is designed for short-term high current
intermittent use. Engaging the boost solenoid for
an extended period will damage the solenoid.
Jump Starting Using the Battery Boost
Switch:
 With the ignition key off,
press and hold the Battery Boost
switch for ten seconds. After
ten seconds, continue to hold
the switch down and turn on the
ignition.
 If the engine fails to crank or
does not crank fast enough,
080349
discontinue the attempt.
Continued attempts will only diminish
any remaining surface charge in the
chassis battery and end future alternative
attempts.
2008 Kn ig ht
Next, start the generator. This may
require using the Battery Boost switch
for the generator to start from the engine
battery. Once the generator is operating,
the electrical combination of the
generator and the inverter will charge the
batteries.
 Allow the generator to run approximately
½ hour before attempting to start the
engine.
 After ½ hour of generator operation,
leave the generator on and hold down
the Battery Boost switch for one minute.
Release the switch for one minute, then
press the switch again for one minute.
Alternate this cycle three to five times.
 Next, hold the switch down and turn the
ignition on. The battery voltage gauge
on the dash should indicate at least 12
Volts. If voltage is sufficient with the
Boost switch held down, try to start the
engine.
 If the engine fails to crank, or fails to
crank quickly, the chassis battery may be
depleted and the motorhome will require
jump-starting or an external charger
hooked to the chassis battery.

Jump Starting Using an External Source:
When using jumper cables to start the
engine, the cables must connect in a parallel
configuration. That is, positive (+) to positive
and negative battery (-) to negative chassis
(-). Always connect the positive (+) before
connecting the negative (-). To prevent arcing
when disconnecting the cables; disconnect the
negative (-) before disconnecting the positive
(+).
driving & safety — 2
WARNING
Always ventilate the battery
compartment prior to any work or
service to the batteries. Gas emitted by
the batteries can explode when exposed
to smoking material, flames, sparks
or other sources of ignition, resulting
in injury or vehicle damage. Batteries
contain sulfuric acid that can burn skin,
eyes and clothing. DO NOT connect the
end of the second cable to the negative
(-) terminal of the battery to be jumped.
Connect only to the chassis, away from
the battery.
CAUTION
A large amount of electrical current
is required to jump-start an engine.
The sizes of the battery, alternator and
jumper cables supplying the “jump” are
current limiting factors. Wait a sufficient
amount of time for a surface charge
to build before attempting to start the
engine. Voltage fluctuations that occur
during a jump-start procedure can
damage sensitive electronic equipment
and charging systems. If a jump-start
is necessary, it is recommended to call
Roadside Assistance. They will have the
equipment necessary to jump-start the
motorhome.
CAUTION
DO NOT use the towed vehicle for
jump-starting. The charging system of
the towed vehicle does not supply the
amperage necessary to jump-start the
motorhome. Voltage sensitive equipment
on the towed vehicle can be damaged
and render the towed vehicle disabled.
1. When using an external electrical
source to connect to the chassis battery,
turn the main battery disconnect
switches OFF prior to hooking up the
jumper cables.
2. Hook up the cables then wait several
minutes to allow a surface charge to
build in the chassis battery before
attempting to start the engine.
3. Turn ON the battery disconnect
switches and attempt to start the engine.
DO NOT crank the engine more than a
few seconds.
4. After the engine has started, disconnect
the cables. Disconnect the negative (-)
cables before disconnecting the positive
(+) cables to prevent arcing.
5. If the engine does not crank, or cranks
slowly, DO NOT CONTINUE.
Extensive damage, fire or injury can
occur. Obtain help from a qualified
technician.
Towing Procedures
If calling a towing company for service, it is
recommended to use a lowboy/landall type of
trailer. If a tow truck is used it needs to have
a support arm that goes under the motorhome
and secures to the front axle. Inform the tow
company of the axle weights and total weight of
the motorhome.
Other important information is the length of the
motorhome, number of passengers and milepost
location. Two tow trucks may be necessary to
tow the motorhome and to tow a trailer or tow
vehicle if it is not operational.
020182
020183
The towing company
may need to locate the
air nipple to release the
air brakes. The air nipple
is located in the front
generator compartment and
should be used by towing
personnel only. Generally,
if the motorhome ever needs
to be towed, use the following
instructions.
020145
Air Nipple:
Located in the
front generator
compartment.
080350
2008 K Nig ht
29
driving & safety — 2
Secure any loose or protruding parts if
the motorhome is damaged.
 Inspect the points of attachment on a
disabled motorhome. If attachment points
are damaged, select other attachment
points at a substantial frame structural
member.
 Never allow anyone to go under a
motorhome while it is being lifted by
towing equipment unless the disabled
motorhome is adequately supported by
safety stands.
 DO NOT tow the motorhome from the
rear. Towing from the rear will severely
overload the front tires and suspension,
possibly resulting in tire and/or front
suspension failure. Rear frame extensions
are not designed to support weight loads
imposed by lifting the motorhome from
the rear.

020228b
If the rear wheels are disabled, place
the motorhome on a flat bed trailer, or use
a heavy duty dolly under the rear wheels
and tow the motorhome from the front.
 The drive shaft must be removed to
prevent damage to the transmission.
Secure end caps to prevent losing or
contaminating the needle bearings.
 The mud flap may need to be removed
to prevent damage due to limited ground
clearance.
WARNING
In case the motorhome requires towing,
ensure all precautions are followed. The
drive shaft must be disconnected and the
mud flap may need to be removed. The
manufacturer WILL NOT cover damage
to the motorhome caused by a towing
company.
Disabling Parking Brake
The park/emergency
brakes apply to the drive
axle only. The brakes
can be manually released
if the air system will
not build sufficient air
pressure to release them.
090368
This emergency procedure
is to be used by trained
Example of a properly
technicians or towing
chocked wheel.
personnel to move the
motorhome to a safe
location or repair facility.

30
WARNING
Only trained personnel should perform
this procedure. Brake chamber spring
is under high pressure. Removal of
retaining band could result in serious
injury or death.
Disabling Brakes:
 Place wheel chocks firmly against the
wheel before performing this procedure.
 Remove the plug from the center of rear
brake chamber on the drive axle.
 Remove the caging tool from its holder
on the brake chamber and insert the tool
2008 Kn ig ht
into hole. Turn clockwise to engage.
Screw nut and washer onto caging
tool. Use a wrench to tighten the nut,
compressing the internal spring to release
the brake.
 Repeat procedure for the other side.

Enabling Brakes:
 After towing, or when air pressure is
again available, loosen the nut and
remove the tool. Return the caging tool to
its original location and replace the plug.
 Repeat for the other side.
090369
Brake Camber
090456
WARNING
Failure to securely chock the wheels can
result in the motorhome rolling when the
spring brakes are released. Severe injury
or death can occur.
Tires
Maintaining proper tire inflation pressure
is one of the most critical aspects of travel.
Improper pressure will lead to abnormal wear
and/or sudden tire failure. All tire positions must
be weighed separately with the motorhome fully
loaded to determine proper tire inflation pressure.
driving & safety — 2
If one tire position on the axle is heavier than
the other side, inflate both sides according to
the heaviest side. This will provide correct air
pressure across the axle while cornering. To
obtain the maximum wear and best service from
tires, it is helpful to understand their components
and functions.
Tire Components:
090438
Tread: Provides traction and cornering grip.
Belts: Stabilize and strengthen the tread.
Sidewall: Protects the side of the tire from road
and curb damage.
Body Ply: Gives the tire strength and flexibility.
Bead: Assures an air-tight fit with the wheel.
Inner Liner: Keeps air inside the tire.
Importance of Air Pressure
Tire Pressure Inflation Guideline
The most important factor in maximizing the
life of the tires is maintaining proper inflation.
Driving on any tire that does not have the correct
inflation pressure for the load of the motorhome
is dangerous and may cause premature wear, tire
damage and/or loss of control of the motorhome.
An under-inflated tire will build up excessive
heat that may go beyond the design limits of
the rubber and radial cords and could result
in sudden failure. An under-inflated tire will
also cause poor motorhome handling, rapid
and/or irregular tire wear and an increase in
rolling resistance that results in decreased fuel
economy.
An over-inflated tire will reduce the tire’s
footprint/contact patch with the road, thus
reducing traction, braking capacity and handling
of the motorhome. Over-inflation of a tire for
the load will result in a harsh ride, uneven tire
wear and is susceptible to impact damage.
Maintaining correct tire inflation pressure for
each loaded wheel position on the motorhome is
of the utmost importance and must be a part of
regular motorhome maintenance.
Federal law requires that the specifications
for the tire’s maximum load rating be molded
into the sidewall of the tire. The amount of air
pressure to use is dependent on the weight of
the motorhome when fully loaded. The tire
chart indicates the weights that can be properly
supported by varying air pressures. Decreasing
air pressure decreases load carrying capacity.
Always comply with the tire manufacturer’s
recommended pressure inflation guideline.
The actual weight of the motorhome can vary
significantly depending on how it is loaded. For
optimum tire wear, ride and handling always
comply with the manufacturer guideline. A tire
inflation chart listing proper inflation pressure
for different loads can be found in this section.
The tires of the motorhome are inflated to
pressure(s) appropriate for the actual weight on
each axle in the unloaded, shipped condition.
When the motorhome is loaded, check and
adjust the inflation pressure on each tire as
needed.
Always inflate tires to the pressure indicated in
the tire chart for the load carried by the tire. DO
NOT OVERINFLATE OR UNDERINFLATE
THE TIRES.
The Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR) of
the axles listed on the federal certification label
attached to the motorhome is the maximum
allowable loaded weight on an axle.
When the actual loaded weight of the
motorhome and the weight on each axle is
unknown, follow the recommended tire inflation
pressure(s) listed on the federal certification
label. When loading a motorhome never exceed
the motorhome’s Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
(GVWR) or the GAWR for each axle.
WARNING
Driving on a tire that is under-inflated
can exceed the design limits of the
tire and may damage the sidewall.
A damaged sidewall can burst upon
inflation resulting in serious damage,
injury or death. Aged tires are also
susceptible to sidewall damage.
2008 K Nig ht
31
driving & safety — 2
Contact the tire manufacturer
for further information
concerning proper tire
Tire Size
pressure inflation and
other tire issues.
8R19.5
NOTE
The motorhome
is equipped with
Goodyear 275/70R
22.5 G670 RV
Unisteel Radial,
Load Range H
tires at the time
of printing. The
motorhome
manufacturer will
not be responsible
for substitution of
an incorrect tire
size or load range.
Verify tire brand,
size and load range
before obtaining
replacement tires.
Tire Chart - Goodyear
Max
Speed
Rating
(MPH)
75
225/70R19.5
75
245/70R19.5
75
265/70R19.5
9R22.5
10R22.5
75
75
65
11R22.5
75
12R22.5
75
245/75R22.5
75
255/70R22.5
75
265/75R22.5
75
275/70R22.5
75
275/80R22.5
75
295/75R22.5
75
295/80R22.5
75
315/80R22.5
75
11R24.5
75
285/75R24.5
75
Single
(S)
Dual
(D)
65
70
75
80
85
90
95
100
105
110
S
2410
2540
2680
2835
2955
3075
3195
3305
3415
D
2350
2460
2610
2755
2865
2975
3085
3195
3305
3525(F)
3415(F)
I NFLAT I ON PRESSURE PS I
115
120
S
2895
3040
3195
3315
3450
3845
2720
2860
3000
3115
3245
3640(F)
3415(F)
3715
D
3490
3615
3970(G)
3750(G)
S
3640
3740
3890
4080(F)
4190
4335
4540(G)
D
3415
3515
3655
3970(F)
4115
4265
4410(G)
S
3970
4180
4355
4540
4685
4850
5070
5170
5355(G)
D
3750
3930
4095
4300
4405
4560
4805
4860
5070(G)
4390
4540(F)
S
3370
3560
3730
3890
4080
4235
D
3270
3410
3550
3690
3860
4005
4150
4300(F)
S
4080
4280
4480
4675
4850
5025
5205(F)
5360
5515
5675(G)
D
3860
4045
4230
4410
4585
4760
4940(F)
5075
5210
5355(G)
S
D
4530
4380
4770
4580
4990
4760
5220
4950
5510
5205
5730
5415
5950
5625
6175(G)
6465
5950
6610(H)
5840(G)
6320
5895
6005(H)
S
4940
5200
5450
5690
6005
6205
6405
6610
6870
7130
7390(H)
D
4780
4990
5190
5390
5675
5785
5895
6005
6265
6525
6780(H)
S
3470
3645
3860
3980
4140
4300
4455
4610
4675(G)
D
3260
3425
3640
3740
3890
4080
4190
4335
4410(G)
S
4190
4370
4550
4675
4895
5065
5205
5400
5510(H)
D
3970
4110
4275
4410
4455
4610
4675
4915
5070(H)
4255
4205
4440
4370
4620
4525
4800
4685
4975
4805(G)
5150
5205(G)
S
5170
5400
5630
5850
6070
6290
6510
6730
6940(H)
D
4770
4980
5180
5390
5590
5800
6000
6200
6395(H)
5500
5080
5745
5305
5985
5530
6225
5750
6460
5965
6700
6185
6930
6400
7160(H)
6610(H)
S
D
3875
3870
4070
4040
S
D
S
4725
4940
5155
5370
5510
5780
5980
6610(H)
4690
4885
5070
5260
5440
5675(G)
5800
6175(G)
6005(H)
6370
D
5480
4855
5750
5100
6020
5335
6285
5570
6550
5805
6810
6035
7070
6265
7320
6490
7580
6720
S
6415
6670
6940
7190
7440
7610
7920
D
5840
6070
6395
6540
6770
6940
7210
8270(J)
7610(J)
6610(G)
6005(G)
6790
6970
6205
6405
6040
6175(G)
S
D
S
5310
5550
5840
6095
6350
D
5070
5260
5510
5675
5840
5835
5675(G)
S
4770
4990
5210
5420
5675
D
4740
4930
5205
5310
5495
7160(H)
6610(H)
The motorhome manufacturer is not the author of this chart and makes no representation or warranty concerning the accuracy of the
information disclosed by the chart. Monaco is not responsible for the accuracy of the information disclosed or for any errors within the Tire
Inflation Chart. WARNING: DO NOT exceed tire manufacturer’s maximum speed rating.
32
125
2008 Kn ig ht
7830(H)
6490(H)
driving & safety — 2
Understanding the Inflation Table:
The tire size is on the left margin of the table.
Determine the Single or Dual inflation reading,
denoted with a D or S on the Table. Single is for
the front axle. Dual is for the drive axle. On the
following chart, find the corresponding psi at the
top columns to see the corresponding maximum
weight capacity for that psi.
Rated load capacities are listed for individual
tires in a Dual or Single position.
NOTE
Every load range has a maximum rating
as well as a minimum rating. DO NOT
exceed those ratings.
WARNING
DO NOT exceed tire manufacturer’s
maximum speed rating.
Inspecting & Pressure
Weigh all tire positions separately and use
the tire charts to determine correct tire inflation
pressure. All pressures are rated at a cold psi.
Cold psi is defined as early in the morning
before the day’s ambient temperature, sun’s
radiant heat or the heat generated while driving
have caused the tire pressure to temporarily
increase. Check tire inflation pressure every
morning before driving. Use a quality truck tire
gauge with an angle airhead to ensure access to
the dual wheel positions of the drive axle.
Ensure the valve cap is replaced on the stem
after the inflation pressure is checked. Use valve
stem caps with a positive seal to prevent air
escaping from the valve stem.
If there are extension hoses on the valve stem,
make sure they are good quality reinforced
stainless steel braid. Attach hoses securely to the
outer wheel.
The valve stem cap guarantees the valve core
will remain free of dirt and foreign material.
Material lodged between the valve core and
internal stem can cause slow leaks resulting in
tire failure.
Optimum tire performance is achieved at
proper inflation pressure for the load carried.
DO NOT mix tires of different tread patterns,
size or construction on the same axle. The
difference in traction could cause rear end gear
bind and mechanical damage to the drive train.
CAUTION
Never let air out of a hot tire.
2008 K Nig ht

High fuel consumption.
Reduced handling quality.
WARNING
A slow leak may go unnoticed on one of
the dual tires. This can cause the good
tire to fail by exceeding the load limit.
Tires with damaged sidewalls can burst
upon inflation. A flat or nearly flat tire
can also generate enough heat from
friction to ignite.
Unequal tire pressures on same axle can
cause:
 Uneven braking
 Swerve upon acceleration
 Steering lead
 Torque steer
 Reduced handling quality
WARNING
For safety purposes, clear the area of
people and pets during tire inflation.
Inflate tires using a remote inflation
device.
Over-inflation can cause:
 Hard ride.
 Tire bruising or carcass damage.
 Rapid tread wear in the center of
the tire.
Under-inflation can cause:
 Tire squeal on turns.
 Separations.
 Rapid and uneven wear on the
edges of the tread.
 Circumferential breaks.
 Tire container may bruise or
rupture.
 Higher risk of road hazard.
 Tire cord breakage.
 Loss of casing durability.
 Excessive tire temperature.

020161c
090440b
33
driving & safety — 2
Air Pressure Checklist
1. When inspecting the tires, confirm
the tires are cool before increasing or
reducing air pressure. Driving a short
distance can heat up tires.
NOTE
If the motorhome must be driven a
distance to get air, check and record the
tire pressure first and add the recorded
calculation when reaching the pump. It
is normal for tires to heat up and the air
pressure to increase as driven. Never
reduce air pressure when tires are hot.
NOTE
Air pressure in a tire goes up (in warm
weather) or down (in cold weather)
one to two pounds for every 10° F of
temperature change.
Tire Support When Leveling
Tire Vibration
Extreme caution must be taken to ensure the
tires are fully supported when placing blocks
under the tires. The load on the tire should be
evenly distributed on the support block. In the
case of dual tires, distribute the load evenly on
blocks for both tires. If not properly supported,
the steel cables in the sidewall of the tires may
be damaged and could lead to premature fatigue
of the sidewall.
Sudden tire failure is often preceded by tire
vibration. Symptoms that can cause tire failure
are a bulge in the sidewall or swelling in the
tire carcass. Striking an object or large hole
in the road surface can damage a tire. Inspect
the tires periodically thereafter as rotational
forces can continue to stress damaged areas
and later manifest in tire failure. If an unusual
vibration begins, or a bulge is noticed in the
sidewall, have the tires evaluated by a qualified
professional as soon as possible.
CAUTION
Supporting the tires prevents
damage to the sidewall of the
tires but does not prevent tire
roll.
2. Remove the cap from the valve on one
tire.
3. Firmly press a tire gauge onto the valve
and record reading.
4. Add air to achieve recommended air
pressure.
5. If the tire is over filled, release air by
pushing on the metal stem in the center
of the valve. Recheck the pressure with
the tire gauge.
6. Replace the valve cap.
7. Repeat with each tire.
8. Visually inspect all the tires for nails or
other objects that could be embedded
or puncture the tire and cause an air
leak.
9. Check the sidewalls for gouges, cuts,
bulges, or other irregularities.
34
020063 mod
2008 Kn ig ht
driving & safety — 2
Tire Rotation
Tire rotation can increase the useful life of the
tires by achieving uniform wear on all of the
tires. Have the tire manufacturer determine the
rotation pattern. The first tire rotation is the most
important in determining which rotation pattern
to use. Any unusual or unique wear patterns,
or indications of uneven wear that may have
developed, should be evaluated for possible
tire rotation. Misalignment, imbalance or other
mechanical problems may exist and will need to
be corrected prior to rotation.
Tread
To prevent skidding and hydroplaning, replace
tires when the tread is worn down to 4/32”
on the front, and 2/32” on the rear. Questions
regarding tread wear should be directed to the
tire manufacturer.
Built in tread wear indicators, or wear
indicators which look like narrow strips of
smooth rubber across the tread, will appear
on the tire when the tread is worn down to
2/32”. The tire should be replaced when wear
indicators are noticed.
Visually check the tires for signs of uneven
wear. Signs of irregular tread wear are usually
exhibited by low or unusually smooth areas on
the tire surface. Consult the tire manufacturer as
soon as possible.
WARNING
In many instances tire life is not
determined by mileage, but by age. Tires
are subject to weathering. Weathering
cracks run in circumference with the
tire. Though the sidewall of the tire may
look structurally sound, weathering can
occur inside the well of the tread. Have
the tire manufacturer inspect the tires
for age weathering.
Storage of Tires - Long Term
A cool, dry garage with a sealed cement floor
is the preferred method of storage. Tires stored
outside may prematurely age.
Prior to Storage:
 Thoroughly clean the tires.
 Unload the motorhome to reduce weight
on the tires.
 Ensure the surface is reasonably level,
firm, clean and has good drainage.
 Inflate the tires to the maximum inflation
pressure as indicated on the Federal
Identification Tag.
During Storage:
 Cover the tires to block direct sunlight.
 Periodically ensure tires are at proper
pressure.
 Move the motorhome every three months
to prevent cracking in bulge areas, as
well as flat spotting from prolonged
sidewall strain and tread deflection.
2008 K Nig ht
Removal from Storage:
Before removing the motorhome from longterm storage thoroughly inspect each tire’s
tread area and air pressure. If the tires have lost
air during storage, inflate them to the correct
pressure.
Wheel Mounting
For used nuts add
two drops of oil
between flange and
hex.
Hub Piloted Mounting:
 Flange nuts generate higher
clamping force. Always use
grade eight studs with hub
mount wheels.
 Before installing the
wheels, lubricate the hub
pilot pads with a drop of
oil to prevent galling. DO
NOT lubricate any other
090268c
Flange Nut:
wheel or hub surface.
Front & Side
 For a hub with intermittent
View.
pilot pads, position a pad at
the twelve o’clock position
to center the wheel and reduce runout.
NOTE
Loosen and
tighten lug nuts
in sequence (see
illustration).
Sequence tighten
to 50 ft. lbs. first,
then sequence
tighten to 500
ft lbs. Overtightening can
cause distortion.
090268 copy2
35
driving & safety — 2
WARNING
Never use wheels or lug nuts different
than the original equipment as this
could damage the wheel or the mounting
system. Damage to the wheel or
mounting system could cause a wheel
to come off while the motorhome is in
motion.
Front Wheels:
Slide the front wheel over the studs. Use
caution to avoid damaging stud threads. Snug
the nuts in sequence. When all nuts have
been seated, tighten the nuts to 500 ft. lbs. in
sequence (as in illustration).
Dual Rear Wheels:
Slide the inner dual wheel over the studs. Use
caution to avoid damaging threads. Align the
handholds for valve access and slide the outer
dual wheel over the studs, again using caution
to avoid damaging the stud threads. When all
nuts are seated, tighten the nuts to 500 ft. lbs. in
sequence (as in illustration).
The hub mount wheels use two-piece flange
cap nuts for both front and rear applications. No
inner cap nuts are required.
Torque the Nuts Properly:
 Tighten the wheel nuts to the
recommended lug nut torque. DO NOT
over tighten.
 Maintain the nut torque at the
recommended level through planned
periodic checks or at 10,000 mile
intervals, whichever comes first.
 If air wrenches are used, they must be
periodically calibrated for the proper
torque output. Use a torque wrench to
36
check air wrench output and adjust line
pressure for the correct torque.
Weighing the Motorhome
Proper weight distribution, load management
and operating within established limitations will
aid in safe and enjoyable travel. The information
in this section outlines guidelines and provides
worksheets for weighing procedures.
Proper weight distribution and load
management is an individual responsibility.
In order to correctly manage load and weight
distribution, more than one weight measurement
is required. Each wheel position must be
weighed to accurately determine the weight
placed on each wheel position for proper
weight computations. The entire process of
weigh management begins with the Gross
Vehicle Weight Rating as listed on the Federal
Certification Label. This weight cannot be
exceeded.
CAUTION
Most States limit the amount of weight
carried by any single axle position. It
is the responsibility of the operator to
know the legal weight limit of the State
in which they travel.
Weight Terms
Numerous Federal, State and local
governments mandate weight limits.
Understanding the terminology and performing
proper weighing procedure will help eliminate
confusion. It is important to weigh the
motorhome to calculate Cargo Carrying
2008 Kn ig ht
Capacity (CCC) and ensure no axle is
overloaded.
The Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR) of
the axles is listed on the federal certification
label attached to the motorhome. This is
the maximum allowable loaded weight on a
particular axle. This label is generally located to
the rear of the driver’s seat, on the wall.
When the actual loaded weight of the
motorhome, and the weight on each axle is
unknown, follow the recommended tire inflation
pressure(s) listed on the federal certification
label. When loading a motorhome never exceed
the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) or
the GAWR for each axle.
NOTE
Contact the tire manufacturer for
further information concerning proper
tire pressure inflation and other tire
issues.
The Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR)
and Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR) listed
on the Federal Certification Label attached to the
motorhome details the chassis manufacturer’s
and/or the RV manufacturer’s total vehicle
maximum weight rating and per axle weight
rating.
The GVWR is the maximum total weight
for which the motorhome is rated - including
passengers, fluids and cargo. The GAWR is
the maximum weight for which a single axle is
designed. The tires, wheels, axle, motorhome
frame and/or other components of the
motorhome may limit these per axle and total
maximum weight ratings.
driving & safety — 2
The Federal Certification Label is a guide
in knowing the maximum loaded axle weight
rating GAWR, and subsequently the correct
tire inflation pressure for that weight. Every
motorhome, even of the same make and model,
will vary in actual loaded axle weights because
of different options and personal loads.
While the actual loaded axle weight should
be below the GAWR, the motorhome must be
weighed in a loaded condition to determine
actual weight. Separately weigh the front axle
and rear axle. It is possible for a motorhome to
be within the GVWR yet overloaded on one
axle. It is even possible for one wheel position
to be overloaded, even though the GAWR is not
exceeded. For this reason it will be necessary to
weigh each wheel position of the motorhome to
give a clear indication of exactly how the weight
of the motorhome is distributed.
Instructions and diagrams are presented on the
following pages. When the total weight and the
weight on each axle is known, the tire load data
chart in this manual will show the correct cold
inflation pressure per tire for each axle.
There are two important factors to consider
when loading the motorhome: total weight and
balance. When loading heavy objects keep them
as low as possible, preferably on the floor or
below in storage compartments. Load weight
must be distributed as evenly as possible.
The following is an explanation of
commonly used weight abbreviations:
 Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
(GVWR): Maximum permissible weight
of this motorhome. GVWR is equal to or
greater than the sum of UVW plus CCC.

Unloaded Vehicle Weight (UVW):
Weight of this motorhome as built at
factory with full fuel, engine oil and
coolants. UVW does not include cargo,
fresh water, LP-Gas, occupants or dealer
installed accessories.

Cargo Carrying Capacity (CCC):
Equal to GVWR minus each of the
following: UVW, full fresh potable
water weight (including water heater),
full LP-Gas weight, and SCWR. Tongue
weight of towed vehicle and dealer
installed equipment will reduce CCC.

Gross Combination Weight Rating
(GCWR): The maximum allowable
loaded weight of this motorhome and
any towed trailer or towed vehicle.

Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR):
Load-carrying capacity specified by
manufacturer of a single axle system, as
measured at tire ground interfaces.

Sleeping Capacity Weight Rating
(SCWR): The manufacturer’s designated
number of sleeping positions multiplied
by 154 pounds.
Tire Pressure:
A motorhome may weigh slightly heavier on
one side. Tire inflation pressure of the heavier
side tires determine the inflation pressure for all
tire(s) on that axle due to the weight transfer that
occurs when cornering.
Improperly inflated tires, or an incorrectly
loaded suspension, can result in poor fuel
2008 K Nig ht
economy, poor handling and over-stressed
chassis components. How the motorhome is
loaded will influence tire inflation pressure and
the load carried by each axle. This is why each
wheel position must be weighed. Motorhome
axle configuration and floor plan styles will
require different weighing procedures.
NOTE
When weighing a motorhome, each tire
on any axle must be inflated to the same
pressure. The wheel position carrying
the most weight will determine the tire
inflation pressure for each tire of that
particular axle.
Scales:
Certified public scales are located in moving
and storage lots, farm supplies with grain
elevators, gravel pits, recycling companies
and large commercial truck stops. To locate a
nearby public scale access, check the local area
telephone book yellow pages under ScalesPublic or Weighers. A nominal fee may be
charged, but this is money wisely spent.
Weight scale types and weighing methods
determine the procedure used to calculate proper
tire inflation pressure and axle loading. Several
types of scales are in use today. A platform scale
will allow the entire motorhome to fit on the
scale to read the GVW in one scale recording. A
segmented platform scale is designed to weigh
one axle at a time. A single axle scale weighs
one axle at a time. Some scales read only one
wheel position at a time due to physical size.
Several scale readings may be required to
determine the GAW or GVW total. Each wheel
position requires weighing, referred to as a fourpoint weigh to accurately determine the correct
tire inflation pressure.
37
driving & safety — 2
NOTE
The most accurate method to determine
proper tire pressure is to weigh each
wheel position independently. Weighing
the entire axle will not accurately
determine the actual weight carried by
each whell position. When weighing the
drive axle dual position, divide the total
weight by two to determine the weight
carried by each tire.
Weight Label
When weighing, the scales and the motorhome
must be level to obtain an accurate scale reading.
Even when an axle is not physically on the scale,
a definite lean in the motorhome will produce
inaccurate scale readings.
38
100179d
2008 Kn ig ht
driving & safety — 2
Four Corner Weighing (Example)
NOTE
Following scale readings and Gross Axle
Weight Ratings are fictitious. Actual
scale readings and Gross Axle Weight
Ratings will vary with model and
options.
The motorhome must be weighed fully
loaded to obtain accurate scale readings and
to determine the proper tire pressure. All slide
rooms must be in retracted position.
Take the rear axle Gross Axle Weight
Rating (GAWR) and divide it by two.
Example: Rear axle GAWR taken from
the motorhome Vehicle Certification
Label is 14,500 lbs. Divide the figure by
2, using chart below, record 7,250 lbs. on
Scale B and D, line 1.
 Weigh the driver side rear corner (Scale
B) and record weight on chart Scale B,
line 2. Example: 4,400 lbs.
 Weigh the passenger side rear corner
(Scale D) and record weight on chart
Scale D, line 2. Example: 4,100 lbs.
 Add chart Scale B and D, lines 1, for
Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR)
and record on chart under Totals.
Example: 14,500 lbs.
 Add chart Scale B and D, lines 2, for
actual Gross Axle Weight (GAW) and
record on chart under Totals. Example:
8,500 lbs.
 Actual Gross Axle Weight (GAW).
Example: 8,500 lbs., is not to exceed
Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR).
Example: 14,500 lbs.

020152b
Refer to the Example Tire Chart (Tire
size 275/70R22.5). Use the highest actual
weight, Scale B or D, line 2. Example
4,400 lbs. Determine the proper tire
pressure for each tire using the Load
Inflation chart. Example: 95 psi or stamp
on the sidewall of the tire.
 Repeat above procedures to determine
front axle Scale A and C, tire pressures.

CAUTION
If actual weight carried by any tire is
below the tire chart weight specification
minimum tire pressure, the minimum
inflation pressure must be maintained.
Tire pressure below the minimum
inflation pressure can overheat and
damage the tire casing leading to
premature tire failure or blowout.
WARNING
Improperly inflated or overloaded tires
can cause a blowout. An overloaded
axle can cause a component failure of
the suspension system. Tire blowout
or broken suspension components can
lead to loss of vehicle control resulting
in property damage, personal injury or
death.
2008 K Nig ht
39
driving & safety — 2
Cargo Carrying Capacity:
When weighing the motorhome it is important
to understand that each motorhome, even of
the same model year, floorplan and length will
weigh different due to options and accessories.
The Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR),
Gross Combination Weight Rating (GCWR)
and/or Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR)
must not be exceeded.
GVWR limits the weight of the entire load
combination, regardless of the water, LP-Gas,
passengers and cargo weight.
It is important to understand that the weighing
process is performed in two phases. First, by
determining the Cargo Carrying Capacity
(CCC); and second, to ensure the GVWR is
not exceeded when adjusting tire pressures. The
weighing process should start by recording the
GVWR from the Federal Weight Label, then
weighing the motorhome unloaded, without
passengers and with a full fuel tank. Engine
and transmission fluid levels must be full. This
is known as the Unloaded Vehicle Weight
(UVW). Once this weight has been recorded it
can be subtracted from the GVWR.
GVWR
22,500
= A
- UVW
8,200
A
8,200
-
581
B
7,619
- 100.8
=
B
7,619
14,300
Next, begin to calculate the Cargo Carrying
Capacity (CCC). Fresh water weight and
LP-Gas weight can now be subtracted from the
remaining total line A.
Water weight is the number
of gallons multiplied by
8.3.
 LP-Gas weight is the
number of gallons
multiplied by 4.2.

A 10-gallon water heater with a 40-gallon
fresh tank would total 50 gallons times 8.3, or
415 lbs. A 30-gallon LP-Gas tank will have 24
gallons of LP-Gas due to the 80% valve. This
would mean 24 gallons multiplied by 4.2, or
100.8 lbs.
=
C 7,518.2
Next, calculate the Sleep Capacity Weight
Rating (SCWR) the manufacturer’s designated
number of sleeping positions for the motorhome
multiplied by 154 lbs.
The 154 lbs. (70kg) is the average weight
established by the U.S. Federal Government and
Transport Canada, and is used to arrive at Cargo
Carrying Capacity (CCC). However, actual sleep
capacity weight may be greater. The SCWR is
not intended to limit the sleeping capacity to a
specified weight.
Example: If the manufacturer has designated
the motorhome sleeping position at 4 (616 lbs.)
and there are four people who weigh 200, 200,
178 and 138 lbs., totaling 716 lbs., that doesn’t
mean the sleeping capacity is reduced to three
individuals, but rather the CCC is reduced by 100
lbs. due to the actual passenger weight.
020255b conv
C 7,518.2 - SCWR 770 = CCC 6,748.2
40
2008 Kn ig ht
driving & safety — 2
Cargo Carrying Capacity (CCC) is how
much cargo the motorhome can carry. However,
tongue weight of a towed vehicle will further
reduce this amount.
Now the motorhome can be fully loaded and
weighed to ensure GVWR is not exceeded.
Once the motorhome is fully loaded it is ready to
be weighed to obtain an accurate scale reading
and determine the proper tire pressure. All slide
rooms must be in the retracted position when
weighing the motorhome. The motorhome must
remain as level as possible on the scale, even
when an axle or side is not physically on the
scale.
Cargo Carrying Capacity Flowchart
Each wheel position must be weighed to
accurately determine the weight carried
at each wheel position.
 Refer to the previous examples on how
to weigh each wheel position. Each
wheel position weight must be weighed
and recorded to determine proper tire
inflation.
 Wheel position weights are not to exceed
Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR)
and Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
(GVWR) as printed on the Motorhome
Vehicle Certification Label.
 Compare wheel position weights with
weight ratings on the label. If wheel
position weights exceed maximum
specifications, items will need to be
removed until rating weight is within
specification.

020254c
2008 K Nig ht
41
driving & safety — 2
Weighing Procedure Worksheet
42
Example Worksheet
2008 Kn ig ht
020255b conv
driving & safety — 2
Weight Record Sheet
Actual Worksheet
020255b
2008 K Nig ht
43
driving & safety — 2
Smoke Detector
Maintenance
Statistics show that most fire casualties are not
caused by direct flame, but by less visible smoke
(products of combustion). The smoke detector
automatically returns from alarm to normal state
when the reason for activation, the presence
of smoke, is completely removed. Fires are
commonly caused by smoking in bed, leaving
children unattended or using flammable cleaning
fluids. Please be safety conscious and avoid
unnecessary risk.
WARNING
There is no way to insure against
injury or loss of life in a fire; however,
the smoke detector is intended to help
reduce the risk of tragedy. Additional
smoke detectors may help to reduce the
risk. Proper use and care of the smoke
detector could save lives.
Operation
When a 9 Volt DC battery is correctly
connected, the LED flashes every minute and
a loud alarm will sound when a product of
combustion is sensed.
NOTE
The unit will not operate without
a battery. A battery flag pops up
preventing the unit from being installed
to the mounting bracket without a
battery. Carbon zinc batteries average a
service life of one year. Alkaline batteries
average a service life of one to two years.
44
Maintenance for Proper Operation:
 Test the smoke alarm once a week.
 Keep a supply of 9 Volt DC batteries on
hand.
 Vacuum the slots in the cover and sides
with a soft brush attachment every
month. Test the smoke alarm after the
unit has been vacuumed.
 The smoke alarm will beep once a
minute when a low battery exists.
Replace battery immediately.
020123
Located on ceiling in
main living area
Testing
Simply press the test button on the smoke
alarm cover for approximately three seconds.
The alarm will sound if all electronic circuitry,
horn and battery are properly working. The
smoke alarm should be tested at least once a
week when the motorhome is in use, prior to
each trip and when the motorhome has been
in storage. When testing the smoke alarm it is
advised to stand at arm’s length.
CAUTION
Never use an open flame to test the
smoke alarm as this may ignite the
alarm or surrounding area and set fire
to the motorhome.
2008 Kn ig ht
Troubleshooting
If the alarm does not sound when the test
button is pushed, or with a smoke test, try the
following:
 Inspect alarm for obvious damage.
 Check for the recommended battery type.
 Check the battery for proper connection
or replace the battery if needed.
 Gently vacuum as recommended.
If these procedures do not correct the problem,
DO NOT attempt repairs. If the smoke alarm is
within the warranty period and the terms indicate
the nature of the problem, return the unit to your
dealer. Smoke detectors beyond the warranty
period cannot be economically repaired.
driving & safety — 2
Carbon Monoxide Detector
American National Standards Institute (ANSI)
A119.2 - Fire & Life Safety 3-4.6 Carbon
Monoxide Detectors states “All RV’s equipped
with an internal combustion engine or designed
with features to accommodate future installation
of an internal combustion engine and truck
campers shall be equipped with a listed CO
detector installed in accordance with its listing.”
The motorhome is equipped with a Carbon
Monoxide detector. Everyone is at risk with
Carbon Monoxide poisoning. Carbon Monoxide
(CO) is a colorless, odorless and tasteless gas
that binds with hemoglobin reducing the body’s
ability to absorb and carry oxygen to vital
organs. Even low levels of CO have been known
to cause brain and other vital organ damage in
unborn infants, with no effect on the mother.
When removed from exposure, the symptoms
dissipate as Carbon Monoxide is expelled
through the lungs. Level of contamination
in the body reduces at half-life increments at
approximately four-hour intervals. Treatment
with Oxygen will quicken recovery time.
In cases of mild exposure, the symptoms may
include: a slight headache, nausea, vomiting
and fatigue. Some consider this a “Flu-like
Symptom.” Symptoms for medium exposure
may include a severe throbbing headache,
drowsiness, confusion and fast heart rate.
Extreme exposure can result in unconsciousness,
convulsions, cardio-respiratory failure and
death. Young children and household pets may
be the first affected. Other highly sensitive
people include the elderly and those with lung or
heart disease or anemia.
The CO detector is designed to detect the toxic
CO Gas resulting from incomplete combustion
of any fuel. This can be gasoline, propane,
natural gas, oil, charcoal or wood. Anything that
burns fuel such as engines, generators, furnaces,
gas stoves or water heaters, produce CO Gas.
Consequently, it is uncommon for household
smoke from cigarettes or normal cooking to
cause the alarm to sound.
CAUTION
Activation of this device indicates the
presence of carbon monoxide (CO),
which can be fatal. A concentration of
above 100 PPM will cause a warning
condition. Individuals with medical
problems may consider using detection
devices with lower carbon monoxide
alarming capabilities. Prolonged
exposure to the horn at a close distance
may be harmful to hearing.
020150c
Located in bedroom
2008 K Nig ht
WARNING
Constant beeping and a flashing red
light means CO gas has been detected.
Shut off appliances, motorhome
engine, and water heater. Evacuate the
motorhome and call the fire department.
Have any problems corrected before
restarting any appliances or the coach.
The CO detector is wired to the house
batteries. This allows reliable protection by
alerting the build up of potentially dangerous
levels of CO. Once the unit is powered, it will
run through a brief warm-up and self check prior
to monitoring for CO gas.
WARNING
If unplugged from shore power the
house battery disconnect switch must be
ON for the CO detector to operate.
Operation
The detector is equipped with a self-cleaning
CO sensor and requires a ten minute initial
warm-up period to clean the sensor element
and achieve stabilization. During the warm-up
period, the green power light will flash ON and
OFF. The green power light should be lit when
the power is on. If the light is not lit, turn off
the power and check all wire connections. If
the power is on and the connections are correct,
but the indicator still does not light, the detector
should be returned for service. DO NOT attempt
to fix the detector. The indicator light displays a
specific color to monitor along with a matching
sound pattern.
45
driving & safety — 2
count to check that all persons are accounted for.
Call the nearest fire department and ask them to
determine the source of the Carbon Monoxide.
DO NOT re-enter the motorhome until it has
been aired out and the problem corrected.
020150b
Indicator Lights and Sound Patterns:
 ON or normal condition is indicated by
green. The CO detector has power and is
sensing air for the presence of CO Gas.
The alarm will not sound.
 Flashing red indicates low CO alarm
condition along with four beeps then
OFF for five seconds. The alarm will
sound and can be reset by the TEST/
RESET button. The CO detector has
detected the presence of 60 ppm.
 Steady red indicates a CO ALARM
condition. The detector has sensed the
presence of levels over 100 ppm of
Carbon monoxide. The alarm horn will
sound continuously until the RESET
switch is reset.
 Alternating red and green indicates a
malfunctioning alarm.
Potential Sources of CO when operating
the motorhome:
 Engine Exhaust
 Portable Grills
 Portable Space Heaters
 Camp Fires
 Gas Stoves and Ovens
 Generator Exhaust
 Portable Generators
 Nearby Motorhomes
 Defective Engine Exhaust System
Testing
Alarm
Test Procedures:
Test the Carbon Monoxide detector operation
after the motorhome has been in storage, before
each trip and at least once a week during use.
Test the alarm by holding the TEST/RESET
button in until the alarm sounds. The alarm will
sound four beeps and the indicator lamp goes
steady red. Six seconds later the alarm will
again beep four times and the indicator light
goes steady green.
When the alarm sounds have the detector and
the motorhome checked by an authorized service
technician as soon as possible. Never disconnect
a CO detector to silence an annoying alarm.
Evacuate the motorhome immediately when the
red light is lit and the alarm sounds. Do a head
Peak Level Memory:
The CO detector has the capability to
remember the level of Carbon Monoxide that
activated the alarm. Press the TEST/RESET
button for less than one second and observe the
visual and audible signals.
46
2008 Kn ig ht
One beep and one green flash indicate
memory is clear.
 Two beeps and two red flashes indicate
less than 100 ppm.
 Three beeps and three red flashes
indicate less than 200 ppm.
 Four beeps and four red flashes indicate
greater than 200 ppm.

NOTE
Memory is erased when power is
disconnected for 15 seconds.
Cleaning & Maintenance
Use a vacuum cleaner to remove dust or any
other buildup on the detector. DO NOT wash.
Wipe the detector with a damp cloth and dry
with a towel. DO NOT open the detector for
cleaning. DO NOT paint the detector. It is
recommend that the Carbon Monoxide detector
be replaced every 5 years. The CO detector has
no user service parts. If there is a problem with
the detector refer to an authorized service center.
DO NOT REMOVE POWER.
INSPECT
Check the CO detector weekly and at
the beginning and end of each trip.
Fire Extinguisher
The fire extinguisher in the motorhome is
located near the main entrance door. Please read
the operating instructions that are printed on the
fire extinguisher. If there is any doubt on how to
operate the fire extinguisher practice using it.
driving & safety — 2
Escape (Egress) Window
Be sure to replace or recharge the extinguisher
immediately after use.
Inspect the fire extinguisher at least once a
month. Do so more frequently if the extinguisher
is exposed to weather or possible tampering.
DO NOT test the extinguisher by partially
discharging. Internal pressure will escape and
the fire extinguisher will need to be replaced.
The Egress window, designated for use as
an emergency exit, is identified inside of the
motorhome by a red locking handle and Exit
label.
To open, lift the red handle and push outward.
Pull closed and lower handles to lock the Egress
window.
Hinges along the outside window top identify
the Egress window on the motorhome exterior.
The glass slider in the Egress window operates
the same as all other windows in the motorhome.
Occasionally open and close the Egress window
to prevent the rubber seal from sticking.
100209
Classes of Fire:
A- Fires that are fueled by materials that leave a
residue when they burn: paper, wood, cloth,
rubber, and certain plastics.
B - Fires that involve flammable liquids and
gases: gasoline, paint thinner, kitchen grease,
propane and acetylene.
C - Fires that involve energized electrical
wiring or equipment. If electricity to the
equipment is turned off, a class C fire
becomes one of the other two class fires.
020283b
WARNING
Road vibration will cause
extinguisher powder to
compact and may cause
extinguisher malfunction.
Invert and shake
extinguisher monthly.
There are three classes of
fire to be concerned with in a
motorhome. Any fire can fall into
more than one class; a fire that
involves both burning paper and
kitchen grease is a Class AB fire.
020029
020261
2008 K Nig ht
47
driving & safety — 2
Notes
48
2008 Kn ig ht
3
2008 Knight
exterior & interior care — Section 3
exterIor care ................................................... 52
Corrosion......................................................... 52
Washing.......................................................... 52
Drying.............................................................. 52
Waxing............................................................ 52
Paint.Codes..................................................... 53
Tire.Care.......................................................... 53
Wheels.-.Coated.Aluminum.............................. 53
Bright.Metal..................................................... 54
exterIor maIntenance .................................... 54
Fiberglass........................................................ 54
Roof.Care.&.Seal.Inspections........................... 55
Sealant.Types................................................... 55
InterIor care ................................................... 57
Cockpit............................................................ 57
faBrIcS............................................................... 57
General.Care.&.Cleaning................................... 57
Vinyl................................................................ 57
Leather............................................................ 59
Ultra-Leather.................................................... 59
floorS................................................................ 60
Carpet.Cleaning................................................ 60
Tile.Floor.......................................................... 61
Laminate.Floor................................................. 61
SHoWer .............................................................. 61
ceIlIng................................................................ 61
ceIlIng................................................................
Wall coverIngS ............................................... 62
WooD care......................................................... 62
coUntertopS .................................................... 64
Solid.Surface................................................... 64
Solid.Surface...................................................
Laminate. ........................................................ 64
Laminate.
StaInleSS Steel SUrfaceS ............................. 64
WInDoWS............................................................ 64
Condensation. ................................................. 65
Condensation.
WInDoW treatmentS ....................................... 65
Mini-Blinds...................................................... 65
Mini-Blinds......................................................
Day/Night.Shades............................................ 65
Day/Night.Shades............................................
molD & mIlDeW................................................. 66
peSt
p
eSt control .................................................... 67
Storage
S
torage ............................................................. 69
Short.Term.
Short.Term
S
hort.Term....................................................... 69
Long.Term.......................................................
LLong.Term
ong.Term.......................................................
....................................................... 69
Winter.Storage.Checklist..................................
Winter.Storage.Checklist
W
inter.Storage.Checklist..................................
.................................. 71
Removal.from.Storage.
Removal.from.Storage
R
emoval.from.Storage...................................... 71
exterior & interior care — 3
NOTE
“Section 3 - Exterior Care &
Maintenance” is a general cleaning
section. Some of the articles within this
section may or may not apply to your
motorhome.
Exterior Care
Corrosion
The most common cause of corrosion to
the motorhome exterior is accumulation of
road salts, grime and dirt. These elements,
combined with moisture, may possibly cause
early component failure. The undercarriage,
around wheel openings and the radiator charge
air cooler package require periodic cleaning
to prevent component failure caused from
corrosive materials collected on roadways. If
the motorhome is driven in areas where road
salts are used it should be washed at least once
a week. Otherwise, it is recommended to hose
off the undercarriage area at least once a month
to help minimize the corrosion process. High
pressure washers or steam cleaners are the most
effective way of cleaning off the underside and
inside wheel openings. Avoid directly spraying
the painted surface with a high-pressure washer.
CAUTION
Exercise caution when cleaning the
radiator charge air cooler package.
Damage to the fins can result when using
a high pressure washer or steam cleaner.
Nozzle discharge pressure can exceed
1800 psi. Avoid using high pressure
steam cleaners on the exterior paint
surfaces. Remove all spattered washing
debris from the exterior paint surfaces
as soon as possible.
50
Washing
Drying
Periodic cleaning will help to preserve the
paint finish. The motorhome is painted with a
“base coat, clear coat system.” Clear coat is a
polyurethane-based material which brings out
the shine and luster to the base coat paint. Care
should be used when washing the motorhome.
Use only mild detergents or (preferred)
specifically designed automotive detergents.
Avoid abrasive cleansers or laundry detergents
that will scratch the clear coat and leave a soap
film. Use a soft cloth to wash the paint finish.
Avoid brushes as they can scratch the surface
and damage the paint. Before washing the
motorhome, remove most of the accumulated
dirt and “road wash” behind wheel openings,
below the windshield and on the rear of the
motorhome. If build up is excessive, run water
over a soft cotton cloth while gently wiping the
surface in one direction. This will help float
away the “build-up” from the clear coat. Avoid
back and forth or circular motions as this may
act like sandpaper, scratching the clear coat and
leaving a haze or “swirl marks.” After removing
the heavy build-up, use the mixed detergent
solution to wash the motorhome. Start washing
at the top of the motorhome working towards
the bottom. If possible, wash the motorhome in
a shaded area when the exterior is not hot to the
touch. If necessary, turn the motorhome around
to keep the area being washed in the shade. Try
not to allow the detergent to dry onto the clear
coat surface. Use plenty of water when rinsing
the surface to remove all detergent residue.
Chamois cloths come in natural and synthetic
materials. Either type is acceptable as long as
the surface is clean. Soak the chamois in clean
water, then wring it dry. Remove the water from
the surface, starting at the top and working
towards the bottom, using a downward “S”
pattern. Wring out the chamois as needed. Using
a chamois cloth to remove the rinse water is not
necessary, but the effort can be worthwhile.
2008 Kn ig ht
Waxing
It is recommended to wax the motorhome
twice a year: spring and fall. Many types of
protective barriers are available today that may
be applied to the clear coat: glazes, waxes,
polishes, rubbing compounds or combinations of
these products.
NOTE
Use a grease and wax remover before
applying another coat of wax. Chemicals
can become trapped between layers of
wax, possibly damaging the paint finish.
INFORMATION
When selecting a product, follow the
product manufacturer’s recommended
application instructions.
Types of Products:
Glazes - Glazes are generally used
to fill very fine scratches in the clear
coat. They are applied either by hand
or by using a polisher with a special
pad.
Exterior & Interior CAre — 3
Waxes - Waxes come in many types
of chemical make-up. Most contain
cleaning agents, lubricants and wax.
Cleaning agents remove oxidation
and leave a high gloss and wax
leaves a clear film that protects the
finish.
Polishes - Polishes combine wax
based substances with abrasives
to clean and polish at the same
time. These products can be too
abrasive for clear coats and are not
recommended for use.
Rubbing Compounds - These
types of products are generally
applied by using a buffer. The use of
rubbing compounds should be left
to professionals as undesired results
can quickly occur. These types of
products are generally used to correct
or flatten a surface by removing high
spots or small amounts of material.
When selecting a product, the container should
be marked, “safe for clear coats” or “clear
coat safe.” Carefully follow the application
instructions when using a product. Upon first
use of a product, try it on a small test spot in an
inconspicuous area in case an undesired reaction
occurs.
Observe the test area from different angles to
check for hazing or swirl marks. If an abnormal
reaction to the finish occurs, discontinue product
use and consult the product manufacturer. If the
product is a paste, do not allow dried paste to
be baked on by the sun. Remove paste shortly
after drying. Clean, dry, 100% cotton cloths
are best suited for the removal of dried paste.
Turn the cloth often. Use a separate clean cloth
to buff. The surface should feel slick when
rubbing the cloth lightly over it. Avoid repeated
wax applications which can cause build up.
Some very fine scratches or swirl marks may
be removed by an application of a glaze. These
types of glazes fill the scratches or swirl marks.
The motorhome has a large surface area.
Washing and waxing may not be completed
in one afternoon. Select sections to wax until
the motorhome is complete. If the task seems
overwhelming, have an automotive detailer
perform the task.
Paint Codes
The motorhome color scheme is comprised of
specific paint colors, each assigned a code used
to achieve a desired color of paint. “Touch-up”
paint may be used to repair a small scratch or
imperfection in the paint surface. To paint a
larger area, it is necessary to obtain the paint
code to get the correct color match.
To Obtain the Paint Code:
1. Contact National Parts at 1-877-4666226.
2. Specify the year, model, serial number
and exterior color scheme name (if
known).
3. This formula can be mixed at a local
BASF paint store.
2008 K Nig ht
NOTE
All special paint schemes require
contacting Monaco Coach directly for
paint codes.
Tire Care
Proper care and methods in cleaning must be
used to obtain the maximum service years out of
the tires. Use a soft brush and a mild detergent
to clean the tires. If a dressing product is used to
“protect” the tires from aging, use extra care and
caution. Tire dressings that contain petroleum
products or alcohol may cause deterioration or
cracking.
In many cases it is not the dressing that
causes a problem but the chemical reaction that
subsequently occurs. When these same dressing
products are used on a passenger car tire that is
replaced every three to four years, it is rare to
see a major problem. However, in most cases
motorhome tires may last longer due to limited
annual mileage and exposure.
Wheels - Coated Aluminum
Inside:
If the tires are removed, inspect and clean the
entire rim. Air used to fill the tire may contain
moisture and can cause the areas of the wheel
under the tire to severely corrode. Use a soft
brush to remove any foreign materials from the
tire side of the rim. Lubricate the rim and tire
bead with a non-water-based lubricant before
mounting the tire and ensure the inside of tire is
dry before installing.
51
exterior & interior care — 3
WARNING
DO NOT use a flammable solution to
coat the inside of the rim. This can lead
to an explosion during tire inflation or in
subsequent operation of the motorhome.
Outside:
The coated surface of the wheels should
be treated the same as the paint finish on the
motorhome. Road soils, grime and brake dust
trap moisture which can cause corrosion over a
period of time.
1. Frequently clean using high-pressure
water.
2. Wash with a 100% cotton cloth and
a mild soap solution (dish soap or
carwash soap is recommended).
3. Rinse all remaining soap residue with
high-pressure water and wipe the
surface dry using a 100% cotton cloth
to avoid water spots.
4. A secondary hand washing may be
required to remove some stubborn road
films.
5. Carnauba wax can be applied to help
protect the finish.
NOTE
Allow heated wheels that are extremely
hot to cool before spraying with cold
water.
CAUTION
DO NOT use the following items on
coated aluminum wheels:
52
Polishes (unless marked “safe for clear
coat” or Alcoa Aluminum Care).
 Synthetic cleaning pads, wire or abrasive
brushes, steel wool or scouring pads
(these can mar or scratch the finish).
 Strong detergents, alkaline or acidic
cleaners, acids or lye-based chemical
products or solvents.

CAUTION
Rinse aluminum wheels using highpressure water to remove debris
from the surface before washing. DO
NOT scrub. Rubbing debris against
the surface of the wheel can result in
scratches. DO NOT allow soap solution
to dry on the finish of the wheel as
spotting will occur.
INFORMATION
Instructions for cleaning, handling and
minor scratch repair to the coating can
be found in Accuride service bulletin
2.0037 Rev 1. Contact Accuride at 1-800823-8332 for futher information.
Bright Metal
All chrome and stainless steel should be
washed and cleaned each time the motorhome is
washed. Use only automotive approved nonabrasive cleaners and polishes on exterior bright
work. DO NOT use rubbing compounds. DO
NOT use abrasive cleaners or compounds to
clean the mirrors.
2008 Kn ig ht
NOTE
When using chemicals to remove road
tars, use only automotive products that
are recommended for painted surfaces
and fiberglass. Observe the warning
recommendations and directions printed
on the container of any agent being
used.
Exterior Maintenance
The motorhome is exposed to extreme
temperatures, humidity, ultraviolet rays, rain
and other environmental conditions. While in
operation the motorhome is subject to twisting
and flexing caused by rough roads, potholes
and winding mountain roads. Maintenance is
necessary not only to keep the exterior looking
nice, but also to keep it in proper working order.
Fiberglass
Inspect the fiberglass exterior. Periodic
inspection may reveal that flexing of the
fiberglass exterior has created imperfections
in the surface commonly known as “spider” or
“hairline” cracks. A crack that has opened up
to reveal the cloth weave threatens the integrity
of the fiberglass. If the exterior exhibits signs
of damage, prevent moisture penetration,
particularly in freezing climates. Cover the area
using plastic sheeting and/or tape, and have the
damaged fiberglass repaired as soon as possible.
Exterior & Interior CAre — 3
Roof Care & Seal Inspections
Whenever there is something affixed to the
motorhome, such as a vent attached the roof, a
seal is applied to prevent water intrusion. Each
type of sealant has a specific use. While the
beltline uses a silicone or urethane base sealant
to prevent water intrusion, roof openings use
an acrylic based sealant. Moisture intrusion
can occur at any time for a number of reasons.
Therefore regular sealant inspection and
maintenance will greatly reduce the likelihood of
moisture intrusion and costly repairs.
The motorhome is sealed at the factory.
However, extreme weather conditions can
shorten the life of the sealant while harsh road
conditions can compromise sealant integrity.
Maintaining sealant integrity is part of regular
motorhome maintenance. Inspect all joints,
seams and openings at least once every 6
months. While sealant integrity may appear
fine, a small void under the right conditions can
quickly cause major damage. Make a full interior
inspection for signs of moisture intrusion every
two weeks if the motorhome is in storage.
CAUTION
Inspect exterior seals, seams and joints
for sealant integrity at least twice a
year. Make a full interior inspection for
water leaks every two weeks while the
motorhome is in storage.
Inspecting
Surface must be clean and dry. Inspect
seal for voids, cracks, bubbling, peeling
or pulling away. Sealant that looks fine
without imperfections is acceptable
for continued service. Sealant that is
old, cracking, flaking or bubbling will
allow moisture intrusion and must be
repaired.
WARNING
Inspecting sealant will require use of
a ladder or scaffold assembly. Roof
access is also required. Follow proper
safety measures accordingly. Exercise
extreme care whenever using a ladder/
scaffold assembly. Avoid getting on the
roof if it is icy or moisture laden as the
surface can be very slick. Use judgment
if inspection is considered dangerous.
Have the motorhome inspected or sealed
(if necessary) by a qualified service
technician.
Sealant Replacement:
Carefully remove sealant that is cracking,
flaking, bubbling, peeling or pulling away from
the surface. The area under the removed sealant
will need to be clean and dry before applying
new sealant. Applying new sealant over a dirty
or moisture laden surface will not allow proper
adhesion. Sealant application may require simple
hand tools and paper towels or rags for cleanup.
Some sealants may be labeled hazardous or
require chemicals for cleanup. Follow all of the
manufacturer’s warnings and precautions when
dealing with these substances.
If health limits exposure to chemicals
or inhibits skills or abilities, employ a
qualified service technician to perform
the tasks.
Sealant Types
General Maintenance – Roof: Rubber
Sealant: Dolphin #7589 UVR Elastiseal
This product is used for large roof openings
such as around vents, skylights, any roof
mounted antennas and ladder roof mounts. Clean
the old sealant that is lifting before applying
the new. Make sure the roof is dry and free of
dirt. This product is found in a tub container.
Care should be used when near an edge, as the
product will spread out. Masking tape may be
used to mask around area to avoid mishaps.
WARNING
This product is flammable, and if
swallowed, can be fatal. Use only in wellventilated areas. Consult manufacturer
data for application and safety
instructions.
For small areas of maintenance various rubber
sealants are available in a tube. These products
are available at RV supply locations.
WARNING
Some sealants may be labeled hazardous
or require use of petroleum distillates
for cleanup. Use proper precautions as
suggested by the sealant or chemical
manufacturer. Use of protective
eye wear, gloves, respirator or open
ventilation may be required. Use
judgment when working with chemicals.
2008 K Nig ht
53
exterior & interior care — 3
General Maintenance – Roof Air
Conditioner:
The roof air conditioners use a closed cell
foam base gasket. No sealants are required.
The roof air conditioners should be checked for
tightness by the four mounting bolts located in
each interior corner of the air conditioner roof
opening. Torque specification is 40 to 50 in/lbs.
The base gasket should be compressed to about
½”.
General Maintenance – Windshield: Black
Silicone Sealant: Dow Corning #999-A Black
Used for sealing small areas or imperfections
around windshields. The product is available
in a tube. Clean up using solvents such as
mineral spirits. Consult manufacturer data for
application and safety instructions.
General Maintenance – Exterior
Attachments: Dow Corning #999-A Clear
Silicone or Colorimetric High Performance
Clear Silicone
Primarily used on the sidewalls around
windows, doors, handles, beltline molding,
latches and bases of surface mounted items such
as clearance lights. Old peeling sealant should
be removed with nylon sticks or equivalent.
Avoid using metal utensils which can scratch the
painted surface. Use nylon sticks or equivalent.
Avoid lacquer thinners or ketone based solvents
as these chemicals can damage painted surfaces.
Confirm that surface is clean and dry before a
new application. Cut the tube at an angle with
the smallest usable opening. Avoid a heavy bead
as a little goes a long way. Use finger at a 45°
angle on beaded surface to smooth out product.
DO NOT moisten finger, use a disposable latex
54
glove. Keep rags or paper towels handy for clean
up. Use care when applying silicone and plan
ahead before starting a bead. Look for obstacles
that may impede application.
CAUTION
Avoid eye and skin contact and
breathing of vapors. Consult
manufacturer data for application and
safety instructions.
General Maintenance – Openings: Spray
Foam
This product is used as a sealant where a hole
has been made for items such as
water lines or wires that are coming
through a floor or bulkhead opening.
Consult manufacturer data for
application and safety instructions.
Windshield Installation: Black Urethane
Used for sealing the windshields, not to fill
holes or other imperfections. Black urethane
comes in a tube and it applies much the same
way as silicone. Clean up using solvents such as
paint thinner. Gloves are required as product is
considered a hazardous material.
WARNING
Avoid eye and skin contact and
breathing of vapors. Consult
manufacturer data for application and
safety instructions.
070209ca
Typical Roof Layout: Inspect each item for sealant integrity. Roof A/C’s
use a special foam gasket.
070209d
Typical Side View: Side window seals require silicone. Windshield requires black urethane
2008 Kn ig ht
Exterior & Interior CAre — 3
Sealing Under a Painted Surface: Acrylic
Sealants: Geocel # 2300
Used where items are sealed under a painted
surface such as the metal corners of slide out
rooms and roof mounted awning brackets.
The material is specially formulated to allow
paint adhesion. Consult manufacturer data for
application and safety instructions.
Interior Care
Cockpit
The cockpit area dashboard is a moldedfiberglass, vinyl-wrapped pod. The instrument
panel is comprised of various gauges and
switches. The dashboard and instrument panel
each have different cleaning requirements.
Clean the vinyl wrapped dash pod following the
instructions under Vinyl Care in this section. In
the event a blemish or small cut occurs in the
vinyl, contact a professional upholstery repair
service.
Clean the plastic or Plexiglas® instrument
panels using a cloth dampened in a mild soap
and water solution. Dry using a separate cotton
cloth. Plastic polish products that will help to
brighten the appearance of plastic or Plexiglas
instrument panels are Novus Plastic Care®, a
three-part system; Meguires® and Johnson Paste
Wax®, which will require extensive buffing and
rubbing.
Glass lens gauges can be cleaned using glass
cleaner. Spray cleaner on the cloth, not directly
onto the lens, to prevent over spray or runoff.
CAUTION
DO NOT allow glass cleaners to come in
contact with the plastic. Glass cleaning
products can damage plastic by dulling
the finish or causing it to become brittle.
TIP
To determine if the lens is glass or
plastic, tap the lens with a fingernail.
Plastic lens will have a dull hollow sound
whereas glass will have a clear ping
sound.
To prevent overall soiling, frequently
vacuum or lightly brush to remove dust
and grime.
 Clean spots using a mild water-free
solvent or dry cleaning product.
 Clean only in a well ventilated area and
avoid any product containing carbon
tetrachloride or other toxic materials.
 Use a professional furniture cleaning
service for overall cleaning.

Fabrics
Vinyl
Special care needs to be taken when the
motorhome is exposed to a very humid climate
for an extended period of time. Protect the fabric
from any unnecessary exposure to moisture.
Cover all upholstery and make sure window
coverings are down to protect fabrics from sun
damage. Frequently used items require more
attention than those items not regularly used.
If a spill occurs, blot the moisture as quickly
as possible. DO NOT use soap and hot water as
this may set a stain. Clean the spot as soon as
possible.
Several areas of the motorhome, such as the
dash, ceiling and items of furniture, may be
covered in vinyl. The care and cleaning of these
areas are as follows:
General Care & Cleaning
Cleaning Upholstery Fabrics:
 Water-based cleaners are not
recommended.
 If a spill does occur, blot the soiled area,
DO NOT rub it.
 Some solvents may have an adverse
reaction on a specific backing of
the upholstery fabric and are not
recommended.
2008 K Nig ht
Normal Cleaning:
Most common stains can be cleaned using
warm soapy water and a clear water rinse.
Moderate scrubbing with a medium bristle brush
will help to loosen soil from the depression
of embossed surfaces. For stubborn stains use
the following commercially available mild
detergents in accordance with the manufacturer’s
instructions: Mr. Clean or Fantastik®.
Full strength rubbing alcohol or mineral spirits
may be tried cautiously as a last resort on very
stubborn stains if the above suggestions do
not work. Indiscriminate use of any solvent, or
solvent containing cleaner, can severely damage
or discolor the vinyl. Stains may become
permanent if they are not immediately removed.
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exterior & interior care — 3
NOTE
Detergents should never be used on a
regular or repeated basis for normal
cleaning.
CAUTION
Powdered cleaners containing abrasives,
steel wool and industrial strength
cleaners are not recommended for vinyl.
Bird Excreta & Vomit Stains:
Sponge the area with soapy water
containing a diluted bleach until the stain
is removed. Rinse thoroughly with clean
water.
Urine Stains:
Sponge with soapy water containing a
small amount of household ammonia.
Rinse thoroughly with clean water.
Surface Mildew:
Wash with diluted bleach and use a
soft brush for stubborn growth. Rinse
repeatedly with clear, cold water.
Ballpoint Ink:
Wipe the stain immediately with rubbing
alcohol in a well ventilated area.
WARNING
If flammable solvents such as alcohol,
turpentine or varsol are used for
cleaning, use only small quantities
while in a well-ventilated area. Exercise
proper caution by notifying any persons
in the area. Keep away from any ignition
source. Always wear protective gloves.
56
Oil-Base Paint:
Use turpentine in a well ventilated area to
remove any fresh paint. Dried paint must
be moistened using a semi-solid, gel-type
stripper. The softened paint can be gently
scraped away. Rinse with soap and water.
CAUTION
Lacquer solvent will cause immediate
irreparable damage to the vinyl. DO
NOT use wax on vinyl upholstery as it
will cause premature embrittlement and
cracking. Dilute chlorine bleach before
using. Never use full strength bleach.
Paint strippers will remove the print
pattern and damage the vinyl if it comes
in direct contact.
Latex Paint:
Fresh paint can be wiped off with a damp
cloth. Hot soapy water will normally
remove dried latex.
Tar or Asphalt:
Remove immediately. Prolonged contact
will result in a permanent stain. Use a
cloth lightly dampened with mineral
spirits and rub the stain gently, working
from the outer edge of the stain toward
the center to prevent spreading. Rinse
with soap and water.
Crayon, Mustard or Ketchup:
Sponge with mild soap and water. For
stubborn stains that have set, use a cloth
soaked in diluted mild detergent with
gentle rubbing. Any remaining stain
should be washed with diluted bleach.
Rinse repeatedly with cold water.
2008 Kn ig ht
Chewing Gum:
Scrape off as much gum as possible using
a dull knife. Rub the gum with an ice
cube to harden and for easier removal.
In a well ventilated area, use a cloth
saturated with mineral spirits and gently
rub the remaining gum. Rinse thoroughly
with clean water.
Blood or Plant Residue:
Rub out spots using a clean cloth soaked
in cool water. For stubborn spots, use
household ammonia and rinse repeatedly
with a clean, wet cloth. DO NOT use
hot water or soap suds as this will set the
stain.
Lipstick, Grease, Oil, Make-Up or Shoe
Polish:
Apply a small amount of mineral spirits
with a cloth. Rub gently. Be careful not
to spread the stain by smearing beyond
the original source. Remove shoe polish
immediately as it contains a dye which
will cause permanent staining. Rinse
thoroughly with clean water.
Candy, Ice Cream, Coffee, Tea, Fruit
Stains, Liquor, Wine, Tanning Lotion
or Soft Drinks:
Loose material should be gently scraped
with a dull knife. Use lukewarm water
and sponge repeatedly. Any soiled area
that remains after drying should be gently
rubbed with a cloth or dampened with a
mild detergent solution. Rinse thoroughly
with clean water.
Exterior & Interior CAre — 3
TIP
Vinyl requires periodic cleaning to
maintain its appearance and to prevent
the buildup of dirt and contaminants
that may permanently stain or reduce
the life of the vinyl if left untreated.
Frequency of cleaning and procedures
used depend upon the amount of use
and the environmental conditions in
which the vinyl is subjected. Tears or
holes in the vinyl can be temporarily
covered with clear tape to prevent
further damage. Repairs should be
made by a professional upholstery
shop. Commercial repair products may
contain lacquers and cause the vinyl
to become brittle and more difficult to
repair.
Optima Leather & “O” Vinyl
Cleaning Suggestions:
The following steps are to be performed in
sequence. Each subsequent step is to be used if
the previous step was not successful. Clean area
with warm water after each process.
For General Cleaning:
Wipe the soiled area with warm water, a mild
detergent soap and a soft cotton cloth.
For Oil-based Stains:
Spray soiled area with household cleaner, such
as 409® or Fantastik®, and wipe with warm
water using a soft cotton cloth.
For Marker-type Stains:
Dab stained area with solution of 50%
Isopropyl Alcohol and 50% warm water using a
soft cotton cloth.
WARNING
Avoid open flames or hot lighting when
using an alcohol solution.
CAUTION
DO NOT use any abrasive cleaner with
this material.
NOTE
A five parts water to one part
bleach solution is recommended for
disinfecting.
Leather
Spots & Spills:
Absorb excess liquid immediately with a clean
cloth or sponge. Use water only if necessary. DO
NOT use a cleaning product. If water is used,
clean the entire area where the spot occurred. An
example would be the entire seat cushion or the
entire arm. Allow to air dry. DO NOT dry the
wet areas with hair dryers, etc.
Stubborn Spots and Stains:
Use lukewarm water and a mild soap to work
up a thin layer of suds on a piece of cheesecloth.
Scrub the surface. Rinse with a piece of clean,
damp cheesecloth. Allow to air dry. DO NOT
use saddle soap, cleaning solvents, furniture
polish, oils, varnish, abrasive cleaners, soaps or
ammonia water.
NOTE
These are recommended or suggested
methods of cleaning. The manufacturer
is not responsible for damage incurred
while cleaning. Always test the cleaning
method in an inconspicuous area first
before applying to the entire area.
2008 K Nig ht
Ultra-Leather
Care Instructions:
 Spot clean with mild soap and water.
 Air dry or dry using a hair dryer on the
warm setting.
 For stubborn stains, use mild solvent.
 For tougher stains, try Fantastik® brand
spray cleaner.
 Disinfect with a 5:1 NONCHLORINATED (only) bleach
solution.
 Dry clean using commercial dry cleaning
solvents only.
 Use a mild detergent for:
- Red Wine, Liquor, Coffee, Tea, Cola,
Milk
- Ketchup, Mustard, Mayonnaise, Steak
Sauce, Soy Sauce
- Butter, Salad Oil, Chocolate, Lipstick,
Make-up, Face Cream
- Suntan Oil, Machine Oil, Urine, Blood
Removing ballpoint pen stains:
Wipe the stain off with ethanol (ethyl alcohol).
Follow all manufacturer safety instructions when
using chemicals.
If the stain remains, use the following
procedure:
1. Dilute household bleach (sodium
hypochloride) with the same amount of
water. (One part to one part solution.)
2. Apply the bleach/water solution to a
piece of tissue (do not apply too much).
Place the tissue on the stained surface
and cover it with polyethylene film to
prevent the solution from drying.
57
exterior & interior care — 3
3. Periodically remove the tissues to check
on the condition of the stain. When the
stain is almost gone, remove the tissues
completely. DO NOT leave on for
more than one hour.
4. Wash the stain with sufficient amount of
clean water.
CAUTION
If bleach residue remains on the fabric,
the polyurethane resin and back cloth
will yellow and deteriorate.
Neutralize bleach by the following method:
 Place a piece of tissue, as in Step 2, and
apply hydrogen peroxide solution (15%).
 Leave the solution on for approximately
30 minutes, then remove the tissue.
 Completely remove the residue of
hydrogen peroxide on the Ultra-leather
with water.
For more information, please call:
Ultrafabrics, LLC Customer Service:
1-877-309-6648
Floors
Carpet Cleaning
Spot Removal Procedures:
 Act quickly when anything is dropped or
spilled. Remove spots before they dry.
 Blot liquids with a clean, white absorbent
cloth or paper towel.
 For semi-solids, scoop up with a rounded
spoon.
58
For solids, break up and vacuum out as
much as possible.
 Pretest the spot removal agent in an
inconspicuous area to make certain it will
not damage the carpet dyes.
 Apply a small amount of the cleaning
solution recommended for the particular
spot. DO NOT scrub. Work from the
edges of the spot to the center. Blot
thoroughly. Repeat until spot is removed.
 Follow steps on the Carpet Spot Removal
Guide.
 After each application, absorb as much
as possible before proceeding to the next
step.
 Absorb remaining moisture with layers
of white paper towels, weighted down
with a non-staining glass or ceramic
object.
 When completely dry, vacuum or brush
the pile to restore texture.
 If the spot is not completely removed,
contact a professional carpet cleaner.

Cleaning Solutions:
A. Dry Cleaning Fluid: A nonflammable
spot removal liquid, available in
grocery and hardware stores.
B. Nail Polish Remover: Any acetate,
which often has a banana fragrance.
DO NOT use if it contains acetone.
C. Detergent Solution: Mix two cups of
cold water and 1/8 teaspoon mild liquid
detergent (no lanolin, non-bleach).
D. Warm Water: Lukewarm tap water.
2008 Kn ig ht
E. Vinegar Solution: One cup white
vinegar to one cup water.
F. Ammonia Solution: One tablespoon
household ammonia to one cup water.
G. Stain Removal Kit: Available from
retail carpet stores or professional
cleaners.
H. Call Professional: Additional
suggestions, special cleaning chemicals
or the ability to patch the area may be
available.
I. Permanent Change: Due to the nature
of the stain, there may be color loss.
The carpet has been permanently
dyed or the carpet yarns have been
permanently damaged.
NOTE
While the recommended cleaning agents
have proven to be effective, some stains
may become permanent.
Exterior & Interior CAre — 3
Tile Floor
Tile floors vary in porosity and surface
irregularities. Regular maintenance is important
to keep the tile in the motorhome looking
showroom new. Once the slide-out has been
extended, keep the tile floor clean to prevent dirt
from scratching the tiles prior to retracting the
slide-out.
NOTE
Tile is ceramic and will chip or break.
Avoid dropping heavy or sharp objects
on the tile.
Cleaning Tile:
Use a damp sponge mop or a cloth to clean
tile. If moderate staining occurs, cleaning with a
window cleaner such as Windex® should do the
job. A mild solution of hot water and all-purpose
cleaner for tile floors, walls and countertops can
also be used. Rinse well with clear water and
dry with a soft cloth to prevent streaking. Avoid
cleaning tile with soap. Soap forms a film to
dull the luster. Soap also promotes the growth
of mildew and bacteria. DO NOT use powdered
cleaners on unglazed tile floors. Undissolved
powder will dull the surface. Grout sealers are
available that protect the porous surfaces. If a
sealer is used, follow the sealant manufacturer
guideline for application. Never use sealers on
unglazed tile. With the exception of terra cotta,
which may be oiled or waxed, tile does not need
to be polished or buffed to maintain its finish.
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NOTE
Before using any solution to clean
the tile, check the manufacturer’s
warning label to ensure safety of the
product. If there is any doubt, apply
several test patches of the solution in
an inconspicuous place to determine
product suitability.
Grout:
Grout used is a two part concrete mix and can
develop surface cracks over time. In motorhome
application, due to the constant flexing of the
flooring, this process may accelerate. If the grout
requires cleaning, scrub with a plastic brush.
DO NOT use steel wool as small particles may
remain and produce unsightly stains.
Laminate Floor
Laminate flooring used in the motorhome
provides style, durability and ease of
maintenance. This high-pressure laminated
flooring is designed to be incorporated as a
floating floor.
Laminate flooring is constructed of three
main material components. The surface, similar
to many countertops, contains aluminum
oxide particles to form an extremely hard,
durable outer layer. The carrier, or core layer,
is constructed from high density fiberboard.
A tongue and groove design provides a tighter
bond. The backer or bottom layer is also made
of laminate for strength.
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exterior & interior care — 3
Cleaning and Maintenance:
For everyday cleaning, vacuum the floor to
remove dirt and debris. It is recommended to
occasionally mop the floor using a cotton string
mop and a minimal amount of water. Use a
mixture of soap-free household cleaner (either
vinegar or ammonia work well) and water for a
more thorough cleaning.
Shower
Showers are susceptible to soap build-up. To
control mildew growth, spray the shower with
household chlorine bleach. Allow it to stand for
five minutes, then rinse with clear water. Clean
the glass shower doors with window cleaner on
a weekly basis to maintain shine. If water spots
cannot be removed from glass, rub lightly with
the flat edge of a razor blade to remove deposits.
To prevent excessive moisture and a continual
growth of mildew, use the shower only with
adequate ventilation. The sealant in a regularly
used shower should be replaced once a year. To
replace sealant, remove the old sealant using
a sharp non-metallic instrument. Apply a new
sealant, which can be found at most recreational
vehicle supply stores.
Ceiling
The ceiling of the motorhome can be a variety
of materials or fabrics.
Hardwood, Vinyl and Decorated Paneling:
Certain cleaning agents will affect the surface
on both printed and unprinted vinyl. Use only
a mild, non-abrasive detergent and warm water
with a soft cloth or sponge to clean. DO NOT
use bleach, alcohol, oil-based spray cleaners or
cleaning agents that contain solvents, citrus oil
or harsh chemicals.
Wall Coverings
Immediately remove solvent based or
pigmented substances from wall coverings. DO
NOT use abrasive cleaners containing chlorine
bleach or solvents. Fidelity and Jolie brands
are recommended. Always begin with a mild
detergent or soap and warm water. To remove
normal dirt, clean with a soft sponge. Rinse and
wipe dry. Before applying a cleaner, test the
cleaning agent on a small, inconspicuous portion
of the wall covering to ensure the cleaner does
not affect the color or gloss of the wall covering.
Care for the Tower Wall Covering:
Remove ordinary stains with mild
soap and warm water. Sponge on.
Rinse well and dry with a soft cloth. To
remove ball point pen, blood, lipstick,
etc., use a sponge or soft bristle brush
and Formula 409®, Fantastik® or
a similar product. Rinse well and
dry. Finish cleaning by applying full strength
isopropyl alcohol with a sponge or soft brush.
Rinse well and dry.
Care for the Satinesque Wall Covering:
Remove stain quickly to minimize the reaction
on the wall covering, especially if the stain is
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2008 Kn ig ht
solvent-based or pigmented. Examples: nail
polish, oil, shampoo, lacquer, enamel, paint, ink
and lipstick.
Begin cleaning the stain with a mild soapbased detergent; and if necessary, move to a
stronger cleaner such as household bleach, liquid
household cleaners or rubbing alcohol. Before
applying a stronger cleaner, test the cleaning
agent on a small inconspicuous portion of the
wall covering to ensure the cleaner does not
affect the color or gloss of the wall covering.
Stain Removal Procedures for Specific
Stain Types:
Normal Dirt:
Remove normal dirt using a mild soap
or detergent and warm water. Allow
it to soak for a few minutes then rub
briskly with a cloth or sponge.
Nail Polish, Shellac or Lacquer:
Remove liquid using a dry cloth. Use
care not to spread the stain. Quickly
clean the remaining stain with rubbing
alcohol. Rinse with clean water.
Ink:
Remove immediately by wiping with
a cloth dampened in rubbing alcohol.
Rinse with clean water.
Chewing Gum:
Rub with an ice cube to cool and
harden. Gently pull off the bulk of the
gum. Remove remaining gum with
rubbing alcohol.
Exterior & Interior CAre — 3
Pencil:
Erase as much of pencil mark as
possible. Wipe remaining marks with
rubbing alcohol.
Blood, Feces or Urine:
Remove these staining substances as
quickly as possible. Wash the stained
area with a strong soap. If the stain
does not disappear, rinse the soapy
area thoroughly with clean water.
Mix a solution of 50% water and 50%
household bleach. Clean the stained
area with the bleach solution. Rinse
with clean water.
Wood Care
For general cleaning, regularly wipe wood
surfaces using a soft cloth lightly dampened with
clear warm water. Thoroughly dry to prevent
streaking. For stubborn stains, use a clean cloth
dampened with a solution of mild non-alkaline
soap (dishwashing liquid) and water and rinse.
Dry thoroughly, buffing in the direction of
the wood grain. Never use abrasive cleaners,
scouring pads or powdered cleansers. Polishing
products used on the solid wood surface depends
on individual preference. Always follow product
instructions.
Excessive dampness, dryness, heat, or cold
can damage solid wood finishes. Sunlight
can change the color or age the wood. Never
allow moisture or spills to stand, always blot
dry immediately. Solvents, alcohol, nail polish
and polish removers, as well as harsh cleaners,
should not be used on finished wood surfaces.
Minor damage to solid wood surfaces can be
repaired quickly and effectively with a bit of
hard work, some careful attention to details, and
most importantly, the right materials. However,
any wood repair or finishing job is best left for a
professionally trained individual.
Nail Holes and Small Cracks:
Fill nail holes and small cracks with wood
putty or dough for unstained woods prior to any
sanding. Stained finishes require filling holes
and cracks after the stain has been applied. Putty
should match the stain closely in color.
NOTE
It is important to inform the service
technician of any products used for the
care and cleaning in the event of wood
repairs.
TIP
A little sawdust and wood glue can be
used to make putty for end grains.
Sanding and Sandpaper:
The following table is a general guide, but this
may vary with wood type. The key to sanding
is using the right sandpaper for the repair that is
needed. Always sand with the grain.
GRIT
GRADE
USE
80-120
Medium
150-180
Fine
220-240
Very Fine
Sanding between coats
of sealing.
280-320
Extra Fine
Removing dust spots or
marks between finish
coats.
360-600
Super Fine
Removing luster or
surface blemishes.
Smoothing the surface,
removing small marks.
Final sanding prior to
finishing.
Steel Wool:
Abrasive material composed of long steel
fibers of varying degrees of fineness that are
matted together. Coarser grades are used to
remove paint and other finishes; the finer grades
for polishing or smoothing a finished surface.
2008 K Nig ht
Scratches and Nicks:
“Quick and simple” rarely describes repairs
to stained wood finishes; however, a few tricks
used by professional woodworkers can be tried
to repair nicks and scratches.
Fixing scratches in stained woodwork:
Light scratches will often disappear when
carefully rubbed with furniture polish or paste
wax. When scratches appear lighter than the
surrounding dark-stained woodwork, it usually
means either that the scratch goes through the
stain into the wood or that the varnish is flaking
off. Deeper scratches can be hidden by carefully
rubbing with a piece of oily nut meat such as
Brazil nut, black walnut or pecan. Be careful
to rub the nut meat directly into the scratch to
avoid darkening of the surrounding wood. Color
the scratch with brown coloring crayon or liquid
shoe dye (especially good on walnut). Always
test a procedure on an inconspicuous area on the
wood to ensure no damages to the finish occurs.
Staining the scratch with iodine:
Mahogany - Use new iodine.
Brown or Cherry Mahogany - Use iodine
that has turned dark brown.
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exterior & interior care — 3
Maple - Dilute one part iodine with one part
denatured alcohol.
Commercial scratch removers, or stick wax to
match the wood finish, can also be used. After
the scratch has been hidden, polish or wax the
entire area. Deep scratches should be repaired
and finished by a professional.
Dents:
Small dents may be repaired by using steam.
To raise a small dent, place a damp cloth over
the area and hold a medium-hot iron on it. The
steam causes the wood fibers to swell back into
place. It may be necessary to repeat this process
until the dented area is level with the surface.
Allow the area to dry.
Restoring the clear finish:
The finished surface on the wood is a clear
lacquer coating. The lacquer finish can be
repaired should the finish become dulled or
scratched. Scratches extending into the wood
will require wood repair by filling the damaged
area. If there is light damage, the wood can be
steamed to bring the wood surface level.
Lacquer finish sheen can be restored by
carefully using 0000 steel wool or equivalent.
Sand damaged lacquer with fine sandpaper. Once
the scratched surface is smooth, apply a clear
lacquer coating using an aerosol. Lacquer can
be applied by cloth or brush, but best results are
obtained from an aerosol. If necessary, use 0000
steel wool or equivalent to bring out the luster
and smooth overspray.
62
CAUTION
Use top coats and finishes in accordance
with the manufacture’s safety
instructions. Use only in well ventilated
areas with proper respiratory filters and
masks.
Re-staining the wood:
If bare wood is visible at the bottom of the
scratch, the wood will need to be re-stained.
To remove damaged varnish, lightly roughen a
small area around the scratch with sandpaper,
steel wool or synthetic steel wool. Find a stain
that is a shade lighter than the wood finish. Stain
the bare wood with a very small amount of stain
on a rag, brush or cotton swab. If the color is too
light, apply additional coats. Rub away excess
stain with a dry rag. If the wood becomes too
dark, use a rag moistened in mineral spirits to
lighten the wood. Select a lighter color stain and
continue.
Several companies have simplified this repair
process by designing oil-based wood stain into
marker-like containers to rub on to the scratch.
Torn and scratched wood fibers will absorb stain
and darken quickly. Start with a stain color that
is lighter than the original finish. A second coat
can always be applied if the color of the first
coat is too light. Once the color is blended, patch
the clear finish as described above and apply a
wipe-on finish.
Countertops
Solid Surface
Routine Care:
The motorhome solid surface countertops and
sinks have a matte/satin finish. Soapy water or
ammonia-based cleaners will remove most dirt
and stains from all tops and bowls. Individual
techniques may be used to remove different
stains. Follow the recommendations below.
Cleaning the Countertops:
 Most dirt and stains: Use soapy water
or ammonia-based cleaner.
 Water marks: Wipe with damp cloth
and towel dry.
 Difficult stains: Use soft scrub and a
grey Scotchbrite Pad.
 Disinfecting: Occasionally wipe surface
with diluted household bleach (one part
water and one part bleach).
Cleaning the Solid Surfaces Sink:
Occasionally clean by using Soft Scrub Liquid
Cleanser and a grey Scotchbrite pad. Scrub the
sink, rinse and towel dry.
Removing Cuts and Scratches:
Solid Surface countertops are completely
renewable. Use the following instructions to
remove minor cuts and scratches.
Sand area starting with 180 grit
sandpaper, working your way up to 2000
grit or until blemish is gone and renewed
finish is achieved.
 Never sand in one small area. Feather out
lightly at each increase in sandpaper grit
to blend restoration.

2008 Kn ig ht
Exterior & Interior CAre — 3
Preventing Heat Damage:
Hot pans and heat-generating appliances, such
as frying pans or crockpots, can damage the
surface. To prevent heat damage, always use a
hot pad or a trivet with rubber feet to protect the
surface.
Other Important Tips:
Avoid exposing the solid surface to chemicals
such as paint removers or oven cleaners. If
these chemicals come in contact with the Solid
Surface, quickly wash with water. Avoid contact
with nail polish or nail polish remover. If contact
is made, quickly wash with water.
NOTE
DO NOT cut directly on the solid
surface. When pouring boiling water
into the Solid Surface sink, run the cold
water faucet to dilute the excess heat.
Laminate
Clean laminate countertops with a damp
cloth or sponge. Use a spray cleaner to remove
stubborn stains. Avoid using harsh abrasives,
scouring powders, peroxides or bleaches as these
products may dull or damage the surface. Avoid
contact with dyes, bleaches and indelible inks
used on food packages. DO NOT use laminated
countertops as a cutting board. Laminated
countertops are resistant to minor heat; however,
hot pans, irons and lit cigarettes damage the
surface. Use hot pads under pans taken directly
from the stovetop.
NOTE
DO NOT cut directly on the laminate
surface.
Stainless Steel Surfaces
Clean stainless steel once a week with a damp
sponge. Apply stainless steel cleaner/polish
with the grain, not across, using a non-abrasive
cloth or sponge. DO NOT use steel wool, wire
brushes or abrasive sponge pads. These will
mar the finish. Cleaner containing chloride is
not recommended; however, if used, thoroughly
rinse the surface to prevent corrosion. To avoid
water spots, do not allow water to evaporate
on the surface.
NOTE
DO NOT cut directly on the stainless
steel surface.
Windows
Water Spots:
Glass will develop water spots when not
properly cleaned. Water spots are magnified on
a reflective finish. Use a squeegee immediately
after washing to reduce water spotting. To
remove stubborn water stains from reflective
glass we recommend Cerium Oxide Polishing
Compound, made by C.R. Lawrence, available
at most glass shops.
Condensation
Condensation occurs from water vapor present
in the air. More vapor is added by breathing,
bathing, cooking, etc. collects wherever there
is available air space. When the temperature
reaches the dew point, the water vapor in the air
condenses and changes to liquid form.
2008 K Nig ht
Controlling Moisture Condensation:
Reduce or eliminate interior moisture
condensation during cold weather by using the
following steps:
 Partially open the roof vents and
windows so that outside air can circulate
into the interior. Increase the ventilation
when large numbers of people are in the
motorhome. Even in raining or snowing
conditions the air outside will be far drier
than interior air.
 Install a dehumidifier. Continuous use of
a dehumidifier is effective in removing
excess moisture from interior air. Using
a dehumidifier is not a cure-all, however,
it will reduce the amount of outside air
needed for ventilation.
 Run the range vent fan when cooking
and the bath vent fan (or open the bath
vent) when bathing, to reduce water
vapor. Avoid excessive boiling or use of
steam producing hot water.
 DO NOT heat the motorhome interior
with the range or oven. Heating with the
range or oven increases the risk of toxic
fumes and depletes oxygen. Open flames
also add moisture to the interior air and
increase condensation.
 In very cold weather, leave cabinet and
closet doors partially open. Air flow will
warm and ventilate the interior storage
compartments and exterior walls to
reduce or eliminate condensation and
prevent the possibility of ice formations.
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exterior & interior care — 3
Window Treatments
Mini-Blinds
Dusting:
Regular dusting will maintain the appearance
of the mini-blinds. Keep aluminum blinds
looking their best by periodically wiping with
a soft cloth or a dusting mitt. By tilting the
slats down, not quite closed, most of the top
surface of each slat can be cleaned. Blinds may
be cleaned while hanging in place using this
method.
Vacuuming:
For deeper cleaning, vacuum gently with the
soft brush attachment of a vacuum cleaner.
Compressed Air or Hair Dryer (non-heat setting):
Blow dust off each slat. Dust will be air-borne
using this method so ventilate the motorhome.
Spot-Cleaning:
Spot-clean shades and blinds using a soft cloth
or a moistened sponge with lukewarm water.
Add mild detergent, if needed. Blot gently to
avoid creasing. In a dusty environment, the
blinds may need to be cleaned regularly using a
sponge or dampened soft cloth. Use warm (not
hot) water and a mild detergent that does not
contain abrasives. Rinse the blinds using a clean
cloth and water to prevent water spots. Place a
towel directly under the blinds to absorb water
that may drip.
Ultrasonic cleaning:
Professional ultrasonic cleaning may be
preferred.
64
Day/Night Shades
Leave Day-Night shades in the up position
when not in use to help the shades hold their
shape.
Tension Adjustment:
Tension should be adjusted if the shades are
loose or there is excessive vibration. A button is
located on the bottom of the shade at each end.
Two lines on each side of the shade are threaded
through the button and tied off.
Pull the tied-off
lines through the
button to increase
tension. Leave
some slack so the
shades are not too
tight.
 Tie the lines off
at the new position. Adjust each side
equally.
 Operate the shades to ensure tension is
set correctly and equally on both sides.
 Trim excess line from both sides if
desired.

030779c
Dusting:
Vacuum with a brush attachment or use a
dusting tool on a regular basis.
Cleaning:
A dry foam cleaner may be used for soil
and dirt removal. Follow all directions on the
container, or use a cleaning solution of ¼ oz.
clear liquid soap to 8 oz. water.
2008 Kn ig ht
NOTE
DO NOT use colored liquid soap as a
stain may appear when fabric dries.
Mold & Mildew
What is Mold?
Mold is a type of fungus that occurs naturally
in the environment and can leave a musty
odor, discolor fabrics, stain surfaces and cause
considerable damage to the motorhome.
What Does Mold Need to Grow?
Mold requires a food source to grow such
as grease or soil. Synthetic fabrics, such as
acetate, polyester, acrylic and nylon, are mildew
resistant, but soil on the surface of these fabrics
are susceptible to mold.
Temperate climate and moisture also help
to cultivate mold growth. Moisture in the
motorhome can result from unattended spills,
leaks, overflows and condensation. Moisture
allowed to remain on a growth medium can
develop mold within 24 to 48 hours. Minimizing
moisture inside of the motorhome can reduce
or eliminate favorable mold growth conditions.
Good housekeeping and regular maintenance
are essential in the effort to prevent or eliminate
mold growth.
Exterior & Interior CAre — 3
Consequences of Mold:
All mold is not necessarily harmful, but certain
strains of mold have been shown to cause, in
susceptible persons, allergic reactions, including
skin irritation, watery eyes, runny noise,
coughing, sneezing, congestion, sore throat and
headache. Individuals with suppressed immune
systems may risk infections. Some experts
contend that mold causes serious symptoms
and disease which may even be life threatening.
However, experts disagree about the level of
mold exposure that may cause health problems,
and about the exact nature and extent of the
health problems that may be caused by mold.
Moreover, the Center for Disease Control states
that a casual link between the presence of toxic
mold and serious health conditions has not been
proven.
Standards or threshold limit values for
concentration of mold or mold spores have not
been set. Currently, there are no EPA regulations
or standards for airborne mold contaminants.
There is simply no practical way to eliminate
all mold and mold spores in the indoor
environment. For example, studies have shown
that ozone cleaners are not effective at killing
airborne mold or surface mold contamination.
Controlling Mold Growth:
The motorhome owner should eliminate
mold growth in the motorhome. Take the
following steps to eliminate mold growth in the
motorhome:
1. Carefully examine items for signs
of mold before loading them in the
motorhome. Potted plants (roots and
soil), furnishings, clothing and linens,
as well as many other household items,
may contain mold.
2. Regular vacuuming and cleaning will
help reduce mold levels. Mild bleach
solutions and most tile cleaners are
effective in eliminating or preventing
mold growth.
3. Indoor humidity can be reduced by 30
to 60% when venting clothes dryers
to the outdoors. Ventilate the kitchen
and bathroom by opening windows,
using exhaust fans or a combination
of both. Operating the air conditioning
will remove excess moisture in the air,
and help facilitate evaporation of water
from wet surfaces.
4. Promptly clean up spills, condensation
and other sources of moisture.
Thoroughly dry any wet surfaces or
material. DO NOT let water pool or
stand in the motorhome. Promptly
replace materials that cannot be
thoroughly dried.
5. Inspect for leaks on a regular basis.
Look for discolorations or wet spots.
Repair leaks promptly. Inspect
condensation pans (refrigerators and
air conditioners) for mold growth. Take
notice of musty odors and any visible
signs of mold.
2008 K Nig ht
6. Should mold develop, thoroughly
clean the affected area with a mild
solution of bleach. First, test to see if
the affected material or surface is color
safe. If mold growth is severe, call on
the services of a qualified professional
cleaner.
7. If mold cannot be removed, throw the
item away.
Whether or not a motorhome owner
experiences mold growth depends largely on
how the motorhome is managed and maintained.
As a manufacturer, our responsibility is
limited to things that we can control. As
explained in the written warranty, we will
repair or replace defects in the construction
(defects defined as a failure to comply
with reasonable standards of motorhome
construction) for the Limited Warranty coverage
period provided. THE MANUFACTURER
WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DAMAGE CAUSED BY MOLD THAT
MAY BE THE CONSEQUENCE OF OR
ASSOCIATED WITH DEFECTS IN THE
CONSTRUCTION.
Pest Control
Regardless of the area one lives in or travels
to, it is safe in stating there will be pests waiting.
These pests are not only annoying; they can pose
a health risk and create serious damage to the
motorhome.
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exterior & interior care — 3

Common pests include insects such as
ants, cockroaches, termites, flies, pantry
pests and wasps as well as wildlife such
as rodents, raccoons, bats, birds and
snakes. It is important to remember that
pests are searching for food, water and
a place to live. Eliminating any one of
those elements will help control the pest
infestation. Take immediate steps to
remove pests as soon as their presence is
detected.
Steps to help control pests:
 Reduce clutter inside the motorhome
and storage bays. All storage items,
particularly food (including pet
food), should be kept in tightly sealed
containers. Seal all cracks and holes,
and insure that window, door and vent
screens are securely in place.
 Routinely clean the motorhome,
including storage bays. Wipe down the
water bay. Promptly remove all crumbs
from areas where food is regularly
prepared and eaten. Garbage should be
placed in a sealed container and removed
to an outside receptacle daily. Only put
out pet food that will be immediately
eaten.
 Keep foods such as flour, cereal,
spaghetti and pet food in re-sealable
containers with tight lids.
 Sweep and vacuum often (especially in
eating areas) to help eliminate a food
source for pests.
 Seal cracks, crevices, and gaps around
doors and windows.
66
Many pests need moisture to successfully
live and reproduce. Limit their access to
water or moisture sources by sealing any
cracks and leaks in pipes and faucets.
Reduce moisture in the motorhome by
controlling condensation, immediately
wiping up spills and promptly repairing
leaks. Be extra alert around areas that
attract rodents and insects, including the
sewer hose, fresh water hose, bay doors
and items that may be leaning against
the outside of the motorhome, such as
fishing poles and golf clubs.
 When the motorhome is stored outdoors,
clear the surrounding area of all rodent
friendly hiding places:shrubs, trees and
clutter. Completely seal the underside
of the motorhome. Wire mesh will work
well to prevent points of entry, but
beware of blocking necessary air vents.
Prior to operating the motorhome after
storage, remove all insect and animal
nests that may have developed around
vents, engine compartments, the exhaust
pipe and in the wheel wells.

Rodents:
Rodents may chew through wires or build
nests in components of the motorhome. Signs of
rodent infestation include droppings, shredded
material or chewed furniture fabrics and vinyl.
Rodents like to build nests with wire insulation,
and are commonly attracted to the outside
coating of 120 Volt AC wiring more than 12 Volt
DC wiring.
2008 Kn ig ht
NOTE
Although the back cap of the
motorhomes is well sealed, rodents are
capable of chewing through the foam
insulation and that area should be
routinely inspected.
If there are signs of rodent infestation around
the motorhome, place traps or poisons in
suspected areas. Keep the traps and poisons
safely away from pets and children. Cheese is
not the best bait for a rodent trap. Use peanut
butter or chocolate in small amounts. Place
the bait on the trigger of the trap to induce the
rodent to climb onto the trigger to reach the
bait. Rodents do not limit invasion to unused
vehicles.
Insects:
Eliminate insects when signs of infestation
appear. If you are unable to identify the type of
insect, purchase sticky traps from the hardware
store and place the tape where the insects
have been seen. Once a sample is caught, seek
assistance in identifying the insect to determine
what will be required to remove the infestation.
Regularly inspect the exterior of the
motorhome for signs of a budding wasp nest,
and promptly destroy small nests before they
become too large.
Spiders can be in any structure. Immediately
remove spider webs. Some types of spiders
like to nest on top of the diesel tank and around
the diesel hoses. Dispense of spiders using a
vacuum. Use care to capture the spider and egg
sacs. Throw the vacuum bag away in a sealed
bag.
Exterior & Interior CAre — 3
Fruit flies invade the motorhome by attaching
to fresh fruits and vegetables. Determine what
food items are generating the flies and discard
that item in an outdoor trash receptacle. Fruit
flies can be eliminated with a homemade trap.
Pour a few ounces of vinegar into a cup and
cover the cup with plastic wrap. Secure the wrap
with tape or a rubber band and poke a ¼" hole in
the plastic. Place the trap in the area where fruit
flies are present.
Ants live in colonies. Only a fraction of the
ant colony will leave to seek food. Spraying
pesticides will only kill the ants that are away
from the colony. The colony must be destroyed
to eliminate all ants. Keep ants away from the
sewer hose by spraying the hose ends with a
soap and water solution.
Fleas can be removed by properly treating pets
with a veterinarian approved treatment and by
thoroughly cleaning the motorhome. Vacuum
vinyl areas and tile floors to remove dust, flea
larva and flea eggs. Follow by thoroughly
washing those areas with soap and water.
Carpets must be vacuumed and treated with a
residual flea control product labeled safe for
indoor carpet and furniture use. Perform the
cleaning treatment daily for three days to ensure
that all fleas have encountered the treatment.
Flying outdoor insects are attracted to
bright light. Yellow porch light covers on the
motorhome work to discourage insect invasion.
During nighttime hours insects will be attracted
to docking lights, or other bright exterior
lighting.
If the presence of moths is detected inside
of the motorhome, usually by holes appearing
in material, clean the affected clothing and all
other items stored in the same area. Follow
by completely cleaning the closet, dresser or
storage area. If cracks are detected, seal the
cracks and treat the area with a properly labeled
indoor pest control product.
Birds:
Even birds can be considered pests,
particularly when the motorhome is parked in
the flight path of a flock. Bird droppings are
hard to remove and will leave stains. Prevent
permanent staining to the motorhome roof by
regularly cleaning the surface to remove all bird
droppings.
Damage from Pests:
Lizards have been known to crawl into the
inverter and short out the circuit board. Lizards
can be captured using glue traps. To remove
the lizard from the trap, dissolve the glue with
vegetable oil and release it outside and well
away from the motorhome. A scorpion will
glow blue-green in UV light. If the presence
of scorpions in the motorhome is suspected,
investigate with an UV black light during the
nighttime hours.
Best sources of information about common
household pests:
The Internet is a great place to find
information about common pests. The National
Pest Management Association website can be
useful resource about common pests. Another
good source for information are colleges and
universities with entomology (study of insects)
departments.
Electronic pest control devices can be costly
and most likely will not work on all types of
rodents and insects. When calling on the services
2008 K Nig ht
of a professional to combat pest infestation, call
a reputable business that is licensed in handling
pesticides. Check references. Explain that you
are seeking assistance for a motorhome, as
treatments may differ from standard household
jobs.
If a pest problem is suspected in the
motorhome, consider professional pest control
help. The following guidelines can be used for
selecting a pest control service:
 Seek referrals from those who have used
pest control services. Inquire about the
type of pest problem encountered and if
they were satisfied with the service.
 Membership in the national, state or
local pest control associations is a good
indicator that the company has access
to modern technical information and is
committed to further education.
 Reach a complete understanding with
the company before work starts; find out
what the pest is, how the problem will be
treated, how long the period of treatment
will be, and what results can be expected.
 Be sure to understand what is guaranteed
and what is not.
67
exterior & interior care — 3
Storage
Short Term
Short term storage is defined as storing the
motorhome for a period of thirty days or less.
Properly preparing the motorhome during
periods of short term storage will make bringing
the motorhome out of storage a much easier
process. Winterize the plumbing system if the
motorhome is stored in winter months, or if
stored when temperatures are below 32º F.
Checklist - Short Term Storage:
 Retract the slide rooms. DO NOT
store the motorhome with slide rooms
extended.
 Shut off all appliances. Close the primary
LP-Gas valve.
 Remove all articles from refrigerator/
freezer and clean thoroughly. Prop doors
open to prevent mildew.
 Drain holding tanks. Winterize the fresh
water system using FDA RV antifreeze
or air pressure to evacuate the plumbing
system.
 Retract and secure all awnings.
 Turn OFF the interior house power.
 Store batteries fully charged. Batteries
stored in a discharged state will readily
freeze.
 If possible, position the motorhome so
the batteries are accessible. This allows a
battery to be charged or replaced without
moving the motorhome.
 If available, leave the motorhome hooked
to shore power. Leave both the house and
chassis battery disconnect switches ON.
68
Careful placement of a small heat source
in the interior will help control moisture.
Desiccate filter systems will help remove
interior moisture.
 If AC power is not available, turn both
the house and chassis battery disconnect
switches OFF.
 If possible, store the motorhome inside a
storage building.
 If stored outside, inspect all seams and
seals twice a month for possible leakage.
 Store the motorhome with a full fuel tank
to minimize moisture condensing at top
of fuel tank.
 Close vents and windows to prevent
wind driven rain entrance.
 Store tires at maximum inflation
pressure.
 Leave cabinet doors and drawers open
to facilitate air movement behind those
areas.
 Perform a full interior inspection for
water leaks twice a month. Be sure to
check behind all cabinet doors.

Long Term
Long term storage of the motorhome can be
defined as leaving a motorhome unattended for
a period of thirty days or more. A motorhome
requires protection from the elements just
as a house or a car would. When left out in
the environment without proper storage or
maintenance, a motorhome is vulnerable to the
moisture and oxidation processes inherent in the
environment.
2008 Kn ig ht
NOTE
The natural process of condensation
will occur with temperature changes
of 30º F or more in one day. Humidity
readings of 60% or greater will allow
the accumulated moisture to remain for
extended periods of time.
If AC power is not available in storage area:
 Turn off all appliances.
 Turn off interior house power using the
battery cut-out switch.
 If possible, situate the motorhome so the
batteries remain accessible. This allows a
battery to be charged or replaced without
moving the motorhome.
 Charge the batteries to a full state of
charge.
 Turn both the house and chassis battery
OFF.
 When stored outside, check battery
voltage while the motorhome is in
storage.
 Preventive measures should be used
if the voltage readings are low. When
using preventative measures, taking the
motorhome out of storage or moving the
motorhome in case of emergency is a
much easier process.
NOTE
Batteries in a low state of charge will
readily freeze. Freezing will damage the
battery.
Exterior & Interior CAre — 3
If AC power is available:
The chassis battery disconnect switch should
remain ON. The inverter will charge both house
and chassis battery banks. A 30 Amp shore
power service will be more than adequate.
CAUTION
A 20 Amp service using light duty
extension cords and the required
adapters create serious voltage losses.
Line voltage loss and the resistance
at each electrical connection is a
hazardous combination and should be
avoided. Damage to sensitive electronic
equipment may result!
Surfaces to park/store the motorhome on:
 Avoid parking the motorhome on a grass
or gravel surface to prevent moisture
accumulation.
 Concrete pads seal the surface and allow
better ventilation under the motorhome.
 Storage buildings with concrete floors, or
heated storage facilities, greatly reduce
the amount of moisture accumulation and
protects the motorhome from moisture
damage.
Outdoor Storage Area:
 The interior should be heated to help
prevent mold and mildew growth.
Moisture removing desiccate filter
systems are available from hardware and
RV supply stores. Place the filter system
inside the motorhome to reduce interior
moisture condensation or humidity.
 Proper winterization of the fresh water
system will prevent potential damage in
extreme cold.
Ultraviolet radiation affects soft goods
and rubber products such as privacy
curtains, window shades and tires. These
items should be protected. Store Day/
Night Shades in the Up position.
 Cardboard templates can be made for
the windows to protect the interior from
exposure to direct sunlight.
 Tire covers are available to protect the
sidewall of the tires from cracking. Make
sure tires in storage contain the correct
air pressure to prevent damaged caused
by underinflation.
 Regularly wash the exterior to help
control moss accumulation. Waxing the
motorhome twice a year will augment
these substances.

Inspect the motorhome:
 Leave cabinet doors and drawers open
to facilitate air movement behind those
areas.
 Perform a full interior inspection for
water leaks every two weeks while the
motorhome is in storage. Check inside all
cabinets for signs of dampness or leaks.
Inspect the ceiling areas around roof
vents or other roof openings.
 Inspect and clean the roof and sidewall
seams at least once a year. Inspect for
exterior sealant gaps of all roof seams,
vents, skylights, roof air conditioners and
windows.
2008 K Nig ht
Fuel:
Storing the motorhome with a full fuel tank
will minimize moisture condensing at the top of
the tank. Diesel fuel is an organic material which
will develop a microbe growth (black slime).
Fuel stabilizers may be added to control microbe
growth and degrading of the fuel. Consult the
engine manufacturer’s owner’s manual or a
distributor for further detailed information on
fuel stabilizers and additives.
Brakes:
Brakes suffer from non-use during periods of
storage. The bare metal machined surfaces of
brake drums or rotors have only a light coating
of dust from the brake lining friction material.
The brake dust is the only thing protecting the
bare metal surfaces from rusting. Only regular
brake applications dry the moisture preventing
rust on brake drum or rotor surfaces. During
periods of non-use, oxygen and moisture oxidize
the machined surfaces. Only occasional use
keeps these surfaces from oxidizing. Rusty brake
drum or rotor surfaces permeate the brake lining
upon the first few applications, reducing the
friction action of the linings.
69
exterior & interior care — 3
Engine:
Internal combustion engines need to be
“exercised” on a regular basis to ensure an
adequate supply of lubricating oil coats the
cylinder walls and piston rings. Valve and valve
seat surfaces also suffer from non-use. Some
valves will remain open depending at which
part of the combustion cycle the engine has
stopped. The heat and cold of the day allows
moisture to accumulate through the exhaust
system. Start all engines at least twice a month.
Electric Motors:
Electric motors in the motorhome should be
occasionally operated to help lubricate and keep
surfaces freely rotating. These items include the
roof air conditioners, dash fans, dash blower
motor, furnance and powered roof vents.
Winter Storage Checklist
Plumbing Lines - Drain and protect.
(See Winterizing - Section 6.)
 Fresh Water Tank - Drain.
 Body - Clean and wax. Oil locks and
hinges. Repair roof seams as needed.
 Countertop and Cabinets - Wash with
mild soap and water.
 Curtains - Remove and clean according
to care specifications.
 Windows - Cover windows by pulling
blinds, closing shades or using a separate
cover such as a sheet.
 Holding Tank - Drain and rinse. Close
valves.

70
NOTE
Add a small amount of antifreeze to
waste holding tanks to keep valves and
gaskets lubricated.
Drain Traps - Pour RV antifreeze down
all drains.
 Refrigerator - Clean and leave both
doors propped open. Cover exterior
panels and roof vents. If equipped
with an icemaker, drain icemaker and
icemaker tray. See the manufacturer’s
manual for more detail.
 Batteries - Add distilled water and
recharge if needed. If necessary,
disconnect the cables, remove the
batteries and store them in a cool dry
place. Check and recharge as needed.
 Air Conditioner - Remove the air filters.
Clean or replace.
 Roof - Keep clear of snow accumulation
or damage may occur.
 Interior/Exterior - Storing under cover
or indoors helps extend interior and
exterior life.
 Fuel Tank - Diesel fuel tank should be
full of fuel.

2008 Kn ig ht
Removal from Storage
Extensive freeze damage or other serious
deterioration can occur if the motorhome is
not properly winterized. If the motorhome is
properly and carefully prepared for storage,
removal from storage will not be difficult. The
following checklist pertains to items or areas
that should be inspected when it is time to take
the motorhome out of storage and put back into
operation. If you have any questions regarding
storage or winterization, consult a qualified
service technician.
 Thoroughly inspect the outside of
motorhome. Look for animal nests in the
wheel wells or in other out of the way
places.
 Remove all appliance flue vent covers,
ceiling vent covers and air conditioning
covers. Be sure the refrigerator openings
are free of debris, insect nests, webs, etc.
 Open all doors and compartments. Check
for animal or insect intrusion, water
damage or other types of damage which
may have occurred.
 Check the state of charge of the batteries.
If necessary, fill LLA cells with distilled
water only. Charge as necessary. Inspect
the cable ends and terminals. They
should be secure and free of corrosion.
 Check all the chassis fluid levels: engine
oil, engine coolant, hydraulic fluid
reservoir, transmission oil and rear axle
oil.
 Start the engine, allowing it to reach
operating temperature. Ensure the engine
instruments indicate proper readings.
Exterior & Interior CAre — 3
While the engine is running, check the
operation of headlights, taillights, turn
signals, back-up lights, license plate light
and emergency flasher. Operate the dash
air conditioner. If the air conditioner
does not work or the compressor makes
unusual noises, have the system checked
by a qualified air conditioner technician.
 Shut the engine down. Adjust or add
fluids as necessary. Inspect around the
engine and under the motorhome for fluid
leaks.
 Drain, sanitize and flush the fresh water
system as outlined in the Water SystemsSection 6. Inspect the sewer drain hose
and connections for leaks. Replace if
necessary.
 Operate all faucets and fixtures in the
fresh water system. Run a sufficient
amount of fresh water through all the
water lines and faucets to thoroughly
purge any potable antifreeze from the
fresh water system.

NOTE
Discard at least the first two trays of ice
from the icemaker to ensure the ice does
not contain traces of antifreeze or other
contaminates.
Open cabinet doors and drawers. Inspect
for water leaks at joints or fittings. Repair
as necessary.
 Operate all 12 Volt DC lights and
accessories. If something does not work
there may be a bad 12 Volt DC circuit
breaker or blown fuse.

Install new batteries in battery operated
safety detectors or devices. Test the
Carbon Monoxide, LP-Gas and smoke
detectors for proper operation.
 Check that the monitor panel is properly
functioning.
 Inspect the 120 Volt AC electrical system
which includes the power cord, inverter/
converter, all outlets and exposed wiring.

NOTE
Prepare the generator for operation
following the instructions in the
Generator OEM manual.
Start and run the generator.
Confirm that the batteries are charging.
Operate the 120 Volt AC appliances and
air conditioners. If an electrical item or
appliance is not properly functioning,
contact the dealer or an authorized
service center to have it evaluated.
 Have a qualified technician inspect the
LP-Gas system and perform an
LP-Gas leak test. The leak test should
also include an LP-Gas regulator
adjustment (if needed). The test can also
verify if the regulator is faulty and should
be replaced. Have the LP-Gas tank
inspected.
 Operate each LP-Gas appliance. Observe
all burner/pilot flames for proper color
and size.
 Inspect and clean the interior.
 Check the sealant around all roof and
body seams and windows. Reseal if
necessary.


2008 K Nig ht
Lubricate all the exterior locks, hinges
and latches with a graphite lubricant.
 Check the windshield wiper blade
condition. Check the wiper/washer
operation.
 Wash and wax the exterior. Check the
body for scratches or other damage;
touch up or repair as necessary. Flush the
underside thoroughly.
 Run through the operational checks for
steering, brakes, engine and transmission.
Operate the motorhome slowly during
these checks to allow sufficient
circulation of fluids and resetting of the
components.
 If desired, have the dealer or repair
center double-check preparation to make
necessary adjustments and/or correct
defects.

71
exterior & interior care — 3
Notes
72
2008 Kn ig ht
4
2008 Knight
applianceS — Section 4
applIanceS - IntroDUctIon ............................ 74
refrIgerator .................................................... 74
Operation.Specifics.......................................... 74
Control.Panel.-.Four.Door................................. 75
Icemaker.......................................................... 76
Refrigerator.Alarm............................................ 76
Cooling.Unit.Fans............................................. 76
Doors.............................................................. 77
Storage.Procedures.......................................... 77
Interior.Light.................................................... 77
Service............................................................ 77
Exterior.Refrigerator.Access.Panel.................... 78
Air.in.LP-Gas.Supply.Lines............................... 78
Control.Panel.–.Two.Door.(Optional)................. 78
mIcroWave/convectIon oven ........................ 80
Care.&.Cleaning............................................... 81
cooktop ............................................................. 82
Burner.Grate.................................................... 83
Care.&.Cleaning............................................... 83
cooktop WItH oven (optIonal) ..................... 83
Lighting.the.Burners......................................... 84
Burner.Grate.................................................... 84
Wall tHermoStat ............................................ 85
aIr conDItIonIng - roof .................................. 86
Operation......................................................... 86
Operation.........................................................
Heat.Pump.Operation....................................... 86
Heat.Pump.Operation.......................................
Air.Conditioner.Maintenance. ........................... 87
Air.Conditioner.Maintenance.
Return.Air.Filters.............................................. 87
Return.Air.Filters..............................................
fUrnace ............................................................. 87
Operation......................................................... 88
Operation.........................................................
Using.the.Furnace............................................ 88
Using.the.Furnace............................................
If.the.Furnace.Fails.to.Light. ............................. 88
If.the.Furnace.Fails.to.Light.
Water Heater....................................................
Heater.................................................... 89
WaSHer/Dryer prepareD (optIonal)............ 91
WaSHer/Dryer (optIonal) .............................. 92
Test.Procedure................................................. 92
Test.Procedure.................................................
Operation......................................................... 92
Operation.........................................................
Washer/Dryer.Maintenance..............................
Washer/Dryer.Maintenance
W
asher/Dryer.Maintenance..............................
.............................. 93
Winterizing.the.Washer/Dryer...........................
W
Winterizing.the.Washer/Dryer
interizing.the.Washer/Dryer...........................
........................... 93
central
c
entral vacUUm (optIonal) .......................... 94
Operation.........................................................
Operation
O
peration.........................................................
......................................................... 94
Maintenance....................................................
Maintenance
M
aintenance....................................................
.................................................... 94
ffIreplace
Ireplace electrIc
((optIonal
optIonal – 40 SkQ only) ................................ 95
Operation.........................................................
Operation
O
peration
95
Remote.Control/Receiver.................................. 96
Light.Bulb.Replacement.................................... 96
appliances — 4
Appliances - Introduction
Refrigerator
This section covers operation and care of
various appliances found in the motorhome:
refrigerator, cooktop, microwave, roof air
conditioner and optional appliances. These
appliances operate on AC or DC current, LP-Gas
or a combination of the three.
Follow the specific guidelines in the
refrigerator manual to ensure longevity and
proper operation of the refrigerator. With proper
care and maintenance, the refrigerator should
provide years of trouble-free service.
INFORMATION
Detailed information with CAUTION
or WARNING instructions for the
various appliances, other than what is
found in this section, can be found in
the manufacturer manuals.
WARNING
Before entering any type of refueling
station, turn off all LP-Gas operated
appliances. Most LP-Gas appliances
used in motorhomes are vented to
the outside. When parked close to a
gasoline pump, it is possible for fuel
vapors to enter this type of appliance
and ignite, resulting in an explosion or
fire.
INFORMATION
Refer to the refrigerator manual for
detailed operating and maintenance
instructions.
NOTE
To reduce the possibility of food
spoilage, keep the interior box
temperature at or below 40º F. The
refrigerator will consume more
energy to maintain low temperature,
especially in hot, humid climates.
Lower temperature may also lead to
more frost build-up.
WARNING
DO NOT use the refrigerator if there
is an ammonia smell inside or outside
of the refrigerator, or if a yellowish
substance appears inside or at the
outside access compartment. This can
be an indication of a refrigerant leak.
Contact an authorized repair facility.
Operation Specifics
The refrigerator operates from LP-Gas or
120 Volts AC electric.
 DC Voltage for control pad operation
must be no higher than 15.4 Volts DC or
lower than 10.5 Volts DC.
 AC voltage must be no higher than 132
Volts AC or lower than 108 Volts AC.

WARNING
Carbon Monoxide gas may cause
nausea, fainting or death. Operating
an LP-Gas appliance with inadequate
ventilation or partial blockage of the
flue can result in Carbon Monoxide
poisoning. DO NOT store flammable
liquids such as lighter fluid, gasoline
or propane in the outside refrigerator
compartment.
NOTE
Features and options vary with
floorplans.
74
020295
CAUTION
Operating the refrigerator off-level
separates chemicals, causing them to
crystallize and block the circulation
action of the cooling unit. Damage is
cumulative and irreversible.
Important: Operate refrigerator only when
level. Level the refrigerator using a torpedo or
bulls eye level. Place the levels on the bottom
shelf of the refrigerator. The bubble should be at
least half-way inside the circles.
2008 Kn ig ht
For the refrigerator to operate:
The house batteries must be charged and
on.
 The primary LP-Gas valve must be open.
 Figure A: The refrigerator 120 Volt
AC cord(s) must be plugged in (located
outside behind refrigerator access door).
 Figure B: If controls do not light up,
check house battery charge status or see
if the 12 Volt DC wires are plugged into
the refrigerator’s circuit board (located
outside behind refrigerator access door).
 Figure C: The water valve(s) must be
open if the refrigerator is equipped with
an icemaker.

appliances — 4
Figure C
030864d
040575
Water Valve: Located under the
refrigerator or outside behind
the refrigerator access door.
Depending on floorplan, some
models have an additional
secondary water valve located
in the water service center or
exterior compartment.
Figure A
LED Display:
This screen is used for mode, temperature
and fault code display.
MODE Button:
Controls the operation mode of the
refrigerator.
 Press the MODE button to select
between Automatic AU, AC or LP
operation.
030967
SET TEMP Button:
Adjusts the temperature.
 To adjust, push and hold the SET TEMP
button.
 Number “9” is the coldest setting.
Figure B
Control Panel - Four Door
ON/OFF Button:
Turns the refrigerator on or off.
 Push the ON/OFF button to start the
refrigerator in Auto mode.
 Push and hold the ON/OFF button for
two seconds to shut it off.
Manual Mode (MAN):
When one of the two manual modes is
selected:
1. AC = The refrigerator is operating on
AC electric.
2. LP = The refrigerator is operating on
LP-Gas.
2008 K Nig ht
Automatic Mode (AU):
This feature selects AC over LP-Gas
operation. If AC discontinues, the refrigerator
will automatically switch to LP-Gas operation.
An alarm will sound and a code will display if
the LP-Gas igniter fails to light.
Press the MODE button until AU
displays. Release the button.
 Press and hold the SET TEMP button
until the desired temperature displays.
Release button.
 In AUTO mode, AU/AC or AU/LP will
alternate three times when a mode has
changed.

If the LP-Gas does not ignite within 30
seconds, the control changes to a different
energy source or the gas safety valve closes and
“NO” “FL” displays. Turn the refrigerator off
then back on. If the gas does not ignite after
several attempts, consult an authorized service
technician.
Tips:
 Cool items first, if possible, before
putting them into the refrigerator.
75
appliances — 4
Keep the doors shut. Know what you
want before opening the doors.
 Allow the refrigerator 24 hours of
operation before actual use to help get a
head start with the refrigeration process.
 A box of open baking soda will help
absorb food odors.
 Ice build up can be slowed in high
humidity if the end of the drain tube
is submersed in drip pan. It may be
necessary to add water to the drip pan to
keep the tube submersed.

Pull the metal arm (bail) down to turn the
icemaker on.
 Push the arm up to turn the icemaker
off.

031007
NOTE
Water may spill out of the ice tray
if the icemaker is in operation while
the motorhome is in transit. DO
NOT use the first one or two trays
of ice following storage. Operating
the icemaker without water pressure
supplied to the refrigerator will risk
damage to the icemaker assembly.
030987
Drip Pan: Located behind the
outside access.
Icemaker
The icemaker requires 120 Volts AC to
operate. Only after the freezer reaches freezing
temperature will the icemaker function. City
water or the water pump must be on and the
valve for the water supply line to the icemaker
must be on. The water valve located under the
refrigerator or outside behind the refrigerator
access door must be open. Depending on
floorplan, some models have an additional
secondary water valve located in the water
service center or exterior compartment that also
must be open.
Water Line Heater:
A thermal disc supplies voltage to heater
tape when ambient temperature is less then 38°
F (+/- 4°) and shuts off at temperature greater
than 48° F (+/- 5°). The water line heater is only
for the line from the solenoid to the icemaker.
The line from the icemaker shut-off valve to the
water valve is protected with foam insulation.
The refrigerator audible alarm will sound
for the following reasons:
1. DC or AC voltage is higher or lower
than allowed.
2. The refrigerator fails to light on LP-Gas
or fails to light after a period of operation.
3. Refrigerator is set to Auto, 120 Volts
AC is discontinued and LP-Gas fails
to light. NO AC will display, followed
by NO FL, and the alarm will sound.
Consult the OEM manual.
4. Door is open longer than two minutes.
5. The circuit board detects a failure. The
control panel will display a code.
NOTE
If the alarm sounds, note the code
in the LED display and turn the
refrigerator off to silence the alarm.
INFORMATION
Refer to the OEM manual for the list
of codes and their meanings.
Cooling Unit Fans
The cooling unit is equipped with a pair of
cooling fans that pass air across the cooling unit.
These fans start automatically and are audible
when in operation.
030974d
76
Refrigerator Alarm
2008 Kn ig ht
appliances — 4
Doors
Storage Procedures
The refrigerator doors use a positive latch
that secures the door with a “click” to prevent
the door from opening during travel. The doors
use a heating element located in the flapper on
the left door. The heating element activates when
operating the refrigerator in any mode to help
prevent moisture accumulation in high humidity
conditions.
030965c
Mold and mildew may contaminate a
completely sealed refrigerator in storage. The
motorhome refrigerator has a storage position
to lock the doors partially open and promote
airflow that will help prevent mold build up. To
use the refrigerator storage position:
1. Completely empty the refrigerator.
2. Disconnect power to the refrigerator.
3. Thoroughly clean the interior box using
a soft cloth to remove all stains and
spills.
4. Partially open the doors and slide tab
into the cut-out of the striker plate.
Storage Feature:
 Turn the refrigerator off and remove
all items. Leave the drip tray under the
cooling fins.
 DO NOT use a heating gun, hair dryer or
sharp objects to remove frost as these can
damage the interior or cooling unit.
 Wash the interior using mild spray
cleaners or a solution of liquid dish
detergent and warm water. DO NOT use
scouring pads or abrasive cleaners that
can damage the interior finish.
 Rinse with a solution of baking soda and
water. Dry with a clean cloth.
 Lock the doors open.

CAUTION
DO NOT use a hot air blower to
defrost. Permanent damage could
result to plastic parts. DO NOT use
a knife, ice pick or any other sharp
instrument to remove ice from the
freezer as they can puncture the
system.
Bulb Replacement:
1. Remove the light cover by pulling it
toward the front of the refrigerator.
2. Remove the light bulb from the holder.
3. Install a GE#214-2 replacement bulb
and replace the cover.
031116
NOTE
Replacement bulb number is accurate
at time of printing. Confirm part
number before ordering or obtaining
replacement.
Service
Interior Light
The interior light is located at the top of the
fresh food compartment. When the door is open
the light will illuminate.
2008 K Nig ht
The LP-Gas function of the refrigerator and
LP-Gas pressure will require annual service.
Over time, the BTU rating of the flame can
change, affecting the refrigerator’s performance.
Ambient temperature, high humidity and altitude
above 5,500 ft. can affect performance and
function. If possible, switch mode operation to
AC while at a higher altitude.
77
appliances — 4
Exterior Refrigerator Access Panel
NOTE
Ensure the exterior refrigerator
access panel is properly replaced after
removal.
031223
Ensure latches
are in the locked
position.
031222
Ensure tabs are
inserted.
031224
Air in LP-Gas Supply Lines
For safety reasons, the refrigerator will
attempt to ignite on propane gas within a
specified amount of time. When starting the
refrigerator for the first time after storage, or
after servicing the gas supply system, propane
gas supply lines may contain air. Due to the
air in the gas supply lines, the refrigerator may
not ignite on propane gas within the specified
amount of time. Follow the procedure on how to
remove air from the LP-Gas supply lines.
To remove the air from the LP-Gas supply lines:
 Ensure the primary LP-Gas valve and
any other necessary valves are open.
 Try lighting the cooktop burners first
to quickly purge air from the main
distribution line.
 Push the ON/OFF button to turn the
refrigerator on.
 Press the MODE button until the
refrigerator indicates LP. The refrigerator
will start a 30 second trial for ignition
during which the gas safety valve opens
and the igniter sparks.
 If the refrigerator fails to light, indicated
by F or NO FL (No Flame), turn the
refrigerator off then back on and set
to LP mode. If after the third attempt
the refrigerator fails to light, stop and
consult your local dealer or an authorized
Norcold Service Center.
Control Panel – Two Door (Optional)
ON/OFF Button – Turns the refrigerator
on or off.
 AUTO/STORE Button – Used to select
energy mode between AUTO AC, AUTO
Gas, or LP-Gas. The AUTO/STORE
button is also used to save settings.


LED Display – The screen displays
temperature, different modes of
operation, and status messages:
- Temperature in frozen food compartment.
- Temperature in fresh food compartment.
- AUTO AC mode.
- AUTO Gas mode.
- LP-Gas mode.
- Temperature setting.
- Clock.
- Status and error messages.

SET Button – Used to adjust the
temperature range and to set the clock.
Starting Up:
Press the main power ON/OFF button. If the
clock has to be set the LED display will show
flashing horizontal bars “-- --“.
WARNING
Before starting the refrigerator,
check that all gas valves are in the
ON position, this includes the shut off
valve in the rear of the refrigerator.
031217
78
2008 Kn ig ht
appliances — 4
Setting the Clock:
1. Press the SET button until figures flash
on the LED display. Hours are on the
left and minutes to the right.
2. Press the SET button to adjust time. PM
is indicated by a dot under PM on the
LED display.
3. Save settings by either pressing the
AUTO/STORE button, or waiting 5
seconds (the settings will automatically
save).
Setting the Temperature:
1. Press the SET button to the desired
temperature setting - 1 to 5. Number 5
is the coldest temperature.
2. Save settings by either pressing the
AUTO/STORE button, or waiting 5
seconds (the settings will automatically
store).
Selecting Mode of Operation:
The mode of operation ranges between
AUTO AC, AUTO Gas, or LP-Gas.
1. To select automatic operation press the
AUTO/STORE button until AUTO is
displayed. In this mode the system will
automatically select the most suitable
energy source available - AC or LP-Gas
operation.
2. To select LP-Gas operation only, press
the AUTO/STORE button until a dot is
indicated above LP.
Automatic Defrost:
The refrigerator will automatically defrost
the frozen and fresh food compartments every 24
hours.
Manual Defrost:
If desired, the refrigerator may be manually
defrosted. A defrost cycle takes about 1 hour,
depending upon the amount of frost in the
refrigerator.
1. Before defrosting, press the ON/OFF
button to turn off the refrigerator.
2. Press and hold the AUTO/STORE
button, then press the ON/OFF button.
“dE Fr” will show in the LED display.
Status Message:
At times the LED display may show either
a status message or error message. Refer to the
manufacturer’s manual for the list of codes and
their meanings.
WARNING
Never use strong chemicals or
abrasives to clean the refrigerator.
Damage to the protective surfaces will
occur.
NOTE
If the refrigerator will not be in
operation for a period of weeks, it
should be emptied, defrosted, cleaned,
and the doors left ajar. The ice trays
should be dried and kept outside the
refrigerator.
NOTE
Current mode of operation and the
energy source, AC or Gas, will be
indicated by a dot on the LED display.
2008 K Nig ht
Automatic Ice Dispenser: The ice dispenser
on the freezer door conveniently dispenses ice.
To Operate:
1. Press either the
Cube or Crush
button, and place
a glass against
the dispensing
arm.
2. To stop
dispensing ice,
pull the glass
away from the
031216e
dispensing arm.
Drip Tray Feature:
A drip tray is located beneath the dispenser
to catch small spills. The tray is removable and
dishwasher safe.
NOTE
The drip tray is not a drain. DO NOT
pour water into the drip tray.
Lock Out Feature:
The ice dispensing system can be “locked
out” to prevent unwanted use.
1. To Lock Out press lock button for 3 to 5
seconds until the red light comes on.
2. To Unlock press the lock button for 3 to
5 seconds until the red light goes out.
Dispenser Light:
The light illuminates the dispenser area and
can be turned on and off by pressing the light
button. The dispenser light will also turn on
automatically when ice is dispensed.
79
appliances — 4
NOTE
If the bulb needs to be replaced use an
E14, 120V, 6-watt appliance bulb.
INFORMATION
For safety reasons, when opening the
freezer door the ice dispensing and
ice making system will automatically
shut off. Closing the freezer door
automatically resumes operation of ice
dispensing and ice making operation.
Ice Maker:
The ice maker works
from 120 Volts AC
only. The water
valve supplying the
refrigerator must be
turned on, and the ice
level bail arm must be
in the down position.
031218b
NOTE
If the ice maker is in operation while
the motorhome is in motion, water
may spill out of the ice tray. Raise the
bail arm to the full UP/OFF position
about 1 ½ hours before departing.
This will allow water in the ice tray
to freeze. DO NOT use the first 1 or
2 trays of ice if the refrigerator has
been in storage. Ice cubes may have
contaminants. DO NOT operate the
icemaker without water pressure
supplied to the refrigerator as this can
damage the ice maker assembly.
80
Microwave/Convection Oven
The microwave/convection oven operates
from 120 Volt AC supplied by shore power, the
generator or inverter.
Operation Tips:
 Ensure cookware being used is
microwave safe. Gold paint or glaze
may contain a trace amount of gold
which is electrically conductive and not
compatible for microwave. Use hand
painted china commonly contains traces
of metal.
 The glass tray and roller guide must
always be in place during cooking.
 Ensure the door is firmly closed before
use.
 If the control pad is not lit, plug another
electrical appliance into the same outlet
to verify 120 Volt AC power is present. If
the test item works, contact an appliance
repair facility to have the microwave/
convection oven checked.
 Steam accumulating inside or around
the outside of the oven door may occur
when the microwave/convection oven is
operated under high humidity conditions
and in no way indicates a malfunction of
the unit. Wipe away steam using a soft
cloth.

Microwave/Convection Oven Facts:
One of the most useful documents for the
microwave/convection oven is the operations
manual, located in the owner’s information file
box. Read it carefully and keep it for reference.
2008 Kn ig ht
A properly functioning microwave/
convection oven presents no hazard with
ordinary use. Safety features should be kept
in good condition. Never attempt to bypass
safety interlocks or allow debris or residue to
accumulate on the door or oven face. If the oven
is damaged, discontinue use.
Oven adjustments or repairs should be
made by qualified service personnel. Check the
microwave/convection oven owner’s manual
for maintenance tips and other information.
Remember to register the microwave/convection
oven with the manufacturer.
CAUTION
The ventilation fan cannot be manually
turned off if it has automatically
started from a heated cooktop. Turn
off the microwave AC breaker to
prevent the flames from spreading into
the microwave.
NOTE
When dry camping, minimize using
the inverter to operate the microwave/
convection oven due to the high rate of
battery consumption.
NOTE
The microwave/convection oven is for
food preparation only. DO NOT use
the microwave/convection oven to dry
clothes, newspapers, shoes or other
items.
NOTE
For more detailed information and
operating instructions, refer to
microwave/convection oven OEM
manual.
appliances — 4
CAUTION
Long-term use of the inverter to
operate the microwave while in transit
will damage the alternator. Use the
generator to operate the microwave
while in transit.
5. Replace louver and mounting screws.
Care & Cleaning
The exterior of the microwave/convection
oven is plastic and metal. The interior is metal.
DO NOT clean with scouring pads, harsh
or abrasive cleaners, chemical cleaners or
petroleum based thinners that can damage the
finish. Use mild soap and water with a damp
cloth or paper towel to remove stains or spills.
When cleaning the touch pad, open the door
to prevent accidental operation. Use mild
soap and water with a soft cloth. Avoid using
excess amounts of water on the touch pad. The
turntable plate and oven racks are dishwasher
safe.
Charcoal Filter:
Depending on use, the charcoal filter should
be replaced every 6 to 12 months. Use the
following procedure to remove the louvers to
replace the charcoal filter and oven light:
1. Remove power to the microwave/
convection oven.
2. Remove the screws (A) securing the
louver.
3. Insert a flat edge screwdriver over each
tab pressing downward and move the
louver away from the microwave.
4. Remove and replace the charcoal filter.
Ensure the filter is positioned on the
supporting tabs.
031106c
Oven Light:
1. Remove the louver as previously
indicated.
2. Slide the metal light cover forward and
lift upwards.
3. Remove the light bulb and replace only
with an equivalent watt bulb. DO NOT
EXCEED 30 WATTS.
4. Replace light cover, louver and
mounting screws.
Hood Light:
1. Remove power to the microwave/convection oven.
2. Remove the screw (B) securing the
light cover.
3. Remove the light bulb and replace only
with an equivalent watt bulb. DO NOT
EXCEED 30 WATTS.
4. Close the cover and re-secure with
screw.
2008 K Nig ht
CAUTION
Light cover may be hot. DO NOT
touch glass with lamp ON. Never use
the light for prolonged periods, such as
a night light.
Grease Filters:
Operating the microwave/convection oven
without the grease filters in place can damage
the unit. Grease filters should be cleaned at least
once a month. To remove the filters, use the pulltab to slide the filter to the end of the opening
and tip down. Soak the filters in the sink or in a
dishpan filled with hot water and detergent.
DO NOT use ammonia or other alkalibased products that may darken the filter
material.
 Agitate the filter. Use a scrub brush to
remove caked on grease.
 Rinse the filter thoroughly and shake dry.
Place the filter back into the opening, tip
upward and slide filter to the end of the
opening. Lock in place. Be careful not to
kink or warp the filter upon installation.

Cleaning Tips:
 Turn the oven off before cleaning.
 Cover food while cooking to keep food
spattering to a minimum.
 Clean up all spills or spatters before they
dry. Wipe up food spatters or spilled
liquids with a damp cloth. Mild detergent
may be used for stubborn spills. DO
NOT use harsh detergent or abrasive
cleaner.
81
appliances — 4
It is occasionally necessary to remove the
glass tray for cleaning. Wash the tray in
warm, sudsy water or in a dishwasher.
 The roller guide and oven cavity floor
should be regularly cleaned to avoid
excessive noise. Wipe the bottom surface
of the oven with mild detergent water or
window cleaner and then dry. The roller
guide may be washed in mild sudsy
water.
 Food odors may linger inside oven.
To help eliminate odors, combine the
juice and the peel from one lemon,
several whole cloves and 8 oz. of water
into a two cup bowl. Place in oven on
high power; bring to a boil for several
minutes. Let cool in the oven for several
minutes.
 Clean the outside oven surface with soap
and water. Wipe away any residue using
a damp cloth. Dry with a soft cloth. To
prevent damage to the operating parts
inside the oven, do not allow water to
seep into the ventilation openings.
 If the control panel becomes wet, clean
with a soft, dry cloth. DO NOT use harsh
detergents or abrasive when cleaning the
control panel.

82
Cooktop
The cooktop
uses LP-Gas only
as a fuel source.
The burners use a
piezo type igniter.
031274f
The cooktop should
be used for cooking purposes only and not as
a heating source. When the burner valve is
opened the fuel source flows through the valve
into the mixture tube. The fuel passes by a hole
or venturi in the mixture tube, which draws air
in with the fuel for a proper fuel/air ratio. The
flame should have a blue appearance with a
lighter blue defined flame at the burner head.
A yellow flame or yellow tips indicate a rich
fuel mixture, which can leave a black color or
carbon on the bottom of a pot or pan.
The cooktop operates under the following
conditions:
 The primary LP-Gas valve on the LP
tank is open.
 The battery cut-out switch is on.
Cooktop Covers:
Before using the cooktop covers must be
removed.
 Never place the covers on the cooktop
while burners are in use.
 Do not use the covers as a griddle.
 The covers must be in place while the
motorhome is in transit.

2008 Kn ig ht
Using the Cooktop:
1. Place the cookware on the burner grate
over the desired surface burner.
2. Open the burner valve by applying a
downward pressure to the knob and
rotating clockwise.
031274c
3. When the burner lights, rotate knob to
the desired flame setting. In the event
of a power outage or igniter failure, the
cooktop can be manually lit.
Control Knobs:
 Turn appropriate burner knob
counterclockwise to LITE. DO NOT
attempt to light more than one burner at
a time.
 Turn the SPARK knob clockwise one
click. If the burner fails to light, continue
turning the SPARK knob clockwise until
the burner lights.
 Move the burner knob clockwise to OFF,
to turn the burner off.
appliances — 4
WARNING
DO NOT leave burners unattended
during cooking. DO NOT leave burner
valve(s) open while burner(s) are not
lit. LP-Gas is heavier than air and
will settle on the floor and “hide” in
corners. If you smell gas, extinguish
all open flames. Open all windows and
doors. DO NOT touch any electrical
switches. They may cause a spark that
can ignite. Evacuate the motorhome
and shut off the primary LP-Gas
valve. Liquid propane is highly
volatile, highly explosive and extremely
dangerous. Explosion, fire, property
damage, injury or death can result.
Contact a qualified service center to
have the problem correctly diagnosed
and repaired before resuming
operation.
Operation Tips:
A yellow flame is an indication of
incorrect fuel/air ratio. Lowered BTU
output and carbon build up can occur.
 When cooking at an altitude above 5,000
feet, the flame may change appearance
and the flame BTU output will be
lowered. Allow extra time cooking time.
 DO NOT allow the tips of the flame to
extend beyond pan or pot edge. When
this occurs heat is wasted and possibility
of injury increases.
 Cooking time can be reduced if the least
amount of liquid is used. The choice
of cookware selected can make a big
difference.
 Additional information can be located in
the cooktop OEM manual.
.

Burner Grate
The two burner grates attached to the
cooktop cover by four insertion tabs can be
removed for cleaning purposes. Place a cloth
down to protect the countertop. To remove a
burner grate, pull up on the grate. To re-install a
burner grate align the two insertion tabs with the
two grommets and push down.
Porcelain Enamel:
Sharp blows, radical surface temperature
changes, etc., will cause enamel to chip or
crack. Some foods, such as vinegar, lemon
juice, tomatoes and milk, contain acids that can
dull the finish of the enamel. To avoid dulling
the finish, wipe up the spill before it is baked
on. Steel wool and course, gritty cleanser will
scratch or mar the surface. Use gentle kitchen
cleanser powder or grease cleaner. For further
information on care and maintenance of the
porcelain, call Hopes Cultured Marble Polish at
800-325-4026.
031274g
Cooktop with oven (optional)
Care & Cleaning
Regularly wipe down the cooktop with a soft
cloth and a warm detergent solution to keep it
clean. DO NOT clean the cooktop with abrasive
or harsh cleaners such as steel wool, bleach,
ammonia or oven cleaner.
Use a dry paper towel or cloth to wipe up
spatters or spills when the cooktop surface is still
slightly warm. To avoid accidental burns, do not
clean the cooktop when it is hot to touch. DO
NOT allow food to bake on. Clean the surface
burner grate and caps using the same guidelines
as the cooktop surface.
The cooktop range/oven uses only LP-Gas
as a fuel source. The burners use a piezo type
igniter. The cooktop should be used for cooking
purposes only and not as a heating source. When
the burner valve is opened the fuel source flows
through the valve into the mixture tube. The fuel
passes by a hole or venturi in the mixture tube,
which draws air in with the fuel for a proper
fuel/air ratio. The flame should be blue with a
lighter blue defined flame at the burner head. A
yellow flame or tips indicate a rich fuel mixture,
which can leave a black color or carbon on the
bottom of a pot or pan.
The cooktop operates under the following
conditions:
1. The primary LP-Gas valve on the LP
tank is open.
2. The battery cut-out switch is on.
2008 K Nig ht
83
appliances — 4
DO NOT use the covers as a griddle.
The covers must always be in place when
the motorhome is in transit.
 DO NOT use the oven with the covers in
the closed position.
Burner Grate

Oven

The two burner grates attached to the
cooktop cover by four insertion tabs can be
removed for cleaning purposes. Place a cloth
down to protect the countertop. To remove a
burner grate, pull up on the grate. To re-install a
burner grate align the two insertion tabs with the
two grommets and push down.
Lighting the Burners
Oven
031274d
The oven may be used with the
cooktop cover in place.
 Push in the oven control knob and rotate
counterclockwise to PILOT ON.
 Light the oven pilot located near the back
of the oven, under the broiler shelf and to
the right of the oven burner.
 Set the oven control knob to PILOT ON
to maintain the pilot flame. The oven
and broiler are now ready for operation.
The oven pilot has been factory set and
requires no further adjustment.
 To extinguish the oven pilot push in the
oven control knob and rotate clockwise
to OFF.

WARNING
Extinguish pilots when refueling or
traveling. DO NOT block vents in oven
with any objects.
Cooktop Covers:
 Before cooking on the rangetop, the
covers must be removed.
 Never close the covers while the burners
are in use.
84
031274g
Oven
WARNING
If you smell gas, extinguish all open
flames and turn off the main gas
supply. Liquid propane is highly
volatile, highly explosive and
extremely dangerous. Explosion, fire,
property damage, injury or death can
result. Propane is a “heavy” gas and
will lay on the floor and “hide” in
corners. Open all windows and doors.
DO NOT touch any electrical switches.
They may cause a spark which can
ignite. Contact a qualified service
center to have the problem correctly
diagnosed and repaired before
resuming operation.
031274e
Turn the appropriate burner knob
counterclockwise to LITE. DO NOT
attempt to light more than one burner at
a time.
 Turn the SPARK knob clockwise one
click. If the burner fails to light, continue
turning the SPARK knob clockwise until
the burner lights.
 Turn the burner knob clockwise to OFF,
to turn the burner off.

WARNING
Cooktop covers must be removed
when the cooking surface is in
operation.
2008 Kn ig ht

Operation Tips:
A yellow flame is an indication of
incorrect fuel/air ratio. Lowered BTU
output and carbon build up can occur.
appliances — 4
Flame appearance may change and BTU
output will lower when operating the
cooktop at an altitude above 5,000’.
Allow extra cooking time.
 DO NOT allow the tips of the flame to
extend beyond pan or pot edge. When
this occurs heat is wasted and possibility
of injury increases.
 Remove cooktop covers to help keep the
underside of the cooktop clean. Place
strips of aluminum foil on the cooktop
floor pan and under burners. DO NOT
restrict air flow of mixture tubes.
 Pre-heat the oven for 10 minutes prior to
use.

Cleaning Tips:
Clean all surfaces as soon as
possible after boil overs or
spillovers.
 Use warm soapy water to clean
the burner grates, cooktops,
painted surfaces, porcelain
surfaces, stainless steel
Glass cleaner
should be
surfaces and plastic items on
applied to
the range or cooktop. Grit or
the cooktop
using
acid-type cleaners may ruin the asurface
paper towel.
surface.
DO NOT spray
cleaner directly
 Use only non-abrasive plastic
on the surface.
scrubbing pads.
 DO NOT allow foods containing
acids (such as lemon or tomato juice,
or vinegar) to remain on porcelain or
painted surfaces. Acids may remove the
glossy finish. Wipe up egg spills when
cooktop is cool.


Allow porcelain surfaces to cool before
cleaning. Burns from the heated surface
may occur or the cooktop porcelain can
crack.
Wall Thermostat
The comfort control thermostat controls
the HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air
Conditioning systems) is located in the hallway
Regular cleaning with a soft cloth and a
area.
warm detergent solution is generally enough to
The comfort control includes five different
keep the cooktop clean. Wash, rinse and dry with functions of the HVAC system: OFF, FAN,
a soft cloth. Thoroughly clean the cooktop when COOL, HEAT PUMP and FURNACE which
it is cool. Use a dry cloth or paper towel while
are selected by pressing the MODE button.
the surface is warm to the touch to clean splatters FAN controls the blower speed of the roof air
or spills. Cleaning will be more difficult if spills conditioner. Two speeds are available: Low
bake on to the surface. Glass cleaner sprayed
and High. Selecting Auto adjusts the fan speed
on a paper towel should be used for the cooktop
automatically based on temperature set point and
surface. DO NOT spray glass cleaner directly on actual temperature in a selected zone.
the surface. DO NOT use abrasive cleaners or
The motor home is divided into two
steel wool. Harsh cleansers like bleach, ammonia operating Zones: Living Room and Bedroom/
and oven cleaner should NEVER be used. The
Bathroom. The comfort control must be in
surface burner grate and caps should be cleaned
Zone 1 for the furnace to operate unless the
using the same guidelines as the cooktop surface. motorhome is equipped with two furnaces.
For floorplans with two furnaces, Zone 1 will
Porcelain Enamel:
operate the living room furnace and Zone 2 will
Porcelain enamel, a type of glass fused on
operate the bedroom furnace. Press the Zone
steel at a very high temperature, is not extremely button to change zones. The selected zone will
delicate but must be treated as glass. Sharp
flash. The line under the zone indicates that a
blows, radical surface temperature changes, etc., selected function is operating in that zone. The
will cause enamel to chip or crack. Some foods,
UP or DOWN buttons control the temperature in
such as vinegar, lemon juice, tomatoes and milk, any mode.
contain acids which can dull the finish of the
Remote temperature
enamel. To avoid dulling the finish, wipe up the
sensors are located
spill before it is baked on. The surface is glass
throughout the motorhome
and must be given consideration when cleaning. to ensure accurate
Steel wool and coarse, gritty cleanser will
temperature control.
scratch or mar the surface. Any gentle kitchen
cleanser powder or grease cleaner will be
030950
Remote
suitable. For further information on care of the
Temperature
porcelain, call “Hopes Cultured Marble Polish”
Sensor
at 1-800-325-4026.
2008 K Nig ht
85
appliances — 4
Wall Thermostat Requirement for
Operation:
 Ensure house batteries are charged.
 Ensure house battery disconnect is on.
 Battery cut-out switch must be on.
Living Room = Zone 1
Bedroom/Bathroom = Zone 2
NOTE
The Comfort Control must be ON to
operate any HVAC function. DO NOT
select conflicting modes of operation.
One zone cannot be on COOL while
another zone is set to FURNACE.
NOTE
The motorhome will not heat or cool
faster by selecting a very high or very
low temperature setting.
Air Conditioning - Roof
The roof air conditioners operate from
120 Volts AC supplied by shore power or the
generator. The wall thermostat requires 12 Volt
DC to operate.
NOTE
The air conditioning system freezes
moisture in the air. It is recommended
to set the blower fan speed to high
when operating in high humidity.
NOTE
There are ambient air temperature
limitations in Heat Pump mode. The
roof air conditioner will not operate
in Heat Pump mode with ambient
temperatures of 30º F and below.
86
Operation
Heat Pump Operation
Operation Requirements:
 120 Volts AC, from either shore power or
the generator, is supplied.
 The battery cut-out switch is ON and the
house batteries are charged.
Fan Operation:
Circulates interior air by
using the roof air conditioner
blower. The fan speed controls
the roof air conditioner blower
speed in the following modes:
Fan, Cool or Heat Pump.
Press the MODE button
repeatedly until Fan is displayed.
 Press the FAN button to select the
desired fan speed.
NOTE
The roof air conditioner will not
operate in Heat Pump mode with
ambient temperatures at or below 30º
F.
050200k

Air Conditioner Operation:
 Press the ZONE button to
select Zone.
 Press the MODE button
repeatedly until COOL is
displayed.
 Set desired fan speed by
pressing the FAN button.
 Set desired cooling
temperature by pressing the UP or
DOWN buttons.
NOTE
The compressor will engage
approximately two minutes after
blower motor activation to prevent
accidental compressor operation
against high pressure.
2008 Kn ig ht
Heat Pump mode offers heat by using the air
conditioner as a heat source. The air conditioning
principle is reversed, supplying heated air to the
ceiling registers instead of refrigerated air. There
are ambient temperature limitations in Heat
Pump mode.
050200e
Aux Heat Mode:
If the Heat Pump mode is selected at or
below 30° F, or if operating in Heat Pump
mode and temperature drops to 30º F, the air
conditioner will stop Heat Pump operation and
Aux Heat will display. The furnace will be
selected as the auxiliary heat source and will
begin operation. The furnace will remain the
primary heat source until ambient temperature
rises above 42º F.
When ambient temperature is between
30 and 42º F, a defrost cycle is initiated
approximately every 40 minutes of compressor
operation. The blower motor will stop for five
minutes and Defrost will be displayed. After
the defrost cycle the heat pump operation will
resume.
appliances — 4
Heat Pump Operation:
Turn ON the battery cut-out
switch.
 Slide the ON/OFF switch to
the ON position.
 Press the ZONE button to
select Zone.
 Press the MODE button
repeatedly until Heat Pump
is displayed.
 Set desired fan speed by pressing the
FAN button.
 Press the UP or DOWN buttons to set
desired heating temperature.
Return Air Filters
Furnace
Frequently clean the return air filters. The
filters are located inside the motorhome behind
the intake vent covers. To access the filters,
firmly grasp the leading edge and push back
on both tabs. Never run the air conditioner
without the return air filters in place. Dust and
other particles will plug the evaporator core and
substanially reduce the performance of the air
conditioners.
The furnace and its related components
are 12 Volt DC operated, using LP-Gas as the
fuel source. Electronic circuitry (automatic
ignition) is used to ignite the burner. The furnace
uses outside air for the burner combustion and
exhaust is expelled through the outside vent.
Inside air is drawn into the furnace and blown
across the internal heat exchanger. Heated air is
then discharged through ducted hoses which run
throughout the motorhome.

050200l
Air Conditioner Maintenance
Air Conditioner Cover:
Ensure that the air conditioner cover screws
are tight whenever the roof is accessed.
To Clean the Return Air Filters:
 Wash filters in warm soapy water. DO
NOT use solvents.
 Rinse filters thoroughly with fresh water.
Allow them to dry.
 Install filters and secure the intake vent
covers.
070192c
031221
Ensure the A/C cover screws
(location as illustrated by arrows)
are tight when the roof is accessed.
CAUTION
DO NOT store any items/materials in
furnace area. Restricted air flow may
hamper furnace operation leading to
failure and/or fire hazard.
WARNING
IF YOU SMELL GAS extinguish all
open flames and turn off the LP-Gas
primary valve. Liquid propane is a
highly volatile, extremely dangerous
gas. It can explode or ignite, which
may result in property damage, injury
or death. Propane is “heavy” and
can “float” on the floor or “hide” in
corners. Open all windows and doors.
DO NOT touch electrical switches.
They may spark, which can ignite.
Keep all open flames, spark producing
devices and smoking material out of
the area. Contact a qualified service
center to have the problem correctly
diagnosed and repaired before
resuming operation.
NOTE
For more detailed information and
operating instructions refer to the
furnace OEM manual.
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87
appliances — 4
Operation
The furnace operates in the following
manner. The wall thermostat sends a signal
to the front roof air conditioner circuit board,
which closes a relay. Closing a relay sends
an electrical signal to the furnace to begin the
ignition cycle. There is a small time delay before
the blower motor begins. Once the blower
motor attains a predetermined speed it will
close the sail switch. The sail switch, which is
now closed, sends the electrical signal through
a high temperature protection switch, then to
the automatic ignition circuit board. After the
thermostat is satisfied, the gas valve closes and
extinguishes the burner. The blower motor stops
approximately two or three minutes after cool
down.
Furnace Requirements for Operation:
1. LP-Gas primary valve on the LP-Gas
tank is open and the LP-Gas valve at
furnace is on.
2. House batteries in the motorhome are
fully charged.
3. Battery cut-out switch is on.
NOTE
The automatic ignition circuit board
will attempt to light the burner three
times before the ignition board will
go into “lock-out.” If the burner does
not light, the furnace blower motor
will continue to run and the wall
thermostat will have to be cycled off.
88
Using the Furnace
If the Furnace Fails to Light
Slide the ON/OFF switch to
the ON position.
 Press the ZONE button
to select Zone 1 (some
floorplans include furnaces
in Zone 1 and 2).
 Select the Furnace mode
050200m
on the Comfort Control
using the MODE button.
 Select the desired temperature using the
UP and DOWN arrow buttons.

Tips:
After storage the furnace may produce
a musty smell during the first couple of
cycles.
 Operating the furnace at an altitude
above 5,000 feet reduces the BTU output
due to air/fuel ratio.
 The furnace will periodically need
serviced by a qualified technician. If
the furnace exhibits unusual symptoms
or noises, or has an unusual odor when
operating, have the furnace checked or
serviced.
If the furnace fails to light make sure the
LP-Gas primary supply valve is open. The
furnace will not light if the blower motor is not
spinning to its specified speed. This may be due
to a low house battery charge condition.
To Charge the House Batteries:
 Hook-up to shore power.
 Start the generator.
 Start the main engine to charge the
batteries.

NOTE
When washing the exterior of the
motorhome, avoid a direct stream of
water into the outside furnace vents.
This can cause damage to the furnace.
030943f
If the blower fails to operate after verifying
the batteries are charged and the fuses are good,
use a screwdriver to open the outside access
door. Push the reset switch to off then to reset.
WARNING
If you smell gas and the blower motor
is spinning, do not attempt additional
furnace operation as this may result in
an explosion, fire or personal injury.
Contact a qualified technician.
2008 Kn ig ht
appliances — 4
Water Heater


The water heater uses two different methods
to heat water: (1) 120 Volt AC, supplied either
by shore power or the on board generator (2)
LP-Gas. The 120 Volt AC function is most
energy efficient when operated from shore
power. The burner for LP-Gas operation is
controlled by an automatic ignition circuit board
powered by 12 Volt DC. Two thermostats control
water temperature, one for 120 Volt AC and the
other for LP-Gas. Thermostat temperature is
preset by the water heater manufacturer and not
adjustable. For ease of winterization, the water
heater is equipped with a tank drain plug and
bypass valve.
Turn on the water pump or city water.
One at a time, open the hot and cold
valves of all faucets until a steady stream
of clear water flows with no bubbles
or pockets of air. DO NOT operate the
water heater until the system is purged of
air.
WARNING
IF YOU SMELL GAS extinguish all
open flame and turn off the primary
LP-Gas valve. DO NOT touch any
electrical switches. They may cause
a spark that can ignite. Open all
windows and doors. Evacuate the
motorhome. Propane is a “heavy” gas
and will lie on the floor and “hide”
in corners. Liquid propane is highly
volatile, explosive and extremely
dangerous. Explosion, fire, property
damage, injury or death can result.
Contact a qualified service center to
repair LP-Gas leaks before resuming
operation.
Water Heater Operation:
Turn on the battery cut-out switch.
 120 Volt AC is supplied from shore
power (preferred) or the generator.
 The house batteries are charged.
 Open the primary LP-Gas valve on the
LP-Gas tank.

NOTE
Refer to the Water Heater OEM
manual for detailed instructions.
040405e
Before Using the Water Heater:
Use water to purge air from the water system
and water heater and if necessary, purge FDA
approved RV antifreeze from the system.
To Purge Air and Pressurize the System:
 Turn the water heater bypass valve
(located at the back of the water heater)
to Normal Flow. If necessary install drain
plug. Depending on floor plan, the water
heater can be located in one of several
areas. One location is in the bedroom
closet. Another location is an outside
compartment, typically a curbside
compartment.
 Fill the fresh water tank or hook to city
water.
Located at back of water heater

Inspect the water heater and water
system for leaks after the water system is
purged of air.
CAUTION
After purging the water lines and
water heater, small air pockets or
hydrogen gas may be present. After
the first heat cycle of the water heater,
initially open hot water faucets slowly
to minimize potential spattering of hot
water.
NOTE
DO NOT operate the water heater
without water. Damage to the
thermostats and electric heating
element can occur.
Heating Water with 120 Volt AC:
 Have either shore power (preferred) or
the generator supplying AC voltage.
 Press the water heater 120 Volt switch.
The indicator lamp will glow steady.
NOTE
It is not fuel efficient to use the
generator to operate the water heater
on 120 Volt AC.
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89
appliances — 4
Heating Water with LP-Gas:
Turn on the LP-Gas.
 Press the water heater
12 Volt switch, the
indicator will glow.
If the DSI fault light
illuminates this will
indicate lockout.
Press the switch twice
to reset the ignition
cycle. If problem persists consult a
qualified technician.
gas is turned off, the 120 Volt AC
source has been disconnected and
the 12 Volt DC source has been
disconnected. Failure to do so can
result in explosion, fire or injury.

060306j
NOTE
LP-Gas and 120 Volt AC functions can
be on at the same time. This will speed
up the process of heating water for
large volume use.
CAUTION
It is recommended not to operate the
water heater on LP-Gas while the
motorhome is in transit. Be sure the
water heater is off before refueling.
NOTE
Due to potential air in the LP-Gas
lines, the water heater will attempt
three ignition cycles. If the burner does
not light after the third attempt, the
LP-Gas function will lock-out and DSI
fault light will illuminate. Reasons for
lockout may be air in the gas system
or burner tube obstructions caused by
an insect or spider web. Cycling the
12 Volt switch will reset the ignition
board. If problem persists consult a
qualified technician.
WARNING
Before beginning any service or work
on the water heater make sure the LP90
High Temperature Thermostat:
Seperate thermostats are used for LP-Gas
and AC electric. If a thermostat fails, a hightemperature safety limit switch will open.
CAUTION
If the high-temperature safety limit
should open, discontinue using the
water heater. Have the water heater
inspected by a qualified technician
to determine the cause of the over
temperature condition.
Water Heater Bypass
Valve:
The bypass valve is
located at the back of the
water heater. Turning the
valve to the bypass position
040405f
prevents water from
entering the water heater. Turn the valve to the
bypass position when winterizing. For normal
operation, turn bypass valve to normal flow.
Pressure &
Temperature Relief
Valve:
The water
heater is equipped
with a Pressure &
Temperature (P & T)
relief safety valve.
The P & T valve is
designed to open if
2008 Kn ig ht
040424c
water temperature in the tank exceeds 210° F
(98.8° C) or internal pressure exceeds 150 psi.
If water begins to weep from the valve, it may
be due to a loss of the air pocket in the tank and
not a defective valve. See re-establishing the air
pocket.
Re-establishing the Air Pocket:
Water may weep from the P & T valve under
normal operation. This is not necessarily a faulty
valve but more likely caused by lack of an air
pocket and water expansion. The water heater
tank is designed with an internal air pocket.
Eventually, the cyclic expansion of water will
absorb the air pocket. When weeping from the
valve occurs, the air pocket will need to be
re-established utilizing the following procedure.
If the valve continues to weep after establishing
the air pocket, contact a qualified service center
to evaluate the valve.
CAUTION
Ensure the water heater is cool prior
to establishing the air pocket.
1. Turn Off the water heater.
2. Turn Off the incoming water supply.
3. Open the hot water faucet closest to the
water heater.
4. Open the handle of the P & T valve.
5. Allow excess water to drain from the
water heater through the P & T valve.
When draining is complete, close the P
& T valve by allowing it to snap shut.
Close the faucet and turn on the water
supply.
6. Turn on the water heater.
appliances — 4
Water Heater Compartment:
Periodically inspect the
water heater compartment and
door screen for foreign material
that can prevent the flow of
combustion and ventilating air.
The water heater drain plug and
pressure relief valve are located
inside.
NOTE
Be sure to refill the water heater with
water before resuming operation.
010720f
CAUTION
DO NOT block any opening.
Tips:
 Turn off the water heater when not in use
to conserve energy.
 Shut the water off when not rinsing.
 Operate the water heater using LP-Gas
when hooked to 30 Amp shore power.
This will reduce the likelihood of
tripping the shore power breaker. When
the water heater element is in operation,
it will use approximately 12 Amps at 120
Volts AC. Appliances that operate from
120 Volts AC may need to be operated in
sequence to avoid tripping a breaker.
Draining & Storage:
Drain the water heater to prevent freeze
damage if the motorhome is to be stored during
the winter months.
1. Turn off electrical power to the water
heater.
2. Shut off the primary LP-Gas valve.
3. Open low point drains.
4. Open both Hot and Cold on all faucets.
5. Remove water heater drain plug.
6. Turn the bypass valve to the bypass
position.
Troubleshooting:
 Insects may make
nests in the burner
tube. Check the
burner tube for
obstructions if
the water heater
fails to light. It is
recommended to
clean the burner
040424m
tube with a brush
and not compressed air. Compressed air
may not fully remove the obstruction.
 If the water heater indicator light does
not illuminate and the water heater does
not light, ensure interior house power is
on, shore power plugged in and working,
and the AC breaker is on. Check for
a blown fuse in the house distribution
panel.
 If the water heater fails to operate after
checking the fuses, the high-temperature
safety limit switch may be tripped. Have
a qualified technician inspect the water
heater.
Washer/Dryer Prepared (Optional)
The washer/dryer “prep” package includes
the following items:
Color coded water supply lines. A red
line for hot; a blue line for cold.
 A 1½” water drain line with threaded
cap, P-trap and an automatic vent cap.

2008 K Nig ht

A 120 Volt receptacle located in the
compartment.
NOTE
Sidewall dryer vents are not part of
the prep package. If a sidewall vent is
to be installed, properly seal vent to
sidewall.
If a washer/dryer is to be installed at a later
date, follow all the manufacturer’s installation
instructions.
Listed here are further instructions which
should be adhered to for safe and reliable
operation:
DO NOT connect the clothes dryer
exhaust duct to any other duct, vent or
chimney.
 DO NOT terminate the exhaust duct
beneath the motorhome.
 Use proper length fastener
when attaching exhaust vent
to exterior sidewall. Stainless
steel fasteners are best suited
for this as they will not rust.
 If the cabinet or closet in
which a washer/dryer is
installed does not have
vented louvered doors, the
manufacturer’s installation
instructions may require
installation of vented doors
or vents to be installed for
sufficient circulation of air.

040495e
91
appliances — 4
Washer/Dryer (Optional)
The automatic
washer/dryer is front
loading with an extra
large door opening
for easier access.
Several wash and dry
programs are available
along with variable
water temperature
settings.
CAUTION
DO NOT use the washer/dryer while
traveling. Suspension movement,
combined with the weight of the drum
while in the wash cycle, can damage
the internal components of the washer/
dryer.
Test Procedure
031017g
The washer/dryer operates on 120 Volt
AC from shore power or the generator.
 The washer/dryer uses about 12 to 20
gallons of water per wash cycle.

CAUTION
It is highly recommended that the
motorhome is hooked to shore services
when using the washing machine due
to limited fresh water supply and
limited grey tank capacity. On certain
model floor plans and options, the
washer may drain into the black tank.
INFORMATION
Refer to the washer/dryer OEM
manual for detailed operating
instructions.
WARNING
Open a window or vent while
operating the dryer. The washer/dryer
can create negative air pressure inside
the motorhome that can accumulate
Carbon Monoxide or LP-Gas while
operating fuel-burning appliances.
Before using the washer, after winter storage
or a long period of non-use, conduct a simple
test procedure to verify that all the hardware and
electronic components are functioning. Wipe the
interior and exterior of the washer dryer with a
damp cloth to remove accumulated dust.
NOTE
Perform this test before putting the
washer/dryer in use or after the winter
months. This will clear the water lines
and drum of winterization antifreeze.
Operation
Test Procedure Requirements:
Secure water supply lines and open fresh
water valves.
 Hook to city water or turn on the water
pump.
 Hook to shore power or start
the generator.

To Conduct the Test Procedure:
1. Set the selector knob to Reset.
2. Set the Dry Timer knob to 30 minutes.
Push the On/Off button to ON. Wait 5
seconds. The Auto Dry light should be
on and the Status light flashes fast then
slow.
3. Set the selector knob to a wash cycle.
Set Wash Temp knob to Warm. Water
should be flowing into washer and
drum should rotate both directions.
4. Set the selector knob to Reset. Wait 5
seconds.
5. Set the selector knob to Spin. Water
drains and drum rotation increase.
6. Set the selector knob to Reset. Wait 5
seconds.
7. Set the selector knob to Dry. Dryer fan
begins and drum rotates both
directions.
8. Set the selector knob to Reset. Wait 5
seconds.
9. Set the Dry Time knob to zero. The
Auto Dry light should go off.
10. The door will unlock in 2 minutes or
less. The Status light flashes fast then
slow. The door should now open.
031017e
92
2008 Kn ig ht
appliances — 4
11. Push the On/Off button to Out (OFF)
position. The Status light should be
off.
12. If applicable, close the holding tank
drain valve.
WARNING
DO NOT use washer/dryer heat to dry
articles containing foam rubber or
similar textured, rubber-like materials.
CAUTION
DO NOT wash or dry articles that
have been previously cleaned, washed,
soaked or spotted with gasoline, dry
cleaning solvents or other flammable
or vaporous substances that could
ignite or explode. DO NOT add
gasoline, dry cleaning solvents or other
flammable or explosive substances to
the washer.
To begin a wash load:
Sort and pre-treat clothes.
 Add the measured amount of detergent
suggested by the package directions
(maximum 2 tablespoons).
 Load the clothes loosely into the washer.
Close the washer door.
 Turn the Wash Temperature knob to the
desired temperature setting.
 Choose the desired washing cycle option
using the Selector knob.
 Load wash tray with detergent.
 Turn the power ON.
 After the cycle is complete, wait 2
minutes for the door lock to release
before attempting to open the door.
 If applicable, turn the power OFF and
close the holding tank drain valve.

Washer/Dryer Maintenance
Winterizing the Washer/Dryer
Occasionally wipe the exterior cabinet of
the washer/dryer with a damp cloth or sponge.
Wipe dry with a soft cloth. DO NOT use polish
on plastic trim. In areas of hard water, detergent
can accumulate in the drum. Obtain a packaged
water softener. Add quantity as specified by
the manufacturer directly to the drum. Run
the washer through a complete cycle using hot
water. Repeat the process if necessary. Remove
hard water deposits using only cleaners labeled
as washer safe. Wipe the inside of the washer/
dryer door with a soft cloth to remove moisture.
Periodically apply a thin coat of paste wax to the
inner door, especially to the area immediately
next to the door window, to protect the door
finish from laundry spills and discoloration.
Reduced water flow to the washer/dryer may
indicate the Hot and Cold water inlet screens
are clogged. Remove water pressure and undo
water lines at the back of the washer/dryer.
Use tweezers or pliers to remove screens from
fittings. Clean and
install screens and
water lines. Hook
to city water or
turn on the water
pump. Check for
water leaks before
using the washer/
dryer.
Winterize Using Air Pressure:
1. Refer to Section 6 “Winterizing” and
prepare water system for air pressure.
1. Hook an airline (regulated to 45 psi or
less) to the water inlet of the
motorhome..
2. Rotate Selector knob to a wash position
with the Wash Temp setting on Warm.
Press the power button to ON. Air
pressure clears the Hot and Cold water
lines.
3. After water lines are clear, rotate Selector knob to Spin. Allow the pump to
drain the drum.
4. Set Selector knob to Reset and Timer to
zero. The door unlocks in 2 minutes or
less. Open door and pour in ¼ gallon of
non-toxic antifreeze.
5. Set selector knob to Spin. The pump
primes with antifreeze. Set selector
knob to Reset and turn the power OFF.
CAUTION
The washer/dryer may require special
winterizing instructions. Refer to
the washer/dryer OEM manual for
instructions and recommendations.
031017b
NOTE
Should the washer/dryer need removal
for service, care should be taken as the
washer/dryer weighs about 170 lbs.
Use proper accommodations to avoid
injury or damage to the cabinetry.
2008 K Nig ht
93
appliances — 4
central vacuum (optional)
Operation
Plug into shore power or
start generator.
 Lift lid on wall receptacle
to start vacuum. Insert the
hose in the receptacle and
release lid.
 Connect desired attachment
on hose and start
031264f
vacuuming.
Inlet located in living

2. Rotate the bag cover counterclockwise
and remove cover.
3. With a finger on each side of the inlet,
slide the bag off the inlet tube.
Counterclockwise to
unlock for removal
Clockwise to lock.
031264d
room area.
NOTE
Consult vacuum OEM manual for
detailed operation and maintenance.
031264
Maintenance
Vacuum has a thermal protector built into
the motor to prevent overheating. If motor will
not operate, it will automatically reset in about
½ hour. If motor brushes or bearings are worn
out, the circuit protector will trip off again after
a short period of time. If this happens, contact
a qualified service representative. Depending
on floor plan, the vacuum is located in either a
roadside or curbside compartment or under the
bed.
031264c
Motor Filter: Check
before replacing
bag.
4. Pull the center cardboard tab to
automatically seal the bag and prevent
dust from leakage.
5. Remove the bag from the vacuum and
discard. DO NOT reuse.
6. Check support (motor) filter.
7. Unfold the new “OX” bag and insert
into the vacuum so the center cardboard seal tab is toward bag cover. The
top arrow should point to the bag cover.
8. With a finger on each of the cardboard
tabs, slide the bag on the inlet tube.
9. Line up the mark on the bag cover with
the unlock symbol and rotate clockwise
to lock symbol.
Replacing & Cleaning the Support
(Motor) Filter:
1. Inspect during each bag change. The
filter should be cleaned every fifth bag
replacement or when excessively dry.
2. Remove dust bag as previously
instructed.
Changing the Bag:
To keep your vacuum at top efficiency,
change the filter bag at regular intervals. To
maintain cleanability, replace filter bag when it is
about ¾ full.
1. Unplug the power unit from grounded
outlet.
94
Ensure the bag
seal is secure over
the inlet tube.
2008 Kn ig ht
appliances — 4
3. Locate the support (motor) filter in the
bottom of the bag compartment and lift
out.
4. Clean by rinsing under warm water and
let air dry if heavily soiled.Replace torn
or obstructed filters.
5. Reinstall dry motor filter before use.
Be sure filter is tucked under retaining
tabs.
6. Reinstall bag as previously instructed.
WARNING
To reduce the risk of fire, electric
shock or injury:
 Unplug and disconnect power before
servicing.
 Avoid wet surfaces.
 Use only manufacturer’s
recommended attachments.
 DO NOT use without dustbag and/or
filters in place.
 DO NOT pick up anything that is
burning or smoking, such as cigarettes,
matches, or hot ashes.
 Use extra care when cleaning on stairs.
 DO NOT use to pick up flammable or
combustible liquids such as gasoline
or use in areas where they may be
present.
031264e
FIREPLACE ELECTRIC (Optional - 40 SKQ
Only)
The fireplace operates on 120 Volt AC
supplied by shore power and produces heat
using interior lamps. At start up the fireplace
may emit a slight, harmless odor caused by
the initial heating of internal parts. Follow the
recommendations listed below to reduce the risk
of fire, electrical shock or injury.
 Read all instructions prior to using the
fireplace.
 The remote control supplied with the
fireplace will turn the unit on and off.
The main ON/OFF switch must be turned
ON before remote control will operate.
 The fireplace is hot while in use. To
avoid burns, do not let skin touch hot
surfaces. Keep combustible materials,
such as furniture, pillows, bedding,
paper, cloth and curtains at least 3’ from
the front of the unit.
 Extreme caution is necessary when the
fireplace is operated by or near children
and/or handicap persons and whenever
the fireplace is left operating unattended.
 Foreign objects in any ventilation or
exhaust opening can cause electric shock,
fire or damage the heater.
 To prevent a possible fire, do not block
air intake or exhaust in any manner.
 The fireplace contains hot and arcing
interior parts. Do not store gasoline,
paint, or flammable liquids where the
unit will be exposed to flammable
vapors.
 Do not modify this fireplace. Use it
only as described in this manual. Any
2008 K Nig ht
other use not recommended by the
manufacturer may cause fire, electric
shock or injury.
 Do not burn wood or other materials in
the fireplace.
 Do not strike fireplace glass.
 Always disconnect power before
performing fireplace cleaning or
maintenance.
INFORMATION
Consult OEM manual for detailed
maintenance and operating
instructions.
Operation
The following will explain the function of
each control. To access the controls, open the
upper grill by pulling the top forward and down.
To conceal the controls during operation, return
the grill to the original upright position.
Main ON/OFF Switch: The ON/OFF switch
supplies power to all fireplace functions (Heater/
Flame). The fireplace can also be turned on and
off using the remote control supplied with the
unit. The main ON/OFF switch must be turned
ON before remote control will operate.
Flame Action Control: Turn the flame
action control knob to adjust flame speed to the
desired level.
Flame Brightness Control: Turn the knob
to increase or decrease brightness of the flame
and embers.
95
appliances — 4

030998b
Heater ON/OFF Switch: Supplies power to
heating unit when main ON/OFF switch is ON.
Heater Thermostat Control: Turn the
thermostat control clockwise to increase
temperature setting or counterclockwise to
decrease temperature setting.
Temperature Cut-off Switch: This unit
is equipped with a thermostat to control room
temperature. In the event the fireplace overheats,
an automatic cut-out will turn the unit off. The
fireplace can be reset by switching the ON/OFF
switch to OFF and waiting five minutes before
turning the unit back to ON.
CAUTION
Contact a service technician if it
becomes necessary to frequently reset
the fireplace.
Using the remote turn the fireplace ON/
OFF.
NOTE
Depending on model fireplace, receiver
may already be installed.
Light Bulb Replacement
Light bulbs should be replaced when a
section of the flame is dark or when the clarity
and detail of the log exterior disappears. Two
bulbs at the top of the opening illuminate the
log set exterior, and four bulbs under the log set
generate the flames and embers.
WARNING
To reduce the risk of fire, electric
shock or damage to persons, turn
OFF circuit beaker before attempting
maintenance or cleaning.
NOTE
Verify brand and size of bulb before
obtaining replacements. Allow at least
ten minutes for light bulbs to cool
before touching to avoid accidental
burning of the skin.
Remote Control/Receiver
Plug fireplace cord
into the outlet located
on the bottom of the
receiver.
 Plug receiver into the
wall outlet.
 Turn ON the main
power switch located
on the fireplace.
TIP
Replace all light bulbs at one time if
bulbs are close to the end of rated life.
Group replacement will reduce the
number of times needed to open the
unit to replace light bulbs.

96
030998d
Receiver
Remote Control
2008 Kn ig ht
To Open the Light Bulb Area:
Remove the trim by pulling straight
forward.
 Hold glass in place while removing
retaining top clip.
 Lift glass out and store in a safe place.

CAUTION
Safety glass may break if bumped,
struck or dropped. Use care when
handling the glass.
5
2008 Knight
equipment — Section 5
eQUIpment - IntroDUctIon .......................... 98
entry Step...................................................... 98
Operation...................................................... 98
Step.Cover.................................................... 98
graB HanDle .................................................. 99
entry Door .................................................... 99
Latch.Adjustments........................................ 99
Screen.Door.................................................. 99
keyleSS entry (optIonal) ......................... 100
Operation.................................................... 100
SlIDe-oUt operatIon .................................. 100
Extending.&.Retracting.Slide.Rooms............ 101
Troubleshooting.......................................... 101
Manual.Override.-.Main.Slide-out.Room...... 102
Manual.Override.-.Bedroom......................... 103
aWnIngS ........................................................ 103
Slide-out.Cover........................................... 103
Front.Door.-.Mirage..................................... 104
Window.Awning.......................................... 104
Patio.Awning.-.Eclipse................................. 104
Awning.Care.&.Cleaning.............................. 105
Storm.Precautions...................................... 105
fanS .............................................................. 106
Automatic................................................... 106
BeDroom ceIlIng fan
(not on all UnItS) ...................................... 106
poWer SUnvISorS ...................................... 107
pUll DoWn SHaDeS ..................................... 107
Door - SlIDIng ............................................. 107
Seat controlS ............................................. 107
SWIvel SeatS................................................ 108
Sofa ............................................................... 108
Easy.Bed.Sofa............................................ 108
Hide-A-Bed.(Optional)................................. 108
HIDe-a-BeD aIr mattreSS (optIonal) ....... 109
Select comfort aIr
mattreSS (optIonal) .................................. 109
free StanDIng DInette (optIonal) ...........110
arcHeD Back BootH DInette (optInal) ....110
Bed.Conversion........................................... 110
BootH DInette (not on all UnItS)............ 110
Storage UnDer BeD .................................... 111
laDDer - rear .............................................. 111
Storage Bay SlIDe-oUt
tray (optIonal) ........................................... 111
cItIzen BanD (cB) raDIo - prep.................. 112
gpS navIgatIon (optIonal) ........................ 112
SatellIte raDIo (optIonal) ....................... 112
alaDDIn™ SyStem (optIonal) ................... 112
Aladdin.Operations...................................... 113
Aladdin.Main.Menu..................................... 113
Voyager.Monitor.......................................... 113
Coach.Info.................................................. 113
Trip.Meter.Selection.................................... 114
Select.Video.Source.................................... 114
Time.and.Alarm.Functions........................... 114
System.Options.......................................... 114
Power.Down.Aladdin................................... 115
tv entertaInment componentS ............... 115
Television.(Front).Lockout.Feature............... 115
Connections.-.Cable.TV,.Computer.
&.Phone..................................................... 115
TV.Antenna................................................. 115
Video.Selector.Box...................................... 116
entertaInment ............................................ 116
DaSH raDIo ................................................... 118
Speaker.Switch........................................... 118
Speaker.Switch...........................................
Dash.Radio.Operation................................. 118
Dash.Radio.Operation.
BeDroom DaSH raDIo SWItcH.................... 118
Home tHeatre SUrroUnD SoUnD .............. 119
Speaker.Switch........................................... 119
Speaker.Switch...........................................
Remote.Control. ......................................... 119
Remote.Control.
BeDroom DvD (optIonal) ........................... 119
SatellIte SyStem ........................................ 119
DSS.Prewire............................................... 119
DSS.Prewire...............................................
SatellIte....................................................... 120
Semi-Automatic.Non.In-Motion.(Optional)... 120
Semi-Automatic.Non.In-Motion.(Optional)...
Satellite.Requirements. ............................... 120
Satellite.Requirements.
Maintenance...............................................
Maintenance
M
aintenance...............................................
............................................... 121
eexterIor
xterIor entertaInment
center
c
enter (SHarp tv) optIonal ..................... 121
SyStemS
S
yStemS control center.......................... 122
Equipment — 5
EQUIPMENT - INTRODUCTION
This section covers the basic operation and
care of equipment found in the motorhome,
most of which are provided for entertainment
and comfort. More detailed information about
specific equipment may be found in the OEM
manuals. Optional equipment will also be
discussed in this section which may not apply to
all motorhomes.
INFORMATION
Detailed information with CAUTION or
WARNING instructions for the various
electronics, other than what is provided
in this section, can be found in the OEM
manuals.
Entry Step
Operation
The exterior electric entry
step features retractable steps,
automatic retraction with
the ignition key in the RUN
position and a last out feature.
080498z
Located on
NOTE
When dry camping it is passenger side.
important to note that
when the switch is illuminated, all step
circuits are active and drawing current
from the chassis battery. Chassis battery
disconnect switch must be on for entry
step to operate.
Operating the Entry Step:
1. With the entry door open, turn the
step switch on. Ensure the chassis
disconnect switch is on.
98
2. Close the door. The step should retract
and lock in the IN position.
3. Open the door. The step should extend
and lock in the OUT position. The step
will retract when the door is closed.
4. When the switch is turned off, the step
should remain in the extended position.
Close the door and turn on the ignition
switch. The step will retract for travel.
5. With the power switch off, the step
extended, the entry door closed and the
ignition turned on, the ignition override
system will engage to automatically
retract the step.
6. Turn the ignition off and open the door.
The step will extend and lock in the
OUT position. This is the “last out”
feature. When the ignition is on the
step will always activate with door
movement, regardless of the power
switch position.
WARNING
Turning the ignition switch to the ON
position while the motorhome is parked
will cause the entry step to retract.
Visually confirm that the entry step
is fully extended prior to exiting the
motorhome.
CAUTION
High curbs can impede step operation.
Use care when parked on side streets.
If the entry step fails to operate:
 Verify that the entry step switch is ON.
 Check the main power supply for the step:
a 25 Amp fuse located in the roadside
front electrical panel.
2008 k n ight

A magnetic door
jam switch is used
to control step
operation. Use a
separate magnet to
apply a “trigger” to
the door jam switch. Rotate test magnet
to align polarity field.
090355
WARNING
If the motorhome is driven with the
step in the extended position there is the
possibility of causing major damage to
both the step and the motorhome.
CAUTION
Keep fingers, clothing and other
hardware away from moving
components.
NOTE
Clean and inspect step more frequently
in adverse weather conditions. Mud,
snow, road salts and sand could quickly
break down lubricant and corrode
painted surfaces.
NOTE
The steps are self lubricating and
require no maintenance.
Step Cover
An electrically operated stepwell cover will
extend and retract using the switch on the center
console. Power is supplied by a 15 Amp circuit
breaker in the roadside front electrical panel.
equipment — 5
To operate the Stepwell Cover:
1. Chassis Battery Disconnect must be on.
2. Press and hold the Step Cover switch to
the desired direction. Release the switch
to stop movement.
CAUTION
When operating the stepwell cover,
make sure there are no pets, shoes or
other obstructions in the stepwell area.
DO NOT operate the stepwell cover
while standing in the stepwell area.
GRAB HANDLE
The grab handle is used to aid in entering and
exiting the motorhome.
WARNING
Clean the acrylic grab handle
using mild Soap and Water
only! Do Not use alcohol
based glass cleaners as these
solutions adversely affect acrylic
material causing stress cracks
leading to eventual failure of
the grab handle. Use of alcohol
based cleaners combined with
heat and light will expedite
deterioration of the acrylic
material.
020130d
Entry Door
With a box wrench or socket, loosen
the movable strike bolt. Make all
adjustments in small increments. Tighten
the bolt firmly after making adjustments.
The bolts should have slight up and
down movement for vibration control in
travel.
 Test the operation of the dead bolt lock
to ensure proper functions.
 Apply silicone weekly to the entry door
rubber gaskets to prevent squeaking
while the motorhome is in use. Use a 1”
sponge paint brush, sprayed with silicone
for easy application.

The entry door is adjusted at the factory and
tested for all operations.
The door uses two
separate locks for safety
and security. One locking
system is the door lock and
the other is a dead bolt. The
door handle incorporates
020129h
a primary and secondary
latching system. This is used to ensure safe
latching. There are adjustments which can be
made to help maintain entry door performance.
Latch Adjustments
Adjusting the Entry Door Latch:
 Determine which bolt needs adjustment.
 Slowly close the entry door, observing
the latch and strike bolt alignment. DO
NOT attempt to latch if the alignment
is off. If the alignment is correct, allow
the latch to catch in the first (primary)
position only.
 The latch should move to the second
position with only slight pressure applied
to the entry door. Upper and lower
latches should be evenly timed. Press
on the entry door to check for further
movement.
 The entry handle should operate with
little effort to open the entry door. Excess
pressure indicates the bolts are set too far
back.
2008 k n ight
CAUTION
When operating the entry door, ensure
the dead bolt latch is fully unlocked
prior to closing. Failure to do so can
result in damage to the dead bolt and/or
entry door.
Screen Door
Changing Screen Door Glass:
 The screen slider is Tuffak; the slider can
be bowed for removal and replacement.
 Replace with new Tuffak and reverse the
procedure.
Adjusting the Screen Door:
 Loosen the fasteners on the hinge side of
the screen door; two on the top and two
on the bottom.
 The steel hinge has slots to allow
movement.
99
Equipment — 5

Four Phillips type screws are on the top
hinge and on the bottom hinge to adjust
the screen door for proper fit. The hinge
should fit tightly to the trim of the door
when the screen is latched to the open.
To Operate:
 Chassis battery disconnect must be ON.
NOTE
Key fob operation distance is within
approximately 50 feet of the motorhome.
Removable Screen:
 The top half of the screen door is
removable, allowing a clear view through
the entry door glass while in operation.
 To remove the top half of the screen door
for travel, rotate clips and remove the
screen.
 To store the screen for travel, use the
clips provided on the bottom half of the
screen door.
Slide-out Operation
Slide room operation uses safety features to
prevent mechanical damage or physical harm.
Slide room(s) will not operate until all safety
requirements are met. To prevent damage to
cabinet doors or the slide room, secure all
cabinet doors in the closed position prior to
room activation. Some interior doors may
require being fully open or fully closed for the
slide room to operate.
Keyless Entry (Optional)
Operation
Key Fob:
1. Locks entry door.
2. No function. Button is OEM/dealer
defined.
3. Unlocks entry door.
4. Panic mode. Activated by
pressing and
4
holding button for
approximately two
seconds. Motorhome
lights will flash.
3
Pressing the lock
or unlock button
deactivates panic
mode.
CAUTION
Never move the motorhome with any
slide room extended. Perform the slide
room operation with the air suspension
system full.
Safety Requirements:
 Ensure the ignition key is in the OFF
position when extending to the OUT
position.
 The park brake must be applied.
1
2
CAUTION
DO NOT leave the slide room extended
during severe weather. Conditions such
as high winds or heavy rain may cause
damage. Rain water can pool on the
slide room awning, adding weight and
causing the
awning to sag.
Retract the
room in small
increments to
allow water
run off.
060306b
100
2008 k n ight
NOTE
Extensive damage could occur to
the slide-out room and awning when
extending the slide-out room in snow,
sleet, ice or freezing rain conditions.
If the slide room is extended in such
conditions, clear the awning and ensure
free movement prior to operating the
slide-out room.
Operation Requirements:
 House battery disconnect switch must be
on.
 House batteries are fully charged
Guidelines to ensure long life of slide
system:
 Inspect slide roof slide for debris such
as pine needles, dirt, leaves, sticks, etc.
Debris left on the top may cause damage
to the seals during retraction. If debris is
present, wash with soap and water, then
rinse.
 When the room is out, visually inspect
the wipe seal for dirt or other foreign
material and for tears.
 If the slide room leaks, fully retract the
room. If necessary, tape exterior opening
closed with duct tape until repairs to the
motorhome can be completed.
 Open a window or vent to equalize
pressure during slide operation.
equipment — 5
CAUTION
Firmly latch all cabinet doors adjacent
to the slide before extending or
retracting the rooms. Damage to doors
or the fascia may occur.
NOTE
Dirt and grit trapped under the slide
room can scratch and damage the floor.
Clean the floor before retracting the
slide room. Never move the motorhome
with the slide room extended.
NOTE
DO NOT use petroleum based products
on the slide seal. Petroleum based
products can damage the paint and will
cause premature aging of the rubber
seal.
Extending & Retracting Slide Rooms
To Extend or Retract Slide Rooms:
 Move the driver or passenger seat
forward. Clean the floor of dirt or grit
that could result in damage during
operation.
 Confirm there is enough clearance inside/
outside the motorhome for the room to
extend/retract. Allow at least five feet of
clearance to extend a slide-out.
 Retract hydraulic jacks. Start engine.
Allow time for the air suspension to
support the chassis.
 Turn off the engine. Ensure park brake
is applied when extending and retracting
the slide room.
 Open a window or vent to equalize
pressure during slide-out operation.
 Confirm the house batteries are fully
charged and operating.
People, pets and objects must be clear of
the slide room path.
 Remove the lock bars if extending.
 Firmly latch all cabinet doors and close
drawers. Damage to the doors, drawers
and fascia can occur.
 Locate the slide-out room
control switch. Press and
hold the slide room switch
to the desired (IN or OUT)
060158n
position.
 Release the switch anytime to stop
room movement. The drive motor will
not automatically stop; the switch must
be released. A change in motor sound
indicates full extension/retraction.
 If applicable, install any lock bars for
travel.

CAUTION
Continuous operation of the slide room
can drain the batteries and overheat the
motor.
WARNING
The outside area must be clear of
obstructions that can restrict slide room
operation. Ensure there is five or more
feet of clear space outside the slide room
prior to extending the room or damage
to the slide, the motorhome or property
can occur. When retracting the slide
room, ensure there is sufficient clearance
inside the motorhome. Move the driver
or passenger seat forward before
activating the slide room.
CAUTION
If a problem with the slide-out occurs,
contact a qualified technician.
Troubleshooting
CAUTION
Remove lock bar prior to extending
slide-out.
If the slide room does not operate, a safety
feature may be engaged to prevent room
operation.
If the slide room does not respond from the
switch:
 Ensure ignition key is OFF.
 Ensure the park brake is applied.
 Make sure the lock bar is removed.
 House battery disconnect switch is ON.
 House batteries are fully charged.
030802c
2008 k n ight
101
Equipment — 5
If the slide room does not operate after
checking the safety requirements:
 Examine all electrical connections at the
slide-out switch.
 Check the 5 Amp fuse and 20 Amp
circuit breaker in the black box located in
the curbside battery compartment.

It may be necessary to contact a repair
facility to have the problem diagnosed
and repaired.
WARNING
DO NOT work on slide-out system
unless the battery is disconnected. Make
sure floor is clean before retracting slideout room.
Manual Override - Main Slide-out Room
080429h
Located in curbside battery
compartment. Fuse and
circuit breaker location may
vary.
Check the slide-out relay fuse found in
the roadside front electrical panel.
 Check slide-out fuse or fuses (depending
on floorplan) located in bedroom
distribution panel.
 House batteries are fully charged.
 For hydraulic pump system check
fluid level in reservoir. Maintain fluid
within ½” from top of reservoir when
slide-outs are completely retracted. Use
automatic transmission fluid (ATF) such
as Dexron 5 or Mercon 3. The hydraulic
pump is located in a rear roadside
compartment. Use a barrel key to unlock
the compartment, then use the barrel key
to unlock the air conditioner condenser
compartment. Hydraulic pump is located
inside the compartment.

102
Depending on floorplan the main slide-out
(living room) may have either an electric motor system or a hydraulic pump system. Before
working on slide-out system, turn off both house
and battery disconnect switches.
To Move the Main Slide Room (Electric
Motor System) Manually:
1. Turn off both the battery and house
disconnect switches.
2. Access the slide room electric motor.
The motor is located in either a
curbside or roadside compartment,
depending on the floorplan. The motor
is at the top of the compartment.
031226f
2008 k n ight
4. Remove 12 Volt DC power from the
slide-out motor by disconnecting the
electrical plug. The plug can be located
by following wires that run from the
motor to the plug.
4. Attach a crescent wrench to the
electric motor drive shaft. Turn
counterclockwise to bring slide room
in, turn clockwise to move slide room
out.
5. Take motorhome to an authorized repair
center.
To Move the Slide
Room (Hydraulic
Pump System)
Manually:
1. Turn off both the
battery and house
disconnect switches.
2. Access the slide room
hydraulic pump. The
pump is typically
located, depending
031266e
on floor plan, in a roadside
compartment.
3. Remove the protective label.
4. Attach a standard ¼" hex bit into a
cordless drill, screwdriver, or ratchet
wrench.
5. Insert the ¼" hex bit into the coupler
found under the protective label.
6. Run drill forward or clockwise to
extend slideout room and in reverse
or counterclockwise to retract slideout
room.
7. Take motorhome to an authorized repair
center.
equipment — 5
Manual Override - Bedroom
Depending on floorplan the bedroom may have
either a cable or an above floor slide-out system.
The above floor slide-out is used when the bed
moves with the slide out. If the closet moves
with the slide-out, the system is cable.
To Move the Bedroom Slide Room
(Above Floor System) Manually:
1. Turn off both the battery and house
disconnect switches.
2. The above floor slide-out motor is
located under the bed. Lift the bed and
remove the access panel.
3. Disconnect the slide-out motor
electrical plug to remove 12 Volt DC
power from the slide-out motor. The
plug can be located by following wires
that run from the motor to the plug.
5. Once the slide room is manually
retracted, apply pressure to the wrench
to firmly set the room and prevent room
drift.
6. Take the motorhome to an authorized
repair center.
CAUTION
Do not continue to turn the motor after
the room is fully extended or retracted.
Damage to the slide mechanism can
occur.
To Move the Bedroom Slide Room
(Cable System) Manually:
1. Turn off both the battery and house
disconnect switches.
2. Locate the bedroom slide-out motor.
The motor is located near the ceiling
of the slide-out. Remove the fascia,
valance, or both.
3. Disconnect the slide-out motor
electrical plug to remove 12 Volt DC
power from the slide-out motor. The
plug can be located by following wires
that run from the motor to the plug.
4. Attach the flexible shaft to the fitting on
the end of the slide-out motor.
5. Attach a socket and ratchet or drill
to the other end of the flexible shaft.
reverse the direction. Over-torquing
can cause severe damage.
6. Turn in proper direction to move the
room. If the cables tighten and the
motor is difficult to turn, reverse the
direction. Over-torquing can cause
severe damage.
7. Take motorhome to an authorized repair
center
Awnings
Slide-out Cover
The slide-out cover automatically reacts to
slide-out direction. A fixed edge of the slide-out
cover is installed into an awning rail, mounted
just above the slide-out. A spring-loaded roller
with special brackets mounts to the slide-out. In
a hard rain the cover helps prevent water from
penetrating the seal of the slide-out. The
slide-out cover will automatically reach full
extension when the slide-out room is fully
extended.
The slide-out cover automatically rolls up into
the travel position when the slide-out room is
completely retracted.
Slide-out awning
Slide-out cover
030750c
Slide-out
4. Use a wrench to turn driveshaft and
retract room.
031277d
031236
2008 k n ight
103
Equipment — 5
NOTE
When retracting the slide-out, stop the
room approximately halfway. Confirm
that the fabric is properly rolling before
fully retracting the slide-out.
CAUTION
The slide room and slide-out awning
should be retracted before heavy wind,
rain or snow to prevent damage to the
awning or motorhome. Wind can drive
rain under the slide-out awning and into
the motorhome.
CAUTION
At least five feet of clearance is needed
between the side of the motorhome and
any objects, such as trees or fences,
to allow the slide room and slide-out
awning to fully extend.
CAUTION
Rain water can pool on the slide-out
awning. The added weight will cause
the awning to sag. Upon retracting the
room, material can become caught in
between the top of slide room and the
opening in the motorhome. It will be
necessary to retract the room in small
increments and allow the water time to
run off.
Front Door - Mirage
The Mirage awning operates on 12 Volt DC by
the push of a button to extend the awning to its
full extension.
To Operate:
 Check for sufficient clearance
before extending the awning.
 Chassis battery disconnect
switch must be on.
 Turn the ignition switch OFF.
 Push the Door Awning Extend/
Retract button and hold. When
060313f
desired extension is reached,
release the button.
 To close, push the Door Awning Extend/
Retract button and hold to retract the
awning to its travel position.
If the awning fails to operate:
 Ensure ignition is off.
 Check power at 15 Amp circuit breaker
in front electrical panel in roadside front
compartment.
NOTE
See awning OEM manual for detailed
operation instructions.
Window Awning
To Extend
the Window
Awning:
 Hook loop of
pull strap with
catch rod and
pull awning,
reel assembly
and side arms
to extend fully
away from motorhome.
030581b
104
2008 k n ight
030792
Hook pull strap on side strap hook,
remove catch rod from pull strap and
store.
To Retract the Window Awning:
 Hook catch rod on pull strap, remove
pull strap from side strap hook and
slowly allow awning to retract.
 Remove catch rod from pull strap and
store for future use.

Patio Awning - Eclipse
The Eclipse awning operates on 12 Volt DC by
the push of a button. The awning requires 10’ of
lateral side clearance.
To Operate:
 Turn the ignition switch
OFF.
 Check for sufficient
clearance before
extending the awning.
060313g
 Chassis battery
disconnect switch must be ON.
 Turn the Awning Power On/Off button to
ON .
 Push and hold the Extend/Retract button
to extend the awning. Release the button
at any time for partial extension.
 Push the Extend/Retract button and hold
to retract awning.
equipment — 5
External Control Switch:
An external control switch is located at the
bottom of the front outside arm.
Awning Care & Cleaning
On a monthly basis, loosen hardened dirt
and remove dust from the awning with a dry,
medium bristle brush. Thoroughly rinse both the
top and bottom with a garden hose.
A high-quality fabric cleaner may be used
to help maintain appearance. Carefully follow
the instructions on cleaning products. Metal
surfaces should be cleaned with soapy water
and thoroughly rinsed. Allow the awning to
thoroughly air dry while extended. Awning
maintenance products can be found at RV supply
stores.
031243B
To Operate:
 Turn the ignition switch OFF.
 Check for sufficient clearance before
extending the awning.
 Chassis battery disconnect switch must
be ON.
 Turn the Awning Power On/Off button to
ON.
 Push and hold the external control
switch to extend and retract the awning.
Release the button at any time for partial
extension.
If the awning fails to operate:
 Ensure ignition is off.
 Check power at 15 Amp circuit breaker
in front electrical panel in roadside front
compartment.
NOTE
See awning OEM manual for detailed
operation instructions.
Carefree Awnings:
Acrylic Awnings - Wash both sides of the
awning with a mild soap (i.e., dish soap) and
lukewarm water. DO NOT use detergents. If
necessary, reapply the solution to keep fabric
saturated. Rinse the awning thoroughly. Repeat,
if necessary, until most of the stains disappear.
Contact Carefree of Colorado for removal of
stubborn stains.
Polyweave and Vinyl Awnings - Mildew will
not form on the awning material itself, but may
form on the dust accumulated on the canopy. A
quality vinyl cleaner, such as Carefree Awning
Magic, will help keep the awning looking new.
A mild soap (i.e. dish soap) and lukewarm water
solution can be used. DO NOT use detergents.
Be sure to follow the instructions on the
container.
2008 k n ight
Leaks:
It is normal for slight leakage to occur through
the fabric where water is allowed to accumulate.
If water drips through the needle holes in the
stitching use a commercial seam sealer that is
available in canvas and trailer supply stores.
Paraffin wax may also be applied to the top of
the seams. As the awning “weathers” these holes
will normally seal themselves.
Soap or chemical residue can “wet” the fabric
so that it appears unable to repel water. Rinse
the fabric thoroughly and test to see if it is water
repellent after it dries. If leakage continues after
washing and thoroughly rinsing, please contact
Carefree of Colorado.
Storm Precautions
The warranty does not cover damage caused
by acts of nature; therefore, steps should be
taken to prevent damage from occurring due
to wind, rain or storms. Retract the awning in
inclement weather conditions or when leaving
the motorhome unattended. Should the awning
need to be retracted while the fabric is wet,
extended it as soon as possible to allow it to
completely dry.
NOTE
Water weighs 8.33 pounds per gallon.
The awning was not designed to
withstand the 500 to 700 pounds of
water that could accumulate on the
canvas.
105
Equipment — 5
Fans
Automatic
A wall thermostat controls the automatic vent
and power of the fan. The system operates from
12 Volt DC power.
Fan Operation:
 Ensure house batteries are on.
 Turn on the battery cut-out switch.
 Press the vent cover knob into the
Automatic position.
 Use the wall switch to raise the vent
cover. The vent cover must be open at
least 2" before the fan will run.
 Turn power knob clockwise to turn fan
on. The power knob also adjusts fan
speed.
NOTE
To override the automatic setting, pull
the vent cover knob out to the manual
position and close vent. The fan blade
will stop spinning when the vent is
closed.
WARNING
DO NOT hold switch after the motor
has stopped. This may cause damage to
the automatic lift system resulting in a
stuck vent.
NOTE
The safety switch built into the fan will
not allow the fan blade motor to operate
unless the vent is open 2" or more.
Tips for Fan Operation:
 Operate the fan to reduce condensation
inside the motorhome. Condensation
occurs naturally from fluctuations in
interior and exterior temperatures,
humidity, steam from cooking. Shower
use is another source of condensation.
 If the fan fails to operate, check for a
blown fuse either in the house fuse panel
or the 4 Amp fuse on the fan.
 To remove the screen, loosen the screws
holding the screen in place. Use a
non-abrasive soap and water to clean and
reinstall.
 Slightly open windows on the shaded
side of the motorhome to create the
most airflow, especially on hot, sunny
days. Direct airflow by slightly opening
selected windows. Maximum airflow is
achieved between an open window and
the Fantastic Vent.
NOTE
DO NOT leave the fan switch in the
active mode while the motorhome is
stored or unattended for extended
periods. High winds, unusual conditions
or obstructions may prevent the fan
cover from fully closing, resulting in
leakage and serious damage.
Bedroom Ceiling Fan (not on all units)
A bi-directional 12 Volt DC powered ceiling
fan is located in the bedroom. Place the
switch in the up position to move the blades
counterclockwise and push air down (for cooling
in summer). Place the switch in the down
position to move the blades clockwise and pull
air up (for warming in winter). Turn the fan off
before reversing fan blade direction.
Fan operation is controlled by a switch next to
the bed and has three positions: Off, High Speed,
and Low Speed. The battery cut-out switch must
be on for the ceiling fan to operate.
Periodic maintenance consists of cleaning the
blades with a soft cloth towel or a vacuum to
remove dust build up.
030949e
031205d
030832k
CAUTION
DO NOT enter into fan
path when on. Serious
injury can occur.
031271b
106
2008 k n ight
equipment — 5
power Sunvisors
PUll Down Shades
To extend the sunvisor press
and hold the lower portion of
the control switch until the
desired location is obtained. To
retract the sunvisor press and
hold the upper portion of the
control switch. Clean the sunvisor
using a soft clean brush.
The driver and passenger windows are
equipped with a pull down shade to filter
sunlight. To utilize, pull down on the handle.
080498g
WARNING
DO NOT attempt to move or drive
the motorhome with any window view
obstructed.
LUBE
The pocket door rollers should be lubed
with just a small drop of oil once a year
to help increase the life of the rollers and
improve sliding.
Seat Controls
The Pilot and Co-Pilot seats are adjustable
to provide maximum comfort. Seats must be
locked in the forward facing direction while
traveling.
NOTE
The seats operate from 12 Volt DC house
power.
030853b
Requirement for Operation:
 Chassis battery disconnect switch must
be on.
 Chassis batteries fully charged.
WARNING
DO NOT attempt to move or drive
the motorhome with any window view
obstructed.
030853d
Requirements for Seat Operation:
 House battery disconnect must be on.
 Battery cut-out switch must be on.
Door - Sliding
The sliding pocket door uses two rollers at the
top of each door may require adjustment during
the life of the motorhome. Locate the small
wrench and turn the adjusting screw upward or
downward.
If the pocket door
needs to be removed,
locate the portion that
is secured to the top
of the pocket door and
rotate the small lever
outward to release the
latches.
070147
Typical Power Seat
060251wi
2008 k n ight
107
Equipment — 5
Sofa
Swivel Seats
Hide-A-Bed (Optional)
Easy Bed Sofa
Swivel Seat Operation:
 To swivel, pull out on the swivel control
lever.
 When rotating the driver seat, put the
steering wheel in the upright position.
 Move the seat forward, then pull the
swivel lever out and rotate to the desired
position.
WARNING
Seats must be locked in the forward
facing position while the motorhome in
transit.
NOTE
If the either seat is rotated 180º, it must
be rotated back in the opposite direction.
The 12 Volt wiring in the seat may
disconnect if seat if rotated 360 degrees.
NOTE
Types of seat controls vary depending on
seat manufacturer.
The sofa converts easily into a bed. Clear the
area of obstruction.
Sofa to Sleeper:
 If applicable,
slide the
lever forward
to release
the locking
mechanism.
 Raise the sofa
seat base until
seat base and
backrest form
a “V” shape
by lifting
up from the
center of sofa
just below the
seat cushions.
 Push down on
seat base until
the seat base
and backrest
are flat.
108
Sofa to Sleeper:
Remove the
three seat
cushions to
access the hidea-bed. The seat
cushions should
be stored safely
until the bed is
converted back
to a sofa.
 If applicable,
release the lock
on the right side
of metal bar,
grasp the front
metal bar and lift
up pulling out on
the bar slightly
until the leg of
031154b
the bed is firmly
resting on the floor.
 When the legs of the bed are firmly on
the floor there will be another lifting
bar exposed to complete the conversion
process.
 Grasping and opening the lifting bar will
open the bed fully. The bed is now ready
for linen.

031153b
Sleeper to Sofa:
 Lift the seat base up until seat and back
rest are in a “V” shape.
 Push down on seat base.
020243
The sofa hide-a-bed will convert easily into a
bed. Clear the area of obstruction and debris.
WARNING
DO NOT use the sofa for transporting
infants or children that require safety
seats or booster seats.
2008 k n ight
equipment — 5
Sleeper to Sofa:
 Remove all bedding from the hide-a-bed.
 Grasp the foot of the hide-a-bed in the
center using the metal lifting bar.
 Fold over the bottom portion of the bed
that will form the seat.
 Lift the front portion of the lifting bar to
raise and lower the hide-a-bed back into
the sofa base.
 Replace the seat cushions.
hide-a-bed Air Mattress (Optional)
The air mattress inflates and deflates in a
matter of seconds. Inflate the mattress by using
the electric inflation pump that operates from
any 120 Volt AC outlet. For ease of operation,
position the sofa so that accessing an electrical
outlet is convenient.
To Inflate Mattress:
 Open sofa and allow the mattress to lie
flat.
 Unzip the corner of the mattress labeled
“Air Pump Access”
 Remove valve cap by turning cap
counterclockwise.
020260d
After cap is removed, insert pump
motor and turn clockwise until pump is
engaged.
 Plug in pump motor and inflate to full,
approximately 60 seconds. A motor pitch
change occurs when mattress is full.
 Remove pump and reseal valve cap by
turning clockwise.
 Zip the “Air Pump Access” cover closed.
The bed is now ready for linen.

To Deflate Mattress:
 Remove bed linen.
 Unzip the corner cover of the mattress
labeled “Air Pump Access.”
 Open deflation valve by lifting valve
latch. Allow mattress to deflate.
 Once mattress is deflated swing valve
to closed position. DO NOT LOCK
VALVE CLOSED by locking the valve.
Air trapped in the mattress could cause
damage.
 Zip the “Air Pump Access” cover closed
and close the sofa.
NOTE
DO NOT close deflation valve when
closing the sleeper mechanism.
WARNING
The electric inflation pump is for indoor
use only. DO NOT ues near or place in
water. Keep infants and small children
away from pump and product when not
fully inflated. Partially inflated product
can cause suffocation.
Removing the Mattress Valve:
 Open deflation valve by lifting up on
valve tab.
 Remove old valve by lifting the black
plastic on the outer edge of the valve
toward the center. The valve will then lift
out.
Installing New Mattress Valve:
 To install the new valve, first open the
replacement.
 Once open, seat the hinge area on to
the hinge support, then squeeze the
vinyl towards the center of the mattress
opening.
 Feed the vinyl through the opening of the
new valve.
 Once installed make sure there are no
bulges in the vinyl. Use thumb to make
sure that it is smooth.
 Next, lock the replacement shut.
Select Comfort Air Mattress
(Optional)
The Air Mattress uses uniquely designed air
chambers to provide a gentle cushion of support
which can be adjusted for comfort and firmness.
The mattress can be personalized to an owner’s
ideal comfort level.
031117
Air Mattress Pump
2008 k n ight
031117c
Air Mattress Remote
109
Equipment — 5
To Operate Air Mattress:
The air mattress requires 120 Volt AC power
from shore power or the generator to operate.
The inverter can be used, but battery power may
be depleted by continued use.
Ensure the battery-cut out switch is on and the
house batteries are charged.
What is a Sleep Number:
 It is a setting between 0 and 100 that
represents the ideal combination of
mattress comfort, firmness, and support
for each person’s body.
 Use the initial Sleep Number on the
remote as a starting point.
Setting the Sleep Number:
1. Lie on the bed in a normal sleep
position.
2. Press and release any remote button
to display the current Sleep Number
setting.
3. To change setting, press the firmer or
softer buttons until desired comfort
setting is achieved.
4. Remain still until the number change is
complete.
5. When adjustment is complete, the Sleep
Number will stay lit for five seconds
and then the display will turn off.
NOTE
Finding the ideal Sleep Number may
require experimenting with different
settings.
Mattress Care:
The cover may be spot cleaned with
carbonated water or mild detergent. DO NOT
dry clean the mattress cover or put it in a
washing machine. DO NOT apply a stain-guard,
as this may cause yellowing of the fabric.
In rare instances, under the right conditions,
mold or mildew may form inside mattress or
bedding. If this occurs call the manufacturer’s
customer service department at 800-318-2231.
Mountain Traveling:
If traveling into a mountainous region, either
(1) temporarily disconnect the mattress from the
pump hose to allow air escape or (2) partially
deflate the mattress chamber to a Sleep Number
of 20.
WARNING
Rapid changes in altitude will effect
the air pressure inside the mattress.
The chamber may be damaged if the
pressure becomes too great.
NOTE
For more detailed information consult
the OEM manual or call 800-318-2231.
Free Standing Dinette (optional)
The free standing dinette comes with two
standing chairs and two folding chairs.
To Extend/Retract Table:
 To extend, pull out on table until it locks
completely out.
 To retract, push in on table until it locks
completely in.
Table does not retract
completely
031273
WARNING
Only forward facing booth dinette seats
equipped with seat belts are designed
for occupancy while the motorhome is in
motion. DO NOT occupy dining chairs
while the motorhome is in motion. To
avoid injury in case of a crash or sudden
stop, chairs should be stored in an
enclosed area or secured with tie down
straps.
ARCHED BACK BOOTH DINETTE
Bed Conversion
For Bed:
 Remove the seat cushions. This allows
the table to move down into the bed
position.
 Under the table locate the
button lock found on front
bracket. Push button to
unlock leg. Swing leg up.
020163g
110
2008 k n ight
equipment — 5
Tilt table up to release table from wall
bracket.
 Pull table out and push down lowering
table until it fits between the two seats.
 Use cushions for a mattress.

For Table:
 Swing table up and attach to wall
bracket.
 Unlock leg lock and extend leg into
position.
 Place cushions back into seat cushion
positions.
storage under bed
Storage Bay Slide-out Tray (Optional)
To use the storage compartment located under
the bed, lift up the bed by the front edge of the
mattress platform. Gas struts hold the mattress
and platform open.
The storage bay slide-out tray is an option
available for use in the storage compartment
bays of the motorhome. This allows for the payload to slide outward for easier access.
NOTE
Overstressing gas struts by rapidly
opening or closing the bed access cover
can damage the struts or mounts. In
extreme cold, struts may not hold the
mattress platform open.
Storage: Storage is provided under both seats.
 Remove cushions and lift lid to access
storage compartments.
 Open front doors to access storage
compartments.
WARNING
Only forward facing booth dinette seats
equipped with seat belts are designed
for occupancy while the motorhome
is in motion. DO NOT occupy booth
dinette (if not equipped with safety
belts) or the dining chairs, while the
motorhome is in motion. To avoid injury
in case of a crash or sudden stop, chairs
must be stored in an enclosed area or
secured with tie down straps while the
motorhome is in motion.
100215b
Ladder - Rear
031211d
The rear ladder allows access to the roof. Care
should be used when climbing the ladder. Access
to the roof should be limited to cleaning and
sealing purposes only. Stow the lower portion of
the ladder in the cargo bay during travel.
NOTE
Maximum weight capacity for the ladder
is 300 lbs.
The motorhome must be level before
opening.
 To open, press down on the latch and
hold to unlock. The tray can then be
pulled out.
 To close, slide the tray in and the latch
will catch and lock.
 Never exceed maximum weight capacity
(800 lbs).

2008 k n ight
WARNING
The motorhome must be level when
sliding the drawer out of the bay
compartment. The drawer can slide out
abruptly and cause bodily harm if the
motorhome is not level.
111
Equipment — 5
Citizen Band (CB) Radio - Prep
A two pin connector labeled Citizens Band
Radio is located behind the dash panel, along
with the CB Antenna coax, which is routed to the
roof mounted base. The red wire is + 12 Volt DC
(positive) and has a two amp fuse in the front
distribution panel. The white wire is connected
to the frame (ground).
GPS Navigation (Optional)
NOTE
For information regarding subscriptions
and service coverage areas, contact the
appropriate provider for the system.
Sirius® Radio
1-888-539-7474
www.siriusradio.com
INFORMATION
For detailed information and operating
instructions on the satellite radio, refer
to the OEM manual.
The GPS Mobile Navigation system provides
2-D and 3-D map views, instant re-routing and
turn-by-turn instructions. The system includes a
GPS antenna, a DVD ROM player and a DVD
map of the US and Canada.
Located in driver overhead compartment
031219c
CAUTION
For safety, only perform GPS operations
when motorhome is parked.
INFORMATION
Complete information and instruction
are found in the OEM manual.
Satellite Radio (OPTIONAL)
The satellite radio is a digital signal decoder
and tuner. Signals are transmitted from a ground
station to satellites orbiting over the continental
United States. The satellite then transmits the
signal to an antenna in the motorhome. The radio
receiver decodes the transmission and plays
the selected channel within that transmission.
Signals are also transmitted to ground repeaters
for listeners in urban areas where the satellite
signal can be interrupted.
112
ALADDIN™ SYSTEM (OPTIONAL)
The Aladdin™ system is designed to
monitor various chassis and electrical systems
providing up to date and accurate information.
Chassis information comes from the engine
and transmission electronics. This allows the
operator to make informed decisions regarding
operation of the motorhome.
2008 k n ight
Aladdin™
Controller:
The controller allows
the operator to control
cursor movements.
 Press the select or
right button to enter
a screen.
 Press the left button
to return to the
previous screen.
 Press the up or down buttons to scroll
through or change information.
080377f
LED Indicator:
An LED provides system-on power indication.
The LED blinks whenever the controller is used.
The LED will blink every few seconds when
the Aladdin™ system is powered on. Pressing
the select or left button on the controller will
activate the system and the LED will turn on.
Select Buttons:
Two select buttons are used for operation. One
is found on the Aladdin controller, the other on
the Voyager monitor. To avoid confusion they
will be referred to as (Aladdin) select button and
(Voyager) select button.
equipment — 5
Aladdin Operations
Voyager Monitor
The chassis battery disconnect switch must be
on. The Aladdin will function with the ignition
switch in the ACC, On or Ignition position.
To view Aladdin information screens, the rear
view camera, or (optional) side cameras the
Voyager monitor must be ON. Once the Voyager
monitor is operating press the (Voyager) select
(CA. SEL) button to scroll camera(s) or to view
the Aladdin main menu screen.
Turning off the ignition will cause both the
Aladdin and the Voyager monitor to turn off.
In addition, when the Voyager monitor is
ON, placing the transmission in reverse will
activate the rear view camera displaying it on
the monitor. For motorhomes equipped with
the (optional) side cameras, activating a turn
signal will select that corresponding side camera
displaying it on the monitor. Turning the hazard
lights ON will show the rear view camera on the
monitor.
INFORMATION
If the ignition is in the ACC or On
position Aladdin gives only limited
information with some screens
appearing with no information
(“xxx”). For Aladdin to give complete
information, the engine MUST be
running.
Aladdin™ Main Menu
When the system
first powers up,
Aladdin will display
the information
screen or camera that
was last used when
the system was turned
off. To access the
020195o
main menu, press the
Voyager select (CA. SEL) button and scroll to
the main menu screen.
When the main menu is accessed, press the
Aladdin up or down buttons to scroll through the
main menu. An arrow indicates the current menu
item. Press the select or right button to enter that
menu item. Press the left button to return to the
previous screen.
Voyager Select Button:
Use the select (CA. SEL) button on the
Voyager monitor to scroll through the various
screens. The screens can include (depending on
options): rear camera, left and right camera, and
an Aladdin main menu screen.
Viewing Camera(s):
The rear view camera or (optional) side
cameras can be viewed in any main menu
heading. Simply press the Voyager select (CA.
SEL) button to scroll to the various camera
views.
2008 k n ight
Coach Info
Coach Info
displays current
available engine and
transmission data.
Compass heading,
time, and temperature
are displayed on each
020195p
screen.
By pressing the select or right button an engine
information screen appears, press the select or
right button again and “No Signal” screen will
display, press select or right again to access the
engine/transmission screens.
There are five engine/transmission screens
each displaying four parameters of data. A
sixth screen displays outside and basement
temperature. The screens automatically scan,
approximately every six seconds, or press the
select or right button to activate scanning.
Press the up or down buttons to move through
the screens and disable automatic scanning.
Press the select or right button to resume
automatic scanning. Press the left button to
return to the previous screen. Continue pressing
the left button to return to the Main Menu.
113
Equipment — 5
Trip Meter Selection
Trip Meter
Selection provides
trip information for
up to 10 different
trips, plus dedicated
trip leg status and
fuel status screens.
Trip screens selected
020195r
are independent
of each other and can be started, paused,
resumed, cleared, and provide time and distance
information as well as average speed and fuel
mileage.
Trip Leg Statistics gives trip information, plus
distance-to-go and time-to-go based on trip leg
averages.
The Fuel Tank Statistics provides such
information as estimated fuel remaining and
range based on current averages.
Changes made
to any of the Trip
Meter selections,
with the exception of
clearing a numbered
trip, should be done
while the ignition is
on to enable Aladdin
020200b
to collect necessary
information from the engine. The last available
information will be used if the ignition is off
when changes are made.
The status screen display may take several
minutes after a change is made before it starts
updating values. In the case of Duration, the
display will not update for approximately six
minutes because Duration is displayed to the
114
tenth of an hour (six minutes).
The Aladdin requests engine statistics
periodically from the engine for use with trip
calculations. After such a change the next
valid engine data will not be available for
approximately one minute. The rate of data
change is also influenced by motorhome speed,
fuel rate, and time.
Select Video Source
Use this screen to
access the optional
Navigational screens.
020195s
Time and Alarm Functions
Time and Alarm
Functions allow the
operator to view the
current time, set the
date and time, set
alarms, and change
the sound of the
alarm.
2008 k n ight
020195t
System Options
System Options
provides a submenu
for Aladdin functions
that are less frequently
used such as how
to adjust screen
appearance. Only
service personnel
should access System Setup.
020195u
Compass
Calibration: Compass
calibration allows
the operator to either
calibrate the compass
or enter declination.
Calibration will
compensate for metal
020195m
construction within
the motorhome and increase accuracy. Entering a
declination will allow for true North or magnetic
North compass headings.
Calibration is accomplished by selecting
Start Calibration, then driving in a full 360º
circle. At the end of driving this loop, select
Stop Calibration. A successful calibration will
cause a “Calibration Successful” message to be
displayed. A calibration that fails will display
“Calibration Fail” along with a failure code.
equipment — 5
Power Down Aladdin
Television (Front) Lockout Feature
TV Antenna
Turn off the ignition
to power down. A tensecond countdown
is performed prior
to power down the
Aladdin. Press the
select or left button to
abort the countdown
020195q
and the Aladdin
will remain on. The Aladdin can be manually
powered down by selecting the Power Down
Aladdin option.
The ignition switch controls the outlet for the
front TV, allowing the front TV to be operated
only while the vehicle is at rest. Viewing time
of the front TV from the inverter depends on
state of charge of the house batteries and any
additional 12 Volt DC lighting being used.
The television (TV) antenna is a manual crank
style antenna with built in electronics that use 12
Volts DC to “boost” signal strength. A weak or
fuzzy signal can be amplified by turning on the
TV antenna power button on the video selector
box. The antenna and booster work together
to provide the best possible picture for most
situations. Certain conditions may occur that
require no amplification, and amplification may
actually worsen the reception. In this case, the
picture quality may improve by lowering the
antenna and providing no amplification.
TV Entertainment Components
Connections - Cable TV, Computer & Phone
The motorhome is equipped with cable TV,
satellite and phone hook-up, located in the
roadside rear compartment. For convenience,
the auxiliary outlets are located throughout the
motorhome.
The following paragraphs will discuss the
operations and various components that make up
the entertainment center.
INFORMATION
It is recommended to become familiar
with individual components. Refer to
OEM manuals for detailed instructions
on operating individual components.
NOTE
All components of the entertainment
system require 120 Volts AC to operate.
Hook to shore power, start the generator
or turn on the inverter. The satellite
system requires 12 Volts DC to operate.
Turn on the interior house power using
the battery cut-out switch.
060192e
Located in roadside
rear compartment
060192bf
Cable out
connection
Located curbside
compartment
NOTE
The cable connection in the roadside
rear compartment is a CABLE IN
that connects, for example, to a
campground cable hook-up. A second
cable connection is located in a curbside
compartment. This is a CABLE OUT
that is used to connect to an independent
television monitor, for example, a
monitor sitting on a picnic table.
2008 k n ight
WARNING
DO NOT raise the TV antenna near
overhead electrical wires. Contact may
cause serious injury or death. DO NOT
move the motorhome when the TV
antenna is up.
To Raise the Antenna:
 Rotate the crank
handle clockwise
to raise the
antenna (about 14
½ turns).
 Pull down on the
outside directional
wheel and rotate
130024
the antenna until
the best picture is
obtained. The directional wheel is spring
loaded.
115
Equipment — 5
To Lower The
Antenna:
 Pull down on the
directional wheel
and align arrows
together.
130024
 Rotate the
crank handle
counterclockwise
to lower the antenna fully into the cradle.
Make an outside visual inspection to
ensure the antenna is properly stowed.
CAUTION
DO NOT move motorhome with
antenna in the raised or partially
raised position and risk damage by tree
limbs or wires. Worm gear damage or
breakage may result.
WARNING
Before raising antenna, make an outside
visual inspection for any obstructions or
overhead electrical wires. Damage to the
antenna, severe shock, personal injury
or death can occur from inadequate
clearance.
Video Selector Box
The motorhome is equipped with a video
selector box which has five inputs and three
outputs.
030861b
116
Features Include:
 Push button controls allow sending
signals from any one of five different
inputs to two televisions and VCR.
 Five inputs are Satellite Receiver, TV
Antenna, VCR, Cable TV & DVD/AUX.
 Three Outputs: Main TV, TV2, and VCR.
 Built-in +12 VDC television antenna
power supply eliminates need for
separate wall mounted television antenna
power supply.
 Self-resetting fuses used in antenna
power supply prevent failure caused by
shorted connections.
 Video switch allows independent
viewing of signals on different
televisions with a record option from
VCR.
NOTE
Two areas will be mainly used on
the video selector box. For functions
regarding the front television, make
selections (TV Ant, Cable, etc.) in the
area marked “Main TV.” For the
bedroom television, use the area marked
“TV 2.”
Entertainment
To Operate Any Entertainment Component:
All the entertainment components require 120
Volt AC to operate. Hook to shore power, start
the generator or turn on the inverter. Ensure
the battery cut out switch is on and the house
batteries are charged. The ignition key must be
in the OFF position.
2008 k n ight
NOTE
Operation of the entertainment
components is accurate at the
time of printing. Due to changes
in the entertainment equipment
(manufacturers and models), and
possible changes in the electrical systems
of the motorhome, operation of various
entertainment components may vary
from what is printed.
To Watch Main Television (Sharp) from the
Antenna:
 On the video selector box press the
television antenna POWER button ON.
This provides +12 Volt power to the
television antenna amplifier located
inside the antenna housing.
 Press the TV ANT button located in the
area marked “MAIN TV.”
 Turn on TV. Use Input button to select
TV.
 For Home Theatre sound press Speaker
switch to Home Theatre. On DVD player
press source button to select AUX 1,
which will appear in window.
 Select desired channel on TV.
 Use volume control on DVD player to
select desired sound level.
To Watch Bedroom Television (Sharp) from
the Antenna:
 On the video selector box press the
television antenna POWER button ON.
This provides +12 Volt power to the
television antenna amplifier located
inside the antenna housing.
 Press the TV ANT button located in the
area marked TV2.
equipment — 5
Turn on TV. Use Input button to select
MONO.
 Select desired channel on TV.
 Use volume control on TV to select
desired sound level.

NOTE
Refer to television OEM manual on how
to receive all available channels in the
area.
NOTE
The picture quality from the outdoor
television antenna varies by location
of the station in relationship to the
antenna. If picture quality is poor and
there is no external power supply, try
turning the television Antenna Power
button located on the control box OFF
and ON.
To Watch Main Television (Sharp) from a
Cable Signal:
 On the video selector box press the
CABLE TV button above the area
marked MAIN TV.
 Turn on TV. Use Input button to select
TV.
 Access the television main menu and
select the Set Up menu. Within the menu
select Channel Set Up and select Cable.
 Initiate a channel Auto Search to scan
available channels (also called Auto
Channel Memory). Exit menu.
 For Home Theatre sound press Speaker
switch to Home Theatre. On DVD player
press source button to select “AUX 1”
which will appear in window.
 Select desired channel on TV.

Use volume control on DVD player to
select desired sound level.
To Watch Bedroom Television (Sharp) from
a Cable Signal:
 On the video selector box press the
CABLE TV button above the area
marked TV2.
 Turn on TV. Use Input button to select
TV.
 Access the television main menu and
select the Set Up menu. Within the set up
menu select Channel Set Up and select
Cable.
 Initiate a channel Auto Search to scan
available channels (also called Auto
Channel Memory). Exit menu.
 Select desired channel on TV.
 Use volume control on TV to select
desired sound level.
NOTE
To view Cable TV signals the
motorhome must be connected to a
Cable TV. Cable TV inputs are available
at many of today’s campgrounds.
NOTE
Refer to television OEM manual on how
to receive all available channels in the
area.
To Watch Main Television (Sharp) from
Satellite Signal:
 Turn on TV. Use Input button to select
INPUT 2.
 Turn ON satellite receiver, then use
satellite tracking system to acquire
satellite.
2008 k n ight
Use satellite remote control to select
desired channel.
 For Home Theatre sound press Speaker
switch to Home Theatre. On DVD player
press source button to select AUX 1,
which will appear in window.
 Use volume control on DVD player to
select desired sound level.

To Watch Bedroom Television (Sharp) from
Satellite Signal:
 On the video selector box press the SAT
button in area marked TV2.
 Turn on TV. Use Input button to select
INPUT 2, some television models may
require INPUT 3.
 Turn ON satellite receiver, then use
satellite tracking system to acquire
satellite.
 Use satellite remote control to select
desired channel.
 Use volume control on TV to select
desired sound level.
NOTE
If the satellite receiver is in the bedroom
there is no need to press the SAT button
in area marked “TV2” on the video
selector box. If the satellite receiver is in
the front then the video selector box is
needed for bedroom reception.
To Watch Main Television (Sharp) from a
DVD:
 Turn DVD player on.
 Push source button on DVD player until
letters DVD appear in window.
 Open DVD tray by pushing either button
1-5.
117
Equipment — 5
Insert DVD into tray.
To close tray push same tray button.
DVD will load and play automatically.
 Turn TV on. Using Input button select
INPUT 1.
 For Home Theatre sound press Speaker
switch to Home Theatre.
 Select volume on DVD player to desired
level.
Press Radio Power switch, located on the
dash, to On.
 Turn on the dash radio.
 Use MODE button to select AM or FM.
 Select station.
 Adjust volume on dash radio.



031220
031278
Dash Radio
Remote
031193e
To Play CD:
 For Home Theatre sound press Speaker
switch to Home Theatre.
 Turn DVD player on.
 Open DVD tray by pushing either button
1-5.
 Insert CD tray.
 To close tray push same tray button. CD
will load and play automatically.
 Adjust volume on DVD player to desired
level.
DASH RADIO
The dash radio is an AM/FM/Weather Band, CD
and Sirius ready stereo receiver that holds fifteen
FM and ten AM preset stations.
The dash radio is played using speakers throughout the motorhome and is capable of stereo
sound.
118
NOTE
Refer to the dash radio OEM manual
for detailed operating instructions and
information.
Speaker Switch
A speaker switch is located in the
compartment above the driver. When
activated, sound is played in
motorhome.
 Dash Radio position: sound is
heard through front and bedroom
speakers.
 Home Theatre position: bedroom
speakers play only.
031066n
Dash Radio Operation
To Play Radio:
 House battery disconnect switch must be
On.
 Ensure that the battery cut-out switch is
On.
 Select desired position for Speaker
switch.
2008 k n ight
NOTE
The radio power switch, located on
dash, must be On for the radio to
operate.
To Play CD:
 Select desired position for Speaker
switch.
 Press Radio Power switch, located on the
dash, to On.
 Turn on the dash radio.
 Insert CD. CD loads and plays
automatically.
 Adjust volume on dash radio.
BEDROOM DASH RADIO SWITCH
A radio ON/OFF switch is located near the
bed and gives the ability to turn the dash radio
On/Off from the bedroom. The switch can be
utilized for all dash radio functions such as
AM/FM station play and CD operation.
When activated the switch performs these
functions:
 Allows sound through the bedroom
speakers only.
 Turns the dash radio OFF.
equipment — 5
SATELLITE SYSTEM
NOTE
For the bedroom dash radio switch to
function the dash radio must be on.
DSS Prewire
Infra-Red
transmitter plugged in

HOME THEATRE SURROUND SOUND

The Home Theatre Surround Sound System
has speakers located throughout the living room
area. The system operates from 12 Volt DC
powered from the coach batteries or the inverter.
Home Theatre Surround Sound operates through
the DVD player only. Surround Sound is not
capable through the dash radio or bedroom
speakers.
Speaker Switch
A Speaker switch is located in the
overhead compartment above the
driver’s seat.
 Place switch in Home Theater
position for Surround Sound.
 Dash Radio position turns sound
OFF.
Remote control must be
pointed at the Infra-Red eye
above the Main TV to perform
functions.
031193f
Infra-Red eye
by TV
NOTE
Overhead lights can affect the InfraRed eye’s ability to receive a signal from
the remote control. If a problem exists
turn lights off one-by-one until remote is
performing functions.
BEDROOM DVD (OPTIONAL)
031066n
The bedroom DVD player has many features
including multi-format playback for movies,
photos and music and progressive scan for
enhanced picture quality.
Remote Control
The remote control can be used to perform
many entertainment functions.
Requirements for Remote Control
Operation:
 Batteries in remote control are operating
and charged
 Infra-Red transmitter must be connected
into the Infra-Red input on the DVD
player.
031193e
The motorhome is pre-wired with two (2) RG6
cables that route from the satellite prep plate
connections ROOF LNB #1 and ROOF LNB #2
to an area above the first ceiling light. One cable
RG6 routes to the driver’s side rear compartment
while the other cable RG6 coax routes to the rear
bedroom receiver location.
The motorhome also has telephone lines which
route from the driver’s side rear compartment to
each satellite receiver location: main TV and rear
bedroom.
All cables are attached to the satellite prep
plate located in the overhead cabinet above
the driver. These include ROOF LNB #1 and
ROOF LNB #2 to the roof satellite dish, exterior
dish, to the cable plate in the drivers side rear
compartment, rear receiver to the rear bedroom
interface plate, and receiver #1 out to the switch
box as satellite in.
The following corresponds to the connections
on the front of the Satellite Receiver Connection.
031242b
Requirements for Operation:
 House battery disconnect switch must be
On.
 Battery cut out switch must be On.
INFORMATION
For more detailed operating information
refer to the bedroom clock player OEM
manual.
2008 k n ight
031070d
FROM EXT DISH: Hook-up to a
portable satellite dish. Run a coaxial cable from
this connection to Satellite In.
119
Equipment — 5
ROOF LNB #1: Hook-up to the roof satellite
dish. Run a coaxial cable from this connection to
Satellite In.
DVD V: DVD out to bedroom TV.
Satellite Requirements
DVD L: Hook-up composite AV.
ROOF LNB #2: Hook-up to the roof satellite
dish. Run a coaxial cable from this connection to
Satellite In.
DVD R: Hook-up to composite AV.
TO REAR RCVR: Hook-up to the rear
bedroom receiver.
Semi-Automatic Non In-Motion (Optional)
The satellite system requires a clear view of
the southern sky to receive signal. Ideal antenna
site has an unobstructed view of 15º to 75º in the
Southern horizon.
If the satellite antenna receives intermittent
signals or cannot locate the satellite, check
around outside of motorhome for blockage such
as trees, building, etc. The satellite antenna must
be located in the selected satellite’s coverage
area in order to receive a signal.
NOTE
When equipped with a satellite receiver
(not provided) the receiver must be
turned on for the system to function.
RCVR #1 OUT: Hook-up to the video selector
box. Run a coaxial cable from this connection to
From Satellite.
The following corresponds to the connections
on the front of the Bedroom Satellite Receiver
Connection.
COAX: This connection is used to hook-up
Satellite Input to bedroom receiver.
SATELLITE V:
Hook-up
Satellite
receiver out to bedroom TV.
SATELLITE L:
Hook-up audio.
SATELLITE
The self-contained stationary, semi-automatic
satellite TV system can acquire DirecTV®,
DISH Network™ and other satellite prescription
provider’s satellite signals throughout the
continental United States when the motorhome
is in a stationary position.
A phone line, located in the compartment
above the driver, is provided to be attached to a
satellite receiver for Pay-Per-View movies and
events.
NOTE
The satellite is a self-acquiring
satellite TV antenna for use when the
motorhome is stationary. The system is
not designed to track the TV satellite
when the motorhome is in motion.
NOTE
Channel availability will vary with
satellite system and providers. Consult
the OEM manual for providers,
coverage areas and channel availability.
031027b
To Switch Satellites:
Press and hold the 3 position switch for one
second. Up will switch to 119. Down will switch
to 110.
System Start-up:
 Upon power-up the system performs a set
of start-up routines.
 Antenna then searches for a TV satellite.
SATELLITE R:
This connection is
used to hook-up
audio.
120
For Dish 500
Subscribers:
After being locked
onto a satellite Dish
500, subscribers
can switch back
and forth between
the 110 and 119
satellites.
2008 k n ight
equipment — 5
“Instant On” Operation:
As part of operation, the satellite routinely
saves its position to memory. When turned on,
the system looks at the last saved position. If
the motorhome has not changed location, the
antenna will immediately acquire the signal.
If the motorhome moves after the system is
turned off, the antenna will quickly carry out
normal initialization
routine to re-acquire
the satellite. To turn the
system off, press the
Power button.
NOTE
It is highly
recommended that
the system be turned
OFF prior to moving
031199
the motorhome. The
system will not track a satellite while the
motorhome is in motion.
The system requires the following preventive
maintenance for optimum performance.
Maintenance
Monthly:
 Wash the exterior of the radome and base
plate assembly with fresh water; a mild
detergent may be added to remove grime.
DO NOT spray the radome directly with
high-pressure water.
 DO NOT apply abrasive cleaners or
volatile solvents, such as acetone, to the
ABS dome.
Annually:
 Have the satellite system inspected by a
professional RV Technician or satellite
installer.
 Apply full strength liquid dish detergent
to the dome surface and allow it to dry.
This treatment provides a film on the
dome surface that will allow moisture to
bead up and roll off.
NOTE
If a need arises to paint the radome,
ONLY use non-metallic automotive
paint to avoid degrading the RF signal
strength and the reception quality.
INFORMATION
For information on warranty, repair,
and liability policies, refer to the
complete warranty statement provided
with the OEM Manual.
EXTERIOR ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
(OPTIONAL)
The exterior entertainment has a LCD
television, AM/FM radio, CD/DVD player and
two speakers.
To Operate Any Component:
All the entertainment components require 120
Volt AC from shore power, generator, or the
inverter. Ensure the battery cut out switch is on
and the house batteries are charged.
NOTE
For detailed infromation on features
and operating instructions refer to OEM
manual for particular entertainment
component.
NOTE
For optimum signal strength, keep
the dome clean from dirt, bugs and
other debris. Periodic washing of the
dome with mild soap and water is
recommended. If the motorhome is
to be stored for long periods of time
it is recommended that the system be
put through a search procedure on a
quarterly basis to keep all moving parts
in good working order.
2008 k n ight
121
Equipment — 5
SYSTEMS CONTROL CENTER
8. Water Heater Switch - Applies 120
Volt AC power to the Water Heater.
The System Control Center enables a central
location for many of the switches and control
monitors used to operate the motorhome. This
panel is a flush wall-mounted unit.
9. Slide-Out Room Controls - Extends
and retracts Slide Rooms.
1. Comfort Control - Controls Furnace,
Roof A/C and Fan.
2. System Heat - Turns on the 12 Volt
Bay Heater in the Water Service Center.
3. Generator - Starts and stops the
Generator.
10. Inverter Remote Panel – Turns
Inverter on or off and monitors battery
charging status.
11. 50 Amp Energy Management
System – Provides circuit protection
for all 120 Volt AC loads and manages
120 Volt AC distribution.
4. Tank Monitor Panel - Displays the
status of the Black and Grey Holding
Tanks, Fresh Water Tank and LP-Gas
Tank. Also displays status of House
Batteries.
5. Tank Test Switch – Spring loaded
switch displays tank and house battery
status on the monitor panel.
6. Water Pump Switch - Applies 12
Volt DC power to the Water Pump
if operating from the on-board fresh
water tank. The pump status light
illuminates when the water pump is on.
7. Water Heater Switch - Applies 12 Volt
DC power to ignite the Water Heater.
If the Water Heater fails to ignite, the
DSI FAULT lamp will illuminate. If
problem persists consult a qualified
technician.
122
060306w
2008 k n ight
6
2008 Knight
Water SyStemS — Section 6
Water SyStemS - IntroDUctIon .................. 126
Water tankS ................................................... 126
Measurements.&.Calibration........................... 126
Fresh.Water.Fill.............................................. 127
Water tank - freSH gravIty fIll ................ 127
City.Water.Hook-up........................................ 127
Power.Water.Hose.Reel.(Optional).................. 128
Water pUmp .................................................... 128
Water.Pump.Troubleshooting.......................... 128
Water fIlter - faUcet ................................... 129
Water SyStemS .............................................. 130
Troubleshooting............................................. 130
Disinfecting.Fresh.Water................................. 130
faUcet ScreenS .............................................. 131
lIQUID Soap DISpenSer .................................. 131
WaSte Water SyStemS ................................. 131
Proper.Waste.Disposal................................... 131
What.Not.to.Put.in.Waste.Holding.Tanks......... 131
What.to.Put.in.Holding.Tanks.......................... 131
Waste.Drain.Hose.......................................... 132
Tank.Flush...................................................... 132
WaSte pUmp (optIonal) ................................ 133
toIlet ............................................................... 13
135
Cleaning.&.Maintenance. ............................... 13
Cleaning.&.Maintenance.
136
electrIc toIlet
(40 SkQ & 40 Dft moDelS only) .................... 13
136
Operation....................................................... 13
Operation.......................................................
136
Programming.the.Water.Level. ....................... 1137
Programming.the.Water.Level.
Holding.Tank.Level.Sensors. .......................... 13
Holding.Tank.Level.Sensors.
137
Cleaning........................................................ 13
Cleaning........................................................
137
Maintenance.................................................. 13
Maintenance..................................................
137
Winterization.................................................. 13
Winterization..................................................
138
Drain.Traps.&.Auto.Vents............................... 13
Drain.Traps.&.Auto.Vents.
138
colD WeatHer conDItIonS............................ 13
138
Cold.Weather.Storage.................................... 13
Cold.Weather.Storage.
138
WInterIzatIon ................................................. 13
139
Using.Air.Pressure.........................................
Using.Air.Pressure
U
sing.Air.Pressure.........................................
......................................... 13
139
Using.Non-Toxic.Antifreeze.............................
Using.Non-Toxic.Antifreeze.
U
sing.Non-Toxic.Antifreeze.............................
............................ 14
140
De-winterization.............................................
De-winterization
D
e-winterization.............................................
............................................. 14
141
Water
W
ater ServIce center .................................. 14
142
water systems — 6
Water Systems - Introduction
This section contains
information about the operation
and care of various water
system equipment found in
the motorhome. Optional
water equipment will also be
discussed, so not all information
may be applicable to each
motorhome. More detailed
information with CAUTION
040480m
or WARNING instructions for
various equipment, other than what is found in
this section, can be found in the OEM manuals
in the owner information box.
Newcomers to a self-contained motorhome
soon discover water does not last long unless
consumption is drastically reduced. For example,
less water can be used for showering if the
shower is turned off while soaping down, then
turned back on to rinse. Plenty of water will be
available to meet personal needs once habits are
adjusted.
The motorhome plumbing system may be
operated with or without shore services. The
plumbing system holding tanks include a fresh
water tank, a grey water tank and a black water
tank. The sinks, shower and optional clothes
washer drain into the grey tank, and the toilet
drains into the black tank. An onboard water
pump will supply all faucets and toilets with
water from the fresh tank. Close monitoring
of the holding tanks is necessary when shore
services are not available. A monitor panel is
located in the hallway. An optional monitor
panel can be located in the water service center.
124
The motorhome plumbing system can be
attached to shore services (city water and sewer)
at the roadside service center. The service center
includes the city water/fresh tank fill connection
and the grey and black tank valves, drains and
tank flush connections. If shore services are
available, the shore water supply (city water)
can be used to pressurize the water system, so
the onboard water pump can be left off. The
grey and black tanks share a termination outlet.
A sewer hose can be attached from the drain to
the shore sewer connection. It is recommended
to leave the black tank drain closed and the grey
tank drain open when hooked to shore services
to avoid a clogged sewer hose. Drain and flush
the grey and black tanks after dumping and/or
prior to departure.
Fresh Water System:
The fresh water system consists
of a fresh water tank, water
pump, gravity fill connection,
water filter, a city/fresh water
040400
connection and a water hose that
is marked for potable water use only. Proper care
of the hose is necessary. After each use, drain the
water hose and coil the hose neatly. Attach the
ends together to keep dirt, debris and insects out
of the hose. If the motorhome has the optional
electric hose reel, the hose will be included. Coil
hose on the reel after each use and attach plug to
keep debris and insects out.
Waste Water System:
The waste water system consists of a waste
holding tank (grey water), sewage holding tank
(black water), flush system, toilet, waste hose
and drains.
2008 Kn ig ht
WARNING
Water is electrically conductive. DO
NOT use any electrically powered item
or electrical outlet that may be exposed
to a water source. Such use can result in
a serious shock, causing injury or death.
Water Tanks
Measurements & Calibration
The motorhome
is equipped with a
monitor panel to aid in
managing the storage
tanks. The monitor
panel is located on
the Systems Control
060306m
Center in the hallway
area. A second
optional monitor panel
is located in the roadside
water service center. The
switch marked Test is a
momentary switch which
requires being held down Monitor Panel (Optional)
while testing the level of Located in Service Center
030446g
the storage tanks. Read the
scale for the
> desired storage tank that is being
monitored. Each scale uses colored lights along
with a corresponding scale reading.
LP Tank and Fresh Tank
Holding and GreyTanks
Red = Empty
Green = Empty
Red = 1/3 Full
Yellow = 1/3 Full
Yellow = 2/3 Full
Red = 2/3 Full
Green = Full
Red = Full
Water systems — 6
Fresh Water Fill
When connecting the motorhome to fresh
water, use a hose manufactured and labeled
“for potable water.” This ensures that the hose
will not flavor the water. It is recommended to
install a pressure regulator on the water line. On
hot days the hose may expand and burst from
excessive pressure within the hose.
1. If the motorhome has the
optional Power Hose Reel,
pull hose out. Connect
one end of the pressure
regulator to the water
source and the other end
to the hose and go to step
#3. If motorhome does not
have the optional power
hose reel, proceed with
step 2.
2. Connect one end of the
pressure regulator to the
water source and
the other end to the
potable hose.
3. Connect potable hose
to the City/Fresh
Water Fill valve.
4. Open the water pump
shut-off valve.
5. Make sure the fresh
water tank drain valve is in the
closed position.
6. Turn the water control handle to the
“Tank Fill” position.
040480y
7. Turn on water at the water source. The
water should be audible as the fresh
water tank fills. Observe tank fill by
using monitor panel located inside the
motorhome, or the (optional) monitor
panel located in the roadside water
service center.
8. Frequently press the “Test” switch
and read the scale as the fresh water
tank fills. Do not leave the motorhome
unattended while filling the fresh water
tank.
9. The tank is nearing full when the light
marked “F” illuminates. When the tank
is completely full, water will flow out
an overflow tube under the motorhome.
10. Turn off water supply and return the
water control handle to “City Water”
position.
11. Disconnect the potable hose. Remove
pressure regulator. Store the hose with
both ends connected to prevent debris
from entering the hose.
12. If applicable, activate the (optional)
power hose reel switch to coil the hose
on the reel. Attach plug to keep debris
and insects out.
Water tank - fresh gravity fill
040460o
The gravity fill inlet allows fluids to be
introduced directly into the fresh water tank.
When dry camping, water can be poured directly
from a container into the fresh water tank. The
gravity fill inlet can be used to pour disinfecting
solution into the fresh water tank. Use only
potable water sources, solutions and delivery
2008 K Nig ht
systems when using the gravity fill inlet.
Filling the Tank:
1. Unscrew fill cap taking care
to keep cap and inlet clean.
2. Insert potable water hose
into inlet.
3. Fill tank until water overflows from inlet.
NOTE
DO NOT leave the
gravity fill inlet
unattended when in use.
040406
Located in the
roadside water
service center
City Water Hook-up
When connecting the motorhome to fresh
waste, use a hose manufactured and labeled for
potable water to ensure the hose will not flavor
the water. It is recommended to install a pressure
regulator on the water line to prevent the hose
from expanding and bursting due to excessive
pressure.
1. If the motorhome has an optional
hose reel, pull hose out. Connect the
pressure regulator to the water source
and the other end to the hose and
proceed to #4.
2. Install the pressure regulator on the
water source.
3. Connect the pressure regulator to the
potable hose and the potable hose to the
City/Fresh Water Fill Valve.
4. Water control valve should be in the
“City Water” position.
125
water systems — 6
5. Turn on the water at the source.
6. The water pump can either be OFF or
ON. It will not affect the water pump
to leave it on.
7. Open each faucet, one at a time, to rid
any trapped air inside the pipes.
CAUTION
Some water sources develop high water
pressure, particularly in mountainous
regions. High water pressure is anything
over 55 psi (pounds per square inch).
Excessive water pressure may cause
leaks in water lines and/or damage the
water heater.
Power Water Hose Reel (Optional)
To extend, manually spool the hose to
water source for connection. Hose retrieval is
accomplished by pushing the water hose reel
switch that powers the 12 VDC motor. The
rocker type switch prohibits the reel from being
inadvertently left on.
040624
Water Pump
The water pump
pressurizes the fresh water
system when not connected
to city water. The water
pump is self-priming,
operating on demand as
water is used. The water
pump is located in the water
service center.
CAUTION
DO NOT continue water pump
operation if the fresh water holding tank
is empty. Damage to the water pump
or electrical supply system
may result.
Operation Requirements:
 House battery disconnect
switch must be on.
 Turn on battery cut-out switch.
WARNING
Before leaving the motorhome for
extended periods of time (i.e. overnight
or longer) be sure that the city water
supply and water pump have been
turned off. Damage from neglect will be
the responsibility of the owner, not the
manufacturer.
The water pump can be operated from
these following locations:
 Hallway Systems Control Panel
 Water Service Center
 Kitchen
To turn the water pump on or
off:
 Momentarily press the water
pump switch. The indicator
lamp illuminates when the
water pump is turned on.
126
040586
Water pump inlet
screen: Located on
water pump in water
service center. Clean
every two months.
2008 Kn ig ht
040537c
Service Center
Water Pump
Switch
To operate the water pump after unhooking
from a city water supply or after storage:
 Close all drain valves and low point
drains.
 Fill the fresh water tank.
 Open the hot and cold water valves of
each faucet.
 Turn the water pump on. Wait for the
water lines and the hot water tank to fill.
 Close each faucet when it delivers a
steady stream of water (cold water
faucets first). Water Pump Troubleshooting
Vibration induced by road conditions can
cause the plumbing or pump hardware to loosen.
Check the water pump system for components
that are loose. Many symptoms can be resolved
by tightening the hardware. Check the following
items:
Water pump will not start or blows the fuse:
 Check the electrical connections, fuse
or breaker, main switch and ground
connection.
 Is voltage present at the pressure switch
on the pump? If voltage is present, the
pressure switch may be faulty. As a test,
temporarily bypass the pressure switch.
 Check the charging system for correct
voltage and good ground.
Water systems — 6
Check for an open or grounded circuit or
motor.
 Check for a seized or locked diaphragm
assembly (water frozen).

Water pump will not prime or sputters
(No discharge/motor runs):
 Is the pump inlet strainer clogged with
debris?
 Is there water in the tank or has air
collected in the water heater?
 Is the inlet tubing and plumbing sucking
in air at plumbing connections (vacuum
leak)?
 Check for proper voltage with the pump
operating.
 Check the pump housing for cracks or
loose drive assembly screws.
Water pump will not shut-off or continues
to run when the faucet is closed:
 Check to see if the fresh water/tank fill
valve is completely closed.
 Check the output (pressure) side
plumbing for leaks and inspect for a
leaky toilet or valves.
 Look for a loose drive assembly or pump
head screws.
Water pump is noisy or rough in operation:
 Check for plumbing that may have
vibrated loose.
 Does the mounting surface multiply
noise (flexible)?
 Check for mounting feet that are loose or
compressed too tight.
 Look for loose pump head to motor
screws.
Water pump is rapid cycling:
 Look for restrictive water flow in the
faucets or shower heads.
Water Filter - Faucet
The filtration system filters up to 1,000 gallons
between filter changes. Depending on use
change filter cartridge approximately every 6
months (this is about 1,000 gallons) or when
water flow is noticeably reduced. The maximum
pressure for the system is 125 psi and maximum
temperature 100º F.
NOTE
Depending on floor plan, the water filter
can be located in several locations. One
location is an exterior compartment,
typically a curbside compartment.
Another location is behind the water
heater. To locate this water filter open
the compartment next to the water
heater. Once inside this compartment
open the access panel to gain entry to
the back of the water heater.
CAUTION
Protect filter from freezing or damage to
the system could occur.
Filter Removal:
 Turn off the water
supply and the water
pump.
 Open faucets to
bleed off pressure.
 Unscrew the filter bowl using
the bowl wrench.

Check o-ring for damage and lubricate
if necessary. O-ring should be changed
every third cartridge change to ensure
proper sealing.
 Remove the old cartridge and discard.
 Empty any remaining water in the bowl.

2008 K Nig ht
040520c
Water Filter
Removal
Wrench
Filter Installation:
 Insert new cartridge into filter bowl.
 Screw filter bowl back onto head and
hand tighten securely.
 Turn on water pump or city water.
 Thoroughly flush and purge air from the
system by opening faucets and running
the water for approximately 20 minutes.
 Check for leaks.
To Winterize:
 Disconnect the two
water line connections
(normal usage) on
either side of the filter
bowl head.
 Connect a bypass hose
to the two water lines.
 Unscrew the filter bowl
using the bowl wrench.
040520b
 Remove the old
cartridge and discard.
 Empty any remaining water in the bowl.
 Store the filter bowl. DO NOT screw
filter bowl back onto filter head.
 Winterize the motorhome.
To De-Winterize:
 Disconnect the bypass hose to the two
water lines. Store bypass hose.
 Reconnect the two water lines to the
filter bowl head.
127
water systems — 6
Insert new cartridge into filter bowl.
Screw filter bowl back onto head and
hand tighten securely.
 Turn on water pump or city water.
 Thoroughly flush and purge air from the
system by opening faucets and running
the water for approximately 20 minutes.
 Check for leaks.

Disinfecting Fresh Water

NOTE
Confirm the filter cartridge number
before ordering or obtaining a
replacement.
CAUTION
O-ring must be properly seated in the
groove of the lower housing or a water
leak could occur.
NOTE
For further assistance and information
contact Shurflo Customer Service at 1800-854-3218.
Water Systems
Troubleshooting
If the water pump cycles after closing the
faucets, drain valves and inlet valves, a leak may
be present. At this time check for leaks around
fittings, valves, filters and connections of the hot
and cold water system. If problems continue,
take the motorhome to an authorized dealer for
repair.
128
Disinfecting the water system with household
bleach (superchlorination) protects against
bacteriological or viral contamination from
common water sources.
Disinfect the fresh water system:
 If the motorhome is new.
 If the motorhome has been in storage.
 Every three months during use.
NOTE
Use the gravity fill to perform this task.
Remove cap from the gravity fill. Add
the solution. When finished, secure the
gravity fill cap.
To Disinfect the Water System:
 Remove the water line connections and
connect the bypass hose to the water
lines (see “Water Filter).
 Prepare a household chlorine bleach
solution of 1 gallon water and ¼ cup of
chlorine bleach. Use 1 gallon of solution
for every 15 gallons of tank capacity.
E.g.: Add 2-2/3 gallons solution to a 40
gallon tank. This mixture puts a 50 ppm
(parts per million) residual in the water
system, and acts as a quick-kill dosage
for harmful bacteria, viruses and slimeforming organisms. Concentrations
higher than 50 ppm may damage the
water lines and/or tanks.
 Turn the water pump OFF.
 Drain the fresh water tank. Close the
drain and pour the solution into the fresh
water tank using the gravity fill and a
funnel.
2008 Kn ig ht
Turn the water pump ON. Open each
faucet, in turn, and run the water until
you smell a distinct chlorine bleach odor.
Do not forget the hot water, tub and
shower faucets.
 Allow the system to stand for 4 hours.
 Drain the system and flush with fresh
water. The water tank and low point
drains are located in the roadside water
service center. Flush with fresh water
repeatedly until the water system no
longer smells or tastes like chlorine
bleach.
 Install new water filter. Remove bypass
hose and store. Reconnect water lines to
water filter.

TIP
Use the same hose labeled for potable
water to introduce the chlorine solution
into the system. This will disinfect
the potable water hose at the same
time. Several flushes will be required
to remove chlorine residue from the
potable hose.
INFORMATION
Household bleach is 5.25% Sodium
Hypochlorite. Higher concentration will
increase PPM ratio.
Water systems — 6
Faucet Screens
Fresh water sources will vary by location.
Build up of lime deposits, or debris on the faucet
screen, will restrict or plug the flow of water
coming from the faucets. Should the flow of
water reduce, the filter screen in the faucet head
may be clogged. All faucet screens should be
checked and cleaned every two weeks of use.
Faucet screens ar normally located on the
outlet side of the faucet and held in place
with a threaded collar.
 Remove screen from faucet.
 Clean screen using a small soft brush and
de-liming solution.
 Reinstall screen and check water flow.

040472c
Typical Water Faucet
040533c
Liquid Soap Dispenser
The liquid soap dispenser can be used with
any type of liquid soap or lotion. The liner of the
bottle will not corrode or discolor the contents
of the dispenser. Use a soft cloth and blot dry
to clean. Abrasive cleansers or polishes can
damage the finish on the dispenser.
Lift dispenser pump
out of bottle.
 Use funnel to fill bottle
with liquid soap or
lotion.

040519e
Waste Water Systems
Proper Waste Disposal
Dumping raw sewage from toilet holding
tanks, except at authorized dumping stations,
is universally prohibited. Most National, State
and private parks have either a central dump
facility or campsite hook-up for sewage. Many
modern rest areas along the interstate now have
dump stations available. Woodall’s Campground
Directory, Trailer Life’s RV Campgrounds
and Services Directory, Rand McNally’s
Campground and Trailer Park Guide, Good
Sam Park Director (Good Sam Club) and other
similar publications list dumping stations. Some
major oil companies offer dump facilities at
selected stations also.
What Not to Put in Waste Holding Tanks
DO NOT use strong or full strength
detergents to deodorize and disinfect.
Use odor control chemicals made
especially for holding tanks.
 Automotive antifreeze, ammonia, alcohol
or acetone in holding tanks will dissolve
plastic.

2008 K Nig ht
DO NOT dispose of table scraps or
cooking grease into the tanks. They can
clog pipes or damage tremination valve
seals.
 Facial tissue is thicker, softer and
stronger than a rapidly dissolving tissue.
White toilet paper dissolves faster than
colored. To test tissue dissolving ability,
immerse one tissue square into a jar
of water. Shake the jar five times to
determine how the tissue disintegrates.
DO NOT use any type of tissue that
remains in one piece. Paper designed
specifically for holding tanks is available
at most RV supply stores.

NOTE
Never dispose of sanitary supplies or
other non-dissolving items into the
system. Facial tissue, wet strength tissue,
paper towels or an excessive amount of
toilet tissue can create clogging in the
holding tank system.
CAUTION
DO NOT use any products that contain
petroleum distillate or ammonia in
place of RV odor controlling chemicals.
Petroleum distillate or ammonia will
damage the ABS plastic holding tanks
and seals.
What to Put in Holding Tanks
Grey Water Tank:
The grey water waste tank stores the sink,
shower and clothes washer (if equipped) drain
water. A reduced mixture of chemicals may help
to control odor in the grey tank.
129
water systems — 6
Ensure that there is enough liquid in the
holding tanks prior to dumping the waste
holding tanks to provide a smooth flow through
the valve, drain pipe and drain hose. Empty
the waste holding tanks weekly to prevent
stagnation and overfilling.
Black Water Tank:
Before initially operating the toilet, treat the
sewage holding tank with a pre-charge of water
and an odor-control chemical (available at most
RV supply stores). First, add approximately
three gallons of water to the holding tank. Next,
mix the chemicals, in accordance with the
manufacturer instructions, with approximately
one gallon of water. Pour mixture through toilet
to the holding tank. Be careful not to spill the
chemical on hands, clothing, toilet bowl or
carpet. Hot weather conditions may require
adjusting the amount of chemical used to control
odor. Repeat the chemical pre-charge to the
holding tank each time the tank is cycled.
WARNING
Most chemical mixtures for holding
tank odor control are poisonous. Follow
the product manufacturer’s directions
and warnings when using holding tank
additive. DO NOT use any products that
contain petroleum distillate or ammonia
in place of RV odor controlling
chemical. Petroleum distillate or
ammonia will damage the ABS plastic
holding tanks and seals.
Waste Drain Hose
A flexible three-inch
sewer hose attaches
between the termination
drain and the shore
facility. Sewer hoses
usually come in 10 or 20
foot lengths.
The shore fitting for the
030834d
sewer hose may be a three
or four-inch, male or female thread pipe;
or a four-inch pipe with no threads, covered
by a metal plate. Different style of adapters are
available to fit most configurations. Hose ladders
may also be purchased to support the hose.
It is important that the hose remains secure.
Always tighten clamps and restraining
devices before use. Lay the hose inline between
the termination outlet and the shore fitting.
Restrain the hose to prevent movement during
use. Wear protective and/or disposable gloves
when handling the sewer hose.
To Attach the Hose:
 Remove termination cap. Align coupler
tangs with termination tabs. Twist
coupler clockwise 90º locking coupler to
termination outlet.
 Attach other end of hose to drain
service. Restrain
hose to prevent
movement during
use.
 Open the liquid
waste drain (grey
water) valve.
130013
130
2008 Kn ig ht
The solid waste drain (black water) valve
remains closed until the tank is full or until time
of departure to help prevent clogging. Use the
outside faucet or shower attachment for washing
or rinsing the sewer hose after dumping the
black tank.
NOTE
Use care when connecting the sewer
hose adapter to the termination outlet in
cold weather.
NOTE
Close the grey water valve 24 hours
prior to departing to allow the tank to
fill with liquid to help in the dumping
process.
LUBE
Periodically lubricate the O-ring on the
sewer hose adapter with silicone spray.
Tank Flush
The motorhome comes equipped with a power
flush nozzle, located in the black tank to help
reduce solids build-up. Flush the black tank
each drain cycle. Failure to thoroughly rinse the
black tank may result in accumulated solids and
a clogged spray nozzle.
Gravity Drain Hose Dumping:
1. Attach sewer hose to terminal drain and
shore facility.
2. Prepare to dump the solid waste (black)
tank first. Close the liquid waste drain
(grey) valve.
3. Fill the grey tank to at least 50% by
running water in the shower or sinks.
Water systems — 6
WARNING
Operating the flush system unattended
can risk flooding. Use the tank flush
system each time the holding tanks are
cycled. Failure to routinely use the flush
system will result in a clogged spray
nozzle. Turn off the water supply when
finished flushing the tank.
040460w
4. Open the solid waste drain (black)
valve. Allow the black tank to drain.
5. Connect one end of the pressure
regulator to the water source and
the end to a non-potable water hose.
Connect the non-potable hose to the
tank flush fitting.
6. Turn on the water source and allow
water to rinse the black tank at least
three minutes. Never operate the
system unattended. Ensure the water
flows freely though the drain hose.
7. When completed, turn off the water
source and close the black water valve.
8. Open the grey water valve. The water
in the grey tank will flush remaining
solids from the hose. With the grey
water valve open, run two gallons of
water down any drain to flush grey
tank. The grey valve remains open
until the next drain cycle, or time of
departure.
9. When preparing for travel, close both
dump valves. Undo restraining devices
from the hose. Disconnect the hose
from the termination outlet by rotating
the fitting counterclockwise 90º.
10. Raise the hose and drain using hand
over hand method working the hose
towards shore fitting. Rinse the hose
with outside facility and repeat the
hose drain process.
11. Remove the hose from shore fitting.
Install hose in carrier and lock door.
Secure the termination cap (required by
law in some states).
12. If desired, add chemicals to the tanks
to control odor. Follow the directions
given by the manufacturer of the
chemical.
NOTE
Dump the black tank before driving.
When operating Sani-Con it is recommended
to wear disposable gloves, safety glasses
and protective clothing. The house battery
disconnect switch, located in curbside battery
compartment, must be on for the Sani-Con
system to operate. The waste pump operates on
12 Volts from the house battery.
INFORMATION
For additional information consult RV
Sani-Con literature or website:
www.emptythetanks.com
WARNING
NEVER place in
the toilet personal
hygiene products,
cigarette butts,
paper towels, table
scraps, grease, any
100220
tissue that remains
in one piece, any object that can be
considered foreign. These objects will
damage the Sani-Con system and void
manufacturer’s warranty.
WARNING
Never leave the Sani-Con pump
unattended while in use. DO NOT allow
the pump to run dry for any period of
time. Damage to the pump impeller and
Sani-Con system will result and void
manufacturer’s warranty.
waste pump (optional)
The waste pump (Sani-Con system) is a selfpriming impeller pump designed to minimize
clogging when draining the tanks. The system
comes with a 1½” outlet hose with sewer pipe
adapter and a 13 gallon per minute macerator
pump.
2008 K Nig ht
100220b
131
water systems — 6
To Empty the Black Tank (Solid Waste):
 Close the black tank (solid waste) and
grey tank (liquid waste) valves.
 Remove the terminal drain outlet cap.
 Secure the flexible sewer hose from
the Sani-Con macerator pump to the
termination drain outlet by aligning
the sewer hose coupler tangs with
the terminal tabs. Twist the coupler
clockwise to lock it to the terminal outlet.
 Remove the drip cap at 1 ½” end of
discharge nozzle (see illustration).
WARNING
Be sure to remove the drip cap from
the Sani-Con hose end (see illustration).
Failure to do so will result in damage to
the Sani-Con system.
040623b
CAUTION
If the pump is activated while the drip
cap is on the hose end, switch the pump
off (use the Sani-Con On/Off switch) and
wait at least
30 seconds to
allow pressure
to dissipate
before
removing the
drip cap.
040516t
132
Periodically tighten all hose clamps.
Install discharge nozzle to the sewer
connection (dump station). Adapters
allow the discharge nozzle to be adapted
from 3” to 4” threaded or non-threaded
sewer connection. Ensure the discharge
nozzle is installed correctly prior to
operation.
 Open the solid waste (black tank) valve
by pulling outward.
 Turn on the waste pump using the SaniCon switch located on Water Service
Center panel.
 Push the test switch on the monitor panel
to read tank level. Allow the black tank
to empty.
 When the black tank is empty, turn off
the Sani-Con pump and leave the black
tank valve open.
 Store sewer hose and Sani-Con discharge
nozzle for travel. Secure termination cap
(required by law in some states).
 If desired, add chemicals to the holding
tanks to control odor. Follow the
chemical manufacturer’s directions.


To Empty the Grey Tank (Liquid Waste):
 Secure the flexible sewer hose from
the Sani-Con macerator pump to the
termination drain outlet.
 Remove the drip cap at 1 ½” end of
discharge nozzle (see illustration).
 Periodically tighten all hose clamps.
 Install discharge nozzle to the sewer
connection (dump ststion). Adapters
allow the discharge nozzle to be adapted
from 3” to 4” threaded or non-threaded
sewer connection. Ensure the discharge
2008 Kn ig ht
nozzle is installed correctly prior to
operation.
 If applicable, close the black tank (solid
waste water) valve.
 Open the grey tank valve.
 Turn on the Sani-Con pump. Allow the
grey tank to empty.
 Push the test switch on the monitor panel
to read tank levels.
 If applicable, the black tank (solid waste)
can be emptied at this time.
 Turn the Sani-Con pump off.
 Close the grey tank drain valve and, if
applicable, the black tank valve.
 Store sewer hose and Sani-Con discharge
nozzle for travel. Secure termination cap
(required by law in some states).
 If desired, add chemicals to the holding
tanks to control odor. Follow the
chemical manufacturer’s directions.
Using Tank Flush:
WARNING
Never operate the flush system
unattended. Flooding may occur. Use the
tank flush system each time the holding
tanks are cycled. Failure to routinely use
the flush system will result in a clogged
spray nozzle. Turn off the water supply
when finished flushing the tank.
 Secure the flexible sewer hose from
the Sani-Con macerator pump to the
termination drain outlet.
 Remove the drip cap at 1 ½” end of
discharge nozzle (see illustration).
 Periodically tighten all hose clamps.
 Install discharge nozzle to the sewer
connection (dump station).
Water systems — 6
Connect a non-potable water hose with
pressure regulator to the water source.
Connect the other end of the water hose
to the Tank Flush fitting.
 Open the solid waste (black tank) valve.
 Turn on the water source and allow the
water to rinse the black tank at least
three minutes. Never operate the system
unattended.
 Turn the water off, disconnect the nonpotable hose and pressure regulator. Store
the hose and regulator for future use.
 Turn the Sani-Con pump on and allow
black tank to empty.
 Turn the Sani-Con pump off
 Close black tank drain valve.
 If applicable, the grey tank (liquid waste)
can be emptied at this time. Close grey
tank valve.
 Store sewer hose and Sani-Con discharge
nozzle for travel. Secure termination cap
(required by law in some states).
 If desired, add chemicals to the holding
tanks to control odor. Follow the
chemical manufacturer’s directions.
Toilet

Grey Water Bypass:
The grey water bypass system allows
continuous grey water flow. The liquid (grey)
waste uses gravity to drain from the tank and
bypasses the pump by going through the bypass
hose into the sewage service. The bypass hose
is the small hose connected at the termination
point of the dump valves and “T-s” into the small
flexible hose on the outlet side of the macerator
pump. The bypass system is located inside the
housing that covers the sewer hose.
The toilet uses water from
either the fresh water tank or
a city water supply. The water
pump must be turned on or
connect the motorhome to city
water. The toilet flushes directly
into the sewage holding tank
(black water).
CAUTION
To prevent accumulation of solids below
toilet, add several gallons of water to the
holding tank before use. Most chemical
mixtures for holding tank odor control
are poisonous. Follow the product
manufacturer’s directions and warnings
when using any holding tank additive.
040623
View with housing removed
Troubleshooting:
 The house battery disconnect switch
must be on.
 12 Volt DC power for the macerator
pump comes from the house batteries and
is protected with a 20 Amp mini-breaker.
The breaker is located in the curbside
electrical battery compartment. Open
the black
box above
the batteries
to access
the minibreaker. Due
to options and
changes to the
motorhome,
the amperage
values and
items listed on
fuse label will
060162b
change.
2008 K Nig ht
040466
NOTE
Never dispose of sanitary supplies or
other non-dissolving items into the toilet.
Facial tissue, wet strength tissue, paper
towels or an excess toilet tissue can clog
the tank or termination valve.
040467

To add water to the toilet before using,
press and hold the pedal halfway until the
desired water level is reached. Generally,
more water is required only when
flushing solids.
133
water systems — 6

To flush the toilet, push the lever all the
way down until the sewage leaves the
toilet.
Water flow pressures vary. Therefore, holding
the flush lever down for several seconds may be
required. Release the flush lever, allowing it to
snap back, permitting positive sealing around
the flush ball. A small amount of water should
remain in bowl.

To operate the hand
sprayer, depress the
thumb lever. Step on
foot pedal. Direct water
into the bowl.
040397
Cleaning & Maintenance
The toilet should be cleaned regularly for
maximum sanitation and operational efficiency.
Clean the toilet bowl with a mild bathroom
cleaner. DO NOT use chlorine or caustic
chemicals, such as drain opening types, as they
will damage the seals.
Clean the toilet system using the tank flush.
If additional flushing is desired, flush with
several gallons of fresh water and one cup of dry
laundry detergent. Add odor control deodorant,
in the amount specified for the holding tank
capacity, every few days during use.

Between closet flange and toilet:
Confirm that flange screws are snug.
DO NOT over tighten screws. If leak
continues, remove toilet and check flange
height. Adjust the flange height to 7/16"
above floor, if necessary. Replace flange
seal if damaged.
Maintenance - Bowl Problems:
 Poor flush: Flush should be obtained
within two to three seconds. If a problem
persists, adjust the water level. If
problems continue, the water pressure or
flow rate may be low. Remove the water
supply line and check flow rate. Flow
rate should be at least ten quarts (9.5
liters) per minute. Water pressure should
not be below 25 psi.
 Bowl will not hold water: Check for and
remove any foreign material from blade
seal track. Check blade seal compression
with mechanism. If blade seal is worn,
replace.
NOTE
If the motorhome is in storage for six
months, spray silicone on the toilet valve
and work it back and forth. Perform
this maintenance monthly during use
(silicone will evaporate in about 30
days). DO NOT use a petroleum-based
lubricant, damage to the seals will occur.
Maintenance - Checking for Leaks:
 Back of toilet: Check water supply
line connection for tightness. Toilet
tissue works well to find leaks. The
tissue changes texture when contacting
moisture.
134
electric TOILET
(40 sKQ & 40 dft models only)
The toilet is an electric
macerating toilet. To avoid
damage only flush organic
material and toilet paper. To
operate the toilet the house
battery disconnect switch
must be on.
The toilet uses a 40
Amp mini-breaker located
in the curbside battery
compartment. Open the black
box above the batteries to
access the mini-breaker.
Operation
040536
0606162b
Mini Breaker
NOTE: The label may vary with
options or changes to the motorhome.
To operate the toilet the house batteries must
be on and charged.
Water Saver Flush:
 Press and release left button. This mode
is recommended for flushing liquids and
small amounts of toilet paper only.
Normal Flush:
 Press and release right button. This mode
is recommended for flushing solids and
toilet paper.
Empty Bowl:
 Press both buttons simultaneously and
release. This empties the bowl and leaves
it dry for travel.
2008 Kn ig ht
Water systems — 6

Press either button once to add water, run
motor and return to normal use.
LED Sleep Mode: To save power
consumption when not in use, an automatic LED
sleep mode is programmed on this control panel.
If the toilet is not used for 8 hours, the keypad’s
LED lights will go out. The press of any button
will start a flush and reactivate backlighting.
Programming the Water Level
The water level in the
bowl can be programmed.
The minimum
recommended refill level
is ½" above the bowl
outfall hole. The opening
in the bowl is the outfall
hole. After changing water
040466c
source from municipal
to pump, resetting water may be necessary. To
program the water level perform the following
steps.
Press both buttons and hold.
 LEDs will flash indicating the toilet is in
program mode.
 As water enters the bowl, release fingers
from buttons to set the level of standing
water in the bowl. The level remains
constant after each flush until it is
changed.

Cleaning
040466d
Water Icon Not Lighted: Toilet system is Off,
in sleep mode or not receiving power.
Water Icon Lighted Green: Toilet system is
On and the holding tank is between empty and
half full.
Water Icon Lighted Yellow: Toilet system is
On and the holding tank is at least half full.
Water Icon Lighted Red: Toilet system is On
and the holding tank is full.
Holding Tank Level Sensors
Full Tank Lockout: For the safety of the
system, the toilet will not flush when the when
the system senses a full tank. This occurs when
the Water Icon is red.
The toilet system has tank level sensors
mounted on the outside of the black tank. On
the bathroom control panel is a small water icon
located in the bottom right corner. The following
information pertains to that water icon.
Emergency Override If the tank is full
(Water Icon is red) and an emergency flush is
needed do the following:
 Press and hold either flush button for 6
seconds to flush toilet.
WARNING
Drain the black tank. If the black
tank is not drained, flushing will cause
overfilling of the black waste tank and
system back up. The diagnostic LED
warning icon will flash.
2008 K Nig ht
Regularly clean the toilet for maximum
sanitation and operational efficiency. Clean the
toilet bowl with a mild bathroom cleaner. DO
NOT use chlorine or caustic chemicals, such
as drain opening types, as they will damage the
seals.
Clean out the system by flushing several
gallons of fresh water through with one cup
of dry laundry detergent. Add odor control
deodorant, in the amount specified for your
holding tank capacity, after cleaning and every
few days during use.
NOTE
Most chemical mixtures for holding tank
odor control are poisonous. Follow the
product manufacturer’s directions and
warnings when using any holding tank
additive.
Maintenance
To find leaks, check behind or under toilet.
Take four or five sheets of toilet tissue and
wipe all the water line connections. Start at the
top of the unit and work downward. When the
tissue comes in contact with leaking water it
immediately changes texture.
135
water systems — 6
NOTE
Before storing the motorhome, the toilet
must be flushed repeatedly to remove
any solids that may have built up.
NOTE
If the motorhome is in storage for six
months it is a good idea to spray silicone
on the toilet valve and work it back
and forth. Perform this maintenance
monthly (silicone will evaporate in about
30 days).
Winterization
The toilet must be winterized to avoid freeze
damage. Follow the winterization in Section 6.
With the Tecma toilet it is recommended to flush
toilet until antifreeze is seen in the bowl. Flush
an additional 5 times with the antifreeze mixture
to ensure discharge line is winterized.
Drain Traps & Auto Vents
Sinks, shower and clothes washer (if equipped)
drains incorporate a water trap (P-Trap) and auto
vents to prevent waste water holding tank odor
from entering the motorhome.
Drain Traps:
P-Traps are usually within 54" of a vent tee
and must contain water to block odors. During
storage water can evaporate and allow odor into
motorhome. If odor is detected, run water into
sinks, shower and clothes washer (if equipped)
to fill P-traps.
136
070152
AutoVents:
The auto vent is designed to assist in the
smooth flow of water in the drain without
creating a vacuum. If stuck in the open position
the auto vent can allow grey odors to enter the
motorhome. Some auto vents can double as
“clean outs” in the event the line needs to be
snaked out.
Cold Weather Conditions
Extended use in below freezing (32° F/0° C)
weather will require operation of the furnace
to protect interior water lines, fixtures, water
storage tanks and pumps. Exposed drains
may freeze quickly. If in doubt about what
temperature the motorhome will tolerate,
winterize with potable antifreeze. Cold
temperature can adversely affect water systems
below the floor level because the furnace does
not provide heat to these components. A 12 Volt
bay heater and thermal snap disc are located in
the water service bay. The System Heat switch
on the monitor panel operates the bay heater and
should be turned on when ambient temperatures
approach 44º F (+/-6º F) and freezing
temperatures occur.
2008 Kn ig ht
System Heat Operation:
1. Systems heat switch is
turned ON to apply power
to the snap disc thermostat.
2. When the bay temperature
reaches 40º F (+/-6º
F) the snap disc
thermostat closes.
The bay heater and
systems heat Active
light turns on. The
heater continues to
operate until bay
temperature reaches
55º F (=/-6º F). The
bay heater and Active indicator light
will turn OFF.
040437
030981d
NOTE
The bay heater consumes about 20 Amps
when operating. House batter power can
be quickly consumed. It is recommended
to hook shore power when using Systems
Heat.
Cold Weather Storage
If the motorhome is stored where freezing
temperatures may occur, drain the domestic fresh
water loop. Begin draining the fresh water tank
by opening the low point drain for the fresh tank
and allowing the water to drain.
NOTE
Icemakers, water filters, water purifiers
and water heaters all use domestic water
and should be drained and stored in
accordance with the manufacturer’s
recommendation for winterization.
Water systems — 6
Winterization
Water, plumbing and sewer systems require
winterization when the motorhome is placed
in storage. The recommended method of
winterizing the motorhome is using air pressure
to remove liquids that may freeze and cause
damage to the various systems and appliances.
The lines can then be left empty or filled with an
FDA approved RV antifreeze. When plumbing
lines are drained, antifreeze is not necessary,
and the decision to use antifreeze is left to the
motorhome operator.
NOTE
ONLY FDA approved RV antifreeze
should be used to winterize the water
systems in the motorhome.
Using Air Pressure
Access to an air compressor and an adapter to
connect the air line regulator to the water system
is necessary. Air adapters used for winterization
are available at RV supply locations. Air
pressure SHOULD NOT exceed 40 PSI.
Higher pressure can damage the lines.
WARNING
It is recommended that a qualified
RV service technician familiar with
motorhomes, such as an authorized
dealer, perform the winterization
procedure.
NOTE
Freeze damage is not covered under
warranty.
1. Empty and flush the holding tanks.
2. Disconnect the water line connections
on either side of the water filter bowl
head. Connect the bypass hose to
the water lines. Unscrew filter bowl,
remove old cartridge and empty any
remaining water in the bowl. DO NOT
screw filter bowl back onto filter head
(see “Water Filter.”).
3. Drain the fresh water tank by opening
the fresh water tank drain valve located
in the roadside water service center.
4. Open fresh water tank low point drain
valve. Open winterization valve. Open
hot and cold water low-point drain
valves. Open water pump shut-off
valve. All are located in the roadside
water service center.
5. If equipped, open the secondary ice
maker drain valve.
CAUTION
Some appliances such as the washer/
dryer and ice maker require special
winterizing instructions not covered
in this section. Refer to the specific
appliance OEM manual for instructions
and recommendations.
6. Turn the water pump on for 30 - 60
seconds and allow it to run so that all
the water is cleared out of the pump
and water tank.
7. Turn the pump off.
8. If applicable, disconnect water line to
ice maker.
9. Close water pump shut-off valve. Close
winterization valve.
2008 K Nig ht
10. Leave open hot and cold water lowpoint drain valves, fresh water tank low
point drain valve, and fresh water tank
drain valve.
11. If equipped, leave open the secondary
ice maker drain valve.
12. Open the water
heater exterior access
door. Open the high
temperature/pressure
relief valve to vent water
heater. Remove water
heater drain plug and
allow water heater to
040424l
drain.
13. Locate bypass
valve at back of
water heater and
move valve to
BYPASS position.
14. Connect an
air hose with
regulator to
the City Water/
Fresh Tank Fill
040405e
connection. Position the
City /Fresh Water control
lever to the “City Water”
position. Set regulator
to 40 PSI and turn on air
compressor. DO NOT
exceed 40 PSI in the
040460p
water lines and faucets.
15. When water stops flowing from low
point drain valves, open all faucets
- including outside faucet and shower
- one at a time until air comes out. Do
not forget to drain the shower faucet.
137
water systems — 6
16. Hold toilet mechanism open until the
water has stopped running.
17. Shut off the air compressor and
disconnect the air hose.
18. One gallon of FDA approved RV
antifreeze is needed to protect various
water drain lines in the motorhome.
Pour 1 pint into both the kitchen and
bath shower drains. Pour 2 pints into
the bath sink drain. This will protect
the P-traps, with some of the antifreeze
going into grey tank to protect the
drain valve. Open the toilet bowl valve.
Pour another 3 pints into the toilet,
letting the antifreeze run into the black
tank to protect the valve located there.
If applicable, pour the last pint of
antifreeze into the washer/dryer drain
after the toilet bowl valve has been
closed.
19. Use a soft cloth to wipe out the sinks
and shower (after the antifreeze is
poured in) to protect the surfaces from
stains.
20. Leave all drains open until the
motorhome is used again.
WARNING
When draining the low water drain lines
and the water heater be sure the water
is not hot. Hot water from the lines can
burn or injure skin.
NOTE
Clean up antifreeze spills immediately to
prevent permanent staining.
138
Using Non-Toxic Antifreeze
Approximately five to eight gallons of FDA
approved antifreeze will be required to winterize
the motorhome.
WARNING
It is recommended that a qualified
RV service technician familiar with
motorhomes, such as an authorized
dealer, do this procedure.
WARNING
Use only specifically designed, non-toxic,
FDA Approved RV antifreeze for potable
water systems. NEVER use automobile
engine antifreeze. If ingested, antifreeze
can cause serious injury or death.
NOTE
Freeze damage is not covered under
warranty.
1. Empty and flush the holding tanks.
2. Disconnect the water line connections
on either side of the water filter bowl
head. Connect the bypass hose to
the water lines. Unscrew filter bowl,
remove old cartridge and empty any
remaining water in the bowl. DO NOT
screw filter bowl back onto filter head
(see “Water Filter.”).
3. Drain the fresh water tank by opening
the fresh water tank drain valve.
4. Open fresh water tank low point drain
valve, winterization valve, low-point
drain valves, water pump shut-off valve
and allow water to drain.
5. If equipped, open secondary ice maker
drain valve.
2008 Kn ig ht
CAUTION
Some appliances such as washer/
dryer and ice maker require special
winterizing instructions not covered
in this section. Refer to the specific
appliance OEM manual for instructions
and recommendations.
6. Position the City/Fresh Water Control
Lever to the “Tank Fill” position.
7. Turn the water pump on for 30 - 60
seconds and allow it to run so all water
is cleared out of the pump and fresh
water tank. Turn the pump off.
8. Open the water heater exterior access
panel. Open the high temperature/
pressure relief valve to vent water
heater. Remove water heater drain plug
to allow water heater to drain.
9. After the water is drained place water
heater bypass valve to BYPASS
position.
10. Replace the water heater drain plug and
close the pressure relief valve.
11. Close all faucets, drain valves, low
point drains, and water pump shut-off
valve.
12. Open winterization valve.
13. If equipped, open secondary ice maker
drain valve.
CAUTION
Ensure the fresh water tank is
completely drained. Antifreeze will not
enter the fresh water tank.
Water systems — 6
14. Connect a hose
to the Fresh
Tank/City Water
connection and
place the other
end into the
container of
antifreeze.
15. Turn ON the
water pump.
16. Open all faucets,
one at a time, hot
040502k
and cold starting
with the faucet farthest from the
pump. Turn faucet off when a small
amount of antifreeze appears.
17. Hold the toilet flush mechanism open
until antifreeze appears.
18. Use a soft cloth to wipe out the sinks
and shower to protect surface from
antifreeze stains.
19. Exterior faucet and shower should
be opened and closed using the same
procedures as the interior faucets.
20. One gallon of FDA approved RV
antifreeze is needed to protect various
water drain lines in the motorhome.
Pour 1 pint into both the kitchen and
bath shower drains. Pour 2 pints into
the bath sink drain, with some of the
antifreeze going into grey tank to
protect the drain valve. Open the toilet
bowl valve, pour another 3½ pints into
the toilet, letting the antifreeze run
into the black tank to protect the valve
located there. Pour the last pint of
antifreeze into the toilet after the bowl
valve is closed.
21. Turn water pump off.
22. Disconnect the power supply line
affecting water pump operation.
WARNING
When draining the low water drain lines
and the water heater be sure the water
is not hot. Hot water from the lines can
burn or injure skin.
NOTE
Clean up antifreeze spills immediately to
prevent permanent staining.
De-winterization
9. If applicable, cycle ice maker several
times until fresh water is present and
reconnect valve outlet line.
10. Install new water filter cartridge.
11. Disconnect bypass hose on water filter
and reconnect water lines to filter bowl
head.
12. Fill water heater with water.
CAUTION
The first two trays of ice from the
icemaker may contain contaminants.
Discard and replenish the icemaker as
needed.
1. Open the fresh water tank drain valve
and fresh water tank low point drain
valve.
2. Open the winterization valve. Open
water pump shut-off valve. Open hot
and cold water low point drains. This
will allow any water to drain.
3. If equipped, open secondary ice maker
drain valve.
4. Close fresh water tank drain valve,
fresh water tank low point drain valve,
hot and cold water low point drains,
and winterization valve.
5. Leave open water pump shut-off valve.
This will allow water to circulate in the
plumbing system.
6. Fill the fresh water tank with water.
7. Connect the power supply line for the
water pump.
8. Turn water pump on and operate all
faucets, one at a time, until clear water
is present.
2008 K Nig ht
139
water systems — 6
Water service center
040592m
Typical Water System
NOTE
Layout of water service center and location
of components will vary with floor plans and
options. This is a representation of the water
service center.
140
2008 Kn ig ht
1. Power Water Hose Reel Switch
(Optional)
2. City/Fresh Water Fill Connection
3. Water Pressure Regulator
4. Hose Faucet
5. Storage Light/Water Pump Switches
6. Sewage Tank Flush Fitting
7. City/Fresh Water Fill Handle
8. Shower
9. Tank Monitor Gauge (Optional)
10. Gravity Tank Fill
11. Soap Dispenser
12. Winterize Connection
13. Sani-Con Switch (Optional)
14. Sani-Con Tank Flush System (Optional)
15. Low Point (Hot & Cold Water) Drain
Valves
16. Systems Test Port (For Qualified
Technicians Only)
17. Secondary Ice Maker Drain Valve (Not
On All Units)
18. Access Port
19. Fresh Water Tank Low Point Drain
Valve
20. Water Pump Shut-Off Valve
21. Winterization Valve
22. Fresh Water Tank Drain Valve
23. 12 Volt Bay Heater
24. Grey Tank Dump Valve
25. Black Tank Dump Valve
26. Access Port
27. Sewer Hose
28. Water Pump
7
2008 Knight
lp gaS SyStemS — Section 7
lp-gaS SyStemS ................................................ 144
lp-gaS Detector .............................................. 144
Testing............................................................. 145
Alarm............................................................... 145
Maintenance.................................................... 146
lp-gaS emergency
proceDUreS cHecklISt ................................... 146
lp-gaS tank ....................................................... 146
Measurement................................................... 146
Tank.Capacity.................................................. 147
Tank.Filling....................................................... 147
Tank.Operation................................................. 147
lp-gaS fUnDamentalS ..................................... 148
lp-gaS regUlator ............................................ 148
lp-gaS HoSe InSpectIon .................................. 150
lp-gaS DIStrIBUtIon lIneS .............................. 150
lp-gaS conSUmptIon ....................................... 150
lp-gaS Safety tIpS........................................... 151
lp gas systems — 7
LP-Gas Systems
This section contains safety information and
operating instructions of the Liquefied Petroleum
Gas (LP-Gas) system and related equipment in
the motorhome. Some items discussed may not
be applicable to all motorhomes. More detailed
information with CAUTION or WARNING
instructions for various equipment other than
items within this section, can be found in the
equipment manufacturer’s manual in the owner’s
information box.
The LP-Gas tank mounted in the motorhome
contains LP-Gas that is under high pressure.
As fuel is used, the liquid vaporizes and passes
through the primary tank valve to a regulator
that reduces pressure. Low-pressure gas is
then distributed to components through a pipe
manifold system.
Component ignition problems are commonly
caused by air in the manifold system or incorrect
gas pressure. DO NOT attempt to adjust the
regulator. Adjustments must be made by a
dealer or an authorized service personnel with
the proper equipment. In higher elevations or
extreme cold weather (10° F/-12° C or lower)
a shortage of LP-Gas may be experienced. If
LP-Gas is going to be used in higher elevations
or cold climates for a long period of time, have
authorized service personnel adjust the LP-Gas
regulator for these conditions.
Have the LP-Gas system tested by an
authorized dealer or service center at least once
a year and before every extended trip. The test
will include having the system checked for leaks
and the regulator pressure checked and tested
for functionality. Although the manufacturer and
the dealer test the system carefully for leakage,
travel vibrations can loosen fittings.
142
WARNING
When storing portable LP-Gas tanks
that are not connected to an LP-Gas
system, install an approved plug in the
tank outlet hole to prevent leaks. DO
NOT store or transport empty LP-Gas
tanks, portable tanks, gasoline or other
flammable liquids in the interior area of
the motorhome. Keep open flame and
spark producing materials away from
the LP-Gas area. Shut off all appliances
and the primary LP-Gas tank valve
when the motorhome is in storage. If this
warning is ignored, a fire or explosion
could result.
Leaks (identified by the odor of rotten eggs
or sulfur) can be easily found by applying a
leak detector solution on all connections. Never
light a match, have an open flame or use any
spark producing equipment or appliance to
test for leaks. Leaks can usually be repaired by
tightening the fittings. If not, shut off the primary
gas valve at the tank. Hand-tighten the primary
valve only. DO NOT use a wrench or pliers as
over tightening may damage valve seats and
cause leaks. If a leak is suspected, immediately
see an authorized dealer or service center for
repairs.
WARNING
LP-Gas is highly volatile and extremely
explosive. DO NOT use matches or a
flame to test for leaks. Only approved
LP-Gas leak testing solution for leak
detection should be used. Unapproved
solutions can damage copper tubing and
brass fittings. A liquid dish soap solution
of 10 parts water may be used. Shake
the solution until bubbles form and then
apply the mixed solution to fittings and
2008 Kn ig ht
accessory control valves. All fittings
tested should be thoroughly rinsed and
dried after testing. Never attempt to
adjust LP-Gas regulators. Only qualified
service personnel should perform
maintenance or repairs to the LP-Gas
system.
NOTE
It may be illegal to travel in some
states and Canadian provinces with the
primary LP-Gas valve open. Failure to
comply with these State and Canadian
province requirements may result in
fines and/or pose a safety hazard.
LP-Gas Detector
The LP-Gas detector is required safety
equipment in RVs. American National
Standards Institute (ANSI) A119.2 - Fire &
Life Safety 3-4.8 LP Gas Detectors states “ A
LP-Gas detector must be installed in any RV that
contains an LP-Gas appliance and an electrical
system. The LP-Gas detector must be listed as
suitable for use in recreational vehicles under
the requirement of UL 1484 Residential Gas
Detectors, and installed according to the terms
of its listing.”
030646
lp gas systems — 7
LP-Gas is heavier than air and will settle to
the lowest point in the motorhome. The LP-Gas
detector is also sensitive to other fumes such
as hair spray, of which most contain butane as
the propellant. Butane, like propane, is heavier
than air and will settle to the floor level. Sulfated
batteries (rotten egg odor) will also sound the
alarm. When this occurs, reset the detector to
stop the alert sound.
About the LP-Gas Detector:
Be aware of the difference between a leak
versus LP-Gas escaping from an unlit, open
burner. Pure LP-Gas vapors from a leaking pipe
or fitting are heavier than air and will build up
heaviest concentration at the leak and float down
to mix with air. If a burner is left on, the area
around the burner, range and adjoining counter
space is combustible and can cause injury and
damage when ignited. This condition will exist
for an extended time period. Eventually, the LPGas will reach the detector’s location and cause
the alarm to sound.
for several months after the date of manufacture.
If it is determined that the detector has false
alarmed because of the above mentioned
nuisance gases, reset the detector and ventilate
the motorhome with fresh outside air. Take
precautions to ensure one of these cases has not
masked an actual LP-Gas alarm condition.
The LP-Gas detector draws less current than
one instrument panel lamp and will detect gas
until the battery is drained down to 7.0 Volts. A
voltage higher than 7.0 Volts is needed for the
detector to operate properly. If the power source
is disconnected, or if the power is otherwise
interrupted, the detector will not operate.
The LP-Gas detector has a self-check circuit
running at all times while the detector is
powered. In the event that the circuitry fails,
a failure alarm will sound and the operating
indicator will cease to light.
The LP-Gas detector is wired to the house
batteries. This allows reliable protecting by
alerting the build up of potentially dangerous
levels of LP-Gas.
NOTE
The LP-Gas detector indicates the
presence of LP-Gas only at its sensor.
Combustible levels of LP-Gas may be
present in other areas. The detector is
intended for detection of LP-Gas only.
WARNING
If the motorhome is unplugged
from shore power, the house battery
disconnect switch must be ON for the
LP-Gas detector to operate.
The LP-Gas detector is not designed to detect
other types of gas. However, some products may
cause the detector to alarm, such as alcohol,
liquor, kerosene, gasoline, deodorants, colognes,
propellant used in spray cans and cleaning
solvents. In some cases, vapors from glue and
adhesive used in the manufacturing of the
motorhome may also cause the detector to alarm
LP-Gas Detector Operation:
Upon first application of power the LED will
flash yellow for three minutes while the detector
is stabilizing. At the end of the start cycle the
LED will turn Green indicating full operation.
If the detector senses unsafe levels of LP-Gas it
will immediately sound an alarm. The LP-Gas
detector operates on 12 Volt DC, with a current
draw of less than 1/10th of one amp.
2008 K Nig ht
CAUTION
The detector will not sound an alarm
during the three minute warm up cycle.
Testing
Press the TEST switch any time during the
warm up cycle or while in normal operation.
The LED will turn red and an alarm will sound.
Release the switch. This is the only way to test
full operation of the detector.
030646b
Alarm
020155e
The red LED will flash and the alarm will
sound whenever dangerous levels of LP-Gas
or natural gas are detected. The detector will
continue to alarm until the gas clears or the
Test/Mute switch is pressed.
Alarm Procedures:
1. Turn off all LP-Gas appliances (stove,
water heater, furnace, refrigerator),
extinguish all flames and smoking
material. Evacuate immediately. Leave
doors and windows open.
143
lp gas systems — 7
2. Turn off primary
valve on the
LP-Gas tank.
3. Determine
and repair
the source
of the leak.
If necessary,
contact a
qualified professional for service.
4. After two minutes the detector will
return to normal operation (solid
green) or resound the alarm if
dangerous levels of gas remain in the
area.
050250d
Potential sources of lp-gas leaks when operating the motorhome
 Cooktop
burners
 Defective
LP-Gas Connection
 Oven
 Defective
Regulator
 Refrigerator
 Portable
 Water
 Furnace
Heater
Propane Powered Appliances/Accessories
WARNING
DO NOT operate any electric switch.
This can produce a spark and ignite the
gas.
CAUTION
DO NOT re-enter until the problem is
corrected.
Alarm Mute:
Press the Test/Mute switch when the detector
is in alarm.
1. The red LED will continue to flash and
the alarm will beep every 30 seconds
until the gas level has dropped to a safe
level.
2. The LED will flash green until the end
of the Mute cycle.
3. If dangerous gas levels return before
the end of the Mute cycle, the alarm
will beep four times and return to
phase 1.
144
Fault Alarm:
Should the microprocessor sense a fault in the
gas detector, a fault alarm will sound twice every
15 seconds. The LED will alternately flash red to
green and the MUTE switch will not respond to
any command. The gas detector must be repaired
or replaced.
Maintenance
1. Vacuum the dust off the detector
cover weekly (more frequently in
dusty locations) using the soft brush
attachment of a vacuum.
2. DO NOT spray cleaning agents or
waxes directly onto the front panel.
This action may damage the sensor,
cause an alarm or cause a detector
malfunction.
050250d
DO NOT operate any electric switch.
This can produce a spark and ignite the
gas.
 Open windows and doors.
 Evacuate the motorhome. Stay clear of
the surrounding area.
 Keep all ignition sources out of the area.
 Contact a qualified service technician to
find the source and repair the gas leak.

WARNING
A fire or explosion from ignited gas or
gas fumes can cause serious injury or
death.
LP-Gas Tank
Measurement
LP-Gas Emergency Procedures
Checklist
If you smell gas (a rotten egg or sulfur
smell) at any time, perform the following steps
immediately:
 Shut off LP-Gas appliances.
 Manually turn off the primary shut-off
valve at the LP-Gas tank.
2008 Kn ig ht
The motorhome is equipped with a monitor
panel to aid in managing the LP-Gas tank. The
monitor panel is located on the systems control
center in the hallway area. A second optional
monitor panel can be found in the roadside water
service center. The switch marked TEST is a
momentary switch which requires being held
down along with a corresponding scale reading.
lp gas systems — 7
igniters to prevent a fire or explosion. Have a
trained service person fill the LP-Gas tank.
060306m
Monitor Panel (Optional)
Located in Service Center
030446g
Tank Capacity
NOTE
This chart reflects product specifications
available at the time of printing.
NOTE
LP-Gas tank capacity is estimated
LP-Gas Tank Capacity
*39 Gallons
*Actual filled LP-Gas capacity is 80% of listing due to safety
shut-off required on tank.
based upon calculations provided by
the tank manufacturer and represents
approximate capacity. The actual
“usable capacity” may be greater or
less than the estimated capacity. Actual
full liquid capacity is 80% of full tank
capacity.
Tank Filling
Woodall’s Campground and Trailer Guide, and
other similar publications, list refueling stations.
Many travel parks sell LP-Gas. Before filling the
LP-Gas tank, shut off pilot lights, appliances and
WARNING
Before entering a refueling station, turn
off all pilot lights and LP-Gas operated
appliances. Most LP-Gas appliances
used in motorhomes are vented to
the outside. Fuel vapors can enter an
appliance vent on a motorhome that
is parked close to a gasoline pump,
resulting in an explosion or fire.
WARNING
Extinguish all sources of heat, sparks,
flames and smoking materials within a
50’ radius during the fueling process.
The LP-Gas tank fill is located in the roadside
compartment. The tank must be filled to
the proper level to allow for expansion. An
overfilled tank may cause the safety valve to
release pressure emitting a strong rotten egg
odor near the tank and/or a hissing noise may be
detected.
NOTE
If the tank is new and being filled for the
first time, inform the service technician
to purge any air from the tank prior to
filling.
Tank Operation
Manually open the primary shut-off
valve located on the LP-Gas tank.
 Turn off the primary valve on the LPGas tank when the tank is being filled,
when driving, in between trips and when
in storage.
 Hand-tighten the primary valve only. DO
NOT use a wrench or pliers. This will
over-tighten the valve. The primary valve
is designed to be closed by hand. Overtightening may permanently damage the
valve seat.

WARNING
Small amounts of LP-Gas can escape
and evaporate during the fueling
process. Protect bare skin. Instant
freezing will occur if exposed to
LP-Gas.
LP-Gas exists in both liquid and vapor form
within the tank. A full tank is approximately
80% liquid. The pressure inside the tank varies
with the temperature of the liquid. All tanks are
required to have a safety pressure relief device
to release excess pressure. Actual full liquid
capacity is approximately 80% of full tank
capacity. The monitor panel is adjusted for this
and will indicate full at this point.
2008 K Nig ht
050250d
NOTE
In some States and Canadian provinces,
it may be illegal to drive the motorhome
while primary valve on the LP-Gas tank
is open.
145
lp gas systems — 7
LP-Gas Fundamentals
LP-Gas Regulator
LP-Gas is compressed into liquid form in the
tank. Only the vapor is used during combustion
by an appliance. As vapor is removed from
the tank, the remaining liquid will vaporize
to maintain pressure that is removed during
consumption. This process will continue until
there is no liquid remaining in the tank.
Temperature affects the vaporizing action of
the liquid. If temperature of the liquid is - 44º
F, the liquid remains stable with tank pressure,
about 0 psi. If liquid temperature is 100º F, the
liquid quickly vaporizes with tank pressure,
about 200 psi. Vapor pressure must remain
relatively consistent, regardless of temperature,
for the appliance heat output to remain stable.
Vapor pressure regulation is performed by the
regulator.
The two-stage regulator reduces vapor
pressure so that it is safe for use. The first
stage of the regulator reduces tank pressure
to a range of 10 to 13 psig (pounds per square
inch gauge). The second stage further reduces
pressure to a working pressure of 0.4 psig (11
Inches of Water Column or about 6¼ ounces
psi.). A vent is installed to allow the internal
diaphragm to move with atmospheric pressure
change. It is important to keep the vent clean
and clear of obstruction or corrosion. If the vent
becomes clogged, pressure from LP tank may
cause erratic pressure regulation. If there is any
corrosion, contact a qualified LP-Gas service
technician. The regulator is mounted so that
the vent faces downward. If the vent becomes
clogged, clean it with a toothbrush.
NOTE
The above information is not a complete guide for the use of
LP-Gas tanks or appliances. In cold climates keep
LP-Gas level above 50% to keep vaporization of LP-Gas at
the highest level.
146
2008 Kn ig ht
lp gas systems — 7
050251
050260
Manometer Gauge
WARNING
DO NOT attempt to adjust the
regulator. Adjustments require special
equipment. Failure to follow these
instructions may result in a fire or
explosion, and can cause severe personal
injury or death. DO NOT operate
LP-Gas appliances until the LP-Gas
pressure is checked and a leak down test
is performed!
Manometers:
The manometer is the best way to accurately
determine LP-Gas pressure. There are two
different styles of manometers: Gauge and
U-tube. Gas pressure is measured in Inches of
Water Column. This is the amount of pressure
applied to one side of a U-shaped tube half filled
with water. The amount of pressure needed to
raise the column of water 11" represents 11
Inches of Water Column.
2008 K Nig ht
K
SPAR
If A Freeze Up Occurs:
 Have an LP-Gas distributor purge the
tank.
 Have the LP-Gas distributor inject
methyl alcohol in the tank.
TIP
Attach the manometer gauge to the
accessory hookup line to avoid loosening
any interior LP-Gas line connections.
RK
To Prevent Freeze Up:
 Ensure the LP-Gas tank is totally free of
moisture prior to filling.
 Ensure the tank is not overfilled.
 Keep the valve closed when the tank is
empty.
Damage to the regulator can occur when the
tank is overfilled. The regulator is designed
to work with vapor only. This is why the tank
is filled to only 80% of its liquid capacity.
The other 20% allows for vaporization of the
liquid. The primary vapor valve is located in
the vapor section of the tank. In an overfilled
tank, liquefied petroleum can fill the regulator.
Vaporizing liquid can freeze the diaphragm.
High tank pressure on a frozen diaphragm can
cause a rupture and result in erratic pressure
regulation. This is why it is important to
have the LP-Gas pressure checked for proper
pressure and accurate regulation during
appliance operation. Erratic pressure regulation
dramatically affects refrigerator operation on
LP-Gas.
sPA
Under normal atmospheric conditions an
LP-Gas regulator will not freeze, nor will the
LP-Gas. Vapor passing through the regulator
will expand and cool, condensing moisture in
the gas. The moisture will freeze, build up and
block the vent. The possibility of freeze up is
greatly reduced with the two-stage regulator.
High
Output
050259s
U-Tube Testing Layout
147
lp gas systems — 7
NOTE
Pricking of the cover in the manufacture
of this type of hose is common and
necessary for satisfactory hose
performance. Consequently, the
uniformly pricked cover should not be
viewed with alarm.
Cause for hose replacement:
 Damage to the textile reinforcement or
wire braid; wire braid reinforced hose,
which has been kinked or flattened so as
to permanently deform the wire braid in
the un-pressurized state.
 Blistering or loose outer cover.
148
NOTE
Only a qualified RV service technician
should complete replacement of LP-Gas
components.
Additional suggested maintenance:
After performing extensive testing the
manufacturer of the flexible LP-Gas supply
hoses has determined that the hoses be
replaced every ten (10) years as the failure
rate may increase after this period of time.
The motorhome manufacturer recommends
following this guideline to assure continued
safety and dependable use.
LP-Gas Distribution Lines
A primary manifold black steel pipe running
throughout the motorhome distributes LP-Gas
to secondary lines. All secondary lines leading
to gas appliances are made of copper tubing
with flared fittings. It is recommended that gas
distribution work be performed by an authorized
dealer or an authorized service technician.
INSPECTION
Inspect the rubber flexible lines twice a
year for abrasions, tears, kinks or other
signs of damage.
If a gas leak is suspected, have the system
inspected and repaired by a qualified service
technician as soon as possible.
2008 Kn ig ht
K
SPAR
Inspection tips:
Hose strength is controlled by the plies of
reinforcement. Damage in this area cannot
be tolerated. It is important that if a damaged
LP-Gas hose is found, the source of the damage
be determined and corrected prior to the
replacement. Small cuts, nicks, or gouges that
do not go completely through the cover are not
cause for replacement of the hose. Inspection
should be performed when the hose is not under
pressure.
Slippage; evidenced by the misalignment
of the hose and coupling and/or the
scored or exposed area where slippage
has occurred.
RK
The hose manufacturer suggests that a
flexible LP-Gas supply hose undergo regular
inspection. As a guideline, it is recommended
that all flexible LP-Gas lines connecting the
slide-out, appliances and tanks be inspected in
the spring and fall of each year by a qualified RV
technician.

sPA
LP-Gas Hose Inspection
High
Output
050257z
LP-Gas Consumption
Each gallon of LP-Gas produces 91,502 BTUs
of heat. One 27 gallon tank produces two million
BTU’s. Total consumption depends on the rate
of usage by each appliance and the operating
time. The stove typically uses the most LP-Gas.
Determine Fuel Consumption:
To determine approximately how many hours
an LP-Gas appliance will operate on one gallon
of LP-Gas, use the following formula:
lp gas systems — 7
LP-Gas appliances are rated in Input
BTU (British Thermal Units). The rating
is usually stamped or printed on a tag
affixed to the appliance. For example: the
Input rating of the appliance is 10,000
BTUs.
 One gallon of LP-Gas produces 91,502
BTUs.
 Divide the amount of BTUs of one
gallon of LP-Gas (91,502) by the rating
on the appliance in this example 10,000.
Net continuous operation time for one
gallon of LP-Gas for this appliance
would be approximately 9.2 hours.

The above formula can be useful when trying
to determine the approximate length of time
a tank of LP-Gas will last. Generally, LP-Gas
appliances do not continuously operate. An
example would be the typical cycling of the
refrigerator.
Determining how long a tank of LP-Gas
will last:
 Combine the BTU
input totals of all
Typical Appliance
BTU Ratings
appliances, and
Cooktop
the approximate
Large - 9,500 BTU
length of time
these appliances
Small - 6,500 BTU
operate per day.
Refrigerator (Norcold)
 Multiply the
4-door - 2,200 BTU
number of liquid
gallons in the
LP-Gas tank by
91,502.

Divide the total of BTUs of the LPGas tank by the total number of BTUs
the appliances consume, equals the
approximate number of hours of
operation before refueling.
WARNING
LP-Gas is highly volatile and extremely
explosive. Never use matches or
open flame to test for leaks. Use only
approved LP-Gas leak testing solution
to test for leaks. Unapproved solutions
can damage copper tubing and brass
fittings. Never attempt to adjust the LPGas regulator without the use of proper
equipment. Improper LP-Gas regulator
adjustment will affect the performance
of LP-Gas operated appliances.
Incorrect flame or explosion can
occur. Only qualified personnel should
perform any maintenance or repair to
the LP-Gas system.
LP-Gas Safety Tips
LP-Gas is one of the safest and most reliable
fuels available on the market when handled
properly. LP-Gas, however, does have a great
explosive potential if handled improperly.
Danger is minimized by becoming familiar
with and following a few safety precautions,
and by learning how to properly operate LPGas appliances. Use of LP-Gas requires the
responsibility to enforce extra safety measures.
2008 K Nig ht
The motorhome is equipped with many
LP-Gas operated appliances because it is a
convenient and efficient source of fuel. LP-Gas
appliances must be operated and maintained
in accordance with the product manufacturer’s
instructions.
The National Propane Gas Association
(NPGA) has a special service program
offered called GAS® (Gas Appliance System)
Check. The GAS® Check program is aimed
at educating users about the convenience
of propane with safety and peace of mind.
For information on the NPGA Gas® Check
program, call (202) 466-7200 or visit www.
npga.org.
Maintenance and Safety Tips for the
LP-Gas Refrigerator and Furnace:
 Have the refrigerator and furnace
systems inspected annually by an
authorized server center.
 Have the venting system checked for
blockage before using the refrigerator
or furnace for the first time each season.
Insects may have built nests that will
obstruct flow.
 At the first indication of incomplete
combustion (yellow flame instead of a
blue flame or soot is present) contact a
service technician. Improper combustion
can cause Carbon Monoxide buildup,
which is potentially fatal.
149
lp gas systems — 7
Maintenance and Safety Tips for the
LP-Gas Range:
 Burner flame should be a blue color,
which indicates complete combustion. If
not, have the unit serviced by a qualified
technician.
 DO NOT cover the oven bottom with
foil. Air circulation will be restricted.
 Never use LP-Gas ranges or ovens for
heating purposes.
 Ensure children understand never to turn
or play with the knobs on the front of the
LP-Gas range.
Maintenance and Safety Tips for the
LP-Gas Water Heater:
 Have the water heater venting system
inspected annually or before first use of
the season.
 Keep flammable substances away
from the water heater. DO NOT store
items close to it as this may block the
airflow the water heater needs to operate
completely.
 At the first indication of incomplete
combustion (yellow flame instead of
a blue flame or soot is present) call a
service technician immediately. Improper
combustion can cause Carbon Monoxide
buildup, which is potentially fatal.
150
2008 Kn ig ht
2008 Trek
electrical systems - house — Section 8
House Electrical - Introduction............... 154
Battery disconnect....................................... 155
House............................................................ 155
Battery cut-out switch................................ 155
Shore power hook-up................................... 155
Manual Cord Reel........................................... 157
Transfer switch............................................ 157
GENERATOR - 120 AC DIESEL............................. 157
Pre-Start Checks............................................ 158
Starting the Generator.................................... 158
Stopping the Generator................................... 159
Powering the Equipment................................. 159
Generator Fuel................................................ 159
Resetting the Circuit Breaker........................... 159
Generator Exercise......................................... 160
iNVERTER........................................................... 160
Providing AC Power with Inverter................... 160
Battery Charging with the Inverter................... 160
Factory Default Settings................................. 161
Battery Temperature Sensor........................... 161
Distribution Panel (50 Amp)......................... 162
House 120/240 Volt AC Panel........................ 162
Energy Management System.......................... 162
Circuit Breaker............................................... 163
GFCI Breakers & Outlets................................. 164
Distribution Panel......................................... 164
House 12 Volt DC........................................... 164
Fuses................................................................. 165
BATTERies - house........................................... 165
Battery Maintenance...................................... 166
Testing the Battery......................................... 166
Battery Charge Time & Consumption Rate...... 167
LIGHTS................................................................ 168
Incandescent Light......................................... 168
Interior Halogen ............................................ 169
Fluorescent Light............................................ 169
Electrical Layout.......................................... 170
electrical systems - house — 8
House Electrical - Introduction
This section contains guidelines, procedures
and information that assist in understanding
the electrical system and the operation of
various components. Refer to the OEM manuals
included in the Owner’s Information File box for
their respective, in-depth, individual component
operating instructions.
General Overview:
The motorhome can utilize various sources
of electrical power: shore power connection,
generator, inverter, chassis batteries and
house batteries. All of these electrical power
sources, while independent of each other, can
be combined in a variety of ways to provide a
highly efficient electrical operating system. Two
types of electrical systems are used: 120/240
Volt AC and 12 Volt DC.
The motorhome 120/240 Volt AC system can
be operated from three different power sources:
shore power, on-board generator or inverter.
Shore power is the most efficient and should
be used whenever possible. The generator can
be used when shore power is unavailable. The
inverter supplies silent A/C power using the
house batteries of the motorhome. The inverter
supplies AC power to the sub-panel. However,
the inverter AC power output is limited and
should be used sparingly to conserve house
battery power. Two different sources supply the
main AC circuit breaker panel with power: the
shore power cord or the on-board generator. The
power source used is automatically selected by a
switching device known as a transfer switch. The
inverter supplies AC power to the sub-panel.
152
WARNING
The electrical system is engineered
and tested for safety. Circuit breakers
and fuses protect the electrical circuits
from overloading. When planning
modifications or additions to the
electrical system, ensure safety of the
electrical system. Please note that any
modifications may void the warranty.
WARNING
Water is electrically conductive. DO
NOT use any electrically powered item
or outlet that may be exposed to a water
source. Such use can result in a serious
shock causing injury or death.
The motorhome has two 12 Volt DC systems:
chassis and house. These two systems, for the
most part, are separate from one another. The
house system does not operate engine functions;
the engine system does not operate house
functions. However, within the two systems
there are some inner connections. For example:
While the motorhome is driven the alternator
on the engine will charge the house batteries.
Likewise, while the motorhome is plugged into
shore power, or the generator is running, the
engine batteries are being charged. Each system
will supply 12 Volt DC power to the 12 Volt DC
distribution panels.
The chassis and house systems have their own
sets of batteries. The chassis batteries supply 12
Volt DC power to the front distribution panel
located outside in the front roadside bay. This
panel contains mostly engine system circuits and
wiring such as headlights, taillight, dashboard
functions, gauges, etc. The house batteries
supply 12 Volt DC power to the distribution
panel located in the bedroom. This panel
contains fuses for the house interior lighting and
2008 knight
appliances. Become familiar with these panels
and the items they operate.
With all the technological advancements taking
place in the past several years manufacturers
have now incorporated electronics into these
systems. It is important to keep the 12 Volt DC
systems in good working order. These systems,
with their incorporated electronics, are voltage
sensitive. Some items can be damaged if the DC
voltage is not maintained within the designed
specifications.
A majority of the lighting and appliances are
designed to operate from 12 Volt DC (direct
current) power. This is why the batteries
play such an important role in the function
of the motorhome. There are exceptions with
appliances such as the microwave or television;
however, indirectly they still operate from 12
Volt DC power, as they can be operated from
the inverter. The chassis functions (engine,
transmission, dash air, etc.) are also 12 Volt DC.
Shore Power:
The motorhome is equipped with a shore
power cord to connect the motorhome to outside
electrical services. Shore power service is the
most efficient source of electrical power. The
plug end of the shore power cord is 50 Amp120/
240 Volt AC. When this type of power source is
not available, electrical adapters will be required
to allow a proper and safe connection to the
electrical service supply.
NOTE
When 50 Amp shore service is not
available, care will have to be used when
operating the appliances and using the
outlets to avoid overloading the shore
power service.
electrical system - house — 8
Generator:
The generator can be selected for use when
shore power is unavailable. The maximum
amount of generator output power, measured in
watts, is calculated at an elevation of 500’ above
sea level. This figure decreases slightly at higher
altitude. Ambient temperature also effects total
maximum output. The amount of AC electrical
load applied to the generator determines fuel
consumption.
Inverter:
The Inverter is an auxiliary 120 Volt AC
power source that inverts 12 Volt DC house
battery power to 120 Volts AC. This device has
limited AC power output, measured in watts,
and operates only selected appliances and
outlets. The Inverter also converts 120 Volts AC
power, supplied from either shore power or the
generator, to 12 Volts DC power, to recharge the
batteries. When dry camping, the Inverter may
be used to supply power to selected outlets.
Battery disconnect
House
The house battery
disconnect switch turns the
house battery power supply
on or off by disconnecting
12 Volt DC power to the
060077b
following items: inverter,
Located in curbside
house fuse panel in the
battery compartment.
bedroom, house fuse panel
in the front electrical box. Turn the house battery
disconnect switch off when the motorhome is
going to be stored for more than 48 hours or
before performing electrical maintenance. If
possible, leave the motorhome plugged into
an outside electrical service with the house
battery disconnect switch on to help prevent the
possibility of dead batteries. Use of the house
battery disconnect switch will not turn off all DC
electrical items or other parasitic loads present
on the house battery. Some are federal mandate
items such as the LP-Gas detector.
Battery cut-out switch
The battery cut-out switch is
located inside and next to the entry
door. This switch controls the 12
Volt DC power to the house fuse
panels. When the switch is activated,
power is supplied to all the interior
DC lighting and DC operated appliances. Some
appliances require both DC and AC power to
operate, such as the roof air conditioner. This
switch is helpful when dry camping to conserve
house battery power. Refrigerator and inverter
operation are unaffected by the operation of
this switch. When turned off, this switch will
not stop all parasitic loads and therefore is not a
substitute for the main battery disconnect switch.
Shore power hook-up
The power requirement for
the motorhome is 50 Amp
120/240 Volt AC single
phase. The motorhome
can be operated from 30
Amp 120 Volt AC but with
limited capacity. If 50
Amp shore power service
020125
is available, connect the
supplied shore power
cord. If less than 50 Amp service is available,
electrical adapters will be required and power
consumption must be reduced to avoid tripping
the shore power breaker. The shore cord is
stored in a roadside compartment.
BATT
CUT OUT
CAUTION
To avoid flash damage to electrical
contacts, turn off the interior lighting
before activating the battery cut-off
switch.
2008 knight
CAUTION
Avoid flash damage to the electrical
system contacts. Before plugging the
motorhome into shore power, starting
the generator or using the inverter make
sure all the appliances are off.
WARNING
Keep fingers away from metal contacts
of the shore plug end. Do not stand
in water when making electrical
connections. Serious electrical shock
and personal injury can occur. To avoid
the risk of an electrical shock, turn the
circuit breaker off for the power supply
outlet before making the shore power
connection.
153
electrical systems - house — 8
CAUTION
DO NOT remove cover from shore
power supply to troubleshoot electricity
to the motorhome. Serious personal
injury or death may occur. Inform the
park manager is there is no power to the
motorhome. It is the park manager’s
responsibility to fix problems with the
shore power pedestal.
Plugging in the Shore Cord:
 Located in a rear roadside compartment
is the shore power cord.
 Unscrew the deck plate and extend a
sufficient amount of cable through the
deck plate to reach the socket.
 Turn all appliances off.
 Check the shore power source amperage.
If 50 Amp service is not available, install
the proper electrical adapter(s) to the
cord.
 Always turn OFF the shore power
breaker at the power supply before
connecting or disconnecting the shore
cord to avoid an accidential shock or
flashing of electrical contacts.
 Align cord end with
socket terminals. Push
cord all the way into
socket so the cord
blades do not show.
060203

After the connection is made, turn the
shore power breaker on. The transfer
switch should make an audible click.
Disconnecting the Shore Cord:
 Turn off all AC appliances.
 Turn off the shore power breaker.
This will prevent accidental shock and
flashing of electrical contacts when
disconnecting.
 Grasp housing of electrical cord. Without
touching electrical contacts, work cord
out and away from socket.
 Straighten, clean and manually rewind
the cord.
 Stow in compartment.
When Hooked to 50 Amps:
After verifying proper voltage, wait
approximately one minute for the inverter to
stabilize charging of the batteries before starting
air conditioners or other large AC loads.
When Hooked to 30 Amps:
If 50 Amp service is not available, wait
approximately one hour before operating
electric appliances. Use caution when operating
appliances to avoid overloading the supplied
shore service breaker. Operate appliances and
outlets in sequence rather than all at the same
time.
The continuous amount of current
through a breaker or fuse is only 80% of
its rated capacity.
 50 Amp 240 Volt AC shore power
service consists of two power supply
conductors (120 Volts AC each), a
neutral and a safety ground. The 50
Amp breaker simultaneously limits each
power supply conductor to no more than
a short-term maximum of 50 Amps for
each conductor. The 50 Amp 240 Volt
service actually provides 80 continuous
amps.
 Use care when hooked to anything less
than 50 Amp shore services. Shore power
service less than 50 Amps consists of one
power supply conductor, a neutral and a
safety ground; 30 Amp shore service is
limited to 24 continuous Amps; 20 Amp
shore service is limited to 16 continuous
Amps.

Electrical Adapters:
There are different electrical adapters to suit
a variety of needs. Only UL approved adapters
should be used. The most common adapter is
a 50-30 Amp adapter. This type of connector
adapts the 50 Amp shore cord to a 30 Amp shore
power outlet. Always install the adapter to the
cord prior to making the connection to the outlet.
Power Supply:
Different amperage supplies vary greatly in the
amount of available current.
060164
Typical 50 - 30 Amp Adapter
060212
154
2008 knight
electrical system - house — 8
Another common adapter is a 30 to 20 Amp
adapter. This type of connector adapts the 30
Amp shore cord to a 20 Amp shore power outlet.
Always install the adapter to the cord prior to
making the connection to the outlet.
060174
Typical 30 - 20 Amp Adapter: Adapts 30 Amp Shore Cord
to 20 Amp Shore Power Outlet
CAUTION
If shore power service is limited to 15
or 20 Amps, use of light duty extension
cords and electrical adapters will
create a voltage loss through the cord
and at each electrical connection. Line
voltage loss and the resistance at each
electrical connection can be a hazardous
combination. Damage to sensitive
electronic equipment may result!
WARNING
Avoid the risk of electrical shock or
component damage by disconnecting
from shore power during electrical
storm activity. Use the inverter/charger
or start the generator if AC power is
needed.
NOTE
Three types of shore power outlets
most commonly used are shown in the
illustration.
WARNING
Before working on the electrical system,
disconnect from shore power and turn
off the inverter/charger. Disconnect
the negative 12 Volt DC battery cables
at the batteries. Remove rings, metal
watch bands and other metal jewelry
before working around batteries and
connectors. Use caution when working
with metal tools. If the tool contacts a
battery terminal or metal connected to
it, a short circuit could occur causing
personal injury, explosion or fire.
Manual Cord Reel
The cord reel will coil
and stow the shore cord.
Use the hand crank to
retract the power cord.
To extend power cord,
pull out. Extend only
as much power cord as
required to reach the
outlet. The cord should
not be taut, but slightly
slack.
In the event both shore and generator power
are available, generator power will override
shore power after a 30 second delay. This allows
the generator time to warm up before applying
an AC load.
Once the generator is shut down, shore power
will be available after a two second delay.
NOTE
The shore cord is NOT electrically
connected to the generator. When the
generator is operating, the electrical
contacts of the shore cord are not
electrically energized.
NOTE
To prevent damage to transfer switch
contacts, discontinue appliance
operation and turn off auxiliary
electrical loads operated by outlets
before connecting/disconnecting
shore power or starting/stopping the
generator.
060152d
Located in rear roadside
compartment
The generator is located in the front
compartment of the motorhome. To open the
compartment, hold the door and push in on the
two locking tabs. Gently lower the door open.
The door is secured by chains on the side.
To operate the generator the house battery
disconnect switch must be on.
Transfer switch
The transfer switch will
automatically transfer AC
power from the shore power
cord or generator through
the transfer switch to the
120/240 Volt AC breaker
panel.
GENERATOR - 120 AC DIESEL
060167d
Located in rear roadside
compartment
NOTE
For detailed operating instructions and
information refer to the generator OEM
manual.
060121c
2008 knight
155
electrical systems - house — 8
Generator can be started from these
locations:
 The generator remote switch on the dash.
 The generator switch located on the
generator.
 The generator switch on the hallway
systems control panel.
020159l
060144j
Pre-Start Checks
Prior to the first start
of the day, perform
a general inspection
including oil and
coolant levels. Keep
a maintenance log on
number of hours in
operation since the last
service. Perform any
service or maintenance
that may be due.
Starting the Generator
020159o
Before Starting the Generator:
 Clear people and animals from hazards
of electrical shock and moving parts.
 All appliances and other large AC
electrical loads must be off.
156
NOTE
The generator may require priming. To
prime, hold control switch in the OFF
position. Repeat if necessary. The diesel
generator fuel pick-up tube is cut to
approximately 1/4 tank so as not to run
the main engine out of fuel.
Push and hold the control
switch in START position until
the generator starts. Release
switch. On diesel models the
control switch may flash up to
15 seconds, indicating engine
preheat.
WARNING
When parking near high grass, be sure
the hot exhaust does not come into
contact with the grass, it could be a fire
hazard. Hot exhaust pipe or hot exhaust
gases can ignite the grass.
CAUTION
Exhaust extensions add weight to the
generator exhaust system. Exhaust
piping or manifold damage can
result, allowing carbon monoxide to
accumulate or leak into the motorhome.
080357
WARNING
Excessive cranking can overheat
and damage the starter motor. DO
NOT crank the engine more than 30
seconds at any one time. Wait at least
two minutes before resuming. If the
generator fails to start refer to the
manufacturer’s manual.
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WARNING
When the motorhome is parked,
position the dash air conditioner
vent control in the OFF position
to prevent exhaust gases from
entering the motorhome. The engine
exhaust contains carbon monoxide,
which is poisonous and can cause
unconsciousness and/or death. Inspect
the exhaust system before starting the
generator. DO NOT block the exhaust
pipe or put the motorhome where
the exhaust may accumulate outside,
underneath, or inside the motorhome or
nearby vehicles. Operate the generator
only when there is a safe dispersion of
exhaust. Monitor outside conditions to
ensure the exhaust continues to disperse
safely.
electrical system - house — 8
Stopping the Generator
Turn off the appliances
and disconnect other AC
loads being used. Allow the
generator to run unloaded for
at least one minute before
shutdown to allow the engine
to cool. Momentarily push the
control switch to the STOP
position. Release the switch.
NOTE
The generator may shut down when
loaded nearly to full power and an
air conditioner (or other large motor
load) cycles on. Briefly during start
up an electric motor can draw up to
three times the rated power. For this
reason it may be necessary to operate
some appliances in sequence when air
conditioners or other large motor loads
are on.
080357
NOTE
The generator requires only a
momentary stop signal.
Powering the Equipment
The AC output of the generator powers the
motorhome air conditioners, the AC Inverter/
Charger and all appliances and items plugged
into the electrical outlets of the motorhome.
The number of electrical appliances that can be
operated at any given time depends upon how
much power is available from the generator. If
the generator is overloaded or a short circuit
causes over current, either the generator will
shut down or the circuit breaker will trip.
If power consumption, in total, exceeds the
generator power output, compensation for
temperature and elevation may be necessary.
Operate appliances in sequence, rather than all at
the same time.
Compensation for temperature and elevation
may also be necessary. The generator’s
maximum output is rated at 500 feet above sea
level. Beyond this point, the generator will lose
approximately 3.5% of its rated power for every
1000 feet gained in elevation. High and low
temperatures can also affect generator output.
Power decreases 1% for every 10ºF above 85ºF.
Counteract these effects by operating appliances
in sequence rather than at the same time.
INFORMATION
The generator may shut down for
reasons other than an overload. If
a blink code appears on the control
switch, refer to the manufacturer’s
manual to obtain an explanation for the
code.
average fuel consumpton
NoLoad
HalfLoad
FullLoad
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Generator Fuel
There is always a possibility fuel may be
contaminated. Diesel fuel may contain water
or a microbe growth (black slime). Any
contamination of fuel will greatly reduce the
total output of the generator, and may cause
erratic AC output.
NOTE
The motorhome manufacturer does not
cover damage to the generator caused
by fuel contamination, or to appliances
due to erratic AC voltage.
Resetting the Circuit Breaker
If a circuit breaker trips in the main AC
breaker panel, or on the generator control panel,
there may be a short circuit or too much load.
NOTE
The generator will continue to run after
a circuit breaker trips.
If a circuit breaker trips,
disconnect or turn off as
many loads as possible.
To reset the circuit
breaker, switch the circuit
breaker to OFF. Then
switch back to ON to reconnect
the circuit.
020159r
On Generator
Control Panel
desel 8,000 watts (gal./hrs.)
0.13
0.49
1.02
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electrical systems - house — 8
If the circuit breaker immediately trips, the
electrical distribution system has a short or
the circuit breaker is faulty. Call a qualified
electrician. If the circuit breaker does not trip,
reconnect a combination of loads that will
not overload the generator or cause the circuit
breaker to trip again. Remember to compensate
for elevation and temperature changes when
reconnecting loads.
NOTE
An appliance or load may have a short if
it causes a circuit breaker to trip after
reconnection. DO NOT continue to reset
breaker. Have the problem corrected
before resuming operation.
iNVERTER
The inverter changes DC battery power to
AC electrical power, and charges the house and
chassis batteries when hooked to shore power or
operating from the generator. Use the inverter
to supply AC power when shore power is not
available and the generator is not going to be
used as a secondary AC power source. The
inverter supplies AC power to most outlets and
appliances. Remember that using the inverter
quickly consumes house battery power. Turn
off the inverter when not in use to conserve
house battery power. The remote panel is used
to change the variable settings. The inverter is
located in a rear curbside compartment.
Generator Exercise
Providing AC Power with Inverter
If use of the generator is infrequent, exercise
the generator once a month by operating it at
approximately half the maximum rated output
for two hours. This exercise will help promote
better starting, more reliable operation and
longer engine life. This procedure drives off
moisture, lubricates the internal engine parts,
replaces the old stale fuel with a fresh supply,
and also promotes removing oxides from the
electrical switches and contacts.
To turn the inverter on:
Press the INVERTER ON/OFF switch at the
remote panel. If the inverter doesn’t sense AC
power from the generator or shore power, it will
provide AC power from the motorhome batteries
to most outlets and appliances. If the generator is
started or the motorhome is connected to shore
power, the inverter will automatically begin
charging.
NOTE
Avoid short run periods of the generator.
Run the generator set under a load for a
minimum of one-half hour.
158
Battery Charging with the Inverter
The inverter will automatically begin charging
when AC power is supplied from shore service
or the generator. The inverter uses a three-stage
charge cycle to charge the batteries. The charger
may be turned off, if desired.
To turn the charger on and off:
 Press the switch marked CHARGER
ON/OFF on the remote panel.
Shore Setting:
The Shore setting in the remote panel adjusts
the amount of AC current the battery charger
can use. If hooked to less than 50 amp service,
select the proper Shore setting to help prevent
combined AC loads such as the roof air
conditioner and the charger from overloading
limited shore power service.
To Adjust Shore Power Setting:
Press the Shore button on the inverter remote.
Turn the knob on the inverter remote left or
right to scroll through shore setting options.
Press the knob to select. An arrow will appear
next to the selected setting.
NOTE
Settings 20 Amp and below limits
battery charge capacity and may
hamper ability to efficiently operate DC
electrical loads. Remember to reset to
higher amperage when available.
060254b
Remote Panel
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electrical system - house — 8
Factory Default Settings
Shore Setting AC Power
50 Amp
When hooked to 50 Amp Shore Service.
30 Amp
When hooked to 30 Amp shore service.
20 Amp
When hooked to 20 Amp shore service.
10 Amp
Used when shore service is severely limited or
experiencing shore power overload.
5 Amp
Minimum charge capacity setting. Used when shore
service is severely limited or experiencing shore
power overload.
Inverter three-stage charging cycle:
 Bulk Charge Cycle: Brings the DC
voltage up high, initially between 14.2
- 14.6 Volts DC. The length of time the
inverter is in Bulk Charge depends the
state of charge of the batteries.


Absorb Cycle: Absorb Cycle battery
voltage is the same as the Bulk Charge
Cycle, between 14.2 - 14.6 Volts DC.
Length of the Absorb Cycle is a timed
event determined by the inverter.
Float Charge Cycle: Charge voltage is
generally around 13.3 - 13.7 Volts DC.
Approximately 80% of the charging
cycle has been completed by this time.
NOTE
Refer to the OEM manual located in
the Owner’s Information File Box for
detailed instructions.
NOTE
The Inverter/Charger will charge
the batteries with AC power applied
regardless of remote status.
Bulk Charge
Water (charger) on full until bucket (battery) is 80% full.
Absorb Charge
Water (charger) slows until
bucket (battery) is 90% full.
Float Charge
Water (charger) slowly
trickles into bucket
(battery) until 100% full.
Water (charger) will adjust
flow to maintain level.
Hose = Inverter in Charge Mode
Bucket = Battery
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Function
Search
Low Battery Cutoff
Battery Bank
Battery Type
Charge Rate
Default
5 Watts
11 Volts DC
400 AH
Liquid Lead Acid
80 %
Contrast
75 %
Battery Temperature Sensor
A Battery Temperature Sensor (BTS) is
affixed to one of the house battery terminals
to measure battery temperature and send that
information to the inverter. When battery
temperature rises, the inverter will decrease
charge voltage to prevent boiling the batteries.
When battery temperature cools, the inverter will
raise charge voltage. Voltage compensation with
temperature variation is necessary to keep charge
voltage at optimum values. If the BTS cord is
unplugged from the inverter, the inverter will use
a temperature default setting of 77º F/25º C as a
reference point.
06023b
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electrical systems - house — 8
Distribution Panel (50 Amp)
Energy Management System
House 120/240 Volt AC Panel
The AC distribution panels are located in a
bedroom cabinet. The main 240 Volt AC panel
receives power from the transfer switch, which is
supplied by either shore power or the generator.
The AC power is supplied to the 50 Amp main
breaker first. Then the power is supplied to the
individual branch circuit breakers. The panel
label describes the breaker layout and the item,
outlet or appliance to which they pertain.
060286q
NOTE
This panel will vary with options or
changes to the motorhome.
WARNING
The 120/240 Volt AC panel contains high
voltage which can cause serious injury
or death. Before beginning any work or
testing procedures involving the electric
panels, or any of the branch circuits,
be sure the motorhome is unplugged
from shore power and the generator is
not running and the inverter is in the
off position. Certain testing procedures
can require the AC power to be on. Only
qualified personnel or personnel with
electrical backgrounds should attempt
any testing procedures.
160
The Energy Management System is easily
identified by the remote display panel located
inside motorhome.
The 50 Amp Smart EMS consists of two
elements: the display panel and the bedroom
distribution panel. The distribution panel,
located in the bedroom, is a completely selfcontained 120/240 Volt power distribution and
energy management system intended to be used
in recreational vehicles. It is housed in a sheet
metal enclosure with removable front panel.
It provides circuit protection for all the 120
Volt AC loads in the motorhome and a system
of energy management to minimize the overloading and tripping of circuit breakers.
Circuit Breakers:
The distribution panel offers slots for eight
single or dual, standard 120 Volt circuit breakers.
Two of these breakers, located in the two center
positions, must be a 50 Amp unit that act as
a main input protection for each of the lines
supplying the remainder of the branch breakers
(up to 12).
Energy Management:
The 50 Amp Smart EMS automatically
senses the available power to the motorhome,
determining whether it is connected to a 120 Volt
AC - 30 Amp shore power source, 50 Amp shore
power source or generator source. Depending
upon available power, the EMS controls the
operation of 6 possible loads as indicated on the
distribution panel. These may be any type load,
but are typically heavier loads; those whose use
can be “postponed until a time when current is
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available for use. If the available power source
is 120 Volt AC - 30 Amp shore power, the EMS
attempts to keep the total 120 Volt current draw
to less than 30 Amps.
Operation:
If 120 Volt AC is not available at the
distribution panel, L1 or L2 outputs, the
system shuts itself off. This feature is intended
to prevent the system from drawing current
from the +12 Volt DC battery supply when
not in operation. When 120 Volt AC power is
applied, the system automatically powers up and
determines the nature of the power source.
If the generator is running, 120 Volt AC will
be present at the distribution panel L1 and L2
inputs. In this mode the energy management
feature is disabled and all control relay contacts
are closed, energizing all of the controlled loads.
The control module sends a signal to the display
panel causing the load meter to display actual
load current, the GEN SET service indicator to
light and all power status indicators to light.
If 120 Volt AC is present at the distribution
panel L1 and L2 inputs the system will assume
that 120 Volt AC, 30 Amp shore power is
available and the energy management feature
will be enabled. If only 20 Amp service is
available the user must select the 20 AMP
service mode by momentarily pressing the 20/30
Amp select switch on the Control Panel. Initially,
all relay contacts are closed and the total current
is monitored. If the total current should exceed
the service limit the system will turn off the first
load in the shedding table, turning the loads off
and calculating the amount of current that was
removed, which is the value for that load. This
value is placed in memory.
electrical system - house — 8
If the current remains above the service limit,
the system will turn off the next load in the
shedding table, again calculating the amount of
current that was removed and placing this value,
which is the value of that load, in memory.
The system continues to turn off loads until
the total current falls below the service limit or
all of the six controlled loads have been shed.
Through this process the system has “learned”
the amount of current each particular load draws.
This feature compensates for the differences in
current draw over a range of line voltage and
ambient temperature, by re-learning the load
each time it is turned off or “shed.”
The 50 Amp Smart EMS now waits until the
total current is lower than the service limit and
enough current is available (as compared with
the amount in memory for the last load shed)
before turning that load back on. This assures
that there is sufficient current to operate the load.
NOTE
There is a two minute minimum delay
period after a load is shed before the
load will be turned on again to prevent
air conditioners from turning on with a
head pressure.
average running current for the system and, if
it exceeds 80% of the service rating, the EMS
sheds loads to reduce the average current below
that limit.
For example, if a system operating under 120
Volt AC, 30 Amp service has been running at
the 30 Amp limit for three hours, the EMS will
change its shedding threshold to 24 Amps and
turn off loads until the 24 Amp limit is attained.
If the user selects the 20 Amp service mode
this limit translates to 16 Amps. Because the
EMS calculates a running three hour average, if
the average load current drops below the limit
the system restores power to loads based on
their impact on the limit. If the system is in the
averaging mode the decimal point at the lower
right corner of the load meter display on the
display panel illuminates.
Display Panel: The display panel connects to
the distribution panel located in the bedroom.
Six power status LED’s indicate power is
applied to those loads. These LED’s are on when
the power is applied. The load meter has a two
digit display to indicate the amount of current
actually being drawn by all the appliances in the
motorhome.
Three Hour Averaging:
The RVIA (Recreational Vehicle Industry
Association) in conjunction with the NEC
(National Electrical Council) have established
rules regarding the rating of electrical systems
and the use of energy management systems.
One of these rules requires that, if any energy
management system is used, the average total
load current for the system over a three hour
period be limited to 80% of the service rating.
For that reason the 50 Amp EMS calculates the
Four service type LED’s indicate the source for
120/240 Volt AC power. Three of these sources
are automatically detected and indicated by the
EMS, namely: Gen Set Service, 50 Amp Service
and 30 Amp Service.
The 20 Amp service mode is not automatically
detected and the operator must manually select
the 20 Amp mode when 20 Amp service is
available. The service select button allows the
current threshold to be set to either 30 Amps or
20 Amps, to match the incoming service.
Circuit Breaker
The internal configuration of the circuit
breaker is designed to trip when excess current
causes the breaker to heat up. The trip action of
the circuit breaker can occur within milliseconds
due to the speed at which electricity can travel.
Breakers are designed to operate at a continuous
load of 80% of the breaker’s rated capacity.
For example: A breaker with a 20 Amp
rating will operate a continuous 16 Amp load.
This design leaves a small amount of working
capacity within the breaker. When an inductive
load is applied, such as when an electric motor
turns on, the motor starts to spin and current
consumption may momentarily exceed the
rated capacity of the breaker. As the electric
motor comes up to operating speed, the electric
motor’s current consumption will decrease.
The AC current load then falls back into the
breaker’s rated 80% set point. This electric
principle should be kept in mind when using
anything other than 50 Amp shore service and
using appliances with electric motors, such as air
conditioners.
060303b
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161
electrical systems - house — 8
When using outlets, care should be considered
when applying loads such as electric motors,
heaters, coffee makers, toasters, hair dryers or
other large current consuming loads. The current
rating is usually stated on most electrical items.
The current rating will either be rated in amps or
watts. Current ratings stated on electrical items
will change slightly with voltage fluctuations.
As voltage increases, current consumption
decreases. As voltage decreases, current
consumption increases. This may explain why
in some instances items operated at borderline
voltage to current tolerances may seem fine in
one location but problematic in another.
NOTE
To calculate watts to amps simply divide
the watt figure by the voltage of which
the item operates. For example: The
electrical item is rated at 1370 watts.
Divide that by the operating voltage of
115 Volts AC which equals 11.913 Amps.
Use this formula to calculate the amount
of load and compare to the available
power supply.
GFCI Breakers & Outlets
A Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) can
be found in two different types of applications.
One type is incorporated in a breaker used in 120
Volt AC breaker panels; the other is incorporated
in an outlet.
The GFCI, whether it is a breaker or an
outlet, offers two types of protection. One type
of protection is from over-current or shorts to
guard against hazardous ground fault currents
that can result in injury or death. Ground fault
currents are currents that flow from the “hot” or
162
power terminal through a person to the ground.
For example: touching a faulty appliance while
making contact with an electrical ground such as
a water fixture or the earth.
The GFCI offers protection against the type of
shock that can result from faulty insulation, wet
wiring from inside an appliance, or any device
or equipment plugged in or wired to that circuit.
The ground fault portion of the outlet or breaker
uses sensitive electronics inside the outlet or
breaker to detect a ground fault problem. The
electronics monitor the normal current of power
flowing to the hot (black) wire through the load
(eg. a light bulb or appliance) and coming back
on the neutral (white) wire. If a small amount of
current comes back on the safety ground wire,
the electronics will trip the breaker or outlet,
stopping the flow of electricity. The amount of
current it takes to trip the device from a ground
fault varies slightly from the different outlet or
breaker manufacturers (approximately 4 to 6
milliamps or less).
WARNING
If a breaker or outlet continually trips,
DO NOT continue to reset breaker
or outlet until the problem has been
identified and corrected.
NOTE
The ground fault outlet or breaker
should be tested once a month to ensure
it is operating. Use the TEST button on
the outlet or breaker. It should trip with
an audible “click.” The breaker or outlet
will not trip if AC power is not present
at the device. If power is present and
the device will not trip, replace it before
using that circuit.
Distribution Panel
House 12 Volt DC
The 12 Volt house contains fuses (located in
a bedroom cabinet) that protect the electrical
circuits. These fuses are the standard automotive
type.
NOTE
One milliamp is 1/1000 of one Amp.
Electrical shocks resulting from ground faults
can be felt, but such a shock is considerably
less than one without ground fault protection.
People with medical conditions that make them
susceptible to shock, can still be seriously
injured. A GFCI outlet or breaker will not protect
against shock from a normal current flow. For
example: a shock from touching both metal
prongs of an electrical cord or appliance while
plugging it in.
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Typical arrangement of fuses.
060165s
electrical system - house — 8
Shorting a battery cable to ground with a
battery at a reasonable state of charge can result
in a fire or serious personal injury from a burn.
Note: Fuses may change with options.
060286s
Fuses
The 12 Volt DC fuses service the interior
house functions, such as lighting, fans and
the monitor panel. A blown fuse is evident by
the broken metal strip located in the center of
the fuse. Replacement fuses should be of the
same amperage. Installing a higher rated fuse
can damage the wiring. Fuse current set points
follow much of the same electrical principle
as the 120 Volt AC breakers. Using 12 Volt
DC as the electromotive force can make it
more susceptible to outside influences, such as
corrosion from weathering or oxidation.
The danger from shocks with this voltage is
minimized, but can still occur. A good example
is when a magnetic field is generated, then
collapses when the power supply is cut. The
result is a discharge that can reach tens of
thousands of volts for a short time period. Care
should be used when working with this voltage
as current values can be quite high, as in the case
of battery cables.
AMPERAGE
1
2
3
4
5
7.5
10
15
20
25
30
COLOR
BLACK
GRAY
VIOLET
PINK
GOLD
BROWN
RED
BLUE
YELLOW
CLEAR
GREEN
060086b
BATTERies - house
House batteries are designed for use with
12 Volt DC operated lights, appliances and
inverters.
House Battery Types:
 Liquid Lead Acid (LLA)
Deep Cycle Batteries:
Deep cycle batteries are a type of Liquid Lead
Acid (LLA) battery. Deep cycle batteries are
best suited for use with 12 Volt operated lights,
appliances and inverter/converters. Deep cycle
batteries are designed to have a majority of their
capacity used before being recharged.
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NOTE
Tap water contains minerals which can
alter battery chemistry and ruin the
battery. Use only distilled water when
refilling the LLA battery.
Battery Slide-Out Tray (Optional):
The slide-out battery tray is secured in place by
a locking mechanism at the front of the tray. To
slide the tray out, push in on the two handles and
pull until the tray stops. To secure the battery
tray, push it back in until the tray latches.
060193s
Maintenance:
The battery tray slide will occasionally require
lubrication. When performing maintenance to
the batteries, remove old lubricant and dirt from
the battery tray slide with solvent, brake cleaner
or equivalent. DO NOT allow any cleaning
solution or battery acid by-products to splatter
onto and damage the painted surfaces. Lubricate
all moving parts of the battery tray slide with
white lithium grease or a spray lubricant
recommended by the manufacturer.
NOTE
Driving without the tray secured can
result in damage.
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electrical systems - house — 8
CAUTION
Many types of petroleum based products
or battery by-products can damage
the paint finish. DO NOT allow these
types of chemicals to get on the paint
finish. If the chemicals splatter on to the
painted surfaces, immediately rinse the
surface using plenty of water and a mild
detergent.
Battery Maintenance
Liquid Lead
Acid (LLA)
battery cells
should be
checked at least
once a month.
The level should
be above the top
of the plates, but not overfull. The electrolyte
level should be approximately 3/8" below the
well to allow room for expansion while the
battery is being charged. Over-filling the battery
will allow the electrolyte solution to boil or gas
out of the battery cap. Remember to use only
distilled water to refill the battery. A battery with
a low electrolyte level will rapidly boil out the
water once the plates have been exposed to air.
Periodically check the batteries for corrosion
and cracks. Replace vent plugs that are cracked
or missing. Keep the top of the batteries clean.
The accumulation of electrolyte and dirt may
permit small amounts of current to flow between
the terminals, which can drain the battery.
020162f
020034
Check the battery connections for tightness
and corrosion. If corrosion is found, disconnect
the cables (mark cable locations) and carefully
clean them with a mild solution of baking soda
and water, or an aerosol product specifically
designed for battery maintenance. DO NOT
allow cleaning solution to seep into the battery
and damage the electrolyte balance. Use water to
rinse the top of the battery and surrounding area
when done. Carefully hook the cables back to
the battery. The battery cable to battery terminal
connections should be metal to metal. Coat
the terminals with petroleum jelly or an anticorrosion grease.
WARNING
Liquid lead acid batteries produce
hydrogen gas while charging. This
is highly explosive. DO NOT smoke
around batteries and keep all sources of
ignition or flames away from batteries.
The hydrogen gas may explode resulting
in fire, personal injury, property
damage or death.
Testing the Battery
A battery can be tested
and monitored several
ways. The monitor panel
on the hallway Systems
Control Center and the
optional monitor in water
service center show
voltage of the house
batteries. Press the Test
switch to check battery
status.
030816b
Hydrometer (cylinder
type) shown testing
LLA type battery.
164
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electrical system - house — 8
Checking the Electrolyte Solution
The most efficient way of testing the batteries
is to check the electrolyte solution. The only
way to test a battery’s electrolyte solution is
with a hydrometer. Many styles are available,
from types with cylinder graduation (shown
here) to types with floating balls. Hydrometers
can be purchased from most auto parts stores.
The hydrometer tests the battery’s electrolyte
solution which is measured in specific gravity.
Distilled water has a specific assigned gravity
of 1,000. The hydrometer is calibrated to this
mark. Pure sulfuric acid has a specific gravity
reading of 1,840. The acid is 1.84 times heavier
than water. The electrolyte solution is about
64% water to 36% acid (fully charged battery).
Hydrometers with cylinder graduation are
graphed and the exact state of specific gravity
can be determined.
Temperature and recent battery activity
(charging or discharging) affect the hydrometer
readings. It is best to check the battery when
it has been “at rest” for at least three hours,
although readings taken at other times will give
a “ballpark” figure. When using the hydrometer,
draw the electrolyte solution up into the tube.
Allow the hydrometer to attain the same
temperature as the electrolyte solution. Note the
reading for that cell. Complete the same test for
the rest of the cells on that battery bank.
The hydrometer is calibrated at 80° F.
Temperature affects the hydrometer readings.
The higher the electrolyte temperature, the
higher the specific gravity reading. The lower
the temperature, the lower the specific gravity
reading. Add or subtract four points for each 10°
variance from the 80° F chart. Readings between
cells should not vary more than 50 points.
If one cell in a particular
battery bank being tested is at
a 50% state of charge while
the others are indicating a
full charge, charge only that
battery to see if the low cell
will come up. At the same
time, do not over charge the
“healthy” cells.
If the low cell does not
come up after charging, this
battery can damage the rest of
the battery bank and should
be replaced. An accurate
digital Volt meter + - .5% will
also give an indicator of the
battery’s state of charge.
030815
Placing a load on the
Temperature
Battery:
Correction Chart
Another test that can be
performed is to place a specific load on the
battery for a predetermined length of time equal
to that particular battery’s rating. This machine
is usually an adjustable carbon pile that can vary
the load being applied to the batteries while
monitoring voltage to see if they will perform to
their specific rated capacities.
NOTE
See the chart for temperature
compensation. Liquid levels should be
even between the cells of the battery
being tested as it will affect the accuracy
of the test.
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WARNING
Sulfuric acid in the batteries can cause
severe injury or death. Sulfuric acid
can cause permanent damage to eyes,
burn skin and eat holes in clothing.
Always wear splash-proof safety goggles
when working around the battery. If
the battery electrolyte is splashed in
the eyes, or on skin, immediately flush
the affected area for 15 minutes with
large quantities of clean water. In case
of eye contact, seek immediate medical
aid. Never add acid to a battery once
the battery has been placed in service.
Doing so may result in hazardous
splattering of electrolyte.
Battery Charge Time & Consumption Rate
Calculating Run Times:
Calculating run time figures when operating
120 Volt AC electrical items with an inverter
can be exponential due to battery characteristics.
Flow characteristics of electrons vary
with different battery types and chemical
compositions. Deep cycle batteries are generally
designed to slowly release a majority of their
charge capacity. Deep cycle batteries are
rated in amp hours (Ahrs) with the discharge
occurring over an extended period of time
before the battery is charged. Engine starting
batteries are designed to quickly release large
amounts of current for short durations, without
depleting battery reserves. Commercial type
batteries bridge the gap of deep cycle and engine
batteries. Commercial batteries release medium
amounts of current over a longer period of time
but they are not designed to cycle their charge
capacity.
165
electrical systems - house — 8
The working range of a deep cycle battery is
between 50 and 100% state of charge (SOC).
Deep cycle batteries should not be cycled below
50% state of charge. Discharging a deep cycle
battery below 50% state of charge shortens the
life of the battery. Deep cycle batteries use an
amp hour rating which is usually calculated over
a 20 hour discharge interval. For example: A
deep cycle battery with a rated capacity of 100
Ahrs. is designed to release current at the rate
of 5 Amps per hour. Multiply a 5 Amp load
over a 20 hour discharge period equals the rated
100 Ahr. capacity. These discharge figures are
calculated with the battery starting at 100%
state of charge with the battery at 80º F when
the discharge cycle begins. However, increasing
the discharge load applied to the battery from
5 Amps to 10 Amps on a 100 Ahr battery does
not yield ten hours of discharge time. This is
due to the internal reactions which occur when
a battery is discharging. Actual discharge time
for a 10 Amp load may be closer to eight hours
of discharge time. Increasing the load applied to
the battery to 20 Amps will not yield five hours
discharge time but may be less than three hours.
It might be understood as a point of diminishing
return.
Calculating applied loads to an inverter to
approximate run time from the battery amp
hours available is not an equal trade up when
voltage is inverted and amperage is calculated.
When the inverter is used to operate an AC load
it uses approximately ten times the DC current
needed from the battery when inverting 12 Volts
DC to operate the 120 Volt AC item. There is
also a small efficiency loss of about 10% when
inverting. For example: When using the inverter
to operate an AC electrical item, which has a
166
current draw rating of 2 Amps, the inverter will
use over 20 Amps DC power from the batteries.
LIGHTS
Determining Current Consumption:
First determine the amount of current used
by an AC item. For example: The television is
rated at 200 watts at 120 Volts AC. Calculate
watts to amps. Divide 200 watts by the operating
voltage of 120, this equals 1.6 Amps. Multiply
1.6 Amps AC current by a factor of ten the
inverter will use, this equals 16 Amps DC
battery current. Add the revised 10% efficiency
loss figure, this calculates to a total of 17.6
Amps DC. If the battery bank capacity is rated at
500 Ahrs., actual elapsed time to the suggested
50% state of charge would net viewing time for
the television at approximately 13 hours in ideal
conditions.
The run time figure will vary greatly with
the actual state of charge of the battery bank
when the discharge process begins. Ambient
temperature, combined with other working
loads, such as lights and parasitic loads applied
to batteries, affect run times. Calculating the
exact run time is not precise due to all the
variables and equations involved; however,
an approximate time figure can be obtained.
Proper battery maintenance and charge cycles
affect battery performance. Observe the battery
condition with hydrometer and voltage readings.
Use only distilled water when filling batteries.
To achieve the highest quality of battery
performance and longevity maintain the batteries
in their proper operating range.
The bulb inside the 12V incandescent light is
replaceable.
2008 knight
Incandescent Light
To Replace a Bulb:
1. Carefully squeeze the lens cover then
gently pull the cover out. The cover has
tabs that lock the cover in place
2. Using a clean cloth or piece of tissue
carefully grasp the bulb and rotate to
the unlock position.
3. Remove bulb from the socket.
4. The bulb replacement is 1141 12V
21CP.
080475c
NOTE
Replacement bulb number is accurate at
time of printing. Confirm replacement
bulb number before ordering or
obtaining a replacement.
5. Using a clean cloth or piece of tissue
grasp the new bulb and align the
prongs on the bulb with the slot on
light socket.
electrical system - house — 8
6. Push bulb in and rotate to lock position.
7. Gently squeeze lens cover and insert
tabs on cover into fixture.
CAUTION
Do not touch the incandescent bulbs
while it is on. Allow bulb to cool down
before replacing because a hot bulb can
cause a burn.
Interior Halogen
To Remove:
1. Grasp light fixture and pull down
slightly then tilt fixture to one side.
This will allow one spring clip to come
out.
CAUTION
Push spring clip inward with a finger as
clip is being eased out. If this is not done
spring clip can snap back on fingers.
2. Tilt fixture to other side
and ease the other spring
clip out.
3. Unscrew the light lens
counterclockwise and
remove.
4. Carefully grasp bulb
and pull from socket.
Replace with the same
060200d
type of bulb.
5. Use a clean cloth or piece of tissue to
grasp new bulb. DO NOT touch bulb
directly as this can cause a “hot spot”
and result in immediate bulb failure.
6. Align contacts of bulb with terminals in
fixture base. Insert bulb until contacts
are firmly seated.
To Reinstall:
7. Align tabs on light lens with slots in
fixture base. Rotate lens clockwise
until light lens locks into place.
8. Fold up both spring clips and insert
light fixture into opening. Once in
opening the spring clips will expand
and lock light fixture into place.
CAUTION
DO NOT touch halogen lighting while
on. They can cause a burn. DO NOT
touch replacement bulbs. Oil in the
hands can cause a “hot-spot” to occur. If
the bulb is touched, allow it to cool and
clean the bulb with alcohol.
Fluorescent Light
Operation: Turn the fixture On/Off by
pressing the power switch on the side.
NOTE
Replacement tube number is accurate
at the time of printing. Confirm
replacement tube number before
ordering or obtaining replacement.
To Replace a Fluorescent Tube:
 Align the prongs on the fluorescent tube
with socket slot.
 Insert tube and using both hands rotate to
seat.
WARNING
Fluorescent bulb must be fully seated
for proper operation.
Insert one groove on the lens cover into
the guide rail.
 Carefully squeeze lens cover to insert
other groove into guide rail.

CAUTION
DO NOT touch fluorescent tubes while
they are on. Make sure tubes are cool
before handling.
To Remove a Fluorescent Tube:
 Make sure light fixture is Off.
 Carefully squeeze both sides of lens
cover. The cover has a groove on each
side that fits into guide rail. Remove lens
cover.
 Grasp the fluorescent tube with both
hands and rotate so that the prongs are
facing straight up in the socket slot.
 Carefully remove tube.
 Replace with Philips TL 8W/33T
fluorescent tube
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167
electrical systems - house — 8
Electrical Layout
NOTE
Representation of electrical system
may vary with options and changes
to motorhome.
168
2008 knight
060191v
9
2008 Knight
electrical SyStemS - chaSSiS — Section 9
cHaSSIS electrIcal - IntroDUctIon ............. 172
Battery DISconnect ........................................ 172
Chassis........................................................... 172
Chassis...........................................................
Battery - cHaSSIS ............................................ 172
fUSe & cIrcUItS ................................................ 172
Battery maIntaIner
(BI-DIrectIonal ISolator relay Delay)........ 175
Relays............................................................. 175
Relays.............................................................
alternator........................................................ 176
Alternator.Testing.Procedure. ........................... 176
Alternator.Testing.Procedure.
SteerIng colUmn ............................................. 177
Tilt.&.Telescope............................................... 177
Tilt.&.Telescope...............................................
conSole ............................................................. 177
Transmission.Shift.Selector.............................. 177
Transmission.Shift.Selector..............................
Parking.Brake.
Parking.Brake
P
arking.Brake.. ................................................. 178
Leveling.Controls.............................................
LLeveling.Controls
eveling.Controls.............................................
............................................. 178
DaSH
D
aSH ................................................................... 179
Instrument.Panel..............................................
IInstrument.Panel
nstrument.Panel..............................................
.............................................. 179
Indicator.Lights................................................
IIndicator.Lights
ndicator.Lights................................................
................................................ 180
Switches.
Switches
S
witches.. ........................................................ 181
aIr
a
Ir conDItIoner & Heater controlS ............ 183
Operating.Tips.&.Hints.....................................
Operating.Tips.&.Hints
O
perating.Tips.&.Hints.....................................
..................................... 184
System.Components........................................ 185
Troubleshooting............................................... 186
DIagnoStIc plUg locatIon .............................. 187
alaDDIn™ engIne DISplay (optIonal)........... 187
engIne “no Start” floW cHart ..................... 188
electrical systems - chassis — 9
Chassis Electrical - introduction
This section contains guidelines, procedures
and information that will assist in understanding
the chassis electrical system and the operation of
various components. Refer to the OEM manuals
included in the Owner’s Information File box for
their respective, in-depth, individual component
operating instructions.
Battery Disconnect
Chassis
The chassis battery
disconnect is located on
in the curbside battery
compartment. The switch
controls the DC power to
060077c
the front electrical bay. Most chassis
and engine functions are interrupted when the
battery disconnect is turned off. Some electronic
components of the engine and transmission
require a constant power source and will
continue to draw power when the disconnect is
engaged.
Turn the chassis battery disconnect switch
off when the motorhome is going to be stored
or when performing electrical maintenance. If
possible, leave the motorhome plugged into an
AC source with the chassis battery disconnect
switch on to help prevent the possibility of dead
batteries.
If an AC source is not available, and the
motorhome is going to be stored more than 48
hours, it is recommended to turn the chassis
battery disconnect switch off.
170
WARNING
When welding is involved for
motorhome repair or modification,
only qualified, experienced technicians
should weld on the chassis. Improper
welding procedures and materials
may weaken the assembly or result in
damage that is not obvious and may not
cause an immediate problem or failure.
Unauthorized modifications or repairs to
the chassis could result in a forfeiture of
warranty coverage.
DANGER
Due to the sensitive nature of the
electronics on the chassis, the following
precautions are required to protect
electrical components in the motorhome
chassis:
1. Disconnect the (+) positive and (-)
negative battery connection.
2. Cover electronic control components
and wiring to protect from hot
sparks.
3. Disconnect the terminal plugs from
the engine Electronic Control Unit,
located on the curbside of the engine
block.
4. Disconnect all the plugs from the
transmission Electronic Control Unit
located in roadside front distribution
panel.
5. DO NOT connect welding cables to
electronic control components.
6. Attach the welding ground cable no
more than two feet from the part to
be welded.
Battery - Chassis
The chassis battery is designed to produce high
amperage necessary to start the engine. Maintain
2008 Kn ig ht
the chassis battery through regular electrolyte
level inspections and hydrometer readings.
High electrolyte consumption, or inconsistent
hydrometer cell readings, may indicate a
charging system problem. Perform a charging
system and current draw check if the battery is
exhibiting abnormal hydrometer readings.
NOTE
Replacement
batteries should
have the same
cold cranking
amp (CCA)
rating.
080460b
Battery with cover removed.
Cut plastic to remove cover.
fuse & circuits
The motorhome relies on three electrical
panels to control chassis functions and some
house operated items.
The front electrical panel (also called the front
run box) is located in the outside roadside front
compartment and contains fuses, self resetting
manual reset supply circuit breakers, solenoid
and relays for many chassis and house related
functions. The front distribution box, located
under the front electrical panel, controls front
chassis functions only. A rear distribution box,
located in a curbside rear compartment, controls
rear chassis functions only.
electrical systems - chassis — 9
The fuses are standard plug-in type (ATM).
When a fuse “BLOWS,” the wire in middle of
the plastic case will be broken. A bad or blown
fuse must be replaced with a fuse of the same
rating and type.
Using a fuse of a different rating will defeat
the circuit protection provided by the fuse,
which could result in damage to the motorhome
electrical system. A fuse that has been replaced
and continues to blow may indicate a fault exists
or an electronic component has failed. It is
recommended that the motorhome be taken to a
qualified RV technician before any future use to
diagnose and repair the problem.
Circuits are identified on the fuse label located
on the inside of the door.
 For the front electrical panel remove 3
wing nuts to view label.
 For front and rear distribution boxes turn
handle to unlock box and view label.
Front Electrical Panel Label
100216f
Note: Fuse panel will change with options
or changes to the motorhome.
NOTE:
Representation
of front
electrical panel.
Components
and location of
components
will change
with options or
changes to the
motorhome.
Front Electrical Panel
080528g
2008 K Nig ht
Typical Front Electrical Panel Layout
080427
171
electrical systems - chassis — 9
080522f
Front Distribution Box Label
080522i
Rear Distribution Box Label
Note: Fuse panel will change
with options or changes to
the motorhome.
Front Distribution Box
080522d
Rear Distribution Box
080522
080522b
080522e
Typical Rear Distribution Box Layout
Typical Front Distribution Box Layout
172
2008 Kn ig ht
electrical systems - chassis — 9
BATTERY MAINTAINER (Bi-Directional
Isolator Relay Delay)
The Battery
Maintainer (BiDirectional Isolator
Relay Delay) constantly
senses voltage of the
house and chassis
batteries.
With engine running,
both the house and
060216l
chassis batteries are
Located in front
roadside compartment
charged from the
engine’s alternator.
When the motorhome is plugged into shore
power or operating from the generator, both the
house and chassis batteries are charged from
the inverter/converter. If neither battery is being
charged, the batteries are fully isolated.
The battery maintainer also senses heavy loads
on either battery to prevent the wrong battery
from being inadvertently discharged.
Relays
The motorhome uses various
relays to operate electrical
equipment, such as lights and
motors. If a relay needs to be
replaced, carefully record the
location of each wire and all
markings or labels.
Relays can look the same in appearance, but
differ in function. Note that on the side of the
relay is a schematic drawing identifying if the
relay is 87 or 87a relay. These current ratings
differ, and if mixed, will create problems. Ensure
the replacement relay is of the current rating to
assure proper operation.
Another indicator to the type of relay is the
post or legs. Turn the relay over and look at the
post.
Note the differences between the numbered
posts:
1. The 30 post is the incoming fuse and/or
breaker power. Some relay applications
supply power to the 30 post. Some use
it for ground. The 30 post can be used
many different ways.
2. The 85 post is one side of the coil,
tripped different ways.
3. The 86 post is the opposite side of the
coil, tripped different ways.
4. The 87 posts are not common to the 30
post until the relay is tripped. When the
relay trips, both 87 posts are common
to the 30 post.
5. Using an 87a relay, the 30 post and the
87a post are common. When the coil is
tripped, the 87a post becomes inactive
and the 30 post becomes common to
the 87 post located on the outside of the
relay.
080406
2008 K Nig ht
080405b
080405c
A Single Pole Single
Throw relay (SPST)
is an electro-magnetic
080405d
Single Pole Single Throw
switch consisting of
Relay.
a coil (terminals 85
& 86), one common terminal (30), one normally
closed terminal (87a), and one normally open
terminal (87).
When the coil of the relay is at rest (not
energized) the common terminal (30) and the
normally closed terminal (87a) have continuity.
When the coil is energized, the common terminal
(30) and the normally open terminal (87) have
continuity.
NOTE
When there is power applied to the coil,
the coil sets up a magnetic field in the
windings. When the power is removed,
the field collapses. A momentary high
voltage discharge will occur. This is how
an ignition coil works.
173
electrical systems - chassis — 9
080405
The alternator replaces amp hours the chassis
battery used to start the engine. The amount of
charge the alternator sends to the chassis battery
is dependent on the amount of time the engine
is operated. Repeatedly starting the engine for
short periods may not be enough operating time
to adequately replace the amp hours the chassis
battery uses to start the engine.
When traveling, keep an eye on the voltmeter
in the dash area. Normal readings should be
between 13 to 14.5 Volts DC. Voltage indications
higher or lower indicate a potential problem
with the charging system. If the alternator
output drops below an acceptable level, a charge
indication warning lamp will illuminate.
Alternator Testing Procedure
Alternator Testing:
 Check all wiring for burnt or loose
electrical connections. Repair as needed.
 Check all grounds and electrical
connections to confirm they are clean and
tight.
- Alternator ground to chassis frame.
- Motor block ground to chassis frame.
- Chassis battery ground to chassis frame.
- Alternator positive output to isolator relay
terminal.
Inspect the alternator for damage.
Check belt, pulley and fan for wear.
Replace as needed.
 DO NOT disconnect the battery or
battery wire from the alternator with the
engine running as this can damage the
alternator or regulator.
 The pulley for the alternator should be
torqued to 80 ft. lbs.
 Chassis battery voltage with the engine
OFF should range from 12.2 to 12.7 Volt
DC.
 Chassis battery voltage with the engine at
idle should range 13.5 to 14.2 Volts DC.
 The output of the alternator range is 13.6
to 15.4 Volts DC. Connect a volt meter
to the (B+) terminal of the alternator and
chassis ground. Idle the engine up to
1200 RPM.
 Connect a clamp-on amp-meter, if
available, to the positive battery cable to
verify the battery state/rate of charge.

Alternator

The function
of the alternator
is an electrical
system voltage
maintainer, not a
battery charger.
When the engine
is operating,
090347b
the alternator
maintains electrical system voltage
relative to a load, such as headlights and
windshield wipers. When a heavy load is placed
on the alternator, such as trying to charge dead
house batteries, the operating temperature of
the alternator will increase. Excess operating
temperature of the alternator for extended
periods of operation can lead to premature
failure of the alternator.
.OF
TOTERMC
DUVA
WITCH
TOKEYS
NOTE
The alternator is not designed to charge
the house batteries from a complete
discharge to a full state of charge. The
alternator will maintain the battery
charge during travel, supplying the DC
current necessary to operate running
lights or other DC loads.
If the house batteries are in a low state of
charge, it is recommended to charge the house
batteries with the converter/inverter or an
auxiliary battery charger before driving the
motorhome.
CAUTION
Long-term use of the inverter to operate
the microwave while in transit will
damage the alternator. Use the generator
to operate the microwave while in
transit.

174
2008 Kn ig ht
electrical systems - chassis — 9
caution
The alternator is not a battery charger.
The alternator is designed to maintain
proper electrical system voltage. A
battery with a low state of charge, or a
dead battery, may overheat and damage
the alternator.
Steering column
Tilt & Telescope
Tilt and telescope steering wheel control lever
is located on the steering column.
To Tilt the Steering Wheel:
 Pull the lever up and tilt the steering
wheel to the desired level.
 Release the lever to lock the steering
wheel in the new position.
To Telescope the Steering Wheel:
 Push and hold the lever down.
 Move the steering wheel to the desired
location.
 Release the lever to lock the steering
wheel in the new position.
Turn Signal Indicator and Headlight High/
Low Dimmer Control:
 Both are located on the steering column.
 Push the lever forward to activate right
turn indicator circuits when ignition is
on.
 Pull the lever back to activate left turn
indicator circuits when the ignition is on.
 Pull the lever up to select high/low beam
circuits when the headlights are on.
NOTE
An audible sound is heard when turn
signals are activated. Applying the foot
brake cancels the turn signal sound,
releasing the foot brake activates the
audible turn signal sound.
Hazard Flashers:
The flasher button is located on the steering
column.
 To turn on the four way flashers, pull out
on the flasher button.
 To turn off the flashers, push the button
in.
 Turning on the hazard flashers activates
the rear view camera.
Turn Signal on Mirror:
 A turn signal indicator
is found on each mirror.
Upon activation of a
turn signal the indicator
will blink.
 The indicator light is
mounted on the side of
the mirror.
NOTE
Switch and component placement on
panels may vary.
Transmission Shift Selector
The keypads on the shift
control are R (Reverse),
N (Neutral), D (Drive),
Arrow up, Arrow down,
Mode button. A digital
display window shows
gear selection, various
transmission modes, oil
level and transmission
fault codes. Generation 4
keypads have a split screen
displaying two number
080355g
sets while in drive. The
left number displays the highest forward range
available. The right number is the range that the
transmission is currently in. NN (Neutral) will
appear in the display window when the ignition
is turned On. This indicates the transmission
is in neutral and it is safe to start. If the NN
does not display when the ignition is turned on,
there is no power to the shift selector and the
transmission will not allow the engine to start.
No display is an indicator of electrical problems
with the engine batteries, ECU or the shift
selector.
031210i
090243
Console
2008 K Nig ht
175
electrical systems - chassis — 9
Keypad Functions:
 Select the Reverse gear by pressing R.
RR will display.
 Select Neutral by pressing N. The area
around the N button has a raised ridge so
the driver can orient his hand to the push
buttons by touch without looking at the
display. NN will display.
 Select Drive range by pressing D. The
highest forward gear (6th gear) appears
in the display and the transmission will
shift to first gear indicated as 6 1.
 The Up and Down arrow buttons are
used to select a higher (if not in “6”) or
lower (if not in “1”) forward range. These
buttons are not functional in Neutral
or Reverse. When in Drive, one press
changes the gear range selected by one.
If the button is held continuously, the
selected range will continue to change
up or down until the button is released or
until the highest/lowest possible range of
gears is selected.
 The Mode button enables a secondary
shift point to be selected. This is
commonly referred to as Economy
mode. Economy mode affects the upshift
schedule 3-4, 4-5, 5-6 and downshift
schedule 6-5, 5-4, 4-3. During highway
driving, with the cruise control set
between 55 and 65 m.p.h., setting the
transmission to economy mode will
eliminate about 99% of transmission
downshifts from sixth to fifth when
incurring a slight incline or overpass.
176
Do Not use economy mode while traveling
in mountain terrain. The lower RPM shift
schedule will reduce the flow of antifreeze,
lubricating oil and air flow through the radiator,
resulting in increased transmission and engine
temperature.
CAUTION
DO NOT use the economy mode
in heavy stop and go traffic or
mountainous terrain. Frequent shifting
will occur and increase transmission
fluid temperature. Exit economy mode
until road conditions improve.
NOTE
When the Auxiliary Braking device is
used, the display will change to a default
reading of 6-2. This setting is preselected at the factory and can only be
altered by an authorized Allison Service
center. The transmission is not actually
in second gear. This is only a reference
point indicating the transmission will
automatically downshift to second
gear when auxiliary braking device is
engaged.
WARNING
It is possible for the parking brake to be
accidentally released if the air system
is charged. It is advised to fabricate a
device to be placed under the parking
brake handle to prevent children or pets
from releasing the brake when parked. A
wooden clothespin, clasped to the shaft,
is suitable.
Leveling Controls
Power Gear Control Hydraulic Systems:
The three-point hydraulic leveling system is
operated from the control module to manually or
automatically level the motorhome. The control
features a multiple warning system with flashing
lights and an alarm to alert of a jack down.
Parking Brake
The parking brake system is
activated by pulling the pushpull control knob located on
the driver’s left console panel.
When the knob is pushed,
the brake is released. Prior
to driving, allow time for the
air compressor to build up
sufficient air to shut off the air
warning lamp.
2008 Kn ig ht
Power Gear Hydraulic Level
020039f
020039f
electrical systems - chassis — 9
DASH
6. ODOMETER/TRIP METER:
Records the mileage driven as well as
total mileage on a trip.
Instrument Panel
11
11
5
7. MILEAGE/TRIP RESET BUTTON:
Used to toggle between the odometer,
Trip 1, Trip 2 and the transmission
temperature. Holding the button down
for two seconds resets the trip meter.
8
3
8. FUEL: Fuel gauge registers
approximate fuel tank level when
ignition switch is in the run position.
6
4
2
7
1
1. TURBO BOOST: Indicates boost
pressure produced by engine
turbocharger.
2. COOLANT TEMP: Indicates an
approximate normal operating range.
Monitor this gauge frequently when
climbing hills, towing or in high
ambient temperatures. If the needle
indicates an out of range condition
take IMMEDIATE ACTION to avoid
engine damage. Refer to the OEM
instructions for specific temperature
recommendations. Coolant temperature
can also be monitored with the
(optional) Aladdin system.
10
080209b
9
3. TACHOMETER: Displays engine
speed in revolutions per minute (RPM).
4. OIL PRESSURE: Indicates oil
pressure not the amount of oil in
the engine. Refer to manufacturer’s
instructions for specific pressure
recommendations.
WARNING
If oil pressure drops and the WARNING
lamp illuminates, stop the engine and
check oil level.
NOTE
Fuel mileage varies with driving style
and road conditions. Always average
more than one tankful to obtain a more
accurate figure. The diesel Generator
uses fuel from main tank and will affect
fuel mileage figures. Diesel generators
will not operate below ¼ tank to ensure
there is enough fuel to run main engine.
9. VOLTMETER: Shows the charge
condition in the chassis battery. The
normal voltage with the ignition
switch ON and the engine OFF varies
between 12.0 and 13 Volts. Battery
charging voltage is about 14.0 Volts
when the engine is operating under
a normal load. Battery readings of
less than 10.5, or more than 15 Volts,
usually indicate a battery or electrical
system problem.
5. SPEEDOMETER: Indicates the speed
of the motorhome. The gauge indicates
MPH and KPH.
2008 K Nig ht
177
electrical systems - chassis — 9
10. TRANS TEMP: Shows approximate
temperature of the transmission fluid.
DO NOT let the transmission cooler oil
temperature exceed OEM specifications.
If excess temperature is indicated, stop the
motorhome and shift to neutral. Accelerate
the engine at 1200 to 1500 RPM and
allow temperature to return to normal.
Transmission temperature can also be
monitored with the (optional) Aladdin
system.
11. AIR PRESSURE GAUGE: Uses
two needles to indicate air system
pressures. One needle indicates air
pressure of the front air tank. The other
needle indicates air pressure of the
rear air tank. The normal air system
operating pressures are 115 to 130 psi.
These air pressures are preset at the
factory. If a problem occurs with either
air system not maintaining normal
operating pressure, it is an indication
of a malfunction in the air system.
Use caution and stop the motorhome
in a safe area. Contact a qualified
technician immediately.
NOTE
Layouts may vary with difference in
models or options.
Indicator Lights
1. PARK BRAKE: Parking/emergency
brake is applied.
178
7
14
6
8
18
13
19
10
12
11
17
5
1
9
2
16
15
4
3
2. ABS: Indicates possible fault in the
ABS Brake system.
3. LEFT TURN: Audible left Turn
Indicators: Audible indicator cancels
when the brake is applied.
8. ANT
UP: Illuminates
when the TV antenna is raised.
Lower the antenna before moving the
motorhome.
9. LOW FUEL: Fuel level is becoming
low.
4. RIGHT TURN: Audible right Turn
Indicators: Audible indicator cancels
when the brake is applied.
10. HEADLIGHT BEAM: Turns on
when high beams are active.
5. CRUISE: Indicates when cruise
control is activated.
11. WAIT TO START: Monitors the air
intake heater at engine start up. Wait
for lamp to cycle off before cranking
engine.
6. WARNING: Out of range condition
exists within the engine protection
circuits. Have the motorhome serviced
as soon as possible.
7. STOP ENGINE: A severe out of range
condition exists within the engine
protection circuits. Pull over and stop
as soon as possible. Shut-off engine
to avoid engine damage or related
systems.
2008 Kn ig ht
080209b
12. CHECK TRANS: Alerts of problems
related to the Allison Transmission.
The light should momentarily
illuminate when the ignition is
switched ON. When starting, the
lamp will extinguish indicating the
circuits are working properly. If the
lamp fails to illuminate, or remains on,
the transmission needs to be checked
immediately. Contact the nearest
Allison dealer.
electrical systems - chassis — 9
13. ALT FAIL: Failure within the
alternator charging system.
14. SEAT BELT WARNING: A warning
light that indicates seat belts are not
fastened.
15. ATC (Automatic Traction Control):
The ATC indicator light will illuminate
steady when the ignition key is turned
ON. The light remains illuminated
until the first brake application. The
indicator illuminates when the ATC
switch is pressed. See Section 10 for
more information.
16. LOW WASH: Windshield washer
fluid is becoming low.
17. LOW AIR: Air tank pressures are out
of range. Check air pressure.
18. DPF: The DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter)
light turns on when an active regeneration
cycle is necessary and has not been
able to initiate. See Section 10 for more
information.
19. HEST: The HEST (High Exhaust System
Temperature) light turns on when exhaust
temperatures reach 1450º F. This indicates
that an active regeneration cycle is
underway. No fault exists as long as there
are no other active warning lights. See
Section 10 for more information.
Switches
CRUISE ON/OFF: Turns cruise ON or OFF.
Dash switches come either
with or without a bar light.
The bar light indicates the
item/function is active. Icon
lighting for both switch
060066n
types illuminate with panel
lamps. Dash switches can be
illuminated and dimmed if desired, by turning
the headlight switch counterclockwise. Rotating
clockwise dims and turns off the switch light.
CRUISE CANCEL: Signals the cruise system
to disengage without losing the current speed
memory.
Driver’s Console & Dash
DRIVER SHADE: Operates the power sun
visor located on driver’s side.
PASS SHADE: Operates the power sun visor
located on the passenger side.
PEDAL IN/OUT: PEDAL IN/OUT: Use the
Pedal In/Out switch to adjust the brake and
throttle pedals. The switch moves the pedals
inward or outward. When the pedals reach
the end of their traveling distance the motor
will stop. Release the switch. Do not continue
moving the pedals. Damage to the motor and/
or fuse may result if operation of the switch
continues after reaching the fullest extend or
retract position.
ATC: The ATC system improves traction on
slippery or unstable surfaces by preventing
excessive wheel slip (See Section 10 for
detailed information). An indicator light on the
dash turns on with switch.
2008 K Nig ht
CRUISE SET/RES:
 Cruise SET - Actuates the Cruise Set
function of the engine controller.
 Cruise RES - Actuates the Cruise
Resume function of the engine controller.
NOTE
The cruise control system will not
operate with the exhaust brake engaged.
WARNING
To take control of the motorhome do
not use cruise control in heavy traffic or
on roads that are winding, slippery or
unpaved. Do not shift the transmission
into “N” (Neutral) with the cruise
control on as high engine RPM run up
occurs until the cruise control is turned
off.
ICC: Flashes all exterior lights at once.
EXH BRAKE: The exhaust brake is an
auxiliary braking device for slowing down the
motorhome. The exhaust brake is an effective
device for speed control in town and on local
routes. The exhaust brake is not a substitute for
service brakes. Do not neglect service brake
maintenance.
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electrical systems - chassis — 9
AIR DUMP: Manually dumps all air out of
air bags. May aid in leveling the motorhome.
Releasing air from air bags gives more range
of travel for leveling. Ignition must be in the
accessory or run position.
BATT BOOST: A switch that connects the
house batteries to the chassis batteries to
assist in starting the engine in the event the
motorhome chassis battery has been drained
and cannot start the engine.
MIRROR HEAT: Turns on exterior mirror
heat. Mirror heaters should be used when
defogging or de-icing. Mirror heat should not
be left on unless continuous fogging conditions
occurs.
MIRROR ADJUST: To
adjust the rear view mirror,
use the middle switch
to select the left or right
mirror. The middle position
is to prevent accidental
bumping of the switch and
changing of the mirror position.
ALADDIN CONTROLLER:
The controller allows the
operater to control cursor
movements and select different
menus and screens in the
Aladdin System.
080377f
BACK UP MONITOR: Used with the back
up camera and will display the rear view of the
motorhome.
HEADLIGHT: Pull one click
to operate the parking lights.
Pull two clicks to operate the
headlights. Rotating the headlight
080332
switch counterclockwise
illuminates the dash lights. Rotating the switch
clockwise dims the dash lights.
060097
NOTE
Ignition must be in the ON or RUN
position to operate mirror adjust.
AUX BLOWER (Optional): The auxiliary
blower switch operates a two speed fan which
assists in windshield defrosting, cooling
and recirculation. Middle position is off, up
position is high fan and down is low fan.
180
WIPER/WASHER: Wiper
operations are controlled when
rotating the knob to the right.
When the knob is rotated from
OFF to DELAY, the wiper will
turn on and time delay between
080339
wipes (ranging from 45 seconds to
two seconds) will occur. The amount of delay
time changes as knob is rotated. A continuous
low or high speed can be obtained by rotating
the knob to the appropriate position. The
wipers will be turned off with the switch in
the OFF position. When the end of the knob
is pushed in, washer fluid will be dispensed
from the system and the wipers will turn on
momentarily.
DRIVER’S MAP LIGHT: Rotating the
headlight switch counterclockwise turns on
the halogen map light above the driver. Rotate
clockwise to turn off. The map light is not
dimmable. The battery cut-out switch must be
on for map light to function
NOTE
If the headlights are left ON and
the ignition turned OFF a warning
bell sounds alerting the driver that
headlights are still ON.
2008 Kn ig ht
FOG LIGHTS: Operates the fog lights with
the ignition key on and the headlights in the
low beam position. The fog lights will go
off when the headlights are switched to high
beam.
electrical systems - chassis — 9
RADIO: Turns on the radio. The dash radio
ON/OFF switch must be on in order for this
switch to operate.
GEN SET: The generator automatically
initiates a preheat cycle when the switch
is pressed to START. The preheat cycle is
indicated by the light on the switch flashing
rapidly. Depending on ambient temperature
when preheat cycle may last up to fifteen
seconds.
To Start the Generator: Press and hold the
switch to START. The light flashes rapidly
indicating the preheat cycle. At the end of the
preheat cycle the engine will crank and start.
Release the switch after the generator has
started and is operating smoothly.
To Stop the Generator: Momentarily press
the switch to STOP. It is not necessary to hold
the switch until the generator has stopped.
Passenger Console
STEP COVER: The sliding step well cover is
extended and retracted at two switch locations.
The other switch is located at the driver
console. Power comes from the house batteries
and requires the battery cut-off switch to be on.
MAP LIGHT: Turns ON and OFF map light.
The battery cut-out switch must be on for map
light to function.
PASS SHADE: Operates the power sun visor
located on passenger side.
STEP LIGHT: Operates step light.
Entry Door:
BATT CUT-OUT: Turns house battery power
on to 12 Volt domestic fuse panels.
ENTRY STEP: Provides power to operate the
entry step through magnetic switches.
STEP COVER: Extends and retracts the step
cover.
PORCH LIGHT: Turns ON and OFF the
outside porch light.
WARNING
Stepwell cover is under air pressure.
When operating the stepwell cover be
sure there are not pets, shoes or other
obstructions in the stepwell area. Do
not operate the stepwell cover while
standing in the stepwell area.
CEILING LIGHT: Illuminates the front
ceiling light from the entry area.
PATIO AWNING ON/OFF: Turns power on
and off to the patio awning.
PATIO AWNING EXT/RET: Extends and
retracts patio awning.
Air conditioner & heater controls
Dash AC and Heater Control: Designed to
provide heating, cooling and defrost for the pilot
and co-pilot area. The system is not capable of
heating or cooling the entire motorhome.
Blower Control Switch: Controls the four
speeds of the blower motor. This is one of the
most effective ways of controlling temperature.
The mode control switch must be in the OFF
position for the blower to activate.
Temperature Control Switch: Setting the
switch to the red zone controls an electric water
valve regulating the amount of engine coolant
passing through the heating coils in the system.
Rotating to the blue zone sets the cut-in/cut-out
temperature of the air conditioning compressor
on the engine.
STOR LIGHTS: Turns the bay lights ON and
OFF.
DOOR AWNING: Extends and retracts
door awning.
Blower Speed Control Temperature Control
Mode Control
Switch
080221
2008 K Nig ht
181
electrical systems - chassis — 9
Mode Control Switch: Directs air flow by
opening or closing damper doors. Use the Mode
Control Switch to direct airflow where it is
needed to maximize comfort in the cockpit area.
NOTE
The air conditioning compressor is
activated when using MAX A/C, A/C,
MIX and DEFROST.
MAX A/C - Recirculated air is
drawn from the passenger area
and discharged through the dash
louvers.
A/C - Fresh Air is drawn from
outside into the system and
discharged through the dash
louvers.
VENT - Fresh air is drawn in
and discharged throughout the
dash louvers.
OFF - The blower motor does
not operate. The fresh air inlet
door will close, minimizing
outside air infiltration into the
motorhome.
BI-LEVEL - Fresh air is drawn
in and discharged through the
dash and the floor louvers.
MIX - Fresh air is drawn in and
discharged through the floor and
defrost louvers. The A/C system
operates to dehumidify the
discharged air.
DEFROST - Fresh air is drawn
in and discharged through
the defrost louvers. The
A/C compressor operates to
dehumidify the discharged air.
A/C Operation: When the Mode Control
Knob is positioned in the A/C mode, fresh air
is drawn through the front air intake of the unit
through the A/C coil. The Mode Control Knob in
the MAX A/C position closes off a damper door
to outside air and recirculates air from inside the
motorhome. Select this position when maximum
cold air is desired or to keep outside air from
entering the motorhome.
NOTE
Activate the A/C system monthly to keep
internal components of the compressor
lubricated.
Heat and Defrost Operation:
 Set the Mode Control Switch to the
desired position.
 Set the Temperature Control Switch to
the red zone.
FLOOR - Fresh air is drawn in
and discharged through the floor
louvers.
182
2008 Kn ig ht
Operating Tips & Hints
Air intake and discharge temperatures are
greatly affected by ambient temperatures and
relative humidity. A large amount of cooling
capacity is used to dehumidify as well as
cool air. After three to five minutes of A/C
operations, discharged air temperature should be
approximately 20º to 30º F. cooler than the fresh
or recirculated air entering the A/C system.
At the beginning of the day, activate the
compressor with the engine at idle. This will
avoid sudden high speed activation resulting
in possible damage from lack of internal
compressor lubrication.
Winter Use:
 De-ice the windshield using the
DEFROST mode.
 Air will heat up faster with a slower
blower speed until normal operating
temperature ranges are reached.
Summer Use:
 Close all windows and vents to hot,
humid outside air.
 MAX A/C and HI blower provides quick
cool down.
 Use a lower blower speed to produce
cooler air.
 Temperature Control switch must be set
to the blue zone for cool air.
electrical systems - chassis — 9
Heater: The heater warms the air in the dash
area. Much like the refrigeration side of the
system, a liquid will be used in the process.
This liquid is the engine coolant. The coolant is
passed from the radiator to an electronic water
valve. When open, the water valve will allow
the coolant to flow through the heater core. The
heater core is much like a miniature radiator.
Air is drawn into the system by a blower motor
through the outside recirculation door opening.
Air is blown through the A/C evaporator core
and then through the heater core. When the
temperature control is in the WARM position
coolant flows through the heater core. When the
temperature is in the COOL position coolant
flow bypasses the heater core. In either position,
the airflow is felt at the discharge vents.
Electric Water Valve: The water valve
controls the water flow to the heater core. A
control module compares the output voltage
from the thermostat to the feedback for the
stepper motor of the water valve. The control
module then drives the motor to within one-half
volt of the control thermostat voltage.
Functional Test:
 Start and operate the engine until
the water reaches normal operating
temperature.
 Set the HVAC temperature control to the
full hot position.
 The discharge air outlets should have hot
air.
 Rotate the temperature control to full
cold position.
 Allow 10 minutes for the temperature to
stabilize.

The discharge air outlets should have
cold air.
System Components
Compressor - The compressor is
belt driven from the engine through
the compressor and electronic clutch
pulley. The compressor will pump
freon from a low-pressure gas into a
high-pressure, high-temperature gas.
This is the start of the refrigeration
process.
Condenser - The condenser is made
of coils and fins which provide rapid
transfer of heat from the refrigerant
as external air passes over the coils.
The high-pressure gas is changed to a
high-pressure liquid.
Condenser Fan - A steady flow of
cooling air is maintained across the
condenser during system operations.
Receiver-Drier - Freon leaves the
condenser, enters the receiver-drier and
is stored until needed. The drier filters
out moisture in the system. It only
takes one drop of moisture to cause a
malfunction in the cooling unit.
2008 K Nig ht
Expansion Valve - The expansion
valve suppresses the refrigerant into
the evaporator according to the cooling
requirements. The pressure is reduced
in the restrictive effort of the expansion
valve. A part of the valve is the
capillary tube assembly. The capillary
tube is the sensing bulb at the outlet of
the evaporator.
Evaporator - A tube core and fins are
used in the evaporator similar to the
condenser. Air is blown through the
fins to allow the evaporator to cool and
reduce pressure.
Blower and Motor - The evaporator
has a fan called the blower. The blower
will draw air from the cab area and
force the air over the evaporator coils
and fins. This forced air will ensure
continuous vaporizing of the R134a.
Relays and Switches - Both electronic
and vacuum switches are used in the
control and operations of the system.
183
electrical systems - chassis — 9
Vacuum Generator - The vacuum
generator is important to the operation
of the dash heating and A/C systems.
This provides the vacuum to open
and close the vacuum switches. The
vacuum generator creates 15 inches of
vacuum that is passed to a reservoir
ball. Most dash heater and A/C systems
will only require 10 inches of vacuum
to operate the switches. The output
from the reservoir is sent to the vent
control knob. The control knob will
then direct the vacuum operation to
the appropriate vacuum switch to open
or close vents and switches. When the
ignition is on and the A/C is operating,
the vacuum generator will operate.
030947
Vacuum Generator: Located at front firewall.
Troubleshooting
The dash A/C and Heat system uses a
combination of compressed air (developed by
the chassis system), vacuum air (developed by
the vacuum generator) and electric relays and
vacuum switches. Therefore, any repair can be
classified in one of five categories:
184
Electrical Vacuum
Air Conditioner
 Heater
 Defroster


No Cooling:
1. Check that the blower is operating, A/C
switch is in A/C or MAX A/C position,
temperature control is turned to MAX
cooling (blue area).
2. System fuses are not blown.
3. Condenser fan is operating.
4. Check power supply to unit and
grounding of system.
5. Check wiring.
6. Coolant valve is leaking.
7. Drive belt is loose or broken.
8. Compressor Clutch is inoperative, will
not engage.
9. Expansion Valve is faulty or frozen.
10. Thermostat control is faulty.
11. Mode control switch is faulty.
12. Compressor is faulty.
13. Loss of refrigerant.
NOTE
An ultraviolet or UV Blue Light cube
is used for leak detection when dye is
introduced to the A/C System.
Reduced Cooling:
1. Coolant valve not operating correctly.
2. Air passages are obstructed.
3. Loose or worn drive belt.
4. Check blower and select switch.
5. Thermostat control valve is faulty.
6. Expansion valve is faulty.
7. Compressor is faulty.
8. Low refrigerant charge.
2008 Kn ig ht
No Heating:
1. A/C switch is turned off.
2. Blower switch is turned off.
3. Verify the proper engine coolant level.
4. Verify that the engine is reaching
operating temperature.
5. Verify engine coolant is reaching water
valve attached to unit.
6. Verify operation of water valve to
permit engine coolant to pass through
valve to heater core.
7. Check unit fuses.
8. Check power supply to water valve and
grounding.
9. Check wiring.
10. Engine thermostat faulty.
Blower Does Not Operate or Runs Slow:
1. Check fuses.
2. Check for loose or corroded connection.
3. Check wiring.
4. Check to ensure ignition switch is on.
5. Check blower and select switch.
6. Motor shaft has seized.
7. Blower wheel is out of alignment.
Damper Doors DO NOT Operate:
1. Is the vacuum generator being powered
and producing a vacuum?
2. Check the vacuum line entering the unit
for vacuum.
3. Check that the vacuum solenoid
mounted on unit is receiving power
from the mode switch. If operating
properly, the vacuum solenoid will feel
hot if current is engaging the solenoid.
4. Check the mode switch.
5. Check wiring.
electrical systems - chassis — 9
6. Check for a pinch in the vacuum line
leading to the vacuum motor that
operates the damper door in question.
Diagnostic Plug Location
The diagnostic plug is located under the dash
on the left side of the steering column. Through
this plug, ABS, engine and transmission systems
communicate over SAE J1939 electronic
technology. J1587 is used to retrieve diagnostic
codes from a particular system, such as the
engine for example.
Aladdin™ Engine Display (Optional)
The Aladdin System
will display engine and
transmission statistics at
a quick glance.
NOTE
The backup
camera and engine/
transmission
screens cannot
simultaneously display.
080377f
To display engine and transmission
information, use the controller to enter Coach
Info from the Main Menu.
090280e
Engine Diagnostics:
The engine diagnostics will notify the operator
of deviations from the programmed limits of
the engine through the warning lamp in the
dashboard. Should a system component with the
engine develop a deviation, the warning lamp
will illuminate and a diagnostic code will be
logged and stored in the system memory. These
codes are accessed by a service technician using
special equipment.
020195o
020195v
2008 K Nig ht
185
electrical systems - chassis — 9
engine “no start” flow chart
186
2008 Kn ig ht
10
2008 Knight
chaSSiS information — Section 10
cHaSSIS - IntroDUctIon ............................. 190
aIr SUpply SyStem ...................................... 190
Air.Governor............................................... 191
Air.Storage.Tanks........................................ 191
Air.Fittings.................................................. 192
aIr SyStem cHargIng (external) ............. 192
Air.System.Test........................................... 192
Air.Coupler.................................................. 194
aIr Dryer ...................................................... 194
Desiccant.Cartridge..................................... 195
Desiccant-Type.Air.Dryer............................. 196
Air.Dryer.Cycle............................................ 196
aIr SprIng InSpectIonS ............................. 196
HeIgHt control valveS.............................. 197
Brake SyStemS ............................................ 197
Air.Brakes................................................... 197
Park.&.Emergency.Brake.System................ 198
Automatic.Slack.Adjuster............................ 198
Brake.Systems.-.Backup............................. 198
aBS/atc SyStem (antI-lock BrakeS) ........ 199
ABS.Diagnostic........................................... 200
front axle ................................................... 201
Alignment................................................... 202
Lubrication.Maintenance.Safety................... 203
Steering.Components.................................. 203
Steering.Column......................................... 203
Drag.Link.................................................... 204
Center.Link................................................. 204
Steering.Spindles........................................ 204
Control.Arm.Bushings................................. 204
Front.Brakes................................................ 205
SteerIng gear..............................................
gear.............................................. 205
205
DrIve axle & DrIve SHaft .......................... 205
205
U-Joint.Angles.Phasing.&.
Driveline.Balance........................................ 207
Driveline.Balance.
207
SHock aBSorBer.......................................... 208
208
levelIng - HyDraUlIc ................................. 208
208
Prior.to.Leveling.......................................... 209
Prior.to.Leveling..........................................
209
Manual.Leveling.......................................... 209
Manual.Leveling..........................................
209
Automatic.Leveling. .................................... 210
Automatic.Leveling.
210
Retracting.Leveling.Jacks. .......................... 210
Retracting.Leveling.Jacks.
210
engIne - general InformatIon ................. 211
211
StartIng proceDUre .................................. 212
212
Normal.Starting.......................................... 212
Normal.Starting.
212
Cold.Weather.............................................. 212
Cold.Weather..............................................
212
engIne oIl ..................................................... 221
213
133
engIne SHUtDoWn ....................................... 221
214
144
Extended.Engine.Shutdown......................... 221
Extended.Engine.Shutdown.........................
214
144
coolant SyStem .......................................... 221
214
144
Radiator/Charge.Air.Cooler.......................... 2216
Radiator/Charge.Air.Cooler..........................
16
rear grIll .................................................... 2217
17
exHaUSt Brake ............................................ 2218
18
Operation.................................................... 2218
Operation....................................................
18
Functions.................................................... 218
tranSmISSIon .............................................. 218
Shift.Selector.............................................. 218
Check.Trans.Indicator.................................. 219
Periodic.Inspections.................................... 220
tranSmISSIon flUID & fIlterS .................. 221
fUel SyStem ................................................. 2222
Fuel.Requirements...................................... 2222
Fuel.Requirements.
Fuel.Tank..................................................... 2223
Fuel.Tank
Fuel.Sender.. ............................................... 2224
Fuel.Sender
Fuel.Lines.&.Hoses..................................... 2225
Fuel.Lines.&.Hoses.....................................
Fuel.Filters.................................................. 2225
Fuel.Filters..................................................
HyDraUlIc SyStem ...................................... 2225
Hydraulic.Reservoir.. ................................... 2225
Hydraulic.Reservoir
Hydraulic.Filter............................................ 2226
Hydraulic.Filter............................................
aIr Intake & cHarge aIr SyStem .............. 2226
Changing.Air.Filter.. ..................................... 2227
Changing.Air.Filter
Air.Filter.Restriction.Indicator.. ..................... 2227
Air.Filter.Restriction.Indicator
DIeSel partIcUlate fIlter ......................... 227
lUBrIcatIon maIntenance ......................... 2228
llUBrIcatIon
UBrIcatIon cHartS .................................... 2232
SpecIfIcatIonS
S
pecIfIcatIonS cHartS............................... 2234
Tank.Capacities.
TTank.Capacities
ank.Capacities.. ......................................... 2234
Engine.Specifications..................................
EEngine.Specifications
ngine.Specifications..................................
.................................. 2234
Chassis.Fluid.Capacities.
Chassis.Fluid.Capacities
C
hassis.Fluid.Capacities.. ............................ 2234
Generator.Specifications.............................
Generator.Specifications
G
enerator.Specifications.............................
............................. 2234
Belts.&.Filters.
Belts.&.Filters
B
elts.&.Filters.............................................. 2234
Battery
B
attery SpecIfIcatIon cHartS ................. 2235
Maintenance.Records............................ 236
chassis information — 10
Chassis - Introduction
This section contains information and
instruction regarding various components of the
motorhome chassis. Follow the guidelines and
procedures to help understand and operate the
motorhome. Complete instructions for engine
and transmission are located in their respective
operators manual included in the Owner’s
Information File Box.
WARNING
When welding is involved for
motorhome repair or modification,
only qualified, experienced technicians
should weld on the chassis. Improper
welding procedures and materials
may weaken the assembly or result in
damage that is not obvious and may not
cause an immediate problem or failure.
Unauthorized modifications or repairs to
the chassis could result in a forfeiture of
warranty coverage.
DANGER
Due to the sensitive nature of the
electronics on the chassis, the following
precautions are required to protect
electrical components in the motorhome
chassis.
1. Disconnect the (+) positive and (-)
negative battery connection.
2. Cover electronic control components
and wiring to protect from hot sparks.
3. Disconnect the terminal plugs from
the engine Electronic Control Unit
located on the curb side of the engine
block.
188
4. Disconnect all the plugs from the
transmission Electronic Control
Module located in the roadside front
distribution panel.
5. Disconnect the wiring from the
alternator.
6. DO NOT connect welding cables to
electronic control components.
7. Attach the welding ground cable no
more than two feet from the part to be
welded.
The Roadmaster chassis design provides
exceptional balance, handling and braking
characteristics. The Roadmaster chassis is an
engine and frame unit featuring an all steel frame
design, providing greater structural integrity
and uniform stress distribution. Incorporated
in the Roadmaster chassis is the air suspension
system using eight air bags and gas shock
absorbers. This design provides the smoothest
ride, best handling and trouble free service
while delivering excellent drive ability. The
chassis also has a three-point hydraulic leveling
system. The Roadmaster chassis design offers
unsurpassed ease of maintenance and service.
The towing system rating incorporated in the
construction of the frame is 10,000 lbs. towing
and 1,000 lbs. tongue weight.
100168c
The Roadmaster’s exclusive raised rail
chassis with air suspension consists of front and
rear axles, with trailing links. A panhard bar
on each axle controls side motion. Each axle
2008 Kn ig ht
mounts to the trailing links that are connected
to the chassis. The raised rail design of main
chassis offers increased bay storage space. The
suspension control arms attach to the frame
through bushings, which require no lubrication.
The preset suspension ride height automatically
maintains proper suspension height throughout
the load range.
Air Supply System
The air compressing system on the motorhome
is comprised of several items: air compressor, air
governor, air dryer, a front air tank and a rear air
tank. The compressed air system operates several
items, some of which include brakes, suspension,
air horns, air gauge. The air system is charged
by a gear driven air compressor mounted on the
engine. As engine speed increases, compressed
air output increases. When air is compressed,
heat is generated. Heat dissipates as air is
discharged from the compressor. Moisture
condenses in the compressed air as it cools.
The moisture laden air then enters an air dryer
where the air is filtered. The filtered air charges
the front air tank. The front air tank is divided
in two halves: a wet side and a dry side. The
compressed air enters the wet side before
entering the dry side. A discharge line from the
dry side of the front air tank charges the rear air
tank. Discharge lines use inline check valves to
prevent back flow of compressed air.
chassis information — 10
The pneumatically operated items are divided
into two categories: brakes and accessory air.
Brakes have full use of supplied air pressure.
Accessory air items, such as air horns, receive
air through pressure protection valves (PPV).
The PPV will not allow compressed air flow
until about 60 psi. In the event of an air system
problem, the pressure protection valve will
leave a reserve air charge for braking. Pressure
protection valves are installed for safety.
Air Governor
Air Storage Tanks
The air
governor, located
in the engine
compartment,
regulates the air
compressor to
Located on engine
090319
cut-in and cut-out,
keeping the air system in the specified
operating range of 110 to 130 psi, then sends an
air “purge” signal to the
Air Dryer.
Cut-in pressure of
about 105 psi is factory
preset from the governor
manufacturer and is
not adjustable. Cut-out
pressure is calibrated to
130 psi. When cut-out
pressure is reached, the
governor will send an air
purge signal to the Air
Dryer. This opens the
purge port of the Air Dryer,
expelling moisture. The
purge action of the Air
Dryer is identified by the
short release of air at the
rear of the motorhome.
Manually drain the
front and rear air tanks
once a month, or more,
depending on operating
conditions where humidity
is high.
090404b
Rear tank drain: located
next to rear hitch
090435c
090435b
Front Tank Drain: located
in generator compartment
Air Drains:
Air system tank drains are located in the
generator compartment and in the rear engine
compartment. The air tanks should be drained at
least once a month or more often in areas of high
humidity and where temperature fluctuates 40º F
or more daily.
To Drain the Tanks:
• Slowly open the drain valves. Moisture
will be expelled under pressure. After
all moisture and air is purged from the
tanks, the valves should remain open
an additional five minutes to allow any
moisture remaining a chance to drain.
• Close valves and start engine. Check
valves for leaks.
Representation of air supply system
2008 K Nig ht
189
chassis information — 10
WARNING
Wear safety glasses to prevent eye injury
from expelled moisture. Open drain
valves slowly as moisture will be expelled
under high-pressure.

Pull hose away from fitting to expand
and set inner seal. Ensure hose is
properly retained in fitting.
NOTE
Both air tanks have a pressure relief
valve which is set to release at about 130
psi.
Air Fittings
Push-in fittings are used to connect air hoses
between pneumatically operated items. Fittings,
sizes and types vary for different applications.
Threaded fittings adapt the push-in fittings to
connect pneumatically operated items. Parts
include the release ring, locking ring, solid brass
body and special rubber compound O-ring.
Damaged hoses can be repaired by splicing.
090446
To Disconnect Hose:
 Push hose into fitting.
 Push release ring down
against locking ring
portion of the fitting
body.
 While holding the
release ring down,
pull hose away from
fitting.
090445
To Connect Hose:
 Push hose into fitting
090466
through the release ring and the
O-ring. Use a slight twisting motion to
seat firmly against the internal tube stop.
190
NOTE
When putting air hose back into fitting,
be sure that hose is cut as squarely as
possible for an even seal in the fitting.
The cavity of the positive tubing stop
provides support to prevent leakage.
WARNING
DO NOT remove air hoses from fittings
while system is pressurized. Serious
injury may occur.
WARNING
Never place yourself under motorhome
without first properly blocking frame
(jackstands) from coming down in case
of rapid deflation of air system.
Air System Charging (External)
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The air system on the motorhome can be
charged from an external air
supply source. Located in the
front generator compartment
is a type C automotive male
fitting. Caution should be
020145
used when charging the air
Located in generator
system from this fitting. The compartment
air supplied from an external
source may contain moisture. Compressed air
introduced into the air system from this fitting
is not filtered by the air dryer. The auxiliary air
charge fitting will charge the front and rear air
tanks. A shut-off valve is installed to prevent air
from escaping.
CAUTION
The external air supply source should
be regulated to charge the air system
on the motorhome no higher than
120 psi. Damage to the air system or
pneumatically operated items may occur.
Air System Test
Air system integrity is tested at the factory.
The air system is equipped with several safety
features. Periodically test these safety features
for function as well as checking the air system
for possible leaks.
NOTE
These tests can also be found in the
Department of Motor Vehicle (DMV) air
brake certification requirement. Some
tests will require precautions for safety
purposes.
Inflation Rate Test:
chassis information — 10
This will test how long it takes the air system
to achieve a specific pressure in a timed event
when starting at a lower pressure. This test
will verify the minimum acceptable volume of
compressed air created by the air system.
1. Start engine. Increase engine speed to
1000 rpm.
2. Beginning time for the test will
commence when air system pressure
obtains 85 psi.
3. End time when system pressure obtains
100 psi.
Elapsed time must not exceed 45 seconds.
Air Governor Cutout Test:
The air governor controls action of the air
system pump. This will test the air governor
cutout pressure setting, which indicates system
pressure has achieved maximum set psi.
1. Start engine.
2. Run engine until a chuff (air release) is
heard from the air dryer.
Maximum cutout pressure must not exceed 155
psi. Air system pressure will stabilize between
135 to 145 psi.
Unapplied Pressure Loss Test:
This test will verify maximum acceptable
air system pressure loss rate without use of
any pneumatically operated devices. This test
requires a flat, level surface as the park brake
will be released with the engine off. Chock
wheels to prevent vehicle movement.
1. Start engine.
2. Run engine until a chuff (air release) is
heard from the air dryer.
3. Shut engine off.
4. Release the park brake.
Note system pressure after air system stabilizes
from release of park brake. Air system pressure
must not lose more than 2 psi per minute.
Applied Pressure Loss Test:
This test will verify the rate of maximum
acceptable air system pressure loss with only
the service brakes applied. Do not use other
pneumatically operated devices during this test.
This test requires a flat, level surface as the park
brake will be released with the engine off. Chock
wheels to prevent vehicle movement.
1. Start engine.
2. Run engine until a chuff (air release) is
heard from the air dryer.
3. Shut engine off.
4. Release the park brake.
5. Apply and hold service brake pedal.
Note system pressure after air system pressure
stabilizes. Air system pressure must not lose
more than 3 psi per minute.
Low Air Warning Test:
This test will verify low air warning buzzer/
lamp activation. A Low Air warning buzzer or
lamp will sound/illuminate should air system
pressure fall to 60 or 65 psi.
1. Start engine.
2. Run engine until low air warning
indicators are inactive.
3. Shut engine off then turn key to ignition
2008 K Nig ht
on.
4. Fan (apply/release in quick succession)
service brake pedal.
Low air warning indicator will sound no lower
than 60 psi.
Park Brake Apply Test:
The park brake will automatically apply if low
air warning indicator(s) are ignored and system
pressure falls well below safe operating levels.
A flat, level surface is required as the park brake
will be released with the engine off. Chock
wheels to prevent vehicle movement.
1. Start engine.
2. Run engine until low air warning
indicators are inactive.
3. Shut engine off.
4. Release park brake.
5. Fan (apply/release in quick succession)
service brake pedal.
The park brake will automatically apply
between 20 to 40 psi.
Park Brake Hold Test:
This test will verify engagement of the park
brake. A flat, level surface is required. While the
test is performed with the park brake applied,
use precautions in case of vehicle movement.
This test only verifies the park brake is engaged.
It is not intended to verify the maximum amount
of braking force created by the park brake.
1. Start engine.
2. Place transmission into gear. Do not
release park brake.
3. Apply light throttle, not to exceed 1,000
191
chassis information — 10
RPM.
Test confirms that the park brake is engaged
and holding.
Air Governor Cut-in Test:
The air governor controls action of the air
system pump. This will confirm the air governor
cut-in pressure setting.
1. Start engine.
2. Run engine until a chuff (air release) is
heard from the air dryer.
3. Fan (apply/release in quick succession)
service brake pedal until system
pressure is between 110 and 115 psi.
Air governor cut-in pressure is approximately
115 psi.
Brake Grab Test:
This test will verify brake friction torque between
the front wheels. This test requires a rapid and full
pressure application of service brake pedal. Use
proper precautions to prevent movement of cargo
or other items that are not secured. This is a single
vehicle test. Select deserted and level road surface
(preferably a large and empty parking lot). Road
crown, depending on severity, may affect test
results.
1. Start engine.
2. Run engine until a chuff (air release) is
heard from the air dryer.
3. Release park brake.
4. Accelerate to approximately 5 mph.
5. Rapidly and firmly apply service
brake pedal to bring vehicle to an
abrupt stop.
192
The steering wheel will not pull to the
left or right if front wheel braking torque is
symmetrical.
Air Coupler
Provided for convenience is a remote
air supply coupler located in the generator
compartment. This female fitting will accept
type C automotive connectors. This auxiliary
air fitting may be used to inflate tires, air
mattresses or other pneumatic items. This fitting
is not designed to charge the air system on the
motorhome. The air supply for the auxiliary air
fitting is charged from the front air tank through
a pressure protection valve.
090435b
Located in generator compartment
To use this feature:
 Slide the locking collar back. Using a
firm grip, fully insert the air fitting into
the auxiliary air supply. Release the
locking collar to retain the air fitting after
the fitting is properly inserted.
To remove fitting:
 Firmly grip the air hose near the fitting to
prevent recoil.
2008 Kn ig ht

Slide the locking collar back to release
fitting.
NOTE
Due to air pressure restrictions in the
pressure protection valve and tire stem
valve, the maximum amount of tire
pressure achieved when the system is
used to fill a tire is approximately 115 psi
with the air system on the motorhome
charged to 130 psi. Maximum outlet air
pressure is achieved when the air system
completes the fill cycle indicated by the
purge cycle of the air dryer. Use a short
hose to reduce tire fill time.
Air Dryer
The air dryer, located between the frame rails
next to the transmission, removes moisture from
the compressed air system to prevent freezing
of brakes or other pneumatically operated
items. The three functions of the air dryer are
cooling, filtering and drying the system air. This
prevents valve and seal damage or wash away of
lubricants as well as freeze damage to the system
components.
Air Dryer Cycle:
The governor turns the compressor on when
the supply tank pressure drops below cut-in
pressure. Compressed air then passes into the
air dryer at the inlet port. Moisture-laden air
and contaminants pass through the desiccant.
Moisture is retained by the desiccant and collects
in the base of the dryer. When the compressor
reaches cut-out pressure (approximately 130
psi) the purge valve opens and the dryer purges
and expels water collected in the dryer base.
chassis information — 10
The regeneration valve opens sending a small
charge of dry system air from the front air tank
back through the dryer. The backflow dries the
desiccant, preparing it for the next cycle.
Air Dryer Components:
1. Purge Valve: A valve located on the
bottom of the air dryer base that remains
open during a compressor unload cycle
to allow collected moisture, condensation
and contamination to expel from the air
dryer during the purge cycle.
2. Pressure Relief Valve: Protects the air
dryer from over-pressurization.
3. Regeneration Valve: Controls
regeneration of the desiccant by allowing
air from the supply and secondary tanks
to bypass the outlet check valve.
4. Heater Power Connection: Provides 12
Volt DC power to the heating element.
070164b
In extreme cold, verify that the air dryer
heater is in good working order. The 100-watt
heater in the air dryer is controlled by ignition
power. The heater turns on below 45° F and off
when the air dryer temperature is above 86° F.
The 15 amp fuse for the heater is located in the
rear distribution box found in the rear curbside
compartment.
WARNING
Remove all pressure from the air system
before disconnecting any component,
including the desiccant cartridge.
Pressurized air can cause serious
personal injury.
Desiccant Cartridge
Warm, humid air from the
compressor condenses into
either water or water vapor.
A desiccant-type air dryer
protects the air brake system
by drying moisture-laden air
070165
before it passes through the
air reservoirs and into the
brake system. The replacement kit contains one
cartridge and one O-ring.
To Replace the Cartridge:
1. Loosen and remove the old cartridge.
Use a strap wrench, if necessary.
2. Remove and discard the O-ring from
the dryer base.
3. Inspect and clean the seal seat. Repair
any minor damage.
2008 K Nig ht
NOTE
If the seats are damaged so
badly that a tight seal cannot be
maintained, replace the air dryer.
4. Install a new O-ring.
5. Lubricate the O-Ring on the stem with
a thin layer of grease.
6. Lubricate the cartridge seal with a thin
layer of grease.
7. Thread the replacement cartridge onto
the base until the seal touches the base.
Tighten the cartridge ONE additional
turn. DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN.
NOTE
If an excess amount of water is present
when performing the monthly air tank
drain service, the filter for the air dryer
may need to be changed.
080223
1. O-Ring
2. Seal Seat
3. Cartridge Seal
193
chassis information — 10
Air Spring Inspections
Replacement Requirements
Components
When to replace?
Desiccant Cartridge
• Every two to three years. • Preventive maintenance.
• When compressor is
• Contaminated cartridge.
replaced.
• Saturated or contaminated
cartridge, high duty cycle
• Water in supply tank.
Why?
Items listed below should be checked when the
motorhome is in for periodic maintenance.
NOTE
Never attempt to service the air
suspension on a motorhome with the air
spring inflated.
(wrong application of air dryer).
Desiccant-Type Air Dryer
1. Warm, humid air from the compressor
condenses into either water or water
vapor before entering the air dryer.
2. A desiccant-type air dryer protects the
motorhome air brake system by drying
moisture-laden air before it passes
through the air reservoirs and into the
brake system.
3. Water collects in the base of the dryer
when warm air condenses the water
before it enters the dryer, or inside of
the dryer before the water reaches the
desiccant.
4. The desiccant material then removes
additional water vapor, further drying
the air.
5. During regeneration phase, the
regeneration valve and pressurecontrolled check valve remove water
from the desiccant bed with a backflow
of dried, expanded system air.
194
Air Dryer Cycle
The governor turns the compressor on when
the supply tank pressure drops below cut-in
pressure. Compressed air passes into the air
dryer at the inlet port:
1. Moisture-laden air and contaminants
pass through the desiccant.
2. Moisture is retained by the desiccant.
Moisture also collects in the base of the
dryer.
3. The governor turns the compressor
off when the system reaches cutout
pressure (approximately 135 psi).
4. The dryer purges and expels water
collected in the dryer base.
5. When the regeneration valve opens, the
dry system air flows back through the
dryer. A small charge of air from the
front air tank backflows through the
filter. The backflow dries the desiccant,
preparing it for the next cycle.
2008 Kn ig ht
Inspect the Outer Diameter (OD) of the
air springs. Check for irregular wear or
heat cracking.
 Inspect air lines to ensure contact does
not exist between air line and OD of the
air springs. Air lines can rub a hole in an
air spring very quickly.
 Ensure there is sufficient clearance
around the complete circumference
of the air spring while at maximum
diameter.
 Inspect the OD of piston for buildup of
foreign materials. On a reversible sleeve
style air spring, the piston is the bottom
component of the air spring.
 The correct ride height should be
maintained. All motorhomes with air
springs have a specified ride height
established by the manufacturer. This
height should be maintained within ¼
inch. This dimension can be checked
with the motorhome loaded or empty.
 The leveling valves (or height control
valves) assist in ensuring the total air
spring system works as required. Clean,
inspect and replace if necessary.

chassis information — 10
Make sure to check shock absorbers for
leaking hydraulic oil and worn or broken
end connectors. If a broken shock is
found, replace it immediately. The shock
absorber will normally limit the rebound
of an air spring and keep it from over
extending.
 Check the tightness of all mounting
hardware (nuts and bolts). If loose,
tighten. DO NOT over-tighten.

Cleaning:
The approved cleaning method is to use
soap and water, methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol
or isopropyl alcohol. Unapproved cleaning
methods include all organic solvents, open
flames, abrasive and direct pressurized steam
cleaning.
Height Control Valves
Height Control Valves (HCV) inflate or
deflate air springs to maintain proper suspension
height throughout the load range. Two Height
Control Valves are installed at the rear drive
axle to control rear suspension height and left
or right tilt of the motorhome. A separate HCV
is installed to control front suspension height.
The three HCVs mount to the main frame of the
motorhome, above the axles, with a linkage rod
connecting the valve to the axle.
Actuating components inside of the valves
are oil dampened to reduce valve reaction to
momentary suspension bounce and rebound.
When a constant suspension change occurs, such
as a load change or weight transfer through a
sustained corner, the valve reacts by adding or
purging air from the air springs as needed.
The air springs mount between the axle Hframe assembly and the two main frame rails.
Air spring support plates mount to the main
frame and the H-frame. There is a specified
distance the air spring must maintain between
the mounting plates. Other than specified
distance between the plates will compromise
ride quality and handling, and affect shock
absorber travel, drive shaft angle, as well as
various other running gear components.
Brake Systems
Air Brakes
The air brake system on the motorhome differs
from a conventional automotive hydraulic
braking system and should be treated differently.
Proper maintenance and lubrication are the
keys to keeping the air brake system in proper
working order.
The air system supplies air to the foot brake,
or treadle valve. Pushing down on the treadle
valve supplies an air charge signal to a sealed
brake chamber that consists of a spring and air
bladder. The air charge signal pushes on the
bladder and extends a threaded rod connected to
the automatic slack adjuster. The slack adjuster
rotates the S-cam expanding the shoes against
the drum. Air disc brakes follow much the same
principle, with the exception of the threaded rod
directly activating calipers.
Consideration needs to be given to stopping
distances and air system pressures. The
motorhome requires longer stopping distances.
Each brake application uses air from the air
system, and engine speed is directly proportional
to how fast that air system is replenished.
2008 K Nig ht
Prepare for downhill grades. It may be necessary
to select a lower gear and/or use the exhaust
brake. Use individual short brake applications
down long hills, rather than “riding” the
brakes, to extend the life of the brake lining.
Avoid overheating the brakes. Hot brakes have
less stopping power. When maneuvering the
motorhome around small areas, or backing into
spaces, several individual brake applications
might be made. Watch the air gauge. When
preparing to back into a space swing the
motorhome so it is aligned with the parking slot
before backing up.
The air braking system on the motorhome is
equipped with a low air pressure warning system
safety feature. Should a low air condition arise
while the vehicle is in operation, a warning
buzzer will sound and a dash warning light will
illuminate at approximately 60 to 65 psi (pounds
per square inch) to alert the operator.
195
chassis information — 10
Park & Emergency Brake System
The Park and Emergency Brake System
(Spring Brakes) applies to the rear drive axle
only. When the park brake is applied, air is
released from the rear brake chambers, allowing
the large spring in each rear brake chamber
to manually push the brake pads against the
rotor. The air system must be charged above
35 psi to allow the park brake to release.
Pushing down on the park brake handle charges
the rear brake chambers with air pressure,
overriding the emergency brake springs and
releasing the brakes. In the event of air loss
while the vehicle is under operation, the park
brake will automatically apply (this occurs at
approximately 30 psi), acting as an automatic
emergency brake system.
When preparing to depart, allow the air system
to achieve full air pressure as indicated by the air
gauge needles. Listen for the air dryer to purge,
indicating that the air dryer is functioning.
Look and listen for abnormalities. Abnormal
air pressure readings by either needle of the air
gauge alerts the operator to have the air system
checked to avoid an untimely failure.
Should a failure occur in the air system,
preventing the air pressure from building, it
may become necessary to “cage” the spring
brakes (“cage” procedure in Section 2 Towing
Procedures - Disabling Parking Brake). This
is an emergency procedure only. Caging the
rear air brake chambers manually overrides the
spring brakes and allows the vehicle to move.
This procedure does not affect normal service
braking.
196
NOTE
When the park brake is released, the
Park illumination lamp will remain lit
until air system pressure is above 65 psi.
WARNING
When parked with the air tank not
depleted, there is possibility of an
accidental release of the parking brake.
Traveling with small children and/or
pets may require a small block to be
fabricated to prevent accidental release.
The block should be placed under the
knob on the dash panel. A wooden
clothes pin, clasped at the base of the
shaft, will work.
Automatic Slack Adjuster
The braking system is equipped with automatic
slack adjusters. As brake lining wears, the slack
adjusters will automatically ratchet on the return
stroke as needed. This ratchet action will keep
the brake lining at proper adjustment. Automatic
slack adjusters and the connecting S-cam shaft
require periodic lubrication and inspection.
NOTE
Replacement parts should be of the
same original equipment size and type.
Mixing brake components may result
in unequal braking action. Brake
maintenance is not covered by the
manufacturer.
WARNING
Brake lining may contain asbestos
material and should only be serviced by
qualified service technicians who are
trained in the appropriate precautionary
procedures. If any loss of braking
effectiveness or abnormal braking
2008 Kn ig ht
indications are noticed, the brakes and
slack adjusters should be inspected by a
qualified brake technician.
WARNING
Automatic slack adjusters are not
designed to be manually adjusted.
DO NOT manually adjust the slack
adjusters. If any loss of braking
effectiveness or abnormal braking
indications are noticed, the brakes and
slack adjusters should be inspected by a
qualified brake technician.
Brake Systems - Backup
The motorhome air braking system is equipped
with backup safety systems and warning alarms
in the event of air system failure. For example:
should the air compressor fail to charge the
air system and low air gauge readings go
undetected, a low air pressure warning buzzer
will sound and a low air pressure dash warning
indicator light will flash. These warning
indicators occur at approximately 65 psi.
This will alert the operator of an impending
situation. If the motorhome is allowed continued
operation, the pneumatic emergency spring
brake relay valve, installed in the air system,
senses the low air pressure condition and will
release the air charge from the spring brake air
chambers on the rear drive axle. In this case,
the park brakes will automatically apply at
approximately 30 psi. This safety backup system
acts as an automatic emergency brake system.
chassis information — 10
Another backup safety is the air system
separation of the front and rear brakes,
implemented by using two air tanks. One tank
is located in the front and the other is located
in the rear. This separation allows the front air
tank to operate the front brakes; the rear tank
operates the rear drive axle brakes. This tank
division gives reassurance in case one tank
experiences a failure of an accessory air item
allowing the compressed air to escape.
Accessory air items are other pneumatically
operated items such as the air horn, vacuum
generator, etc. The accessory air items operate
only when air tank pressures exceed 65 psi.
This is done with pressure protection valves.
Should an accessory air item fail, the pressure
protection valve (PPV) reserves the remaining
air pressure of 65 psi for braking. This will leave
the motorhome with one air tank fully charged
for safety backup.
The rear air tank also has a safety backup
- the safety inversion valve. The inversion
valve senses the absence of rear air tank
pressure. In this case the inversion valve
will allow the operator to make a modulated
spring brake application, made in conjunction
with the emergency spring brake relay valve.
The inversion valve allows the front air tank
pressure to recharge the rear brake chambers
after the modulated spring brake application
has been made. This backup system implements
use of all the brakes, allowing the operator to
bring the motorhome a safe stop. In case of all
compressed air charge escaping from the front
air tank, the operator will still have full use of
the rear brakes.
ABS/ATC System (Anti-lock Brakes)
The motorhome is equipped with an antilock braking system (ABS) and automatic
traction control system (ATC). The ABS system
monitors wheel rotation speeds by using a 100tooth magnetic tone ring mounted to the hub.
Revolving with the wheel, the magnetic tone
ring is polarized giving positive and negative
pulsations. A stationary sensor is mounted
adjacent to the tone ring to monitor magnetic
pulses. The pulses are monitored by the ABS
electronic control unit (ECU).
The ECU monitors all wheel sensors at the
rate of 100 times per second. The ECU controls
Pressure Modulator Valves. Pressure Modulator
Valves have two electric-over-air solenoids,
a hold solenoid and a release solenoid. The
modulator valves are open under normal
braking, allowing a straight through air signal
from the treadle valve to the brake chamber.
Should a wheel lose traction under a braking
application, the ECU will energize the hold
solenoid of the Pressure Modulator Valve to
interrupt the air signal from the treadle valve to
the brake chamber. The release solenoid vents
the existing air signal, at the brake chamber
to the atmosphere, allowing the skidding tire
to regain traction. Skidding tires have less
tractive efficiency. It is possible, under certain
conditions, to have the wheel(s) skid with a
normal functioning ABS system.
The ABS itself does not apply additional
braking power. The purpose of the ABS is to
limit wheel lock and decrease stopping distance.
Cautious driving practices and maintaining
adequate safe distance when following vehicles
is the key to safe vehicle operation.
2008 K Nig ht
WARNING
The ABS/ATC system is designed to
increase tire to road surface traction but
cannot overcome naturally occurring
laws of physics. The ABS/ATC system,
combined with safe driving practices,
will reduce the possibility of wheel skid
and loss of lateral stability.
ABS Component Function:
 Speed sensors and tone rings on each
wheel monitor wheel rotation.
 Each speed sensor communicates wheel
rotation pulses to the Electronic Control
Unit.
 The ECU receives the speed sensor
signal pulses to calculate speed and
acceleration rates of each wheel.
 Based on the speed sensor input, the
ECU detects impending wheel lock
and operates the ABS Modulator
Valves required for proper control. The
Modulator Valves are operated in the Air,
Release or Hold modes to regulate air
pressure to the brake chambers.
090307
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chassis information — 10

Braking force is applied at a level which
minimizes the stopping distance while
maintaining as much lateral stability as
possible.
ABS Warning Light:
The ABS will perform a dash indicator lamp
check and self-diagnostic test each time the
ignition is switched to the on position.

When the ignition is turned on, the ABS
indicator illuminates momentarily (3
seconds) verifying the self-diagnostic
test. If the ABS indicator light remains
on, or illuminates while the motorhome
is being operated, this indicates a fault
in the anti-lock brake system. This fault
will not affect normal service braking.
The motorhome will need to go to a
service center to repair the problem.
INFORMATION
If a fault code occurs, call a Bendix
service locator at 1-800-247-2725 and
take the motorhome to the nearest
repair facility.
ABS Diagnostic
If the ABS light on the dash comes on it
indicates that a fault has occurred with the Antilock Brake System only. Normal braking is not
affected but the motorhome will need to go to
a service center. The service center can retrieve
ABS diagnostic fault codes.
198
Retrieving Codes Using ECU:
System configuration codes and fault codes are
displayed through the dash ABS warning light
as a series of blinked sequences. The fault codes
can be accessed by properly grounding Terminal
18 in the X1 connector found on the ABS ECU
module. The Bendix ABS ECU module is
located under the shift selector panel. On the
back of the ECU locate the black X1 connector,
pin 18. Ground pin 18 as described by inserting
a wire at the rear of the connector. Pin 18 is
located in the bottom right corner (labeled ABS
Warning).
NOTE
System configuration codes are
sequences of six blinked digits while
fault codes are sequences of two blinked
digits. Refer to an authorized Bendix
service center for a list of blink code
sequences. If grounding out is not done
correctly for a specific readout, stop
then start the procedure again.
NOTE
All blink codes are displayed by the ABS
warning light only.
The system is capable of performing
several diagnostic mode functions. After
ignition on, a two second delay must be
observed prior to grounding.
Active code retrieval: ground 1 time.
Inactive code retrieval: ground 2 times.
Clearing active codes: ground 3 times.
2008 Kn ig ht
System configuration check: ground 4 times.
Dynamometer test mode: ground 5 times.
Reconfigure ECU: ground 7 times.
NOTE
Reconfigure Mode is entered by
grounding prior to “ignition on.” Once
ignition is on, stop grounding, then
ground 7 times.
ATC System:
The ATC system improves traction on
slippery or unstable road surfaces by limiting
excessive drive wheel slip. This is accomplished
two ways, limiting engine torque to the drive
wheel or engaging a brake to the spinning
drive wheel. During normal operation engine
torque is unaffected. The ATC system works in
conjunction with the ABS Electronic Control
Unit. The ECU monitors tone ring speed of the
drive wheel in relation to the other wheels. If a
speed differential occurs in the drive wheel, the
ECU enters Automatic Traction Control mode.
During an ATC event, the ECU will
automatically react to optimize traction and
safety if the motorhome encounters a slippery
road surface. Engine torque is normally reduced
to limit drive wheel slip.
NOTE
The ATC system is always active.
chassis information — 10
ATC reacts to drive wheel slip by:
 Reducing engine torque to the drive
wheel if road speed is above 25 mph.
 Reducing engine torque and activating
drive axle brake controls if road speed
is below 25 mph. If the brake control
activates, it remains active regardless of
road speed.
ATC Indicator Light:
During normal operation, the
ATC indicator light on the dash
will illuminate steady when the
ignition key is turned ON. If an
ATC event occurs, the indicator
light will flash quickly. The
indicator light will flash slowly if
the ATC switch is activated.
090372
ATC Switch:
Activating the ATC switch reduces ECU
control over engine torque. Momentarily
pressing the ATC switch allows the ECU to
increase the amount of engine torque applied to
the drive wheel in an ATC event. The amount
of engine torque applied to the drive wheel will
vary with the amount of drive wheel slip versus
road speed. In an ATC event, the ECU remains
active regardless of road speed or switch
position. The light flashes slowly when the ATC
switch is activated.
080498y
Located on
driver’s console
CAUTION
Normally the switch should remain
inactive. During an ATC event (drive
wheel slip) the ECU will automatically
optimize drive wheel traction in most
situations. Activating the switch during
periods of wheel slip can increase torque
to the spinning drive wheel. Drive train
damage can occur if the spinning drive
wheel should suddenly regain traction.
If the motorhome is stuck it is advised
to call a professional towing company
to limit the possibility of body and drive
train damage.
Front Axle
While driving the motorhome, be aware of
any changes in the feel of steering and have
the system checked when noting apparent
differences. It is normal to hear some hydraulic
noise from the steering, especially when the
steering is at maximum, or while turning
the wheel when the motorhome is parked.
Investigate any unusual or loud noises that
occur. Begin by checking the level of the
hydraulic fluid. Traveling at slow speeds over
rough surfaces may cause a “clunking” noise to
emanate from the steering column, but if noise is
2008 K Nig ht
heard on smooth surfaces while sharply turning
back and forth, the noise should be inspected
and repaired as necessary.
Shimmy and looseness should be checked
and corrected as soon as possible. If looseness
is felt in the steering, the steering linkages can
be observed while someone turns the steering
wheel left and right. Watch the linkages for
evident play or uneven interaction between
components to help pinpoint a problem. Wheel
bearings should be cleaned and repacked with
high temperature disc brake grease every 30,000
miles. Have the steering system checked for
damage after a severe impact, such as striking
large potholes or curbs, and front-end collisions.
Observe the alignment of the steering wheel; a
change in the alignment may indicate damage to
the steering components or suspension.
Maintenance for the system entails adequate
lubrication. Use only a hand operated grease gun
on the fittings. Grease fittings for the steering
system are found on the both ends of the drag
link (the bar connecting the steering gear to the
axle), and on the intermediate steering shaft
located between the steering wheel and steering
gear. The correct wheel alignment promotes
longer tire wear and ease of handling while
minimizing the strain on the steering system
and the axle components. Use NLGI #2 Lithium
soap base lubricant for all steering linkage and
brake components.
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chassis information — 10
Alignment
Camber:
Camber, as shown, is vertical tilt of wheel as
viewed from the front of the motorhome. This is
machined into the axle when manufactured and
is not adjustable.
Incorrect toe settings, where toed-in or toedout, can have a significant affect on tire wear.
The toe setting is adjusted by lengthening or
shortening the cross tube.
“Negative” caster is the tilt of the top end of
the kingpin toward the front of the motorhome.
Setting the caster angle more positive than
specified may result in excess steering effort
and/or shimmy. Decreasing the angle may result
in the motorhome wandering or poor steering
return to center. The caster angle is determined
by the installed position of the steer axle.
• “Positive” camber is an outward tilt of
the wheel at the top.
• “Negative” camber is an inward tilt of
the wheel at the top.
090265
090267
Toe Setting: The toe setting represents
different distances between the front and rear of
the tires (measured at the vertical center line of
the tires).
Toe-in: Occurs when the tire front distance is
less than the tire rear distance.
Caster Adjustments:
Caster is the fore and aft tilt
(toward the front or rear of the
motorhome) of the steering kingpin
as viewed from the side of the
motorhome.
“Positive” caster is the tilt of the
top end of the kingpin toward the
rear of the motorhome.
Toe-out: Occurs when the tire front distance is
greater than the tire rear distance.
Wheels are generally set with initial toe-in.
As the motorhome operates tires tend toward
a toe-out condition. By starting with an initial
toe-in setting, a desirable “near zero toe-in” can
be achieved when the motorhome is in motion.
200
090266
Left
Right
Camber
Not Adjustable
Not Adjustable
Caster*
3.5º +/- .5º
Total Toe
4.0º +/- .5º
1/16″ (+/- 1/32”)
* Right must exceed Left at least 1.5 º, but less than 2.5 º.
NOTE: Motorhome must be at ride height for proper
alignment.
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chassis information — 10
Lubrication Maintenance Safety
Steering Components
The front axle components require periodic
lubrication maintenance. Chock wheels
for safety prior to accessing components
underneath the motorhome.
WARNING
Never place yourself under motorhome
without first properly blocking frame
(jackstands) from coming down in case
of rapid deflation of air system.
NOTE
Suspension and steering components
are lubricated at factory using Texaco
Starplex NLGI 2 Lithium Soap based
grease.
Typical Steering Components
1. Axle Beam
2. Steering Box
3. Intermediate Steering Shaft
4. Universal Joints
5. Slip Yoke
6. Ball Joint
7. Steering Column
8. Steering Wheel
9. Right Knuckle Assembly
10. Spindle
11. Kingpin
12. Centerlink
13. Pitman Arm
14. Drag Link
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Steering Column
The intermediate steering shaft connects the
steering wheel to the steering box. Service the
intermediate steering shaft universal joints and
slip yoke every 30,000 miles or annually. Check
the torque on the clamp bolt at least every five
years or 50,000 miles. Remove the steering
column cover to access the upper universal
joint and slip yoke lubrication points. The lower
universal joint is accessed from underneath in
the generator compartment behind the front
electrical box.
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chassis information — 10
Warning
Do not place yourself under motorhome
without first properly blocking frame
(jackstands) from coming down in case
of rapid deflation of air system.
Greasing the Intermediate Steering
Shaft Universal Joints:
1. Check the shaft for looseness. Repair if
loose or worn.
2. Apply the specified grease at the grease
fitting on the universal joint. Apply
until the new grease purges from all the
seals.
3. If the new grease does not purge from
the seals, disassemble and clean the
joint or replace the universal joint. DO
NOT lose the needle bearings.
Drag Link
The drag link connects the steering box
pitman arm to the steer axle. The movable joint
(ball joint) uses sealed boots to prevent water
intrusion. DO NOT rupture the boot when
applying grease. Grease interval is six months or
every 5,000 miles.
Greasing the Intermediate Steering Shaft
Slip Yoke and Splines:
Intermediate Steering Shaft: Torque clamp
bolt to 48 ft. lbs. for 3/8” and 75 ft. lbs. for
7/16”.
1. Check the shaft for looseness. Repair if
loose or worn.
2. With finger, cover the rear air hole so
grease flows to the front seal. Apply the
specified grease at the grease fitting on
the slip yoke. Apply until new grease
purges and forces finger away from
the air hole in the end of the slip yoke.
Greasing interval is yearly or every
30,000 miles.
202
NOTE
Depending upon application universal
joints may have two grease fittings each.
It is necessary to apply grease to each
fitting to properly lube the universal
joint.
NOTE
It will be necessary to start the
motorhome and turn the steering wheel
to access fitting(s).
Center Link
Steering Spindles
The steering
Upper
Lubrication
spindles attach to
Points
the front axle and
pivot on the kingpin.
The wheel end
Lower
assembly and brake
Lubrication
Points
090414
system attach to the
spindle. There are upper and lower lubrication
points for the kingpin. The drag link attaches to
the roadside spindle. After initially lubricating
the roadside and curbside kingpins, rotate the
steering assembly lock to lock (full left to right)
then move assembly back to center. This purges
any remaining air pockets. Continue lubricating
the kingpins until new grease purges with no air
pockets. Greasing interval is every six months or
5,000 miles.
Control Arm Bushings
090353c
090349b
The center link is located on the backside of
the steer axle. The center link attaches the two
wheels together causing the right front to track
with the left front. Greasing interval is every six
months or 5,000 miles.
090354b
2008 Kn ig ht
Control arms align the axles perpendicular
with the frame. The panhard bar controls side
to side motion of the axles in the frame. Control
arm bushings and panhard bar bushings do not
require lubrication.
chassis information — 10
Front Brakes
The slack adjuster and
camshaft need to be lubed
periodically to ensure
proper brake operation.
Lubricate every 10,000
miles or three months
using a NLGI #2 Lithium
090350
soap-based lubricant.
Typical Air Drum Brakes:
Lubricate until new grease
appears at exit points.
Steering Gear
Power steering is provided by using hydraulic
pressure to assist rotating the output shaft of
the steering gear. Located at the end of the
input shaft of the steering gear is poppet valve
and worm drive. The poppet valve directs the
hydraulic fluid pressure to a type of spool.
The worm drive threads in the center of the
spool. When in the center position, pressurized
hydraulic fluid bypasses the spool. When a turn
is made, the poppet valve shifts to one direction
or the other, directing the hydraulic pressure
to one side of the spool depending on turning
direction. The hydraulic fluid is then cooled
before returning to the reservoir.
NOTE
Inspect for signs of leakage when
performing fluid level checks.
Changing the hydraulic filter in the engine
compartment at regular intervals will help
ensure trouble-free operation.
090403c
Drive Axle & Drive Shaft
The steering gear has been designed to provide
long service life and simple service repair. The
rack and sector shaft does not require center
point adjustment. The clearance between the
cylinder bore and the piston is closely controlled
and a pistion ring was added to better use the
hydraulic oil supplied. With reasonable care
and limited maintenance the steering gear will
provide many miles of reliable performance. The
bleeder valve is used on intitial installation and
replacement.
Drive Axle:
The chassis drive axle
is a single reduction
axle. The differential
gears consist of a
hypoid pinion and
ring gear set and bevel
090416
Ring and Pinion Gears
differential gears. The
differential carrier can
be removed from the axle housing as a unit in
order to perform repairs.
2008 K Nig ht
All power from the engine to the rear tires is
transferred through the rear axle. For this reason,
it is important that maintenance be performed on
the axle as required to avoid premature wear of
the gears and bearings in the axle.
Drive Axle Lubricant:
The rear axle is filled with synthetic gear oil
meeting MIL-L-2105D specifications. Change
interval is every 250,000 miles or 36 months,
whichever occurs first.
During lubricant change, fine metal particles
will be observed clinging to the magnetic fill
and drain plugs of the axle. These particles are
normal wear particles from the axle components,
but will cause faster than normal wear of
the axle components if allowed to circulate
through the lubricant. It is recommended that
the magnetic plugs be tested, if not replaced, at
each lubricant change. These plugs should have
sufficient magnetic strength to pick up a 1.5
pound weight of low carbon steel. Never replace
a magnetic plug with a non-magnetic “pipe
plug” as they will not keep the lubricant clear of
metal particles or seal properly.
The level of lubricant in the rear axle should
be checked every 30,000 miles or 6 months,
whichever occurs first. This will ensure adequate
lubricant in the axle for proper operation.
Regular inspection of the drive axle lube levels
is an essential maintenance procedure.
Warning
Do not place yourself under motorhome
without first properly blocking frame
(jackstands) from coming down in case
of rapid deflation of air system.
203
chassis information — 10
Proper Drive Axle Lubricant Level:
 With the motorhome parked on a level
surface and rear axle warm, place a large
container under axle.
 Clean the area around the fill plug, which
is located approximately halfway up the
axle housing bowl.
 Remove the fill plug and observe the
lubricant level.
 The lubricant
should be level with
bottom of the hole.
 Important: The lube
level close enough
to the hole to be
Correct Oil Level
seen or touched is
not sufficient. The
lube must be level
with the hole.
 Correct the level as
090264
necessary.
Incorrect Oil Level
 Re-install the fill
plug and tighten to
35 to 50 ft. lbs.
To Drain and Replace Lubricant:
1. Place a large container
under the axle.
2. Remove drain plug and
allow axle to completely
drain.
3. Properly dispose of oil.
Fill Plug 090467b
4. Clean the drain plug and test
(replace the drain plug if needed).
5. Install and tighten drain plug to 35 to
50 ft. lbs.
6. Clean the area around the fill plug from
the axle-housing bowl.
204
7. Fill the axle with approved lubricant
until the level is even with the bottom
of the fill plug hole.
WARNING
When checking or changing the
lubricant, always ensure that the axle
is not hot. Oil temperature 90º F or
hotter can easily cause severe burns.
NOTE
When checking the lube level also check
the housing breathers on top of axle
housing. Clean the breathers if dirty or
replace them if damaged.
090467d
Drive Shaft:
The drive shaft transfers the power produced
by the engine to the drive axle. A worn or out of
balance drive shaft causes chassis vibration that
generally increases in intensity with road speed.
Lubrication Maintenance:
The drive shaft requires periodic lubrication
maintenance. Lubricate the slip joint and
universal joints every 5,000 miles or 6 months,
whichever occurs first. Use NLGI #2 chassis
lubricant.
2008 Kn ig ht
NOTE
It will be necessary to move the
motorhome forward or backward to
access all fittings on the drive shaft.
Greasing the Drive Shaft Universal Joints:
1. Check the drive shaft for looseness.
Repair if loose or worn.
2. Apply the specified grease at the grease
fitting on the universal joint. Apply
until new grease purges from all the
seals.
3. If new grease does not purge at the
seals, loosen the bearing cap bolts and
re-grease until all four caps purge.
If new grease still does not purge,
disassemble and clean or replace the
universal joint.
NOTE
Depending upon application universal
joints may have two grease fittings each.
It is necessary to apply grease to each
fitting to properly lube the universal
joint.
090417d
Dual Zerk U-Joint
Greasing the Drive Shaft Slip Yoke and
Splines:
1. Check the drive shaft for looseness.
Repair if loose or worn.
chassis information — 10
2. With finger, cover the rear air hole so
grease flows to the front seal. Apply the
specified grease at the grease fitting on
the slip yoke. Apply until new grease
purges and forces finger away from the
air hole in the end of the slip yoke.
WARNING
Rotating
shafts can be
dangerous.
Rotating
shafts can
snag clothes,
skin, hair, hands, etc. causing serious
injury or death. DO NOT work on or
near a shaft with or without a guard
when the engine is running.
U-Joint Angles Phasing & Driveline Balance
Correct U-joint working angles, U-joint
phasing, and driveline balance is vital to
maintaining a quiet-running drivetrain and
long life of drivetrain components (including
driveline components).
When in phase, the slip yoke lugs (ears) and
tube yoke lugs (ears) are in line. Normally this
is the ideal condition and gives the smoothest
running shaft. There may be an alignment arrow
stamped on the slip yoke and on the tube shaft
to assure proper phasing when assembling these
components. If there are no alignment marks,
they should be added before disassembly of the
shaft to assure proper reassembly.
Phasing is relatively simple on a two-joint set.
Be sure the slip yoke lugs and the tube yoke lugs
are in line.
090336
The U-Joint working angle is the angle
formed by the intersection of the driveshaft
centerline and the extended centerline of the
shaft of any component to which the U-joint
connects. Because the double oscillating motion
of a U-joint that connects angled shafts causes
a fluctuating speed difference between the
shafts, the effect created by the U-joint at one
end of the shaft must cancel the effect created
by the U-joint at the other end. This is done by
making U-joint working angles at both ends of
the driveshaft about equal, with the U-joints
in phase. If the yoke lugs at both ends of the
shaft are lying in the same plane (a plane which
bisects the shaft lengthwise), the U-joints will be
in phase.
Any condition which allows excessive
movement of a driveshaft will cause driveline
imbalance: loose end yoke nuts, loose U-joint
bearing cap retaining capscrews, worn U-joint
trunnions, bearings and worn slip-joint splines.
Among the most common causes of U-joint
and slip joint damage is lack of lubrication. To
keep the motorhome operating smoothly and
economically, the driveline must be carefully
checked and lubricated at regular intervals.
090337
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205
chassis information — 10
Shock Absorber
Leveling - Hydraulic
The shock absorber is a hydraulic
device used to dampen suspension/
body movement. Road surface
irregularities are compensated for by
the shock absorber. The Roadmaster
chassis incorporates the Monroe shock
in the design of the exclusive air glide
suspension system. This shock absorber
is a telescopic, mono tube unit filled with
nitrogen gas and hydraulic oil. The result
of the mixture is uninterrupted damping
090315
for the smallest of wheel deflection.
By design, a self lubricating seal is used
which will allow approximately 10% of the
total oil capacity to pass onto the piston rod.
The gradual process of oil loss does not affect
the performance of the shock absorber during
the service life. This process will be evident
after a long period of service by an oil film on
the body of the shock absorber. The appearance
of a coating or film on the body or rod is
completely normal, it is an indication the shock
is functioning normally.
Road holding, handling, balance and braking
characteristics all can be contributed to the
shock absorber. The operating conditions for
which the shock absorber must endure will
determine the life span. However, since the
only moving part is the piston rod, there are no
springs, hinges or pins to wear out, get weak or
deteriorate.
The leveling system is designed to reduce sight
selection problems and stabilize the motorhome
when parked. The leveling system features a
remote control panel (located near the pilot seat).
The multiple warning system that consists of a
Jacks Down LED and warning alarm if a jack is
down and the transmission is placed in gear or
the park brake is released. The leveling system
can be operated in manual or automatic modes.
Safety Features:
The leveling system has safety features to
prevent a jack from extending during travel. The
control panel will not activate until the following
safety features are in place.
 The transmission is in Neutral.
 The parking brake is applied.
 The ignition switch is in the On position.
Indicator Lamps:
 MAN – Indicates system is in manual
level mode.
 AUTO – Initiates Automatic level mode.
 ON/OFF – Turns the leveling system on
or off.
 WAIT - Indicates system is initializing
 JACKS DOWN – Indicates one or more
jack is extended.
 LOW VOLTAGE – Indicates chassis
voltage is low.
 ENGAGE PARK BRAKE – Indicates
the Park Brake is disengaged.
 The LED adjacent to any extend switch
indicates that position is low.
CAUTION
The leveling jacks are not designed
for changing tires. Using the jacks
to elevate any wheel position off the
ground will cause problems with the
suspension system, frame alignment
and damage to the windsheild.
020039e
206
Remote:
The remote control panel includes four
switches that operate all the jacks, an Auto
switch, a MAN (manual) switch, a retract All
Jacks switch and a power ON/OFF switch. A
LED light next to a directional button indicates
that position is low.
2008 Kn ig ht
CAUTION
DO NOT move the motorhome while
the jacks are still in contact with the
ground or extended. Damage to the
jacks can occur.
chassis information — 10
Prior to Leveling
Chassis battery voltage must be at least
12 Volts DC.
 Select a level site if possible, or park
the motorhome with the front facing
downhill.
 Apply the parking brake. Place the
transmission in Neutral.
 Lower the air suspension (if applicable)
by stepping on the brake several times
until system air pressure is below 60
psi. With the ignition on, push and
hold the Air Dump switch to lower the
suspension. This reduces the amount the
jack will need to extend before making
contact with the surface.

CAUTION
Survey the area around and under
the motorhome for obstructions
that can damage the motorhome or
undercarriage components before
lowering the air suspension. Damage to
the mud flap may occur if it is located
over a raised area.
CAUTION
Ensure potential jack contact points are
clear of obstruction or depression before
operation. Keep all people clear of the
motorhome during the leveling system
operations. Never expose hands or other
parts of the body near hydraulic leaks.
Hydraulic lines are under high pressure.
Oil leaks may cut and penetrate the skin
causing serious injury.
CAUTION
Hot asphalt, gravel or dirt may not
support the weight that is placed on
the hydraulic jack pads. Place thick
plywood under the jack pads to help
disperse the weight. If blocking up a
rear jack pad to gain added clearance
when the motorhome is on a slope, place
a wheel chock at the opposite set of rear
wheels to prevent the motorhome from
rolling.
Manual Leveling
The manual leveling mode can be used for
leveling or stabilization preference. An indicator
lamp adjacent to an extend switch indicates that
jack position(s) is low.
Manual Leveling Operation:
 Follow the instructions in Prior to
Leveling.
 Turn the ignition switch to On position.
 Press the ON/OFF button to turn the
system on.
 Press and hold the MAN (manual) button
for five seconds. Once the indicator lamp
below the MAN button illuminates, the
system is ready.
CAUTION
Prior to leveling the motorhome it is
important that all jacks be in contact
with the ground to stabilize and support
the frame. No single jack should be
solely used to level the motorhome.
Applying an improper leveling process
can cause excess torsion stress and/or
twisting of the chassis, frame and body,
resulting in damage to the windshield or
an entry door malfunction.
NOTE
If additional height or surface support is
needed, construct a 1' x 1' wooden block
made from two pieces of ¾" plywood
for a total thickness of 1½". Drill hole
in corner and use awning wand to slide
wooden block under jack pad.

Extend the front jack until contact with
the surface is made. Extend an additional
½". This allows the front jack to act as a
pivot point.
Wood Support Block
2008 K Nig ht
207
chassis information — 10
Extend the jack position according to the
indicator lamp. Example: If the indicator
lamp is lit under Jack Extend Switch
- Rear, the rear of the motorhome is low.
Press and hold the Rear button. Both rear
jacks will extend. Once level, the system
will automatically stop. The Power Gear
Level Light will illuminate. Release the
switch. Pressing Right or Left will extend
a single rear jack accordingly.
 Turn off the remote panel.
 Turn off the Ignition switch.
NOTE
A Jacks Down warning light will
illuminate when the jacks are extended.
The alarm will sound if the jacks are
down and the park brake is released or
transmission placed in gear.

The motorhome is level when the LED’s
next to Jack Extend switches are off
and the green Power Gear Level light is
illuminated.
 Turn off the remote panel.
 Turn off the ignition switch.

NOTE
If additional height
or surface support is
needed, construct a
1' x 1' wooden block
made from two pieces
of ¾" plywood for a
Wood Support
total thickness of 1½".
Block
Drill a hole in one corner
and use the awning wand to slide the
wooden block under the jack pad.
Automatic Leveling
The automatic function of the leveling system
should only engage when the site is relatively
level and solid to prevent excessive twist/stress
to the frame. It is essential that there is no
movement in the motorhome prior to and during
the automatic leveling process.
Automatic Leveling Operation:
 Follow the instructions in Prior to
Leveling.
 Turn the ignition switch to the On
position.
 Press the ON/OFF button to turn the
system on.
 Press the Auto switch. The pump motor
activates and the appropriate jacks
automatically extend and level the
motorhome.
208
Retracting Leveling Jacks
Turn the ignition switch to the On
position.
 Apply the parking brake.
 Turn On the remote panel.
 Momentarily press the All Jacks Retract
button. If retracting in manual mode, the
All Jacks button must be held until the
Jacks Down LED goes out.

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
Once the Jacks Down LED goes out, the
jacks should be fully retracted. Make a
visual inspection to ensure that all jacks
have fully retracted before moving the
motorhome.
INSPECTION
Before moving the motorhome always
perform a visual inspection to be sure
that all jacks have fully retracted.
Remove any debris that may be on the
jack pad.
If the jacks fail to extend or retract:
 Apply the park brake, turn the ignition
to the On position and place the
transmission in Park.
 If jacks still do not operate, check
the leveling system fuse in the front
distribution box.
NOTE
The
hydraulic
pump is
equipped
with an
internal
thermal
breaker for
020185b
protection
against
overheating.
If the pump
is used repeatedly in a short period
of time the breaker will trip. It resets
automatically in 5 to 30 minutes.
chassis information — 10
Drive-away Protection:
With the jacks extended and the park brake
is released or transmission placed in gear,
a warning alarm will sound and all LEDs
will illuminate. The jacks will automatically
retract. A full visual inspection is required to
confirm full retraction of jacks before moving
motorhome.
Maintenance:
At weekly intervals, use 100% silicone spray
on the jack rod. This will help prevent moisture
damage to surface of the jack rod. If parked
near coastal areas, apply more frequently.
Occasional oil or grease on the extended jack
rod is normal.
 Remove dirt and road debris from the
jacks as needed.
 Check the fluid level every month with
all jacks retracted. The fluid level should
begin to flow from the weep hole.
 Inspect and clean all hydraulic pump
electrical connections every 12 months.
 For jacks equipped with a grease fitting at
the bottom of the cylinder, two pumps of
grease should
be sufficient for
20 to 30 uses.
DO NOT over
grease. Damage
to the rod seal
will occur.
 Fluid change
070185c
interval is 36
months.
Adding Fluid:
If the leveling system makes unusual noise or
the alarm sounds when driving around corners or
over bumpy roads, this indicates a low fluid level.
1. Chock all wheels for safety.
2. Ensure all jacks are retracted.
3. Unscrew the fill plug from the top of
the pump. Slowly fill the reservoir with
Dexron 3 Mercon ATF hydraulic fluid
until ¼" from the fill plug.
5. Replace plug fill.
Level Sensor
Fill Plug
090506
Engine - General Information
The diesel engine operates differently from the
conventional gasoline engine. Gasoline engines
control engine speed using a butterfly throttle
plate controlling air/fuel mixture inlet flow. As
the throttle plate opens, vacuum created by the
piston velocity draws the metered fuel/air charge
into the combustion chamber, then ignites from
a controlled electric ignition source. Closing the
throttle plate limits the fuel/air supply, slowing
2008 K Nig ht
engine speed, increasing intake manifold
vacuum.
The diesel engine in the motorhome controls
engine speed by varying fuel supply only. No
throttle plates are used. An exhaust driven
turbine system (turbocharger) compresses the
fresh air supply into the engine. The fuel is
injected under pressure into the combustion
chamber. Ignition of fuel/air charge occurs
from heat generated by rapid high compression.
The turbo boost gauge registers amount of
intake manifold pressure measured in lbs./in².
Therefore, no intake manifold vacuum exists.
Diesel engine RPM (revolutions per minute)
operating speeds are generally much lower than
that of the gasoline engine. Peak torque and
horsepower output values occur at much lower
engine speeds. Idle speeds between the two
engine types are similar, however maximum
engine speeds are quite different. The gasoline
engine generally is not regulated to a maximum
engine speed. The maximum engine speed on a
diesel engine is controlled by an engine speed
governor set by the engine manufacturer.
WARNING
DO NOT operate a diesel engine
where there are or can be combustible
vapors. Vapors can be drawn through
the air intake system and cause engine
acceleration and over-speeding, resulting
in fire, explosion and extensive property
damage. Numerous safety devices are
available, such as air intake shutoff
devices, to minimize risk of an engine
over-speeding where an engine (due
to its application) might operate in a
combustible environment, such as fuel
spills or gas leaks.
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chassis information — 10
INFORMATION
The equipment owner and operator is
responsible for safe operation of engine.
Consult your engine manufacturers
owners manual or authorized repair
location for more information.
Starting Procedure
Normal Starting
The engine is equipped with an intake
manifold grid heater. The grid heater helps
engine starting in cold weather. Intake manifold
air temperature is monitored by the Electronic
Control Module on the engine. If intake
manifold temperature is below specified level
(approximately 40º F.), the manifold grid heater
will activate. Grid heater activation is indicated
by the WAIT TO START indicator lamp.
WARNING
Use of ether starting fluids may cause an
explosion upon grid heater activation.
To Start the Engine:
With the throttle in idle position, turn ignition
to ON. Allow the WAIT TO START lamp
to extinguish. Turn key to the start position.
When the engine starts the grid heater will again
energize for a time period determined by the
Electronic Control Module. Allow the engine
to idle with no load for three to five minutes.
The engine coolant temperature should be up
to normal operating
range (140º F/60 º
C to 212º F/100º C)
before operating the
engine under full
throttle.
210
NOTE
DO NOT idle the engine for long periods
of time. Consistent periods of long
idle wastes fuel and may cause engine
damage.
Cold Weather
In sub-freezing or extreme cold, engine oil
becomes thick and battery output is reduced.
Thick oil, combined with less amperage
available from the battery, increases difficulty in
starting the engine.
020165h
Depending on ambient temperature it may
be necessary to pre-heat the engine. Located in
the coolant passage in the engine is a heating
unit that operates from 120 Volt AC. If it is
necessary to pre-heat the engine due to ambient
temperature, it is recommended to activate the
block heater the night before, allowing several
hours for the block heater to warm the engine.
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It is possible to operate diesel engines in
extremely cold environments when the engine
is properly equipped with the correct lubricants,
fuels and coolant. Cold weather operation can
be defined in two categories: Winter and Arctic.
WINTER (32º to -25º F) (0º to -32º
C): Use a 50% antifreeze to 50%
water coolant mixture, use multiviscosity oil meeting manufacturers
specifications and fuel to have
maximum cloud pour points 10º F (6º
C) lower than the ambient temperature
in which the motorhome operates.
ARCTIC (-25º to -65º F) (-32º to
-52º C): Use a 60% antifreeze to
40% water coolant mixture. Use oil
meeting manufacturers specifications
and fuel to have maximum cloud
pour points 10º F (6º C) lower than
the ambient temperature in which the
motorhome operates.
INFORMATION
Refer to the engine manufacturers
Owner’s Manual for more detailed
information.
NOTE
The engine is filled with 15-40w
multi-viscosity oil from the factory.
Generally this will start the engine in
temperature down to 15º F. If the engine
has normalized to a temperature below
15º F it will be necessary to pre-heat the
engine before starting.
chassis information — 10
CAUTION
Upon cranking an engine in cold
temperature, the starter may rapidly
engage and disengage. If this occurs
STOP attempting to crank the engine
to prevent starter damage. Pre-heat the
engine before making further attempts
to start.
Block Heat:
The block heater is rated
between 850 and 1500
watts, depending on engine
size. For efficiency, hook
to shore power or plug
the block heater cord to a
separate power cord rated
for 15 Amps and a GFCI
protected outlet rated at
20 Amps. The engine may
require several hours of preheating before starting.
090397
Located roadside
rear compartment
It is recommended to start preheating the
engine the night before departure.
To Use the Block Heater:
 Hook to shore power and plug the
block heater cord into the block heater
receptacle (both are located in the
roadside rear compartment).
2. Always follow the recommended oil,
fuel, and coolant specifications as
outlined in the OEM Engine Manual.
Proper oil viscosity and coolant
concentration eases engine starting and
helps to avoid engine damage.
3. Allow the engine to idle until it
sufficiently warms for operation.
Utilize the fast idle feature to quicken
the process. Wait to operate the
motorhome for at least three minutes or
until the coolant temperature begins to
rise.
4. Check the air inlet and filter daily, or
as necessary, when driving in snow
conditions.
5. The demand on batteries increase
during winter; check and service the
batteries frequently to help ensure
trouble-free starts.
6. Start out slowly with the motorhome
to allow the transmission and axle
lubricants time to circulate and warm
before putting them under full load.
WARNING
Use of ether starting fluids may cause an
explosion upon grid heater activation.
Tips:
1. When operating below 32º F, the
Aqua-Hot and/or block heater preheat
can enhance engine starting by easing
cranking and helping to prevent
engine misfire and white smoke during
starting.
2008 K Nig ht
Engine Oil
Cummins Engine Requirements:
Maintenance guidelines and requirements
are located in the Cummins Operation &
Maintenance Manual. These recommendations
for the engine will extend engine life and
improve performance, resulting in cost efficient
operations. A good maintenance schedule begins
with a daily awareness of the engine and its
various systems.
A high grade 15W-40 multi-viscosity
heavy duty lubricating oil meeting American
Petroleum Institute (API) specification CJ-4 is
recommended. A critical factor in maintaining
engine performance and durability is the use of
high grade, multigrade lubricating oil and strict
adherence to the maintenance service intervals.
A straight weight or monograde lubricating oil
is not recommended. Shortened drain intervals
may be required as determined by a close
monitoring of the lubricating oil condition by
means of an oil sampling program. The use
of oil analysis to extend drain interval is not
recommended. There are numerous variables
which is the basis of the recommendation.
Synthetic oils API category III specifications
are recommended for extreme cold temperatures
only. Low viscosity oils used for winter
operations will aid in starting. Synthetic oils,
or oil with adequate low temperature properties
used for Arctic operations where the engine
cannot be kept warm when shut down, will aid
in starting. The use of synthetic oils should not
be used to extend drain intervals. Extended oil
change intervals can decrease engine life and
possibly affect the engine warranty.
211
chassis information — 10
Oil additives should not be used unless
the oil supplier or oil manufacturer has been
consulted and provided positive evidence or
data establishing satisfactory performance in the
engine.
NOTE
The engine does not require a “breakin” procedure.
INFORMATION
Refer to the engine OEM manual for
details on the oil maintenance schedule.
Engine Shutdown
Allow the engine to idle three to five minutes
after a full load operation. This allows adequate
cool down of pistons, cylinders, bearings and
turbocharger components. Under normal driving
conditions, exiting the highway is generally
lighter engine operation and the need for the
three to five minutes is not necessary.
Extended Engine Shutdown
When the motorhome has been sitting for
30 days or more, verify all the fluid levels are
correct. Follow the normal starting procedures.
If the oil pressure gauge does not register within
15 seconds, shut off the engine immediately
to avoid damage. Consult the engine
manufacturer’s owner’s manual for guidelines
on troubleshooting low oil pressure, or contact
a qualified service technician. Allow the engine
to idle for five minutes before operating under a
load.
Lubricating oil recommendations and specifications.
NOTE
The Engine is filled with 15W-40
multi-viscosity oil from the factory.
212
070201
Coolant System
A fully formulated coolant is recommended
to simplify cooling system maintenance. The
system uses a fully formatted antifreeze or
coolant. Coolant that is fully formulated contains
balanced amounts of antifreeze, Supplemental
Coolant Additive (SCA), buffering compounds
and clean, quality water.
The difference between fully formatted
antifreeze and fully formatted coolant is the
percentage of water. The antifreeze of coolant
must meet ethylene glycol or propylene glycol
recommendations.
2008 Kn ig ht
Antifreeze that is not fully formulated must be
mixed with clean, quality water (distilled water
preferred) in a 50/50 ratio (40 to 60% working
range). This ratio will provide protection from
-33º F. to 226º F boiling point. The actual lowest
freezing point of ethylene glycol antifreeze is
at 68 percent. Using higher concentrations of
antifreeze will raise the freezing point of the
solution and increase the possibility of a silica
gel problem.
Antifreeze must be of low silicate content
as defined by ASTM D-4985. The 50/50 ratio
of antifreeze and clean quality water plus
SCA must be premixed prior to being put in
the cooling system. The 50/50 mix ratio must
be premixed prior to being put in the system.
Placing antifreeze and then water in the cooling
system is not recommended. Refer to the OEM
engine manual for more information.
CAUTION
An over-concentration of antifreeze
will reduce freeze protection. Use of
high silicate antifreeze can damage
the cooling system and engine. SCA is
required in the cooling system to inhibit
cylinder liner pitting as a result of
cavitation erosion.
WARNING
DO NOT continue engine operation
if engine temperature rises and the
Warning light on the dash illuminates.
The engine protection software will
begin to decrease fuel (derate) to the
engine regardless of throttle position.
Continued operation will result in severe
engine damage.
chassis information — 10
Good-Quality Water:
Good quality water is important for cooling
system performance. Excessive levels of
calcium and magnesium contribute to scaling
problems, and excessive levels of chlorides and
sulfates cause cooling system corrosion.
Testing the Coolant:
A refractometer must be used to measure the
freezing point of the coolant accurately. DO
NOT use a floating ball hydrometer. Using
floating ball hydrometers can give an incorrect
reading.
Coolant System Sealing Additives:
DO NOT use sealing additives in the cooling
system. The use of sealing additives will:
 Build up in coolant low-flow areas.
 Plug the radiator and oil cooler.
 Possibly damage the water pump seal.
Cooling System Soluble Oils:
DO NOT use soluble oils in the cooling
system. The use of soluble oils will:
 Corrode brass and copper.
 Damage heat transfer surfaces.
 Damage seals and hoses.
Check the coolant level before each trip,
refueling, and when checking the oil level.
Coolant freeze point is checked at every oil
change interval or as specified by the engine
manufacture. Coolant drain and flush intervals
are specified by the engine manufacturer. Refer
to the OEM engine manual for more information
on service maintenance intervals.
INFORMATION
Refer to the engine OEM manual for
details on engine coolant maintenance.
Coolant Types:
 Use a low-silicate antifreeze that meets
ASTM4985 (GM6038M specification)
criteria.
 Fully formulated coolant MUST meet
ASTM D-6210/D-6211.
 Recommendations include using either
a 50/50 mixture of good quality water
and fully formulated antifreeze or fully
formulated coolant.
NOTE
For detailed information on engine
coolants for Cummins engines, refer to
Cummins Coolant Requirements and
Maintenance Bulletin 3666132.
Engine Coolant Reservoir:
The engine coolant reservoir is connected
to the radiator by a hose. Coolant heats and
expands as the motorhome is driven. Coolant
displaced by expansion, overflows from the
radiator into the reservoir. Coolant contracts as
it cools and is drawn back in the radiator by a
vacuum. Thus, the radiator is filled to capacity
with coolant at all times resulting in increased
cooling efficiency. The coolant level should be
at, or slightly above, the appropriate mark on the
reservoir tank when the system is cold.
The reservoir is marked MIN (cold
check)/MAX (hot check), or the reservoir
has upper (hot check) and lower (cold check)
sight windows. Maintain coolant between the
appropriate reservoir indicators.
2008 K Nig ht
CAUTION
DO NOT remove the reservoir cap while
the engine is running or if the engine is
hot. Cap removal can result in severe
burns and damage to the engine cooling
system.
NOTE
Be sure to replace cap
after adding fliud.
Coolant Levels:
 Check coolant level before
each trip, when refueling, Coolant Reservoir
and when checking the oil cap is rated at 16 lbs.
level.
 A low coolant alarm will sound and a
low coolant indication will appear on the
instrument panel if coolant level drops
below acceptable levels in the reservoir.
Stop the motorhome and inspect the
coolant level before continued operation.
 Coolant level should remain between
the MIN and MAX indicators on the
reservoir when the cooling system is
properly filled.
Supplemental Coolant Additive (SCA):
SCA is required to protect the cylinder
liner/sleeve from cavitation erosion. Cavitation
erosion is caused by minute air pockets that
collect on the cylinder liner. The air pockets will
pop (implode) during engine operation. Over
time this can erode a hole through the cylinder
liner. Supplemental coolant additives inhibit
formation of the air pockets. The SCA content of
the coolant is checked with Litmus paper.
213
chassis information — 10
Test kits are available from the engine
manufacturer as well as aftermarket. Litmus
paper is time and light sensitive. Check the
SCA content at each oil change following the
directions in the test kit.
Refer to the engine OEM manual for further
information.
NOTE
SCA test kits are time and light
sensitive. Store test kit in a dry and
dark location. Discard if out of date.
Pink colored antifreeze may not be
compatible with certain test kits.
Cooling System Maintenance:
Refer to the engine OEM manual for detailed
information regarding cooling system service
and maintenance intervals. Services include
draining and replacing the coolant, flushing the
cooling system, inspecting the water pump and
standpipe and replacing the thermostat, gasket or
seal.
Coolant Overheated:
The engine can overheat for a number of
reasons. Before engine temperature reaches a
critical point, it is preceded by illumination of
dash indicator lamps as well as above normal
temperature gauge readings. It is best to adhere
to these indicators and take corrective action
before the engine is subjected to extreme heat
and potential engine damage.
If the engine should begin to severely
overheat, engine protection software will begin
to decrease fuel regardless of throttle position
(derate) to reduce heat created by combustion.
Damage to the engine will occur if engine
214
operation continues and cause of the overheat
condition is not immediately corrected. At this
point it is best to shut off the engine as soon as
possible to avoid further engine damage.
WARNING
It is advised to shut off the engine
should the engine overheat. It may take
several hours before engine temperature
has lowered to a safe operating range.
Do not remove the coolant reservoir
cap as severe burns may result. Never
add cold water to an overheated engine
as this will cause uneven rapid cooling
and possibly result in further engine
damage.
Freeze Protection:
Coolant freeze protection is checked using a
refractometer for accuracy. This meter checks at
what point the coolant begins to freeze. Refer to
the engine OEM manual for test procedures.
Coolant System - Thawing:
If the coolant system becomes frozen,
the motorhome must be towed. Place the
motorhome in a warm area until completely
thawed. If the engine is operated when the
cooling system is frozen, the engine may
overheat due to insufficient coolant circulation.
Once thawed, check the engine, radiator and
related components for damage caused by
expansion of frozen coolant.
Coolant Hoses:
Inspect coolant hoses and connections when
checking engine or transmission fluids. Look for
any signs of chaffing at hose restraints or sharp
edges. Indications that hoses have reached the
2008 Kn ig ht
end of service life include cracking or swelling
around clamps and connections. Oil leaks can
also deteriorate hoses.
Overheating can be caused by a collapsed
hose. Old hoses can also deteriorate on the
inside causing partial clogs reducing cooling
efficiency. Replace any hose found to be
cracked, swollen or damaged. Periodically check
hose clamp torque.
Inspect:
Every 12 months - Inspect all hoses, clamps,
and fittings for leaks due to cracking, softness
and loose clamps/fittings. Look for signs of
fluid leaks, damaged end fittings or ballooning;
chafed, kinked, or crushed hoses; and loose
clamps and fittings. Correct any deficiencies
found.
Radiator/Charge Air Cooler
The diesel engine uses compression to ignite
the fuel/air charge. To increase compression
inside the combustion chamber (resulting in
increased power output) a turbocharger is added
to the engine. The turbocharger is a paired
housing assembly with impellers inside each
housing connected by a common shaft. One
impeller is propelled by the engine exhaust,
which drives the other impeller. The function
of the other impeller is to increase compression
inside the combustion chamber by forcing air
into the intake manifold.
chassis information — 10
This process works well, however, the intake
air charge is heated two different ways: through
convection by the exhaust gases driving the
turbocharger and when air is compressed. This
negative effect inside the combustion chamber
results in lost power potential. Therefore, a
Charge Air Cooler (CAC) is installed to cool the
intake air before it enters the engine. The CAC
performs the same function as a radiator, cooling
air instead of liquid. Ambient air passing through
the CAC will cool the engine intake air charge.
After leaving the turbocharger, intake air
is compressed and heated to approximately
300º to 375º F., depending on the engine load
and throttle position. Before air enters the
intake manifold, the CAC cools the intake
air temperature to the engine manufacturer
specifications. Lowered intake air temperatures
reduce exhaust emissions, improve fuel
economy and increase horsepower. The CAC
will continually expand and contract up to ¼” as
throttle increases and decreases.
Cleaning and Maintenance:
 Regular maintenance includes draining
the engine coolant, flushing/cleaning
the cooling system, inspecting the
water pump standpipe, replacing the
thermostat, gasket and seal, and replacing
the coolant and SCA element.
 Inspect the charge air cooler every six
months and remove dirt and debris that
may block the fins. If the motorhome
develops an oil leak, there is a possibility
that the oil will coat the fins of the CAC.
Dust will adhere to the oil film, clog the
fins and reduce cooling efficiency. When
the oil leak is repaired, the CAC must be
thoroughly cleaned.
During each oil change inspect the
engine side of the radiator/CAC
assembly for foreign objects that may
cause restriction.
 Spraying degreaser on the charge air
cooler, as well as using a steam cleaner,
will not damage the CAC. However,
pressure washer and steam cleaner
nozzles placed too close to the CAC
can bend the fins. The recommended
cleaning procedure for the CAC and the
radiator is to use a bucket of mild soap
and water. Carefully wash with a bristle
brush then rinse using a garden hose,
with minimum water pressure, standing
back a distance to avoid bending the fins.
 When performing maintenance, it is also
necessary to inspect other components of
the cooling system. The charge air cooler
and radiator also requires an inspection
for cracks, broken welds, secure
mounting, and general cleanliness.

Coolant Hoses:
Inspect coolant hoses and connections when
checking engine or transmission fluids. Look for
any signs of chaffing at hose restraints or sharp
edges. Indications that hoses have reached the
end of service life included cracking or swelling
around clamps and connections. Oil leaks can
also deteriorate hoses. Overheating can be
caused by a collapsed hose or a clog caused by
rubber shedding from a rotten hose. Replace any
hose found to be cracked, swollen or damaged.
Connections should be inspected periodically
and hose clamps tightened.
2008 K Nig ht
Every 12 months:
Inspect all hoses, clamps, and fittings for leaks
due to cracking, softness, and loose clamps/
fittings. Look for signs of fluid leaks, damaged
end fittings, ballooning, chafed, kinked, or
crushed hoses, and loose clamps and fittings.
Correct any deficiencies found.
REAR GRILL
The rear grill pulls out for access to the
radiator compartment. The grill is attached by
four tabs that insert into four grommets, one on
each corner. To detach, place both hands evenly
spaced on the grill and gently ease the grill out.
To reinstall, align the tabs with the grommets
and push in.
WARNING
When reinstalling it is IMPORTANT
that the four corners of the grill are
securely attached to the four grommets.
Failure to do so may result in the grill
jarring loose with travel.
090496d
215
chassis information — 10
Exhaust Brake
The exhaust brake (auxiliary
braking system) is designed
to supplement the standard air
brake system. Attached directly
to the engine turbocharger,
the exhaust brake system and
is not designed to bring the
motorhome to a complete
stop; however, it can assist in
controlling the speed of the
motorhome. Use of the exhaust
090392b
braking system can extend the
service life of pads, shoes, rotors and drums.
Operation
A switch on the driver’s console
operates the exhaust brake. The
exhaust brake will operate when
the switch is on and the throttle is
released.
NOTE
The exhaust brake is designed to
supplement the service brakes. The
exhaust brake will not bring the
motorhome to a stop. Use of the exhaust
brake can help increase the service life
of the service brakes.
NOTE
Activating the exhaust brake does not
cancel cruise control.
080498m
Functions
When the exhaust brake is activated, a flapper
inside the exhaust brake moves and restricts the
flow of exhaust gases. This causes an increase
of exhaust pressure within the engine. Increased
exhaust pressure slows engine speed. The
amount of engine braking power developed is
related to engine speed (RPM), so the engine
braking effect increases with higher engine
RPM.
The exhaust brake is wired to the electronically
controlled transmission. Use the exhaust brake
216
when descending a hill or off ramp. When the
exhaust brake is activated the transmission
automatically optimizes downshifts, utilizing the
gear selected to maximize the effectiveness of
the exhaust brake.
Certain road conditions and engine speeds
may require manually shifting the transmission
in order to generate adequate engine RPM and
increase the engine brake effect.
NOTE
Idle the engine three to five minutes at
approximately 1000 RPM to warm the
engine before activating the exhaust
brake.
Transmission
The Allison World transmission incorporates
the World Transmission Electronic Control
(WTEC) system. The system is compromised
of five major components connected by a
wiring harness: the Electronic Control Unit
(ECU), engine throttle position sensor, three
speed sensors, remote shift selector (keypad)
and the control module. The ECU processes
information received from the throttle position
2008 Kn ig ht
sensor, speed sensor, pressure switch and shift
selector to provide optimum shift quality. This
is accomplished by matching transmission and
engine RPM during a shift to establish a desired
shift profile within the ECU. Another feature
of the transmission is the ability to “learn” or
“adapt.” The electronic control system optimizes
shift quality by using “Adaptive Shifting.”
A wide variety of varied shift conditions
is required before optimizing shift quality.
Generally, five typical shifts of a consistent shift
type are needed to optimize shift quality.
Shift Selector
The keypads on the shift
control are R (Reverse),
N (Neutral), D (Drive),
Arrow up, Arrow down,
Mode button. A digital
display window shows
gear selection, various
transmission modes, oil
level and transmission
fault codes. Generation 4
080355g
keypads have a split screen
displaying two number sets while in drive. The
left number displays the highest forward range
available. The right number is the range that the
transmission is currently in. NN (Neutral) will
appear in the display window when the ignition
is turned On. This indicates the transmission is
in neutral and it is safe to start the crank. If the
NN does not display when the ignition is turned
on, there is no power to the shift selector and the
transmission will not allow the engine to start.
chassis information — 10
No display is an indicator of electrical problems
with the engine batteries, ECU or the shift
selector.
Keypad Functions:
 Select the Reverse gear by pressing R.
RR will display.
 Select Neutral by pressing N. The area
around the N button has a raised ridge so
the driver can orient his hand to the push
buttons by touch without looking at the
display.
 Select Drive range by pressing D. The
highest forward gear (6th gear) appears
in the display and the transmission will
shift to first gear indicated as 6 1.
 The Up and Down arrow buttons are
used to select a higher (if not in “6”)
or lower (if not in “1”) forward range.
These buttons are not functional in
Neutral or Reverse.
 When in Drive, one press changes the
gear range selected by one. If the button
is held continuously, the selected range
will continue to change up or down
until the button is released or until the
highest/lowest possible range of gears is
selected.
 The Mode button enables a secondary
shift point to be selected. This is
commonly referred to as Economy
mode. Economy mode affects the upshift
schedule 3-4, 4-5, 5-6 and downshift
schedule 6-5, 5-4, 4-3. During highway
driving, with the cruise control set
between 55 and 65 m.p.h., setting the
transmission to economy mode will
eliminate about 99% of transmission
downshifts from sixth to fifth when
incurring a slight incline or overpass.
CAUTION
DO NOT use Economy Mode in heavy
stop and go traffic or mountainous
terrains. Frequent shifting while using
heavy throttle occurs in Economy
Mode and increases transmission fluid
temperature. Exit Economy Mode until
road conditions improve.
NOTE
The Mode button is used by the service
technician to access diagnostic codes
when troubleshooting. The diagnostic
circuitry must be enabled to display.
NOTE
Cruise control switch enabled alerts
the shift schedule. Turn off the cruise
power switch in congested traffic and
mountainous terrain.
CAUTION
Engine temperature may rise when
ascending long grades using full throttle.
Towing a load will increase the demand
on the engine. If this occurs, manually
shift the transmission to the next lower
gear and use less throttle. The engine
will use less fuel and RPM should
increase.
NOTE
The transmission will not accept a
manually selected gear change to occur
if the gear selected is out of the specified
operating range.
above 900. The display will flash “66”
indicating the engine RPM is excessive.
Select “N” and lower engine RPM.
Check Trans Indicator
The electronic control system of the
transmission is programmed to inform the
operator of a problem with the transmission
system and reacts automatically to protect the
operator, motorhome and transmission. When
the Electronic Control Unit (ECU) detects a DO
NOT SHIFT (DNS) condition the ECU restricts
shifting, turns on the CHECK TRANS light in
the instrument panel and registers a fault code.
NOTE
For some problems, fault codes may be
registered without the ECU activating
the CHECK TRANS light. An Allison
Transmission authorized service outlet
should be consulted whenever there is a
transmission related concern. They have
the equipment to check diagnostic codes
and correct problems which may arise.
Each time the engine is started the CHECK
TRANS icon will light, then turn off after a few
seconds. This momentary lighting is to indicate
that the status light circuit is working properly.
If the CHECK TRANS light does not illuminate
during start up, or if the light remains on after
start up, the transmission system should be
checked immediately.
NOTE
The transmission will not shift into gear
from Neutral if the engine RPM is at or
2008 K Nig ht
217
chassis information — 10
Continued illumination of the CHECK
TRANS light during vehicle operation (other
than start up) indicates that the ECU has signaled
a diagnostic code. Illumination of the CHECK
TRANS light is accompanied by a flashing
display from the shift selector. The shift selector
display will show actual range attained and the
transmission will not respond to shift selector
requests.
Indications from the shift selector are provided
to inform the operator that the transmission is
not performing as designed and is operating at
reduced capabilities. Before turning the ignition
off, the transmission may be operated for a short
time in the selected range in order to “limp
home” for service assistance. Service should be
performed immediately in order to minimize
potential damage to the transmission.
When the Check Trans icon illuminates the
keypad will not respond to command and the
transmission generally will downshift to 4th
gear. The torque converter will not “lock-up”
and engine speed is automatically reduced.
Direction changes (i.e. forward to reverse) will
not be allowed. Locate a safe secure place to
park the motorhome. If the engine is shut off,
then engaged after a Check Trans indication,
the transmission remains in Neutral until the
fault causing the Check Trans light has been
corrected.
NOTE
Contact an authorized Allison
Transmission service center whenever
a transmission related concern arises.
For some problems, fault codes
may be registered without the ECU
activating the Check Trans indicator. An
authorized Allison Transmission Service
218
center will have the equipment to check
diagnostic codes and correct problems
that may arise.
Diagnostic Codes:
The shift selector can be used to display
transmission malfunctions as numerical codes.
Each code is a two-digit main code and a
two-digit sub code. These codes will fall in
two classes: active and inactive. Active codes
are codes currently affecting the ECU process
and transmission operation. Inactive codes are
retained in memory but may not affect the ECU
process or transmission operation. A service
technician will activate Diagnostic mode or hook
an electronic display (Pro-Link) to the data plug
to retrieve diagnostic codes. A maximum of five
codes, D1 to D5, may be listed at one time. The
highest priority code will be listed in D1. The
Mode button will enable selection of sequential
codes. Allison 4th Generation controls list each
code consisting of five characters. The first being
a letter followed by a four digit number string.
The most severe or recent code is listed in the
ECU memory first with a maximum of five
codes being d1 to d5 possibly listed at the same
time. When new codes are added, the oldest
inactive codes will be dropped.
To Display Diagnostic Codes:
 Stop the motorhome at a safe location.
 Apply the parking brake.
 Simultaneously press the up and down
arrows once to enter oil level display
mode. Then press the up and down
arrows again to enter diagnostic mode.
2008 Kn ig ht
The codes will display one digit at a
time or two characters at a time on 4th
Generation controls.
 Press the mode button to scroll through
the codes.
 Record all diagnostic codes that are
displayed. The codes then can be used by
an Allison Service Center for evaluation
and repair.
 Inactive codes can be cleared by holding
the Mode button for approximately three
seconds. 4th Generation controls require
holding the Mode button for ten seconds
to clear both inactive and active codes.

Some codes are self-clearing while others will
require service or ignition on/off cycles to clear.
Periodic Inspections
The Allison MH Series requires very little
maintenance. Careful attention to the fluid level,
electrical connections and hydraulic hoses is
very important.
The transmission should be kept clean for easy
inspection. Make periodic checks for loose bolts
and leaking fluid. Check the condition of the
electrical harnesses regularly. Check the engine
cooling system occasionally for evidence of
transmission fluid that would indicate a faulty
oil cooler. Report any abnormal condition to an
Allison Service Center.
chassis information — 10
Prevent Major Problems:
Help the control system oversee the operation
of the transmission. Minor problems can be kept
from becoming major problems if an Allison
Transmission Service center is notified when one
of these conditions occur:
1. Shifting feels odd.
2. Transmission leaks fluid.
3. Unusual transmission-related sounds
(sound made by normal engine
thermostatic fan cycling when climbing
a long grade with a heavy load are
often mistaken for transmission-related
sounds).
4. The Check Trans indicator comes on
frequently.
Transmission Fluid & Filters
The transmission is filled with TranSynd™
synthetic transmission fluid at the factory.
TranSynd™ synthetic transmission fluid extends
service intervals. A small tag has been attached
to the dipstick identifying that the transmission
is filled with TranSynd™ synthetic transmission
fluid. A remote fill is located at the back of the
engine and a transmission check/fill is located on
the engine.
Manufacturers) manual. Fluid and filters may
require changing earlier than recommended in
the transmission OEM manual, depending on
the severity of operating conditions. Fluid must
also be changed whenever there is evidence of
dirt or high temperature operation as indicated
by discoloration, strong odor or fluid analysis.
Local conditions, severity of operation or duty
cycle will dictate more or less frequent service
intervals.
CAUTION
DO NOT mix Dexron III® transmission
fluid with TranSynd™ Synthetic
transmission fluid.
NOTE
Be sure to retain the receipt for proof of
the initial Main filter change. Refer to
the Allison transmission owner’s manual
or contact an authorized Allison service
center for service intervals.
Proper Fluid Levels:
Transmission fluid cools, lubricates and
transmits hydraulic power. Proper fluid levels
must be maintained at all times. If fluid level
is too low, the converter and clutches do not
receive an adequate supply of fluid. If fluid level
is too high, the fluid can aerate. Aerated fluid
can cause the transmission to shift erratically or
overheat.
Fluid and Filter Change Interval:
An Oil Level Sensor (OLS) is built into the
The transmission has
transmission. The fluid level can be checked
two filters: a main filter
easily and cleanly using the shift selector. Check
and a lube filter. Follow
the transmission fluid level before each trip and
the service intervals
070176after removing the motorhome from storage.
listed in the transmission
Located inside rear
engine access
OEM (Original Equipment
2008 K Nig ht
Fluid Level Check from the Shift Selector:
To Enter Oil Level Sense Mode:
 Park the motorhome on a level surface.
Place the transmission in “N” and set
parking brake.
 The transmission temperature must be at
least at operating temperature or an error
code will appear.
 The motorhome must be stationary and in
Neutral for approximately two minutes to
allow the fluid to settle in the sump.
 The engine must be idling lower than 800
RPM.
 Simultaneously press the Up and Down
buttons once.
The transmission is now in Oil Level Sense
mode. The display will indicate one character at
a time. An “o” followed by “L” represents oil
level check mode. One of the following will be
indicated:
Common Oil Level Fault Codes
Display
Cause of Code
o,L - O,X
Setting time too short
o,L - 5,0
Engine speed (RPM) too low
o,L - 5,9
Engine speed (RPM) too high
o,L - 6,5
Neutral must be selected
o,L - 7,0
Sump fluid temperature too low
o,L - 7,9
Sump fluid temperature too high
o,L - 8,9
Output shaft rotation
o,L - 9,5
Sensor failure


“o K” represents the level is okay.
“Lo” represents a low fluid level
followed by a numeric indication of the
number of quarts needed fill the sump.
219
chassis information — 10
“HI” represents an overfull condition
followed by a numeric indication of the
number of quarts the sump is overfull.
 A countdown of flashing numbers
indicates the fluid is still settling. When
the fluid has stabilized in the sump, the
true level will be indicated.
 If an “o” “L” “-” followed by a number
displays, the oil level sensor could not
read the level due to one of conditions
listed in the “Common Oil Level Fault
Codes” chart.
 Exit by pressing “N.”

Cold Check - Manual Check Procedures:
The concept of a cold check is to determine
adequate fluid level for safe operating such
as after a fluid and filter change. A cold
check should be performed after transmission
maintenance or service until a hot fluid level
check or fluid level check from the shift selector
can be performed.
To Check the Fluid When Cold:
 Park the motorhome on a level surface.
Set the parking brake.
 Chock the wheels to prevent the
motorhome from moving.
 Start the engine.
 Allow the engine to run at idle (500 to
800 RPM) for one minute.
 Apply the service brakes and shift to D
(Drive), then to N (Neutral) and next to
R (Reverse) to fill the system. Shift the
transmission to N (Neutral) and release
the service brakes. Allow the engine to
idle at 500 to 800 RPM.
220
Remove the dipstick and wipe clean.
Reinsert the dipstick fully into the tube,
then remove to check fluid level. Repeat
to verify reading, if needed.
 Safe operating level is anywhere within
the Cold Check band on the dipstick.
This allows safe operation of the
transmission until a Hot Check or fluid
level check from the shift selector can be
performed.
 If the level is not within this band, add
or drain the fluid as necessary to put the
level to the middle of the Cold Check
band.
 Perform a fluid level check from the
shift selector or a Hot Check at the first
opportunity when normal operating
temperatures are reached.

CAUTION
Low or high fluid level can cause
overheating and irregular shift patterns.
These conditions can damage the
transmission if not corrected.
Fluid Levels - Hot Check
Fluid level rises as temperature increases.
Fluid must be hot to ensure an accurate check.
Be sure fluid has reached normal operating
temperature. If a transmission temperature gauge
is not present, check the fluid level when the
engine water temperature gauge has stabilized
and the motorhome has been driven for at least
one hour.

Park the motorhome on a level surface
and shift to N (Neutral). Apply the
parking brake and allow the engine to
idle (500 to 800 RPM).
2008 Kn ig ht
After wiping the dipstick clean, check
the fluid level. Safe operating level is
anywhere within the Hot Run band on
the dipstick.
 The width of the Hot Run band is
approximately one quart of fluid at
normal temperature range.
 If the level is not within this band, add
or drain the fluid as necessary to put the
level within the Hot Run band.
 Ensure that fluid level checks are
consistent. Check the level more than
once. If readings are not consistent,
ensure the transmission breather is clean
and not clogged. If readings are still not
consistent, contact the nearest Allison
Service Center.

Fuel System
Fuel Requirements
Diesel fuel classified as # 2 is used in moderate
and temperate climates. A winter blend of #1
and #2 diesel fuels is available during the winter
months in cooler climates (or possibly yearround in extremely cold or arctic areas). The
dispensing pump may not indicate winter blend.
chassis information — 10
LSD (Low Sulfur Diesel) and ULSD (Ultra
Low Sulfur Diesel): Beginning June 1, 2006,
80% of available diesel fuel in the United
States will have less sulfur. Beginning October
15, 2006, additional labeling on diesel fuel
dispensing pumps will reflect the reduction
in sulfur to include Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel
(ULSD) and Low Sulfur Diesel (LSD). ULSD
fuel contains a maximum sulfur content of 15
ppm (parts per million) while LSD fuel contains
a maximum sulfur content of 500 ppm. 2007 and
later model year engines and emission systems
are designed to use ULSD fuel. Refer to the
OEM engine manual for which type of fuel is
acceptable for use.
100217
100217
WARNING
Use of LSD fuel in ULSD engines will
damage emission control systems and is
subject to fine.
CAUTION
Engines designed for ULSD fuel require
specially formulated motor oil classified
by the API (American Petroleum
Institute) as category CJ-4.
NOTE
Some states (including California) have
prohibited the sale of Low Sulfur Diesel.
Biodiesel: Biodiesel is a synthetic fuel made
from plant oil or recycled cooking oil. Biodiesel
is often sold as a biodiesel/petrodiesel blend
with an alphanumeric designation that indicates
biodiesel content. For example: B5 is 5%
biodiesel and 95% petrodiesel while B100 is
100% biodiesel. Due to variances in biodiesel,
its use is restricted by the engine manufacturer.
Refer to the OEM engine manual for acceptable
biodiesel tolerances.
Tips: Try to obtain fuel from sources that
are serviced often such as large truck service
facilities. The fuel supply is fresh and the
possibility of introducing contaminants or water
into the fuel system is reduced. If the engine
runs out of fuel, the fuel system will need to be
thoroughly primed before the engine will start
and run properly.
NOTE
Due to the precise tolerances of diesel
injection systems, it is extremely
important that fuel be kept clean and
free of dirt or water. Dirt or water in the
system can cause severe damage to both
the fuel pump and the fuel injectors.
Fuel additives for lubricity are not
recommended. There are numerous
diesel fuel additives to help remove
moisture from fuel, prevent microbe
growth and to prevent gelling during
cold weather. Before adding any type
of fuel additive or extender, consult the
Manufacturer’s Owner’s Manual.
Fuel Tank
The diesel fuel tank is made of aluminum.
Pick-up and return lines are placed at opposite
ends of the tank to inhibit fuel aeration. The
engine pickup tube is cut at a 45° angle to allow
optimum flow to the engine. The generator
intake tube is set to approximately ¼ of a tank.
This will prevent depleting the fuel supply while
dry camping.
090335h
WARNING
DO NOT mix gasoline, alcohol or
gasohol with diesel fuel. This mixture
can cause an explosion.
2008 K Nig ht
221
chassis information — 10
The bottom of the tank is made in a “V”
configuration allowing the engine pick-up tube
access to almost all available fuel in the tank.
Internal baffles slow fuel slosh. A check valve
placed at the bottom of the baffle, at the end of
the tank with the pick-up tube, prevents fuel
starvation through long corners when fuel supply
is low.
NOTE
Fill the fuel tank if the motorhome is
going to be stored for any length of
time to reduce the amount of potential
condensation. After storage, check
the vent tube for blockage. It is not
uncommon for insects to plug the vent
tube. If pressure or vacuum exists when
the fuel cap is removed, the vent tube
may be blocked. The end of the vent
tube is located on the curbside of the fuel
tank, near the bottom.
Fuel Sender
The Centroid
fuel sender
has no moving
parts and works
by measuring
electrical
property
between inner
and outer tubes
in the tank.
090318c
The more fuel
between the
tubes the higher the reading. Electronics in the
head of the sender convert the capacitance to
current to drive the fuel gauge.
222
Connections:
The Centroid sender has four connections:
1 and 2 - Positive (POS) and Negative
(NEG): Battery voltage to run the electronics
in the sender head.
3 - SEND: Connects to the SEND
terminal of the gauge on the dash.
4 - ALARM: Makes a connection
internally to the negative (NEG)
terminal when the low fuel alarm level
is reached (when the fuel gauge is
reading about 1/8 tank). This turns on
the fuel indicator on the liquid crystal
display on the speedometer and is not
adjustable.
Adjustments:
The Centroid sender has two adjustments:
1 - EMPTY: Adjusts for length of sender.
It is set at the factory, covered with a
sealant and should not be changed.
2 - FULL (Full Adjustment): The full
adjustment can be used to correct
for slight differences between fuel
meters. During installation it was
factory calibrated and does not need
re-adjustment.
The correct adjustment technique, with a full
tank of fuel, is to start with the full adjustment
screw completely clockwise. This should cause
the reading to be above full. Adjust slowly, rotate
counterclockwise, until the full mark on the
gauge is reached. The intent is to always adjust
downscale rather than upscale.
2008 Kn ig ht
NOTE
The adjustement must be made within
thirty seconds of turning on power. If
you don’t finish, turn the power off and
back on to get another thirty seconds of
adjustment time. Beyond thirty seconds
from power up, the sender responds too
slowly to changes to allow calibration
(“damped” output).
Troubleshooting:
A. Electronic Output: The sender has
a transistorized output to prevent
an ohmmeter from getting a correct
reading of output resistance.
B. Fuel Only: The sender will not work
correctly in conducting fluids such as
water (it will read above full empty all
the time in water). One possibility is
that when there is a constant above-full
empty reading is that there may be
water in the bottom of the fuel tank.
C. Contact Centroid: Probably 90% of
the return Centroid tests work okay
on the bench. If you have incorrect
readings contact Centroid (telephone:
800-423-3574, or preferably, fax: 386423-3709) with the symptoms. A short,
“fill in the blanks” troubleshooting
test is provided to test the sender. It is
easier to find the problem that way than
after the sender has been removed from
the system, since the problem is not
necessarily with the sender.
chassis information — 10
Fuel Lines & Hoses
Make a visual check for fuel leaks at all
engine-mounted fuel lines, connections and at
the fuel tank pick-up and return lines. Leaks
in this area may best be detected by checking
for accumulation of fuel under the tank.
Engine performance and auxiliary equipment
is dependent upon the ability of flexible hoses
to transfer lubricating oil, air, coolant and fuel.
Maintenance of hoses is an important step in
ensuring efficient, economical and safe operation
of the engine and related equipment.
INSPECTION
Check hoses for leaks daily as part of the
pre-start inspection. Check all fittings,
clamps and ties. Ensure the hoses are
not touching shafts, couplings or heated
surfaces, including exhaust manifolds,
sharp edges or other obvious hazardous
areas. Vibration from the engine and
road can move or fatigue clamps
and ties. To ensure continued proper
support, inspect fasteners frequently and
tighten or replace them as necessary.
Fuel Filters
Two filters are used
for the engine: a primary
and secondary filter. The
primary filter is located
roadside behind the air
conditioner condenser;
the seondary filter is
located in the rear engine
compartment.
090426h
NOTE
It is recommended to wear gloves and
old clothing when working with diesel
fuel. Avoid getting fuel in the interior of
the motorhome.
Filter Maintenance Intervals:
 Drain the primary fuel filter daily before
travel.
 Change the primary fuel filter every six
months or every 15,000 miles or at the
first indication of power loss.
 Refer to the engine OEM manual for
service intervals of the secondary fuel
filter.
Water in Fuel:
If water in fuel is found in the primary filter,
DO NOT continue engine operation. Fuel
contaminated with water can damage fuel
injectors. Water is heavier than fuel and will
collect in the primary filter bowl. Drain primary
filter using the valve on the bottom of the filter.
NOTE
Always carry an extra filter as one tank
full of excessively contaminated diesel
fuel can plug a filter.
To Drain the Filter:
 Wear safety goggles.
 Shut off the engine.
 Open the drain valve, by hand,
counterclockwise approximately 1 1/2
to 2 turns until draining occurs. Drain
water/fuel into a container and dispose of
in accordance with local environmental
regulations.
2008 K Nig ht

Close the drain valve by turning
clockwise when clear fuel is visible.
NOTE
Water and sediment from the filter can
contain petroleum products. Consult
the local environmental agency for
recommended disposal guidelines.
If unable to start, contact nearest Cummins
Center or phone 1-800-343-7357 for Cummins
Customer Assistance Center.
Hydraulic System
On a walk around and pre-check of the
motorhome, look for oil leaks under the coach
and around hose fittings. If a hose connection
appears to be leaking, clean the filter and the
surrounding area. If seepage continues, have the
problem corrected to prevent an untimely failure.
Hydraulic Reservoir
The hydraulic filter assembly, located inside
the reservoir, is rated at ten micron*. The
reservoir is filled with 15W-40 motor oil from
the factory.
090391
Located in the rear
engine compartment
223
chassis information — 10
Filter assembly: Nelson 91085G
Filter number: 84365A (ten micron*)
NOTE
Filter number is accurate at time of
printing. Confirm part number before
ordering or obtaining replacement.
The primary function of the power steering
reservoir is to keep the steering system free of
contamination and to dissipate excessive heat
that builds during extreme operating conditions.
Check the oil level in the reservoir every
6,000 miles or three months. The oil dipstick
fill is located on top of the reservoir in the rear
compartment. The oil level should be kept
between the full and add marks on the dipstick.
If adding of fluid is required, use only 15W-40
motor oil.
5. Check the fluid level on the “HOT”
side of the dipstick. It should be in the
area of “HOT” on the dipstick. This is
the normal range for the dipstick. DO
NOT exceed the full mark.
6. If the fluid level is low, add fluid in
small amounts, continuously checking
the level until the “FULL” mark is
reached.
7. Insert the easy grip handle back in the
reservoir and rotate clockwise until
securely fastened.
Hydraulic Filter
Change the hydraulic oil filter every 15,000
miles, or once a year, for cellulose element.
1. Using a 15/16"
wrench, loosen
the center cover
bolt.
2. Remove the bolt
090391b
and cover plate
to access the
spring and filter.
3. Remove the spring and washer to
remove the filter assembly.
4. After replacing the filter assembly,
reverse the process to re-assemble the
reservoir.
5. When attaching the cover plate in
the rubber cover seal, check for any
damage.
Checking the Fluid Level:
1. Start the engine and allow it to reach
normal operating temperature.
2. While the engine is at idle, turn the
steering wheel left and right several
times.
3. Shut the engine off.
4. The easy grip handle is rotated
counterclockwise to remove the
dipstick.
100167
224
2008 Kn ig ht
Air intake & charge air system
The air intake and charge air system supply
the engine with clean air for proper combustion
and performance. Air entering the system is
cleaned through a replaceable filter element and
monitored with an air filter restriction indicator.
The airflow through the air filter is passed
through the engine turbocharger, which
pressurizes and heats the air. The heated
pressurized air then passes through the charge
air cooler, where the air is cooled before entering
the engine intake manifold.
The air entering the engine must be as clean
as possible, as contaminated air can cause
destruction of major engine components. Even
small amounts of contaminants can do major
damage to an engine.
090388d mod crop
INSPECT
The air intake system on a weekly basis,
looking for damage, clogged fins, loose
connections, and wear to the air ducting,
clamps, and filter housing. Check to
ensure that the ducting is not rubbing or
wearing on other components and that
all components are securely in place.
Have any problems investigated and
corrected as soon as possible in order to
prevent engine damage.
chassis information — 10
Changing Air Filter
Air Filter Restriction Indicator
To replace air cleaner,
remove screws and
cover from air cleaner
body. Remove air
cleaner cartridge and
discard. Install new air
cleaner cartridge and
secure with cover and
screws.
The air filter restriction indicator improves
engine efficiency by telling the amount of
restriction present in the air intake system, thus
indicating when the air filter needs changing. A
visual inspection of the air filter is not adequate
and should never dictate service life.
Air Filter Number: Donaldson P533930
NOTE
Filter is accurate at time of printing.
Confirm part number before ordering
or obtaining replacement.
What Indicator Does:
 Continuously shows how much life is left
in engine air filter (window).
 Continuously reads air flow restrictions
in increments (scale).
When To Monitor:
 Inspect indicator before each trip.
When To Change Air Filter:
 When the yellow indicator approaches
the red (top) area it is signaling that
the air filter is becoming excessively
dirty. Service the air filter when the red
indicator stays in the window with the
engine off.
WARNING
DO NOT start the engine with the air
cleaner removed and do not remove it
while the engine is running.
How To Reset Indicator:
 Push button on top to reset.
NOTE
If the air filter restriction indicator
should become faulty, replace entire
unit.
Diesel Particulate Filter
The exhaust system is equipped with a DPF
(Diesel Particulate Filter) to lower particulate
emissions. The DPF traps particulate matter.
Naturally occurring exhaust heat oxidizes
built up particulate and regenerates the filter.
This is called passive regeneration. If passive
regeneration is not sufficient, an active
regeneration cycle will automatically initiate at
speeds greater than 20 mph. Both passive and
active regeneration cycles initiate automatically.
WARNING
Use Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD)
only. Do not use Low Sulfur Diesel
(LSD) with a DPF equipped engine. LSD
will damage the DPF, which may cause
the Stop Engine light to illuminate and
cause the engine to severely derate.
Passive Regeneration:
Passive regeneration uses heat from naturally
occurring exhaust gasses to oxidize built-up
particulate.
090289g
090317
Located in rear roadside compartment
Located in rear engine compartment
2008 K Nig ht
225
chassis information — 10
Active Regeneration:
An active regeneration cycle will be initiated
if exhaust temperatures are not high enough
to regenerate the filter. The motorhome must
be traveling in excess of 20 mph for an active
regeneration cycle to initiate.
During an active
regeneration cycle, diesel
fuel is introduced into the
exhaust system upstream of
the DPF. The fuel will ignite
090502
and super-heat the DPF to
HEST Dash Light
oxidize particulate matter.
The HEST (High Exhaust
System Temperature) dash
light will illuminate when exhaust temperatures
reach 1450º F., indicating that an active
regeneration is underway and exhaust system
temperatures are elevated above normal levels.
These temperature levels may occur for up to 40
minutes. The HEST light will remain on until
the exhaust temperature cools to 650º F., which
may not be until the engine is turned off and
the exhaust system cools before restarting. The
HEST light does not indicate a fault as long as
there are no other active warning lights.
CAUTION
Use extreme caution if parking the
motorhome while the HEST light is on.
The exhaust system and exhaust gas
will be extremely hot to the point of fire
hazard. Do not park the motorhome on
or around anything combustible.
226
NOTE
If the engine is turned off during an
active regeneration cycle, the cycle will
automatically begin again (if necessary)
when the motorhome is operated at
speeds above 20 mph.
DPF Dash Light:
A DPF (Diesel Particulate
Filter) indicator light on the
dash illuminates when an
active regeneration cycle is
090502
necessary and has not been
able to initiate. Driving the
DPF Dash Light
motorhome above speeds of
20 mph will allow an active
regeneration cycle to initiate. The HEST light
will turn on when exhaust temperatures reach
1450º F, indicating an active regeneration cycle
is underway. Once the DPF is clear of particulate
matter the DPF light will turn off.
DPF Light Warning System:
If the DPF remains clogged, there are four
stages of the DPF light warning system. The
HEST light may illuminate during this sequence,
which indicates that an active regeneration cycle
is underway. This should successfully regenerate
the filter. The only indication that the DPF is
clear and in good working order is the DPF light
turning back off.

Stage One: The DPF light glows steady.
This means that an active regeneration
cycle is necessary but has not been able
to initiate.
2008 Kn ig ht

Stage Two: The DPF light flashes. The
DPF filter is clogged to the point that the
engine will slightly derate (lose power).
Stage Three: The DPF light flashes and
the Check engine light turns on. The
DPF is clogged to the point that service
is required immediately. The engine will
severely derate at this point.
 Stage Four: The DPF light and Check
Engine lights extinguish and the Stop
Engine light turns on. Turn off the
engine as soon as possible to avoid
severe engine and/or system component
damage. Do not drive the motorhome in
this condition. The DPF will need to be
removed for repair.

Lubrication Maintenance
Performing regular scheduled maintenance
ensures reliable operation and optimum
service life of the various chassis components.
Completed maintenance brings peace of mind
knowing the various components have received
proper service. Failure to follow maintenance
guidelines, or perform scheduled maintenance,
results in inefficient operation, premature
component wear or component failure resulting
in breakdown.
Maintenance schedules are usually performed
at certain mile or time intervals. When
performing high level procedures, lower level
service should also be performed.
chassis information — 10
NOTE
Maintenance schedules are based on
normal operating conditions and use.
Operating under unusual or adverse
condition shortens service intervals.
NOTE
Engine and transmission service
intervals are listed in their respective
manuals.
Proper Lubricant Waste Disposal:
When performing service maintenance on
the engine, transmission or rear axle, waste
fluids and filters should be properly disposed of
or recycled. Package used oils, antifreeze and
other fluids in sealed containers. In many cases
used oil is accepted free of charge at county
disposal sites. Waste fluids are toxic to pets and
other animals. Waste fluids should not be left in
open containers. The sweet odor of antifreeze is
attractive to pets, but highly toxic.
CAUTION
Properly dispose of used antifreeze
and waste oil. Animals like the sweet
odor of antifreeze and may ingest it if
left in open containers. Wipe up any
fluid spills. Pets may lie in puddles of
fluid, many of which are irritants and
can cause severe chemical burns if not
properly washed.
Lubricant Classification:
Lubricants are manufactured in many forms
for a variety of applications. There are many
different oil and grease consistencies each
with a designed application. To properly select
a particular type of lubricant for a specific
application, the component must be evaluated.
Component stress loads, ambient temperature,
working temperature and environmental
exposure are just a few of the variables to
consider. Select the proper lubricant for its
intended application. As an example: selecting
high viscosity grease to lubricate a lock cylinder
results in sluggish lock cylinder operation
especially in a cool environment. Conversely,
using graphite to lubricate a component that is
under extreme temperature and load will result
in component failure.
Grease ratings and their base compounds are
especially important when selecting a lubricant
type for an intended application. Some grease
compounds are manufactured for multi-use
application. These are acceptable if the grease
rating is in accordance with the manufacturer’s
recommended lubricant type and rating.
Lubricants:
Many chassis components require lubrication.
The types of lubricants used will vary with the
application of the component. A component
may fail prematurely due to lack of lubrication
or from using an incorrect lubricant type. The
component manufacturer usually recommends
a particular type of lubricant with a minimum
approval rating. Most lubricants are tested under
strict guidelines set by the ASTM (American
Society for Testing and Materials). The NLGI
(National Lubricating Grease Institute) helps
disperse information to the grease production
industry. Grease containers usually have
an approval rating by the SAE (Society of
Automotive Engineers), Mil Spec (Military
Specification), API (American Petroleum
Institute) or by other recognized and accepted
organizations.
2008 K Nig ht
The correct lubricant type with an approved
specific rating must be used whenever applying,
changing or adding any lubricant. When
purchasing lubricants for a specific application
be sure the label affirms the type of lubricant
required with the tested rating by the term
“meets or exceeds” in accordance with the
manufacturer specifications.
Lubricating greases are made from different
base compounds giving the grease different
lubricating consistencies, properties and
maximum operating temperatures. Most
containers list the base compound and maximum
operating temperature usually listed as melting
point or drip point. Lubricating components,
such as brake component for example, require
a high temperature special base compound
grease. Lubricating this type of component
with other than specified grease type will result
in inadequate lubricating qualities resulting in
component malfunction or failure.
INSPECTION
When performing any scheduled
maintenance, inspect the area around
where you are working. For example,
changing the oil, look at the rear
differential. Inspect for visual signs of
fluid leaks.
Most fluids and lubricants have a distinct
odor, which can be used to detect early signs of
trouble. Generally, odors are most detectable
soon after parking. Unusual sounds are another
method of detecting a problem early. There are
many types of sounds that are normal, such
as the cyclic purging of the air dryer. Become
familiar with the different sounds. If something
sounds odd, smells peculiar or looks unusual
investigate the situation.
227
chassis information — 10
Greasing:
Thoroughly clean all Zerk grease fittings
before applying new lubricant. Keep paper
towels or disposable rags handy when greasing.
When lubricating items such as drive shafts
and steer axle components, continued grease
application is generally required until new grease
appears at exit points.
Some items use sealed boots around the
component to prevent moisture intrusion. When
greasing these types of components, care must
be given to prevent excess lubricant pressure
from rupturing the seal.
WARNING
Always chock wheels before going
underneath the motorhome.
To apply grease:
 Clean the grease fitting. Initially operate
grease gun until new lubricant discharges
from nozzle, then wipe nozzle clean to
avoid introducing contaminants into the
component.
 Snap nozzle onto grease fitting. Nozzle
must remain in line with the grease fitting
during the application process. If the
nozzle is not in line, lubricant will collect
around nozzle and grease fitting, failing
to lubricate the component.
 Wrap the nozzle with a paper towel
or rag to prevent contamination and
accidental soiling of other areas.
If the component does not accept grease the
Zerk
fitting may be plugged or damaged. Zerk
WARNING
fittings are replaceable and generally available at
Never place yourself under motorhome
without first properly blocking frame
most auto supply stores. Zerk fittings come in a
(jackstands) from coming down in case
variety of angles depending on the application.
of rapid deflation of air system.
Every effort should be made to lubricate the
component, as neglect will only result in
Brake actuating components require lubrication
premature component failure.
to keep the actuating components freely
operating. Avoid contaminating brake linings
NOTE
with lubricant. Particular care and attention to
Some grease fittings may not be
accessible until the steering wheel is
details should be taken when lubricating brake
turned or the motorhome is moved
actuating components. Wheel removal may be
slightly.
necessary to gain access the grease fittings.
NOTE
Suspension, steering, brake and
drivetrain components are lubricated
at factory using NLGI 2 Lithium Soap
based grease.
Typical Zerk Fitting
228
2008 Kn ig ht
090368
chassis information — 10
Notes
2008 K Nig ht
229
chassis information — 10
Lubrication Charts
NOTE
Front and rear
chassis charts are
representations. Actual
location of equipment
may vary.
070168d
070169n
230
2008 Kn ig ht
chassis information — 10
NOTE
Service must be performed every twelve (12) months, regardless of actual mileage, to protect seals, bearings and gaskets from
drying out and failing. The motorhome must be started and driven for at least 20 miles every two weeks. It is important to
remember the generator maintenance interval is based on hours of usage. Consult the OEM Owner’s Manual for the generator
service interval.
2008 K Nig ht
231
chassis information — 10
Specifications charts
Engine Specifications
Tank Capacities
Generator Specifications
8 Kw
Tank Capacities (Approx. Gallons) All Models
ENGINE SPECIFICATIONS
ISC 360 HP
8.3 L/506 CI
Water Heater
10 gallons
Cubic Inch Displacement
Grey Water
62 gallons
Engine HP
360 HP @
2000 RPM
Black Water
40 gallons
Fresh Water
100 gallons
Engine Torque
1050 lbs./ft. @
1400 RPM
Diesel Fuel
100 gallons
Governed Speed
2200 RPM
LP-Gas*
39 gallons
Firing Order
153624
*Actual filled LP-Gas Tank Capacity is 80% of listing due to
safety shutoff required on tank.
NOTE
All tank capacities are estimated based
upon calculations provided by the
tank manufacturers and represent
approximate capacities. The actual
“usable capacity” may be greater or less
than the estimated capacities based upon
fabrication and installation of the tanks.
NOTE
This chart reflects product specifications
available at the time of printing.
Therefore any floor plans introduced
thereafter may not be reflected in the
chart. All other information contained
throughout the manual will still apply.
232
Rear Axle Ratio
4:30:1
Alternator Amp Size
160 Amp
Idle Speed
700 RPM
020159o
Chassis Fluid Capacities
Chassis Liquid Capacities
ISC 360 HP
Engine Oil
19 Qts.
Transmission Oil (with service)
17 Qts.
w/filter
Radiator Coolant (initial amount)
13 Gal.
A/C Refrigerant (initial amount)
4 lbs. 134 A
Hydraulic Oil
3.5 Qts.
Rear End
15 Qts.
Approx.
2008 Kn ig ht
Belts & Filters
NOTE
Filter and belt numbers were correct at
the time of printing. Verify the numbers
at time of removal. The manufacturer
will not be responsible for incorrect filter
or belt usage. Please refer to the engine
manufacturer’s operating instructions
for specific maintenance information.
ISC FILTERS & BELTS
MANUFACTURER
NUMBER
Air Filter
Donaldson
P533930
Alternator Serpentine Belt
Cummins
3972387
Fuel Filter Primary
Fleetguard
FS1003
Fuel Filter Secondary
Fleetguard
FF5636
Oil Filter
Fleetguard
LF9009
Transmission Filter
Allison
29545779
Air Dryer Filter
Meritor Wabco
R950011
chassis information — 10
Battery Specification Charts
2008 K Nig ht
233
chassis information — 10
Maintenance
Records
After scheduled services
are performed, record the
date, odometer reading
and who performed the
service in the boxes
provided after the
maintenance interval. Any
additional information
from “Owner Checks and
Services” or “Periodic
Maintenance” can be
added on the following
record pages. In addition,
retain all maintenance
receipts. The owner
information portfolio is a
convenient place to store
them.
234
2008 Kn ig ht
chassis information — 10
Battery Record
MAKE
TYPE
DATE INSTALLED
REPAIRS
SERVICE
DATE REPLACED
MONTHS
MILES
TIRE RECORD
MAKE
TYPE
PLY
DATE
INSTALLED
REPAIRS
2008 K Nig ht
DATE
REPLACED
SERVICE
MONTHS
MILES
235
chassis information — 10
Technical Publications
Manager:
Vance Buell
OPERATIONS
Technical Writers
William Birch - OR
Nate Bondurant - OR
Thomas Joachim - IN
Claudia Price - IN
Creative Designers
Aaron Graham - OR
Kelly Stroble - OR
Julie Slagle - IN
236
Illustrations:
Kelly Stroble, Aaron Graham, Dustin Hutchcraft
Online Tours
www.monaco-online.com/tours/
PRINTING
Holiday Graphics - IN
Knight 2008 ~ Technical Writer
Claudia Price
Knight 2008 ~ Layout Design
Julie Karnes
Knight 2008 ~ Cover Design
Aaron Graham
ONLINE Corporate Site: www.monaco-online.com
2008 Kn ig ht
INDEX
2008 KNIGHT
INDEX
A
ABS/ATC System (Anti-lock Brakes)......199
ABS Diagnostic .......................................200
Air Conditioner & Heater Controls ........183
Operating Tips & Hints ...........................184
System Components ................................185
Troubleshooting.......................................186
Air Conditioning - Roof ..............................86
Air Conditioner Maintenance ....................87
Heat Pump Operation ................................86
Operation ...................................................86
Return Air Filters .......................................87
Air Dryer....................................................194
Air Dryer Cycle .......................................196
Desiccant-Type Air Dryer .......................196
Desiccant Cartridge .................................195
Air Intake & Charge Air System .............226
Air Filter Restriction Indicator ................227
Changing Air Filter..................................227
Air Spring Inspections .............................196
Air Supply System.....................................190
Air Fittings ..............................................192
Air Governor ...........................................191
Air Storage Tanks ....................................191
Air System Charging (External) ..............192
Air Coupler ..............................................194
Air System Test .......................................192
Aladdin™ Engine Display (Optional) .....187
Aladdin™ System (Optional) ................... 112
Aladdin Main Menu ................................ 112
Aladdin Operations ................................. 112
Coach Info ............................................... 113
Power Down Aladdin .............................. 114
Select Video Source................................. 113
System Options ....................................... 113
Time and Alarm Functions ...................... 113
Trip Meter Selection ................................ 113
Voyager Select Button ............................. 112
Alternator ..................................................176
Alternator Testing Procedure...................176
Appliances - Introduction...........................74
Arched Back Booth Dinette (Optional) ... 110
Bed Conversion ....................................... 110
Awnings ......................................................103
Awning Care & Cleaning ........................105
Front Door - Mirage ................................104
Patio Awning - Eclipse ............................104
Slide-Out Cover.......................................103
Storm Precautions ...................................105
Window Awning ......................................104
B
Backing Up A Motorhome ..........................23
Batteries - house ........................................165
Battery Charge Time &
Consumption Rate ...................................167
Battery Maintenance................................166
Testing the Battery...................................166
Battery - Chassis .......................................172
2008 KnIGht
Battery Cut-out Switch .............................155
Battery Disconnect ....................................172
Chassis .....................................................172
Battery Disconnect ....................................155
House .......................................................155
Battery Maintainer
(Bi-Directional Isolator Relay Delay) ......175
Relays ......................................................175
Battery Specification Charts ....................235
Maintenance Records ..............................236
Bedroom Ceiling Fan (Not On All Units) 106
Bedroom Dash Radio Switch ................... 118
Bedroom DVD (Optional) ........................ 119
Brake Systems ...........................................197
Air Brakes ...............................................197
Automatic Slack Adjuster........................198
Brake Systems - Backup ........................198
Park & Emergency Brake System ...........198
Breaking Camp ...........................................26
C
Carbon Monoxide Detector........................45
Alarm .........................................................46
Cleaning & Maintenance ...........................46
Operation ...................................................45
Testing .......................................................46
Ceiling ..........................................................60
Central Vacuum (Optional)........................94
Maintenance ..............................................94
Operation ...................................................94
Chassis - Introduction...............................190
23
index
Chassis Electrical - Introduction..............172
Citizen Band (CB) Radio - Prep............... 111
Cold Weather Conditions..........................138
Cold Weather Storage...............................138
Console........................................................177
Leveling Controls.....................................178
Parking Brake...........................................178
Transmission Shift Selector......................177
Cooktop.........................................................82
Burner Grate...............................................83
Care & Cleaning.........................................83
Cooktop With Oven (Optional)..................83
Burner Grate...............................................84
Lighting the Burners...................................84
Coolant System...........................................214
Radiator/Charge Air Cooler......................216
Countertops..................................................62
Laminate.....................................................63
Solid Surface..............................................62
D
Dash.............................................................179
Indicator Lights........................................180
Instrument Panel.......................................179
Switches...................................................181
Dash Radio.................................................. 117
Dash Radio Operation.............................. 117
Speaker Switch......................................... 117
Diagnostic Plug Location...........................187
Diesel Particulate Filter.............................227
Distribution Panel......................................164
House 12 Volt DC.....................................164
238
Distribution Panel (50 Amp).....................162
Circuit Breaker.........................................163
Energy Management System....................162
GFCI Breakers & Outlets.........................164
House 120/240 Volt AC Panel..................162
Door - Sliding..............................................107
Drive Axle & Drive Shaft..........................205
U-Joint Angles Phasing &
Driveline Balance.....................................207
Driving & Safety..........................................14
Familiarize Yourself...................................14
Inspections..................................................14
Mirror Adjust..............................................14
Safety Seat Belts.........................................14
Driving Tips..................................................16
Dry Camping................................................25
E
Electrical Layout........................................170
Electric Toilet
(40 SKQ & 40 DFT Models Only)............136
Cleaning...................................................137
Drain Traps & Auto Vents........................138
Holding Tank Level Sensors....................137
Maintenance.............................................137
Operation..................................................136
Programming the Water Level..................137
Winterization............................................138
Emergency Roadside Procedures ..............27
Dead Chassis Battery.................................28
In Case of Flat Tire.....................................28
Engine - General Information................... 211
Engine “No Start” Flow Chart.................188
Engine Oil...................................................213
2008 Kn ig ht
Engine Shutdown.......................................214
Extended Engine Shutdown.....................214
Entertainment............................................ 115
Entry Door....................................................99
Latch Adjustments......................................99
Screen Door................................................99
Entry Step.....................................................98
Operation....................................................98
Step Cover..................................................98
Equipment - Introduction...........................98
Escape (Egress) Window.............................47
Exhaust Brake............................................218
Functions..................................................218
Operation..................................................218
Exterior Care................................................50
Bright Metal...............................................52
Corrosion....................................................50
Drying.........................................................50
Paint Codes.................................................51
Tire Care.....................................................51
Washing......................................................50
Waxing........................................................50
Wheels - Coated Aluminum.......................51
Exterior Entertainment Center
(Sharp TV) Optional..................................121
Exterior Maintenance..................................52
Fiberglass....................................................52
Roof Care & Seal Inspections....................53
Sealant Types..............................................53
index
F
Fabrics...........................................................55
General Care & Cleaning...........................55
Leather........................................................57
Optima Leather & “O” Vinyl.....................57
Ultra-Leather..............................................57
Vinyl...........................................................55
Fans ............................................................106
Automatic.................................................106
Faucet Screens............................................131
Fire Extinguisher..........................................46
Fireplace Electric
(Optional – 40 SKQ Only)...........................95
Light Bulb Replacement.............................96
Operation....................................................95
Remote Control/Receiver...........................96
Floors.............................................................58
Carpet Cleaning..........................................58
Laminate Floor ..........................................59
Tile Floor....................................................59
Free Standing Dinette (Optional)............. 110
Front Axle...................................................201
Alignment.................................................202
Center Link...............................................204
Control Arm Bushings..............................204
Drag Link.................................................204
Front Brakes.............................................205
Lubrication Maintenance Safety..............203
Steering Column.......................................203
Steering Components...............................203
Steering Spindles......................................204
Fuel System.................................................222
Fuel Filters................................................225
Fuel Lines & Hoses..................................225
Fuel Requirements....................................222
Fuel Sender...............................................224
Fuel Tank..................................................223
Furnace.........................................................87
If the Furnace Fails to Light.......................88
Operation....................................................88
Using the Furnace.......................................88
Fuse & Circuits..........................................172
Fuses............................................................165
G
Generator - 120 AC Diesel.........................157
Generator Exercise...................................160
Generator Fuel..........................................159
Powering the Equipment..........................159
Pre-Start Checks.......................................158
Resetting the Circuit Breaker...................159
Starting the Generator..............................158
Stopping the Generator.............................159
Glossary of Terms..........................................5
GPS Navigation (Optional)....................... 111
Grab Handle.................................................99
H
Height Control Valves................................197
Hide-A-Bed Air Mattress (Optional)........109
Select Comfort Air Mattress (Optional)...109
Hitch ............................................................20
Tow Plug Connection.................................22
Using the Rear Receiver.............................20
2008 K Nig ht
Home Theatre Surround Sound............... 118
Remote Control........................................ 118
Speaker Switch......................................... 118
House Electrical - Introduction................154
Hydraulic System.......................................225
Hydraulic Filter........................................226
Hydraulic Reservoir.................................225
I,J
Interior Care.................................................55
Cockpit.......................................................55
Inverter.......................................................160
Battery Charging with the Inverter...........160
Battery Temperature Sensor.....................161
Factory Default Settings...........................161
Providing AC Power with Inverter...........160
K
Keyless Entry (Optional)...........................100
Operation..................................................100
L
Ladder - Rear............................................. 111
Leveling - Hydraulic..................................208
Automatic Leveling..................................210
Manual Leveling......................................209
Prior to Leveling.......................................209
Retracting Leveling Jacks........................210
239
index
Lights...........................................................168
Fluorescent Light......................................169
Incandescent Light...................................168
Interior Halogen ......................................169
Limited Warranty Transfer Application/
Change of Owner Information................... 11
Liquid Soap Dispenser...............................131
LP-Gas Consumption................................150
LP-Gas Detector.........................................144
Alarm........................................................145
Maintenance.............................................146
Testing......................................................145
LP-Gas Distribution Lines........................150
LP-Gas Emergency
Procedures Checklist.................................146
LP-Gas Fundamentals...............................148
LP-Gas Hose Inspection............................150
LP-Gas Regulator......................................148
LP-Gas Safety Tips....................................151
LP-Gas Systems..........................................144
LP-Gas Tank...............................................146
Measurement............................................146
Tank Capacity...........................................147
Tank Filling..............................................147
Tank Operation.........................................147
Lubrication Charts....................................232
Lubrication Maintenance..........................228
M,N
Main Slide-out Operation.........................100
Extending & Retracting Slide Rooms......101
Manual Override - Bedroom....................103
Manual Override Main Slide-out Room...............................102
Troubleshooting........................................101
240
Microwave/Convection Oven......................80
Care & Cleaning.........................................81
Mold & Mildew............................................64
O
Owner’s Manual Survey: Knight 2008........9
P,Q
Pest Control..................................................65
Power Sunvisors ........................................107
Pull Down Shades (Optional)....................107
R
Rear Grill....................................................217
Rear Vision system.......................................22
Refrigerator..................................................74
Air in LP-Gas Supply Lines.......................78
Control Panel - Four Door..........................75
Control Panel – Two Door (Optional)........78
Cooling Unit Fans......................................76
Doors..........................................................77
Exterior Refrigerator Access Panel............78
Icemaker.....................................................76
Interior Light..............................................77
Operation Specifics....................................74
Refrigerator Alarm.....................................76
Service........................................................77
Storage Procedures.....................................77
Reporting Safety Defects...............................4
2008 Kn ig ht
S
Safety Terms...................................................4
Satellite........................................................120
Maintenance.............................................121
Satellite Requirements..............................120
Semi-Automatic Non
In-Motion (Optional)................................120
Satellite Radio (Optional).......................... 111
Satellite System........................................... 119
DSS Prewire............................................. 119
Seat Controls..............................................107
Set-Up Procedures........................................24
Shock Absorber..........................................208
Shore Power Hook-up................................155
Manual Cord Reel....................................157
Shower...........................................................60
Smoke Detector............................................44
Maintenance...............................................44
Operation....................................................44
Testing........................................................44
Troubleshooting..........................................44
Sofa..............................................................108
Easy Bed Sofa..........................................108
Hide-A-Bed (Optional)............................108
Specifications Charts.................................234
Belts & Filters..........................................234
Chassis Fluid Capacities...........................234
Engine Specifications...............................234
Generator Specifications..........................234
Tank Capacities........................................234
Stainless Steel Surfaces................................63
Starting Procedure.....................................212
Cold Weather............................................212
Normal Starting........................................212
index
Steering Column........................................177
Tilt & Telescope.......................................177
Steering Gear..............................................205
Storage..........................................................68
Long Term..................................................68
Removal from Storage...............................70
Short Term..................................................68
Winter Storage Checklist............................70
Storage Bay Slide-out Tray (Optional)..... 111
Storage Under Bed..................................... 110
Swivel Seats................................................108
Systems Control Center.............................123
T,U,V
Tires...............................................................30
Air Pressure Checklist................................34
Importance of Air Pressure.........................31
Inspecting & Pressure.................................33
Storage of Tires - Long Term.....................35
Tire Chart - Goodyear................................32
Tire Pressure Inflation Guideline...............31
Tire Rotation...............................................35
Tire Support When Leveling......................34
Tire Vibration.............................................34
Tread...........................................................35
Toilet............................................................135
Cleaning & Maintenance..........................136
Towing Procedures.......................................29
Disabling Parking Brake............................30
Transfer Switch..........................................157
Transmission...............................................218
Check Trans Indicator..............................219
Periodic Inspections.................................220
Shift Selector............................................218
Transmission Fluid & Filters....................221
Trip Preparation..........................................19
TV Entertainment Components............... 114
Connections - Cable TV, Computer
& Phone.................................................... 114
Television (Front) Lockout Feature.......... 114
TV Antenna.............................................. 114
Video Selector Box................................... 115
W,X,Y,Z
Wall Coverings.............................................60
Wall Thermostat...........................................85
Warranty Information File...........................4
Warranty Limited: 2008 Monaco..................i
Warranty Limited: 2008 Roadmaster.........iii
Washer/Dryer (Optional)............................92
Operation....................................................92
Test Procedure............................................92
Washer/Dryer Maintenance........................93
Winterizing the Washer/Dryer....................93
Washer/Dryer Prepared (Optional)............91
Waste Pump (Optional).............................133
Waste Water Systems . ..............................131
Proper Waste Disposal..............................131
Tank Flush................................................132
Waste Drain Hose.....................................132
What Not to Put in
Waste Holding Tanks................................131
What to Put in Holding Tanks..................131
Water Filter - Faucet..................................129
Water Heater................................................89
Water Pump................................................128
Water Pump Troubleshooting...................128
Water Service Center.................................142
2008 K Nig ht
Water Systems............................................130
Disinfecting Fresh Water..........................130
Troubleshooting........................................130
Water Systems - Introduction...................126
Water Tank - Fresh Gravity Fill...............127
City Water Hook-up.................................127
Power Water Hose Reel (Optional)..........128
Water Tanks................................................126
Fresh Water Fill........................................127
Measurements & Calibration ..................126
Weighing the Motorhome............................36
Cargo Carrying Capacity Flowchart...........41
Four Corner Weighing (Example)..............39
Weighing Procedure Worksheet.................41
Weight Label..............................................38
Weight Record Sheet..................................43
Weight Terms..............................................36
Wheel Mounting...........................................35
Windows........................................................63
Condensation..............................................63
Window Treatments.....................................64
Day/Night Shades.......................................64
Mini-Blinds................................................64
Winterization..............................................139
De-winterization.......................................141
Using Air Pressure....................................139
Using Non-Toxic Antifreeze ...................140
Wood Care....................................................61
241