Cisco 30 VIP Specifications

Doc. No. 78-2877-01
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
Product Numbers: VIP-FE-TX(=)
This configuration note is a standalone publication that provides instructions for installing,
configuring, and maintaining the Fast Ethernet Versatile Interface Processor (VIP-FE-TX) in your
Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series routers.
The VIP-FE-TX operates with the CxBus in the Cisco 7000 series and CyBus in the Cisco 7500
series, and requires that the host Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series router is running Cisco
Internetwork Operating System (Cisco IOS) Release 11.1(1) or later, or a Cisco-approved beta
version of Cisco IOS Release 11.1 or later.
Note The entire VIP-FE-TX card, with port adapters installed, is a field-replaceable unit (FRU).
Individual port adapters are not available as spare parts.
Included are steps for VIP-FE-TX hardware installation, and basic VIP-FE-TX configuration steps
and examples for configuring the individual interfaces on a new VIP-FE-TX.
This publication has two main sections:
•
Versatile Interface Processor Functions, page 3—this section discusses general VIP motherboard
features, maintenance considerations, and overall functions
•
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions, page 30—this section contains subsections that discuss the
FE-TX port adapter and its specific features, configuration and connection requirements, and
functions
You need only refer to the information that is specific to your FE-TX port adapter or to that which
applies to specific VIP motherboard functionality. A table of contents is included on page 2 so you
can more easily find what you need.
Note For complete descriptions of interface subcommands and the configuration options available
for VIP-related interfaces, and which support VIP functionality, refer to the section “If You Need
More Information.”
Copyright © 1995
Cisco Systems, Inc.
All rights reserved.
1
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
This configuration note includes the following sections:
•
•
If You Need More Information
Versatile Interface Processor Functions, page 3
— What is the VIP?, page 3
Note The following section contains important information about the latest Cisco IOS release.
— VIP Software Prerequisites, page 5
— VIP Hardware Prerequisites, page 5
— What is the Cisco 7000 Family?, page 5
— VIP Port Adapter Hardware Configuration Overview, page 10
— VIP Microcode Overview, page 11
— VIP Installation Prerequisites, page 12
— VIP Installation, page 17
— Checking the Installation and Verifying VIP Status, page 20
— Upgrading VIP Microcode, page 24
— Upgrading and Replacing DRAM SIMMs, page 27
•
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions, page 30
— Fast Ethernet Overview, page 30
— FE-TX Port Adapter Description and Fast Ethernet Specifications, page 31
— FE-TX Port Adapter LEDs, page 32
— Attaching FE-TX Port Adapter Interface Cables, page 36
— Configuring the FE-TX Interface, page 37
•
•
SELV Circuit Warning Translations, page 42
Cisco Information Online, page 43
If You Need More Information
The Cisco Internetwork Operating System (Cisco IOS) software running the router contains
extensive features and functionality. The effective use of many of many of these features is easier if
you have more information at hand.
To obtain general information about documentation, call Customer Service at 800 553-6387 or
408 526-7208. Customer Service hours are 5:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Pacific time, Monday through
Friday (excluding company holidays). You can also send e-mail to cs-rep@cisco.com. You can also
refer to the Cisco Information Packet that shipped with your router.
2 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
For additional information on configuring the Cisco 7000 series or Cisco 7500 series routers, the
following documentation resources are available to you:
•
UniverCD
This publication and all other Cisco Systems publications are available on UniverCD, which is
Cisco’s online library of product information. UniverCD is updated and shipped monthly, so it
might be more up to date than printed documentation. To order UniverCD, contact a Cisco Sales
or Customer Service representative.
•
For systems with Cisco IOS Release 11.1(1), a Cisco-approved 11.1 beta software version, or a
later Cisco IOS release, refer to the following modular configuration and modular command
reference publications, as appropriate for your configuration:
— Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide
— Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference
— Wide-Area Networking Configuration Guide
— Wide-Area Networking Command Reference
— Standard Network Protocols Configuration Guide
— Standard Network Protocols Command Reference
— Network Protocols Configuration Guide
— Network Protocols Command Reference
— Bridging and IBM Networking Configuration Guide
— Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference
— Configuration Builder Getting Started Guide
— Troubleshooting Internetworking Systems
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
The following sections describe the Versatile Interface Processor (VIP) and discuss VIP-specific
features and functions, such as installing and removing the VIP, installing and removing port
adapters, and using and configuring common VIP interface functions.
What is the VIP?
The VIP is a new interface processor for use with the Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series
routers, and it installs in the interface processor slots in your Cisco 7000 series or 7500 series router.
The VIP uses a single motherboard with up to two port adapters. The VIP port adapters provide the
individual LAN, WAN, or LAN/WAN interface ports. The VIP can be removed from a chassis while
power is on and the system is operating.
Caution The VIP supports online insertion and removal (OIR), which allows you to remove and
replace a VIP without first shutting down the system. Online insertion and removal maximizes router
availability by letting you add or remove VIPs during system operation; however, the system may
indicate a hardware failure if you fail to follow proper procedures. To help avoid problems with the
installation, review the functional description in the section “Online Insertion and Removal—An
Overview” on page 14, and follow the VIP installation steps carefully.
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
3
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Note The VIP port adapters themselves do not support OIR, nor are they FRUs.
The VIP uses a Reduced Instructions Set Computing (RISC), Mips 4600 processor for high
performance, and has an internal operating frequency of 100 megahertz (MHz) and a 50-MHz
system bus interface. The VIP has 8 megabytes (MB) of dynamic random access memory (DRAM)
as the default DRAM configuration.
Figure 1 shows a VIP-FE-TX. The VIP firmware (microcode), which contains card-specific
software instructions, resides in a Flash memory device in socket location U17. For pinouts, refer to
the section “FE-TX Port Adapter Receptacles, Cables, and Pinouts” on page 33. Single in-line
memory modules contain the DRAM. You can install VIPs in any available interface processor slots
in your Cisco 7000 series or Cisco 7500 series router.
Figure 1
VIP with One FE-TX Port Adapter (Horizontal Orientation Shown)
Bus connector
Port adapter
handles not shown
Microcode
Flash U17
U2
DRAM
SIMMs
U1
Port adapter blank
in port adapter
slot 1
FE-TX in
port adapter
slot 0
K
RJ
45
LI
N
I
MI
EN
AB
LE
D
0
H4709
FAST ETHERNET
Note In the Cisco 7000, Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513 chassis, the VIP is installed vertically. In the
Cisco 7010 and Cisco 7505 chassis, the VIP is installed horizontally. Port adapters have a handle
attached, but this handle is not shown to allow a full view of the detail on the port adapter’s faceplate.
4 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
VIP Software Prerequisites
The VIP requires that the host Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series router is running Cisco
Internetwork Operating System (Cisco IOS) Release 11.1(1) or later, or a Cisco-approved beta
version of Cisco IOS Release 11.1 or later.
Note The latest Cisco IOS release is available via anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) from
ftp/beta111_dir@ftp.cisco.com.
Detailed information about the latest Cisco IOS release can be
found in the ASCII file vip1-readme, which is also available via FTP from ftp.cisco.com in the
directory /ftp/beta111_dir. This ASCII file includes information and instructions on how to get
the current Cisco IOS software images and VIP microcode. To access information located in Cisco
Information Online (CIO), refer to the section “Cisco Information Online” at the end of this
publication.
VIP Hardware Prerequisites
The VIP operates with the CxBus in the Cisco 7000 series and CyBus in the Cisco 7500 series, and
operates with the optional RSP7000 and RSP7000CI RSP-based processor modules in the
Cisco 7000 series routers: Cisco 7000 and Cisco 7010. The VIP will also operate with the Route
Processor RP) and Switch Processor (SP) in the Cisco 7000 series routers. The VIP operates with all
RSP-based processor modules currently shipping in the Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series
routers: Cisco 7505, Cisco 7507, and Cisco 7513.
What is the Cisco 7000 Family?
For the Cisco 7000 family of routers, which includes the Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series
routers, network interfaces reside on modular interface processors, including the VIP, which provide
a direct connection between external networks and the high-speed CxBus in the Cisco 7000 series
and the high-speed CyBus in the Cisco 7500 series.
In all systems, the remaining slots support any combination of network interface types: Ethernet
attachment unit interface (AUI), Ethernet 10BASE-T, Fast Ethernet 100BASE-TX, Asynchronous
Transfer Mode (ATM), Token Ring, multichannel applications, Fiber Distributed Data Interface
(FDDI), channel attachment, serial, or High-Speed Serial Interface (HSSI), and all VIP–based
interfaces.
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
5
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Cisco 7000 Series
Figure 2 and Figure 3 show the rear of the Cisco 7000 series routers: the seven-slot Cisco 7000 and
the five-slot Cisco 7010, respectively. In the Cisco 7000 series, two slots are reserved for the SP (or
SSP) and RP, or for the 7000 Series Route Switch Processor (RSP7000) and the 7000 Series Chassis
Interface (RSP7000CI). The remaining slots are for interface processors: slots 0 through 4 in the
Cisco 7000, and slots 0 through 2 in the Cisco 7010.
Figure 2
Cisco 7000, Interface Processor End
Captive
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Interface processor slots
6 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
0
1
2
3
4
RSP RSP
7000 7000CI
slot 5 slot 6
H5288
X.
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Figure 3
Cisco 7010, Interface Processor End
RSP7000CI slot 4
RSP7000 slot 3
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ROUTE SWITCH PROCESSOR
Interface processor slot 1
Interface processor slot 0
Power switch
H5874
DC OK LED
Chassis ground
screw
Power receptacle
AC-input power supply
Cisco 7500 Series
Figure 4, Figure 5, and Figure 6 show the rear of the Cisco 7500 series routers: the five-slot
Cisco 7505, the seven-slot Cisco 7507, and the thirteen-slot Cisco 7513, respectively.
In the Cisco 7505, one slot (4) is reserved for the Route Switch Processor (RSP1), which contains
the system processor and performs packet switching functions. Slots 0 through 3 are for interface
processors.
Cisco 7505, Interface Processor End
T
NS
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AU
X.
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EN
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ROUTE SWITCH PROCESSOR
LT
Figure 4
Interface processor slot 2
Interface processor slot 1
Interface processor slot 0
H2761
ower switch
Chassis
grounding
receptacles
Power receptacle
DC OK LED
AC-input power supply
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
7
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Figure 5 shows the rear of the seven-slot Cisco 7507 router. In the Cisco 7507, up to two slots (2 and
3) are reserved for the Route Switch Processor (RSP2), which contains the system processor and
performs packet switching functions. Slots 0 and 1 and 4 through 6 are for interface processors.
Figure 5
Cisco 7507, Interface Processor End
aptive
stallation screw
DC
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CO
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Slot 0
1
2
3
RSP slots
8 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
4
5
6
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Figure 6 shows the rear of the Cisco 7513 with two AC-input power supplies installed. Two slots (6
and 7) are reserved for the second generation Route Switch Processor (RSP2), which contains the
system processor and performs packet switching functions. Slots 0 through 5 and 8 through 12 are
for interface processors.
Figure 6
Cisco 7513, Interface Processor End
Blower module
Cable-management
bracket
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Air intake vent
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OUTPUT
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POWER
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POWER
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VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
9
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
VIP Port Adapter Hardware Configuration Overview
The port adapter attaches to the VIP motherboard. (See Figure 7.) The port adapter contains the
physical connections for the VIP interface types to connect to your network.
Figure 7
VIP with One FE-TX Port Adapter (Product Number VIP-FE-TX[=])
Bus connector
Port adapter
handles not shown
Microcode
Flash U17
U2
DRAM
SIMMs
U1
Port adapter blank
in port adapter
slot 1
FE-TX in
port adapter
slot 0
45
RJ
NK
LI
I
MI
EN
AB
LE
D
0
H4709
FAST ETHERNET
Note The VIP-FE-TX must have a blank port adapter installed in the second port adapter slot
location, as shown in Figure 7.
Following are the VIP port adapters by interface type:
•
•
•
•
Ethernet 10BASE-T—4E
Fast Ethernet 100BASE-TX—FE-TX
Synchronous serial—4T
Token Ring—4R
Following are the supported electrical interfaces:
•
•
4E port adapter—10BASE-T Ethernet, using RJ-45
•
4T port adapter—synchronous serial (EIA/TIA-232, EIA-TIA-449, EIA-530, V.35, and X.21;
determined by the cable), using DB-60, 60-pin mini-D-sub connectors
•
4R port adapter—IEEE 802.5 Token Ring, using DB-9, 9-pin D-sub connectors
FE-TX port adapter—IEEE 802.3u Fast Ethernet 100BASE-TX, using Media Independent
Interface (MII) or RJ-45
10 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Note VIP-FE-TX is a fixed configuration. The FE-TX port adapter is not available as a spare part.
The entire VIP-FE-TX assembly is a FRU. The FE-TX port adapter has a handle attached, but this
handle is not shown to allow a full view of the detail on the port adapter’s faceplate.
Caution To prevent system problems, do not remove port adapters from the VIP motherboard or
attempt to install other port adapters on the VIP motherboard.
When only one port adapter is installed on a VIP, as with the VIP-FE-TX, a blank port adapter must
fill the empty slot to allow the VIP and router chassis to conform to electromagnetic interference
(EMI) emissions requirements, and so that air flows through the chassis properly. The blank port
adapter is shown in Figure 8.
Blank Port Adapter, Partial Front View
H4498
Figure 8
VIP Microcode Overview
The VIP microcode (firmware) is an image that provides card-specific software instructions. A Flash
memory device in socket U17 of the VIP contains the default microcode boot image. The router
supports downloadable microcode, which enables you to upgrade microcode versions by
downloading new microcode images, storing them in system Flash memory, and instructing the
system to load its image from Flash instead of the default VIP image. (The RP in the Cisco 7000 and
7010 loads software from ROM or Flash memory; the RSP loads software from Flash only.) You can
store multiple images for an interface type and, with a configuration command, instruct the system
to load any one of them or the default ROM image. All interfaces of the same type (VIP, and so on)
will load the same microcode image, either from the default ROM image or from a single image
stored in system Flash. Although multiple microcode versions for a specific interface type can be
stored concurrently in Flash, only one image can load at startup. The show controllers cbus
command displays the currently loaded and running microcode version for the SP or SSP (in the
Cisco 7000 series routers), each interface processor, and VIP. The show startup-config EXEC
command shows the current system instructions for loading microcode at startup.
Software and interface processor microcode images are carefully optimized and bundled to work
together. Overriding the bundle can result in system incompatibilities. We recommend that you use
the microcode included in the software bundle. For a complete description of microcode and
downloading procedures, refer to the section “Upgrading VIP Microcode” on page 24.
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
11
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
VIP Installation Prerequisites
This section provides a list of parts and tools you will need to perform the installation, and it also
includes safety and ESD-prevention guidelines to help you avoid injury and damage to the
equipment. This section also provides a detailed description of the OIR function to help you perform
online installation successfully and avoid error message and system restarts. If you are installing a
new VIP, be sure to review the equipment descriptions and distance limitations in the section
“FE-TX Port Adapter Receptacles, Cables, and Pinouts” on page 33 when preparing your site and
planning network connections.
List of Parts and Tools
You need the following tools and parts to install a VIP. If you need additional equipment, contact a
service representative for ordering information.
•
•
•
Cables appropriate for the port adapter interfaces on your VIP
Number 1 Phillips and a 3/16-inch, flat-blade screwdriver
Your own ESD-prevention equipment or the disposable grounding wrist strap included with all
upgrade kits, FRUs, and spares
Safety Guidelines
Following are safety guidelines that you should follow when working with any equipment that
connects to electrical power or telephone wiring.
Electrical Equipment Guidelines
Follow these basic guidelines when working with any electrical equipment:
•
Before beginning any procedures requiring access to the chassis interior, locate the emergency
power-off switch for the room in which you are working.
•
•
•
•
Disconnect all power and external cables before moving a chassis.
•
Carefully examine your work area for possible hazards such as moist floors, ungrounded power
extension cables, and missing safety grounds.
Do not work alone when potentially hazardous conditions exist.
Never assume that power has been disconnected from a circuit; always check.
Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to people or makes the equipment
unsafe.
Telephone Wiring Guidelines
Use the following guidelines when working with any equipment that is connected to telephone
wiring or to other network cabling:
•
•
Never install telephone wiring during a lightning storm.
•
Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone line has been
disconnected at the network interface.
•
Use caution when installing or modifying telephone lines.
Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jack is specifically designed for wet
locations.
12 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage
Electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage, which can occur when electronic cards or components are
improperly handled, results in complete or intermittent failures. A processor module comprises a
printed circuit board that is fixed in a metal carrier. Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding,
connectors, and a handle are integral components of the carrier. Although the metal carrier helps to
protect the board from ESD, use a preventive antistatic strap whenever handling a processor module.
Following are guidelines for preventing ESD damage:
•
•
Always use an ESD wrist or ankle strap and ensure that it makes good skin contact.
•
When installing a processor module, use the ejector levers to properly seat the bus connectors in
the backplane, then tighten both captive installation screws. (See Figure 9.) These screws prevent
accidental removal, provide proper grounding for the system, and help to ensure that the bus
connectors are seated in the backplane.
•
When removing a processor module, use the ejector levers to release the bus connectors from the
backplane. Use the handle to pull the processor module out slowly while keeping your other hand
underneath the carrier to guide it straight out of the slot.
•
•
Handle carriers by the handles and carrier edges only; avoid touching the board or connectors.
•
Avoid contact between the processor module and clothing. The wrist strap only protects the board
from ESD voltages on the body; ESD voltages on clothing can still cause damage.
•
Never attempt to remove the printed circuit board from the metal interface processor carrier.
Connect the equipment end of the strap to a captive installation screw on an installed power
supply.
Place a removed processor module board-side-up on an antistatic surface or in a static shielding
bag. If you plan to return the component to the factory, immediately place it in a static shielding
bag.
For safety, periodically check the resistance value of the antistatic strap. The
measurement should be between 1 and 10 megohms.
Caution
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
13
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Online Insertion and Removal—An Overview
The OIR feature allows you to remove and replace a VIP board while the system is operating; you
do not need to notify the software or shut down the system power.
Note The VIP port adapters themselves do not support OIR, nor are they FRUs.
This section describes mechanical functions of system components, emphasizes the importance of
following correct procedures to avoid unnecessary board failures, and is for background only;
specific VIP procedures follow in the section “VIP Installation” on page 17.
Each interface processor contains a receptacle with which it connects to the system backplane. Each
backplane connector comprises a set of tiered pins, in three lengths. The pins send specific signals
to the system as they make contact with the card. The system assesses the signals it receives and the
order in which it receives them to determine what event is occurring and what task it needs to
perform, such as reinitializing new interfaces or shutting down removed ones.
For example, when inserting an interface processor, the longest pins make contact with the
backplane first, and the shortest pins make contact last. The system recognizes the signals and the
sequence in which it receives them. The system expects to receive signals from the individual pins
in this logical sequence, and the ejector levers help to ensure that the pins mate in this sequence.
When you remove or insert an interface processor, the backplane pins send signals to notify the
system, which then performs as follows:
1 Rapidly scans the backplane for configuration changes and does not reset any interfaces.
2 Initializes all newly inserted interface processors, noting any removed interfaces and placing
them in the administratively shut down state.
3 Brings all previously configured interfaces on the interface processor back to the state they were
in when they were removed. Any newly inserted interfaces are put in the administratively shut
down state, as if they were present (but unconfigured) at boot time. If a similar interface processor
type has been reinserted into a slot, then its ports are configured and brought on line up to the
port count of the original interface processor.
The system brings on line only interfaces that match the current configuration and were previously
configured as up; all others require that you configure them with the configure command. OIR
functionality enables you to add, remove, or replace interface processors with the system online,
which provides a method that is seamless to end users on the network, maintains all routing
information, and ensures session preservation.
14 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
The function of the ejector levers (see Figure 9) is to align and seat the card connectors in the
backplane. Failure to use the ejector levers and insert the interface processor properly can disrupt the
order in which the pins make contact with the card or interface processor. Follow the VIP installation
and removal instructions carefully, and review the following examples of incorrect insertion
practices and their results:
•
Using the handle to force the interface processor all the way into the slot can pop the ejector
levers out of their springs. If you then try to use the ejector levers to seat the interface processor,
the first layer of pins (which are already mated to the card or interface processor) can disconnect
and then remate with the backplane, which the system interprets as a board failure.
•
Using the handle to force or slam the interface processor all the way into the slot can damage the
pins on the board connectors if they are not aligned properly with the backplane.
•
When using the handle (rather than the ejector levers) to seat the interface processor in the
backplane, you might need to pull the interface processor back out and push it in again to align
it properly. Even if the backplane pins are not damaged, the pins mating with and disconnecting
from the card or interface processor will cause the system to interpret a board failure. Using the
ejector levers ensures that the board connector mates with the backplane in one continuous
movement.
•
Using the handle to insert or remove an interface processor, or failing to push the ejector levers
fully against the interface processor, can leave some (not all) of the connector pins mated to the
card or interface processor, a state which will hang the system. Using the ejector levers and
making sure that they are pushed fully into position ensures that all three layers of pins are mated
with (or free from) the backplane.
It is also important to use the ejector levers when removing an interface processor to ensure that the
backplane connector pins disconnect from the card or interface processor in the logical sequence
expected by the system. Any interface processor that is only partially connected to the backplane can
hang the bus. Detailed steps for correctly performing OIR are included with the following
procedures for installing and removing the VIP.
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
15
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Figure 9
Ejector Levers and Captive Installation Screws on the VIP (Horizontal Orientation Shown)
Interface processor
card slot
Ejector
lever
Interface processor card
carrier guide (black)
a
b
Captive
installation
screw
H1984
c
Note The VIP is oriented horizontally in the Cisco 7010 and Cisco 7505 and vertically in the Cisco
7000, Cisco 7507, and Cisco 7513.
16 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
VIP Installation
The following sections describe the procedures for removing or installing a VIP in the Cisco 7000
series and Cisco 7500 series routers. The functionality is the same for each router model; therefore,
the term the chassis will be used except where specific model issues arise. The OIR function allows
you to install and remove a VIP without first shutting down the system; however, you must follow
the instructions carefully. Failure to insert the VIP properly can cause system error messages
indicating a board failure. For a complete description of OIR, refer to the section “Online Insertion
and Removal—An Overview” on page 14.
Each unused interface processor slot contains an interface processor filler (which is an interface
processor carrier without an interface board) to keep dust out of the chassis and to maintain proper
air flow through the interface processor compartment. If you are installing a new VIP that is not a
replacement, you must first remove the interface processor filler from an unused slot; proceed to the
next section “Removing an Interface Processor Filler.” If you are replacing a VIP or upgrading the
microcode Flash EPROM on a VIP, proceed to the section “Removing a VIP.”
Note If you suspect that a port adapter has failed, you must replace the entire VIP processor
module. Port adapters are not available as FRUs.
Caution If you use the VIP with a single port adapter, the port adapter must be in slot 0 for the VIP
to function properly. A single port adapter in slot 1 will not be recognized by the system.
Removing an Interface Processor Filler
Select an unused interface processor slot for the new VIP and remove the interface processor filler
as follows:
Step 1 Choose an available slot for the VIP and make a note of it.
Step 1 Use a screwdriver to loosen the captive installation screws on the interface processor filler.
(See Figure 9.)
Step 2 Place your thumbs on both ejector levers and simultaneously pull them both outward to
release the VIP from the backplane connector (in the opposite direction from that shown in
Figure 9c).
Step 3 Grasp the handle with one hand and pull the filler straight out of the slot, keeping your other
hand under the carrier to guide it. (See Figure 10.) Keep the carrier parallel to the
backplane.
Step 4 Store the interface processor filler for future use.
To help prevent dust and contaminants from entering the chassis, do not leave the interface processor
slot open. Immediately proceed to the section “Installing a VIP” on page 19.
Removing a VIP
Remember, the VIP supports OIR; therefore, you need not shut down the interface or the system
power when removing a VIP. If you are replacing a failed VIP, remove the existing board first, then
replace the new VIP in the same slot.
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
17
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Figure 10 shows proper handling of an interface processor during installation.
Handling Processor Modules for Installation and Removal (Horizontal Orientation Shown)
H4714
Figure 10
Captive installation
screws
To remove a VIP, follow these steps:
Step 1 If you are replacing a failed VIP, disconnect all cables from the VIP ports; however, if you
are only moving a VIP to another slot, this step is not necessary.
Step 2 Use a screwdriver to loosen the captive installation screws at both ends of the VIP.
(See Figure 9.)
Caution Always use the ejector levers to remove or install the VIP. Failure to do so can cause
erroneous system error messages indicating a board failure.
Step 3 Place your thumbs on the ejector levers and simultaneously pull both of the ejectors
outward (in the opposite direction from that show in Figure 9c) to release the VIP from the
backplane connector.
Step 4 Use the VIP handle to carefully pull the VIP straight out of the slot, keeping your other
hand under the carrier to guide it. (See Figure 10.) Keep the VIP parallel to the backplane.
Step 5 Place the removed VIP on an antistatic mat or foam pad, or place it in an antistatic bag if
you plan to return it to the factory.
Step 6 If the interface processor slot is to remain empty, install a filler (MAS7K-BLANK) to keep
dust out of the chassis and to maintain proper air flow inside the chassis. Do not leave the
interface processor slot open. Immediately proceed to the section “Installing a VIP.”
18 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Installing a VIP
The VIP slides into the open interface processor slot and connects directly to the backplane. The
interface processors are keyed to guide pins on the backplane, so the VIP can be installed only in an
interface processor slot. Figure 9 shows the functional details of inserting an interface processor and
using the ejector levers. Figure 10 shows proper handling of an interface processor during
installation.
Caution Remove or insert only one interface processor at a time. Allow at least 15 seconds for the
system to complete its discovery and initialization before removing or inserting another interface
processor. Disrupting the sequence before the system has completed verification can cause the
system to interpret hardware failures.
Follow these steps to install a VIP:
Step 1 Ensure that a console terminal is connected to the console port (on the RP or RSP) and that
your console is turned ON.
Step 2 Hold the VIP handle with one hand and place your other hand under the carrier to support
the VIP and guide it into the slot. (See Figure 10.) Avoid touching the card or any connector
pins.
Caution To prevent ESD damage, handle interface processors by the handles and carrier edges
only.
Note The processor modules are oriented horizontally in the Cisco 7010 and Cisco 7505, and
vertically in the Cisco 7000, the Cisco 7507, and the Cisco 7513.
Step 3 Place the back of the VIP in the slot and align the notch on the carrier with the groove in
the slot. (See Figure 9.)
Step 4 While keeping the VIP parallel to the backplane, carefully slide it into the slot until the back
of the faceplate makes contact with the ejector levers, then stop. (See Figure 9b.)
Caution Always use the ejector levers when installing or removing processor modules. A module
that is partially seated in the backplane will cause the system to hang and subsequently crash, and
shoving or slamming the interface processor into the slot can damage the backplane pins and board.
Step 5 Using your thumbs, simultaneously push both ejector levers inward until the VIP is pushed
entirely into its slot. (See Figure 9c.)
Step 6 To ensure that EMI shielding is properly maintained for the chassis, immediately tighten
both of the captive installation screws.
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
19
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Checking the Installation and Verifying VIP Status
You can use the configure command to configure a VIP interface. To use the configure command,
enter the privileged level of the EXEC command interpreter with the enable command. The system
will prompt you for a password if one has been set.
The system prompt for the privileged level ends with a pound sign (#) instead of an angle bracket
(>). At the console terminal, enter the privileged level as follows:
Step 1 At the user-level EXEC prompt, enter the enable command. The EXEC prompts you for a
privileged-level password, as follows:
Router> enable
Password:
Step 2 Enter the password (the password is case sensitive). For security purposes, the password is
not displayed on your console.
Step 3 When you enter the correct password and press Return, the system displays the
privileged-mode system prompt (#) as follows:
Router#
Checking the VIP Installation
After you install the VIP and connect cables (using connection procedures in the respective port
adapter subsections), verify the installation by observing the LED states and the console display.
When the system has reinitialized all interfaces, the enabled LED on the VIP and on all interface
processors should go on. On the VIP-FE-TX, one or the other of the MII and RJ-45 LEDs should be
on, depending on your connection, and the link LED should be on if the VIP is receiving a carrier
signal from the network.
The console screen will also display a message as the system discovers each interface during its
reinitialization.
When you remove and replace interface processors, the system provides status messages on the
console screen. The messages are for information only.
Note Fast Ethernet interfaces are used in the following examples.
The following sample display shows the events logged by the system as a Fast Ethernet-equipped
VIP was removed from slot 2; the system then reinitialized the remaining interface processors and
marked as down the Fast Ethernet interfaces on the VIP that was removed from slot 2. When the VIP
is reinserted, the system automatically brings up the interfaces that were up when the VIP was
removed.
Router#
%OIR-6-REMCARD: Card removed from slot 2, interfaces disabled
%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface FastEthernet2/0/0, changed state to administratively down
Router#
%OIR-6-INSCARD: Card inserted in slot 2, interfaces administratively shut down
%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface FastEthernet2/0/0, changed state to up
20 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Note When a new VIP is inserted or when a VIP is moved to a new slot, the system recognizes the
new interfaces, but leaves them in a shutdown state until you configure them and change their state
to up with the configure command.
The following example display shows the events logged by the system as a new VIP-FE-TX is
inserted in slot 3.
Router#
%OIR-6-INSCARD: Card inserted in slot 3, interfaces administratively shut down
%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface FastEthernet3/0/0, changed state to administratively down
Verify that the VIP is installed correctly as follows:
Step 1 While the system reinitializes each interface, observe the console display messages and
verify that the system discovers the VIP as follows:
•
If you installed a new VIP, the system should recognize all new Fast Ethernet interfaces
but leave them configured as down.
•
If you replaced a VIP, the system should recognize each interface and place it in the
same state (up or down) each was in when you removed the VIP.
Step 2 When the reinitialization is complete, verify that the enabled LED on each port adapter
goes on and remains on. If it does, proceed to step 5. If it does not, proceed to the next step.
Step 3 If the enabled LED on a port adapter fails to go on, suspect that the VIP board connector is
not fully seated in the backplane. Loosen the captive installation screws, then firmly push
both ejector levers into place until they are approximately in the same orientation as the VIP
faceplate. Tighten the captive installation screws. After the system reinitializes the
interfaces, the enabled LED on the port adapter should go on. If it does, proceed to step 5.
If it does not, proceed to step 4.
Step 4 If the enabled LED still fails to go on, remove the VIP and try installing it in another
available interface processor slot.
•
If the enabled LED goes on when the VIP is installed in the new slot, suspect a failed
backplane port in the original interface processor slot.
•
If the enabled LED still fails to go on, but other LEDs on the VIP go on to indicate
activity, proceed to step 5 to resume the installation checkout and suspect that the
enabled LED on the port adapter has failed.
•
•
If no LEDs on the VIP go on, suspect that the VIP is faulty.
If the enabled LED still does not go on, do not proceed with the installation. Contact a
service representative to report the problem and obtain further instructions.
Step 5 If the VIP is new and not a replacement, you have to configure the new interfaces. Proceed
to the appropriate configuration section for your port adapter. (This does not have to be
done immediately, but new interfaces will not be available until you configure them.)
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
21
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Step 6 If the VIP is a replacement, use the show interfaces type slot/port adapter/port or show
controllers cbus command to verify the status of the interfaces. (Refer to the section
“Verifying VIP Status Using show Commands” on page 22.)
If you replaced a VIP with a new VIP with a greater number of ports (for example, if you
replaced a one-port VIP with a two-port VIP), the system will recognize the first interface,
but will not recognize the additional interface. The new interface will remain in the
shutdown state until you configure it.
Step 7 When the interfaces are up, check the activity of each interface by observing the status
LEDs, which are described in the appropriate LED section of this document for your port
adapter type.
Step 8 In general, if an interface’s LED fails to go on and a cable is connected to the port, check
the cable connection and make certain it is properly seated in the connector.
If an error message is displayed on the console terminal, refer to the System Error Messages
publication for error message definitions. If you experience other problems that you are unable to
solve, contact a service representative for assistance.
This completes the VIP installation. If you installed a new VIP or if you installed a replacement VIP
with an additional port, you must now configure the new interface as described in the following
section.
Verifying VIP Status Using show Commands
The following procedure describes how to use the show commands to verify that the new interfaces
are configured correctly:
Step 1 Use the show version or show hardware commands to display the system hardware
configuration. Ensure that the list includes the type of interfaces you just installed (Fast
Ethernet, Ethernet, Token Ring, serial, and so forth).
Step 2 Display all of the current interface processors and their interfaces with the show
controllers cbus command. Verify that the new VIP appears in the correct slot.
Step 3 Specify one of the new VIP interfaces with the show interfaces type slot/port adapter/port
command and verify that the first line of the display specifies the interface with the correct
slot number. Also verify that the interface and line protocol are in the correct state: up or
down.
Step 4 Display the protocols configured for the entire system and specific interfaces with the
command show protocols. If necessary, return to Configuration mode to add or remove
protocol routing on the system or specific interfaces.
Step 5 Display the entire system configuration file with the show configuration command. Verify
that the configuration is accurate for the system and each interface.
If the interface is down and you configured it as up, or if the displays indicate that the hardware is
not functioning properly, ensure that the network interface is properly connected and terminated. If
you still have problems bringing the interface up, contact a service representative for assistance.
22 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
The show controllers cbus command displays the internal status of each interface processor,
including the slot location, the card hardware version, and the currently-running microcode version.
It also lists each interface (port) on each interface processor including the logical interface number,
interface type, physical (slot/port adapter/port) address, and hardware (station address) of each
interface. The following example shows a VIP, with Fast Ethernet interfaces, installed in interface
processor slot 3:
Router# show controller cbus
(display text omitted)
slot3: VIP, hw 2.1, sw 200.09, ccb 5800FF70, cmdq 480000A0, vps 8192
software loaded from system
FLASH ROM version 255.255, VPLD version 20.0
FastEthernet3/0/0, addr 0000.0ca5.2380 (bia 0000.0ca5.2380)
gfreeq 48000140, lfreeq 48000238 (1536 bytes), throttled 0
rxlo 4, rxhi 123, rxcurr 16, maxrxcurr 16
txq 48000240, txacc 480000EA (value 77), txlimit 77
(display text omitted)
The show startup-config command displays the contents of the system configuration file stored in
NVRAM. This file should reflect all new configuration changes you made and wrote to memory with
the show running-config command. (A Fast Ethernet interface is used in this example.)
Router# show startup-config
Using 1652 out of 130048 bytes
version 11.1(1)
!
hostname Router
!
enable-password hello
!
microcode VIP flash VIP11-0
microcode reload
!
(display text omitted)
!
interface FastEthernet 3/0/0
ip address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.248
ip route-cache cbus
!
(display text omitted)
The show protocols command displays the global (system-wide) and interface-specific status of any
configured Level 3 protocol.
Router# show protocols
Global values:
Internet Protocol routing is enabled
FastEthernet3/0/0 is up, line protocol is up
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
23
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Upgrading VIP Microcode
The Cisco 7000 series and the Cisco 7500 series support downloadable microcode, which enables
you to upgrade microcode versions without having to physically replace the microcode Flash
memory device on the board. You can download new microcode versions and store multiple versions
in Flash memory, and you can boot from them just as you can with the system software images.
System software upgrades may also contain upgraded microcode images, which will load
automatically when the new software image is loaded (unless the configuration states otherwise).
Note Software and interface processor microcode images are carefully optimized and bundled to
work together. Overriding the bundle can result in system incompatibilities. We recommend that you
use the microcode included in the software bundle.
You can download microcode to Flash memory by copying the TFTP image of a microcode version
to Flash memory. When the microcode image is stored in Flash memory you can use the
microcode reload command to manually load the new microcode file, and the configure command
to instruct the system to load the new image automatically at each system boot.
In order to compare the size of the microcode image and the amount of Flash memory available, you
must know the size of the new microcode image. The image size is specified in the README file
that is included on the floppy disk with the new image.
Note Note the size of the new image before proceeding to ensure that you have sufficient available
Flash memory for the new image.
Caution Before you copy a file to system Flash memory, be sure there is ample space available in
Flash memory. Compare the size of the file you want to copy to the amount of available Flash
memory shown. If the space available is less than the space required by the file you want to copy,
the copy process will continue, but the entire file will not be copied into Flash memory.
24 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Follow these steps to download (copy) a microcode version from a TFTP server to Flash memory.
Step 1 To display the total amount of Flash memory present, its location, any files that currently
exist in Flash memory and their size, and the amount of Flash memory remaining, use the
show flash command. Following is an example of the output that is displayed:
Router# show flash
-#- ED --type-- --crc--- -seek-- nlen -length- -----date/time------ name
1
.. FFFFFFFF B4A18E0B 3F6494 30
4023316 Jun 26 1994 19:44:29 image/file/1
2
.. FFFFFFFF 8075AA5D 4118B4 23
111518
Jun 29 1994 11:05:57 image/file/2
12044568 bytes available (8533736 bytes used)
Step 2 Compare the amount of available Flash memory (last line in the preceding example) to the
size of the new microcode image on the floppy disk. If you attempt to copy in a new image,
and the size of the new image exceeds the available space in Flash, only part of the new
image will be copied, and the following error message will be displayed:
buffer overflow - xxxx/xxxx
where xxxx/xxxx is the number of bytes read in/number of bytes available.
Step 3 After you verify that there is sufficient space available in Flash memory for the new image,
use the command copy tftp:filename [ flash | slot0 | slot1 ]:filename to copy an image to
Flash memory. (tftp:filename is the file’s source, and [ flash | slot0 | slot1 ]:filename is the
destination in onboard Flash memory or on either of the Flash memory cards.)
An example of the copy tftp:filename command follows:
Router# copy tftp:vip11-1 slot0:vip11-1
20575008 bytes available on device slot0, proceed? [confirm]
Address or name of remote host [1.1.1.1]?
Loading new.image from 1.1.1.1 (via Ethernet1/0): !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!![OK - 7799951/15599616 bytes]
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
Router#
Step 4 Use the show flash command to verify that the microcode has been copied to Flash. The
output should display the filename of the image you copied to Flash (vip11-1 in the
following example):
Router# show flash
-#1
2
3
ED
..
..
..
--type-FFFFFFFF
FFFFFFFF
FFFFFFFF
--crc--B4A18E0B
8075AA5D
EEA1FEEB
-seek-3F6494
4118B4
8436E8
nlen
30
23
22
-length- -----date/time------ name
4023316 Jun 26 1994 19:44:29 image/file/1
111518
Jun 29 1994 11:05:57 image/file/2
4398516 Oct 10 1995 19:35:25 vip11-1
7646052 bytes available (16179788 bytes used)
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
25
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Step 5 To ensure that the new microcode is used when you reboot the system, add the appropriate
commands to the configuration file. To modify the configuration file, enter the configure
terminal command, as follows:
Router# config t
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Router(config)#
End with CNTL/Z.
Step 6 Specify that you are changing the microcode for the VIP (microcode vip), and that it will
load from Flash memory (flash). Then add the filename of the new microcode image to be
loaded from Flash:
Router(config)# microcode vip flash slot0:vip11-1
Step 7 To save the configuration file, press Ctrl-Z.
Step 8 Copy the new configuration to nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM):
Router# copy running-config startup-config
The microcode reload command is automatically added to your running configuration.
The new VIP microcode image will load automatically the next time the system boots or
reinitializes.
Step 9 To load the new microcode immediately, you can issue the microcode reload configuration
command (you must be in Configuration mode to enter this command):
Router# config t
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Router(config)# microcode reload
End with CNTL/Z.
Immediately after you enter the microcode reload command and press Return, the system
reloads all microcode. Configuration mode remains enabled; after the reload is complete,
press Ctrl-Z to exit from Configuration mode and return to the system prompt.
Step 10 To verify that the VIP is using the correct microcode, issue the show startup-config or
show controllers cbus command, which indicates the currently loaded and running
microcode version for each interface processor and the SP or SSP in the Cisco 7000 series
routers.
Router# show controllers cbus
This completes the procedure for downloading microcode to Flash memory.
26 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Upgrading and Replacing DRAM SIMMs
VIPs are shipped with 8 MB of DRAM as the default memory configuration. Depending on memory
requirements, you might need to upgrade the amount of DRAM by replacing the DRAM SIMMs on
the VIP. You also might need to replace a single SIMM in the case of a diagnosed DRAM SIMM
failure.
Note DRAM SIMMs should be upgraded or replaced in the field by a Cisco-certified maintenance
provider. Both DRAM SIMMs are replaced for all upgrades.
Caution SIMMs are sensitive components that are susceptible to ESD damage. Handle SIMMs by
the edges only; avoid touching the memory modules, pins, or traces (the metal fingers along the
connector edge of the SIMM). (See Figure 11.)
Handling a DRAM SIMM—Example Only
H2326
Figure 11
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
27
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Following is the procedure for replacing or upgrading DRAM SIMMs.
Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap between you and an unpainted chassis or VIP surface.
Step 2 Disconnect all cables from the VIP and remove it from the chassis using the procedure in
the section “Removing a VIP” on page 17.
Step 3 Place the VIP on a flat surface (preferably an antistatic mat or foam), and turn it so the face
plate is away from you and the connector edge is toward you. (approximately opposite of
the orientation shown in Figure 12).
Step 4 Locate the DRAM SIMMs in U1 and U2. (See Figure 12.)
Figure 12
Orientation of DRAM SIMMs (U1 and U2) on VIP Motherboard
Bus connector
Port adapter
handles not shown
Microcode
Flash U17
U2
DRAM
SIMMs
U1
Port adapter blank
in port adapter
slot 1
FE-TX in
port adapter
slot 0
EN
28 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
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H4709
FAST ETHERNET
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Step 5 Remove a SIMM by pulling outward on the connectors to unlatch it, as shown in the
enlargement in Figure 13. Be careful not to break the holders on the SIMM connector.
Figure 13
Removing and Replacing DRAM SIMMs
Faceplate edge of
the system card
Pull the tabs away with
your thumbs, bracing your
forefingers against the
posts. Raise the SIMM
to a vertical position.
Polarization notch
H2017
DRAM SIMM
Step 6 Using the SIMM orientation shown in Figure 13, position the new SIMM so that the
polarization notch is located at the right end of the SIMM socket.
Step 7 Insert the new SIMM by sliding the end with the metal fingers into the SIMM connector
socket at approximately a 45-degree angle to the system card. Gently rock the SIMM back
into place until the latch on either side snaps into place. (See Figure 13.)
Caution Do not use excessive force, or the connector could break. To prevent damage, do not push
on the center of the SIMMs. Handle each SIMM with care.
Step 8 As required, repeat Steps 5 through 7 for the second SIMM.
Step 9 Reinstall the VIP in the chassis using the procedure in the section “Installing a VIP” on
page 19.
If error messages relating to memory are displayed once power to the chassis is turned back on, or
the VIP card is installed in a chassis that is already on, repeat Steps 1 through 8, taking care to firmly
reseat each SIMM in its socket.
This completes the procedure for upgrading or replacing DRAM SIMMs on your VIP.
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
29
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions
The following sections discuss the FE-TX port adapter, which is shown in Figure 14.
Fast Ethernet Overview
FE-TX Port Adapter Description and Fast Ethernet Specifications, page 31
FE-TX Port Adapter LEDs, page 32
FE-TX Port Adapter Receptacles, Cables, and Pinouts, page 33
Attaching FE-TX Port Adapter Interface Cables, page 36
Selecting Chassis Slot, Port Adapter, and Fast Ethernet Interface Port Numbers, page 38
Configuring the FE-TX Port Adapters—Descriptions and Examples, page 40
FE-TX Port Adapter, Faceplate View
FAST ETHERNET
45
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Figure 14
H4495
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fast Ethernet Overview
The VIP configured with one FE-TX port adapter provides a 100-Mbps, 100BASE-T, Fast Ethernet
interface. Each 100BASE-T port on the FE-TX port adapter has an RJ-45 connector to attach to
Category 5 unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) for 100BASE-TX, and a MII connector that permits
connection through external transceivers to multimode fiber for 100BASE-FX, or to Category 3, 4,
and 5 UTP or shielded twisted-pair (STP) for 100BASE-T4 physical media.
Both full-duplex and half-duplex operation are supported.The term Ethernet is commonly used for
all carrier sense multiple access/collision detection (CSMA/CD), local-area networks (LANs) that
generally conform to Ethernet specifications, including IEEE 802.3u.
Note 100BASE-TX is intended for Environment A and 100BASE-FX is intended for
Environment B.
IEEE 802.3u is well suited to applications where a local communication medium must carry
sporadic, occasionally heavy traffic at high peak data rates. Stations on a CSMA/CD LAN can access
the network at any time. Before sending data, the station listens to the network to see if it is already
in use. If it is, the station waits until the network is not in use, then transmits; this is half-duplex
operation. A collision occurs when two stations listen for network traffic, hear none, and transmit
very close to simultaneously. When this happens, both transmissions are damaged, and the stations
must retransmit. The stations detect the collision and use backoff algorithms to determine when they
should retransmit.
Both Ethernet and IEEE 802.3u are broadcast networks, which means that all stations see all
transmissions. Each station must examine received frames to determine whether it is the intended
destination and, if it is, pass the frame to a higher protocol layer for processing.
30 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions
IEEE 802.3u specifies the following different physical layers for 100BASE-T:
•
100BASE-TX—100BASE-T, half and full duplex over Category 5 unshielded twisted-pair
(UTP), Electronics Industry Association/Telecommunications Industry Association
[EIA/TIA]–568-compliant cable
•
•
100BASE-FX—100BASE-T, half and full duplex over optical fiber
100BASE-T4—100BASE-T, half and full duplex over Category 3, 4, or 5 UTP or shielded
twisted-pair (STP) cabling with four pairs; also called 4T+ or T2, which is 2-pair UTP over
Category 3 cable.
Each physical layer protocol has a name that summarizes it characteristics in the format
speed/signaling method/segment length where speed is the LAN speed in megabits per second
(Mbps), signaling method is the signaling method used (either baseband or broadband), and segment
length is typically the maximum length between stations in hundreds of meters. Therefore,
100BASE-T specifies a 100-Mbps, baseband LAN with maximum network segments of 100 meters
(or 400 meters for 100BASE-FX).
FE-TX Port Adapter Description and Fast Ethernet Specifications
The FE-TX port adapter is available in the following VIP configurations: FE-TX/blank, FE-TX/4E,
or FE-TX/FE-TX. Figure 15 shows the VIP-FE-TX. The FE-TX port adapter has a handle attached,
but this handle is not shown to allow a full view of the detail on the port adapter’s faceplate.
Figure 15
VIP with One FE-TX Port Adapter Installed (Horizontal Orientation Shown)
Bus connector
Port adapter
handles not shown
Microcode
Flash U17
U2
DRAM
SIMMs
U1
Port adapter blank
in port adapter
slot 1
FE-TX in
port adapter
slot 0
K
45
RJ
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0
H4709
FAST ETHERNET
Caution To prevent system problems, do not remove port adapters from the VIP motherboard, or
attempt to install other port adapters on the VIP motherboard.
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
31
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions
Table 1 lists the cabling specifications for 100-Mbps Fast Ethernet transmission over UTP and STP
cables. Table 2 summarizes IEEE 802.3u 100BASE-T physical characteristics.
Table 1
Parameter
Specifications and Connection Limits for 100-Mbps 100BASE-T Transmission
RJ-45
MII
1
UTP2,
22 to 24
AWG3
Category 3, 4, or 5, 150-ohm UTP or STP, or multimode optical fiber
Cable specification
Category 5
Maximum cable length
–
0.5 m (1.64 ft.) (MII-to-MII cable4)
Maximum segment length
100 m (328 ft.) for 100BASE-TX
1 m (3.28 ft.)5 or 400 m (1,312 ft.) for 100BASE-FX
Maximum network length
200 m (656 ft)5. (with 1 repeater)
–
1. EIA/TIA-568 or EIA-TIA-568 TSB-36 compliant.
2. Cisco Systems does not supply Category 5 UTP RJ-45 or 150-ohm STP MII cables. Both are available commercially.
3. AWG = American Wire Gauge. This gauge is specified by the EIA/TIA-568 standard.
4. This is the cable between the MII port on the FE-TX port adapter and the appropriate transceiver.
5. This length is specifically between any two stations on a repeated segment.
Table 2
IEEE 802.3u Physical Characteristics
Parameter
100BASE-T
Data rate (Mbps)
100
Signaling method
Baseband
Maximum segment length (meters)
100 m between DTE1 and repeaters
Media
RJ-45: Category 5 UTP
MII: Category 3, 4, or 5, 150-ohm UTP or STP, with appropriate transceiver
Topology
Star/Hub
1. DTE = data terminal equipment.
FE-TX Port Adapter LEDs
The FE-TX port adapter contains the enabled LED, standard on all port adapters, and a bank of three
status LEDs for the ports. After system initialization, the enabled LED goes on to indicate that the
FE-TX port adapter has been enabled for operation. (The LEDs are shown in Figure 16.) The
following conditions must be met before the enabled LED goes on:
•
•
The FE-TX interface is correctly connected to the backplane and receiving power.
•
The bus recognizes the FE-TX-equipped VIP.
The FE-TX-equipped VIP contains a valid microcode version that has been downloaded
successfully.
If any of these conditions is not met, or if the initialization fails for other reasons, the enabled LED
does not go on.
32 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions
The bank of three status LEDs indicates the following:
•
•
MII—On when the MII port is selected as the active port by the controller.
•
RJ-45—On when the RJ-45 port is selected as the active port by the controller.
Link—When the RJ-45 port is active, this LED is on when the FE-TX port adapter is receiving
a carrier signal from the network. When the MII port is active, this LED is an indication of
network activity, and it flickers on and off proportionally to this activity.
Either the MII LED or the RJ-45 LED should be on at any one time; never both.
LEDs on the FE-TX Port Adapter (Horizontal Orientation Shown)
H4710
Figure 16
Note The VIP is oriented horizontally in the Cisco 7010 and Cisco 7505, and vertically in the Cisco
7000, the Cisco 7507, and the Cisco 7513.
FE-TX Port Adapter Receptacles, Cables, and Pinouts
The two interface receptacles on the FE-TX port adapter are a single MII, 40-pin, D-shell type, and
a single RJ-45. You can use either one or the other. Only one receptacle can be used at one time. Each
connection supports IEEE 802.3u interfaces compliant with the 100BASE-X and 100BASE-T
standards. The RJ-45 connection does not require an external transceiver. The MII connection
requires an external physical sublayer (PHY) and an external transceiver.
Figure 17 shows the RJ-45 connectors. Table 3 lists the pinouts and signals for the FE-TX RJ-45
connectors.
FE-TX RJ-45 Connections, Plug and Receptacle
87654321
J-45 connector
H2936
Figure 17
Warning The ports labeled “Ethernet,” “10BaseT,” “Token Ring,” “Console,” and “AUX” are
safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV
circuits. Because the BRI circuits are treated like telephone-network voltage, avoid connecting the
SELV circuit to the telephone network voltage (TNV) circuits. (For translated versions of this
warning, refer to the section “SELV Circuit Warning Translations” on page page 42.)
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
33
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions
Table 3
FE-TX RJ-45 Connector Pinout
Pin
Description
1
Receive Data + (RxD+)
2
RxD–
3
Transmit Data + (TxD+)
6
TxD–
Note Referring to the RJ-45 pinout in Table 3, proper common-mode line terminations should be
used for the unused Category 5, UTP cable pairs 4/5 and 7/8. Common-mode termination reduces
the contributions to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and susceptibility to common-mode
sources. Wire pairs 4/5 and 7/8 are actively terminated in the RJ-45, 100BASE-TX port circuitry in
the FE-TX port adapter.
Depending on your RJ-45 interface cabling requirements, use the pinouts in Figure 18 and
Figure 19.
Figure 18
Straight-Through Cable Pinout, FE-TX RJ-45 Connection to a Hub or Repeater
Hub or repeater
3 TxD+
3 RxD+
6 TxD–
6 RxD–
1 RxD+
1 TxD+
2 RxD–
2 TxD–
Figure 19
H3137
FEIP
Crossover Cable Pinout, FE-TX RJ-45 Connections Between Hubs and Repeaters
Hub or repeater
3 TxD+
3 TxD+
6 TxD–
6 TxD–
1 RxD+
1 RxD+
2 RxD–
2 RxD–
H3138
Hub or repeater
Depending on the type of media you use between the MII connection on the port adapter and your
switch or hub, the network side of your 100BASE-T transceiver should be appropriately equipped
with ST-type connectors (for optical fiber), BNC connectors, and so forth. Figure 20 shows the pin
orientation of the female MII connector on the port adapter. The port adapters are field-replacable
units (FRUs).
34 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions
The MII receptacle uses 2-56 screw-type locks, called jackscrews (shown in Figure 20), to secure
the cable or transceiver to the MII port. MII cables and transceivers have knurled thumbscrews
(screws you can tighten with your fingers) that you fasten to the jackscrews on the FE-TX port
adapter’s MII connector. Use the jackscrews to provide strain relief for your MII cable. (The RJ-45
modular plug has strain relief functionality incorporated into the design of its standard plastic
connector.) Figure 20 shows the MII female connector.
Figure 20
FE-TX MII Connection, Receptacle
H2943
Pin 21
ackscrew
Pin 1
Table 4 lists the MII connector pinout and signals. MII cables are available commercially.
Table 4
FE-TX MII Connector Pinout
Pin1
In
Out
In/Out
Description
14–17
–
Yes
–
Transmit Data (TxD)
12
Yes
–
–
Transmit Clock (Tx_CLK)2
11
–
Yes
–
Transmit Error (Tx_ER)
13
–
Yes
–
Transmit Enable (Tx_EN)
3
–
Yes
–
MII Data Clock (MDC)
4–7
Yes
–
–
Receive Data (RxD)
9
Yes
–
–
Receive Clock (Rx_CLK)
10
Yes
–
–
Receive Error (Rx_ER)
8
Yes
–
–
Receive Data Valid (Rx_DV)
18
Yes
–
–
Collision (COL)
19
Yes
–
–
Carrier Sense (CRS)
2
–
–
Yes
MII Data Input/Output (MDIO)
22–39
–
–
–
Common (ground)
1, 20, 21, 40
–
–
–
+5.0 volts (V)
1. Any pins not indicated are not used.
2. Tx_CLK and Rx_CLK are generated by the external transceiver.
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
35
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions
Attaching FE-TX Port Adapter Interface Cables
On a single 100BASE-T port adapter, you can use either the RJ-45 connection or the MII
connection. If you have two FE-TX, 100BASE-T port adapters on your VIP, you can use the RJ-45
connection on one and the MII connection on the other.
Note RJ-45 and MII cables are not available from Cisco Systems; they are available from outside
commercial cable vendors.
Connect RJ-45 and MII cables as follows:
Step 1 If you have RJ-45 connections, attach the Category 5 UTP cable directly to the RJ-45 port
on the FE-TX port adapter. (See Figure 21.)
If you have MII connections, attach an MII cable directly to the MII port on the FE-TX port
adapter or attach a 100BASE-T transceiver, with the media appropriate to your application,
to the MII port on the FE-TX port adapter. (See Figure 21.)
The FE-TX port adapter is an end station device and not a repeater. You must connect the
FE-TX port adapter to a repeater or hub.
Note On the VIP-FE-TX, the FE-TX port adapter can have either an MII attachment or an RJ-45
attachment, but not both simultaneously. The MII and RJ-45 receptacles represent two physical
connection options, for one Fast Ethernet interface. The FE-TX port adapter has a handle attached,
but this handle is not shown to allow a full view of the detail on the port adapter’s faceplate.
Figure 21
Connecting FE-TX MII or RJ-45 Cables (Horizontal Orientation—Shown without Handles)
0
H5920
FAST ETHERNET
MII cable
To transceiver,
repeater, or DTE
36 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
or
RJ-45 cable
To repeater
or DTE
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions
Step 2 Attach the ferrite bead to the RJ-45 cable (at either end), as shown in Figure 22.
Caution The ferrite bead prevents electromagnetic interference (EMI) from affecting the
FE-TX-equipped system and is a required component for proper system operation.
Attaching the Ferrite Bead around the RJ-45 Cable
Ferrite bead
RJ-45 cable
with ferrite bead
H4202
Figure 22
Caution To prevent problems on your FE-TX port adapter and network, do not simultaneously
connect RJ-45 and MII cables to one 100BASE-T port adapter. On a single 100BASE-T port
adapter, only one network connection can be used at one time. Only connect cables that comply with
EIA/TIA-568 standards. (Refer to Table 1 and Table 2 on page 32 for cable recommendations and
specifications.)
Step 3 Attach the network end of your RJ-45 or MII cable to your 100BASE-T transceiver, switch,
hub, repeater, DTE, or other external 100BASE-T equipment.
This completes the FE-TX installation. Proceed to the section “Checking the VIP Installation.”
Configuring the FE-TX Interface
If you installed a new FE-TX interface or if you want to change the configuration of an existing
interface, you must enter Configuration mode, using the configuration command. If you replaced
an interface that was previously configured, the system will recognize the new interface and bring it
up in its existing configuration.
After you verify that the new FE-TX is installed correctly (the enabled LED goes on), use the
privileged-level configure command to configure the new interfaces. Be prepared with the
information you will need, such as the following:
•
•
•
Protocols you plan to route on each new interface.
Internet protocol (IP) addresses if you plan to configure the interfaces for IP routing.
Whether the new interfaces will use bridging.
Note For a summary of the configuration options available and instructions for configuring the
FE-TX interfaces on the VIP, refer to the publications listed in the section “If You Need More
Information” on page 2.
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
37
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions
Note The configure command requires privileged-level access to the EXEC command interpreter,
which usually requires a password. Contact your system administrator, if necessary, to obtain
EXEC-level access.
Selecting Chassis Slot, Port Adapter, and Fast Ethernet Interface Port Numbers
The following section describes how to identify chassis slot, port adapter, and Fast Ethernet interface
port numbers.
Note Although the processor slots in the seven-slot Cisco 7000 and 13-slot Cisco 7513 are
vertically oriented and those in the five-slot Cisco 7010 and Cisco 7505 are horizontally oriented, all
models use the same method for slot and port numbering. (Refer to Figure 2, Figure 3, Figure 4,
Figure 5, or Figure 6 for interface processor slot orientation in your chassis.)
In the router, physical port addresses specify the actual physical location of each interface port on
the router interface processor end. (See Figure 23.) This address is composed of a three-part number
in the format chassis slot number/port adapter number/interface port number.
The first number identifies the chassis slot in which the VIP is installed (as shown in the example
system in Figure 23). The second number identifies the physical port adapter number on the VIP, and
is port adapter slot 0. The interface ports on the FE-TX port adapter is always numbered as
interface 0.
Note If you remove the VIP from slot 3 and install it in slot 2, the address of this port becomes
2/0/0.
Figure 23
Fast Ethernet Interface Port Number Example (Cisco 7505 Shown)
3/0/0 (FE-TX port adapter)
T
OL
NS
CO
AU
X.
E
SE
U
RE
CP
EC
EJ
AL
RM
NO
SL SLO
OT T
0 1
T
HA
LT
ROUTE SWITCH PROCESSOR
EN
AB
LE
Slot 3
Slot 2
Slot 1
H5921
Slot 0
Note: The MII and RJ-45 interface ports on the first port adapter are both
numbered as interface port 0. Only one of them can
be used on each port adapter, at one time.
38 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
Interface
processor
slots
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions
Interface ports on the VIP maintain the same address regardless of whether other interface
processors are installed or removed. However, when you move a VIP to a different slot, the first
number in the address changes to reflect the new slot number.
Figure 23 shows some of the slot port adapter and interface ports of a sample Cisco 7505 system.
For example, on a VIP-FE-TX in slot 3, the address of the Fast Ethernet port adapter is 3/0/0 (chassis
slot 3, port adapter slot 0, and interface port 0). The individual port adapter number is always 0. The
individual interface port numbers always begin with 0. For example, the FE-TX port adapter in the
first port adapter slot in chassis slot 3 would 3/0/0. The number of additional ports depends on the
number of ports on a port adapter.
You can identify interface ports by physically checking the slot/port adapter/interface port location
on the back of the router or by using software commands to display information about a specific
interface or all interfaces in the router.
To display information about a specific interface, use the show interfaces command with the
interface type and port address in the format show interfaces [type slot/port adapter/port].
Following is an example of how the show interfaces command displays status information
(including the physical slot and port address) for the interface you specify. In this example, most of
the status information for each interface is omitted, and a Fast Ethernet interface in slot 3 is used.
Router# sh int fa 3/0/0
FastEthernet3/0/0 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Hardware is cyBus FastEthernet Interface, address is 0000.0ca5.2380 (bia 0000)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec), hdx, 100BaseTX
(display text omitted)
The Fast Ethernet interface port adapter is numbered as port adapter 0. The MII and RJ-45 ports on
a port adapter each have the same port number because only one of them can be used at one time.
The single Fast Ethernet port on the FE-TX port adapter is interface 0.
With the show interfaces type slot/port adapter/port command, use arguments such as the interface
type (fastethernet, and so forth) and the port number (slot/port) to display information about a
specific interface only. The following example of the show interfaces fastethernet command shows
information specific to the Fast Ethernet interface on the first FE-TX port adapter in slot 3:
Router# show interfaces fastethernet 3/0/0
FastEthernet3/0/0 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Hardware is cyBus FastEthernet Interface, address is 0000.0ca5.2380 (bia 0000)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec), hdx, 100BaseTX
ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 4:00:00
Last input 3:08:43, output 3:08:42, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters 2:58:36
Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
0 watchdog, 0 multicast
0 input packets with dribble condition detected
0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets, 0 restarts
0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
39
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions
Configuring the FE-TX Port Adapters—Descriptions and Examples
Following are descriptions and examples of the commands for configuring the FE-TX interface 3/0/0
(slot 3, port adapter 0, Fast Ethernet interface port 0). Descriptions are limited to fields that are
relevant for establishing and verifying the configuration. After configuring the new FE-TX interface,
use show commands to display the status of the new interface or all interfaces, or to verify changes
you have made.
Depending on the requirements for your system configuration and the protocols you plan to route on
the interface, you might also need to enter other configuration subcommands. For complete
descriptions of configuration subcommands and the configuration options available for Fast Ethernet
interfaces, refer to the publications listed in the section “If You Need More Information” on page 2.
FE-TX half-duplex operation is the default. To change to full-duplex operation, use the following
series of commands:
Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Router(config)#
End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# interface fastethernet 3/0/0
Router(config-if)# full-duplex
Router(config-if)# ^z
Using the show interfaces fastethernet command, you can see that the 3/0/0 Fast Ethernet interface
is now configured for full-duplex operation, as follows:
Router# sh int fa 3/0/0
FastEthernet 3/0/0 is administratively up, line protocol is up
(display text omitted)
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive not set, fdx, 100BaseTX
To return the interface to half-duplex operation, use the no full-duplex configuration command, as
follows:
Router# config t
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Router(config)# int fa 3/0/0
Router(config-if)# no full-duplex
Router(config-if)# ^Z
Router#
End with CNTL/Z.
Using the show interfaces fastethernet command, you can see that the 3/0/0 Fast Ethernet interface
is now configured for half-duplex operation, as follows:
Router# sh int fa 3/0/0
FastEthernet3/0/0 is administratively up, line protocol is up
(display text omitted)
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive not set, hdx, 100BaseTX
(display text omitted)
40 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
FE-TX Port Adapter Functions
The RJ-45 connection is the default. To change to an MII connection and then verify it, use the
following series of commands, including the media-type configuration command:
Router# config t
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Router(config)# int fa 3/0/0
Router(config-if)# media-type mii
Router(config-if)# ^Z
End with CNTL/Z.
Router# sh int fa 3/0/0
FastEthernet3/0/0 is administratively up, line protocol is up
(display text omitted)
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive not set, hdx, MII
(display text omitted)
Use the media-type 100BaseTX configuration command to return the interface to its default state
for RJ-45 connections.
The show version (or show hardware) command displays the configuration of the system hardware
(the number of each interface processor type installed), the software version, the names and sources
of configuration files, and the boot images. Following is an example of the show version command
used with a Cisco 7500 series system:
Router# show version
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) GS Software (RSP-A), Version 11.1(1) [mpo 105]
Copyright (c) 1986-1995 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Fri 06-Oct-95 12:22 by mpo
Image text-base: 0x600088A0, data-base: 0x605A4000
ROM: System Bootstrap, Version 5.3(16645) [szhang 571], INTERIM SOFTWARE
ROM: GS Bootstrap Software (RSP-BOOT-M), Version 11.0(1.2), MAINTENANCE INTERIME
honda uptime is 4 hours, 22 minutes
System restarted by reload
System image file is "slot0:rsp-a111-1", booted via slot0
cisco RSP2 (R4600) processor with 32768K bytes of memory.
R4600 processor, Implementation 32, Revision 2.0
Last reset from power-on
G.703/E1 software, Version 1.0.
Bridging software.
X.25 software, Version 2.0, NET2, BFE and GOSIP compliant.
Chassis Interface.
1 RVIP controllers (1 FastEthernet).
4 Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces.
1 FastEthernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces.
125K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.
20480K bytes of Flash PCMCIA card at slot 0 (Sector size 128K).
8192K bytes of Flash internal SIMM (Sector size 256K).
No slave installed in slot 6.
Configuration register is 0x2
Note For complete VIP command descriptions and examples, refer to the publications listed in the
section “If You Need More Information” on page 2.
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
41
SELV Circuit Warning Translations
SELV Circuit Warning Translations
Warning The ports labeled “Ethernet,” “10BaseT,” “Token Ring,” “Console,” and “AUX” are
safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV
circuits. Because the BRI circuits are treated like telephone-network voltage, avoid connecting the
SELV circuit to the telephone network voltage (TNV) circuits.
Waarschuwing De poorten die "Ethernet", "10BaseT", "Token Ring", "Console" en "AUX" zijn
gelabeld, zijn veiligheidscircuits met extra lage spanning (genaamd SELV = Safety Extra-Low
Voltage). SELV-circuits mogen alleen met andere SELV-circuits verbonden worden. Omdat de
BRI-circuits op dezelfde manier als telefoonnetwerkspanning behandeld worden, mag u het
SELV-circuit niet verbinden met de telefoonnetwerkspanning (TNV) circuits.
Varoitus Portit, joissa on nimet "Ethernet", "10BaseT", "Token Ring", "Console" ja "AUX", ovat
erityisen pienen jännityksen omaavia turvallisuuspiirejä (SELV-piirejä). Tällaiset SELV-piirit tulee
yhdistää ainoastaan muihin SELV-piireihin. Koska perusluokan liitäntöjen (Basic Rate Interface- eli
BRI-liitännät) jännite vastaa puhelinverkoston jännitettä, vältä SELV-piirin yhdistämistä
puhelinverkoston jännitepiireihin (TNV-piireihin).
Attention Les ports étiquetés « Ethernet », « 10BaseT », «
oken
T Ring », « Console » et «UX
A » sont
des circuits de sécurité basse tension (Safety Extra-Low Voltage ou SELV). Les circuits SELV ne
doivent être interconnectés qu'avec d'autres circuits SELV. Comme les circuits BRI sont considérés
comme des sources de tension de réseau téléphonique, éviter de connecter un circuit SELV à un
circuit de tension de réseau téléphonique (telephone network voltage ou TNV).
Warnung Die mit "Ethernet", "10BaseT", "Token Ring", "Console" und "AUX" beschrifteten
Buchsen sind Sicherheitskreise mit Sicherheitskleinspannung (Safety Extra-Low Voltage, SELV).
SELV-Kreise sollten ausschließlich an andere SELV-Kreise angeschlossen werden. Da die
BRI-Kreise wie Telefonnetzspannungen behandelt werden, ist der SELV-Kreis nicht an
Telefonnetzspannungskreise (TNV) anzuschließen.
Avvertenza Le porte contrassegnate da "Ethernet", "10BaseT", "TokenRing", "Console" e "AUX"
sono circuiti di sicurezza con tensione molto bassa (SELV). I circuiti SELV devono essere collegati
solo ad altri circuiti SELV. Dato che i circuiti BRI vengono trattati come tensioni di rete telefonica,
evitare di collegare il circuito SELV ai circuiti in cui è presente le tensione di rete telefonica (TNV).
Advarsel Utgangene merket "Ethernet", "10BaseT", "Token Ring", "Console" og "AUX" er
lavspentkretser (SELV) for ekstra sikkerhet. SELV-kretser skal kun kobles til andre SELV-kretser.
Fordi BRI-kretsene håndteres som telenettspenning, unngå å koble SELV-kretsen til kretser for
telenettspenning (TNV).
Aviso As portas "Ethernet", "10BaseT", "Token Ring", "Console", and "AUX" são circuitos de
segurança de baixa tensão (SELV). Estes circuitos deverão ser apenas ligados a outros circuitos
SELV. Devido ao facto de os circuitos BRI (Interface de Ritmo Básico) serem tratados como sendo
de tensão equivalente à da rede telefónica, evite ligar o circuito SELV aos circuitos TNV (tensão de
rede telefónica).
¡Advertencia! Los puertos "Ethernet", "10BaseT", "Token Ring", "Console" y "AUX" son
circuitos de muy baja señal que garantizan ausencia de peligro (Safety Extra-Low Voltage = SELV).
Estos circuitos SELV deben ser conectados exclusivamente con otros también de tipo SELV. Puesto
que los circuitos tipo BRI se comportan como aquéllos con voltajes de red telefónica, debe evitarse
conectar circuitos SELV con circuitos de voltaje de red telefónica (TNV).
Varning! De portar som är märkta "Ethernet", "10BaseT", "Token Ring", "Console" och "AUX" är
SELV-kretsar, d.v.s. skyddskretsar med extra låg spänning (SELV: Safety Extra-Low Voltage =
skyddsklenspänning). SELV-kretsar får endast anslutas till andra SELV-kretsar. Eftersom
BRI-kretsar behandlas liksom telefonnätsspänning bör SELV-kretsen inte anslutas till
telefonnätsspänningskretsar (TNV-kretsar).
42 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
Cisco Information Online
Cisco Information Online
Cisco Information Online (CIO) is Cisco Systems’ primary, real-time support channel. Maintenance
customers and partners can self-register on CIO to obtain additional content and services.
Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, CIO provides a wealth of standard and value-added services
to Cisco’s customers and business partners. CIO services include product information, software
updates, release notes, technical tips, the Bug Navigator, configuration notes, brochures,
descriptions of service offerings, and download access to public and authorized files.
CIO serves a wide variety of users through two interfaces that are updated and enhanced
simultaneously—a character-based version and a multimedia version that resides on the World Wide
Web (WWW). The character-based CIO (called “CIO Classic”) supports Zmodem, Kermit,
Xmodem, FTP, Internet e-mail, and fax download options, and is excellent for quick access to
information over lower bandwidths. The WWW version of CIO provides richly formatted
documents with photographs, figures, graphics, and video, as well as hyperlinks to related
information.
You can access CIO in the following ways:
•
•
•
WWW:
Telnet:
http://www.cisco.com
cio.cisco.com
Modem: From North America, 408 526-8070; from Europe, 33 1 64 46 40 82. Use the
following terminal settings: VT100 emulation; data bits: 8; parity: none; stop bits: 1; and baud
rates up to 14.4 kbps.
For a copy of CIO’s Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ), contact
additional information, contact cio-team@cisco.com.
cio-help@cisco.com.
For
Note If you are a network administrator and need personal technical assistance with a Cisco
product that is under warranty or covered by a maintenance contract, contact Cisco’s Technical
Assistance Center (TAC) at 800 553-2447, 408 526-7209, or tac@cisco.com. To obtain general
information about Cisco Systems, Cisco products, or upgrades, contact 800 553-6387,
408 526-7208, or cs-rep@cisco.com.
This document is to be used in conjunction with the Cisco 7000 Hardware Installation and Maintenance, Cisco 7010 Hardware Installation and Maintenance, Cisco 7505 Hardware
Installation and Maintenance, Cisco 7507 Hardware Installation and Maintenance, and Cisco 7513 Hardware Installation and Maintenance publications. (28771fe.fm)
AtmDirector, Catalyst, CD-PAC, CiscoFusion, Cisco IOS, the Cisco IOS logo, CiscoPro, Cisco Systems, CiscoView, CiscoVision, CiscoWorks, ClickStart, ControlStream, EtherChannel,
HubSwitch, LAN2LAN Enterprise, LAN2LAN Remote Office, LightSwitch, Newport Systems Solutions, Packet, Point and Click Internetworking, RouteStream, SMARTnet, StreamView,
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this document are the property of their respective owners.
Copyright © 1996, Cisco Systems, Inc.
All rights reserved. Printed in USA
9511R
VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration
43
Cisco Information Online
44 VIP-FE-TX Installation and Configuration