HP SureStore Ultrium 230 – Product Specifications

HP Ultrium vs. IBM Ultrium vs. Seagate Ultrium vs. HP SuperDLT
Summary – Ultrium vs. SDLT
•
Transfer rate advantage (15 to 16MB/sec vs. 11Mb/sec) for Ultrium over SDLT. Testing
demonstrates this transfer rate advantage for most data sets.
•
Larger native capacity media advantage for SDLT (SDLT 110GB vs. Ultrium 100GB).
However testing shows that the more efficient data compression engine used by Ultrium
negates the larger native capacity of SDLT media and in some cases Ultrium media has a
larger useful capacity.
•
All drives state reliability at 250,000 hours MTBF with a 100% duty cycle. Unlikely that
the reliability winner will be seen until feedback from field available. Inspection reveals
that the buckling mechanism used by SDLT, because of the requirement to read DLTIV tapes,
is less rigid and appears less robust than the all the buckling mechanisms implemented on
the Ultrium products.
Summary – Ultrium products
HP Ultrium
•
•
•
•
•
strengths
data rate matching – more efficient than
Seagate and IBM does not have it
only drive with HP OBDR
“active” head cleaning
FH drive and HH drive
family of Ultrium products
•
•
weaknesses
no LCD on reseller model (neither has
Seagate)
cannot perform diagnostic checks through
front panel (as is possible on IBM Ultrium)
IBM Ultrium
•
•
•
strengths
family of Ultrium products
many diagnostic tests possible through
front panel with LCD
mechanical isolation of mechanism
•
•
•
weaknesses
up to 50W power requirement (double HP
Ultrium) hence no internal reseller product,
not compatible with many servers without
additional fan pack
fail modes exist with bad cartridges and
power loss during load
crude head cleaning mechanism
Seagate Ultrium
•
•
strengths
perception of quality through appearance
of the mechanism (if covers removed)
mechanical isolation of mechanism
Tarconis Comunicaciones S.A. DE C.V.
•
•
•
www.tarconis.com
weaknesses
worst performer in tests – despite best
paper spec
no head cleaner
least positive manual load
info@tarconis.com
Mérida - México - Monterrey
Contents
Comparison of Key Published Specifications
Product Differentiation - Marketing
Product Comparisons
1 Mechanical Design
2 Cartridge Loading and Media Threading
3 Tape Path and Tape Control
4 Electrical and Servo System
5 Read-Write Head
6 Thermal management
7 User, Automation and Diagnostic Interfaces
8 Cleaning
More Specification Comparisons
Reseller / Branded Product details
Media Comparison
Testing Results
Throughput – Backup and Restore
Tape Capacities
Comparison of Key Published Specifications
All data below is taken from vendor’s published literature
Performance
capacity (native)
sustained transfer
rate (native)
HP Ultrium
IBM Ultrium
Seagate
Ultrium
SuperDLT
100GB
15MB/sec
(900MB/min)
(54GB/hr)
100GB
15MB/sec
(900MB/min)
(54GB/hr)
100GB
16MB/sec
(960MB/min)
(57.6GB/hr)
110GB
11MB/sec
(660MB/min)
39.6GB/hr)
250,000 hours at
100% duty cycle
30,000 hours
100,000 cycles
250,000 hours at
100% duty cycle
250,000 hours at
100% duty cycle
250,000 hours
100% duty cycle
30,000 hours
100,000 cycles
1.9 kg (4.2lbs)
5.3 kg (11.7lbs)
2.95kg
6.6 Kg (14.3lbs)
2.38kg (5lbs4oz)
6.27kg
(13lbs 13oz)
5¼” FH
L = 298 mm
W = 208mm
H = 117mm
5¼” FH
L = 333mm
W = 171mm
H = 146mm
5¼” FH
5¼” FH
L = 325.12mm
W = 175.26mm
H = 160.02mm
4 LEDs
1 LED + 1 char.
display (plus
40 char. LCD on
desktop model)
powered load
and unload
4 LEDs
(repositioned for
desktop model)
3 LEDs
powered load
and unload
powered load
and unload
8.5W
17W
26W
43W
46W
Reliability
MTBF
head life
load/unload life
Weight
internal drive
external drive
Dimensions
internal drive(1)
external drive
User Interface
front panel
(bezel)
cartridge loading
/ unloading
Power
idle
(tape loaded)
maximum
powered load
and unload
11.5W
41W
5V @ 5A
12V @ 2.5A
27W
internal
desktop
internal
desktop
Product Differentiation - Marketing
What the 4 vendors highlighted in their product literature to differentiate their products.
HP Ultrium
•
•
•
•
Data Rate Matching with Adaptive Tape Speed
HP OBDR
TapeTools II support ensures correct installation and provides diagnostic support
Family of Ultrium products including a HH product
IBM Ultrium
•
•
•
•
•
Surface Control Guiding System to handle media
“Dynamic Buffer for best drive performance”
SARS (Statistical Analysis and Reporting System) for drive and media fault reporting
Family of Ultrium products
Leverages proven technology from HDD and Magstar products (read/write equalization,
data flow management, data channel, SCSI circuitry) and HDD manufacturing processes
Seagate Ultrium
•
•
•
•
•
•
Patents on design (Dynamic Powerdown System, FastSenseTM Technology, Head Positioning
System, Tape Threading System)
Dynamic Powerdown keeps media safe in a power cut
FastSenseTM Technology maintains performance when host has a data rate below drive
streaming rate.
64 MB cache
Managed airflow (two fans)
Reseller products bundled with Backup Exec
SuperDLT
•
•
•
Read compatibility with DLTIVtape (DLT8000, DLT7000, DLT4000) media
Positive Leader Link – “robust buckling mechanism to overcome lost leader problems with
DLT drives”.
220GB cartridge capacity (with 2:1 compression)
Notes
A feature similar to the Dynamic Powerdown feature of the Seagate drive is also implemented
in HP Ultrium. The HP drives also store power and stop safe in the event of an unplanned
power termination.
The HP Ultrium and Seagate Ultrium drives have variable speed mechanisms. The IBM Ultrium
and SDLT do not. Of these variable tape speeds, HP Ultrium is the most effective
implementation. The main difference is that HP Ultrium’s Data Rate Matching feature operates
on the fly, while Seagate Ultrium’s FastSense feature only adjusts tape speed at the end of a
wrap and also in steps.
HP Ultrium (TapeTools II), IBM Ultrium (SARS) and SDLT (DLTtools) all have diagnostic programs
to support users. Seatools, Seagate’s program is not available for tape yet.
Product Comparisons
1 Mechanical Design
HP Ultrium
•
•
•
•
Mechanism made by Philips.
Single stage head position actuator
Plastic take-up reel
data rate matching feature reduces tape repositioning for increased reliability through
reduced stress on mechanism and media
IBM Ultrium
•
•
•
•
•
Mechanism made by NEC
Mechanism isolated by 4 dampers – to compensate for lack of low
frequency gain in servo system?
Vibration (or is it a position sensor?) incorporated between reels à
Metal drive clutch for cartridge
Polycarbonate carbon fibre composite reels for tape (very expensive
tooling)
Seagate Ultrium
•
•
•
•
•
•
Mechanism made by Seagate
Mechanism mounted onto chassis via isolating dampers.
Thermal and electrical separation between recording system and electronics
Two stage head position actuator
Metal drive clutch for cartridge
Cast and machined aluminium take up reel
SuperDLT
•
•
Comprised of two ‘modules’
• TCM – tape control module (base plate, cartridge receiver, buckling mechanism and a
PCB)
• DCM – data control module (read-write head, head servo mechanics, take up reel,
tape guides).
Separate PCA to control tape loading and buckling
Notes
IBM and Seagate Ultrium drives have a metal drive clutch for cartridge – possible debris
creation. HP Ultrium uses a plastic drive clutch.
Each drive reposition increases the probability of the mechanism failing. The HP Ultrium ATS
reduces the number of repositions required and consequently increases reliability
Both the Seagate and IBM are isolated from the chassis of the drive to reduce transmitted
vibrations. Unlikely to be any benefit in this except in extreme operating conditions. In these
high vibration conditions the HP drive will slow down.
HP Ultrium
IBM Ultrium
Seagate Ultrium
SuperDLT
2 Cartridge Loading and Media Threading
HP Ultrium
•
•
•
•
“Soft load” with mechanical assist
4 check states ensure that threading commences only when the leader pin is properly
captured in the leader block
Threading positively locks leader pin in leader block so the leader pin won’t be lost if
power is lost
Leader block is in the shape of a half-moon, matched cutout in the hub of the take-up reel
forms a cylindrical winding surface
IBM Ultrium
•
•
•
•
•
•
“soft load” with mechanical assist
If cartridge does not load in drive properly the mechanism forces the cartridge out again
before retrying the load.
• not allowed in Ultrium format
• not acceptable in a library
“juggles” leader pin into slot – not as accurate as HP Ultrium leader capture
Fail modes will be encountered during threading, means drives must be returned to IBM:
• liable to lose leader block if power lost during threading
• no sensors to detect if leader pin present, if cartridge has no leader pin, mechanism
pulls threader into the drive and cannot recover
Poor tape tension control during threading – slack tape evident
As an option a Leader Pin Reattachment kit (p/n 08L9129) is available.
Seagate Ultrium
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
“Soft load” with mechanical assist
Manual load does not accommodate non-straight offering of the cartridge. Cause is the
basic side gripping mechanism for cartridge lugs. HP mechanisms have a more
sophisticated and positive engagement and grabbing mechanism.
Roller bearings used on all sliding mechanisms
Patent pending for threading system. Mechanical arm facilitates multiple retries to engage
leader pin.
Positive Leader Link – describes solid, metal pin attached to drive leader
• compatible with SDLT media and DLTIVtape
2 optical sensors on tape path to feedback threading information
• pin location in cartridge
• slot location in take up reel
Take up reel tensions cartridge reel during threading
SuperDLT
•
•
“soft load” with mechanical assist
Leader capture mechanism design constrained by requirement to load DLTIVtape cartridges
and SDLT cartridges. Not as rigid or positive as any of the Ultrium buckling mechanisms.
Notes
The HP Ultrium drive has a major advantage against IBM and to a lesser extent against the Seagate
drive in media threading system. IBM Ultrium has some fail modes that will require users to return
drives to IBM for repair.
IBM Ultrium can lose the leader block if power is lost during threading and there is the slightest
amount of shaking. The HP Ultrium uses two mechanisms to ensure power loss during threading is
not a problem. 1) A snapping feature that holds the leader pin firmly in the leader block so it
cannot be disconnected if power is lost. 2) The threading track holds the leader block in the proper
position if power is lost. The HP Ultrium design team anticipated this fail mode and designed it out.
Another fail mode the IBM Ultrium is susceptible to is when a cartridge is loaded without a leader
pin. The IBM Ultrium does not have any sensors to detect the presence of the leader pin. If it is
missing, or out of place within the cartridge, the threading mechanism attempts to thread and pulls
the threader into the drive and cannot recover. Even though it uses a driven mechanism for
threading, there is no retry capability. Once the threader is moved toward the T-reel, it cannot be
returned without pulling it back with the cartridge leader. The HP Ultrium implementation uses sensors
on both ends of the leader pin to ensure proper engagement before attempting to thread.
There is anecdotal evidence from STK and ADIC that other media defects, such as failed CM, also
cannot be handled by IBM Ultrium. Seagate Ultrium also suffers the danger of decoupling from the
leader pin if power is lost during a threading operation. There is no means other than back tension
from the cartridge reel to maintain the connection.
For manual cartridge load the HP mechanism is the smoothest, closely matched by the IBM
mechanism. The HP mechanism is also tolerant of cartridges not offered up exactly perpendicular to
the mechanism. By contrast the Seagate mechanism is not accommodating of cartridges offered up
not perfectly square. It also feels non-positive.
HP Ultrium
IBM Ultrium
Seagate Ultrium
SuperDLT
3 Tape Path and Tape Control
HP Ultrium
•
•
2 rotating guide rollers
Data Rate matching by an adaptive tape speed (ATS) algorithm
• adapts to changing host data rates on the fly
• range is 6MB/sec to 15MB/sec (2.1 to 4.1m/sec)
IBM Ultrium
•
Surface Control Guiding – patent pending
• name used to distinguish this from ‘edge guiding’
• 4 guide rollers
• 2 (nearest head) with decompression grooves
• 2 without grooves
Seagate Ultrium
•
•
2 fixed “D” edge guides and 2 rollers on tape path
• made of Fe-doped zirconica – conductive
• “stiction” problems with stationary guides
• fixed guides wear faster than rotating guides
FastSenseTM technology adjust tape speed to host data rate
• operates in steps; 8, 10, 12, 14 or 16MB/sec (2.1, 2.6. 3.1, 3.6 or 4.2 m/sec)
• tape speed only changes at the end of a wrap – could be 10 minutes with a slow host and
compressible data
SuperDLT
•
no variable tape sped but adjusts data buffer level based on average data transfer rate sensed
on SCSI bus
Notes
HP Ultrium
IBM Ultrium
Seagate Ultrium
SuperDLT
4 Electrical and Servo System
HP Ultrium
IBM Ultrium
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•
•
•
•
highest number of discrete components on PCB
all electronics on a single board
high number of connections to main PCB (11)
5 motors
IBM timing based track following servo
Seagate Ultrium
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•
•
•
•
8 layer PCB, all signals on inner layers
2 major ASICS
• “Whirlpool” – servo control
• ARM7TDNI embedded 32-bit RISC processor
• “Scrambler” – formatter
• ARM7TDNI embedded 32-bit RISC processor
7 motors
• 2 x reel motors – 3 phase brushless, 10 poles
• 2 x load motors – brush motor
• 1 x head coarse position – stepper motor
• 1 x head fine position – linear voice coil
• 1 x tape thread
“Dynamic Powerdown System” stores 2 seconds of power to protect media in the event of an
unplanned power cut.
• stored power brakes take up reel and cartridge reel
• servo technology maintains tape tension
Active electrical system between PCB and chassis to reduce emissions. What is this?
SuperDLT
•
•
desktop version is auto-ranging
• 100V to 220V
• 47Hz to 63Hz
desktop version power supply rated at 65W
Notes
HP Ultrium
IBM Ultrium
Seagate Ultrium
SuperDLT
5 Read-Write Head
HP Ultrium
•
•
•
multi-channel inductive write/MR. read shared pole head technology
• chosen for high data rate, speed-independent signal-to-noise, and high areal density.
recording head was developed jointly with Seagate and is sourced from Seagate
• leverages expertise in MR. technology and thin film, assembly and manufacturing expertise
• reduces cost by higher production volumes and shared development costs
2-array head design is used for read while write
IBM Ultrium
•
Produce heads “themselves” (IBM Magnetorestive Head Division).
Seagate Ultrium
•
•
•
Produce head “themselves” (Seagate Recording Head Operations).
Two stage (coarse + fine) head position actuator
• fine positioning uses a voice coil
4 read-write pre-amps (see diagram)
SuperDLT
•
•
•
Head from ReadRite corporation
A second (read) head stack to provide read compatibility with DLTIVtape
This backward read compatibility head retracts during cartridge load/unload and nonbackward operation to reduce head wear and contamination build up.
Notes
Multichannel MR. heads have been used by IBM, STK, and Fujitsu in linear tape drives for more
than five years, so there is a substantial wealth of industrial experience with this technology.
HP Ultrium
IBM Ultrium
Seagate Ultrium
SuperDLT
6 Thermal Management
HP Ultrium
•
mechanical and electrical systems designed for low power consumption
IBM Ultrium
•
•
PCB has many discrete components – high heat generation
measures to reduce heat build up include a thermal conducting strip on PCB
Seagate Ultrium
•
•
•
•
Fans incorporated into ‘brick’.
• not user serviceable
• operate as needed
• optional for automation units
Thermal isolation between recording head and main electronics
thermal coupling rails between PCB edges and chassis
read-write head isolated from airflow
SuperDLT
notes
The HP Ultrium mechanical and electrical systems design for low power consumption is validated by
the ability to produce Ultrium 215.
HP Ultrium
IBM Ultrium
Seagate Ultrium
SuperDLT
7 User, Automation and Diagnostic Interfaces
HP Ultrium
•
•
•
•
•
mechanism has 4 LEDs
• ready / activity
• drive error
• tape error
• cleaning required
unload button on front
power switch on front (desktop model)
Automation control interface based on R-422 port
TapeAlert utility in drives
IBM Ultrium
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
mechanism (IBM 3580) has: single digit LED (green/amber) and single status light
desktop / reseller model has additionally: LCD (20 characters x 2 rows)
8 way option switch
unload button on front
power switch on rear (desktop model)
implemented TapeAlert
manual removal of cartridge possible using screw driver access through bevel
and access hole on base of mechanism
Firmware can be revised by:
• tape (Field Firmware Replace Tape)
• SCSI download
Seagate Ultrium
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
mechanism has 4 LEDs (see figure)
desktop beze has same 4 LEDs ‘artistically’ arranged (see figure)
unload button on front
SeaTools (does this exist?)
RS-422 library interface
• 2mm-centers headers at back of drive
• commands in encapsulated SCSI protocol or Low Overhead protocol (less functionality)
RS-232 diagnostics interface
supports TapeAlert
No manual cartridge unload cabability
• can rewind the tape
cannot “ungrab” the leader pin.
SuperDLT
•
•
•
•
•
•
mechanism has 3 LEDs
• cartridge write protection (on /off)
• drive status (on / off / flashing)
• reserved
infra-red diagnostics port on front panel - GSLinkTM
• with necessary software on a local PC, allows remote or local diagnostics and repair of
drive issues
• interface for firmware revisions control and detail
unload button on front
power switch on rear (desktop model)
DLTtools
implemented TapeAlet
Notes
HP Ultrium
IBM Ultrium
Seagate Ultrium
SuperDLT
8 Cleaning
HP Ultrium
•
•
•
Head cleaning strategy is smart – not just cleaning at each load/unload:
• After each 150,000 tape pulling meters (about 5 full 100/200GB data cartridges), head
cleaning takes place during the unload cycle
• Head cleaner activated when the drive senses there might be a problem caused by
contamination of the head
• If using the head cleaner does not correct the problem then the user will be asked to
insert a cleaning cartridge
• Head cleaner is activated after cleaning cartridge has been used
To preserve head, a maximum of 2 weeks must elapse between use of cleaning cartridge.
Note: if a cleaning cartridge is inserted less than two weeks since last use of cleaning cartridge
then the cleaning tape is not pulled past the head, but the (non-abrasive) head cleaner is
activated.
Head cleaner operated by a dedicated motor
• brush moves perpendicularly over head
• head positioning actuator moves the head up and down to remove debris from grooves in
head stack
IBM Ultrium
•
•
•
•
•
Head cleaner is on a large arm. Position in picture below is with tape unloaded. Operates
(passes over head) when tape is loaded. With tape loaded, the arm is stored horizontal.
head cleaner brush can only make one swipe across the head during a load and unload
• its mechanically linked to the load/unload process
“C” displayed on single digit LED indicates that the drive needs to cleaned with a cleaning
cartridge
If a cleaning cartridge is loaded when the drive is not indicating this is needed then it is ejected
Cleaning cartridge rated at 50 “cleans”
Seagate Ultrium
•
•
No head cleaner.
Appears to have been dropped to get product to market.
• head cleaner seen on early presentations of Seagate LTO
Notes
The HP Ultrium has the most efficient head cleaner implementation. The other LTO drives really rely
on the cleaning cartridge for keeping the head clean. A cleaning cartridge is not nearly as effective
as a brush at dislodging debris from grooves in the head assembly.
This IBM head cleaner brush is located on a large arm that is operated as part of the cartridge load
or unload process. It, thus, just makes one swipe across the head during the load or unload
process. This is very rudimentary and this cleaning strategy takes no account of the cleaning
requirement.
HP’s “active” head cleaning strategy makes the head cleaner operate when it is detected that head
cleaning is needed. To facilitate this, the mechanism is designed to allow cleaning without
unloading the cartridge. And, since cleaning is decoupled from the load or unload operation, the
brish can operate as many times as necessary.
A further advantage of the HP implementation of the head cleaner is that it operates both down and
across the grooves in the head. The IBM Ultrium head cleaner only operates down the grooves and
is thus less efficient in removing any debris.
The Seagate drive has no head cleaner.
HP Ultrium
IBM Ultrium
Seagate Ultrium
SuperDLT
More Specification Comparisons
Data below is taken from vendor’s published literature and other sources
HP
Ultrium
Tape Speed
maximum read /
write tape speed
variable read /
write tape speed
rewind tape
speed
Load / Unload
/ Access times
file access time
from BoT
(100GB tape)
load time
(to BoT)
unload time
rewind time
(100GB tape)
reposition time
Error Rates
uncorrectable
undetected
Cleaning
IBM
Ultrium
Seagate
Ultrium
no
4.15m/sec
(163.4in/sec)
yes – 2MB/sec
steps from 8 to
16MB/sec
4.1m/sec
yes – dynamic
from 6MB/sec to
15MB/sec
4.1m/sec
71sec (average)
142sec (max)
6 m/s
(1)
< 25sec
< 13s (from BoT)
142sec
110sec
SuperDLT
2.95m/sec
(116in/sec)
no
4.1m/sec
(160in/sec)
76sec (average)
152sec (max)
70sec (average)
142sec(max)
10sec
12sec (typical)
40sec
(unformatted tape)
12sec (from BoT)
69sec (average)
140sec (max)
76sec (average)
152sec (max)
2.5s
1 in 1017 bits
1 in 1027 bits
On demand using
only HP cleaning
cartridge
(C7979A)
<1 in 1017 bits
Use IBM head
cleaning cartridge
Cleaning
cartridge
Ultra2 wide LVD
or
Ultra2 wide HVD
Ultra2 wide LVD
or
Ultra wide HVD
1 in 1017 bits
1 in 1027 bits
Interfaces
SCSI
SCSI termination
Ultra2 wide LVD
auto termination
on external drives
SCSI ID Setting
Fibre Channel
Library interface
multimode Ultra2
wide LVD and
ultra wide SE
or
Ultra wide HVD
jumper block
or
through firmware
planned
planned FC-AL
“early 2001”
Bi-directional
RS422
HP SureStore
“planned H1 01”
Bi-directional
RS422
IBM
Seagate Viper
HP SureStore
Ultrium 230
Dimensions
internal drive(2)
external drive
Data Buffer
cache buffer
Power-ext
auto ranging
range
max power
unloaded
standby
Power–int
max power
unloaded
standby
Cooling
required airflow
Format
recording format
data compression
data encoding
method
media capacities
(native)
Cartridge
Memory
L = 203mm
W = 146mm
H = 82.5mm
L = 298 mm
W = 208mm
H = 117mm
L = 211mm
W = 149mm
H = 85mm
16MB
Firmware
SuperDLT 220
L = 211.2mm
W = 149.23mm
H = 86.3mm
L = 203.2mm
W = 146.05mm
H = 82.55mm
L = 325.12mm
W = 175.26mm
H = 160.02mm
64MB
25.0W
14.0W
100V to 240V
and
47Hz to 63Hz
45W(5)
24W
26W
43W(4)
16W(4)
17W(4)
0.17m3 per
minute
(6cu ft/min)
125 linear feet /
minute (measured
in front of bezel)
Linear Tape Open
Ultrium-1
ALDC
1,7 RLL
Linear Tape Open
Ultrium-1
ALDC
Linear Tape Open
Ultrium-1
ALDC
10, 30, 50 and
100 GB
yes – part of
Ultrium format
10, 30, 50 and
100 GB
yes – part of
Ultrium format
10, 30, 50 and
100 GB
yes – part of
Ultrium format
Tape path
Diagnostics
200
SuperDLT
DLZ
PRML
Surface control
guiding
(IBM patent
pending)
Self-test and HP
Library &
TapeTools test
suite
Revision E09D –
upgrade via tape
or SCSI bus
Self-test
Upgrade via tape
or SCSI bus
Operational
dry bulb
temperature range
relative humidity
(non-condensing)
max wet bulb
temperature
altitude
required cooling
airflow
suspended
particles
Storage /
Shipping(3)
dry bulb
temperature range
relative humidity
(non-condensing)
max wet bulb
temperature
altitude
HP SureStore
Ultrium 230
IBM
Seagate Viper
200
HP SureStore
SuperDLT 220
10° to 35°C
10 - 38°C
20 – 80%
20 - 80%
10° to 40°C
(50°F to 104°F)
80% max
10° to 40°C
(50°F to 104°F)
20% to 80%
26°C
0km to 4km
25°C (77°F)
<2,500m
-O.15km to
9.1km
(-500ft to
30,000ft)
0.17m3 per
minute
(6cu ft/min)
<200µg/m3
-40° to 66°C
10% to 95%
-40° to 60°C
(-40°F to 140°F)
10% to 90%
non-condensing
-40° to 66°C
95% max
-40° to 66°C
(-40°F to 150°F)
10% to 95%
46°C (114°F)
0km to 15.25km
Notes
(1) IBM POST tales ~90secs
(2) Dimensions are without the bezel.
(3) Dry bulb temperature is simply the surrounding ambient air temperature without any air motion.
Wet bulb temperature is the temperature air would have if its energy were used to evaporate an
amount of water equal to the amount of water vapour it contains.
(4) Internal power supply on SDLT is rated at 65W
Reseller Product Details
HP SureStore
Ultrium 230e
Standard
Warranty
3 years Express
Exchange.
System matching
warranty when
purchased with
an HP Netserver.
IBM
StorageSmart
Ultrium TX200,
T200
3 year mail-in
exchange
Product
Numbers
internal drive
C7400A
IBM3580 T200
external drive
C7401A
IBM 3580 TX200
Rackmount drive
Interfaces
SCSI II
Pricing
desktop model
C7470A
N/A
internal model
$5,325(b)
Seagate Viper
200
HP SureStore
SuperDLT 220
3 years REACT
programme in
Europe and N
America
3 years
Express
Exchange.
System matching
warranty when
purchased with
an HP Netserver.
STU42001LW-K
(LVD, bundled(1))
STU42001LW-S
(LVD)
STU42001WD-S
(HVD)
STU62001LW-K
(LVD, bundled(2))
STU62001LW-S
(HVD)
STU62001WD-S
(HVD)
LVD, HVD
$5,505(a)
$8,325(c)
$6,139(d) bare
$6,279(d) bundle
$5,805(e) bare
$5,939(e) bundle
(a) hp.com – business store, 12 Jan 2001, excludes shipping and taxes. BoM = CD-ROM
(containing TapeAlert, Tape Tools and drivers), manual, data cartridge, cleaning tape ,
SCSI cable.
(b) hp.com – business store, 12 Jan 2001, excludes shipping, taxes and accessories. BoM =
CD-ROM (containing TapeAlert, Tape Tools and drivers), manual, rails, data cartridge and
cleaning tape.
(c) from shopIBM, 12 January 2001, excludes shipping and taxes. BoM = 2.5m SCSI cable
and required drivers
(d) suggested selling price, seagate.com 12 January 2001
(e) seagate.com, 12 Jan 2001 BoM for bundle = data cartridge, cleaning cartridge and
VERITAS Backup Exec (single server edition)
Media Comparison
type
Dimensions, Color, Weight
cartridge width
color
weight (longest tape)
Tape Features
tape length (longest tape)
tape width
data tracks
track density
linear bit density
coercivity
tape thickness
recording density
media life
Media Storage
Ultrium
Metal particle PEN
SuperDLT
Advanced Metal Powder (AMP)
W = 105.4 mm
L = 102.0 mm
H = 21.5 mm
HP = blue (pantone 287C)
IBM = black
Seagate =
0.2 Kg
W = 104.1mm (4.1”)
L = 104.1mm (4.1”)
H = 25.4mm (1”)
dark green
609 m ± 1m
12.65 mm (½”)
384
1850 oersteds
8.9 microns
4.88Kb/mm
1,000,000 passes
maximum dry bulb temperature
16°C to 32°C
relative humidity (noncondensing)
media archive life
Products Available
20% to 80%
native capacities
1 piece media –
100GB(native)
cleaning cartridge
0.21 Kg
549m (1,800’)
12.65 mm (½”)
448
35.3tracks/mm (896 tpi)
133kbits/inch
1850 oersteds
8.9 microns
1,000,000 passes
18°C to 28°C (with data)
16°C to 32°C (no data)
40% to 60% (with data)
20% to 80% (no data)
30yrs
100GB, 50GB, 30GB, 10GB
HP - C7971A
IBM - 08L9120
Seagate - STUM200
HP - C7979A
IBM - 08L9124
110GB
Testing Results
1 Cartridge Capacity
This test scheduled a backup of ~1GB to run until the backup software reported that the
cartridge was full. In reality this test measures the efficiency of the data compression algorithms
employed by the two drives. The test was run with three different data sets.
data set #1: pre-compressed data
data set #2: typical user data
data set #3: highly compressible data
Results:
data set
SDLT
data on full tape
1
2
3
spec. sheet
HP Ultrium
compression ratio
96.8GB
169.5GB
356.6GB
220GB
0.88
1.54
3.24
2
data on full tape
99.8GB
167.5GB
365.4
200GB
compression ratio
0.99
1.67
3.65
2
tests performed at HP(Bristol) 11 – 16 Jan 2001
data stored (GB) on a full tape
400
300
SDLT
HP Ultrium
200
100
0
1
2
3
Notes
The results from data set 1 validate the effectiveness of the pass-thru mode the Ultrium
compression engine uses to deal with pre-compressed or incompressible data
The results from data set 2 and 3 show the superior efficiency of the compression engine used
by Ultrium (based on the ALDC algorithm) compared to the DLZ compression algorithm used in
SDLT.
2 Power Requirement
An incomplete set of results was acquired. Testing measured current on the 5V and 12V power
lines going into the drives. Triffid was used send read, write and tape movement commands to
the Ultrium drives. It was attempted to use DLTtools to send commands the SDLT drive.
HP Ultrium Results shown below. Maximum power requirement during writing.
IBM Ultrium Our power supply was not able to supply enough current tp get the drive
through the POST. More than 4A (limit of the power supply) was needed on the 5V line.
Seagate Ultrium Was not working (our fault).
SDLT We couldn’t get DLTtools to drive the SDLT.
Notes
The IBM drive is very power hungry. Taking the maximum rated power (5V *5A + 12V *
2.5A) of 50W is significantly more than HP Ultrium. Adding to this the power required for the
optional fan pack will preclude the installation of this drive into many low- and mid-range
servers.
3 Throughput Tests
Testing was done using an HP NetServer LH6000 as the host. (, 2 x 550MHz Xeon processors,
256MB RAM, 8 x 9.1GB, Ultra SCSI II, 7,200rpm disks housed in a dual channel backplane
connected via HP NETRAID 4M, 233MHz, 128MB cache controller). The tape drives were
directly connected via an Adaptec Ultra 160 SCSI III PCI to SCSI adapter.
OS was Windows 2000 (sp1) and backup application was CA ARCserve 2000.
10 data sets were used for backup tests. 6 of these were also used for restore tests.
A - 1MB, non-specific (random content) file type, flat file structure
B - 10MB, non-specific (random content) file type, flat file structure
C - various sized bitmaps, flat file structure
D - 1MB Zipped (compressed 100MB) files, flat file structure
E - 10MB Zipped (compressed 100MB) files, flat file structure
F - combination of D & E
G - various sized files from HP (Bristol) files server (MS Office, Outlook .pst, jpegs, etc),
deep directory structure
H - various sized video (.avi) files, flat file structure
I - MS Exchange database
J - MS Access databases (.mdf)
Backup Rates
Notes
Overall the HP Ultrium drive is the backup performance winner. The IBM Ultrium is the closest
challenger. Although the Seagate Ultrium has the highest ‘paper’ throughput it is the slowest
Ultrium product in backup tests and in some cases slower than the SDLT. The SDLT versus the
average of the three Ultrium drives is not as far behind as the ‘paper’ specification would
suggest. The HP Ultrium drive (15MB/sec) does show a differential compared to SDLT
(11MB/sec) that validates the differential ‘paper’ specification.
For restore rates, all the Ultrium drives are faster than SDLT. Overall the HP, IBM and Seagate
drives all have similar restore performance.
Courtesy of/Cortesía de
Tarconis Comunicaciones S.A. de C.V.
Apartado Postal No. 65
Admin. de Correos S. XXI
Mérida Yuc. 97111
Tel/Fax. (999) 941-7977
Email: info@tarconis.com
www.tarconis.com