McQuay RDS 802C Installation manual

Installation and Maintenance Manual
IM 487-4
Group: Applied Systems
Part Number: IM 487
Date: December 2004
RoofPak™ Applied Rooftop Systems
Air Handler
RAH 047C–077C
12000 to 50000 cfm
RDS 800C–802C
4000 to 20000 cfm
US
© 2004 McQuay International
Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Gas Burner Nameplate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Hazard Identification Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Typical Component Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Typical Unit Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Control Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Controls, Settings, and Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Mechanical Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Unit Clearances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Ventilation Clearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Overhead Clearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Post and Rail Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Rigging and Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Split Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Unit Piping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Steam Coil Piping (All Units) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Steam Piping Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Steam Trap Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Vestibule Assembly Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Damper Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Cabinet Weather Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Installing Ductwork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Installing Duct Static Pressure Sensor Taps . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Installing Building Static Pressure Sensor Taps . . . . . . . . . . 46
Electrical Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Field Power Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Field Control Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Preparing Unit for Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Spring Isolated Fans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Relief Damper Tie-Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting Scroll Dampers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting Supply Fan Thrust Restraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting Seismic Restraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
51
52
52
53
Sequences of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Power-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fan Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Economizer Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Heating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Smoke and Fire Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Smoke Detectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Freeze Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Entering Fan Temperature Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Duct High Pressure Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
MicroTech II™ Remote User Interface (UI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Variable Frequency Drive Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Convenience Receptacle/Section Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
DesignFlow™ Outdoor Air Damper Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Propeller Exhaust Fan Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Exhaust Fan On/Off Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Ultraviolet Lights Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Ultraviolet Light Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Check, Test, and Start Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Servicing Control Panel Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Before Start-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Power Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Fan Start-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Economizer Start-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Heating System Start-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Air Balancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Sheave Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Drive Belt Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Mounting and Adjusting Motor Sheaves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Final Control Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Keypad accessible menu structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Servicing Control Panel Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Planned Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Unit Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Gas Furnace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Bearing Lubrication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Setscrews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Supply Fan Wheel-to-Funnel Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Winterizing Water Coils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Control Panel Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
54
55
55
56
Replacement Parts List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Wiring Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Limited Product Warranty (North America) . . . . . . 114
Legend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Unit Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Enthalpy Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
External Time Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Service and Warranty Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Exceptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Sole Remedy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
McQuay and MicroTech II are registered trademarks of McQuay International.
Microsoft is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
Windows is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
Copyright © 2004 McQuay International. All rights reserved throughout the world.
Introduction
Introduction
This manual provides general information about the “C”
vintage McQuay RoofPak applied rooftop unit, models RDS
and RAH. In addition to an overall description of the unit, it
includes mechanical and electrical installation procedures,
commissioning procedures, sequence of operation information,
and maintenance instructions. For further information on the
optional forced draft gas-fired furnace, refer to Bulletin No.
IM 684 or IM 685.
The MicroTech II applied rooftop unit controller is available
on “C” vintage applied rooftop units. For a detailed description
of the MicroTech II components, input/output configurations,
field wiring options and requirements, service procedures, see
IM 696-3. For operation and information on using and
programming the MicroTech II unit controller, refer to the
appropriate operation manual (see Table 1).
For a description of operation and information on using the
keypad to view data and set parameters, refer to the
appropriate program-specific operation manual (see Table 1).
Table 1: Program specific rooftop unit operation literature
Rooftop unit control configuration
VFDs
Discharge Air Control (VAV or CAV)
Space Comfort Control
(CAV-Zone temperature control)
Operation manual bulletin
number
Vendor IM manuals
OM 137-2
OM 138-2
Gas Burner Nameplate
On units that include gas heat, the nameplate is located on the
lower right corner on the main control box door. It includes the
burner model number, minimum/maximum input, maximum
temperature rise, and minimum cfm.
Hazard Identification Information
WARNING
Warnings indicate potentially hazardous situations, which can
result in property damage, severe personal injury, or death if
not avoided.
CAUTION
Cautions indicate potentially hazardous situations, which can
result in personal injury or equipment damage if not avoided.
Figure 1. Nomenclature
R AH — 047 C S E
RoofPak
Unit Size
RDS 800 = 4000 – 16000 CFM
RDS 802 = 8000 – 20000 CFM
RAH 47 = 12000 – 30000 CFM
RAH 77 = 23000 – 50000 CFM
Heat medium
A = Natural gas
E = Electric
F = Fuel oil
S = Steam
W = Hot water
Y = None
Cooling coil size
S = Standard (low airflow)
L = Large (high airflow)
Y = None or contractor coil
Design vintage
McQuay IM 487-4
1
Introduction
Typical Component Locations
Figure 2 shows a typical blow-through unit with the locations
of the major components. Figure 2 shows a typical
draw-through unit with the locations of the major components.
These figures are for general information only. See the
project’s certified submittals for actual specific dimensions
and locations.
Figure 2. Blow-through configuration (unit size 077C shown)
Plan View
Bottom return
air opening
Optional outside and
return air dampers
Condensate
drain connections
Bottom discharge
opening
Control entrances
Power entrances
Elevation
Optional exhaust dampers
Optional return air fan
Cooling coil
Supply air fan
Discharge plenum
Main control panel
(optional)
Filter section
Optional outside louvers
(both sides)
Heat section natural gas, steam,
hot water, electric)
Optional back return air
2
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Figure 3. Draw-through configuration with SWSI supply fan (unit size 077C shown)
Plan View
Bottom return
air opening
Optional outside and
return air dampers
Bottom discharge
opening
Condensate
drain connection
Control entrances
Power entrances
Elevation
Optional exhaust dampers
Optional return
air fan
Heating/cooling coil
Steam/hot water
Supply air fan
Filter section
Optional outside louvers
(both sides)
Main control panel
(optional)
Optional back return air
McQuay IM 487-4
3
Introduction
Figure 4. Combination draw-through/blow-through with DWDI supply fan)
Plan View
Bottom return
air opening
Condensate
drain connection
Control entrances
Power entrances
Bottom discharge
opening
Elevation
Heating/cooling coil
Mixing box
Discharge plenum
Supply air fan
Filter section
Final filter
cartridge
Fresh air hood
Main control panel
(optional)
Heat section (natural gas, steam
hot water, electric)
4
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Typical Unit Sections
The individual sections that make up a rooftop can vary from
unit to unit. All available sections are shown in Figure 5 and
Figure 6.
Figure 5. Typical unit sections (draw-through and blow-through with DWDI supply fan)
RETURN
AIR
OA/HOOD
COIL
FILTER
COIL
DP ONLY
DP ONLY
TA/30
PLENUM
65/95
MWU
HEAT
OPT
EVAP
COIL
S & HW
STAGG
30% OA
STAGG
S & HW
FLAT
FLAT
BLANK
STAGG
STAGG
BLANK
GAS
STAGG
BLANK
STAGG
BLANK
BLANK
STAGG
PLEN
OPT BLANK
OUTSIDE
AIRSTREAM
STAGG
ELEC
BLANK
ECONO/RA
OPT
BLANK
OPT
FINAL
FILTER
SA FAN
STAGG
ECONO
MIXING BOX
HEAT
FLAT
BLANK
STAGG
ECON. W/PROP. EXH.
FANS, BOTTOM OR
BACK RET. FANS
ECON. W/PROP. EXH.
FANS, & SIDE RET. FANS
McQuay IM 487-4
5
Introduction
Figure 6. Typical unit sections (draw-through with SWSI supply fan)
RETURN
AIR
OA/HOOD
COIL
FILTER
DP ONLY
TA/30
FLAT
PLENUM
65/95
OPT
EVAP
COIL
S & HW
STAGG
30% OA
STAGG
OPT BLANK
OUTSIDE
AIRSTREAM
MWU
HEAT
SA FAN
BLANK
STAGG
ECONO
BLANK
BLANK
STAGG
ECONO/RA
BLANK
MIXING BOX
STAGG
ECON W/PROP. EXH.
FANS, BOTTOM OR
BACK RET. FANS
ECON W/PROP. EXH.
FANS, BOTTOM &
SIDE RET. FANS
Note: Views shown for 047C family. Not to scale
6
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Control Locations
All controls are optional. If controls are ordered, Figure shows
the locations of the various control components mounted
throughout the units. See “Control Panel” on page 8 for the
locations of control components mounted in control panels.
Additional information is included in Table 2 on page 15 and
the wiring diagram legend, which is included in “Wiring
Diagrams” on page 57. Figure shows the blow-through heat
and the blow-through coil sections.
Figure 7. Control locations cftc f C CX F
Supply fan
discharge
plenum
section
Heat
section
DX
section
C9
Filter
section
Economizer
return air
SV1, 2
DAT
SV5, 6 (optional)
LT10 (optional)
C19, 20
(optional)
S10, REC10 (optional)
SD1 (optional)
OAE
PC5
OAT
VM1
(optional)
FS1
(optional)
ACT3
RAT
ACT6
(optional)
LT11 (optional)
S11, REC11
RAE
(optional)
SD2
(optional)
McQuay IM 487-4
7
Introduction
Control Panel
The unit control panels and their locations are shown in the
following figures. These figures show a typical unit
configuration. Specific unit configurations may differ slightly
from these figures depending on the particular unit options.
Figure 8. Control panel locations
8
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Figure 9. Typical main control panel, 800C to 802C, 460 volt
Remote
keypad
ERB1
GCB1
MCB
Resistor
EHB1
VFD remote
display
R24 R25 R28
R58
R20 R26 R27 R28 R30
HS1 S1
R48
SPS1
R60
R45
R69
DHL
SPS2
R46
MMP60
MMP10
MMP20
TB1
S4 S7
Power
supply
F3
Keypad display
Serial conn
M60
T1
M10
REC1
M20
F1A F1B F1C
See separate
detail, page 19
DS1
TB3,
first seven
blocks
McQuay IM 487-4
TB2,
remaining
blocks
TB7
GND LUG DS1
SPS1,2 fittings
for static
pressure tubing
9
Introduction
Figure 10. Typical main control panel, 047C, 460 volt
10
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Figure 11. Typical main control panel, 077C, 460 volt
McQuay IM 487-4
11
Introduction
Figure 12. Typical gas heat panel, 1000 MBH
Figure 14. VFD bypass panel, 40 HP, 460 volt)
IT
TD10
R20
AS
R22
R23
R21
LS2
LS1
S3
Figure 15. Electric heat panel, sizes 800, 802C
FSG
FSG Time
Figure 13. Typical propeller exhaust panel, three fans, 460
volt
FB33
FB32
FB31
M33
M32
M31
SR2
SR3
FB43
M41
FB42
M42
FB41
M41
SR1
TB11
PB3
12
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Figure 16. Electric heat panel, 047C
FB33
M33
FB32
M32
FB43
FB42
M43
M42
Figure 17. Electric heat panel, 077C
FB31
M31
FB41
M41
FB33
FB32
FB31
M33
M32
M31
FB44
FB34
M44
M34
FB43
FB42
FB41
M43
M42
M41
H53
TB11
H53
TB11
GLG3
DS3
GLG3
DS3
McQuay IM 487-4
13
Introduction
Figure 18. Harness plug connector detail
RATS
DATS
OATS
FP1
EPTS
OPEN1
AFD10
AFD20
SV12
SV56
ACT3
OPEN2
OAE
PC7
HL22
OPEN3
GSHT1
GSHT2
SD1
SD2
DFRH
14
PC5
DFLH
OPEN4
LT10
LT11
LT OP1
LT OP2
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Controls, Settings, and Functions
Table 2 below lists all of the unit control devices. Included in
the table are the device symbol, a description of the device, its
function, and any reset information, its location, any device
setting, any setting ranges, differentials, and the device part
number.
Table 2: Controls, settings, and functions
Symbol
Reset
Location
Setting
DAT
Discharge air
Senses discharge air
temperature sensor temperature
N/A
Discharge air
section
N/A
DHL
Duct high limit
switch
Auto
Main control
panel
3.5" w.c
(871.8 Pa)
EFT
Entering fan air
Senses entering fan air
temperature sensor temperature
N/A
Inlet of supply
fan
N/A
Evaporator frost
protection
Senses low refrigerant
temperature
N/A
Return bends of
evaporative coil
Opens at 30°F
Closes at
45°F
Freezestat
Shuts off fans, opens heating
valve, and closes outdoor
damper if low air temperature at
coil is detected
Auto
Heating section
Processes input information
N/A
Main control box
FP1, 2
FS1
Description
MCB Main control board
Function
Prevents excessive VAV duct
pressures; shuts off fan
Returns outside air dampers to
Enthalpy control
minimum position when
(electro-mechanical)
enthalpy is too high
Range
Differential
Part no.
N/A
060004705
0.05–5.0" w.c.
.05" w.c.
065493801
(12.5–1245.4 Pa) (12.5 Pa), fixed
N/A
060004705
N/A
N/A
072501901
38°F (3°C)
or as required
35°F–45°F
(2°C–7°C)
12°F (7°C),
fixed
065830001
N/A
N/A
N/A
060006101
Temperature:
3.5°F (2°C)
030706702
Humidity:
5% fixed
Auto
Economizer
section
“B” or as
required
A–D
Returns outside air dampers to
minimum position when outside
air enthalpy is higher than
return air empalthy (use RAE)
Auto
Economizer
section
Fully CW past
“D”
(when used
with RAE)
A–D
OAT
Outside air
Senses outside air temperature
temperature sensor
N/A
PC5
Dirty filter switch
Senses filter pressure drop
Auto
First filter
section
As required
PC6
Dirty filter switch
Senses filter pressure drop
Auto
Final filter
section
As required
PC7
Airflow proving
switch
Senses supply fan pressure to
prove airflow
Auto
Supply fan
section
.10" w.c. (25
.05-5" w.c.
.05" w.c.
060015801
Pa)
(12.5–1245.4 Pa) (12.5 Pa), fixed
RAE
Used to compare return air
Return air enthalpy
enthalpy to outside air enthalpy
sensor
(used with OAE)
N/A
Economizer
section
N/A
RAT
Return air
Senses return air temperature
temperature sensor
N/A
Return air
section
N/A
SD1
Smoke detector,
supply air
Initiates unit shutdown if smoke
Manual
is detected
Discharge air
section
N/A
SD2
Smoke detector,
return air
Initiates unit shutdown if smoke
Manual
is detected
Return air
section
Static pressure
sensor duct #1
Converts static pressure
signals to voltage signals
N/A
Static pressure
sensor duct #2
Converts static pressure
signals to voltage signals and
sends them to MicroTech II
controller
Static pressure
sensor: building
(space) pressure
S1
S7
OAE
Enthalpy control
(electronic)
SPS1
N/A
049262201
N/A
060004705
.05-5" w.c.
(12.5–1245.4 Pa)
.05" w.c.
(12.5 Pa)
065493801
.05-5" w.c.
(12.5–1245.4 Pa)
.05" w.c.
(12.5 Pa)
065493801
N/A
N/A
049262202
N/A
060004705
N/A
N/A
04925001
N/A
N/A
N/A
04925001
Main control box
N/A
0–5" w.c.
(0–1245.4 Pa)
1–6 VDC out
N/A
049545007
N/A
Main control box
N/A
0–5" w.c.
(0–1245.4 Pa)
1–6 VDC out
N/A
049545007
Converts static pressure
signals to voltage signals.
N/A
Main control box
N/A
-025–0.25" w.c.
(-62.3–62.3 Pa)
1–5 VDC out
N/A
049545006
System switch
Shuts off entire control circuit
(except crankcase heaters)
N/A
Main control box
N/A
N/A
N/A
001355000
ON-OFF-AUTO
switch
Used to manually switch unit
N/A
Main control box
N/A
N/A
N/A
SPS2
McQuay IM 487-4
N/A
15
Introduction
during shipment (winter road chemicals are of particular
concern), clean it when received.
Mechanical Installation
All units should be carefully inspected for damage when
received. Report all shipping damage to the carrier and file a
claim. In most cases, equipment is shipped F.O.B. factory and
claims for freight damage should be filed by the consignee.
The installation of this equipment shall be in accordance with
the regulations of authorities having jurisdiction and all
applicable codes. It is the responsibility of the installer to
determine and follow the applicable codes.
Before unloading the unit, check the unit nameplate to make
sure the voltage complies with the power supply available.
CAUTION
Sharp edges on sheet metal and fasteners
can cause personal injury.
This equipment must be installed, operated, and serviced only
by an experienced installation company and fully trained
personnel.
Unit Clearances
Service Clearance
Allow service clearance approximately as indicated in
Figure 19. Also, McQuay recommends providing a roof
walkway to the rooftop unit as well as along at least the two
sides of the unit that provide access to most controls and
serviceable components.
Receiving Inspection
When the equipment is received, all items should be carefully
checked against the bill of lading to be sure all crates and
cartons have been received. If the unit has become dirty
Figure 19. Service clearances, unit with housed DWDI supply fan
72"
(1829 mm)
A
72"
(1829 mm)
B
C
To Roof
Access
Location
Note:
Sections with heating and/or cooling coils or DWDI
supply fan must have noted service clearance on the
control box side.
16
E
D
C
F
24"
(635 mm)
60"
(1524 mm)
Roof
Walkway
D
X
Varies With Unit Arrangement
Refer to Certified Drawing & Note
Dimension "X"
RDS 800-802 = 90" (2286mm)
RAH 47-77 = 96" (2438mm)
Legend:
A = Return Air Section
B = Filter Section
C = Cooling Section
D = Cooling/Supply Fan Section
E = Heat Section
F = Discharge Plenum Section
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Figure 20. Service clearances, unit with SWSI plenum supply fan
72"
(1829 mm)
A
72"
(1829 mm)
B
C
60"
(1524 mm)
Roof
walkway
To roof
access
location
D
E
F
X
96"
(2438 mm)
Varies with unit arrangement.
Refer to Certified Drawing and
note below.
Note:
Sections with heating and/or cooling coils or DWDI
supply fan must have noted service clearance on the
control box side.
Legend:
A = Return air section
B = Filter section
C = Cooling section
D = Cooling/supply fan section
E = Heat section
F = Discharge plenum section
Dimension "X"
RDS 800–802 = 90" (2286mm)
RAH 47–77 = 96" (2438mm)
Ventilation Clearance
Below are minimum ventilation clearance recommendations.
The system designer must consider each application and
provide adequate ventilation. If this is not done, the unit will
not perform properly.
Unit(s) surrounded by a screen or a fence:
1 The bottom of the screen or fence should be at least 1 ft.
(305 mm) above the roof surface.
2 The distance between the unit and a screen or fence should
be as described in “Service Clearance” on page 16. See also
Figure 19 on page 16.
Do not locate outside air intakes near exhaust vents or other
sources of contaminated air.
If the unit is installed where windy conditions are common,
install wind screens around the unit, maintaining the
clearances specified (see Figure 21). This is particularly
important to prevent blowing snow from entering outside air
intake and to maintain adequate head pressure control when
mechanical cooling is required at low outdoor air
temperatures.
3 The distance between any two units within a screen or
fence should be at least 120" (3048 mm).
Unit(s) surrounded by solid walls:
1 If there are walls on one or two adjacent sides of the unit,
the walls may be any height. If there are walls on more than
two adjacent sides of the unit, the walls should not be
higher than the unit.
2 The distance between the unit and the wall should be at
least 96" (2438 mm) on all sides of the unit.
3 The distance between any two units within the walls should
be at least 120" (3048 mm).
McQuay IM 487-4
17
Introduction
Overhead Clearance
1 Unit(s) surrounded by screens or solid walls must have no
overhead obstructions over any part of the unit.
b Overhead obstructions must be no less than 96"
(2438 mm) above the top of the unit.
2 The following restrictions must be observed for overhead
c There must be no overhead obstructions in the areas
obstructions above the air handler section (see Figure 21):
above the outside air and exhaust dampers that are
farther than 24" (610 mm) from the side of the unit.
a There must be no overhead obstructions above the
furnace flue, or within 9" (229 mm) of the flue box.
Figure 21. Overhead clearance
Overhead
Canopy
9" (229 mm)
Minumum to Flue Box
Typical All Sides
24" (610 mm)
Maximum
Flue Box
2" (51 mm)
Minumum
Top of Unit
to Overhead
Obstruction
24" (610 mm)
Maximum
Figure 22. Side discharge
Side Discharge Opening
(Access in Ductwork
Must be Removed)
Notice
On units with side discharge, access to plenum-mounted
components becomes difficult once ductwork is installed.
Installer must provide access in the ductwork for plenum
mounted controls
18
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Roof Curb Assembly and Installation
Locate the roof curb and unit on a portion of the roof that can
support the weight of the unit. The unit must be supported to
prevent bending or twisting of the machine.
If building construction allows sound and vibration into the
occupied space, locate the unit over a non-critical area. It is
the responsibility of the system designer to make adequate
provisions for noise and vibration in the occupied space.
WARNING
Mold can cause personal injury. Some materials such as
gypsum wall board can promote mold growth when damp.
Such materials must be protected from moisture that can enter
units during maintenance or normal operation.
Install the curb and unit level to allow the condensate drain to
flow properly and allow service access doors to open and close
without binding.
Integral supply and return air duct flanges are provided with
the RAH roof curb, allowing connection of duct work to the
curb before the unit is set. The gasketed top surface of the duct
flanges seals against the unit when it is set on the curb. These
flanges must not support the total weight of the duct work.
Assembly of a typical RAH roof curb is shown in Figure 23 on
page 20. Parts A through H are common to all units having
bottom return openings. Depending on the unit length, Parts L
and M may be included with the roof curb kit to create the
correct overall curb length.
McQuay IM 487-4
Assembly instructions (Figure 23 on page 20)
1 Set curbing parts A through H per dimensions shown over
roof opening or on a level surface. Note location of return
and supply air openings.
2 If applicable, set other curbing parts (D, L, M, etc.) in place
making sure that the orientation complies with the
assembly instructions. Check alignment of all mating bolt
holes. See Detail “A.”
3 Bolt curbing parts together using fasteners provided.
Tighten all bolts finger tight.
4 Square entire curbing assembly and securely tighten all
bolts.
5 Position curb assembly over roof openings. Curb must be
level from side to side and over its length. Check that top
surface of the curb is flat with no bowing or sagging.
6 Weld curbing in place. Caulk all seams watertight. Remove
backing from 0.25" (6 mm) thick × 1.50" (38 mm) wide
gasketing and apply to surfaces shown by cross-hatching.
7 Flash curbing into roof as shown in Detail “B.”
8 Parts E and F are not required on units with no return shaft
within the curb perimeter.
9 Parts G and H are not required on units with no supply shaft
within the curb perimeter.
10 Be sure that electrical connections are coordinated (see
Figure 26).
19
Introduction
Figure 23. RAH roof curb assembly instructions
Using remaining side supports
in this area, align lengths on
opposite sides of assembly
and install a cross support
"D" at each side.
Detail A
M
L
D
3.50"
(90 mm)
8.75"
(222 mm)
G
C
M
81.00"
(2057 mm)
Inside
A
"Y"
Inside
H
Equal Length
Side Supports
H
L
D
7.50"
(191 mm)
Supply
Air
B
C
"X"
Inside
70.75"
(1797 mm)
D
E
8.75"
(222mm)
F
F
3.50"
(90mm)
2.00"
(51 mm)
G
Return
Air
See Detail "A"
A
E
87.00"
(2210 mm)
Inside
B
Dimensions
90.00"
(2286 mm)
94.75"
(2407 mm)
RAH unit
047C
077C with flat cooling coil and /or 44"
SWSI plenum supply fan
077C with staggered or no cooling coil,
and/or 49" SWSI plenum supply fan
X
Y
in
mm
in
mm
38
965
157
5
157
5
28
711
38
965
62
62
46 1168
Figure 24. Roofing detail “B”
Unit base
Curb gasketing
2 × 4 nailer strip
Counterflashing (not furnished)
Flashing (not furnished)
Rigid insulation
(not furnished)
Cant strip
(not furnished)
Roffing material
(not furnished)
Galvanized
curb
Main unit
curb
20
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Figure 25. RDS roof curb assembly instructions
6.80"
(173 mm)
1.50"
(38 mm)
20.00"
(508 mm)
Inside
76.00" (1930 mm)
Inside
G
C
A
H
7.50"
(191 mm)
Supply
Air
H
2.00"
(5.1 mm)
G
D
B
C
"X"
Inside
38.80"
(984 mm)
D
E
F
"XX"
F
"YY"
Return
Air
See Detail "A"
A
E
"Y"
Inside
B
85.00"
(2159 mm)
62.80"
(1594 mm)
Table 3: RDS roof curb assembly instructions
Unit size
Fan
800–802C
None
(2) 15” FC
30" AF
40" AF
McQuay IM 487-4
“X”
“Y”
in
mm
in
24.0
24.0
30.0
36.0
610
610
762
914
82.0
82.0
76.0
78.0
mm
“XX”
in
2083 6.8
2083 6.8
1930 6.8
1981 14.8
“YY”
mm
in
173
173
173
376
1.5
1.5
4.5
3.5
mm
Unit size
Return
fan
38 800–802C
None
38
(2) 15" FC
114
30" AF
89
40" AF
X
Y
in
mm
in
24.0
24.0
30.0
36.0
610
610
762
914
82.0
82.0
76.0
78.0
XX
mm
in
2083 6.8
2083 6.8
1930 6.8
1981 14.8
YY
mm
in
mm
173
173
173
376
1.5
1.5
4.5
3.5
38
38
114
89
21
Introduction
Figure 26. Typical power wire entrance, curb view (RDS 800–802 shown; for exact values, refer to submittal)
D
A
20.0
6.8 6.0
1.5
RA
OPNG
SA
OPNG
76.0
C
B
RPS only
97.0
B
B
A
A
D
See Detail A
2 Typ
4 Typ
6.0
E
Unit length minus 6.4
Detail A
7.5
8.0
12.1
5.1
0.9 Dia.
K.O.
3.0 Dia.
K.O.
3.4
2.1
3.1
4.3
2.0
4.6
4.8
9.7
Post and Rail Mounting
When mounting by post and rail, run the structural support the
full length of the unit. Locate the structural member at the base
of the unit as shown in Figure 27, assuring the I-beam is well
supported by the structural member.
Figure 27. Post and rail mounting
5" *
(127mm)
99" RAH
(2515 mm)
94" RDS
(2388 mm)
CAUTION
The unit must be level side to side and over the entire length.
Equipment damage can result if the unit is not level.
If resilient material is placed between the unit and the rail,
insert a heavy steel plate between the unit and the resilient
material to distribute the load. Seal cabinet penetrations
(electrical, piping, etc.) properly to protect against moisture
and weather.
22
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Rigging and Handling
Lifting brackets with 2" (51 mm) diameter holes are provided
on the sides of the unit.
Use spreader bars, 96" to 100" (2438 to 2540 mm) wide to
prevent damage to the unit cabinet. Avoid twisting or uneven
lifting of the unit. The cable length from the bracket to the
hook should always be longer than the distance between the
outer lifting points.
If the unit is stored at the construction site for an intermediate
period, take these additional precautions:
Figure 28 shows an example of the rigging instruction label
shipped with each unit.
WARNING
Use all lifting points. Improper lifting can cause severe personal
injury and property damage.
Figure 28. Rigging and handling instruction label
Unit has either four or six lifting o
pints (four-point shown below).
1 Support the unit well along the length of the base rail.
Rigging cables must be at leastas long as distance“A.”
2 Level the unit (no twists or uneven ground surface).
3 Provide proper drainage around the unit to prevent flooding
Spreader bars
required
of the equipment.
4 Provide adequate protection from vandalism, mechanical
contact, etc.
5 Securely close the doors.
6 If there are isolation dampers, make sure they are properly
installed and fully closed to prevent the entry of animals
and debris through the supply and return air openings.
A
7 Cover the supply and return air openings on units without
isolation dampers.
Lift only as indicated
Caution: Lifting points may not
be symmetrical to center of
gravity of unit. Balast or unequa
cable lengths may be required.
CAUTION
Lifting points may not be symmetrical to the center of gravity of
the unit. Ballast or unequal cable lengths may be required.
McQuay IM 487-4
23
Introduction
Lifting Points
Figure 29. Unit type RAH lifting points z
To determine the required lifting cable lengths and whether
four-or six-point lifting is required, use Tables 4 and 5 and
Figure 29.
4 Lifting Points
Referring toFigure 29, note that dimension A is the distance
between the outer lifting points. The four outer rigging cables
must be equal to or longer than dimension A. Dimension B
shows the minimum distance between the outer and the inner
lifting points for six-point lifting. Use this to roughly
determine the required length of the middle cables for sixpoint lifting. Determine dimension A by subtracting
dimensions X and Y from dimension Z (e.g., A = Z – X – Y).
A
• Where:
Z
• Z = Total unit length in inches
(refer to certified drawings for this dimension).
X
• X = Outdoor/return air section length (refer to Table 29 and
Table 5 for this dimension).
• If A d 288" (7315 mm), 4-point lifting is sufficient.
• If A > 288" (7315 mm), 6-point lifting is required.
6 Lifting Points
Table 4: RAH X dimension (see Figure 29)
Type of economizer
section
047C
077C
100% OA
Plenum
0–30% OA
0–100% economizer
0–100% economizer with return fan
0
48” (1219 mm)
48” (1219 mm)
72” (1829 mm)
72” (1829 mm)
0
72” (1829 mm)
72” (1829 mm)
96” (2438 mm)
96” (2438 mm)
A
B
Z
Table 5: RDS X dimension (see Figure 29)
Outdoor/return air section
800C
802C
100% OA
Plenum
0–30% OA
0–100% economizer
0–100% economizer with 15" return fan
0–100% economizer with 30" return fan
0–100% economizer with 40" return fan
0
40” (1016 mm)
40” (1016 mm)
40” (1016 mm)
62" (1575 mm)
52" (1321 mm)
—
0
52" (1321 mm)
52" (1321 mm)
52" (1321 mm)
—
52" (1321 mm)
80" (2032 mm)
24
X
RDS 800: B Min. = 62" (1515 mm)
RDS 802: B Min. = 84" (2134 mm)
RAH 47: B Min. = 96" (2438 mm)
RAH 77: B Min. = 120" (3048 mm)
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Split Units
Although units typically ship from the factory as complete
units, they can be factory split at the supply fan bulkhead and
connected later on the roof. This configuration is ordered if the
shipping length or a weight limitation prevents ordering a
packaged unit.
A single nameplate is attached to the air handler section and
power is supplied to both sections through the optional main
control box as in a packaged unit.
(2) mechanically recoupling the cabinet, and (3) reconnecting
power and control wiring.
Phase I. Set sections
1 Remove top cap and save for Step 3.
2 Remove screws on fan panel, leaving retainer clips in place
to secure bulkhead. Save screws for Step 9.
3 Remove plywood and retaining angles from unit and
discard.
RAH Factory Split at Fan
Field reassembly of an RAH unit that has shipped split at the
fan takes place in three phases: (1) setting the sections
4 Carefully lower both sections of unit (fan end and
discharge end) into place, making sure the roof curb
engages the recesses in the unit base.
Figure 30. Set sections
Remove top cap and
save for reassembly.
Fan end of unit
McQuay IM 487-4
Remove plywood and retaining
angles from unit and discard.
Discharge end of unit
Remove screws on fan panel,
leaving retainer clips in place.
Save screws for reassembly.
25
Introduction
Phase II. Reassemble cabinet (Figure 31)
1 Reinstall top cap removed in Phase I, Step 1.
2 Caulk (watertight) ends of splice cap.
3 Caulk (watertight) vertical seam.
4 Install #10 screws (provided).
5 Install screws (.25–20 ×.75) removed in Phase I, Step 2.
6 Install splice cover (provided).
Figure 31. Reassemble cabinet
Reinstall top cap
saved in step 1
Caulk ends
of splice cap
Splice cover,
provided
#10 screws,
provided
Caulk
vertical
seam
See detail
Install screws
(.25 to 20 × .75)
saved from step 1
26
Nut clip-on,
provided
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Phase III. Reconnect power and control wiring
Field Refrigerant Piping and Charging of DX Coils
Once the sections are physically reconnected, the ends of the
power harness are fed back through the unit base into the
junction box, per the unit’s electrical schematics.
Units that ship from the factory with DX coils installed do not
include refrigerant piping or refrigerant controls. The coil
assembly is ready for field connections at the distributors and
at the suction headers. Piping kits that provide the necessary
liquid and hot gas piping and control components are available
for field installation. Field-installed refrigerant piping may exit
the unit cabinet at one of the following locations:
CAUTION
Connect the power block correctly and maintain proper
phasing. Improper installation can cause severe equipment
damage.
1 Make electrical connections and reinstall inner raceway
cover as shown in Figure 32.
Figure 32. Electrical connections and raceway cover
installation
• Through the discharge and bulkhead of the unit.
• Through a cabinet door near the DX coil that is not required
for service areas.
CAUTION
For any of the above cabinet penetrations, tightly seal the hole
to prevent water or air leakage.
If applicable, install as shown
with provided fasteners.
After routing wires,
install inner raceway
cover (see step 6).
• Through the floor of the unit.
3.72 ref.
(94 mm)
In preparing for field piping, the plastic plugs on the
distributors must be removed and the copper caps at the
suction header connections must be unsweated.
Follow piping design, sizing, and installation information
presented in ASHRAE handbooks in the design and
installation of interconnecting piping. The DX coil and
condensing unit are intended to be set at the same elevation, as
close as possible to each other to minimize refrigerant pressure
drop. Design piping to prevent liquid refrigerant carryover to
the compressor and to provide a continuous return of
compressor oil from the system.
CAUTION
2 When power wire reconnection is complete, reinstall the
inner raceway cover in the blank or heat section. Figure 32
shows a typical installation of the raceway cover.
3 Run the control harnesses by removing the external
raceway covers on either side of the unit split.
4 Remove the excess harness length from the external
raceway on the downstream side of the split; then route
along the raceway through the bushed hole in the fan
section and into the junction box where control wiring
terminal blocks are provided for reconnection.
The pounds of refrigerant in the system may exceed the
capacity of the condenser, depending on the amount of
refrigerant in the liquid lines between the DX coil and the
condensing unit.
Refer to condenser manufacturer for information about
refrigerant capacity. Suitable means of containing the
refrigerant is required.
CAUTION
To prevent liquid return and damage to the compressor on
systems with optional hot gas bypass, it is important to locate
the bypass solenoid valve at the condensing unit and not at the
DX coil.
5 Make all electrical connections per the unit’s electrical
schematics.
6 Reinstall the external raceway covers after routing of the
control wires is complete.
McQuay IM 487-4
27
Introduction
Piping Recommendations
1 Use type K or L clean copper tubing. Thoroughly clean or
braze all joints with high temperature solder.
2 Base piping sizes on temperature/pressure limitations as
recommended in the following paragraphs. Under no
circumstances should pipe size be based strictly upon coil
or condensing unit piping connection size.
3 Do not exceed suction line piping pressure drop equivalent
to 2°F (1°C), 3 psi (20.7 kPa) per 100 feet (30.5 m) of
equivalent pipe length. After the suction line size is
determined, check the vertical suction risers to verify that
oil will be carried up the riser and back to the compressor.
Pitch the suction line(s) in the direction of refrigerant flow
and make sure they are adequately supported. Lines should
be free draining and fully insulated between the evaporator
and the compressor. Install a trap on the vertical riser to the
compressor.
4 To determine the minimum tonnage required to carry oil up
suction risers of various sizes, check the vertical suction
risers using Table 6.
5 Insulate suction lines inside the unit cabinet to prevent
condensation.
Table 6: Minimum tonnage (R-22) to carry oil up suction
riser at 40°F saturated suction
Line size O.D.
Minimum tonnage
1 1/8"
1 3/8"
1 5/8"
2 1/8"
2 5/8"
3 1/8"
3 5/8"
4 1/8"
1.5
2.5
3.8
7.6
13.10
20.4
29.7
41.3
6 Size the liquid line for a pressure drop not to exceed the
pressure equivalent of 2°F (1°C), 6 psi (41.4 kPa)
saturated temperature.
Evacuation
After determining the unit is tight and there are no refrigerant
leaks, evacuate the system. Use a vacuum pump with a
pumping capacity of approximately 3 cu.ft./min. and the
ability to reduce the vacuum in the unit to at least 1 mm (1000
microns).
1 Connect a mercury manometer or an electronic or other
type of micron gauge to the unit at a point remote from the
vacuum pump. For readings below 1 millimeter, use an
electronic or other micron gauge.
2 Use the triple evacuation method, which is particularly
helpful if the vacuum pump is unable to obtain the desired
1 mm of vacuum. The system is first evacuated to
approximately 29" (740 mm) of mercury. Then add enough
refrigerant vapor to the system to bring the pressure up to 0
pounds (0 microns).
3 Evacuate the system again to 29" (740 mm) of vacuum.
Repeat his procedure three times. This method is most
effective by holding system pressure at 0 pounds
(0 microns) for a minimum of 1 hour between evacuations.
The first pulldown removes about 90% of the
noncondensables; the second removes about 90% of that
remaining from the first pulldown. After the third
pulldown, only 1/10 of 1% of noncondensables remains.
Table 7 on page 29 shows the relationship between pressure,
microns, atmospheres, and the boiling point of water.
CAUTION
Before replacing refrigerant sensors or protective devices, see
“Experience in the field has shown that R-407C systems can be
“topped off” after a leak has been repaired and operate
normally. There is no need, except in the case of a critically
charged systems, to replace the entire charge after a leak has
been repaired.” on page 109 for an important warning to
prevent an abrupt loss of the entire charge.
Leak Testing
In the case of loss of the nitrogen holding charge, the unit
should be checked for leaks prior to charging the complete
system. If the full charge was lost, leak testing can be done by
charging the refrigerant into the unit to build the pressure to
approximately 10 psig and adding sufficient dry nitrogen to
bring the pressure to a maximum of 125 psig. The unit should
then be leak tested with halide or electronic leak detector.
After making any necessary repair, the system should be
evacuated as described in the following paragraphs.
WARNING
Do not use oxygen or air to build up pressure. Explosion hazard
can cause severe personal injury or death.
28
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Table 7: Pressure-vacuum equivalents
Absolute pressure above zero
Microns
0
50
100
150
200
300
500
1,000
2000
4,000
6000
8,000
10,000
15,000
20,000
30,000
50,000
100,000
200,000
500,000
760,000
PSIA
0
0.001
0.002
0.003
0.004
0.006
0.009
0.019
0.039
0.078
0.117
0.156
0.193
0.290
0.387
0.580
0.967
1.930
3.870
9.670
14.697
Vacuum below 1 atmosphere
Mercury (mm)
760.00
759.95
759.90
759.85
759.80
759.70
759.50
759.00
758.00
756.00
754.00
752.00
750.00
745.00
740.00
730.00
710.00
660.00
560.00
260.00
0
Mercury (in.)
29.921
29,920
29.920
29.920
29.910
29.910
29.900
29.880
29.840
29.760
29.690
29.600
29.530
29.330
29.130
28.740
27.950
25.980
22.050
10.240
0
Charging the System
Units are leak tested at the factory and shipped with a nitrogen
holding charge. If the holding charge has been lost due to
shipping damage, charge the system with enough refrigerant to
raise the unit pressure to 30 psig after first repairing the leaks
and evacuating the system.
1 After all refrigerant piping is complete and the system is
evacuated, it can be charged as described in the paragraphs
following. Connect the refrigerant drum to the gauge port
on the liquid shutoff valve and purge the charging line
between the refrigerant cylinder and the valve. Then open
the valve to the mid position.
Approximate fraction of 1
atmosphere
Boiling point of H2O at each
pressure (oF)
—
1/15,200
1/7,600
1/5,100
1/3,800
1/2,500
1/1,520
1/760
1/380
1/189
1/127
1/95
1/76
1/50
1/38
1/25
1/15
2/15
1/4
2/3
1 Atmosphere
—
–50
–40
–33
–28
–21
–12
1
15
29
39
46
52
63
72
84
101
125
152
192
212
Note: Stamp the total operating charge per circuit on the unit
nameplate for future reference.
CAUTION
Adding refrigerant to the suction always risks liquid-related
damage to the compressor.
Take special care to add refrigerant slowly enough to the
suction to prevent damage. Adjust the charging tank hand
valve so liquid leaves the tank but vapor enters the compressor.
2 If the system is under a vacuum, stand the refrigerant drum
with the connection up, open the drum, and break the
vacuum with refrigerant gas.
3 With a system gas pressure higher than the equivalent of a
freezing temperature, invert the charging cylinder and
elevate the drum above the condenser. With the drum in
this position and the valves open, liquid refrigerant flows
into the condenser. Approximately 75% of the total
requirement estimated for the unit can be charged in this
manner.
4 After 75% of the required charge enters the condenser,
reconnect the refrigerant drum and charging line to the
suction side of the system. Again, purge the connecting
line, stand the drum with the connection side up, and place
the service valve in the open position.
Important: At this point, interrupt the charging procedure and
do prestart checks before attempting to complete the
refrigerant charge.
McQuay IM 487-4
29
Introduction
Unit Piping
Refrigerant Charge
Factory-installed DX coils are designed to use R-22. The total
charge per circuit is the sum of the following three values:
• Condenser section charge. Refer to manufacturer’s data.
• Evaporator coil charge.
• Charge for length of interconnecting piping, installed by
field.
Note: Factory-installed DX coils are intended for one
refrigerant circuit on unit size 800 and two refrigerant
circuits containing identical weights of refrigerant on all
other sizes. The values shown in Table 8, Table 9 and
Table 10 are for each circuit.
Note: The total operating charge per circuit should not exceed
the pumpdown capacity per circuit.
Table 8: Approximate DX coil refrigerant charge per circuit
DX Coil R-22 charge (lbs./circuit)
Unit size
047C
077C
Flat coil
Staggered coil
3 x no. of DX rows
5 x no. of DX rows
3.5 x no. of DX rows
6.5 x no. of DX rows
Table 9: Approximate refrigerant charge per circuit
Unit size
Evaporator coil (lbs/ckt/coil row)
802
802C*
3.30
2.45
* The RDS 802C unit has two refrigerant circuits.
Table 10: Weight of refrigerant R-22 in copper lines
(pounds per 100 feet of Type L tubing)
O.D.
line
size
3/8"
1/2"
5/8"
7/8"
1 1/8"
1 3/8"
1 5/8"
2 1/8"
2 5/8"
3 1/8"
3 5/8"
4 1/8"
30
Weight of refrigerant, lbs./100 feet
Vol. per
100 ft.
Hot gas Suction gas (superheat to
in cubic Liquid @ @ 120°F
85°F)
100°F
feet
cond.
30°F
40°F
0.054
0.100
0.162
0.336
0.573
0.872
1.237
2.147
3.312
4.728
6.398
8.313
3.84
7.12
7.12
24.00
40.80
62.10
88.00
153.00
236.00
336.00
456.00
592.00
0.202
0.374
0.605
1.260
2.140
3.260
4.620
8.040
12,400
17.700
24.000
31.100
0.052
0.098
0.158
0.323
0.550
0.839
1.190
2.060
3.180
4.550
6.150
8.000
0.077
0.143
0.232
0.480
0.820
1.250
1.770
3.060
4.720
6.750
9.140
11.190
Condensate Drain Connection
• The unit is provided with a 1.5" male NPT condensate drain
connection. Refer to certified drawings for the exact
location. For proper drainage, level the unit and drain pan
side to side and install a P-trap
• Units may have positive or negative pressure sections. Use
traps in both cases with extra care given to negative pressure
sections. In Figure 33, dimension “A” should be a minimum
of 8" (203 mm). As a conservative measure to prevent the
cabinet static pressure from blowing or drawing the water
out of the trap and causing air leakage, dimension A should
be two times the maximum static pressure encountered in
the coil section in inches w.c.
• Draining condensate directly onto the roof may be
acceptable; refer to local codes. Provide a small drip pad of
stone, mortar, wood, or metal to protect the roof against
possible damage.
• If condensate is piped into the building drainage system,
pitch the drain line away from the unit a minimum of 1/8"
per foot. The drain line must penetrate the roof external to
the unit. Refer to local codes for additional requirements.
Sealed drain lines require venting to provide proper
condensate flow.
• Where the cooling coils have intermediate condensate pans
on the face of the evaporator coil, copper tubes near both
ends of the coil provide drainage to the main drain pan.
Check that the copper tubes are in place and open before the
unit is put into operation.
• On units with staggered cooling coils, the upper drain pan
drains into the lower coil drain pan through a copper tube
near the center of the drain pan. Check that this tube is open
before putting the unit into operation and as a part of routine
maintenance.
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
• Because drain pans in any air conditioning unit have some
moisture in them, algae, etc. will grow. Periodically clean to
prevent this buildup from plugging the drain and causing the
drain pan to overflow. Clean drain pans to prevent the spread
of disease. Cleaning should be performed by qualified
personnel.
WARNING
Drain pans must be cleaned periodically. Material in
uncleaned drain pans can cause disease.
Cleaning should be performed by qualified personnel.
Figure 33. Condensate drain connection
C o p p e r T u b e
( o n e e a c h e n d o f c o il)
N o te : D r a in lin e m u s t
n o t b e r u n h ig h e r
th a n th is le v e l
4 " (1 0 2 m m )
M in im u m
Piping for Steam, Hot Water/ChIlled Water Coils
Factory-installed chilled water coils are installed in a coil
section that can be designed to accept a factory-installed
heating coil immediately upstream. The coil section can be
ordered in either the draw-through or blow-through position.
All chilled water piping can be done internal to the unit
without requiring a piping vestibule (except on sizes 800–802
when heating coils are included in the cooling coil section).
When a steam or hot water coil is installed in the combination
coil section, the coil connections project to the inside surface
of the door panel. Holes can be cut in the door panels to
connect the piping to the coils, or an accessory piping
vestibule can be added to the unit to provide piping space.
Refer to the section on vestibule assembly instructions. The
piping can then be routed back within the unit as shown in
Figure 35 on page 32.
To avoid piping penetrations through the roof external to the
curb, holes can be cut through the floor of the unit at the
locations specified on the certified drawings.
CAUTION
"A "
8 " (2 0 3 m m )
M in . o r 2 x " P "
M in im iz e T h is
D im e n s io n
V ie w
McQuay IM 487-4
See the “Installation” section of the gas-fired furnace
installation manual, Bulletin No. IM 684 or 685.
Steam and hot water coils can be factory installed in either a
heat section, or in the combination coil section. These sections
can be located either in the draw-through or blow-through
position. When a steam or hot water coil is installed in the heat
section, all piping can be done internal to the unit without
requiring a piping vestibule. Refer to Figure 35 and Figure 37
on page 33.
S e e V ie w " A "
S ta tic P r e s s u r e " P "
( in . w .o .)
D r a in P a n
Gas Piping
A
Seal all holes in the unit floor to prevent water leakage into the
building.
31
Introduction
Hot Water Piping
Note: Factory-installed water valves and piping are bronze,
Hot water coils are provided without valves for field piping or
piped with three-way valves and actuator motors.
With the factory piping and valve package, the two coils are
piped in parallel and controlled through a single three-way
valve. Field piping connections are of the same NPT size as the
valve-male threads at the supply connection, female threads at
the return connection.
Hot water coils are not normally recommended for use with
entering air temperatures below 40°F (4°C). No control system
can guarantee a 100% safeguard against coil freeze-up. Glycol
solutions or brines are the only freeze-safe media for operation
of water coils at low entering air temperature conditions. Refer
to the “Maintenance” section of this manual for more on
winterizing coils. The hot water section consists of two
stacked soils, as shown in Figure 34.
When no factory piping or valve is included, the coil
connections are 1.625” ODM copper on 800 and 802C and
2.12" ODM copper on 047 and 077C. With the factory piping
and valve package, the two coils are piped in parallel and
controlled through a single three-way valve. Field piping
connections are of the same NPT size as the valve-male
threads at the supply connection, female threads at the return
connection.
brass, and copper. Dissimilar metals within the
plumbing system can cause galvanic corrosion. To avoid
corrosion, provide proper di-electric fittings as well as
appropriate water treatment.
CAUTION
Coil freeze possible. Can damage equipment.
Follow instructions for mixing antifreeze solution used. Some
products have higher freezing points in their natural state than
when mixed with water. The freezing of coils is not the
responsibility of McQuay International. Refer to “Winterizing
Water Coils” on page 109.
Steam Coil Piping (All Units)
The steam heat section consists of two stacked coils pitched at
1/8" (3 mm) per foot (305 mm) as shown in Figure 35 to
provide positive condensate removal. When no factory piping
or valve is included, the coil connections are 2.5" male NPT
iron pipe.
Note: The valve actuator spring returns to a stem up position
upon power failure. This allows full flow through the
coil.
Figure 35. Steam heat section (shown with factory valve
and piping)
Figure 34. Hot water heat section (shown with factory valve
and piping)
Upper
Coil
Upper
Coil
2.12 " ODM
Copper Coil
Connections
2.12 " ODM
Copper Coil
Connections
Air Flow
Return
Lower
Coil
Supply
Lower
Coil
Return
Bypass
Supply
Note: The valve actuator spring returns to a stem up position
upon power failure. This allows full flow through the
coil.
Refer to the certified drawings for the recommended piping
entrance locations. Seal all piping penetrations to prevent air
and water leakage.
With the factory piping and valve package, the two coil
supplies are piped in parallel and controlled through a single
two-way valve. The field supply connection is of the same
female NPT size as the valve. Field return connections are
made at the 2.50" male NPT fittings on each of the two stacked
coils.
Refer to the sections on steam coil piping and trap
recommendations for additional information.
Note: The valve actuator spring returns to a stem up position
upon power failure. This allows full flow through the
coil.
32
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Figure 36. Two-way valve package
Steam Trap Recommendations
1 Size traps in accordance with manufacturers’
recommendations. Be certain that the required pressure
differential will always be available. Do not undersize.
2 Float and thermostatic or bucket traps are recommended for
low pressure steam. Use bucket traps on systems with onoff control only.
3 Locate traps at least 12" (305 mm) below the coil return
connection.
S u p p ly
4 Always install strainers as close as possible to the inlet side
of the trap.
R e tu rn
Steam Piping Recommendations
5 A single tap may generally be used for coils piped in
parallel, but an individual trap for each coil is preferred.
Figure 37. Heating coil piping with vestibule
1 Be certain that adequate piping flexibility is provided.
Stresses resulting from expansion of closely coupled piping
and coil arrangement can cause serious damage.
2 Do not reduce pipe size at the coil return connection. Carry
return connection size through the dirt pocket, making the
reduction at the branch leading to the trap.
3 Install vacuum breakers on all applications to prevent
retaining condensate in the coil. Generally, the vacuum
breaker is to be connected between the coil inlet and the
return main. However, if the system has a flooded return
main, the vacuum breaker to the atmosphere; the trap
design should allow venting of the large quantities of air.
4 Do not drain steam mains or takeoffs through coils. Drain
mains ahead of coils through a steam trap to the return line.
5 Do not attempt to lift condensate when using modulating or
on-off control.
6 Pitch all supply and return steam piping down a minimum
of 1" (25 mm) per 10 feet (3 m) of direction of flow.
McQuay IM 487-4
33
Introduction
Steam Coil Freeze Conditions
Chilled Water Piping
If the air entering the steam coil is below 35°F (2°C), note the
following recommendations:
Chilled water coils are provided without valves for field
piping, or piped with three-way valves with motor actuators.
Table 11 provides information on units with factory installed
piping and valve packages. The table also provides field sweat
connection information for units not furnished with factory
installed piping and valve packages.
1 Supply 5 psi (34.5 kPa) steam to coils at all times.
2 Modulating valves are not recommended. Control should
be by means of face and bypass dampers.
3 As additional protection against freeze-up, install the tap
sufficiently far below the coil to provide an adequate
hydrostatic head to ensure removal of condensate during an
interruption on the steam pressure. Estimate 3 ft. (914 mm)
for each 1 psi (7 kPa) of trap differential required.
4 If the unit is to be operated in environments with possible
freezing temperatures, an optional freezestat is
recommended. See “Freeze Protection” on page 85 for
additional information.
With the factory piping and valve package, the coil assembly is
controlled through a single three-way valve. When two coils
are included in the assembly, they are piped in parallel. Field
connections are male NPT, sized as shown in Table 11. Refer
to Figure 40 for a typical cooling coil with factory valve and
piping.
Figure 40. Chilled water coil (shown with factory valve and
piping
Figure 38. Valve assembly
Air Flow
S te m
C lip
Return
Bypass
S te m
Supply
S e ts c re w s
Figure 39. Steam valve package
S u p p ly
R e tu rn
34
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Table 11: Piping connection sizes/valve size options for chilled water piping
Cabinet
size
Application
code
Coil size
Available rows
Face area sq.
Hx 83"
(available with 8,
ft. (sq. m)
(2108 mm)
10, 12 fins/in)
long
33 + 33
Blow-thru or
(2 coils) (838
draw-thru small
+
coil section
838 mm)
38.0
(3.53 m²)
39 + 39
Blow-thru or
(2 coils) (991
draw-thru large
+
coil section
991 mm)
45.0
(4.18 m²)
047C
Face and bypass
section with
small coil
48
(1219 mm)
39 + 39
Face and bypass
(2 coils) (991
section with large
+
coil
991 mm)
27.7
(2.57 m²)
45.0
(4.18 m²)
Blow-thru or
draw-thru small
coil section
45 + 45
(2 coils)
(1143 +
1143 mm)
51.9
(4.82 m²)
Blow-thru or
draw-thru large
coil section
63 + 63
(2 coils)
(1600 +
1600 mm)
72.6
(6.74 m²)
Face and bypass
section with
small coil
63
(1600 mm)
36.3
(3.37 m²)
Face and bypass
section with large
coil
54 + 54
(2 coils)
(1372 +
1372 mm)
62.3
(5.74 m²)
Blow-thru or
draw-thru cooling
only coil section
48 + 78
(1220 +
1981 mm)
26.0
(2.42 m²)
Blow-thru or
draw-thru unit
coil section
48 + 78
(1220 +
1981 mm)
26.0
(2.42 m²)
Face and bypass
section with
small coil
30 + 79
(763 +
2006 mm)
16.5
(2.57 m²)
Blow-thru or
draw-thru
contractor coil
section
36 + 79
(915 +
2006 mm)
19.8
(4.18 m²)
077C
800
or
802
McQuay IM 487-4
3
4
5
6
8
3
4
5
6
8
3
4
5
6
8
3
4
5
6
8
3
4
5
6
8
3
4
5
6
8
3
4
5
6
8
3
4
5
6
8
3
4
5
6
3
4
5
6
3
4
5
6
8
10
3
4
5
6
8
10
Available circuiting
5WH
5WL
5WS
5WM
5WD
Columns (see next page for explanation)
1
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
F
F
F
F
F
D
D
D
D
D
C
C
C
C
C
B
B
B
B
B
E
E
E
E
E
C
C
C
C
C
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
2
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
U
U
U
U
U
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
T
T
T
T
T
R
R
R
R
R
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
1
D
D
D
D
D
C
C
C
C
C
E
E
E
E
E
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
B
B
B
B
B
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
2
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
T
T
T
T
T
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
P
P
P
P
P
S
S
S
S
S
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
1
—
B
—
B
B
—
C
—
C
C
—
C
—
C
C
—
C
—
C
C
—
C
—
C
C
—
B
—
B
B
—
C
—
C
C
—
B
—
B
B
—
G
—
G
—
G
—
G
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
2
—
Q
—
Q
Q
—
Q
—
Q
Q
—
S
—
S
S
—
Q
—
Q
Q
—
P
—
P
P
—
P
—
P
P
—
S
—
S
S
—
P
—
P
P
—
T
—
T
—
T
—
T
—
M
—
M
M
—
K
—
K
K
K
K
1
A
B
B
B
B
A
C
C
C
C
A
C
C
C
C
A
C
C
C
C
A
B
B
B
B
A
B
B
B
B
A
C
C
C
C
A
B
B
B
B
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
2
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
S
S
S
S
S
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
S
S
S
S
S
P
P
P
P
P
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
1
A
B
A
A
B
A
B
A
A
B
A
C
A
A
C
A
B
A
A
B
A
B
A
A
B
A
B
A
A
B
A
C
A
A
C
A
B
A
A
B
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
2
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
S
S
S
S
S
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
S
S
S
S
S
P
P
P
P
P
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
35
Introduction
Table Available Circuiting Legend
Column 1:
These units are available with a factory installed package consisting of a three-way water valve and connecting piping.
A = This combination is not available with a factory-installed piping and valve package.
B = 300, 2.50, or 200 inch three-way valves can be specified
C = 300, 2.50, 2.00, or 150 inch three-way valves can be specified
D = 250, 200, or 150 inch three-way valves can be specified
E = 250, 200, 150, or 1.25 inch three-way valves can be specified
F = 200, 1.50, or 125 inch three-way vales can be specified
G = 1.25, 1.50, 2.00 or 2.50 inch three-way valves can be specified
Field supply and return female NPT connection sizes are the same as the valve size.
Column 2:
The following letters designate units that are not furnished with the factory installed piping/valve package. Required are field sweat
connections, at one or two coils, to male copper tubing for the supply and return water piping.
K = A single 2.00 inch NPT supply and return if fin height is 21–30 inches and 2.50 inches of fin height is 30–36 inches.
L = A single 1.50 inch NPT supply and return
M = A single 2.00 inch NPT supply and return if fin height is 21–30 inches
N = A single 2.50 inch NPT supply and return
P = Two 3.12 inch O.D. supply and two 3.12 O.D. return connections
Q = Two 2.62 inch O.D supply and two 2.62 O.D. return connections
R = Two 2.12 inch O.D. supply and two 2.12 O.D. return connections
S = One 3.12 inch O.D supply and one 3.12 O.D. return connections
T = One 2.62 inch O.D supply and one 2.62 O.D. return connections
U = One 2.12 inch O.D supply and one 2.12 O.D. return connections
36
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Vestibule Assembly Instructions
Step 2
An accessory vestibule is available to provide additional
piping space for coils installed in a four-foot section. A
vestibule is required to maintain door access on a combination
heating and cooling section. Assemble the vestibule to the unit
part by part as shown in Figure 41.
Remove gasketing around door flange and save for use on
vestibule. See Step 4. Remove door and save for Step 4.
Figure 42. Step 2 illustration
Note: The door, hinge, and latch assemblies from the unit are
used on the vestibule.
Step 1
Remove door from section where vestibule is to be located by
removing screws holding hinges to upright support (leave
hinges on door). Set door aside and save for Step 4.
• Remove door latch assembly from other side upright
support. Use offset Phillips screwdriver or a wrench to
remove screws holding latch assembly in place. Save door
latch assembly, screws and bushings for Step 4.
Figure 41. Step 1 illustration
Gasketing
Door Prop
Door
Door Latch Assembly
McQuay IM 487-4
37
Introduction
Step 3
Step 4
1 Assemble side panels A and B to uprights using #10 drill
screws supplied. Make certain side panels are flush against
uprights before securing into place.
2 Fasten bottom panel D to base channel using #10 drill
screws and to side panels A and B using #10 screws
supplied.
3 Set top panel C in place and fasten to side panels A and B
using #10 screws and to top panel using #10 screws
supplied.
1 Reassemble access door to vestibule by screwing hinges
into side panel using screws saved from Step 1. (Access
door must be attached to the vestibule in the same opening
direction as it was on the unit.)
2 Remove and discard latch handle locking screws and
retaining washer. Fasten door latch assembly to side panel
using screws and bushings saved from Step 1. (Latch must
be fastened on the same side as when located on the unit.)
3 Fasten upright angles to vestibule using #10 screws
supplied.
Figure 43. Step 3 illustration
4 Seal between unit and vestibule with silicone sealant along
#10 Screw
top and sides as shown.
Note: Any holes cut in the floor of the unit must be sealed to
prevent water leakage.
Figure 44. Step 4 illustration
Silicone
Sealant
Gasketing
Upright Angle
#10 Screw
#10 Drill
Screw
Silicone
Sealant
Door
Prop
#10 Screw
38
Door
Gasketing
Upright
Angle
Door Latch Assembly
(See Note)
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Damper Assemblies
The optional damper assemblies described in this section
normally are ordered with factory-installed actuators and
linkages. The following sections describe operation and
linkage adjustment of the factory option.
Economizer Dampers
Outside air intake is provided on both sides of the unit, and the
return air path is at the center of the damper set. As the single
actuator modulates the outside air dampers open, the return air
dampers close. Exhaust air exits the unit through the gravity
relief dampers provided at the end of the economizer section.
The outside air return air damper assembly (economizer)
comes with manually adjustable linkage. This adjustable
linkage also can be used for connecting a damper operator.
The damper is set so that the crankarm moves through a 90degree angle to bring the economizer dampers from full open
to full close (see Figure 45). Access to the actuator and linkage
is from the filler section. Mechanical stops are placed in the
crankarm mounting bracket. Do not remove stops. Driving the
crankarm past the stops results in damage to the linkage or
damper. The unit ships with a shipping bolt securing the
linkage crankarm. Remove shipping bolt before use.
Note: For good airflow control, adjust linkages so damper
blades do not open beyond 70 degrees. Opening a
damper blade beyond 70 degrees has little effect on its
airflow.
Do not “over close” low leak damper blades. The edge
seal should just lightly contact the adjoining blade. The
blades will lock up if they are closed so far the seal goes
over center.
Figure 45. Economizer dampers
Outside
Air
Optional Return Air Fan
Economizer
Outside
Air
Shaft .500 Dia.
x 1.50 Long
90
OA
Stroke
Open
OA
Closed
OA
Closed
90
Stroke
OA
Open
.25" (6mm)
.25
3.00
.500 (13mm) Dia. Shaft
x 1.30" (33mm) Long
.75
RDS 800C & 802C
McQuay IM 487-4
RAH 047C - 077C
39
Introduction
Intake Hood Damper (0% to 100% outside air, RAH
47–77 only)
Figure 47. Intake hood damper adjustment, 0% to 100%
outside air
Units requiring 100% outside air are provided with a rain hood
and dampers that can be controlled by a single actuator. The
actuator provides two-position control for opening the
dampers fully during unit operation and closing the dampers
during the off cycle. No unit mounted exhaust dampers are
provided.
AIRFLOW
Intake Hood Damper (0% to 30% outside air)
These dampers are intended to remain at a fixed position
during unit operation, providing fresh air quantities from 0 to
30% of the total system airflow, depending on the damper
setting. This setting is made at the linkage rod on units with
manually adjustable linkages.
On units provided with MicroTech II controls, the damper
position may be set at the controller keypad. During unit
operation, the two-position actuator drives the damper to the
position set on the keypad. During the off cycle, the damper is
automatically closed.
No unit-mounted exhaust dampers are provided with this
option.
Figure 46. Intake hood damper, 0% to 30% outside air
A
l
ir f
90°
Stroke
o w
OA
Closed
OA
Open
.25" (6mm)
3 .1 5 " (8 0 m m )
M a x . S tro k e o f
D a m p e r L in k a g e B a r
Note: Figure 46 shows the RAH 47–77 (The linkage is on the
RH side). The RDS 800–802 are the same except the
linkage is on the LH side.
40
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Mixing Box (RAH 47–77 only)
This section uses an outside air damper and a return air
damper. Using these dampers allows outside air to blend with
return air. Synchronized operation of the dampers is
accomplished by interconnecting rods. As one damper section
opens, the other section is closed. A total of 100% cfm is
always drawn from this section. Damper positioning can be
manually or automatically adjusted. With a field-installed
controller, automatic operation can be obtained.
These dampers provide a similar function to economizer
dampers. This option differs from an economizer in that no
unit mounted exhaust dampers are provided.
Note: For good airflow control, adjust linkages so damper
blades do not open beyond 70 degrees. Opening a
damper blade beyond 70 degrees has little effect on its
airflow. Do not “over close” low leak damper blades.
The edge seal should just lightly contact the adjoining
blade. The blades lock up if they are closed so far that
the seal goes over center.
Figure 48. Mixing box
90
STROKE
OA
OPEN
OA
CLOSED
.25" (6 mm)
OA
CLOSED
.75"
(19 mm)
OA
OPEN
McQuay IM 487-4
3.00"
(76 mm)
41
Introduction
Face and Bypass Dampers
Face and bypass dampers are available in a flat arrangement
for use with heating coils and standard face area cooling coils,
as well as a staggered arrangement for large face area cooling
coils. The damper sets are linked through a jack shaft for
connection to a single actuator (factory or field installed).
Figure 49. Face and bypass dampers, RDS 800–802 only
Airflow
Face Dampers
Open
Face and
Bypass
Damper
.75"
(19mm)
90
Stroke
3.00"
(76mm)
Face Dampers
Closed
Figure 50. Face and bypass dampers, staggered arrangement–RAH 47–77 only
Face Damper
Open
90
Stroke
.25"
(6mm)
Closed
.75"
(19mm)
3.00"
(76mm)
Airflow
Bypass Damper
42
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Figure 51. Face and bypass dampers, flat arrangement—RAH 47–77 only
Optional
Contractor
Coil
Face and Bypass
Damper
Extended
Shaft
Face and Bypass
Dampers
Cabinet Weather Protection
This unit ships from the factory with fully gasketed access
doors and cabinet caulking to provide weather resistant
operation. After the unit is set in place, inspect all door gaskets
for shipping damage and replace if necessary.
Protect the unit from overhead runoff from overhangs or other
such structures.
Recaulk field-assembled options such as external piping or
vestibules per the installation instructions provided with the
option.
CAUTION
Transportation, rigging, or maintenance can damage the unit’s
weather seal. Periodically inspect the unit for leakage. Standing
moisture can promote microbial growth, disease, or damage to
the equipment and building.
McQuay IM 487-4
43
Introduction
Installing Ductwork
On bottom-supply/bottom-return units if a McQuay roof curb
is not used, installing contractor should make an airtight
connection by attaching field fabricated duct collars to the
bottom surface of either the roof curb’s duct flange or the
unit’s duct opening. Do not support the total weight of the duct
work from the unit or these duct flanges. See Figure 52.
Units with optional back return, side discharge, or end
discharge all have duct collars provided. To expose the
discharge duct collars on a side discharge unit, remove the
plenum section access door and the door gasketing.
Use flexible connections between the unit and ductwork to
avoid transmission of vibration from the unit to the structure.
To minimize losses and sound transmission, design duct work
per ASHRAE and SMACNA recommendations.
Where return air ducts are not required, connect a sound
absorbing T or L section to the unit return to reduce noise
transmission to the occupied space.
WARNING
Mold can cause personal injury. Materials such as gypsum wall
board can promote mold growth when damp. Such materials
must be protected from moisture that can enter units during
maintenance or normal operation.
Ductwork exposed to outdoor conditions must be built in
accordance with ASHRAE and SMACNA recommendations
and local building codes.
NOTICE
Installer must provide access in the ductwork for
plenum-mounted controls.
Once duct work is installed in units with side discharge, access
to plenum-mounted components is difficult.
Figure 52. Installing duct work
U n it D u c t O p e n in g
U n it B a s e
9 .7 6 "
4 .5 8 "
F le x ib le
C o n n e c to r
D u c tw o rk
44
D u c t F la n g e r
in R o o f C u r b
R o o f C u rb
McQuay IM 487-4
Introduction
Installing Duct Static Pressure Sensor Taps
Figure 53. Static pressure tubing entrance location
For all VAV units, duct static pressure taps must be field
installed and connected to the pressure sensors in the unit.
Sensor SPS1 is standard; additional sensor SPS2 is optional.
These sensors are located in the main control panel (see
“Control Panel” on page 8).
Carefully locate and install the duct static pressure sensing tap.
Improperly locating or installing the sensing tap causes
unsatisfactory operation of the entire variable air volume
system. Below are pressure tap location and installation
recommendations.The installation must comply with local
code requirements
1 Install a tee fitting with a leak-tight removable cap in each
Static pressure
tubing
tube near the sensor fitting. This facilitates connecting a
manometer or pressure gauge if testing is required.
2 Use different colored tubing for the duct pressure (HI) and
reference pressure (LO) taps, or tag the tubes. McQuay
recommends ¼" plastic tubing.
3 Locate the duct pressure (HI) tap near the end of a long
duct to ensure that all terminal box take-offs along the run
have adequate static pressure.
4 Locate the duct tap in a nonturbulent flow area of the duct.
Keep it several duct diameters away from take-off points,
bends, neckdowns, attenuators, vanes, or other
irregularities.
Figure 54. Pressure sensing tubing installation
Main Control Panel
5 Use a static pressure tip (Dwyer A302 or equivalent) or the
bare end of the plastic tubing for the duct tap. (If the duct is
lined inside, use a static pressure tip device.)
6 Install the duct tap so that it senses only static pressure (not
velocity pressure). If a bare tube end is used, it must be
smooth, square (not cut at an angle) and perpendicular to
the airstream (see Figure 54).
"HI line"
"LO" line
SPS1
Roof
7 Locate the reference pressure (LO) tap somewhere near the
duct pressure tap within the building (see Figure 53). If the
reference tap is not connected to the sensor, unsatisfactory
operation will result.
Remote Sense Point
8 Route the tubes between the curb and the supply duct, and
feed them into the unit through the knockout in the bottom
of the control panel (see Figure 53). Connect the tubes to
appropriate barbed fittings in the control panel. (Fittings are
sized to accept ¼" plastic tubing.)
To Sensor
"HI" input
Ductwork
(Remote Location)
Rubber
Grommet
Tubing Extends
thru Approx. 1/8"
To Sensor
"LO" Input
Pressure Sensing
Tubing
McQuay IM 487-4
45
Introduction
Installing Building Static Pressure Sensor
Taps
If a unit has direct building static pressure control capability,
you must field install and connect static pressure taps to
pressure sensor SPS2 in the unit. This sensor is located at the
bottom of the main control panel next to terminal block TB2
(see “Control Panel Locations” in the “Unit Description”
section of this manual).
Carefully locate and install the two static pressure sensing
taps. Improper location or installation of the sensor taps causes
unsatisfactory operation. Below are pressure tap location and
installation recommendations for both building envelope and
lab, or “space within a space” pressure control applications.
The installation must comply with local code requirements.
CAUTION
Fragile sensor fittings.
If you must remove tubing from a pressure sensor fitting, use
care. Do not use excessive force or wrench the tubing back and
forth to remove or the fitting can break off and damage sensor.
Building Pressurization Applications
1 Install a tee fitting with a leak-tight removable cap in each
tube near the sensor fitting. This facilitates connecting a
manometer or pressure gauge if testing is required.
2 Locate the building pressure (HI) tap in the area that
requires the closest control. Typically, this is a ground level
floor that has doors to the outside.
3 Locate the building tap so it is not influenced by any source
of moving air (velocity pressure). These sources may
include air diffusers or outside doors.
4 Route the building tap tube between the curb and the
supply duct and feed it into the unit through the knockout in
the bottom of the control panel (see Figure 53). Connect the
tube to the ¼-inch HI fitting for sensor SPS2.
6 Use an outdoor static pressure tip (Dwyer A306 or
equivalent) to minimize the adverse effects of wind. Place
some type of screen over the sensor to keep out insects.
Loosely packed cotton works well.
7 Route the outdoor tap tube out of the main control panel
through a small field-cut opening in the edge of the control
wiring raceway cover (see Figure 53 on page 45). Cut this
“mouse hole” in the vertical portion of the edge. Seal the
penetration to prevent water from entering. Connect tube to
the ¼-inch LO fitting for sensor SPS2.
Lab Pressurization Applications
1 Install a “T” fitting with a leak-tight removable cap in each
tube near the sensor fitting. This facilitates connecting a
manometer or pressure gauge if testing is required.
2 Use different colored tubing for the controlled space
pressure (HI) and reference pressure (LO) taps, or tag the
tubes.
3 Regardless whether the controlled space is positive or
negative with respect to its reference, locate the HI pressure
tap in the controlled space. (The setpoint can be set
between -0.2 and 0.2" w.c.)
4 Locate the reference pressure (LO) tap in the area
surrounding the controlled space. Not locating the
reference tap to the sensor results in unsatisfactory
operation.
5 Locate both taps so they are not influenced by any source
of moving air (velocity pressure). These sources may
include air diffusers or doors between the high and low
pressure areas.
6 Route the building tap tube between the curb and the
supply duct and feed it into the unit through the knockout in
the bottom of the control panel (see Figure 53).
7 Connect the tube to the ¼-inch HI fitting for sensor SPS2.
5 Locate the reference pressure (LO) tap on the roof. Keep it
away from the condenser fans, walls, or anything else that
may cause air turbulence. Mount it high enough above the
roof so it is not affected by snow. Not connecting the
reference tap to the sensor results in unsatisfactory
operation.
46
McQuay IM 487-4
Electrical Installation
Electrical Installation
Field Power Wiring
All of the unit side panels are hinged. Do not mount disconnect
switches and/or motor starters on panels that provide access to
internal components. Wiring conduits can penetrate the cabinet
bottom, base frame, or through the hinge and latch cap without
interfering with the access panels.
Note: All holes cut into the unit must be sealed to prevent
water leakage.
Seal conduits connecting the unit to external panels, which
will be exposed to relative humidity and air pressure
differentials. Ground the motor using copper or other corrosion
resistant conductor.
Figure 55. Field power wiring
overload. Before replacing a fuse, circuit breaker, MMP, or
restarting a fan motor, identify the trouble and correct.
According to the National Electrical Code, a disconnecting
means shall be located within sight of and readily accessible
from the air conditioning equipment. The unit can be ordered
with an optional factory mounted disconnect switch. This
switch is not fused. Power leads must be over-current
protected at the point of distribution. The maximum allowable
overcurrent protection (MROPD) appears on the unit
nameplate.
All RDS and RAH Units
All units are provided with internal power wiring for single or
dual point power connection. The power block or an optional
disconnect switch is located within the main control panel.
Field power leads are brought into the unit through 3"
knockouts in the bottom of the main control panel. Refer to the
unit nameplate to determine the number of power connections.
See Figure 56 and Table 13 on page 49.
WARNING
Access
Panels
Hazardous voltage. Can cause severe injury or death.
Disconnect electric power before servicing equipment. More
than one disconnect may be required to de-energize the unit.
Hinge and
Latch Cap
Top
If the unit has a factory mounted disconnect switch, generally
the switch must be turned off to open the main control panel
door. However, the door can be opened without disconnecting
power by following the procedure covered on page 110. If this
is done, use caution since power is not removed from the unit
or the controller.
Note: To wire entry points, refer to certified drawings for
dimensions.
Bottom
Figure 56. RDS and RAH power wiring connections
Must Seal
Access
Panel
Electric heat
control panel
Optional
disconnect
(DS3)
Base
Frame
Bottom
Wiring must comply with all applicable codes and ordinances.
The warranty is voided if wiring is not in accordance with
these specifications. An open fuse, tripped circuit breaker, or
Manual Motor Protector (MMP) indicates a short, ground, or
McQuay IM 487-4
3" power
knockouts
Optional
disconnect (DS2)
Main disconnect (DS1)
or power block (PB1)
3" power
knockouts
47
Electrical Installation
• The preferred entrance for power cables is through the
bottom knockouts provided on the unit. If side entrance is
the only option, a drilling location is provided.
Figure 57. Optional side power wiring entrance
3 " (7 6 m m )
M a x D ia .
CAUTION
M a in
C o n tro l
P a n e l
Wires are located in base rail. Move wires before drilling hole
through base rail.
2 .7 5 "
(7 0 m m )
The drilling dimensions must be followed exactly to prevent
damage to the control panel. The dimensions provided are the
only possible point of side entrance for the power cables.
1 6 "
(4 0 6 m m )
R e m o v e L iftin g B r a c k e t
(If L o c a te d H e re )
B e fo r e D r illin g H o le
Figure 58. Typical power wire entrance, unit view—RDS 800C shown (actual opening shown on submittal documents)
20.0
Supply air opening
10.0
10.0
3.8
A
C
6.0
1.50 MPT drain
3.8
76.0
94.0
E
3.8
B
C
86.5
12.0
Bottom return
opening
3.8
Varies
based on
options
Detail B
3.0 Dia. K.O.
(Qty 3)
0.9 Dia. K.O.
(Qty 4)
Reference from leaving
air end of section
6.6
7.6
8.8
6.8
11.9
12.9
15.3
17.7
22.3
24.3
48
McQuay IM 487-4
Electrical Installation
All Units
The minimum circuit ampacity (wire sizing amps) is shown on
the unit nameplate. Refer to Table 13 on page 49 for the
recommended number of power wires.
Copper wire is required for all conductors. Size wires in
accordance with the ampacity tables in Article 310 of the
National Electrical Code. If long wires are required, it may be
necessary to increase the wire size to prevent excessive voltage
drop. Wires should be sized for a maximum of 3% voltage
drop. Supply voltage must not vary by more than 10% of
nameplate. Phase voltage imbalance must not exceed 2%.
(Calculate the average voltage of the three legs. The leg with
voltage deviating the farthest from the average value must not
be more than 2% away.) Contact the local power company for
correction of improper voltage or phase imbalance.
CAUTION
Provide proper line voltage and phase balance.
Improper line voltage or excessive phase imbalance constitutes
product abuse. It can cause severe damage to the unit's
electrical components.
• A ground lug is provided in the control panel for each
disconnect or power block. Size grounding conductor in
accordance with Table 250-95 of the National Electrical
Code.
• In compliance with the National Electrical Code, an
electrically isolated 115V circuit is provided in the unit to
supply the factory mounted service receptacle outlet and
optional unit lights. This circuit is powered by a field
connected 15A, 115V power supply. Leads are brought in
through a 7/8" knockout in the bottom of the main control
panel, near the power wire entry point.
Table 12: Multiple point power connection options
Number of
electrical
circuits
Disconnect
designation
2
DS2
2
DS1
DS3
DS1
Location
(see Figure 8 on
page 8)
Load
Supply and return fan Main control panel
motors plus controls
Balance of unit
Main control panel
Electric heat
Electric heat
control panel
Balance of unit
Main control panel
Table 13: Recommended 3-phase power wiring to ensure
disconnects and power blocks mate with power wiring
Wire
gauge
Qty./
pole
10
8
6
4
3
2
1
1/0
2/0
3/0
4/0
250
300
350
400
500
3/0
4/0
250
300
350
400
500
250
300
350
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
Insulation
No. of
Conduit
rating
conduits (trade size, in.)
(°C)
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
1/2
3/4
1
1 1/4
1 1/4
1 1/4
1 1/4
1 1/2
2
2
2
2 1/2
2 1/2
3
3
3
2
2
2 1/2
2 1/2
3
3
3
2 1/2
2 1/2
3
For MCA
up to
(amps)
35
50
65
85
100
115
130
150
175
200
230
255
285
310
335
380
400
460
510
570
620
670
760
765
855
930
1.All wire sizes assume separate conduit for each set of parallel conductors.
2.All wire sizes based on NEC Table 310-16 for 75°C THW wire (copper).
Canadian electrical code wire ampacities may vary.
3.All wire sizes assume no voltage drop for short power leads.
McQuay IM 487-4
49
Electrical Installation
Field Control Wiring
Units are available with several control arrangements which
may require low voltage field wiring. Detailed descriptions of
various field control wiring options and requirements are
included in the “Field Wiring” section of Bulletin No. IM 696,
“MicroTech II Applied Rooftop Unit Controller.” Refer to the
unit wiring diagrams for additional installation information.
Wiring must comply with applicable codes and ordinances.
The warranty is voided if wiring is not in accordance with
these specifications.
All field control wiring connections are made at the class II
terminal block TB2, which is located in the main control panel.
Field wiring connections to the 115 volt receptacle and lights
are made at terminal block TB7, which is located also in the
main control panel. Refer to Figure 59 and “Control Panel” on
page 8. Two 7/8" knockouts are provided for wire entry.
Interconnecting wiring enters the air handler unit through 7/8"
knockouts in the bottom of the main control panel. The
interconnecting wiring is connected to TB4 in the air handler
unit. Refer to Figure 60. A 7/8" knockout is also available in
the end of the unit base as shown in Figure 59.
Note: If a single conduit containing 24V and 115V wiring is
run above the roof line between the air handler and
condensing units, install the 24V wiring as an NEC
Class I wiring system.
Figure 60. Interconnecting control wiring
Main
control
panel
Figure 59. Field control wiring connections
TB4
DS2
PB1/DS1
Main control panel
To
condensing
unit
24V field terminal
block (TB2)
WARNING
Control wiring raceway
cover (remove for access
to harness from main control
box to unit-mounted
control devices)
50
Electrical shock hazard. Can cause severe injury or death.
Connect only low voltage NEC Class II circuits to terminal block
TB2.
Reinstall and secure all protective deadfront panels when the
wiring installation is complete.
McQuay IM 487-4
Preparing Unit for Operation
Preparing Unit for Operation
Figure 63. Fan spring mount adjustment
WARNING
Moving machinery hazard. Can cause severe injury or death.
Before servicing equipment, disconnect power and lock off.
More than one disconnect may be required to de-energize unit.
Figure 61. RAH spring mount hold down fasteners
Leveling
screw
Jam nut
Spring
mount
assembly
Fan base
Cross
channel
3 /8" ± 1 /4"
with fan running
Hold-down
fasteners
* Grossly out-of-adjustment thrust restraints can affect this
dimension. Recheck after thrust restrains are adjusted.74
Adjusting Spring Mounts
During operation, all fans should ride level, with the bottom of
the fan base approximately 3/8" (10mm) above the top of the
unit’s cross channel. Unhoused single-width “plug” fans will
also ride at this level when at rest.
Hold-down
fasteners
WARNING
Spring Isolated Fans
Releasing Spring Mounts
The optional spring-mounted supply and return fans are locked
down for shipment. Hold-down fasteners are located at each
spring mount. Remove these fasteners before operating the
fans. Figure 62 shows a typical spring mount. Note that the
3/8" hold-down bolt securing the fan base to the unit cross
channel must be removed.
After removing the hold-down fasteners, rock the fan assembly
by hand to check for freedom of movement.
Figure 62. Spring mounted hold-down fasteners, all units
This bracket is added,
and these 3/8" tie downs
are used for RDS 800C.
Moving machinery hazard. Can cause severe injury or death.
Start the fans for the first time according to the “Check, Test,
and Start Procedures” on page 94. If this is not done, equipment
damage, severe personal injury, or death can occur.
• When not operating, housed double-width fans ride lower at
the discharge end of the fan base than at the motor end.
When the fan is operating against a static pressure, it should
run level. If not, level the assembly as follows (see
Figure 63):
1 Loosen the 1 5/16" jam nut above the fan base.
2 Using a large, straight blade screwdriver, turn the 5/8"
leveling screw clockwise to lower the fan base,
counterclockwise to raise the fan base.
3 When properly adjusted, retighten the jam nut.
Relief Damper Tie-Down
Economizer sections with a 30" or 40" return fan have a relief
damper that is tied down for shipping. Remove the two
brackets and two screws before operation to allow free
movement of dampers. Access is from inside the economizer
section.
This bracket is added,
and these 3/8" tie downs
are used for RDS 800C.
McQuay IM 487-4
51
Preparing Unit for Operation
Adjusting Scroll Dampers
Figure 65. Thrust restraint adjustment
Two sets of scroll dampers are provided in the housing of the
twin 15" x 6" supply fan to allow control of air volume to each
fan wheel. At the factory, these dampers are fully closed,
unrestricting airflow. If fan paralleling occurs, correct it by
loosening the adjustment screw on top of the fan housing (see
Figure 64) and slightly lowering the rod until air distribution
between the fans is even.
Jam nut A
Fan bulkhead
Nut B
Spring clip Washer
Nut C
Figure 64. Scroll damper adjustment
Jam nut A
Adjustment assembly
Thrust restraint angle
Scroll damper
Fan housing frame
Detail A
See Detail A
Adjusting Supply Fan Thrust Restraints
Thrust restraints are provided when housed double-width fans
are mounted on springs. After the spring mounts are adjusted
for level operation when the fan is running, check the thrust
restraints. With the fan off, set the adjustment nuts so the
spring is slightly compressed against the angle bolted to the
fan housing frame. Refer to Figure 65. When the fan is turned
on, the fan moves back to a level position and the thrust
restraint springs compresses.
Thrust restraint adjustment (with fan off)
1.
2.
3.
4.
52
Loosen jam nuts A.
Turn nut C until spring cup and washer contact thrust restraint angle.
Turn nut B until spring is compressed by two turns of nut B.
Tighten jam nuts A.
McQuay IM 487-4
Preparing Unit for Operation
Adjusting Seismic Restraints
Figure 66. Cross section of seismic restraint
Spring-mounted supply air and return air fans can be ordered
with factory-installed seismic restraints. The system consists
of four snubbers, one located next to each spring isolator.
These snubbers allow free movement of the fan assemblies
during normal operation because normal operation does not
cause fan movements that exceed .25" (6 mm). However, if an
abnormal condition occurs, they restrain the fan assembly and
limit movement to .25" (6 mm) in any direction.
The position the fan assumes during normal operation is
determined by actual job site airflow and static pressure.
Therefore, for proper operation, field adjust the seismic
restraints as part of the normal “Check, Test and Start”
procedure. When the fan is operating in a normal manner,
there should be no contact between the snubber restrainer
angle and the snubber neoprene bumper. However, in a
“seismic event,” the snubber limits movement of the spring
mounted fan assembly to .25" (6 mm) in any direction, thereby
helping to prevent the fan from being tossed about and
damaged, or causing damage.
When a seismic restraint is properly adjusted and the fan is
operating normally, the neoprene center bumper is centered
within the 2" (51 mm) diameter hole in the restrainer angle,
and the restrainer angle is centered vertically between the
flanges of the neoprene center bumper. This results in .25"
(6 mm) clearance in all directions. When the fan is turned off,
the restrainer angle may come to rest on the neoprene center
bumper.
McQuay IM 487-4
Fan base channel
Snubber restrainer angle
Adjust up or down
or back and forth
Snubber neoprene
bumper
.25 (6 mm) gap
(fan running)
Snubber neoprene
bumper
Adjust in and out
The seismic restraint is adjustable in all directions. Vertical
slots in the restrainer angle and horizontal slots in the blower
base allow the restrainer angle to be adjusted up and down and
back and forth. The neoprene center bumper is mounted on a
slotted hole allowing in and out adjustment.
Removing the neoprene center bumper bolt allows removal,
disassembly, and replacement of the neoprene components.
53
Sequences of Operation
Sequences of Operation
The following sequences of operation are for a typical “C”
vintage applied rooftop unit equipped with MicroTech II, an
economizer, 3 to 1 turn down burner, variable frequency drives
(VFD), a return air fan and an external time clock. These
sequences describe the ladder wiring diagram logic in detail;
refer to “Wiring Diagrams” on page 57 as you read them. Note
that your unit’s sequences of operation may vary from those
described here. Refer to the wiring diagrams supplied with the
unit for exact information.
For detailed description of operation information relating to
the MicroTech II controller's software, refer to the appropriate
operation manual (see Table 1 on page 1). These manuals
describe the various setpoints, parameters, operating states,
and control algorithms that affect rooftop unit operation.
Power-up
When primary power is connected to the unit, 115VAC power
is fed through control circuit transformer T1 and control circuit
fuse F1C (line 168) to compressor crankcase heaters HTR-1,
HTR-2, HTR-3 and HTR-4 (lines 815, 848, 820, and 853).
When system switch S1 (line 203) is closed, low voltage
transformers T2 (line 203), T3 (line 301)and T9 (line 802)
energize, and 115VAC power is supplied to the following:
• Smoke detectors (lines 265 and 267)
• Economizer actuator ACT3 (line 313)
Transformer T2 supplies 24VAC power to terminals 24V and
COM on the main control board MCB (lines 207 and 208).
Transformer T2 supplies 24VAC power to the following:
• Switch S7 On-Auto-Off (line 217)
• Enthalpy sensor OAE (line 250)
• External time clock contacts (line 215)
• External exhaust fan status contacts (line 257, VAV only)
• Airflow interlock switch PC7 (line 228)
• Dirty filter switches PC5 and PC6 (lines 242 and 247)
• Duct high limit switch DHL (line 260, VAV only)
• Gas furnace alarm relay R24 (line 225)
• Freezestat switch FS1 (line 231, hot water or steam heat
only)
• Smoke detectors SD1 and SD2 (line 237)
When the field supplied Cool Enable switch is in the OFF
position, field wiring terminal TB2 105 de-energizes (line
220). Binary input MCB-BI3 de-energizes and the cooling is
disabled. When the field supplied Heat Enable switch is in the
OFF position, field wiring terminal TB2 106 de-energizes (line
223). Binary input MCB-BI4 de-energizes and the heating is
disabled.
Note: Unit ships with factory installed jumpers between TB2
101 and 105 and between 101 and 106.
• M30A to energize the supply fan VFD (line 426)
• M40A to energize the return fan VFD (line 430)
• Heating control panel (line 603)
• Compressor circuit switches CS1 and CS2 (lines 805 and
838)
54
McQuay IM 487-4
Sequences of Operation
Fan Operation
Economizer Operation
When the main control board (MCB) commands the supply
and return fans to start, the unit enters the Startup operating
state. As a result, a 3-minute timer is set, output MCB-BO3
(line 307) energizes, and relay R26 energizes (line 306).
When the outdoor air is suitable for free cooling, the switch in
enthalpy sensor OAE is in position “3” (line 252) energizing
binary input MCB-BI11. When MCB-BI11 energizes, the
economizer is enabled. (Note: If selected from the keypad, the
enthalpy decision can be made based on outdoor temperature.
In that condition, if the outdoor air temperature is less than or
equal to the changeover set point, the economizer is enabled.)
If cooling is required, the economizer dampers (ACT3) are
modulated to maintain the discharge air temperature setpoint.
When energized, output MCB-BO6 drives the outdoor air
dampers toward the open position; MCB-BO5 drives them
toward the closed (line 318).If the outdoor air dampers are
wide open and more cooling is required, the dampers hold
their positions and mechanical cooling is activated (see
below).
After the 3-minute timer expires, the unit enters the Recirc
operating state. As a result, output MCB-BO1 energizes relay
R67 (line 401). This gives a start signal to supply fan drive
AFD10 (line 445). Four seconds after MCB-BO1 is energized,
output MCB-BO2 energizes relay R68 (line 404). This gives a
start signal to return fan drive AFD20 (line 445).
Within 120 seconds after the fans start, the controller expects
airflow switch PC7 (line 228) to close and thus energize binary
input MCB-BI6. (If MCB-BI6 does not energize, the controller
assumes the fans did not start. It then shuts down the unit and
generates an alarm.)
During the Recirc operating state, the outside air damper is
held closed. The controller does this by energizing output
MCB-BO5 (line 318). On VAV units, output MCB-BO12, the
VAV box output, is also de-energized (line 309) during the
Recirc state.
When the outdoor air is not suitable for free cooling, the
switch in enthalpy sensor OAE is in position “1,”
de-energizing binary input MCB-BI11 (Alternatively, the
outdoor air temperature is above the changeover setpoint plus
the economizer changeover differential). When the economizer
is disabled, the dampers are held at their minimum position.
The supply fan adjustable frequency drive (AFD10) is
modulated to maintain the duct static pressure setpoint. When
energized, output MCB-BO14 (line 407) drives AFD10 toward
increased capacity; MCB-BO13 (line 405) drives it toward
decreased capacity.On VAV units or CAV units equipped with
return fan capacity control, the adjustable frequency drive
(AFD20) is modulated to maintain an acceptable building
static pressure (using either VaneTrol logic or direct
measurement of building pressure; see the appropriate OM for
more information). When energized, output MCB-BO16 (line
409) drives AFD20 toward increased capacity; MCB-BO15
(line 411) drives them toward decreased capacity.
Note: If the inverter bypass switch S4 (lines426 and 430) is in
the bypass position, MMP30 and MMP40 (line 132 and
144) protect the fans from excessive current draw. If
either the supply or return fan is drawing excessive
current, one of the MMPs triggers an auxiliary contacts
(line 426) and open the circuit, causing both fans to
stop.
McQuay IM 487-4
55
Sequences of Operation
Heating
Gas Furnace, Modulating Burner (3 to 1 turn down)
Refer to “Standard Mod, furnace control (1000 MBH)” on
page 78 as you read this sequence of operation. Note that the
gas furnace wiring diagrams supplied with the units include a
detailed sequence of operation. Refer to the wiring diagram
supplied with the unit for exact wiring and sequence of
operation information.
When system switch S1 is closed, 115 VAC power is supplied
to the furnace control circuit. If burner switch S3 and safeties
HL22, HL23 are closed (line 603), terminal 5 (line 609) on the
flame safeguard control (FSG) energizes as does the
modulating gas valve VM1. If heating is enabled (MCB-BI4 is
energized—line 223) and heating is required, the MCB-BO11
energizes relay R20 (line 413). The normally open R20
contacts (line 603) close, and if manual burner switch S3 and
safeties HL22, HL23, FLC (high limit switch) (line 603), LP5,
and HP5 are closed (optional, not shown on page 78), terminal
6 (line 618) on the flame safeguard control (FSG) energizes.
FSG energizes terminal 4 to start the blower motor (BM) (line
609) through contactor M29 on large burners. If the blower is
operational, air switch AS (line 621) closes and makes
electrical continuity from FSG terminal 6 to 7. After a 90second prepurge period, FSG terminals 8 (line 613) and 10
(line 621) energize. As a result, ignition transformer IT and
pilot gas valve GV1 energize. The pilot flame ignites and is
detected by FSG through flame rod FD (line 612). Upon
detection of pilot flame after the 10-second trial for ignition
period, the FSG de-energizes terminal 10 and energizes
terminal 9 to energize main gas valves GV2 and GV3 (lines
617, 619) and low fire start relay R23 (line 624). The R23
contacts (lines 632 and 633) allow the MCB to modulate gas
valve actuator VM1 as required to satisfy the heating demand.
When heating is no longer necessary, MCB-BO11 opens,
de-energizing relay R20 and opening its contacts (line 603). As
a result, the flame safeguard control de-energizes, all gas
valves close, the combustion air blower motor stops, and gas
valve actuator VM1 closes. If the furnace is warm enough to
close it, the FLC fan controls switch (line 602) overrides
supply fan start/stop output MCB-BO1 through R25 (line 402)
and keeps the supply fan running until the furnace cools down
(this might happen during night setback operation).
If the furnace overheats, the FLC high limit control (line 603)
cycles the burner, preventing the furnace temperature from
exceeding the limit control’s setpoint. When the furnace cycles
off, low fire start relay R23 de-energizes. The normally closed
R23 contacts (line 633) cause VM1 to drive to its minimum
position, overriding MicroTech II control of VM1 via
MCB-BO10 and MCB-BO9. Because relay R23 de-energizes
whenever GV2 de-energizes, the burner always starts at low
fire.
Safety Lockout
If the pilot flame does not ignite or the flame safeguard fails to
detect its flame within 10 seconds, the flame safeguard control
enters the “safety lockout” state. FSG terminals 4, 8,9 and 10
de-energize and the burner shuts down. FSG terminal 3
energizes relay R24 (line 610). The R24 contacts (line 225)
signal the controller that the problem exists by energizing the
input to MCB-BI5. If a safety lockout occurs, manually reset
the flame safeguard control.
Whenever the burner is operating, its firing rate is determined
by the position of gas valve actuator VM1. This actuator
modulates the butterfly gas valve and combustion air damper,
thus varying the furnace firing rate between 33% and 100% of
full capacity. When the MCB-BO10 energizes (line 634), VM1
modulates toward open and the firing rate increases. When
MCB-BO9 energizes (line 633), VM1 modulates toward
closed and the firing rate decreases. When both MCB-BO10
and MCB-BO9 are open, VM1 holds its position and the firing
rate remains constant.
56
McQuay IM 487-4
Wiring Diagrams
Wiring Diagrams
Legend
ID
ACT3, 4
ACT5
ACT6
ACT7
ACT8
ACT10,
11
ACT12
AFD10
AFD11
AFD20
AFD60
AS
BM
C10
C20
CB10
CB11
CB20
CB60
CCB1, 2
CPC
CPR
DAT
DFLH
DFRH
DHL
DS1
DS2
DS3
EAT
EFT
EHB1
ID
Description
Actuator motor, economizer
Actuator motor, discharge
isolation damper
Actuator motor, return air
isolation damper
Actuator motor, heat face/
bypass
Actuator motor, cool face/
Bypass
Actuator motor, exhaust
dampers
Actuator motor, enthalpy wheel
bypass damper
Adjustable frequency drive,
supply fan
Adjustable frequency drive,
evap cond. fans
Adjustable frequency drive,
return/exhaust fan
Adjust. freq. drive, energy
recovery wheel(s)
Airflow switch, burner blower
Burner blower motor
Power factor capacitors,
supply fan
Power factor capacitors, return
fan
Circuit breaker, supply fan
Circuit breaker, evaporative
condenser fan(s)
Circuit breaker, return/ exhaust
fan
Circuit breaker, energy
recovery wheel
Compressor control boards,
refrig. circuits
Circuit board, main, micro
controller
Circuit board, expansion, micro
controller
Discharge air temperature
sensor
Design flow lefthand sensor
Design flow righthand sensor
Duct hi-limit
Disconnect, total unit or cond/
heat
Disconnect, SAF/RAF/controls
Disconnect, electric heat
Exhaust air temperature
sensor
Entering fan air temperature
sensor
Staged electric heat board
McQuay IM 487-4
Standard location
ERB1
ERM1
Economizer section
Discharge section
ERM2
Return section
F1A, B
Coil section, heat
F1C
Coil section, cool
F2
Return section
F3
FB31–40
Energy recovery section
FB41–50
AFD/supply fan section
Main/RCE control box
AFD/ret. ex. fan section
Energy recovery section
Gas heat box
Heat section, gas
Supply Fan section
Return section
Main control box
Main/cond. control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Discharge section
Return section
Return section
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Electric heat box
Energy recovery section
Supply fan section
Main control box
FD
FLC
FP1, 2
FS1, 2
FSG
GCB1
GFR1, 2
GFS1, 2
GRD
GV1
GV2
GV3
GV4–8
HL1–10
HL11–20
HL22
HL23
HL31–40
HL41–50
HP5
HS1
HS3
HTR65
HTR66
HUM1
IT
LAT
LP5
LR10
LR20
LS1, 2
LT10–23
Description
Energy recovery board
Energy recovery wheel motor
#1
Energy recovery wheel motor
#2
Fuse, control circuit
transformer (T1), primary
Fuse, control circuit
transformer (T1), secondary
Fuse, control circuit
transformer (T2), primary
Fuse, burner blower motor
Fuseblock, electric heat (top
bank)
Fuseblock, electric heat (bot.
bank)
Flame detector
Fan limit control
Frost protection, refrig. circuits
Freezestat control
Flame safeguard
Generic condenser board,
refrig. circ.
Ground fault relay
Ground fault sensor
Ground
Gas valve, pilot
Gas valve, main/safety
Gas valve, redundant/safety
Gas valve, main, hi turn down
Hi-limits, pwr, elec heaters (top
bank)
Hi-limits, pwr, elec heaters
(bot. bank)
Hi-limits, gas heat (pre-filters)
Hi-limits, gas heat (final filters)
Hi-limits, ctl. elec heaters (top
bank)
Hi-limits, ctl. elec heaters (bot.
bank)
Hi-pressure controls, gas
Heat switch, electric heat
shutdown
Heat switch, electric heat
deadfront interlock
Heater, sump
Heater, vestibule
Humidstat sensor
Ignition transformer
Leaving air temperature sensor
Low-pressure control, gas
Line Reactor, supply fan
Line reactor, return/exhaust fan
Limit switch, low fire, high fire
Light, cabinet sections
Standard location
Main control box
Energy recovery section
Energy recovery section
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Electric heat box
Electric heat box
Heat section, gas
Heat section, gas
Coil section, cool
Coil section, heat/cool
Gas heat box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
All control boxes
Heat section, gas
Heat section, gas
Heat section, gas
Heat section, gas
Heat section, electric
Heat section, electric
Supply fan section
Final filter section
Heat section, electric
Heat section, electric
Heat section, gas
Main control box
Electric heat box
Evap. condenser section
Evap. condenser vestibule
Energy recovery section
Gas heat box
Energy recovery section
Heat section, gas
Inverter bypass box
Inv. bypass/main cont. box
Gas heat box
Supply fan section
57
Wiring Diagrams
ID
M10
M20
M29
M30
M31–39
M40
M41–50
M60
MCB
MJ
MMP1–8
MMP10
MMP11–
18
MMP20
MMP21–
28
MMP30
MMP40
MMP51,
52, 53
MMP60
MP1–6
OAE
OAT
PB1, 2
PB3
PB9, 10
PB11, 12
PB19, 20
PC5
PC6
PC7
PC8
PM1
PVM1, 2
R20
R21, 22
R23
R24
R25
58
Description
Contactor, supply fan
Contactor, return fan
Contactor, burner motor
Contactor, reversing, invertor
bypass, supply fan
Contactor, electric heat (top
bank)
Contactor, reversing, Invertor
Bypass, Return Fan
Contactor, electric heat (bot.
bank)
Contactor, energy recovery
wheel
Microprocessor circuit board
Mechanical Jumper
Manual motor protector,
compressors
Manual motor protector, supply
fan
Manual motor protector, cond.
fans, ckt#1
Manual motor protector, return
fan
Manual motor protector, cond.
fans, ckt#2
Manual motor protector, invrtr.
bypass, sup. fan
Manual motor protector, invrtr.
bypass, ret. fan
Manual motor protector,
exhaust fan(s)
Manual motor protector,
energy recovery wheel
Motor protector, compr.#1-6
Outside air enthalpy sensor
Outside air temperature sensor
Power block, power distribution
Power block, power
distribution, electric heat
Power block, supply fan
Power block, power distribution
Power block, return/exhaust
fan
Pressure control, clogged filter
Pressure control, clogged final
filter
Pressure control, proof airflow
Pressure control, minimum
airflow
Phone modem
Phase voltage monitor
Relay, Heat, gas/ steam/ hot
water
Relay, heat, gas (hi-turn down)
Relay, heat, gas & electric
Relay, heat alarm, gas
Relay, heat, gas, start supply
fan inverter
Standard location
Main control box
Main control box
Gas heat box
Inverter bypass box
ID
R26
R28
R29
R30
Electric heat box
Inverter bypass box
R45
R46, 47
Electric heat box
R48, 49
Main control box
R58,59
Main control box
All control boxes
Main/cond. control box
R60
Main control box
R62, 63,
65
R66
Main/cond. control box
Main control box
Main/cond. control box
Inverter bypass box
Inverter bypass box
Prop exhaust box
Main control box
On compressors
Economizer section
Economizer section
Main control box
Electric heat box
Junction box, split unit
Main control box
Junction box, split unit
Pre filter section
Final filter section
Supply fan section
Coil section, cool
R61
R67
R68
R69
R70–79
RAE
RAT
REC1
REC3
REC10–
23
S1
S3
S4
S7
S10–23
S40–45
SD1
SD2
SPS1, 2
SR1-3
T1
T2
Main control box
Main control box
Gas heat/main cont. box
T3
T4
Gas heat box
Gas/electric heat box
Main control box
Main control box
T5
T6
Description
Relay, isol/exh. dampers,
open/close
Relay, isolation damper, safety
Relay, remote fire alarm
Relay, cool valve with face
bypass
Relay, UV lights
Relay, supply fan inverter, incr/
decr
Relay, return fan inverter, incr/
decr
Relay, heat wheel inverter, incr/
decr
Relay, energy recovery wheel,
enable
Relay, smoke detector,
discharge air
Relay, use on specials
Relay, smoke detector, return
air
Relay, supply fan, enable
Relay, return fan, enable
Relay, Inv. bypass VAV box
interlock
Relay, use on specials
Return air enthalpy sensor
Return air temperature sensor
Receptacle, main box
Receptacle, field power, 115V
Receptacle, cabinet sections
Switch, system on/off
Switch, furnace on/off
Switch, inverter bypass, on/ off
Switch, local on/auto/off to
controller
Switches, cabinet section lights
Switches, door interlock, UV
lights
Smoke detector, supply
Smoke detector, return
Static pressure sensors, duct/
building
Sequencing relays, electric
heat
Transformer, main control (line/
115VAC)
Transformer, control input (115/
24VAC)
Transformer, control output
(115/24VAC)
Transformer, exh. damper
actuator (115/12VDC)
Transformer, electric heat
Transformer, dew point
controller (115/24VAC)
Standard location
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Return section
Return section
Main control box
Discharge bulkhead
Cabinet sections
Main control box
Gas heat box
Main control box
Main control box
Cabinet sections
Cabinet sections
Discharge section
Return section
Main control box
Electric heat box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Electric heat box
Main control box
McQuay IM 487-4
Wiring Diagrams
ID
Description
T9
TB1
TB2
TB3
TB4
TB7
Transformer, refrig. circuit 24V
Terminal block, internal
Terminal block, field
Terminal blocks, factory
Terminal block, RFS, field
Terminal block, 115V
convenience outlet, field
TB11
Terminal block, heat
TB25, 26, Terminal block, split unit
27, 28
junction box
TD5–8
Time delay, part winding,
compr #1 - 4
TD10
Time delay, hi turn down burner
TR1, 2
Transducer, pressure
UV
Ultra-violet light(s)
VM1
Valve motor #1, heating
VM5
Valve motor #5, cooling
VV1
Vent valve, gas heat
ZNT1
Zone temp. sensor, setback
Standard location
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Main control box
Heat control box
Junction box, split unit
Main control box
Gas heat box
Main control box
Coil/discharge section
Gas heat box/ heat section
Coil section, cool
Heat Section, Gas
Field installed
General Notes
1.
Field wiring
2.
Factory wiring
3.
Shielded wire/cable
4.
Main control box
terminals
5.
Auxilliary box
terminals
6.
Field terminals
7.
Plug connector
8.
200/ H200
Wire/harness number
WN7
9.
McQuay IM 487-4
Wire nut/ID
59
60
134
133
132
131
130
129
128
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
119
118
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
109
108
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
CUSTOMER
SUPPLIED
POWER
ELECTRICAL
CIRCUIT #1
G
L3
L2
L1
GLG1
T3B
T3A
T2B
T2A
T1B
T1A
DS1
(Schematic continues on next page.)
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 67. Power package only, main power
McQuay IM 487-4
McQuay IM 487-4
170
169
168
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
159
158
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
149
148
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
139
138
137
136
135
108
T3-1
T2-1
T1-1
168A
151
150
149
139
138
137
/2.00
T1_115VAC
DS1
108
T3-5
T2-5
T1-5
DS1
108
T3-3
T2-3
T1-3
DS1
162
1
2
3
4
T3B
L3B
TB1A
T3B
L3B
164
T3A
L3A
T2A
T2B
L2B
L1B
L2A
T1A
T1B
L1A
426
MMP20
T3A
L3A
T2A
T2B
L2B
T1B
L1B
L2A
T1A
426
MMP10
L1A
1
1
1
F1C
F1B
F1A
2
2
2
L3
L2
426
168B
164A
162A
431
M20
L1
L3
L2
L1
M10
T3
T2
T1
T3
T2
T1
H1
X3
H2
X2
H3
X1
H4
T1
TB1A
GRD
5
6
7
8
HRAF-3
HRAF-2
HRAF-1
HSAF-3
HSAF-2
HSAF-1
(Schematic continues on previous page.)
T1_N
168C
/2.00
/4.00
T3
T2
T1
T3
T2
T1
MTR
+NB
RETURN-FAN
MTR
+NB
SUPPLY-FAN
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 68. Power package only, main power, continued
61
243
242
241
240
239
238
237
236
235
234
233
232
231
230
229
228
227
226
225
224
223
222
221
220
219
218
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
209
208
207
206
205
204
203
202
201
T2_115VAC
168A
200
TB2
TB2
1
1
+PP
PL11
228A
2
67
+PP
238A PL11
6
56
S1
+PP
PL21
17
115
16
TB2
7
68
PL11
+PP
4/R-COM
(ECON/OADM)
+NB
ACT3
H
6
H316-7
1-CCW
BLK
H267-1
H237-3
WHT
H267-2
H237-5
H235-6
H
(20VA PILOT DUTY MINIMUM CONTACT RATING)
(CLOSE)
H315-6
H313-1
1
3
RETURN AIR
SMOKE DETEKTOR
+NB
SD2
2-CW
204A
(24 VOLT SIGNAL FROM THE FIELD)
239A
TB7
8
+PP
PL11
2
TB2
TB2
113
1
2
N
G
69
53
TB1D
REC1
23
24
GND29
TB7
TB1B
G
TB2
10
11
12
13
203D
201C
55
228C
TB7
1
3
115V
4
1
T2
TB1B
14
15
16
GRD
2
H265-1
H237-3
H
6
115
16
17
SUPPLY AIR
SMOKE DETEKTOR
+NB
SD1
(24 VOLT SIGNAL FROM THE FIELD)
219A
24V
CLASS 2
+PP
P20
3
2
N
(Schematic continues on next page.)
(OPEN)
H315-8
H313-2
2
228B
+PP
PL11
+PP
PL21 227A
6
5
219
R63
TB2
3
1
DHL
H
201D
CUSTOMER SUPPLIED POWER
115 VAC
201B
238B
/1.68
R63
H265-2
H237-4
H235-5
10
2
4
5
+PP
P20
204B
227B
228D
TB2
TB2
114
54
T1_N
/1.68
168C
62
T1_115VAC
221
426
256
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 69. Power package only, control power
McQuay IM 487-4
McQuay IM 487-4
270
269
268
267
266
265
264
263
262
261
260
259
258
257
256
255
254
253
252
251
250
249
248
247
246
245
244
6
219
R63
7
26OA
13
426
M10
14
(DUCT HI-LIMIT)
256A
260B
256B
(S.A. FAN AUX CONTACT)
108
106
TB2
TB2
104
105
NOTE: THESE CONTACT ARE FOR USE IN A 24 VOLT A.C. CLASS #2 CIRCUIT.
TB2
TB2
(Schematic continues on previous page.)
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 70. Power package only, control power, continued
63
64
142
141
140
139
138
137
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
129
128
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
119
118
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
109
108
107
CUSTOMER
SUPPLIED
POWER
ELECTRICAL
CIRCUIT #1
109
L3-3
L2-3
L1-3
PB11
T1A
GLG1
G
139
138
137
T3B
T3A
T2B
T2A
T1B
L3
L2
L1
DS2
L3
L2
L1
CB10
T3
T2
T1
H139
H138
H137
GND10
135A
134A
133A
C1
B1
A1
+BB
LR10
U1
139A
138A
W1
V1
L3B
GND
440
+NB
AFD10
T3A
T3B
L3A
H140
C2
B2
A2
137A
T2A
T2B
T1B
L2B
L1B
L2A
T1A
426
+BB
MMP30
L1A
W2
V2
U2
(Schematic continues on the next page.)
G
111A
110A
109A
139B
138B
137B
135B
134B
133B
L3B
L3A
L2B
L2A
L1B
L1A
PB11
L1
L3
L2
L1
L3
L2
425
T3
T2
T1
+BB
M30I
427
T3
T2
T1
+BB
M30B
HSAF-3
HSAF-2
HSAF-1
T3
T2
T1
MTR
+NB
SUPPLY-FAN
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 71. VAV fan power (with SAF and RAF VFDs and manual bypass)
McQuay IM 487-4
McQuay IM 487-4
170
169
168
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
159
158
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
149
148
147
146
145
144
143
168A
/2.00
/8.00
T1_115VAC
109
L3-1
L2-1
L1-1
PB11
109
L3-6
L2-6
L1-6
PB11
164
162
151
150
149
164
163
162
L3
L2
L1
CB20
T3
3
2
1
1
2
3
4
H151
H150
TB1A
203
PVM1
T2
T1
H149
1
1
1
F1C
F1B
F1A
2
2
2
115T1/2.00
168B
164A
162A
G
H1
X3
H2
GND20
147A
146A
145A
X2
H3
C1
B1
A1
149A
U1
T1
151A
150A
TB1A
5
6
7
8
GND
440
GRD
W1
V1
L3B
+NB
AFD20
T3A
T3B
L3A
H152
H4
C2
B2
A2
X1
+BB
LR20
T2A
T2B
T1B
L2B
L1B
L2A
T1A
L1A
426
+BB
MMP40
W2
V2
U2
(Schematic continues on the previous page.)
151B
150B
149B
L1
L3
L2
L1
L3
L2
430
T3
T2
T1
+BB
M40I
432
T3
T2
T1
+BB
M40B
HRAF-3
HRAF-2
HRAF-1
T1_N
168C
/2.00
/2.66
/3.00
/4.00
/6.00
/8.00
T3
T2
T1
MTR
+NB
RETURN-FAN
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 72. VAV fan power (with SAF and RAF VFDs and manual bypass), continued
65
66
141
140
139
138
137
136
135
134
133
113
112
111
110
109
108
107
106
109
L3-3
L2-3
L1-3
PB11
CUSTOMER
SUPPLIED
POWER
ELECTRICAL
CIRCUIT #1
139
138
137
426
T3A
T3B
L3A
L3B
T2A
T2B
L2B
T1B
L1B
L2A
T1A
L1A
139A
138A
T1
426
T3
T2
(Schematic continues on next page.)
L3
L2
L1
GLG1
G
M10
111A
T3
L3
137A
110A
T2
L2
MMP10
109A
T1
L1
DS1
HSAF-3
HSAF-2
HSAF-1
L3B
L3A
L2B
L2A
L1B
L1A
PB11
T3
T2
T1
MTR
SUPPLY-FAN
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 73. CV fan power (SAF and RAF)
McQuay IM 487-4
McQuay IM 487-4
170
169
168
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
152
151
150
149
148
147
146
145
144
168A
/2.00
/8.00
T1_115VAC
109
L3-1
L2-1
L1-1
PB11
109
L3-6
L2-6
L1-6
PB11
151
150
149
162
TB1A
1
2
3
4
T3B
L3B
164
T3A
L3A
T2A
T2B
L2B
T1B
L1B
L2A
T1A
426
MMP20
L1A
1
1
1
F1C
F1B
F1A
2
2
2
L3
L2
L1
T3
T2
T1
168B
164A
162A
431
M20
H1
X3
H2
X2
H3
X1
H4
T1
TB1A
GRD
5
6
7
8
(Schematic continues on the previous page.)
HRAF-3
HRAF-2
HRAF-1
T1_N
168C
/2.00
/3.00
/4.00
/8.00
T3
T2
T1
MTR
RETURN-FAN
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 74. CV fan power (SAF and RAF), continued
67
233
232
231
230
229
228
227
226
225
224
223
222
221
220
219
218
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
209
208
207
206
205
204
203
202
201
T1_115VAC
168A
200
1
3
TB2
101
TB_101
4
+PP
PL15
610
R24
5
203A
200A
156
PVM1
4
5
H231-1
1/R
128
129
GRD
+NB
FS1
+NB
PC7
3/Y
2
H231-3
H228-1
101 HEAT_ENABLE
209A
210A
211A
2
S7
3
1
1
+PP
PL15
OFF
AUTO
ON
SHOWN IN NIGHT
OR UNOCCUPIED
MODE
IS LOCATED ON DEADFRONT
MANUAL_ENABLE
AIR FLOW
1
TB2
A (DB9-MALE) CONNECTION
2
+NB
TIME_CLOCK
CONN.
SERIAL
1
115T1/1.68
168B
101 COOL_ENABLE
TB_101
TB2
TB2
RS-232
BUILDING
BACKNET
MSTP
2
4
203
F3
CONTACT MUST BE OPEN
DURING NORMAL OPERATION
H228-4
3
S1
200
GAS HEAT ALARM
TO ENABLE SOFTWARE
INTERNAL TIME CLOCK,
TERMINALS 101 & 102
MUST NOT BE
JUMPERED
THE FIELD TO REMOVE
JUMPERS WHEN
INSTALLING COOL/HEAT
ENABLE SWITCHES
2.
3.
REFER TO I.M. FOR
MICROTECH II ALARM
CONFIGURATION.
1.
NOTES TO FIELD:
S1/6.00
201A
S1
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
112
108
111
106
105
104
102
DRN
BLK
WHT
MCB
1
BI7
7
6
BI6
R
BI5
5
4
BI4
R
BI3
3
2
BI2
R
BI1
t
SW1
#7
v
t
SW1
#6
v
t
SW1
#5
v
t
SW1
#4
v
t
SW1
#3
v
t
SW1
#2
v
t
SW1
#1
v
RS232 PORT
BINARY
INPUT
P1
BACNET-MSTP
COMM. CARD
BCNT
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
3
1
2
3
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
2
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
2
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
7C
AI7
7
6C
AI6
6
5C
AI5
5
4C
AI4
4
3C
AI3
3
2C
AI2
2
1C
AI1
1
ANALOG
INPUT
REF
N2-
N2+
J1
COM
24VAC
208C
TB1B
23
24
10
11
12
13
3
2
4
1
220C
226C
DRN
BLK
WHT
RED
DRN
BLK
WHT
227C
DRN 227D
BLK
WHT
DRN
BLK
WHT
221C
DRN 221D
BLK
WHT
218C
DRN 219C
BLK
WHT 217C
DRN
BLK
WHT
215C
209C
210C
DRN 210D
BLK
WHT
KEYPAD
DISPLAY
24V
CLASS 2
115V
REF/8.07
N2-/8.06
N2+/8.06
TB1B
133
GRD
132
121
GRD
120
TB2
232C
233C
231C
229C
230C
228C
224C
225C
223C
T2
(Schematic continues on next page.)
231A
228A
225A
223
220
217A
215A
REF
N2-
N2+
MICROPROCESSOR CONTROL BOARD
204A
TB1D
204B
4
2
1
DRN-4
H232-2
H231-1
H230-3
3
+PP 4
PL22
H228-1
H227-2
DRN-4
H226-1
H224-2
DRN-4
H223-1
2
4
4
4
H221-2
DRN-4
H220-1
3
C
1
2
3
A
C
A
H
+NB
ZNT1
ZONE OR
SPACE
SENSOR
(DRIVE
SIDE)
(ENTERING FAN
TEMPERATURE)
+NB
DFRH_DS
+NB
EFT
(OUTDOOR AIR
SENSOR)
+NB
OAT
(RETURN AIR
SENSOR)
+NB
RAT
(DISCHARGE AIR
SENSOR)
+NB
DAT
PWR
5VDC
PWR SUP
5V5V+
DISCHARGE AIR
TEMPERATURE
EXTERNAL RESET
REQ'D FOR NIGHT SETBACK OR SPACE RESET
4
OVERRIDE
H229-2
DRN-4
1
+PP
PL5
2
+PP
PL3
1
2
1
+PP
PL1
2
1
214A
TO CCB1
+PP
PL2
14
15
16
GRD
G
T1_N
/1.68
168C
68
214B
/1.68
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 75. VAV control inputs
McQuay IM 487-4
McQuay IM 487-4
270
269
268
267
266
265
264
263
262
261
260
259
258
257
256
255
254
253
252
251
250
249
248
247
246
245
244
243
242
241
240
239
238
237
236
235
234
203B
/3.00
/4.00
/8.01
T2_115VAC
3
H237-3
S
+
1
+PP
PL21
1
+PP
PL20
1
+NB
RAE
+PP
PL13
4
+PP
PL14
+PP
PL21
16
H237-5
17
H242-4
R66
8
8
TR
SR
+
JPR
HUM
+NB
EXS
2
+NB
OAE
3
TR1
1
3
+PP
PL20
1
H
115
+NB
SD1
H267-1
H
+NB
SD2
115
RA SMOKE DETECTOR
H265-1
SA SMOKE DETECTOR
DUCT HI-LIMIT
DHL
3
6
H252-2
H250-4
H243-1
H242-3
H237JMP
2
3
PRE FILTER
1
+NB
PC5
7
7
R61
5
+PP
PL21
H235-6
H267-2
H265-2
EXTERNAL EXHAUST SWITCH
(SHOWN WITH FAN IN OFF POSITION)
H25O-SR
H25O-+
H252-1
6
+NB
SD2
267
H237-3
6
2
+PP
PL21
2
+PP
PL20
2
+PP
PL13
4
+PP
PL13
1
3
16
H237-4
17
H235-5
235A
TB2
237A
TB2
103
T1_N
/1.68
260A
257A
252A
FILTER
INDICATION
FOR FIELD
109
243A
24VCOM/2.47
204B
242A
+PP
PL20
+PP
PL20
4
5
TB2
SIG_SD/2.38
265
+PP
PL14
+NB
SD1
204B
+PP
PL21
168C
233
113
16
BI16
R
BI15
15
14
BI14
R
BI13
13
12
BI12
R
BI11
11
10
BI10
R
BI9
9
8
BI8
R
t
SW4
#16
t
SW4
#15
t
SW4
#14
t
SW4
#13
t
SW4
#12
t
SW4
#11
t
SW4
#10
t
SW4
#9
t
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
SW1
#8
v
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
1
2
3
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
15V DC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
8
16C
AI16
16
15C
AI15
15
14C
AI14
14
13C
AI13
13
12C
AI12
12
11C
AI11
11
10C
AI10
10
9C
AI9
9
8C
AI8
OPEN ANALOG
INPUT
OPEN ANALOG
INPUT
DRN
BLK
WHT
DRN
BLK
WHT
DRN
BLK
WHT
DRN
BLK
WHT
DRN
BLK
WHT
RED
BLK
265C
266C
264C
262C
263C
261C
257C
254C
253C
252C
245C
246C
244C
214B
241C
240C
214B
RED
WHT
238C
214B
236C
235C
234C
DRN
RED
WHT
BLK
DRN
(Schematic continues on previous page.)
TB2
8
3
6
8
13
+PP
PL8
10
+PP
PL7
GRD
127
126
3
1
2
4
+PP
PL18
5
4
3
9
+PP
PL11
3
2
1
4
+PP
PL23
H265-8
DRN-3
H264-6
H262-8
DRN-13
H261-10
DRN-1
H245-3
H244-2
H243-4
H241-5
H240-4
H239-3
DRN-9
H236-3
H235-1
DRN-4
H234-2
G
T
Y
7
4
8
CW
(OP)
CW
(CL)
CCW
(OP)
-
S
500HOM
440
8-
7+
440
+NB
AFD20
8-
7+
+NB
AFD10
+
PWR
+NB
SHS1
(DUCT STATIC
PRES SENSOR)
SPS1
SPACE
HUMIDITY
SENSOR
500HOM
COM
+NB
VM1
313
+NB
ACT3
SIG_SD/2.41
(OPP
DRIVE
SIDE)
+NB
DFLH_ODS
CCW
(CL)
OUT
(0-5V)
3
2
1
107
131
TB2
24VCOM/2.51
TB2
204B
445
445
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 76. VAV control inputs, continued
69
237
236
235
234
233
232
231
230
229
228
227
226
225
224
223
222
221
220
219
218
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
209
208
207
206
205
204
203
202
168A
203B
201
/1.68
3
+PP
PL21
TB2
6
+NB
SD2
H237-3
101
TB_101
4
+PP
PL15
S1
267
16
203A
1/R
PVM1
3/Y
2
3
+PP
PL20
6
+PP
PL21
H231-3
H228-1
H237JMP
H235-6
+NB
FS1
+NB
PC7
+NB
SD1
1
3
H237-3
2
S7
211C
6
265
1
+PP
PL15
OFF
H237-4
17
16
+PP
PL20
112
108
106
105
104
102
DRN
BLK
WHT
237A
TB2
231A
228A
223
220
217A
215A
REF
N2-
N2+
113
1
8
BI8
R
BI7
7
6
BI6
R
BI5
5
4
BI4
R
BI3
3
2
BI2
R
BI1
t
SW1
#8
v
t
SW1
#7
v
t
SW1
#6
v
t
SW1
#5
v
t
SW1
#4
v
t
SW1
#3
v
t
SW1
#2
v
t
SW1
#1
v
RS232 PORT
BINARY
INPUT
P1
BACNET-MSTP
COMM. CARD
BCNT
MCB
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
3
2
3
2
3
1
2
3
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
2
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
8C
AI8
8
7C
AI7
7
6C
AI6
6
5C
AI5
5
4C
AI4
4
3C
AI3
3
2C
AI2
2
1C
AI1
1
ANALOG
INPUT
REF
N2-
N2+
J1
COM
24VAC
MICROPROCESSOR CONTROL BOARD
204A
TB1D
10
11
12
13
OPEN ANALOG
INPUT
208C
TB1B
23
24
(Schematic continues on next page.)
+PP
PL20
4
5
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
H235-5
235A
AUTO
ON
SHOWN IN NIGHT
OR UNOCCUPIED
MODE
IS LOCATED ON DEADFRONT
101 HEAT_ENABLE
+PP
PL21
5
128
129
GRD
A (DB9-MALE) CONNECTION
TB2
MANUAL_ENABLE
AIR FLOW
1
5
+NB
TIME_CLOCK
CONN.
SERIAL
4
101 COOL_ENABLE
TB_101
TB2
TB2
RS-232
BUILDING
BACKNET
MSTP
2
H237-5
17
H228-4
1
H231-1
TO ENABLE SOFTWARE
INTERNAL TIME CLOCK,
TERMINALS 101 & 102
MUST NOT BE
JUMPERED
THE FIELD TO REMOVE
JUMPERS WHEN
INSTALLING COOL/HEAT
ENABLE SWITCHES
2.
3.
REFER TO I.M. FOR
MICROTECH II ALARM
CONFIGURATION.
1.
NOTES TO FIELD:
204A
T1_115VAC
3
2
RED
WHT
BLK
DRN
DRN
BLK
WHT
RED
DRN
BLK
WHT
DRN
BLK
WHT
DRN
BLK
WHT
DRN
WHT
RED
BLK
DRN
BLK
WHT
4
1
227C
227D
226C
221C
222C
220C
217C
215C
209C
210C
210D
KEYPAD
DISPLAY
24V
CLASS 2
115V
121
120
TB2
REF/8.07
N2-/8.06
N2+/8.06
TB1B
214B
236C
235C
234C
232C
233C
231C
224C
225C
223C
132
GRD
T2
204B
3
2
4
3
+PP
PL22
2
1
+PP
PL3
2
1
+PP
PL1
2
1
1
4
+PP
PL23
2
1
4
4
4
H236-3
H235-1
DRN-4
H234-2
DRN-4
H232-2
H231-1
H230-3
H226-4
H226-2
H225-1
H224-2
DRN-4
H223-1
DRN-4
H221-2
H220-1
214A
TO CCB1
+PP
PL2
GRD
14
15
16
4
OVERRIDE
6
C
3
2
1
1
2
3
A
C
A
+NB
ZNT1
ZONE
SENSOR
COOLING &
HEATING
SETPOINT
(OPP
DRIVE
SIDE)
+NB
DFLH_ODS
(DRIVE
SIDE)
+NB
DFRH_DS
(OUTDOOR AIR
SENSOR)
+NB
OAT
(RETURN AIR
SENSOR)
+NB
RAT
(DISCHARGE AIR
SENSOR)
+NB
DAT
WALLSTAT
3
PWR
5VDC
PWR SUP
5V5V+
H
G
T1_N
/1.68
168C
70
214B
200
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 77. CV control inputs
McQuay IM 487-4
McQuay IM 487-4
269
268
267
266
265
264
263
262
261
260
259
258
257
256
255
254
253
252
251
250
249
248
247
246
245
244
243
242
241
240
239
238
237
236
235
234
233
232
231
230
203B
/3.00
/8.01
T2_115VAC
3
S
+
1
+PP
PL21
1
+PP
PL20
1
+NB
RAE
+PP
PL13
1
+PP
PL6
4
16
H247-1
1
+NB
PC5
3
2
TR
SR
+
JPR
2
HUM
+NB
OAE
3
TR1
FINAL FILTER
1
+NB
PC6
2
3
1
115
H267-1
H
+NB
SD2
115
RA SMOKE DETECTOR
H
+NB
SD1
H267-2
H265-2
H252-2
H250-4
H248-2
H247-4
H243-1
H242-3
3
+PP
PL20
6
+PP
PL21
H231-3
H237JMP
SA SMOKE DETECTOR
H265-1
H25O-SR
H25O-+
+PP
PL21
5
3/Y
H235-6
+NB
FS1
PRE FILTER
1/R
H237-5
17
H242-4
267
H231-1
H252-1
6
+NB
SD2
H237-3
+PP
PL14
+PP
PL21
TB2
101
TB_101
H237-3
6
2
237A
TB2
231A
T1_N
/1.68
OPEN BINARY
INPUT
OPEN BINARY
INPUT
252A
248A
FILTER
INDICATION
FOR FIELD
109
243A
24VCOM/2.47
204B
+PP
PL20
112
+PP
PL20
4
5
TB2
242A
16
H237-4
17
H235-5
235A
+PP
PL21
2
+PP
PL20
2
+PP
PL13
4
+PP
PL13
2
4
+PP
PL6
1
3
+PP
PL14
+NB
SD1
265
TB2
168C
204A
113
16
BI16
R
BI15
15
14
BI14
R
BI13
13
12
BI12
R
BI11
11
10
BI10
R
BI9
9
8
BI8
R
BI7
7
t
SW4
#16
t
SW4
#15
t
SW4
#14
t
SW4
#13
t
SW4
#12
t
SW4
#11
t
SW4
#10
t
SW4
#9
t
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
SW1
#8
v
t
SW1
#7
v
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
1
2
3
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
15V DC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
2
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
1
NJ=VDC
1=RTD
2=MA
3=NTC
16C
AI16
16
15C
AI15
15
14C
AI14
14
13C
AI13
13
12C
AI12
12
11C
AI11
11
10C
AI10
10
9C
AI9
9
8C
AI8
8
7C
AI7
7
OPEN ANALOG
INPUT
OPEN ANALOG
INPUT
OPEN ANALOG
INPUT
OPEN ANALOG
INPUT
253
OPEN ANALOG
INPUT
(Schematic continues on previous page.)
DRN
BLK
WHT
DRN
BLK
WHT
RED
BLK
254C
253C
252C
245C
246C
244C
214B
241C
240C
214B
RED
WHT
238C
214B
236C
DRN
RED
WHT
235C
DRN
BLK
234C
DRN
231C
232C
233C
BLK
WHT
RED
TB2
GRD
127
126
3
1
2
4
+PP
PL18
5
4
3
9
+PP
PL11
3
2
4
3
+PP
PL22
1
4
+PP
PL23
2
1
H230-3
DRN-1
H245-3
H244-2
H243-4
H241-5
H240-4
H239-3
DRN-9
H236-3
H235-1
DRN-4
H234-2
DRN-4
H232-2
H231-1
253
8
4
7
7
4
8
CW
(OP)
CW
(CL)
CCW
(OP)
COM
SPACE
HUMIDITY
SENSOR
343
+NB
VM1
313
+NB
ACT3
(OPP
DRIVE
SIDE)
+NB
DFLH_ODS
(DRIVE
SIDE)
+NB
DFRH_DS
CCW
(CL)
OUT
(0-5V)
3
2
1
1
2
3
252
PWR
+NB
SHS1
107
131
TB2
24VCOM/2.51
TB2
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 78. CV control inputs, continued
71
334
333
332
331
330
329
328
327
326
325
324
323
322
321
320
319
318
317
316
315
314
313
312
311
310
309
308
307
306
305
304
303
302
SOURCE 1-8
WIRED INTERNAL
TO MOTHERBOARD
MCB
BO4
TB1C
19
jprs
18
303A
115V
T3
TB1C
20
21
H313-1
BO5
24V SRC
jprs
L1
+NB
ACT3
307A
305A
239
H313-2
TB2
TB2
116
115
+PP
PL11
(FAN_OPERATION)
(EXT_ALARM_SIGNAL)
2
R26
10
TB2
117
207
(CLOSE)
5
MCB
H315-6
5NO
318A
2-CW
7
PL11
H316-7
+PP
X-COM
(ECON/ACT)
24V SRC
jprs
3-CCW
L2
6NO
BO6
207
(OPEN)
6
MCB
H315-8
8
+PP
PL11 315B
2
(Schematic continues on next page.)
24V SRC
jprs
+PP
315A PL11
6
1
/4.00
+PP
PL11
207
3NO
BO3
24V SRC
T3_COM
3
MCB
207
4NO
303B
/4.00
1-8
4
4
T3_24V
207
SRC
24V
CLASS 2
2. THE TOTAL VA OF THE FIELD
MOUNTED RELAYS CAN NOT
EXCEED 15 VA
NOTES TO FIELD:
1. ALL FIELD MOUNTED RELAYS
MUST HAVE 24VAC CLASS
2 COILS
203B
3
T1_N
1
/2.68
T2_115VAC
2
/1.68
168C
72
301
300
364
362
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 79. Control actuator outputs (CV, stream, or hot water, plus economizer)
McQuay IM 487-4
McQuay IM 487-4
369
368
367
366
365
364
363
362
361
360
359
358
357
356
355
354
353
352
351
350
349
348
347
346
7
H344-7
H343-6
X-COM
33
RECT
AC
RECTIFIER
M
HEAT
+ DC AC
36
TB1F
L1
2-CW
24V SRC
jprs
TB1F
10NO
B10
207
(OPEN)
10
MCB
9
345
344
+PP
PL18
6
+PP
PL18
339A
339C
TB1F
TB1F
L2
3-CCW
34
35
362A
+NB
VM1 243
+PP
PL18 H343-9
343
342
341
340
339
338
368A
367A
H344-8
H343-5
jprs
L1
X1
8
R26
306
9
R26
306
5
115V
12V
24V SRC
+PP
PL18
5
+PP
PL18
9NO
B09
207
(CLOSE)
9
CB
(Schematic continues on previous page.)
L2
X2
8
11
7
6
363B
T4
362B
1
3
+PP
PL17
H366-3
H365-1
6
5
H965
H964
H968
H969
WHT
BLK
RELIEF
DAMPER
(DRIVE
SIDE)
+NB
ACT10
WHT RELIEF
DAMPER
(OPP.DR
SIDE)
BLK
+NB
ACT11
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 80. Control actuator outputs (CV, stream, or hot water, plus economizer), continued
73
433
432
431
430
429
428
427
426
425
424
423
422
421
420
419
418
417
416
415
414
413
412
411
410
409
408
407
406
405
404
403
402
401
+PP
PL7
H426-3
+BB
MMP30
45
+PP
PL8
H426-1
TB2
42
+PP
PL8
MCB
BO1
3
11(31)
133
12(32)
H426-6
207
SRC
MCB
6
+PP
PL7
9-16
426A
SOURCE 9-16
WIRED INTERNAL
TO MOTHERBOARD
1
11(31)
145
H426-4
12(32)
+BB
MMP40
401A
+PP
PL18
5
R25
BO13
BO14
15NO
15
BO16
11NO
BO11
SIG_1/6.01
426B
207
HEAT ENABLE
11
MCB
16NO
207
RAF INCR
16
MCB
207
RAF DECR
BO15
MCB
14NO
207
SAF INCR
14
MCB
13NO
207
SAF DECR
13
MCB
jprs
S4
RETURN
AIR
2C
1C
S4
SUPPLY
AIR
24V SRC
jprs
24V SRC
jprs
24V SRC
jprs
24V SRC
jprs
24V SRC
jprs
24V SRC
427A
431A
BYPASS
2ND
2NC
INVERTER
BYPASS
1NO
1NC
INVERTER
413A
411A
409A
407A
405A
404A
3
7
401
3
404
R68
429A
3
R67
425A
1
1
H413-7
604
(Schematic continues on next page.)
4
2NO
BO2
207
RETURN FAN
2
MCB
1
1NO
207
SUPPLY FAN
24V SRC
C1
+GB
R20
C3
H413-6
8
H1DN
2
R67
10
431B
427B
7
+PP
PL8
10
+PP
PL8
9
+PP
PL7
12
+PP
PL7
H431-7
H429-10
7
R69
H427-9
H425-12
6
447
A1
A1
A1
A1
I
I
I
I
447
10
H1C
A2
+BB
M40B
A2
+BB
M40I
A2
+BB
M30B
A2
+BB
M30I
H1C
R48_49
+PP
PL18
H1UP
H1DN
H1UP
R68
R46_47
2
H429-11
H425-2
+PP
PL7
11
+PP
PL8
2
T1_N
TB2
/1.68
/3.11
T3_COM
jprs
/3.11
T3_24V
203B
/2.68
303B
T2_115VAC
168C
74
303A
400
631
445
432
145
149
445
309
133
137
445
603
445
427
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 81. VFD control (SAF and RAF)
McQuay IM 487-4
450
14
+PP
PL7
445A
6
8
401
R67
7
5
12
239
R61
16
INCR
H2UP
445B
10
3
9
14
H2V
405
R46_47
DECR
H2DN
+PP
PL7
449
425
14
H443-14
11
137
261
13
430
+BB
M40I
14
H443-15
H443C
15
+PP
PL8
13
445C
11
6
8
404
R68
7
5
12
INCR
241
R66
16
H2UP
445D
10
RAF
ABB401
+NB
AFD20
3
9
409
R48_49
H2V
+PP
PL8
448
13
+BB
M30I
H443A
13
SAF
ABB401
+NB
AFD10
14
149
264
DECR
H2DN
+PP
PL8
447
446
445
444
443
442
441
440
439
438
437
436
H443-7
7
443A
H443-4
4
443C
H443-1
435
+PP
PL7
1
443D
H443-12
12
443E
H443-5
5
443G
H443-2
McQuay IM 487-4
2
443H
(Schematic continues on previous page.)
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 82. VFD control (SAF and RAF), continued
+PP
PL8
+PP
PL7
75
636
635
634
633
632
631
630
629
628
627
626
625
624
623
622
621
620
619
618
617
616
615
614
613
612
611
610
609
608
607
606
605
604
603
602
601
201A
H603-1
1
1
3
628
R21
2
LS2
TB11
NO
621A
(FLAME ROD)
FD
TB11
2
COM
HL22
SIG_1/4.28
7
FLAME
AMPLI
FIER
NO
AS 621B
6
G
T
Y
BLK
7
T
I
M
E
R
FSG
CCW
(CL)
CW
(OP)
MODULATING
GAS & AIR
VALVE
ACTUATOR
(FLOATING)
VM1
2K1
3K1
4
2
1
R
WHT
2K2
TB11
612
OPEN
CLOSE
COM
2
R22
4
10
9
8
L2
3
4
H603-4
5K1
4K1
+PP
PL19
H602-2
603A
1K1
6K1
MICROCOMPUTER
(L1)
2
+PP2
PL16
+PP
PL19
FSG
(FLAME SAFEGUARD)
(PLUG-IN TYPE
CONTROLLER)
5
H603-2
RED_G630-B
COM
FSG-G
FSG-F
NOTE:
1.POWER, PILOT & MAIN VALVE INDICATION
LIGHTS ARE PART OF THE FLAMESAFEGUARD
(FSG) CONTROLLER.
2. GV-A IS THE FIRST VALVE AND GV-B
IS THE SECOND VALVE OF A REDUNDANT
COMBINATION VALVE WITH PRESSURE
REGULATION AND MANUAL SHUTOFF
1
+PP
PL16
S1/2.01
426B
76
1
6
413
4
R20
2
5
5
7
1
COM
632A
4
10
5
NO
5
4
413
6
4
L2
BLK
L4
5
4
634A
6
X1
625
R23
IT
L1
TB11
FLC
RED_G613-L
L3
L1
BLACK
RED_G609-L
RED_G602-L2
RED_G603-L3
RED_G617-L
613B
2
628
R21
631A
TB11
1
3
625
R23
LS1
603C
RED_G602-L1
R20
(Schematic continues on next page.)
YEL_G634-2
YEL_G633-1
YEL_G632-R
TD10
628A
3
11
4
8
2
TB11
607A
TB11
603B
602A
WHT_G630-W
621C
617A
613A
611A
610A
9
8
S3
6
L2
X2
BLK
633A
6000V
115V
21
BM
1
10
BLACK
BLACK
BLACK
19
3
+PP
PL19
1
BLK
GV4B
BLK
GV4A
BLK
WHT
WHT
WHT
TB11
TB11
12
11
H634-8
H633-9
H632-9
IGNITION TRANSFORMER
BLACK
7
604B
8
9 +PP
PL18
9
+PP
PL18
+PP
PL19
WHITE
WHITE
WHITE
WHITE
610B
WHT
GV1A
+PP
PL19
GV1B
BLK
WHT_G609-R
BLACK
H610-1
H604-3
SEE THE PIPING SCHEMATIC BELOW
FOR THE NUMBER OF MAIN GAS VALVES
REQUIRED FOR YOUR BURNER SIZE
TB11
TB11
RED_G602-L1
604A
633B
8
+MB
R24
632B
8
9NO
BO9
207
634B
9
+MB
MCB
7
+MB
R25
jprs
24V SRC
10
3
TB11
TB11
C1
C1
207
10NO
BO10
R21
R23
C2
C2
WHT_G617-R
+MB
MCB
jprs
24V SRC
20
1
5
+PP
PL19
R22
T1_N
/1.68
168C
600
H604-5
NB
NB
628
615
627
225
402
632
632
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 83. Super Mod gas furnace control (1000 MBH)
McQuay IM 487-4
McQuay IM 487-4
668
667
666
665
664
663
662
661
660
659
658
657
656
655
654
653
652
651
650
649
648
647
646
645
644
643
642
641
V
V
AIR
SWITCH
TEST
CONN.
MODULATING
ACTUATOR
BURNER
BLOWER
TEST
COCK
GV5B
GV4A
GV5A
VALVE AND
MANUAL VALVE.
(TYPICAL)
GV4B
VALVE AND
PRESS. REG.
COMBINATION GAS CONTROLS
GV1B --MAIN
GV1A --FIRST
IF THE UNIT OVERHEATS, THE HIGH LIMIT CONTROL (FLC) WILL CYCLE THE BURNER, LIMITING FURNACE TEMPERATURE TO THE LIMIT CONTROL SET POINT.
IF AN ATTEMPT IS MADE TO RESTART THE BURNER BY RESETTING THE FLAME SAFEGUARD, OR IF AN AUTOMATIC RESTART IS INITIATED AFTER FLAME FAILURE,
THE EARLIER DESCRIBED PREPURGE CYCLE WITH THE WIDE OPEN AIR VALVE WILL BE REPEATED.
IN THE EVENT THE FLAME FAILS TO IGNITE OR THE FLAME SAFEGUARD FAILS TO DETECT ITS FLAME WITHIN 10 SECONDS, TERMINALS #4, 8, 9, AND 10 WILL BE DE-ENERGIZED,
THUS DE-ENERGIZING THE BURNER AND TERMINAL #3 WILL BECOME ENERGIZED. THE FLAME SAFEGUARD WOULD THEN BE ON SAFETY LOCKOUT AND WOULD REQUIRE MANUAL RESETTING.
TERMINAL #3 WILL ENERGIZE THE HEAT ALARM RELAY (R24), WHICH WOULD THEN ENERGIZE THE REMOTE 'HEAT FAIL' INDICATOR LIGHT AND SEND A FAIL SIGNAL TO BINARY
INPUT #5 ON THE MICROTECH II MAIN CONTROL BOARD (MCB).
AFTER THE FLAME HAS LIT AND BEEN PROVEN, RELAY (R23) IS ENERGIZED ALLOWING (VM1), AS CONTROLLED BY (BO#9) & (BO#10) ON THE MAIN CTRL BRD (MCB), TO POSITION
THE BURNER AIR AND GAS VALVES FOR THE REQUIRED FIRING RATE. WHEN THE MAIN CONTROL SYSTEM CLOSES (BO#10) ON THE MAIN CTRL BRD (MCB), THE GAS VALVE ACTUATOR
WILL RE-POSITION TOWARD A HIGHER FIRING RATE UNTIL (BO#10) OPENS OR THE ACTUATOR REACHES ITS MAXIMUM POSITION. WHEN THE MAIN CONTROL SYSTEM CLOSES (BO#9),
THE ACTUATOR WILL RE-POSITION TOWARD A LOWER FIRING RATE. IF NEITHER (BO#9) OR (BO#10) ON THE MAIN CONTROL BOARD (MCB) ARE CLOSED, THE ACTUATOR WILL REMAIN
AT ITS PRESENT POSITION. THE HEATING CAPACITY IS MONITORED BY THE MAIN CTRL BRD (MCB) THROUGH (AI#10) VIA A POSITION FEEDBACK POTENTIOMETER ON THE ACTUATOR.
AFTER COMPLETION OF THE 60 SECOND PREPURGE PERIOD THERE WILL BE A 10 SECOND TRIAL FOR IGINITION DURING WHICH TERMINAL #8 (COMBINATION GAS VALVE--GV1) AND
TERMINAL #10 (IGNTION TRANSFORMER--IT) WILL BE ENERGIZED. IF FLAME IS BEING DETECTED THROUGHT THE FLAME ROD (FD) AT THE COMPLETION OF THE 10 SECOND TRIAL FOR
IGNITION PERIOD TERMINAL #10 (IGNITION TRANSFORMER--IT) WILL BE DE-ENERGIZED AND TERMINAL #9 (RELAY R23 COIL AND MAIN GAS VALVES--GV4 & GV5) WILL BE ENERGIZED
AND THE CONTROL SYSTEM WILL BE ALLOWED TO CONTROL THE FIRING RATE. THE FLAME SAFEGUARD CONTAINS "LEDS"(LOWER LEFT CORNER) THAT WILL GLOW TO INDICATED OPERATION.
(VM1), THROUGH THE N/C CONTACTS OF (R20) AND (R23), POSITIONS THE BURNER AIR AND GAS CONTROL VALVES TO MINIMUM AFTER A RUN CYCLE. WHEN (R20) IS ENERGIZED
FOR A NEW CALL FOR HEAT, (VM1) THROUGH THE N/O CONTACTS OF (R20) AND THE N/C CONTACTS OF (R21), WILL RE-POSITION THE BURNER AIR VALVE TO ITS MAXIMUM OPEN
POSITION FOR PREPURGE. WHEN THE AIR CONTROL VALVE REACHES THE FULL OPEN POSITION SWITCH (LS2) IS 'MADE', POWERING (FSG) TERMINAL #7 THROUGH THE BURNER
AIR SWITCH (AS). THIS INITIATES THE 60 SECOND PREPURGE CYCLE. CONCURRENTLY, (LS2) POWERS TIMER (TD10) WHICH WILL ENERGIZE RELAY (R21) AFTER 20 SECONDS.
WHEN (R21) IS ENERGIZED (VM1) WILL START THE AIR CONTROL VALVE ON ITS WAY TOWARD THE MINIMUM AIR VALVE POSITION THROUGH THE N/O CONTACT OF (R21) AND THE
N/C CONTACT OF (R23). AT THE COMPLETION OF THE 60 SECOND PREPURGE CYCLE THE VALVE WILL BE AT THE MINIMUM OPEN POSITION AND THE MINIMUM POSITION SWITCH
(LS1) WILL BE 'MADE'. IF (LS1) IS NOT 'MADE' THE COMBINATION GAS CONTROL START VALVES (GV1) WILL NOT OPEN AND THE BURNER WILL GO OUT ON SAFETY LOCKOUT.
THE BURNER AIR CONTROL VALVE WILL BE AT THE MINIMUM POSITION DURING OFF CYCLES. UPON A CALL FOR HEAT OR ANY OTHER TIME THAT A PREPURGE CYCLE OCCURS
THE AIR CONTROL VALVE WILL BE RE-POSITIONED TO THE MAXIMUM POSITION FOR THE PREPURGE AND THEN RETURNED TO THE MINIMUM POSITION FOR LOW FIRE START.
WHEN THE ROOFTOP UNIT IS ENERGIZED 120 VOLT POWER IS SUPPLIED TO THE SYSTEM ON-OFF SWITCH (S1), TO BURNER ON-OFF SWITCH (S3) AND 24 VOLTS TO THE (BO#11)
CONTACTS ON THE MAIN CTRL BRD (MCB). BURNER ON-OFF SWITCH (S3) WILL POWER THE MODULATING GAS VALVE ACTUATOR (VM1) AND TERMINAL #5(L1) ON THE FLAME
SAFEGUARD (FSG). UPON A CALL FOR HEAT, THE CONTROL SYSTEM WILL CLOSE (BO#11) ON THE MAIN CTRL BRD (MCB), THUS ENERGIZING RELAY (R20). WHEN 120 VOLT
POWER IS FURNISHED THROUGH THE SYSTEM ON-OFF SWITCH (S1), THROUGH THE BURNER ON-OFF SWITCH (S3), THROUGH RELAY (R20 CONTACTS, THROUGH THE HIGH LIMIT
CONTROL (FLC) AND TERMINAL #6 ON THE FLAME SAFEQUARD (FSG) IS POWERED. THE FLAME SAFEGUARD THEN ENERGIZES ITS TERMINAL #4, WHICH POWERS THE BURNER COMBUSTION AIR
BLOWER MOTOR (BM). WHENEVER POWER IS RESTORED TO THE FLAME SAFEGUARD, THE FLAME SAFEGUARD WILL GO THROUGH A 10 SECOND INITIATION PERIOD BEFORE THE
PREPURGE PERIOD WILL BEGIN.
SEQUENCE OF OPERATION
(Schematic continues on previous page.)
OVER 1/2 P.S.I.
HIGH PRESS.
REG.
SHUTOFF
COCK
SHUTOFF
COCK
(THRU 1/2 P.S.I.)
PIPING DIAGRAM
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 84. Super Mod gas furnace control (1000 MBH), continued
77
636
635
634
633
632
631
630
629
628
627
626
625
624
623
622
621
620
619
618
617
616
615
614
613
612
611
610
609
608
607
606
605
604
603
602
601
201A
H603-1
1
HL22
2
RED_G630-B
618
(FLAME ROD)
FD
TB11
2
SIG_1/4.28
FSG-F
COM
FLAME
AMPLI
FIER
NO
621B
6
G
T
Y
BLK
7
T
I
M
E
R
CCW
(CL)
CW
(OP)
MODULATING
GAS & AIR
VALVE
ACTUATOR
(FLOATING)
VMI
2K1
3K1
4
2
1
R
WHT
2K2
TB11
OPEN
CLOSE
COM
10
9
8
L2
3
4
H603-4
5K1
4K1
+PP
PL19
H602-2
603A
1K1
6K1
MICROCOMPUTER
(L1)
2
FSG
+PP
PL19
+PP2
PL16
FSG
(FLAME SAFEGUARD)
(PLUG-IN TYPE
CONTROLLER)
5
H603-2
AS
FSG-G
NOTE:
1.POWER, PILOT & MAIN VALVE INDICATION
LIGHTS ARE PART OF THE FLAMESAFEGUARD
(FSG) CONTROLLER.
1
+PP
PL16
S1/2.01
426B
78
5
7
1
4
10
603C
1
3
413
5
L3
L1
4
6
L2
BLK
L4
TB11
IT
5
12
BLK
X2
H634-8
H633-9
H632-9
6000V
115V
L2
RED_G617-L
BLACK
6
BM
GV1
BLACK
619
3
+PP
PL19
BLACK
BLACK
8
634B
633B
9
+PP
PL18
9 +PP
PL18
632B
+PP
PL19
1
+PP
PL19
BLK
9
24V SRC
jprs
9NO
jprs
10
7
WHITE
WHITE
10NO
BO10
8
+MB
R24
207
+MB
MCB
24V SRC
WHT
WHT
7
604B
BO9
207
+MB
MCB
GV3
GV2
610B
BLK
624
BLACK
WHT_G609-R
BLK
H610-1
21
BLK
1
10
H604-3
IGNITION TRANSFORMER
TB11
TB11
RED_G602-L1
604A
11
X1
L1
TB11
TB11
FLC
633C TB11
625
R23
BLACK
RED_G609-L
RED_G602-L2
RED_G603-L3
RED_G602-L1
R20
(Schematic continues on next page.)
YEL_G634-2
YEL_G633-1
YEL_G632-R
3
11
4
8
2
TB11
607A
TB11
603B
602A
WHT_G630-W
621C
617A
613A
611A
610A
609
9
8
S3
+MB
R25
88
C1
R23
20
T1_N
/1.68
5
+PP
PL19
C2
WHT_G617-R
168C
600
TB11
TB11
H604-5
NB
NB
225
402
632
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 85. Standard Mod, furnace control (1000 MBH)
McQuay IM 487-4
McQuay IM 487-4
670
669
668
667
666
665
664
663
662
661
660
659
658
657
656
655
654
653
652
651
650
649
648
647
646
645
644
643
642
TEST
CONN.
AIR
DAMPER
MOD.
GAS
VALVE
AIR
SWITCH
TEST
CONN.
TEST
COCK
BURNER
BLOWER
PILOT VALVE
GV1
GV3
GV2
MAIN GAS VALVES
PRESS. REG.
MAIN
PRESS.
REG.
PILOT
COCK
IF THE UNIT OVERHEATS, THE HIGH LIMIT CONTROL (FLC) WILL CYCLE THE BURNER, LIMITING FURNACE TEMPERATURE TO THE LIMIT CONTROL SET POINT.
IN THE EVENT THE PILOT FAILS TO IGNITE OR THE FLAME SAFEGUARD FAILS TO DETECT ITS FLAME WITHIN 10 SECONDS, TERMINALS #4, 8, 9, AND 10 WILL BE
DE-ENERGIZED, THUS DE-ENERGIZING THE BURNER. THE FLAME SAFEGUARD WOULD THEN BE ON SAFETY LOCKOUT AND WOULD REQUIRE MANUAL RESETTING. THE HEAT ALARM
RELAY (R24) WOULD THEN BE ENERGIZED AND WOULD THEN ENERGIZE THE REMOTE "HEAT FAIL" INDICATOR LIGHT AND SEND A FAIL SIGNAL TO BINARY INPUT #5 ON THE
MICROTECH II MAIN CONTROL BOARD (MCB).
WHENEVER THE BURNER IS IN OPERATION ITS FIRING RATE WILL BE DETERMINED BY THE "FLOATING" GAS VALVE ACTUATOR (VM1). THIS ACTUATOR POSITIONS THE BUTTERFLY
GAS VALVE AND COMBUSTION AIR DAMPER AND CAN SET THE FIRING RATE BETWEEN 33% AND 100% OF NORMAL RATE. WHEN THE MAIN CONTROL SYSTEM CLOSES (BO#10) ON THE
MAIN CTRL BRD.(MCB), THE GAS VALVE ACTUATOR WILL REPOSITION TOWARD A HIGHER FIRING RATE UNTIL EITHER (BO#10) OPENS OR THE ACTUATOR REACHES ITS MAXIMUM
POSITION. WHEN THE MAIN CONTROL SYSTEM CLOSES (BO#9) ON THE MAIN CTRL BRD.(MCB), THE ACTUATOR WILL REPOSITION TOWARD A LOWER FIRING RATE. IF NEITHER
(BO#9) OR (BO#10) ON THE MAIN CONTROL BOARD (MCB) ARE CLOSED THE ACTUATOR WILL REMAIN AT ITS PRESENT POSITION. THE HEATING CAPACITY IS MONITORED BY THE
MAIN CONTROL BOARD (MCB) THROUGH (AI#10) VIA A POSITION FEEDBACK POTENTIOMETER ON THE ACTUATOR (VM1).
LOW FIRE START IS PROVIDED BY RELAY (R23). THE RELAY DRIVES THE GAS VALVE ACTUATOR (VM1) TO THE MINIMUM FIRING RATE POSITION WHENEVER THE FLAME IS NOT
ON, AND HOLDS IT THERE UNTIL THE FLAME HAS LIT AND BEEN PROVEN.
BLOWER OPERATION IS SENSED BY THE AIR SWITCH (AS), WHICH MAKES TERMINAL #6 TO #7. AFTER A 90 SECOND PREPURGE PERIOD, TERMINAL #8 (FIRST GAS VALVE
(PILOT)--GV1) AND TERMINAL #10 (IGNITION TRANSFORMER--IT) WILL BE ENERGIZED. THE PILOT FLAME WILL IGNITE AND BE DETECTED BY THE FLAME SAFEGUARD THROUGH
THE FLAME ROD (FD). UPON DETECTION OF PILOT FLAME, TERMINAL #10 (IGNITION TRANSFORMER--IT) WILL BE DE-ENERGIZED AND TERMINAL #9 (MAIN GAS VALVES--GV2 & GV3)
WILL BE ENERGIZED AND THE MAIN FLAME WILL COME ON. ALSO, THE FLAME SAFEGUARD CONTAINS "LED'S" (LOWER LEFT CORNER) THAT WILL GLOW TO INDICATE OPERATION.
WHEN THE ROOFTOP UNIT IS ENERGIZED 120 VOLT POWER IS SUPPLIED TO THE SYSTEM ON-OFF SWITCH (S1), TO BURNER ON-OFF SWITCH (S3) AND 24 VOLTS TO THE (BO#11)
CONTACTS ON THE MAIN CTRL BRD (MCB). BURNER ON-OFF SWITCH (S3) WILL POWER THE MODULATING GAS VALVE ACTUATOR (VM1) AND TERMINAL #5(L1) ON THE FLAME
SAFEGUARD (FSG). UPON A CALL FOR HEAT, THE CONTROL SYSTEM WILL CLOSE (BO#11) ON THE MAIN CTRL BRD (MCB), THUS ENERGIZING RELAY (R20). WHEN 120 VOLT
POWER IS FURNISHED THROUGH THE SYSTEM ON-OFF SWITCH (S1), THROUGH THE BURNER ON-OFF SWITCH (S3), THROUGH RELAY (R20) CONTACTS, THROUGH THE HIGH LIMIT
CONTROL (FLC) AND TERMINAL #6 ON THE FLAME SAFEQUARD (FSG) IS POWERED. THE FLAME SAFEGUARD THEN ENERGIZES ITS TERMINAL #4, WHICH POWERS
THE BURNER COMBUSTION AIR BLOWER MOTOR (BM). WHENEVER POWER IS RESTORED TO THE FLAME SAFEGUARD, THE FLAME SAFEGUARD WILL GO THROUGH A 10 SECOND
INITIATION PERIOD BEFORE THE PREPURGE PERIOD WILL BEGIN.
SEQUENCE OF OPERATION
(Schematic continues on the previous page.)
SHUTOFF
COCK
SHUTOFF
COCK
OVER 1/2 P.S.I.
HIGH PRESS.
REG.
(THRU 1/2 P.S.I.)
PIPING DIAGRAM
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 86. Standard Mod, furnace control (1000 MBH), continued
79
80
533
532
531
530
529
528
527
526
525
524
523
522
521
520
519
518
517
516
515
514
513
512
511
510
509
508
507
506
505
504
503
502
501
500
HTR4A
HTR3A
HTR2A
HTR1A
L3
L1
L3
L1
L3
L1
L3
L1
L2
L2
L2
L2
518A
514A
510A
506A
519A
515A
511A
507A
520A
516A
512A
508A
4
3
4
3
4
3
2
1
4
3
(MANUAL)
HL4
2
1
(MANUAL)
HL3
2
1
(MANUAL)
HL2
2
1
(MANUAL)
HL1
519B
518B
515B
514B
511B
510B
507B
506B
M31
T3
T2
T1
M34
T3
T2
T1
M33
T3
T2
T1
M32
T3
T2
T1
L3
L2
L1
L3
L2
L1
L3
L2
L1
L3
L2
L1
554
520B
519C
518C
553
516B
515C
514C
550
512B
511C
510C
546
508B
507C
506C
T3
T2
T1
T3
T2
T1
T3
T2
T1
T3
T2
T1
FB34
FB33
FB32
FB31
L3
L2
L1
L3
L2
L1
L3
L2
L1
L3
L2
L1
PB3
L3-8
500
500
L2-8
L1-8
L3-4
L2-4
L1-4
PB3
500
PB3
L3-7
500
L2-7
L1-7
L3-3
L2-3
L1-3
PB3
500
PB3
L3-6
500
L2-6
L1-6
L3-2
L2-2
L1-2
PB3
500
PB3
L3-5
500
L2-5
L1-5
L3-1
L2-1
L1-1
PB3
520D
519E
518E
516D
515E
514E
512D
511E
510E
508D
507E
506E
L3
L2
L1
L3
L2
L1
L3
L2
L1
L3
L2
L1
FB44
FB43
FB42
FB41
T3
T2
T1
T3
T2
T1
T3
T2
T1
T3
T2
T1
520E
519F
518F
516E
515F
514F
512E
511F
510F
508E
507F
506F
(Schematic continues on next page.)
520C
519D
518D
516C
515D
514D
512C
511D
510D
508C
507D
506D
L3B
L3A
L2B
L2A
L1B
L1A
PB3
L3
L2
T3
T2
T1
556
T3
T2
T1
552
M44
L1
L3
L2
T3
T2
T1
548
M43
L1
L3
L2
T3
T2
T1
547
M41
M42
L1
L3
L2
L1
519G
518G
515G
514G
511G
510G
507G
506G
2
1
(MANUAL)
HL14
2
1
(MANUAL)
HL13
2
1
(MANUAL)
HL12
2
1
(MANUAL)
HL11
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
3
520F
516F
512F
508F
511H
507H
L2
L2
L2
L2
510H
506H
L3
L1
L3
L1
L3
L1
L3
L1
HTR4B
HTR3B
HTR2B
HTR1B
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 87. Electric heat control
McQuay IM 487-4
570
569
568
567
566
565
564
563
562
561
560
559
558
557
556
555
554
553
552
551
550
549
548
547
546
545
544
543
542
541
540
539
538
537
536
2
1
5A
6A
5
3
STAGE 1
24C
1
+PP
PL12
3
1
TB11
TB11
11
M34
4A
M33
3A
M32
2A
M31
1A
207
MCB
120 KW
11NO
544B
BO11
8
13
9
6
BI12
J10
7B
8B
M41
1B
M42
2B
M43
3B
M44
4B
HEATER
BANK "B"
STAGE 6
STAGE 5
STAGE 4
STAGE 3
STAGE 2
120 KW
12
11
10
7
4
2
4
556A
554A
552A
550A
548A
+PP
PL12
+PP
PL12
+PP
PL12
+PP
PL12
+PP
PL12
9
8
7
6
5
REFA/1
N2-A/1
REF
N2+A/1
REFB/1
NC-B/1
N2+B/1
536A
N2-
+PP
PL12
93
17
3
HS3
TB11
TB11
TB11
TB11
TB11
TB11
99
98
97
96
95
94
536B
4
UNDER HEATER
DEADFRONT
N2+
546A
T3_COM/3.11
24V
538B
+PP
PL12
T3_24V/3.11
HEATER
BANK "A"
HS1
9-16
MCB
SRC
T3_24V/3.11
538A
ON SWITCH BRACKET
IN MAIN CONTROL PANEL
303A
535
303A
T1_115VAC/1.68
168A
303B
McQuay IM 487-4
556B
554B
552B
550B
548B
546B
1
(AUTO)
HL33
(AUTO)
HL32
(AUTO)
HL44
1
1
1
(AUTO)
HL41
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
(AUTO)
HL34
(AUTO)
HL43
(AUTO)
HL42
(AUTO)
HL31
2
2
2
2
(Schematic continues on previous page.)
556C
555A
553A
552C
550C
549A
547A
546C
A1
A1
A1
A1
M44
M33
M32
M41
A2
A2
A2
A2
A1
A1
A1
A1
M34
M43
M42
M31
A2
A2
A2
A2
530
530
522
522
514
514
506
506
TB11
NB2
2
+PP
PL12
T1_N/1.68
168C
534
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 88. Electric heat control, continued
81
544C
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 89. Fan control, power package only
/1.68
400
115VAC_GF/1
T1_N
401
402
403
404
405
406
407
408
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420
421
422
423
424
425
R63
426
11
MMP10
426D
8
75
76
427
137
SUPPLY FAN ON/OFF
MMP20
426A
426B
75
76
219
TB4
M10
TB4
207
426C
A1
208
A2
137
260
A2
149
149
428
429
430
RETURN FAN ON/OFF
M20
TB4
431A
431
209
A1
432
433
82
McQuay IM 487-4
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 90. CV fan control (SAF and RAF)
/3.11
115VAC_GF/1
T3_24V
TB2
TB2
45
jprs
24V SRC
MCB BO2
9-16
MMP10
R68
404A
2
MMP20
R67
426A
10
M10
426B
11(31)
12(32)
10
2
2
2NO
207
RETURN FAN
11(31)
/1.68
T1_N
401A
jprs
24V SRC
/3.11
T3_COM
R67
1
1NO
207
SUPPLY FAN
42
SOURCE 9-16
WIRED INTERNAL
TO MOTHERBOARD
MCB
207
SRC
MCB BO1
426C
12(32)
3
1
A1
A2
401
R68
M20
431A
3
1
A1
A2
404
Figure 91. Light and receptacle power
FIELD SUPPLIED 115V/60/1
REC1
H
1003A
TB7
SL
1005A
H775
LT10
H776
G
G1009
LT11
S11
H1010-2
w
1
BLK
REC11
H775
H
31
WHT
PL32
2
H776
N
G
McQuay IM 487-4
PL31
2
30
WHT
N
H
H775
H1006-2
w
BLK
REC10
H775
H1010-1
G1004
SL
S10
1
PL32
G
1005B
CP
H1006-1
TB7
TB7
1004B
GRD
PL31
N
1003B
CP
G1012
83
Unit Options
Unit Options
Enthalpy Control
Figure 92. Enthalpy control settings
8 5
9 0
(2 9 .5 ) (3 2 )
0 .8
0
0 .9 0
4 2
3 5
(1 .5 )
4 0
(4 .5 )
4 5
(7 )
0 .6
0
0 .5
0
0 .3
0
0 .4
0
6 5
(1 8 .5 )
A
B
0 .
2
0
C
D
0
0 .1
Ground Fault Protection
The ground fault protection is designed to protect motors from
destructive arcing ground faults. The system consists of a
ground fault relay and a ground fault current sensor. The
ground fault relay employs solid state circuits that will
instantaneously trip and open a set of relay contacts in the 115
volt control circuit to shut the unit down whenever a ground
fault condition exists. The ground fault relay is self powered.
The ground fault sensor is a current transformer type of device
located on the load side of the power block through which the
power wires of all phases are run.
D
3 5
4 0
4 5
(1 .5 ) (4 .5 ) (7 )
R E
H U L A T IV
M ID
E
IT Y
0 .7
0
7 0
(2 1 )
Differential Enthalpy Control (OAE/RAE)
An optional electric differential enthalpy control arrangement
(OAE/RAE) is available on units with MicroTech II control. In
this configuration a solid-state humidity and temperature
sensing device is located in both the return (RAE) and outside
intake (OAE) airstreams. This OAE device has the same A
through D scale as the device described above. However, with
the OAE/RAE arrangement the switch on OAE must be set all
the way past the “D” setting. With this done, the MicroTech II
controller adjusts the return and outside air dampers to use the
airstream with the lowest enthalpy.
1 0 5
(4 0 .5 )
4 0
16
5 0
(1 0 )
1 4
73°F (23°C)
70°F (21°C)
67°F (19*C)
63°F (17°C)
3 8
E N
T H
A L
P Y
—
2 6
B T
U
2 8
P E
R
P O
30
U N
D
3 2
D R
Y
3 4
A I
R
3 6
5 5
(1 3 )
1 2
Control point temperature at 50% RH
8 0
(2 6 .5 )
7 5
(2 4 )
2 4
2 2
2 0
6 0
(1 5 .5 )
1 8
Table 14: Enthalpy control settings
A
B
C
D
1 0 0
(3 8 )
4 4
Units with MicroTech II control and an economizer come
standard with an electromechanical enthalpy control device
(OAE) that senses both the humidity and temperature of the
outside air entering the unit. This device has an enthalpy scale
marked A through D. Table 14 shows the control points at 50%
RH for settings A through D. Figure 92 shows this scale on a
psychrometric chart. When the outside air conditions exceed
the setting of the device, the outside air dampers are positioned
to the minimum outside air intake position by the MicroTech II
controller.
Control curve
9 5
(3 5 )
46
Outside Air Enthalpy Control (OAE)
5 0
(1 0 )
5 5
6 0
6 5
7 0
(1 3 ) (1 5 .5 ) (1 8 .5 ) (2 1 )
C
B
A
7 5
8 0
8 5
9 0
(2 4 ) (2 6 .5 ) (2 9 .5 ) (3 2 )
9 5
(3 5 )
1 0 0 1 0 5
(3 8 ) (4 0 .5 )
Phase Voltage Monitor (see page 111)
The phase voltage monitor protects against high voltage, phase
imbalance, and phase loss (single phasing) when any one of
three line voltages drops to 74% or less of setting. This device
also protects against phase reversal when improper phase
sequence is applied to equipment, and low voltage (brownout)
when all three line voltages drop to 90% or less of setting. An
indicator run light is ON when all phase voltages are within
specified limits. The phase voltage monitor is located on the
load side of the power block with a set of contacts wired to the
115 volt control circuit to shut the unit down whenever the
phase voltages are outside the specified limits.
External Time Clock
You can use an external time clock as an alternative to (or in
addition to) the MicroTech II controller’s internal scheduling
function. The external timing mechanism is set up to open and
close the circuit between field terminals 101 and 102. When
the circuit is open, power is not supplied to binary input
MCB-BI1. This is the normal condition where the controller
follows the programmable internal schedule. When the circuit
is closed, power is fed to BI1. The MicroTech II controller
responds by placing the unit in the occupied mode, overriding
any set internal schedule.
For more information, see the “Digital Inputs” section of
Bulletin No. IM 696, “MicroTech II Applied Rooftop Unit
Controller.”
84
McQuay IM 487-4
Unit Options
Smoke and Fire Protection
McQuay optionally offers factory installed outdoor air, return
air, and exhaust air dampers as well as smoke detectors in the
supply and return air openings, complete with wiring and
control. These components often are used in the building’s
smoke, fume, and fire protection systems. However, due to the
wide variation in building design and ambient operating
conditions into which our units are applied, we do not
represent or warrant that our products will be fit and sufficient
for smoke, fume, and fire control purposes. The owner and a
fully qualified building designer are responsible for meeting
all local and NFPA building code requirements with respect to
smoke, fume, and fire control.
WARNING
Improper smoke, fire, or fume air handling can result in
severe personal injury or death.
Smoke Detectors
minute timer. The MicroTech II controller’s active alarm is
“Freeze Fault.”
When the 10-minute timer expires, the controller begins checking the freezestat
again. If the freezestat is open, the heating valve closes. If the freezestat closes
again, the heating valve opens, and the 10-minute timer resets.
The unit remains shut down until the “Freeze Fail” alarm is
manually cleared. Refer to the operation manual supplied with
the unit for information on clearing alarms (OM138 or
OM137).
Fan Off Operation
If the freezestat detects a freezing condition while the fan is
off, the MicroTech II controller opens the heating valve and
sets a 10-minute timer. The MicroTech II controller’s active
alarm is “Freeze Problem.”
When the 10-minute timer expires, the controller begins
checking the freezestat again. If the freezestat is open, the
heating valve closes. If the freezestat closes again, the heating
valve opens, and the 10-minute timer resets.
Optional smoke detectors can be located at the supply and
return openings. The wiring for these smoke detectors is
shown on any of the “Typical Main Control Circuit” wiring
schematics within the “Wiring Diagrams” section on pages
64–86.
When the freezestat opens again, the “Freeze Prob” alarm
automatically clears. This feature protects the coil and allows
the system to start normally after a cold night.
The sequence of operation for these detectors is as follows:
When smoke is detected by either sensor, the normally closed
sensor contacts open. This removes power from binary input
BI8 on the Main Control Board.
The entering fan temperature (EFT) sensor and an associated
“Lo Airflow Problem” alarm are provided on VAV units with
MicroTech II control and gas or electric heat. The EFT sensor
is located in the supply fan section of the unit at the supply air
funnel.
The MicroTech II controller responds by shutting down the
unit. The controller is placed in the Alarm Off state and cannot
be restarted until the alarm is manually cleared. Refer to the
operation manual supplied with the unit for information on
clearing alarms (OM138 or OM137).
The smoke detectors themselves must be reset manually once
they have tripped. Power must be cycled to the smoke detector
to reset.
Freeze Protection
An optional freezestat is available on units with MicroTech II
control that have hot water, chilled water, or steam heating
coils. The sensing element is located on the downstream side
of the heating coil in the heating section of the unit. If the
freezestat detects a freezing condition and closes, the
MicroTech II controller takes different actions, depending on
whether the fans are on or off. The freezestat is an auto reset
type of control; however, the controller alarm that it causes is
manually reset if the fan is on and auto reset if the fan is off.
Entering Fan Temperature Sensor
Heat is disabled whenever the airflow is detected to be too low
for safe heating operation. This condition is indicated when the
supply air temperature exceeds the mixed air temperature by
more than 60°F (16°C).
Note: This value is not always 60°F. It depends on whether the
unit is gas or electric heat and on the burner/baffling
arrangement on gas heat units.
In this case, a “Lo Airflow Problem” alarm is generated and
heat is not enabled until the alarm is manually cleared. Refer to
the operation manual supplied with the unit for information
clearing alarms (OM138 or OM137).
Fan On Operation
If the freezestat detects a freezing condition while the fan is
on, the MicroTech II controller shuts down the fans, closes the
outdoor air dampers, opens the heating valve, and sets a 10-
McQuay IM 487-4
85
Unit Options
Duct High Pressure Limit
The duct high pressure limit control (DHL) is provided on all
VAV units. The DHL protects the duct work, the terminal
boxes, and the unit from over pressurization, which could be
caused by, for example, tripped fire dampers or control failure.
The DHL control is factory set to open when the discharge
plenum pressure rises to 3.5" w.c. (872 Pa). This setting should
be correct for most applications; however, it is adjustable.
Removing the front cover of the device reveals a scale
showing the current setting. Turning the adjustment screw
(located on the bottom of the device) adjusts the setting up or
down.
If the DHL switch opens, digital input MCB BI 14 on the Main
Control Board will be de-energized. The MicroTech II
controller then shuts down the unit and enters the Off-Alarm
state. The alarm must be manually cleared before the unit can
start again. Refer to the operation manual supplied with your
unit for more information on clearing alarms (OM138 or
OM137).
• Unit mounted power supply and R485 isolator for the
remote UI
• Selector switch to activate either the unit mounted UI or the
remote UI. Only one UI is active at a time.
• Wall mounted electrical box that contains the remote UI. See
Figure 93.
Cable and Wiring Recommendations
Remote wiring to connect the unit to the remote UI is not
included. See Figure 94 on page 86 for wiring information and
the following recommendations.
• No more than 1200 feet of wiring can be used to connect the
remote user interface to the unit.
• Use overall foil shield, 3 twisted pairs, 22 AWG stranded
connectors with drain wire.
• UL 910 plenum rated = Belden 6542FE-1000-877
• Non-plenum rated = Belden 5542FE-1000-8
Figure 93. Factory-assembled remote user interface
MicroTech II™ Remote User Interface (UI)
4.4 "
7.2 "
(4) #6-32
Hex Nuts
(4) #6 Split
Lock Washers
6.9 "
Ground
Enclosure
with Cover
Both a unit mounted and an identical, remote mounted keypad
and display are provided with this option. A remote-mounted
user interface (UI) is available as an option with all rooftop
units. The following items are provided:
Surface Mount,
Modular Jack
with 6 contacts,
Screw Terminals
Cable Assembly
Keypad/Display
Module
• Unit mounted UI
Figure 94. Remote user interface wiring diagram
86
McQuay IM 487-4
Unit Options
Variable Frequency Drive Operation
Refer to the vendor instructions supplied with the unit.
Convenience Receptacle/Section Lights
A Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) convenience
receptacle is provided in the main control box on all units. To
use this receptacle, connect a separate field-supplied 115V
power wiring circuit to the 115V field terminal block TB7,
located in the main control box.
screws. One is located one inch from the top of the vane
and the other one inch from the bottom of the vane. Both
are about eight inches in from the outer edge of the vane.
4 Examine the station for shipping damage. Manually rotate
the vane and verify that it does not rub against anything.
Figure 95. DesignFlow station
Optional lights are available for certain sections in the unit.
Each light includes a switch and convenience receptacle and is
powered by the external 115V power supply connected to
TB7.
DesignFlow™ Outdoor Air Damper Option
DesignFlow™ airflow measurement stations are located inside
the louvered outdoor air intake doors between the intake
louver and outside air dampers. Essentially, they consist of a
vane that is repositioned by airflow, the amount of rotation
indicating the amount of airflow. They are calibrated precisely
at the factory and no further calibration is required. However, a
leveling adjustment is required in the field so that the
DesignFlow unit is in the same orientation as when it was
factory calibrated. See “DesignFlow Station Startup” below.
The rotational position of the DesignFlow unit vane is
translated into CFM by the microprocessor in the MicroTech II
control system. The position of the vane is determined by two
things—the force of the airflow impacting the vane and the
gravitational effect on the vane. Gravity is the only factor at
the lower CFM end of the range. On a correctly leveled unit,
this gravitational effect will be the same as when the unit was
calibrated in the factory.
Accurately leveling a station involves applying a precise
mechanical force against the vane. This force should cause the
vane to move to a specific position if the DesignFlow unit is
correctly leveled.
DesignFlow Station Startup
• Before initial startup of the rooftop unit, carry out the
following procedure on both the right-hand (control panel
side) and left-hand (side opposite the control panel)
DesignFlow station vanes (see Figure 95).
Note: This procedure is much easier to carry out with two
people—one making the mechanical adjustments and
the other viewing and recording readings on the
MicroTech II control panel.
1 Verify that power is supplied to the unit’s MicroTech II
control system. The DesignFlow startup procedure cannot
be completed without use of the MicroTech II controls.
2 Unlock and open the louvered outdoor air intake door on
the side of the unit (see Figure 95).
3 The swinging vane on the measurement station is locked in
place for shipment. Unlock it by removing the two shipping
McQuay IM 487-4
5 Manually hold the vane closed against the mechanical stop
at the top of the assembly. Then, read the current vane
leveling position on the MicroTech II keypad/display.
Do this by viewing the LH Lvl Pos= or RH Lvl Pos=
parameter in the DesignFlow setup menu. The LH Lvl
Pos= parameter indicates the current position of the vane
for the left-hand DesignFlow station (side opposite the
control panel). The RH Lvl Pos= parameter indicates the
current position of the vane for the right-hand DesignFlow
station (control panel side).
Important: Wait several seconds until the value on the
keypad stabilizes before taking the reading.
For detailed information regarding operation and
navigation through the unit keypad, refer to Operation
manual OM 137 (discharge air control units) or OM 138
(zone control units).
6 Confirm the value of the reading. Ideally, it should read
close to 20.00 (19.50 to 20.50 is acceptable). If the reading
is out of range, loosen the screws fixing the mechanical
stop at the top of the assembly, make a small adjustment,
and recheck until the reading is in the specified range.
Note: Generally, adjustments should not be necessary.
7 Locate the leveling component kit, which is shipped with
the unit, in the unit mail control panel.
8 Duct tape the fulcrum alignment plate to the bottom corner
of the vane (see Figure 96) aligning it as follows:
a The bottom edge of its notches should be flush with the
bottom edge of the vane.
b The side of one notch should be even with the bend near
the outer edge of the vane.
c The plate should be flat against the outer surface of the
vane.
87
Unit Options
Figure 96. Tape fulcrum alignment plate to vane
Figure 97. Place leveling weight on fulcrum
V a n e
D u c t T a p e
T h is E d g e
F lu s h w ith
B o tto m o f V a n e
T h
F lu
B o
V a
e s e E d g e s
s h w ith
tto m o f
n e
A lig n m e n t
P la te
F u lc r u m
D u c t T a p e
9 Locate and install the fulcrum used in the leveling
procedure as follows (see Figure 96):
a Wipe the bottom of the louver door where the fulcrum
will be located so that the duct tape will stick to it.
b Pre-apply duct tape to the top surface of the bottom
portion of the fulcrum, extending it about one inch
beyond the edges on three sides.
c With the alignment plate taped to the vane and the vane
in the zero airflow position, locate the fulcrum parallel
to and against the alignment plate.
Note: The zero airflow position is when the vane is swung
away from the back wall and gently resting against its
stop.
d Once the fulcrum is in position, press the duct tape
extensions down to hold the fulcrum in place.
e Remove the alignment plate after installing the fulcrum.
10 Close and latch the louvered intake door.
11 Remove the cover from the access opening in the bottom
blade of the outdoor air intake louver (see Figure 99).
12 Verify that the unit fans are off and that the outdoor air
dampers are closed. If there is a wind, cover the outdoor air
louvers with poly film, cardboard, or other suitable material
to prevent adverse readings due to wind.
13 Rest the leveling weight assembly on the fulcrum, as shown
in Figure 95, so that:
a Its bottom two thumbscrews rest on the top edge of the
fulcrum.
b Its top thumbscrew rests against the vertical alignment
mark on the vane.
Note: The alignment mark is located 0.50 inch in from the
bend on the outer edge of the vane. It intersects with
a hole located one inch up from the bottom outer
edge of the vane.
88
14 Set up the leveling test as follows:
a While holding the weight so it stays on the fulcrum,
manually rotate the vane to the wide-open position,
manually return it to the zero CFM position, and gently
release the vane.
b Locate the leveling weight assembly so its contact point
is against the vertical mark on the vane.
c While the weight assembly teeters on the fulcrum,
gently rap the base frame to slightly vibrate the
assembly and encourage the vane to seek its equilibrium
point.
15 Read the current LH Lvl Pos= (or RH Lvl Pos=) parameter
in the DesignFlow Setup menu on the keypad/display.
These parameters vary from 20% to 80% depending on the
position of the DesignFlow vane
16 If the value indicated by the LH Lvl Pos= (or RH Lvl Pos=)
parameter is not within the range of 23.64% to 24.08%,
adjust the level of the DesignFlow unit using the procedure
described in “Making Level Adjustments” below.
17 When the LH Lvl Pos= (or RH Lvl Pos=) value is in range,
remove the fulcrum and leveling weight assembly and
replace the access opening cover in the louvered door.
McQuay IM 487-4
Unit Options
Making Level Adjustments
7 When finished making the adjustments, tighten the .25-20
The DesignFlow unit is mounted so that it pivots at the top
when three lock nuts are loosened, two at the top and one at
the bottom of the assembly (see Figure 98). Leveling the unit
involves precisely pivoting the assembly with a known force
applied to the vane until the vane opens to a specific position.
If after performing Steps 13 through 15 above, the vane does
not come to rest within the specified range, carry out the
following steps:
1 Unlock and open the louvered outdoor air intake door on
the side of the unit.
2 Loosen the two .25-20 NC lock nuts at the top of the
NC lock nut in the slotted hole at the bottom of the
DesignFlow frame. (See Figure 100.)
8 Gently rap the base frame to slightly vibrate the assembly
to encourage the vane to seek its equilibrium point.
9 Recheck the vane position compared to the range specified
in Step 16 above. Readjust the level as necessary.
10 When the level is correct, unlock and open the louvered
outdoor air intake door on the side of the unit and tighten
the two .25-20 NC lock nuts at the top of the DesignFlow
frame. (See Figure 98.)
11 Close and lock the intake door.
DesignFlow frame. (See Figure 98.)
12 Recheck the vane position and readjust the level as
necessary.
Figure 98. DesignFlow frame
Top lock nuts
13 When the vane position is correct, replace the access
opening cover in the louvered door.
Figure 99. Remove covers from access opening
Vane
Louvered
door
Pivot point
Access opening
Bottom lock nut
Cover
3 Close and lock the intake door.
4 Remove the cover from the access opening in the bottom
blade of the outdoor air intake louver (see Figure 99).
5 Loosen the .25-20 NC lock nut in the slotted hole at the
Figure 100. Leveling adjustment
Threaded adjuster
assembly
bottom of the DesignFlow frame. (See Figure 100.)
6 If the LH Lvl Pos= (or RH Lvl Pos=) value obtained in
step 15 above is HIGHER than the specified range,
move the bottom of the DesignFlow frame closer to the
outdoor air dampers (away from the back end of the unit).
Do this by turning the long adjuster nut to increase the L
dimension in Figure 100.
If the LH Lvl Pos= (or RH Lvl Pos=) value obtained in
step 15 above is LOWER than the specified range,
move the bottom of the DesignFlow frame away from the
outdoor air dampers (toward the back end of the unit). Do
this by turning the long adjuster nut to decrease the L
dimension in Figure 100.
Note: If the necessary adjustment cannot be made using
the long adjuster nut, reposition the two .25-20 NC
jam nuts on the threaded rod to make larger
adjustments (see Figure 100).
McQuay IM 487-4
Long adjuster nut
Jam nuts
To INCREASE L dimension
L
Right hand adjuster
Locknut
To INCREASE L dimension
L
Left hand adjuster
89
Unit Options
Propeller Exhaust Fan Option
Figure 102. Fan rotation
Economizer units may include propeller exhaust or centrifugal
return fan options. This section covers maintenance and
operating instructions for the propeller exhaust option.
Centrifugal return fan construction, maintenance and operation
is similar to that for supply fans and covered in other sections
of this manual.
A ir flo w
A ir flo w
R o ta tio n
R o ta tio n
Figure 101. Two fans with back return shown
Once the fan is put into operation, set up a periodic
maintenance program to preserve the reliability and
performance of the fan. Items to include in this program are:
• Belts
• Bearings
• Fasteners
• Setscrews
• Lubrication
• Removal of Dust/Dirt
Fans and motors
Belts
Premature belt failures are frequently caused by improper belt
tension (either too tight or too loose) or misaligned pulleys.
The proper tension for operating a V-belt is the lowest tension
at which the belts will not slip peak load conditions. For initial
tensioning, the proper belt deflection half way between pulley
centers is 1/64" for each inch of belt span. For example, if the
belt span is 64 inches, the belt deflection should be one inch
using moderate thumb pressure at midpoint of the drive.
See Figure 103.
VFD
Starters
Prestarting Checks
Check all fasteners and set screws for tightness. This is
especially important for bearing set screws.
The propeller should rotate freely and not rub on the fan panel
venturi. Rotation direction of the propeller should be checked
by momentarily turning the unit on. Rotation should be in the
same direction as the rotation decal affixed to the unit or as
shown in Figure 102 on page 90. For three-phase installations,
fan rotation can be reversed by simply interchanging any two
of the three electrical leads. For single phase installations
follow the wiring diagram located on the motor.
The adjustable motor pulley is preset at the factory for the
specified fan RPM. Fan speed can be increased by closing or
decreased by opening the adjustable pulley. Two or three
groove variable pitch pulleys must be adjusted an equal
number of turns open. Any increase in fan speed represents a
substantial increase in horsepower required from the motor.
Always check motor load amperage and compare to name
plate rating when changing fan speed.
90
Check belt tension two times during the first 24 hours of
operation and periodically thereafter. To adjust belt tension,
simply loosen four fasteners (two on each side of the motor
plate) and slide the motor plate away from the fan shaft until
proper belt tension is attained. On some fans, fasteners
attaching the motor to the motor plate must be loosened in
order to adjust the belt.
It is very important that the drive pulleys remain in proper
alignment after adjustments are made. Misalignment of pulleys
results in premature belt wear noise, vibration, and power loss.
See Figure 104.
WARNING
Rotating parts can cause severe personal injury or death.
Replace all belt/fan guards that are removed temporarily for
service.
McQuay IM 487-4
Unit Options
Figure 103. Belt adjustment
Figure 104. Drive pulley alignment
M u s t b e
p a r a lle l
B e lt S p a n
6 4
D e fle c tio n =
B e lt S p a n
B e a r in g
C e n te r lin e s
m u s t c o in c id e
M o to r
M u s t b e
p a r a lle l
A d ju s ta b le
S h e a v e
Table 15: Propeller exhaust fan troubleshooting
Problem
Reduced
Airflow
Excessive
Noise
Cause
Corrective Action
System resistance is too
high.
Unit running backwards.
Fan speed too low.
Excessive dirt on propeller.
Bearings
V-Belt drive
Excessive vibration
Check backdraft dampers for proper operation. Remove obstructions in ductwork. Clean dirty filters.
Check for adequate supply for air exhaust fans or exhaust air for supply fans.
See “Prestarting Checks” on page 90
Increase fan speed
Clean propeller
Tighten bearing collars and setscrews. Lubricate bearings. Replace defective bearings.
Tighten pulleys on motor shaft and fan shaft. Adjust belt tension. Align pulleys. Replace worn belts or pulleys.
Clean dirt build-up from propeller. Check all setscrews and fasteners for tightness. Check for worn bearing.
Correct propeller imbalance. Check for loose dampers, guards or ductwork.
Replace motor.
Defective motor
Figure 105. Propeller exhaust fan replacement parts list
1
2
9
8
7
10
4
3
1. Fan panel
2. Propeller
3. Drive frame
channe l (2)
4. Motor plate
5. Motor
6. Motor pulley
7. Shaft pulley
8. Fan shaft
9. Bearings
10. Belt
11. Bearing plate
6
5
11
McQuay IM 487-4
91
Unit Options
Bearings
Exhaust Fan Troubleshooting
Bearings are the most critical moving part of the fan and
should be inspected at periodic intervals. Locking collars and
set screws, in addition to fasteners attaching the bearings to the
bearing plate, must be checked for tightness. In a clean
environment and temperatures above 32°F/below 200° F, fan
shaft bearings with grease fittings should be lubricated
semiannually using a high quality lithium based grease. If
unusual environmental conditions exist temperatures below
32°F/above 200°F, moisture or contaminants, more frequent
lubrication is required.
Table 15 provides guidelines for troubleshooting problems
with the propeller exhaust fan options. A list of parts is
provided in Figure 105.
With the unit running, add grease very slowly with a manual
grease gun until a slight bead of grease forms at the seal. Be
careful not to unseat the seal by over lubricating or using
excessive pressure. Bearings without grease fittings are
lubricated for life.
Fasteners and Setscrews
Any fan vibration has a tendency to loosen mechanical
fasteners. A periodic inspection should include checking all
fasteners and set screws for tightness. Particular attention
should be paid to setscrews attaching the propeller to the shaft
and the shaft to the bearings. Loose bearing set screws will
lead to premature failure of the fan shaft.
Lubrication
Refer to “Bearings” for bearing lubrication. Many fractional
horsepower motors installed on the smaller fans are lubricated
for life and require no further attention. Motors equipped with
oil holes should be oiled in accordance with the
manufacturer’s instructions printed on the motor. Use a high
grade SAE 20 machine oil and use caution not to over
lubricate.
Motors supplied with grease fittings should be greased
according to directions printed on the motor.
Ultraviolet Lights Option
When this option is employed, ultraviolet C light bathes the
moist surfaces on the coil and drain pan, killing most
microorganisms that can grow there.
Typically, ultraviolet lights are installed on the leaving side of
the cooling coils in the unit. Each light module is mounted on a
rail and is removable for convenient bulb replacement.
UV Light Power Disconnect switches (two per door) are
factory installed on every door that allows a direct line of sight
to the UV lamps when opened. These switches are designed to
prevent UV exposure when cabinet doors are opened and must
not be disabled.
A viewing window near the UV lights allows viewing to
determine if the lights are energized. The viewing windows
use specially designed glass that blocks harmful UV light.
WARNING
UVC exposure is harmful to the skin and eyes. Looking at an
illuminated bulb can cause permanent blindness. Skin
exposure to UVC can cause cancer.
Always disconnect power to unit before servicing. Do not
operate if disconnect switch has been disabled.
Figure 106. Typical ultraviolet light installation
Cooling
Coil
Light Power
Disconnect
Switch
Removal of Dust/Dirt
Thoroughly clean the exterior surface of the motor, fan panel,
and entire propeller periodically. Dirt can clog cooling
openings on motor housings, contaminate bearing lubricant,
and collect on propeller blades causing severe imbalance if left
unchecked. Use caution and do not allow water or solvents to
enter the motor or bearings. Under no circumstances should
motors or bearings be sprayed with steam or water.
AIRFLOW
View
Window
Ultraviolet
Light
Units
Light Power
Disconnect
Switch
Exhaust Fan On/Off Control
The exhaust fans are turned on and off based on building static
pressure, outdoor air damper position, and discharge fan
capacity. Exhaust fans do not have to always run while the
supply fan is on, as does a return fan. They are turned on and
off through output MCB-B02 on the Main Control Board. For
detailed information on Propeller Exhaust Fan Control, refer to
the operation manual supplied with the unit (OM 138 or
OM 137).
92
McQuay IM 487-4
Unit Options
Ultraviolet Light Operation
Refer to the wiring schematic below. 115 VAC power for the
UV lights is provided by control circuit transformer T1. The
lights operate whenever the unit is powered, system switch S1
is closed, and all doors with door power disconnect switches
are closed. To turn the lights off, disconnect power to the entire
unit, or open system switch S1.
The normally open disconnect switches are wired in series in a
circuit that supplies 24VAC to the coil of relay R45. When all
doors are closed, relay R45 is energized, and its normally open
contacts (in series with system switch S1) provide 115VAC to
the UV lights.
Figure 107. Typical ultraviolet light wiring schematic
McQuay IM 487-4
93
Check, Test, and Start Procedures
Check, Test, and Start Procedures
All units are completely run tested at the factory to promote
proper operation in the field. Nevertheless, the following
check, test, and start procedures must be performed to properly
start the unit. To obtain full warranty coverage, complete and
sign the check, test, and start form supplied with the unit and
return it to McQuay International.
WARNING
Electric shock and moving machinery hazard. Can cause
severe equipment damage, personal injury, or death.
Disconnect and tag out all electrical power before servicing this
equipment.
All start-up and service work must be performed only by trained,
experienced technicians familiar with the hazards of working on
this type of equipment.
Read and follow this manual: “MicroTech II Applied Rooftop
Unit Controller” manual (Bulletin IM 696), and operation manual
(Bulletin OM 137 or OM 138) before operating or servicing.
Bond the equipment frame to the building electrical ground
through grounding terminal or other approved means.
A representative of the owner or the operator of the equipment
should be present during start-up to receive instructions in the
operation, care, and maintenance of the unit.
If the unit has a factory mounted disconnect switch, use the
switch’s bypass mechanism to open the main control panel
door without de-energizing the control panel. See page 110 for
instructions.
Whenever accessing the main control panel while it is still
energized, keep the inner deadfront protective panels on to
avoid exposure to high voltage power.
Servicing Control Panel Components
WARNING
Hazardous voltage. Can cause severe injury or death.
Disconnect electric power before servicing equipment. More
than one disconnect may be required to de-energize the unit.
Disconnect all electric power to the unit when servicing
control panel components located behind the protective
deadfront panels. Unless power is disconnected to the unit, the
components behind the protective deadfront panels are
energized with high voltage. Always inspect units for multiple
disconnects to ensure all power is removed from the control
panel and its components before servicing.
Before Start-up
1 Verify that the unit is completely and properly installed
with ductwork connected.
2 Verify that all construction debris is removed, and that the
filters are clean.
3 Verify that all electrical work is complete and properly
terminated.
4 Verify that all electrical connections in the unit control
panel and compressor terminal box are tight, and that the
proper voltage is connected.
5 Verify all nameplate electrical data is compatible with the
power supply.
6 Verify the phase voltage imbalance is no greater than 10%.
7 Verify that gas piping is complete and leak tight.
8 Verify that the shutoff cock is installed ahead of the
furnace, and that all air has been bled from the gas lines.
9 Manually rotate all fans and verify that they rotate freely.
10 Verify that the belts are tight and the sheaves are aligned.
11 Verify that all setscrews and fasteners on the fan assemblies
are still tight. Do this by reading and following the
instructions in “Setscrews,” which is in the “Maintenance”
section of this manual.
12 Verify that the coding coil condensate drain is trapped and
that the drain pan is level.
13 If unit is curb mounted, verify that the curb is properly
flashed to prevent water leakage.
14 Before attempting to operate the unit, review the control
layout description to become familiar with the control
locations.
15 Review the equipment and service literature, the sequences
of operation, and the wiring diagrams to become familiar
with the functions and purposes of the controls and devices.
16 Determine which optional controls are included with the
unit.
17 Before closing (connecting) the power disconnect switch,
open (disconnect) the following unit control circuit
switches:
a Main Control Panel
– Turn system switch S1 to OFF.
– Electric heat units: turn switch HS1 to OFF.
b Furnace Control Compartment
– Turn furnace switch S3 to OFF.
– Main Control Panel Switch S7 to OFF.
18 If the DAC or SCC unit does not have an optional zone
temperature sensor (ZNT1) connected to it, you may need
to change the keypad entry under Setup/Service \ Unit
94
Configuration \ Space Sensor= from YES to NO.
McQuay IM 487-4
Check, Test, and Start Procedures
Note: If desired, you can significantly reduce all MicroTech II
internal control timers by the changing the entry under
keypad menu Setup/Service\Unit Configuration\Timer
Settings\Service= from “0 min” to “X min” where X is
the number of minutes you want the unit to operate with
fast timers.
Power Up
1 Close the unit disconnect switch. With the control system
switch S1 in the OFF position, power should be available
only to the control circuit transformer (TI) and the
compressor crankcase heaters.
2 Turn the Switch S1 to ON. Power should now be supplied
to the control panel, and the LEDs on MCB1 should follow
the normal startup sequence (refer to the “MCB LED
Power-Up Sequence” of IM 696).
Fan Start-up
1 Verify all duct isolation dampers are open. Unit mounted
isolation dampers may be mounted in the supply or return
sections.
2 Place the unit into the “Fan Only” mode through the
keypad menu System Summary\System\Ctrl Mode= Fan
Only.
3 Turn Switch S7 to ON. The controller should enter the
“Startup Initial” operating state. If the fan does not run:
a Check fuses F1 and F3.
b Check the manual motor protectors or that the circuit
breakers have not tripped.
c Check the optional phase monitor.
4 If the fans are equipped with optional spring isolators,
check the fan spring mount adjustment. When the fans are
running they should be level. Refer to “RAH spring mount
hold down fasteners” on page 51.
5 Verify the rotation is correct.
6 Verify the DHL safety is opening at a pressure compatible
with duct working pressure limits.
Note: The supply and return fan drives usually are selected for
operation in the drive's midspeed range. The return fan
drives are usually shipped with fixed pitch sheaves that
will provide the selected fan speed; however, the supply
fan drives are usually shipped with variable pitch
sheaves that are adjusted to provide the minimum fan
speed. Both drives should be adjusted for proper airflow
during air balancing. For more information, refer to “Air
Balancing” on page 96.
McQuay IM 487-4
Economizer Start-up
CAUTION
Adjust dampers properly. Improper adjustment can damage the
dampers.
When an economizer is ordered without an actuator, the
linkage requires a 3.14" linear stroke to open it fully. Do not
allow dampers to be driven beyond their normal full closed or
full open position.
1 Check whether the outdoor air is suitable for free cooling
by displaying the keypad menu Temperature\OA
Damper\OA Ambient=. “Low” indicates low outdoor air
enthalpy; “High” indicates high outdoor air enthalpy. See
“Enthalpy Control” on page 84 to verify that the enthalpy
changeover control is working properly. You may want to
take temperature and humidity measurements.
2 Verify that switches PS1 and PS2 are at OFF. This prevents
compressor operation during the procedure.
3 At the keypad, set the cooling setpoint low enough so the
controller calls for cooling. Adjust the value in
Temperature\Zone Cooling\Occ Clg Spt= below the
temperature shown in Temperature\Zone Cooling\Control
Temp=. In addition, on DAC units, adjust the value in
Temperature\Discharge Cooling\DAT Clg Spt= below the
temperature shown in Temperature\Discharge
Cooling\Disch Air=.
4 Place the unit into cooling mode through the keypad menu
System Summary\System\Ctrl Mode= Cool Only.
5 Observe the outdoor air dampers:
a If the outdoor enthalpy is low, the control algorithm
should start to modulate the dampers open to maintain
the discharge air setpoint.
b If the outdoor enthalpy is high, the dampers should
maintain their minimum position. Look at menu
Temperature\OA Damper\MinOA Pos=. Change this
entry to another value. Verify that the dampers move to
the new minimum position setpoint.
6 If the unit is equipped with the electromechanical enthalpy
changeover control (Honeywell H205) and the outdoor air
condition is borderline, attempt to change its input to the
MicroTech II controller by turning the switch adjustment to
“A” or “D.” Check enthalpy status in keypad menu
Temperature \ OA Damper \ OA Ambient=. If this reading
is “Low,” go to step 5a. If it is “High,” go to step 5b.
Note: It may not be possible to check the economizer
operation in both low and high enthalpy states on the
same day. If this is the case, repeat this procedure on
another day when the opposite outdoor air enthalpy
conditions exist.
95
Check, Test, and Start Procedures
Heating System Start-up
Air Balancing
General
1 At the keypad, set the heating setpoints high enough so that
the controller will call for heating. The value in
Temperature \ Zone Heating \ Occ Htg Spt= will need to be
adjusted above the temperature shown in Temperature \
Zone Heating \ Control Temp=. In addition, on DAC units,
the value in Temperature \ Discharge Heating \ DAT Htg
Spt= will need to be adjusted above the temperature shown
in Temperature \ Discharge Heating \ Disch Air=.
Air balancing should be performed by a qualified air balancing
technician. Note that the supply fan motors are usually shipped
with variable pitch sheaves which are typically set at the low
end of the drive’s fan rpm range. See “Mounting and Adjusting
Motor Sheaves” on page 98. The return fan motors are usually
shipped with fixed pitch sheaves.
2 Place the unit into heating mode through the keypad menu
System Summary \ System \ Ctrl Mode= Heat Only.
3 Verify that the high ambient heat lockout temperature
setpoint, Temperature \ Zone Heating \ OATHtg Lock= is
set above the current outside air temperature (shown in
System Summary \ Temperatures \ OA Temp=).
Gas Furnace
Refer to the “Start-up and Operating Procedures” section of
the Forced Draft Gas Fired Furnace Installation Manual,
Bulletin No. IM 684 or 685. Perform the start-up procedures
given in it.
Electric Heat
Turn the electric heat switch HS1 to ON. The electric heaters
should energize. If the unit has multistage electric heat, the
MicroTech II Auxiliary Control board EHB1 should energize
the heaters in successive stages. The rate of staging is set in
keypad menu Setup/Service \ Heating Setup \ Stage Time=. The
default value of “5 min” can be adjusted from 2 to 60 minutes.
Steam Heat
The steam valve actuator should open the valve. The steam
valve is open when the valve stem is up. If the unit loses
power, the spring in the actuator should drive the valve wide
open. Check this by opening system switch S1.
Hot Water Heat
The hot water valve actuator should open the valve to the coil.
The three-way hot water valve is open to the coil when the
valve stem is down. If the unit loses power, the spring in the
actuator should drive the valve wide open to the coil. Check
this by opening system switch S1.
96
WARNING
Moving machinery hazard. Can cause severe personal injury
or death.
Do not use a mechanically driven tachometer to measure the
speed of return fans on this fan arrangement. Use a strobe
tachometer.
The following should be performed as part of the air balancing
procedure:
1 Check the operating balance with the economizer dampers
positioned for both full outdoor air and minimum outdoor
air.
2 Verify that the total airflow will never be less than that
required for operation of the electric heaters or gas furnace.
3 For VAV units that have fan tracking control, adjust the
supply/return fan balance by using the MicroTech II
controller's built-in, automatic capability. For complete
information on using this feature, see the “Return Fan
Airflow Control: Fan Tracking” section in Bulletin No.
OM 137, “MicroTech II Applied Rooftop Unit Controller.”
4 When the final drive adjustments or changes are complete,
check the current draw of the supply and return fan motors.
The amperage must not exceed the service factor stamped
on the motor nameplate.
5 Upon completion of the air balance, replace variable pitch
motor sheaves (if any) with comparably sized fixed pitch
sheaves. A fixed pitch sheave will reduce vibration and
provide longer belt and bearing life.
WARNING
Rotating parts can cause severe personal injury or death.
Replace all belt/fan guards that are temporarily removed for
service.
McQuay IM 487-4
Check, Test, and Start Procedures
Sheave Alignment
Drive Belt Adjustment
Mounting:
1 Verify both driving and driven sheaves are in alignment and
the shafts are parallel. The center line of the driving sheave
must be in line with the ce1nter line of the driven sheave.
See Figure 108.
General Rules of Tensioning
1 The ideal tension is the lowest tension at which the belt will
not slip under peak load conditions.
2 Verify that all setscrews are torqued to the values shown in
Table 19 on page 107 before starting drive. Check setscrew
torque and belt tension after 24 hours of service.
Figure 108. Sheave alignment (adjustable shown)
2 Check tension frequently during the first 24-48 hours of
operation.
3 Over tensioning shortens belt and bearing life.
4 Keep belts free from foreign material which may cause
slippage.
5 Make V-drive inspection on a periodic basis. Adjust tension
if the belt is slipping. Do not apply belt dressing. This may
damage the belt and cause early failure.
M u s t b e
p a r a lle l
Tension Measurement Procedure
1 Measure the belt span. See Figure 109.
2 Place belt tension checker squarely on one belt at the center
B e a r in g
C e n te r lin e s
m u s t c o in c id e
M o to r
of the belt span. Apply force to the checker, perpendicular
to the belt span, until the belt deflection equals belt span
distance divided by 64. Determine force applied while in
this position.
3 Compare this force to the values on the drive kit label
found on the fan housing.
Figure 109. Drive belt adjustment
D e fle c tio n =
B e lt S p a n
6 4
B e lt S p a n
M u s t b e
p a r a lle l
McQuay IM 487-4
A d ju s ta b le
S h e a v e
97
Check, Test, and Start Procedures
Mounting and Adjusting Motor Sheaves
Figure 110. VM and VP variable pitch sheaves
A
5 Put on belts and adjust the belt tension. Do not force belts
over grooves. Loosen the belts by adjusting the motor base
closer to the fan shaft.
6 Be sure that all keys are in place and that all setscrews are
D
tight before starting the drive. Check the setscrews and belt
tension after 24 hours of service.
E
LVP Variable Pitch Sheaves
Mounting:
S in g le G r o o v e
D
K e y " E " p r o je c ts
to p r o v id e a g r ip
fo r r e m o v a l.
C
1 For single-groove sheaves, slide the sheave onto the motor
D o
s h e
p ro
th e
n o
e v
je c
h u
B
t o
e s
tin
b
p e ra te
w ith fla n g e
g b e y o n d
e n d .
shaft so that the side of the sheave with setscrew A is next
to the motor (see Figure 111 on page 99).
For two-groove sheaves, slide the sheave onto the motor
shaft so that the side of the sheave with setscrew A is away
from the motor (see Figure 111 on page 99).
2 To remove the flange and locking rings:
B
a Loosen setscrews D.
b Loosen but do not remove capscrews E.
A
E
c Remove key F. This key projects a small amount to
provide a grip for removing.
T w o G ro o v e
D
d Rotate the flange counterclockwise until it disengages
the threads on the shaft barrel.
C
C
VM and VP Variable Pitch Sheaves
Mounting:
1 Mount all sheaves on the motor shaft with setscrew A
toward the motor (see Figure 110).
2 Be sure both the driving and driven sheaves are in
alignment and that the shafts are parallel.
3 Fit internal key D between sheave and shaft and lock
setscrew A securely in place.
Adjusting:
1 Slack off all belt tension by moving the motor toward the
driven shaft until the belts are free from the grooves. For
easiest adjustment, remove the belts.
2 Loosen setscrews B and C in the moving parts of the
sheave and pull out external key E (see Figure 110). This
key projects a small amount to provide a grip for removing.
3 Adjust the sheave pitch diameter for the desired fan speed
by opening the moving parts by half or full turns from
closed position. Do not open more than five full turns for
A belts or six full turns for B belts. Adjust both halves of
two-groove sheaves by the same number of turns from
closed to ensure that both grooves have the same pitch
diameter.
4 Replace external key E and securely tighten setscrews B
over the key. Tighten setscrews C into the keyway in the
fixed half of the sheave.
98
3 Be sure that the driving and driven sheaves are in alignment
and the shafts are parallel. When aligning two-groove
sheaves, allow room between the sheave and motor to get
to capscrews E.
4 Insert key C between the sheave and the shaft and tighten
setscrew A securely.
Adjusting:
1 Slack off all belt tension by moving the motor toward the
driven shaft until the belts are free from the grooves. For
easiest adjustment, remove the belts.
2 Loosen setscrews D.
3 Loosen but do not remove capscrews E.
4 Remove key F. This key projects a small amount to provide
a grip for removing.
5 Adjust the pitch diameter by opening or closing the
movable flange by half or full turns. Note that two-groove
sheaves are supplied with both grooves set at the same
pitch diameter. Both movable flanges must be moved the
same number of turns to ensure the same pitch
diameter for satisfactory operation. Do not open
sheaves more than five turns for A belts or six turns for
B belts.
6 Replace key F.
7 Tighten setscrews D and capscrews E.
8 Put on the belts and adjust the belt tension. Do not force
belts over grooves. Loosen the belts by adjusting the motor
base closer to the fan shaft
McQuay IM 487-4
Check, Test, and Start Procedures
Reinsert locking screws A, but do not tighten them until
after adjustment is made.
9 Before starting the drive, make sure that all keys are in
place and all setscrews and all capscrews are tight. Check
and retighten all screws and re-tension the belts after
approximately 24 hours of operation.
3 Adjust the sheave to the desired pitch diameter by turning
the outer locking ring with a spanner wrench. Any pitch
diameter can be obtained within the sheave range. One
complete turn of the outer locking ring will result in a
0.233" (6 mm) change in pitch diameter.] Do not open A-B
sheaves more than four 3/4 turns for A belts or 6 turns
for B belts. Do not open C sheaves more than nine 1/2
turns.
MVP Variable Pitch Sheaves
Adjusting:
1 Slack off belt tension by moving the motor toward the
driven shaft until the belts are free from the grooves. For
easiest adjustment, remove the belts.
2 Loosen both locking screws A in outer locking ring, but do
4 Tighten both locking screws A in the outer locking ring.
not remove them from the sheave. There is a gap of
approximately 1/2" (1 mm) between the inner and outer
locking rings. This gap must be maintained for satisfactory
locking of the sheave.
If locking screws A are removed by accident and the gap is
lost, screw the outer locking ring down until it touches the
inner locking ring. Then back off the outer ring 1/2 to
3/4 turn until the inner and outer ring screw holes line up.
5 Put on the belts and adjust the belt tension. Do not force
belts over grooves. Loosen the belts by adjusting the motor
base closer to the fan shaft.
CAUTION
Do not loosen any screws other than the two locking screws (A)
in the outer locking ring. Before operating the drive, securely
tighten these screws.
Figure 111. LVP variable pitch sleeves
A
A
A
E
E
E
C
C
F
F
D
A
D
D
B
S e c tio n A -A
S e c tio n A -A
Figure 112. MVP variable pitch sheaves (type A-B)
C e n te r F la n g e s
G a p
O u te r L o c k in g
R in g
L o c k in g
S c re w s
"A "
In n e r L o c k in g
R in g
3 C a p s c re w s "B "
McQuay IM 487-4
S p a n n e r W re n c h
H o le
99
Check, Test, and Start Procedures
Figure 113. MVP variable pitch sheaves (type A-B)
B a r r e l F la n g e
E n d F la n g e
B a rre l
1 8 °
2 L o c k in g
S c re w s
"A "
L o n g K e y
H e re
100
S h o rt K e y
H e re
T h re a d
C e n te r F la n g e
A s s e m b ly
McQuay IM 487-4
Final Control Settings
Final Control Settings
When all start-up procedures are completed, set the controls
and program the MicroTech II controller for normal operation.
Use the following list as a guide; some items may not apply to
your unit. For more detail, see IM696 and OM137 or OM138.
1 Turn system switch S1 to ON and S7 to AUTO.
2 Turn gas furnace switch S3 to AUTO or turn electric heat
switch HS1 to ON.
3 Set the electromechanical (Honeywell H205) enthalpy
control (OAE) as required (A, B, C, or D). Set the
solid-state (Honeywell H705/C7400) enthalpy control
(OAE/ RAE) past “D.”
4 Set the heating and cooling parameters as required for
normal unit operation:
a Temperature \ Zone Cooling \
b Temperature \ Zone Heating \
c Temperature \ Discharge Cooling \
d Temperature \ Discharge Heating \
5 Set the low ambient compressor lockout setpoint as
required in menu, Temperature \ Zone Cooling \ OAT Clg
Lock=. Do not set it below 50°F (10°C) unless the unit is
equipped for low ambient operation.
6 Set the high ambient heat lockout temperature setpoint,
Temperature \ Zone Heating \ OAT Htg Lock= as required.
7 Set the alarm limits as required in
Setup/Service \ Alarm Limits \.
8 Set the duct static pressure control parameters as required
in keypad menu Airflow \ Duct Pressure \.
9 Set the building static pressure control parameters as
required in keypad menu Airflow \ Bldg Pressure \.
10 Set the fan tracking parameters as required in keypad
menus Setup/Service \ Fan Tracking Setup \ and Setup/
Service \ Fan Balance \.
11 Set the economizer control parameters as required in
keypad menu Temperature \ OA Damper \.
12 Set the control timers as required in keypad menu
Setup/Service \ Timer Settings \.
13 Set the date and time in keypad menu
Setup/Service \ Time/Date \.
14 Set the operating schedule as required using keypad menus.
Note: When used with a Building Automation System,
these settings may need to be kept at the default of no
schedule:
15 Temporarily disconnect static pressure sensor tubing from
sensors SPS1 and SPS2 (if installed) and place the unit into
the calibrate mode by using the keypad menu Setup/Service
\ Unit Configuration \ Calibrate Mode= and changing the
value from NO to YES. The calibrate mode automatically
zeroes all static pressure sensors and calibrates any actuator
feedback pots connected to the MicroTech II controller.
When the calibration is finished, the keypad menu System
Summary \ System \ Unit Status= changes from “Calib” to
“Off Man.”
16 To restart the unit, reconnect static pressure tubing and
change keypad menu System Summary \ System \ Ctrl
Mode= from OFF to AUTO.
Maintaining Control Parameter Records
McQuay recommends that the MicroTech II controller’s
setpoints and parameters be recorded and saved for future
reference. If the Microprocessor Control Board requires
replacement, this record facilitates entering the unit’s proper
data. The following tables display all the setpoints, monitoring
points, and program variables offered by MicroTech II plus the
keypad road map used to find each parameter.
A number of menus and menu items that appear on the unit
keypad/display are conditional and may not apply to a specific
unit, depending on the unit software configuration. The unit
software configuration is defined by a “Software
Configuration Code” shown on a label located near the
keypad/display. The Software Configuration Code also can be
displayed via the six menu items in the Config Code menu on
the unit keypad/display. Refer to “Main Control Board (MCB)
Configuration” in OM 137 or OM 138.
The shaded menus and menu items in Figure 114 on page 102
are conditional. A conditional menu or menu item includes a
reference in Figure 114 to the position in the Software
Configuration Code upon which its applicability depends. For
example, the Duct Pressure menu in Figure 114 includes a
notation [14=1 or 2]. This notation means that the Duct
Pressure menu (and all its menu items) applies to the specific
unit only if position 14 in its Software Configuration Code is a
1 or a 2. Otherwise, the menu or menu item is not applicable to
the unit and does not affect its operation.
The items in Figure 114 include the factory-set value for all
adjustable items. Keep a record of any changes made to any
of these items.
a Schedules \ Daily Schedule \
b Schedules \ Holiday Schedule \
McQuay IM 487-4
101
102
CANCEL
BACK
Sub Menus
7
8
Previous Alarms
Occupancy= _____
Occ Mode= Auto
OccSrc= _____
Tnt Ovrd= 0 min
Emerg Override= Norm
UnitStatus= _____
Clg Capacity= xxx%
Htg Capacity= xxx%
Clg Status= _____
Htg Status= _____
Clg Capacity= xxx%
Eff Clg Spt= xxx.x°F
DAT Clg Spt= 55.0°F
[1=1 or 3]
Clg Db= 2.0°F
Htg Capacity= xxx%
Eff Htg Spt= xxx.x°F
OATLock Diff= 1°F
OATHtg Lock= 55°F
Htg Status= _____
UnoccHtgDiff= 3.0°F
UnoccHtg Spt= 55.0°F
Space Temp= xxx.x°F
CtrlTemp Src= Return
Htg Deadband= 2.0°F
Max Clg Spt= 65.0°F
Clg Reset= None
[1=1 or 3]
Min Clg Spt@= 0
[1=1 or 3]
Max Clg Spt@= 100
[1=1 or 3]
Min Clg Spt= 55.0°F
Disch Air= xxx.x°F
Control Temp= xxx.x°F
Occ Htg Spt= 70.0°F
Discharge Cooling
Zone Heating
Appl Mode= Heat/Cool
VAV Output= _____
[14=1 or 2]
SAVE
OA Damper Pos= xxx%
[7=1,2,3,4,A,B or C]
Eff Min OA Pos= xxx%
[7=3 or C]
OA Flow= xxxxxCFM
[8>0]
OA Ambient= _____
[7=3 or C]
MinOA Type= None
[7=3 or C]
DesignFlow= No
[8>0]
MinOA Pos= 10%
[1=1,3,A or C]
MinOA Flow= 2000CFM
[8>0]
MinOA @Max Sig= 50%
[7=3 or C]
Min Signal= 0%
[7=3 or C]
OA Damper
OA Temp= xxx.x°F
Ent Fan= xxx.x°F
[9=2,3,4,6,7,A or B]
Disch Air= xxx.x°F
Return Air= xxx.x°F
[1=0 or 1]
Space Temp= xxx.x°F
Control Temp= xxx.x°F
Temperatures
Max Signal= 100%
[7=3 or C]
MinOAResetMax= 50%
[7=3 or C]
Max Fan Diff= 50%
[15=1 or 2]
Min Fan Diff= 20%
[15=1 or 2]
Reset T Limit= 0°F
[7=3 or C]
EconChgovr= Enthalpy
[7=3 or C]
EconChgovrT= 60°F
[7=3 or C]
EconChgovrDiff= 1°F
[7=3 or C]
Max Purge= 60 min
[7=3 or C]
OA Temp= xxx.x°F
Disch Fan= _____
RF/EF Fan= _____
[15=0,1,2 or 4]
Fan Operation= _____
Flow Status= _____
Airflow Summary
2
Select Menu
Save Edited Parameter
ENTER
BACK
Move Display Right
Move Edit Cursor Right
CANCEL
Backup To Previous Menu
Cancel Editing Command
Occupancy
Ctrl Mode= Off
Keypad Key Definitions
Move Display Left
Move Edit Cursor Left
System
1
6
Active Alarms
4
Humidity
5
3
Temperature
Schedules
2
Airflow
Setup/Service
1
System Summary
Main Menu
BSP Db= 0.010"WC
RF/EF Fan Cap= xxx%
DSP Db= 0.08"WC
Disch Fan Cap= xxx%
Stage Time= 10 Min
Sump Dump Spt= 35°F
Max SumpT= 85°F
Min SumpT= 75°F
Min Fan Speed= 25%
Sump Temp= xxx.x°F
VFD Speed= xxx%
Evap Condensing
[6>0]
Max Htg Spt= 120.0°F
Htg Reset= None
[1=1 or 3]
Min Htg Spt@= 0
[1=1 or 3]
Max Htg Spt@= 100
[1=1 or 3]
Min DAT Ctrl= Yes
MinDAT Limit= 55.0°F
[1=0 or 2]
Min Htg Spt= 60.0°F
Eff Htg Spt= xxx.x°F
DAT Htg Spt= 100.0°F
[1=1 or 3]
Htg Db= 2.0°F
Htg Capacity= xxx%
Disch Air= xxx.x°F
Discharge Heating
BldgSP Spt= 0.050"WC
DuctSP Spt= 1.00"WC
RF/EF Fan Cap= xxx%
Bldg Press= x.xx"WC
Bldg Pressure
[15=1,2 or 4]
ER ExhT= xxx.x°F
ER DAT= xxx.x°F
Energy Rec= Yes
EF Min Cap= 5%
RF/EF Fan Cap= xxx%
Energy Recovery
A
[19=1 or 2]
OATLock Diff= 1°F
OATClg Lock= 55°F
Clg Status= _____
UnoccClgDiff= 3.0°F
UnoccClg Spt= 85.0°F
Space Temp= xxx.x°F
CtrlTemp Src= Return
Clg Deadband= 2.0°F
Occ Clg Spt= 75.0°F
Eff Clg Spt= xxx.x°F
Clg Capacity= xxx%
Control Temp= xxx.x°F
Zone Cooling
3
Clear Active Alarm
CLEAR
ALARM
Move Display Down
Decrement Adjustable Parameter
Duct Press= x.xx"WC
Duct Pressure
[14=1 or 2]
Display Active Alarm
ALARM
Move Display Up
Increment Adjustable Parameter
A
Final Control Settings
Figure 114. Keypad accessible menu structure
Keypad accessible menu structure
McQuay IM 487-4
McQuay IM 487-4
A
Sub Menus (Continued)
4
End= mmm dd@hh:mm
Tue= 00:00 - 00:00
Comp 3= xxxxx hr [2=1]
Comp 4= xxxxx hr [2=1]
Pos # 17-20= x.xxx
Pos # 21-22= x.x
Cond Fan2 Spt= 55°F
Cond Fan3 Spt= 65°F
Clg IntTime= 700 sec
Htg IntTime= 500 sec
Period= 60 sec
Min DF Cap= 10%
Min Strt Time= 120 sec
Min Stop Time= 120 sec
BSP Period= 5 sec
PRAC= No
Htg Propbd= 12.0°F
Clg Propbd= 8.0°F
Stage Time= 5 min
Cond Fan Diff= 5°F
Cond Fan4 Spt= 75°F
Cond Fan1 Spt= 0°F
Clg Method= Average
Comp Ctrl= Cross Circ
Lead Circuit= #1
Min OA Dmpr= 5%
BSP IntTime= 10 sec
Spt Source= Keypad
Min Exh Fan Cap= 25%
BSP Propbd= 1.0"WC
Compressor Setup
[2=1 & 3<8]
Exhaust Fan Setup
[15=4]
Zone Temp Setup
[1=0 or 2]
Start Init= 180 sec
Post Heat= 0 min
[14=1 or 2]
Service= 0 min
Recirculate= 3 min
[1=0 or 1]
Low DAT= 3 min
Max MWU= 90 min
[1=0 or 1]
Tnt Ovrd= 120 min
Timer Settings
Bldg Static P Setup
[15=1,2 or 4]
ERcvry= xxxxx hr [19=1or2]
Dehumid= xxxxx hr [1=0or2]
Tnt Ovrd= xxxxx hr
Econo= xxxxx hr [7=3 or C]
Heating= xxxxx hr [9>0]
Comp 6= xxxxx hr [3=6]
Comp 5= xxxxx hr [3=6]
Comp 2= xxxxx hr [2=1]
Pos # 13-16= x.xxx
Mech Cool= xxxxx hr [2>0]
Comp 1= xxxxx hr [2=1]
Clear Alarm= No
Pos # 9-12= x.xxx
Timeout= 15 min
Pos # 5-8= x.xxx
Fan= xxxxx hr
Clg Zero OAT= 100°F
Feedback= 3 Wire
Stage Time= 5 min
PRAC= No
Clg Period= 30 sec
Clg IntTime= 60 sec
Clg Propbd= 30°F
Chilled Water Setup
[2=2 or A]
Date= dd-mmm-yyyy
Day= day
Time= hh:mm:ss
Time/Date
Clg OAT= 85°F
Hol 15=mmmdd-mmmdd
Passwords
Clg Rate= 0.4°F/min
Hol 14=mmmdd-mmmdd
Hol= 00:00 - 00:00
Hol 16=mmmdd-mmmdd
Htg Zero OAT= 0°F
Hol 13=mmmdd-mmmdd
Sun= 00:00 - 00:00
Htg OAT= 35°F
Sat= 00:00 - 00:00
Htg Rate= 0.4°F/min
Auto Update= Yes
Optimal Start= No
Space Temp= xxx.x°F
Optimal Start
Fri= 00:00 - 00:00
Hol 3=mmmdd-mmmdd
Hol 2=mmmdd-mmmdd
Hol 1=mmmdd-mmmdd
Holiday Schedule
Thu= 00:00 - 00:00
Operating Hours
Beg= mmm dd@hh:mm
Mon= 00:00 - 00:00
Wed= 00:00 - 00:00
One Event Schedule
Daily Schedule
5
Pos # 1-4= x.xxx
Configuration Code
DewPnt Db= 2°F
RH Db= 2%
DewPoint Spt= 50°F
RH Setpoint= 50%
Dehum Method=None
Dew Point= xx.x°F
Rel Humidity= xxx%
Dehum Status= _____
Dehumidification
[1=0 or 2]
DF Max w/Exh= 100%
RF@DFMax w/Ex=60%
B
Rem RF/EF Cap= 25%
RF@DFMin w/oEx=15%
PRAC= No
Feedback= 3 Wire
PRAC= No
Clg Period= 30 sec
Clg IntTime= 60 sec
Clg Propbd= 30°F
Economizer Setup
[7=3 or C]
Set Min w/ Exh= No
DF Min w/oExh= 20%
DSP Period= 10 sec
AI11 Reference= No
RH Flow= xxx.xx%
LH Flow= xxx.xx%
Deadband= 6.0%
Max Step= 5.0%
Modband= 50%
Wait Time= 30 sec
DesignFlow Setup
[8>0]
RF@DFMin w/Ex=10%
DF Min w/Exh= 20%
Set Max w/ Exh= No
RF@DFMax w/oEx=95%
Set Min w/o Exh= No
Set Max w/o Exh= No
DF Max w/oExh= 100%
Fan Balance= Off
Fan Balance
[14=1 or 2 & 15=1 or 2]
DSP IntTime= 40 sec
Fan Tracking
[14=1 or 2 & 15=1 or 2]
DF CapCtrl= DuctPres
[14=1 or 2]
Remote DF Cap= 25%
[14=1 or 2]
RF/EF Ctrl= Tracking
[15=1,2 or 4]
Rem RF/EF Cap= 25%
[15=1,2 or 4]
Eng Units= English
DSP Propbd= 6.0"WC
Duct Static P Setup
[14=1 or 2]
EFT Sensor= No
2nd P Sensor= None
[14=1,2 or 15=1,2 or 4]
Space Sensor= Yes
AHU ID= _____
CCB1 ID= _____
[2=1]
CCB2 ID= _____
[2=1, & 3<8]
GCB1 ID= ____
[3=8]
EHB1 ID= _____
[9=2]
ERB1 ID= _____
[19=1 or 2]
Calibrate Mode= No
Unit Configuration
6
Final Control Settings
Figure 114. Keypad accessible menu structure (continued)
103
B
104
Maximum Stages= 4
DH Stage Time= 10min
Sensor Loc= Return
Stage Time= 5 min
Min Off Time= 20 min
Min Exh On= 120 sec
Hi Disch Alm= 170°F
Lo Disch Alm= 40°F
Hi Return Alm= 120°F
[1=1 or 3]
Airflow Switch= Off
Dirty Filter= Off
Alarm Name
Alarm Type
dd-mmm-yy hh:mm:ss
Alarm Type
dd-mmm-yy hh:mm:ss
HtgB H/W= Off
Alarm Name
[3=8]
[9=2]
GenC H/W= Off
Previous Alarm 3
[3<8]
Ckt2 H/W= Off
Previous Alarm 2
[3<8]
Ckt1 H/W= Off
Dirty FnlFltr= Off [20=1]
Alarm Limits
Alarm Type
dd-mmm-yy hh:mm:ss
dd-mmm-yy hh:mm:ss
Alarm Name
Alarm Name
Alarm Type
Previous Alarm 5
dd-mmm-yy hh:mm:ss
Alarm Type
Alarm Name
Active Alarm 2
Alarm= Normal
OA Damper= Auto
[7>0]
Mod Cooling= Auto
[2=2 or A]
Mod Heating= Auto
[9=1,5 or C]
VAV Output= Heat
[14=1 or 2]
Disch Vanes= Auto
[14=1]
RF/EF Vanes= Auto
[15=1]
Disch VFD= Auto
[14=2]
RF/EF VFD= Auto
[15=2]
Discharge Fan= Off
RF/EF Fan= Off
[15=0,1,2 or 4]
Fan Operation= Off
Manual Control= No
Manual Control
Previous Alarm 4
dd-mmm-yy hh:mm:ss
Alarm Type
Alarm Name
Active Alarm 1
7
Minimum Stages= 2
Max ExhT Diff= 6°F
Min Exh Off= 120 sec
Dehum Ctrl= Occupied
Dehum Setup
[1=0 or 2]
Min ExhT Diff= 2°F
Energy Rec Setup
[19=1 or 2]
Alarm Out Warnings
Stage Time= 5 min
[9=2,3,4,6,7,A or B]
F&BP Ctrl= OpenValve
[9=1]
F&BP Chgovr= 37°F
[9=1]
Htg Propbd= 20°F
[9=1,3,4,5,A,B or C]
Htg IntTime= 120 sec
[9=1,3,4,5,A,B or C]
Htg Period= 60 sec
[9=1,3,4,5,A,B or C]
PRAC= No
[9=1,3,4,5,A,B or C]
Feedback= 3 Wire
[9=3,4,5,A,B or C]
Heating Setup
dd-mmm-yy hh:mm:ss
Alarm Type
Alarm Name
Previous Alarm 6
dd-mmm-yy hh:mm:ss
Alarm Type
Alarm Name
Active Alarm 3
Fan Fail= Fast
OA Dmpr Stuck= Fast
[1=2 or 3]
Lo Disch Temp= Fast
Freeze= Fast
[2=2,A or 9=1,5 or C]
Smoke= Fast
OAT Sensor= Fast
[1=3]
Space Sensor= Fast
[1=2 or 3]
Return Sensor= Fast
[1=0 or 1]
Disch Sensor= Fast
Duct Hi Limit= Fast
[14=1 or 2]
Hi Return Temp= Fast
[1=0 or 1]
Hi Disch Temp= Fast
Alarm Out Faults
dd-mmm-yy hh:mm:ss
Alarm Type
Alarm Name
Previous Alarm 7
dd-mmm-yy hh:mm:ss
Alarm Type
Alarm Name
Active Alarm 4
Freeze= Slow
[2=2,A or 9=1,5 or C]
OAT Sensor= Slow
Space Sensor= Slow
[1=0,1 or 3]
Return Sensor= Slow
[1=0 or 1]
Ent Fan Sens= Slow
[18=1]
Lo Airflow= Slow
[9=2,3,4,6,7,A or B]
Heat Fail= Slow
[9=3,4,6,A or B]
Fan Retry= Slow
[14=2]
Hi Press-Ckt1= Slow
[3<8]
Hi Press-Ckt2= Slow
[3<8]
Lo Press-Ckt1= Slow
[3<8]
Lo Press-Ckt2= Slow
[3<8]
Frost-Ckt1= Slow
[3<8]
Frost-Ckt2= Slow
[3<8]
Comp #1 Alm= Slow
[3<8]
Alarm Out Problems
dd-mmm-yy hh:mm:ss
Alarm Type
Alarm Name
Previous Alarm 8
dd-mmm-yy hh:mm:ss
Alarm Type
Alarm Name
Previous Alarm 1
8
Comp #2 Alm= Slow
[3<8]
Comp #3 Alm= Slow
[3=4,5,6 or 7]
Comp #4 Alm= Slow
[3=5,6 or 7]
Comp #5 Alm= Slow
[3=6]
Comp #6 Alm= Slow
[3=6]
PumpDown-Ckt1= Slow
[3<8]
PumpDown-Ckt2= Slow
[3<8]
Ckt1 Clg Ena= Slow
[3<8]
Ckt2 Clg Ena= Slow
[3<8]
GenC Clg Ena= Slow
[3=8]
HtgB Htg Ena= Slow
[9=2]
Ckt1 Comm Fail= Slow
[3<8]
Ckt2 Comm Fail= Slow
[3<8]
Genc Comm Fail= Slow
[3=8]
HtgB Comm Fail= Slow
[9=2]
ERecB CommFail= Slow
[19=1 or 2]
Final Control Settings
Figure 114. Keypad accessible menu structure (continued)
McQuay IM 487-4
Sub Menus (Continued)
Maintenance
Maintenance
Installation and maintenance must be performed only by
qualified personnel who are experienced with this type of
equipment and familiar with local codes and regulations.
WARNING
Moving machinery and electrical power hazards. Can cause
severe personal injury or death.
Disconnect and lock off all power before servicing equipment.
CAUTION
Sharp edges are inherent to sheet metal parts, screws, clips,
and similar items. May cause personal injury.
Exercise caution when servicing equipment.
Servicing Control Panel Components
Disconnect all electric power to the unit when servicing
control panel components. Before servicing, always inspect
units for multiple disconnects to ensure all power is removed
from the control panel and its components.
WARNING
Hazardous voltage. Can cause severe injury or death.
Disconnect electric power before servicing equipment. More
than one disconnect may be required to de-energize the unit.
• Check the power and control voltages.
• Check the running amperage of all motors.
• Check all operating temperatures and pressures.
• Check and adjust all temperature and pressure controls as
needed.
• Check and adjust all damper linkages as needed.
• Check the operation of all safety controls.
• Examine the gas furnace (see Bulletin No. IM 684 or
IM 685).
• Lubricate the door latch mechanisms.
Unit Storage
Location
• The McQuay Rooftop Airhandling Unit is an outdoor unit.
However, the schedule may dictate storage either on the
ground or in its final position at the site. If the unit is stored
on the ground, additional precautions should be taken as
follows:
• Make sure that the unit is well supported along the length of
the base rail.
• Make sure that the unit is level (no twists or uneven ground
surface).
Planned Maintenance
• Provide proper drainage around the unit to prevent flooding
of the equipment
Preventive maintenance is the best way to avoid unnecessary
expense and inconvenience. Have this system inspected at
regular intervals by a qualified service technician. The
required frequency of inspections depends upon the total
operating time and the indoor and outdoor environmental
conditions. Routine maintenance should cover the following
items:
• Provide adequate protection from vandalism, mechanical
contact, etc.
• Tighten all belts, wire connections, and setscrews.
• Clean all mechanically or with cold water, if necessary.
Usually any fouling is only matted on the entering air face of
the coil and can be removed by brushing.
• Lubricate the motor and fan shaft bearings.
• Align or replace the belts as needed.
• Clean or replace the filters as needed.
• Make sure all doors are securely closed.
• If isolation dampers are provided, verify that they are
properly installed and fully closed to prevent the entry of
animals and debris through the supply and return air
openings.
• Units without isolation dampers should be fitted with covers
over the supply and return air openings.
Preparation
Supply (and Return) fans
1 Move the motor base to check and lubricate slides and
leadscrews.
• Check each circuit’s refrigerant sightglass when the circuit is
operating under steady-state, full load conditions. The
sightglass should then be full and clear. If it is not, check for
refrigerant leaks.
2 Remove the drive belts, tag them with the fan name and
Note: A partially full sight glass is not uncommon at part load
Mark the shaft positions first to make sure they stop in a
different position.
conditions.
• Check for proper superheat.
• Check for blockage of the condensate drain. Clean the
condensate pan as needed.
McQuay IM 487-4
unit serial number, and store them in a conditioned space
out of direct sunlight.
3 Once every two weeks, rotate the fan and motor shafts.
4 Depending on local climatic conditions, condensate may
collect on components inside the units. To prevent surface
rust and discoloration, spray all bare metal parts with a rust
105
Maintenance
preventive compound. Pay close attention to fan shafts,
sheaves, bearings, and bearing supports,
Cabinet Sections
Once a month, open a door on each section and verify that no
moisture or debris is accumulating in the unit.
Gas Furnace
For information on maintenance of the gas furnace, refer to
Bulletin No. IM 684 or IM 685.
Bearing Lubrication
CAUTION
Cooling circuits
The steps below are necessary only if the unit has been started.
1 Provide that each circuit is properly pumped down.
2 Pull the fuses to each compressor (store them in the control
cabinet)
3 Close all the refrigerant service valves on each circuit
4 Tag the valves as a warning for the technician who restarts
the units
Gas Furnace
If the unit is equipped with a gas furnace, close the gas shutoff
valve and open furnace control switch S3.
Control Compartment
1 McQuay International recommends that the electronic
control equipment in the unit be stored in a 5% to 95% RH
(non-condensing) environment.
2 It may be necessary to put a heat source (light bulb) in the
main control panel to prevent the accumulation of
atmospheric condensate within the panel.
3 The location and wattage of the heat source is dependent on
local environmental conditions.
4 Check the control compartment every two weeks to provide
that the heat source is functional and is adequate for current
conditions.
Restart
After extended storage, perform a complete start up. Inevitable
accumulations of dirt, insect nests, etc. can contribute to
problems if not cleaned out thoroughly prior to start up. In
addition, thermal cycling tends to loosen mechanical and
electrical connections. Following the startup procedure helps
discover these and other issues that may have developed
during the storage interval.
Bearing overheating potential. Can damage the equipment.
Do not overlubricate bearings.
Use only a high grade mineral grease with a 200°F safe
operating temperature. Refer to Table on page 106 for specific
recommended lubricants.
Motor Bearings
Supply and return fans—Supply and return fan motors
should have grease added after every 2000 hours of operation.
Use one of the greases shown in Table 16 on page 106. Using
the following procedure, relubricate the bearings while the
motor is warm, but not running.
1 Remove and clean upper and lower grease plugs.
2 Insert a grease fitting into the upper hole and add a small
amount of clean grease with a low pressure gun.
3 Run the motor for five minutes before replacing the plugs.
Note: Specific greasing instructions are located on a tag
attached to the motor. If special lubrication instructions
are on the motor, they supersede all other instructions.
Fan Shaft Bearings
Relubricate fan shaft bearings periodically. Relubricate
according to the schedule shown in Table on page 106. If the
bearings are exposed to wet conditions, wide temperature
variations, or other severe atmospheric conditions, relubricate
more frequently. Use one of the greases shown in Table 16.
While the bearing is at normal operating temperatures, rotate
the fan by hand and add only enough grease to purge the seals.
The seals bleed slightly when this occurs. Do not
overlubricate.
Table 16: Recommended greases
Manufacturer
Product name
Temp. range (°F)
Texaco Lubricants Co.
Keystone Ind. Lubricants
Mobil Oil Corporation
Chevron U.S.A. Inc.
Exxon Company. U.S.A.
Shell Oil Company
Premium RB
84EP-2
Mobilith AW2
SRI-2
Ronex MP
Alvania No. 2
-30 to 300
-40 to 200
-40 to 325
-20 to 325
-40 to 300
-20 to 240
Table 17: Recommended fan shaft bearing lubrication
intervals
Operating duty
Continuous
12 Hrs./Day
106
Bearing ambient temperature
To 130°F
To 150°F
Over 150°F
6 months
12 months
4 months
12 months
2 months
6 months
McQuay IM 487-4
Maintenance
Propeller Exhaust
Setscrews
For more information, see page 89.
Setscrews are used to lock bearings, sheaves, locking collars,
and fan wheels to their shafts. They must be checked
periodically to see that they have not loosened. If this is not
done, severe equipment damage could occur.
Vibration Levels
Each unit as shipped is trim balanced to operate smoothly. To
provide satisfactory operation after shipping and installation,
use accepted industry guidelines for field balancing fans. See
Table 18.
Note: Excessive vibration from any cause contributes to
premature fan and motor bearing failure. Monitor
overall vibration levels every six months of operation.
An increase in levels is an indication of potential
trouble.
Table 18: Vibration levels
Fan speed (RPM)
Vibration
800 or less
801 or greater
5 mils maximum displacement
0.20 in/sec maximum velocity
Vibration Causes
1 Wheel imbalance.
a Dirt or debris on wheel blades.
b Loose setscrews in wheel hub or bearing-to-shaft.
c Wheel distorted from overspeed.
2 Bent shaft.
3 Faulty drive.
a Variable pitch sheaves—Axial and radial runout of
flanges; uneven groove spacing; out of balance. Also
similar faults in driven sheave.
b Bad V-belts; lumpy, or mismatched; belt tension too
tight or too loose.
4 Bad bearings, loose bearing hold-down bolts.
5 Motor imbalance.
6 Fan section not supported evenly on foundation.
Periodic Service and Maintenance
1 Check all moving parts for wear every six months.
2 Check bearing collar, sheave, and wheel hub setscrews,
sheave capscrews, and bearing hold-down bolts for
tightness every six months.
McQuay IM 487-4
Using Table 19, check the tightness of all setscrews with a
torque wrench. Note that if the return fan bearings setscrews
must be retightened, a special procedure is required to equally
load both bearings (see “Return Fan Bearing Setscrews”
below).
Table 19: Setscrew minimum torque specifications
Setscrew diameter (in.)
Minimum torque (ft.lb)
1/4
5/16
3/8
7/16
1/2
5/8
5.5
10.5
19.0
29.0
42.0
92.0
Return Fan Bearing Setscrews
Because the return fan is mounted on a vertical shaft, the
following procedure must be used to retighten any return fan
bearing setscrews that have loosened. This procedure will
provide that both bearings are equally loaded. If one bearing is
carrying the entire weight of the fan, it could fail prematurely.
1 Loosen the fan belts.
2 Support the weight of the fan and the fan shaft with timbers
or some other suitable means (see the fan shaft support in
Figure 115). Important: To maintain proper drive
alignment and fan-to-tunnel clearance, the fan and shaft
must not drop at all when the setscrews are loosened in
Step 4.
3 Verify that the upper shaft collar is securely fastened to the
shaft. Check the setscrew torque.
4 Loosen the upper and lower bearing setscrews. The entire
weight of the fan and shaft is now supported by the fan
shaft support.
5 Retighten all bearings to the torque specification given in
Table 19. Remove the fan shaft support and re-tension the
belts.
107
Maintenance
Figure 117. 24" DWDI backward curved wheel-to-funnel
(036C, 040C)
Figure 115. Return fan assembly
U p p e r B e a r in g
W h e e l
.1 8 "
.1 8 "
F u n n e l
F a n S h a ft
F a n W h e e l
9 .3 1 "
CL
9 .3 1 "
F a n
Figure 118. 27 to 40" DWDI airfoil wheel-to-funnel
alignment
F a n S h a ft
S u p p o rt
L o w e r
B e a r in g
Supply Fan Wheel-to-Funnel Alignment
If the unit is equipped with an airfoil or backward curved
supply fan, the fan wheel-to-funnel alignment must be as
shown in Figure 116, Figure 117, Figure 119 and Figure 120 to
obtain proper air delivery and operating clearance. If
necessary, adjustments are made as follows:
1 Verify that the fan shaft has not moved in its bearings.
2 Loosen the fan hub setscrews and move the wheel(s) along
the shaft as necessary to obtain the correct dimension
shown in Table 20, Table 21, and Table 22.
3 Retighten the setscrews to the torque specification given in
Table 19 on page 107. Tighten the setscrews over the
keyway first; tighten those at 90 degrees to the keyway last.
Table 20: 27 to 40" DWDI airfoil wheel-to-funnel
relationship
Wheel-to-funnel relationship (in inches)
Wheel diameter (inches)
“A” +0.3/ — 0.0
27
30
33
36
40
9.9 (246 mm)
10.6 (269 mm)
11.7 (297 mm)
13.1 (333 mm)
14.5 (368 mm0
Figure 119. 40" SWSI airfoil wheel-to-funnel alignment
(RDT 045 to 075)
W h e e l
4 Verify that the radial clearance around the fan is uniform.
Radial clearance can be adjusted by slightly loosening the
funnel hold-down fasteners, shifting the funnel as required,
and retightening the fasteners.
Figure 116. 20" DWDI airfoil wheel-to-funnel (015C to 030C)
W h e e l
F u n n e l
A
.2 5 "
.2 5 "
Table 21: SWSI airfoil wheel-to-funnel relationship
Wheel-to-funnel relationship (in inches)
F u n n e l
108
Wheel diameter
“A”
40
0.62
McQuay IM 487-4
Maintenance
Figure 120. 44" and 49"SWSI airfoil wheel-to-funnel
alignment
W h e e l
device with incorrect setpoint adjustment. Any other
non-authorized trip point or setpoint adjustment voids all or
portions of the unit’s warranty. Authorized setpoint adjustment
is accomplished as follows
1 For motors with a 1.15 service factor, rotate the arrow on
the dial to correspond to the motor FLA.
See in Figure 121.
2 For motors with a 1.0 service factor, multiply the motor
F u n n e l
FLA by 0.9; then rotate the arrow on the dial to correspond
to that value.
A
Table 22: 44" and 49"SWSI airfoil wheel-to-funnel
Relationship
To reset a tripped MMP, clear the trip by rotating the knob
counterclockwise to the OFF position; then rotate knob
clockwise to the ON position. See Figure 121, .
Wheel-to-funnel relationship (in inches)
Wheel diameter
“A”
44
49
16.21
17.81
Experience in the field has shown that R-407C systems can be
“topped off” after a leak has been repaired and operate
normally. There is no need, except in the case of a critically
charged systems, to replace the entire charge after a leak has
been repaired.
Winterizing Water Coils
Coil freeze-up can be caused by such things as air stratification
and failure of outdoor dampers and/or preheat coils. Routine
draining of water cooling coils for winter shutdown cannot be
depended upon as insurance against freeze-up. Severe coil
damage may result. It is recommended that all coils be drained
as thoroughly as possible and then treated in the following
manner.
• Fill each coil independently with an antifreeze solution
using a small circulating pump and again thoroughly drain.
• Check freezing point of antifreeze before proceeding to next
coil. Due to a small amount of water always remaining in
each coil, there will be a diluting effect. The small amount of
antifreeze solution remaining in the coil must always be
concentrated enough to prevent freeze-up.
WARNING
If an overload or a fault current interruption occurs, check
circuits to determine the cause of the interruption.
If a fault condition exits, examine the controller. If damaged,
replace it to reduce the risk of fire or electrical shock.
Other MMP features:
• Three-position rotary operator: OFF-TRIP-ON
See Figure 121.
• Lockout—tagoutable rotary operator: turn the rotary
operator to OFF, slide out the extension arm, and insert a
lockout pin.
• Ambient compensated –20°F to +60°F
• Single-phase sensitivity: if one phase exceeds setpoint, all
three phases open.
• Trip test: insert a 9/64" screw driver in the slot to simulate a
trip. See ‘ in Figure 121.
Figure 121. Manual motor protector
Arrow
1
Note: Carefully read instructions for mixing antifreeze
Three-position
rotary operator
solution used. Some products have a higher freezing
point in their natural state than when mixed with water.
Control Panel Components
Manual Motor Protector (MMP)
Trip test slot
3
The manual motor protector (MMP) provides coordinated
branch circuit, short circuit protection, a disconnecting means,
a motor controller, and coordinated motor overload protection.
A short circuit indicator with manual reset is mounted along
side of each MMP as a means to differentiate between a short
circuit and overload trip conditions.
The MMP trip points are factory set. Do not change unless the
motor ampacity changes or the MMP is replaced with a new
McQuay IM 487-4
109
Maintenance
Circuit Breaker
Disconnect
Circuit breakers are installed upstream of all VFDs to provide
short circuit protection.
The optional disconnect is a molded case switch with many of
the same features of the circuit breaker. The disconnect comes
standard with a through-the-door handle and mechanism to
disconnect power to the unit prior to opening the door. The
handle can be padlocked in the OFF position while performing
maintenance to the unit.
To reset a tripped circuit breaker: Clear the trip by rotating the
lever down to the OFF position. See in Figure 122. Then
rotate lever up to the ON position. See in Figure 122.
WARNING
CAUTION
If an overload or a fault current interruption occurs, check
circuits to determine the cause of the interruption.
If a fault condition exits, examine the controller. If damaged,
replace it to reduce the risk of fire or electrical shock.
Molded case switches do not provide over-current protection.
This device may automatically open the circuit at levels above
the ampere rating of the switch.
Figure 123. Through-the-door handle disconnect
Figure 122. Circuit breaker
2
ON position
1
OFF position
110
McQuay IM 487-4
Maintenance
Terminals
Phase Voltage Monitor (PVM) (see page 84)
The terminals are spring clamp type. They only require
inserting (see in Figure 124) and clamping the wire to be
The phase voltage monitor is designed to protect three-phase
loads from damaging power conditions. A microprocessorbased voltage and phase sensing circuit constantly monitors
the three-phase voltages to detect harmful power line
conditions. When a harmful condition is detected, its output
relay is deactivated after a specified trip delay (Trip Delay).
The output relay reactivates after power line conditions return
to an acceptable level for a specified amount of time (Restart
Delay). The trip and restart delays prevent nuisance tripping
due to rapidly fluctuating power line conditions.
stripped, which offers several advantages over screw
terminals. The clamping is done by inserting a flat-bladed
screw driver (up to 9/64" wide). See in Figure 124.
• Spring connection does not require torquing and resists
vibration
• Easily identifiable terminal markers
• Built-in test ports on each terminal, up to 2.3 mm diameter
See ‘in Figure 124.
Figure 124. Terminal connectors
Other features:
• LED display to indicate status (see in Figure 125)
– Loss of phase
– High or low voltage
– Voltage unbalance
– Phase reversal
– Rapid cycling
– Standard 1 to 500 second variable restart delay (see in
Figure 125)
• Standard 2% to 8% variable voltage unbalance (see ‘in
Figure 125)
• Standard 1 to 30 second trip delay (see ’in Figure 125)
Figure 125. Phase voltage monitor
Standard 2%–8%
variable voltage
unbalance
Standard
1–500 second
variable
restart delay
Standard
1–30 second
trip delay
4
LED display
1
McQuay IM 487-4
111
Replacement Parts List
Replacement Parts List
Component
designation
Description
McQuay part number
MCB
Main Control Board
CCB1
Auxiliary Cooling Control Board (DX Circuit #1 or generic condenser)
060006101
112026101 (replaces 106102701)
CCB2
Auxiliary Cooling Control Board (DX Circuit #2)
112026101 (replaces 106102701)
EHB1
Auxiliary Electric Heat Control Board
112026101 (replaces 106102701)
ERB1
Auxiliary Energy Recovery Control Board
112026101 (replaces 106102801)
–
RS-485 Communication Module (for Auxiliary Control Boards)
060006202
–
Standoffs for mounting RS-485 Communication Module (PN 060006206) onto Auxiliary Control
Board (PN 112026101)
048166707
–
Keypad/Display
060006301
–
Keypad-Main Control Board Cable
111044601
Zone Temperature Sensor with Tenant Override
111048101
Zone Temperature Sensor with Tenant Override & Remote Setpoint Adjustment (SCC units only)
111048102
ZNT1
DAT
Discharge Air Temperature Sensor (50 ft cable length-field cut to length)
060004705
EFT
Entering Fan Air Temperature Sensor (50 ft cable length-field cut to length)
060004705
OAT
Outside Air Temperature Sensor (50 ft cable length-field cut to length)
060004705
RAT
Return Air Temperature Sensor (50 ft cable length-field cut to length)
060004705
Static Pressure Sensor: Duct, No. 1
049545007
SPS1
Static Pressure Sensor: Duct, No. 2
049545007
Static Pressure Sensor: Building (Space) Pressure
049545006
T2
Transformer: 115/24 VAC
060004601
T3
Transformer: 115/24 VAC
060004601
T9
Transformer: 115/24 VAC
060630801
Humidity Sensor: Wall Mount
067294901
SPS2
HUM1
Humidity Sensor: Duct Mount
067295001
PC5
Dirty Filter Switch: First Filter Section
065493801
PC6
Dirty Filter Switch: Final Filter Section
065493801
PC7
Airflow Proving Switch
060015801
DHL
Duct High Limit Switch
065493801
Enthalpy Control: Electromechanical
030706702
OAE
Enthalpy Control: Electronic (Used with RAE)
049262201
Return Air Enthalpy Sensor (Used with Electronic OAE)
049262202
SD1
Smoke Detector: Supply Air
049025001
SD2
Smoke Detector: Return Air
049025001
–
BACnet MS/TP Communication Module (RS485)
060006202
–
BACnet/IP Communication Module (Ethernet Cable 10BASET)
060006201
–
LonMark Space Comfort Controller (SCC) Communication Module
060006203
–
LonMark Discharge Air Controller (DAC) Communication Module
060006204
–
5 VDC Power Supply
111049601
–
–
Serial Port Ribbon
111047201
–
MCB Connector Repair Kit
Power Disconnect Switch
18 in. Lamp Holder
24 in. Lamp Holder
36 in. Lamp Holder
Hard Wire Module
18 in. Lamp
24 in. Lamp
36 in. Lamp
RAE
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
112
MCB Battery
BR2325
300036605
033696300
205484001
205484101
205484201
205485501
205484501
205484601
205484701
McQuay IM 487-4
Service and Warranty Procedure
Service and Warranty Procedure
Replacement Parts
When writing to McQuay for service or replacement parts,
provide the model number, serial number, and unit part
number of the unit as stamped on the serial plate attached to
the unit. For questions regarding wiring diagrams, it will be
necessary to provide the number on the specific diagram. If
replacement parts are required, include the date of unit
installation, the date of failure, an explanation of the
malfunction, and a description of the replacement parts
required.
In-Warranty Return Material Procedure
Material may not be returned except by permission of
authorized factory service personnel of McQuay International
at Minneapolis, Minnesota.
A “return goods” tag will be sent to be included with the
returned material. Enter the information as called for on the tag
in order to expedite handling at out factories and issuance of
credits. All parts shall be returned to the factory designated on
the return goods tag, transportation charges prepaid.
The return of the part does not constitute an order for
replacement. A purchase order for the replacement part must
be entered through your nearest McQuay representative. The
order should include the component's part number and
description and the model and serial numbers of the unit
involved.
If it is determined that the failure of the returned part is due to
faulty material or workmanship within the standard warranty
period, credit will be issued on the customer's purchase order.
McQuay IM 487-4
113
Limited Product Warranty (North America)
Limited Product Warranty (North America)
McQuay International (“Company”) warrants to contractor,
purchaser and any owner of the product (collectively
“Owner”) that Company, at its option, will repair or replace
defective parts in the event any product manufactured by
Company, including products sold under the brand names
McQuay Air Conditioning, AAF Air Conditioning, AAF
HermanNelson and McQuay Service, and used in the United
States or Canada, proves defective in material or workmanship
within twelve (12) months from initial startup or eighteen (18)
months from the date shipped by Company, whichever occurs
first. Authorized replaced parts are warranted for the duration
of the original warranty. All shipments of such parts will be
made FOB factory, freight prepaid and allowed. Company
reserves the right to select carrier and method of shipment.
In addition, labor to repair or replace warranty parts is
provided during Company normal working hours on products
with rotary screw compressors, centrifugal compressors and on
absorption chillers. Warranty labor is not provided for any
other products.
Company’s liability to Owner under this warranty shall not
exceed the lesser of the cost of correcting defects in the
products sold or the original purchase price of the products.
PRODUCT STARTUP ON ABSORPTION, CENTRIFUGAL
AND SCREW COMPRESSOR PRODUCTS IS
MANDATORY and must be performed by McQuay Service or
a Company authorized service representative.
It is Owner’s responsibility to complete and return the
Registration and Startup Forms accompanying the product to
Company within ten (10) days of original startup. If this is not
done, the ship date and the startup date will be deemed the
same for warranty period determination, and this warranty
shall expire twelve (12) months from that date.
Assistance
To obtain assistance or information regarding this warranty,
please contact your local sales representative or McQuay
Service office.
Sole Remedy
THIS WARRANTY CONSTITUTES THE OWNER’S SOLE
REMEDY. IT IS GIVEN IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER
WARRANTIES. THERE IS NO IMPLIED WARRANTY OF
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT AND UNDER NO
CIRCUMSTANCE SHALL COMPANY BE LIABLE FOR
INCIDENTAL, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, CONTINGENT OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, WHETHER THE
THEORY BE BREACH OF THIS OR ANY OTHER
WARRANTY, NEGLIGENCE OR STRICT LIABILITY IN
TORT.
No person (including any agent, sales representative, dealer or
distributor) has the authority to expand the Company’s
obligation beyond the terms of this express warranty or to state
that the performance of the product is other than that published
by Company.
For additional consideration, Company will provide an
extended warranty(ies) on certain products or components
thereof. The terms of the extended warranty(ies) are shown on
a separate extended warranty statement.
Exceptions
1 If free warranty labor is available as set forth above, such
free labor does not include diagnostic visits, inspections,
travel time and related expenses, or unusual access time or
costs required by product location.
2 Refrigerants, fluids, oils and expendable items such as
filters are not covered by this warranty.
3 This warranty shall not apply to products or parts which
(a) have been opened, disassembled, repaired, or altered by
anyone other than Company or its authorized service
representative; or (b) have been subjected to misuse,
negligence, accidents, damage, or abnormal use or service;
or (c) have been operated, installed, or startup has been
provided in a manner contrary to Company’s printed
instructions, or (d) were manufactured or furnished by
others and which are not an integral part of a product
manufactured by Company; or (e) have not been fully paid
for by Owner.
114
McQuay IM 487-4
McQuay IM 487-4
115
116
McQuay IM 487-4
McQuay IM 487-4
117
McQuay Training and Development
Now that you have made an investment in modern, efficient McQuay equipment, its care should be a high priority. For
training information on all McQuay HVAC products, please visit us at www.mcquay.com and click on training, or call
540-248-9646 and ask for the Training Department.
This document contains the most current product information as of this printing. For the most up-to-date product
information please go to www.mcquay.com.
13600 Industrial Park Boulevard, Minneapolis, MN 55441 USA (612) 553-5330