BaoFeng UV-82L User FAQs
Q: Which is the Newest version of the UV-82L?
A: The UV-82 is a recently released transceiver.
Although similar to the UV-5R, this was not simply a rebranding.
The size, design, options and software are unique to this radio.
As with all transceivers, the newest firmware determines the newest radio.
Q: How can I determine which firmware my UV-82L has?
A: Power the radio OFF.
Press and Hold the 5 key.
Power the radio ON.
The display will show BF - - - - This is the Firmware release.
Q: Can the UV-82L firmware be updated?
A: No. The firmware cannot be updated.
The microcontroller is an OTP (One Time Programmable)
Once 'flash' programmed at the factory, it cannot be changed.
FCC CERTIFICATION and TYPE ACCEPTANCE (U.S.)
Q: Is this radio FCC Part 90 certified? (Commercial)
A: At this time, its certification is pending.
Q: Is this radio approved for Ham Radio use? (Ham Radio)
A: Yes. It may be used legally by Licensed Hams on any Part 97 allocation or
service in the U.S.
TRANSMITTER and RECEIVER
Q: I can't hear my signal through the repeater, but I hear the repeater tail.
A: The key here is that you can hear the repeater squelch tail.
You are too close to your receiver and over powering (de-sensing) it.
When this happens, you are blocking everything from your monitor.
1) Listen to your signal on simplex to verify your audio.
2) Call someone on the repeater to verify your signal quality.
If they can hear you, then all is fine.
Q: Can this radio listen to Aircraft frequencies?
A: No. They are out of the radio's frequency range.
Also, the Aircraft Band is AM while the UV-82L is FM only.
Q. Can this radio listen to NOAA / NWS frequencies?
A. Yes. However, it cannot be put in a standby mode and triggered by
their 1050Hz alert tone.
Q. Why does my FM Broadcast Radio keep cutting out?
A. The broadcast radio gives priority to an incoming VHF/UHF signal.
It returns to broadcast X seconds after the signal clears.
X is determined by the ABR setting.
To prevent the radio from switching, set VHF/UHF to an unused frequency.
Q. Why is my audio 'chopping' when listening to a station?
A. The bandwidth settings (Menu 5) should to be set to WIDE.
Q. What range can I expect from these radios?
A. There are many factors to consider. Power, antenna, antenna height,
HASL (height above sea level), terrain, obstruction, trees, horizon, etc.
A good starting point for simplex operation would be QSL.net/distance
Your Mileage may Vary.
PROGRAMMING
Q: I programmed a channel, but it won't save.
A: There are three steps to the process:
1) You must be in the VFO/Frequency mode
2) Display A (top display) must be selected.
3) Channel must be empty before programming frequency data.
(use menu 28 to delete a channel)
Q: How can I store a 7th digit of a frequency? xxx.xxx5
A: Change Step (Menu 1) to 2.5 kHz.
Enter the first 6 digits of the desired frequency, then use the
Up/Down arrow for the last .5 kHz.
Example: 462.7125 would be: 4 6 2 7 1 2 Up Arrow.
A tiny 5 will show to the right of the frequency display.
Q. Can I store different frequencies in A and B?
A. No. There is only a single bank of 128 channels (0-127)
The same frequencies show in both displays A and B.
You can however change the way they appear. (Menu 21 & 22)
The display options are Frequency, Channel Name or Channel Number.
Note: Manual programming of memory channels can Only be done while display A (top
display) is selected.
Q: What is the purpose of A and B if they are both the same?
A: Dual Receive. You can set each to a different preprogrammed channel.
With TDR (Menu 7) turned on, your radio will sample between the
two frequencies and stop on whichever one has activity.
Q. Can displays be synchronized to show Name in A and Freq in B?
A. No. Display A and B operate independently.
Q: Can I disable the transmitter for Receive Only frequencies?
A: Yes. This can be done using the transmit inhibit function of your software.
Q. Can I store FM Radio 65-108MHz channels into memory?
A. No. This is controlled by a separate receive only chip in the radio.
You also cannot make this radio transmit on this band.
Q: How do I switch modes? (VFO/MR)
A: Press and Hold the [MENU] key when turning radio on.
SCANNING
Q: My receiver skips over some channels when scanning.
A: There is a known 'quirk' with the UV-82L receiver.
If a scanned channel has an R-CTCSS (PL) tone of 136.5 Hz or lower, the receiver will not
stop on that channel.
R-CTCSS (PL) tones of 146.2 and higher work fine.
Note: It is recommended to Not use RX Tones unless absolutely necessary.
Q: My radio only scans my top group of frequencies, but not all.
A: Power cycle your radio ON/OFF and the issue should disappear.
TONE ACCESS (CTCSS, DCS, DTMF)
Q: Why can't I key or hear my local repeater, fire dept, etc. ?
A: Some Repeaters and Services require a CTCSS (PL) tone for access but DO
NOT transmit one back. If your display indicates there is an incoming signal but you
hear no audio, you may have an incorrect or unnecessary RX tone set.
This can be tested by pressing the [M] button. When in doubt, leave the RX tone OFF.
Q: What are these CTCSS (PL) tones I keep hearing about?
A: A CTCSS is an 'Tone' sent along with your voice when transmitting.
They are used to access a specific repeater and block interference.
Q: How do I transmit a 1750 Hz tone for repeater access?
A: Press the [PTT] button and then press the [F] button to transmit a 1750 Hz tone.
Q: What are the DTMF keypad positions for A, B, C & D?
A: [Menu] = A [Up] = B [Down] = C [Exit] = D
AFTERMARKET ACCESSORIES
Q: Are cables, antennas, spkr/mic, etc interchangeable?
A: Many accessories are, such as Kenwood / Wouxun.
Q: Is a radio case a good purchase?
A: It depends on your use. Refer to Radio Shut Down below.
Q: Is there a Battery Eliminator for the car?
A: At this time, there is no known Battery Eliminator.
MICROPHONE & AUDIO ISSUES
Q: Why is my microphone audio is low?
A: Here's are some suggestions:
1) Talk directly into the radio, within one inch.
2) Confirm the audio is set to Wide Band. 5 kHz (Menu 5 = W)
3) Try an external spkr/mic to confirm problem is the mic.
4) Blow compressed air into the spkr/mic jack.
5) If you have an external spkr/mic, plug it in and out a few times.
The issue might be a dirty connector.
Note: Some have reported the need to open up the microphone hole in the plastic case.
This can be done by CAREFULLY using a 3/64" drill bit and twisting it slowly by
hand to clear out the opening, but avoid touching the microphone.
There is approx 1/16" clearance between the inside of the case and the microphone
element.
Q: Why is the audio less sensitive than my Icom or Kenwood?
A: The UV-82L was designed as a commercial radio, not ham. It was designed to block out
background noise in an industrial environment. Talking right into the face of the radio cures
most audio weakness.
Q: Is the PTT switch disabled when a Spkr/Mic is plugged in?
A: When a Spkr/Mic plugged in, the [A] PTT button is disabled
ANTENNA QUESTIONS
Q: Which antenna is best?
A: It's all personal preference, but a good rule of thumb is:
The longer the radiator, the better the range, especially on transmit.
Short stubby antennas use a coil to match TX to 50 ohm, not radiate.
The closer to 1/4 or 3/4 wavelength in the air, the better the performance.
A very popular antenna for general use is the Nagoya NA-701, NA-771.
To mate with the UV-82L, the antenna's connector must be SMA Female.
Just remember, it's only 5 watts into a piece of wire.
There is no Magic Antenna out there.
Q: Can I use an antenna with an SMA RP connector?
A: No. The RP stands for Reverse Polarity. The outer shell looks the same
but the Male/Female pin sequence is reversed.
Q: My antenna doesn't screw in all the way.
A: This is not uncommon on some aftermarket antennas. Purchase a thin 5/8" OD
rubber O-Ring. Take your HT with you to the hardware store to assure the proper
fit. You may want to superglue it to the bottom of the antenna ONLY.
Q: Can I build my own antenna?
A: Absolutely. If you want to start small, try a simple ground plane.
Here are the instructions for a GP antenna with a radial length calculator.
The calculator covers all frequencies from DC to Light.
DISP
PLAY QU
UESTIONS
S
Q: Displlay goes daark if I talk
k too long on
o Hi pow
wer.
A: This is
i to be exp
pected from
m a small radio.
r
5 watts creates
c
a lo
ot of heat in
n a small unvented
u
arrea.
Give it tiime to coo
ol down. Th
he LCD wiill return too normal.
The sam
me occurs iff you leavee the unit in
n the car onn a hot dayy.
Run low
w power wh
henever possible. Thiis will alsoo extend baattery life.
Q: Why does my display
d
sho
ow + and - at the sam
me time.
In Chann
nel Mode this
t is norm
mal when the
t TX / RX
X frequenccies differ,,
In Frequ
uency Mode + or - is displayed based
b
on M
Menu 25 (S
SFT-D)
If TX an
nd RX are the
t same (ssimplex) th
he + - indiccator does not displaay.
http://ww
ww.miklorr.com/UV8
82/images/d
display.jpgg
http://ww
ww.miklorr.com/UV8
82/images/u
uv5r-key1.jpg
Q: How accurate is
i the S-Meeter?
A: The What?
W
There's a signaal indicator in the uppper left.
If there'ss a signal, it
i appears. If not, it's gone.
Q: How do I transllate the Batttery indicator in the upper righht?
wn the follo
owing: (tessts by Phill Souza)
A: Tests have show
x 8.32 voltts) 3 bars
Full charrge (approx
Battery drops
d
to 7.09 volts, 2 bars
Battery drops
d
to 6.73 volts, 1 bar
Battery drops
d
to 6.29 volts, 0 bars
Battery drops
d
to 5.91 volts,
the radio
o announcees "low volltage" untill the batterry expires.
Note: Measuremen
nts can vary
y based on
n temperatuure and loaad.
Q: Why does my display
d
disaappear if I wear polarrized sungglasses?
uid crystall elements in the dispplay.
A: LCDss function by polarizing the liqu
Polarized
d sunglasses will react to the po
olarized lenns.
GENERAL QUESTIONS
Q: Why did my radio shut down when I took it out of my pocket.
A: If you carry your radio and keys in the same pocket, a case is recommended. If
the charging contacts are shorted, the battery goes into the protection mode. There
will be no damage to the battery or radio, but the radio will power off. To reset the
protection mode, the battery must be removed and reinserted.
Q: Did I get a used radio? My UV-82L had frequencies pre-programmed.
A: No. Your radio is new. These are channels used for factory testing.
The easiest way to remove them is to:
Press Menu, 41 (Reset), Menu, ALL, Menu.
Q: My radio doesn't speak English?
A: Press Menu, 14, Menu, Make selection, Menu
Options are: CHI / ENG / OFF
Q: How do I lock/unlock my keypad?
A: Hold the # key in for 2 seconds.
Pressing it quickly alternates TX power level.
PROGRAMMING MEMORIES BAOFENG UV 82
Frequency Mode vs. Channel Mode
These two modes have different functions and often confused.
Frequency Mode - Used for a temporary frequency assignment, such as a test
frequency or quick field programming.
Channel Mode - Used for selecting preprogrammed channels.
All programming MUST be initially done in the Frequency Mode using the Upper
Display only. From there you have the option of assigning the entered data to a
specific channel for later access in the Channel Mode if desired.
IMPORTANT: Programming done using the Lower display cannot be saved and
will be lost.
PROGRAMMING A CHANNEL WITH STANDARD OFFSETS
Programming a Repeater Channel with Standard Offsets
This example is for: 146.700 MHz 600kHz minus offset into channel 99 CTCSS
tone 123.0
1. Set radio to VFO Mode (Frequency Mode)
a.) UV5R/GT3 - Press VFO/MR button
b.) UV82 - Turn radio OFF, then Press/Hold MENU button during PowerON.
2. Select Display A (this is a must)
a.) UV5R/GT3 – Press [A/B] and select the Upper Display.
b.) UV82 - Press [EXIT A/B] and select the Upper Display.
3. Disable TDR (Dual Watch/Dual RX) which toggles between A and B.
Press [Menu] 7 [Menu]
Select OFF
Press [Menu] [Exit]
4. Delete Prior Data from the channel to be programmed.
Press [Menu] 2 8 [Menu]
Enter 9 9 (Memory Channel to clear)
Press [Menu] [Exit]
5. Enter the Repeater Offset.
Press [Menu] 2 6 [Menu]
Enter 0 0 6 0 0
Press [Menu] [Exit]
6. Enter the Transmit Frequency Shift.
Press [Menu] 2 5 [Menu]
Enter 2 for Minus shift.
Press [Menu] [Exit]
7. Set CTCSS or DCS codes for Transmit.( example = CTCSS TX tone 123.0 Hz )
Press [Menu] 1 3 [Menu]
PROGRAMMING MEMORIES BAOFENG UV 82 1 Enter 1 2 3 0 [Menu] [Exit]
8. Enter the repeater output frequency, 1 4 6 . 7 0 0
9. Store RX frequency
Press [Menu] 2 7 [Menu]
Enter 9 9 (Memory Channel) (000 to 127 ) This is the channel that was cleared in
step 4.
Press [Menu] [Exit]
10. Press the [ * Scan ] button. This activates Reverse Mode and displays the
TX frequency.
11. Press [Menu] 2 7 [Menu]
Enter the same Memory Channel entered above.
Press [Menu]
12. Press the [* Scan] again to exit the Reverse Mode.
13. Press [Exit] This will now appear it in the channel list when you switch to Channel
Mode.(MR)
SUMMARY OF ABOVE 146.700, - .600 SPLIT, 123.0 TONE
1. Set radio to VFO Mode (Frequency Mode)
2. [EXIT A/B] must be set to Upper Display.
3. Turn TDR OFF
[Menu] 7 [Menu] OFF
[Menu] [Exit]
4. Delete Prior Data
[Menu] 2 8 [Menu] Ch
No. (99) [Menu] [Exit]
5. Repeater Offset.
[Menu] 2 6 [Menu]
0 0 6 0 0 [Menu] [Exit]
6. Enter the TX Frequency Shift.
[Menu] 2 5 [Menu] Shift
[Menu] [Exit]
7. Set TX CTCSS or DCS codes for
Transmit.
[Menu] 1 3 [Menu] 1 2 3 0
[Menu] [Exit]
8. Enter RX frequency
146.700
9. Store RX frequency
[Menu] 2 7 [Menu] Ch No.
(99) [Menu] [Exit]
10. Reverse RX TX display
[ * Scan ]
11. [Menu] 2 7 [Menu] Ch No.
(99) [Menu] [* Scan] [Exit]
Switch to Channel Mode. (MR)
PROGRAMMING MEMORIES BAOFENG UV 82 2 PROGRAMMING A CHANNEL WITH ANY OFFSET
Programming a Repeater Channel with any offset (Standard or Odd
Split) This example is for: 146.700 MHz 600kHz minus offset into channel 99
CTCSS tone 123.0 (optional)
1. Set radio to VFO Mode (Frequency Mode)
a.) UV5R/GT3 - Press VFO/MR button
b.) UV82 - Turn radio OFF, then
Press/Hold MENU button during
PowerON.
2. Select Display A (this is a must)
a.) UV5R - Press [A/B] and select the Upper Display.
b.) UV82 - Press [EXIT A/B] and select the Upper Display.
3. Disable TDR (Dual Watch/Dual RX) which toggles between A and B.
Press [Menu] 7 [Menu]
Select OFF
Press [Menu] [Exit]
4. Delete Prior Data from the channel to be programmed.
Press [Menu] 2 8 [Menu]
Enter 9 9 (Memory Channel to clear)
Press [Menu] [Exit]
5. Store RX frequency
Enter 1 4 6 7 0 0
Press [Menu] 2 7 [Menu]
Enter 9 9 (Memory Channel)
Press [Menu] [Exit]
6. Set CTCSS or DCS codes for
Transmit. (if needed) ( example = CTCSS TX tone 123.0 Hz )
Press [Menu] 1 3 [Menu]
Enter 1 2 3 0 [Menu] [Exit]
7. Store TX frequency
Enter 1 4 6 1 0 0
Press [Menu] 2 7 [Menu]
Enter 9 9 (Memory Channel)
Press [Menu] [Exit]
8. The split is now programmed.
This procedure can be used to program standard offsets as well cross band.
If you know the repeater's RX and TX, you can program them separately without using
the repeater offset menus.
SUMMARY OF ABOVE RX 146.700, TX 146.100 TONE 123.0 (OPTIONAL)
1. Set radio to VFO Mode (Frequency Mode)
2. [EXIT A/B] must be set to Upper Display.
3. Turn TDR OFF [Menu] 7 [Menu] OFF
[Menu] [Exit]
4. Delete Prior Data
[Menu] 2 8 [Menu] Ch
PROGRAMMING MEMORIES BAOFENG UV 82 3 No. (99) [Menu] [Exit]
5. Store RX frequency into channel
1 4 6 7 0 0 [Menu] 2 7
[Menu] Ch No. [Menu] [Exit]
6. Set TX CTCSS or DCS codes for
Transmit. (optional)
[Menu] 1 3 [Menu] 1 2 3 0
[Menu] [Exit]
7. Store TX frequency into channel
1 4 6 1 0 0 [Menu] 2 7
[Menu] Ch No. [Menu] [Exit]
Switch to Channel Mode. (MR)
PROGRAMMING A BASIC SIMPLEX CHANNEL
PROGRAMMING A BASIC SIMPLEX CHANNEL (NO TONE) INTO
CHANNEL 99
The next example shows entering TX and RX frequencies without the Shift (25) or
Offset (26) functions.
This may be more reliable, since only the "A" display works for programming
memories, thus, the radio can only remember one offset value for programming
purposes.
To demonstrate, here is how you would program 146.580 simplex into memory 99.
There is no CTCSS tone in this example.
1. Set radio to VFO Mode (Frequency Mode)
a.) UV5R/GT3 - Press VFO/MR button
b.) UV82 - Turn radio OFF, then Press/Hold MENU button during PowerON.
2. Select Display A (this is a must)
a.) UV5R - Press [A/B] and select the Upper Display.
b.) UV82 - Press [EXIT A/B] and select the Upper Display.
3. Disable TDR (Dual Watch/Dual RX) which toggles between A and B.
Press [Menu] 7 [Menu]
Select OFF
Press [Menu] [Exit]
4. Delete Prior Data from the channel to be programmed.
Press [Menu] 2 8 [Menu] Enter 9 9 (Memory Channel to clear)
Press [Menu] [Exit]
5. Store RX frequency
Enter 1 4 6 5 8 0
Press [Menu] 2 7 [Menu]
Enter 9 9 (Memory Channel)
Press [Menu] [Exit]
6. Store TX frequency
PROGRAMMING MEMORIES BAOFENG UV 82 4 Enter 1 4 6 5 8 0 again
Press [Menu] 2 7 [Menu]
Enter 9 9 (Memory Channel)
Press [Menu] [Exit]
7. The simplex channel is now programmed.
SUMMARY OF ABOVE RX / TX 145.580, NO TONE INTO CHANNEL 99
1. Set radio to VFO Mode (Frequency Mode)
2. [EXIT A/B] must be set to Upper Display.
3. Turn TDR OFF
[Menu] 7 [Menu] OFF
[Menu] [Exit]
4. Delete Prior Data
[Menu] 2 8 [Menu] Ch No. (99) [Menu] [Exit]
5. Store RX frequency into channel
1 4 6 5 8 0 [Menu] 2 7
[Menu] Ch No. (99) [Menu]
[Exit]
6. Store TX frequency into channel
1 4 6 5 8 0 [Menu] 2 7
[Menu] Ch No. (99) [Menu]
[Exit]
Switch to Channel Mode. (MR) PROGRAMMING MEMORIES BAOFENG UV 82 5 Amateur Radio Procedural Signals
Signal
Meaning when used as a question
Meaning when used as a statement.
Will you tell me my exact frequency (or
QRG
Your exact frequency (or that of ______) is ______.
that of ______)?
QRH
Does my frequency vary?
Your frequency varies.
The tone of your transmission is ______ (1=good
QRI
How is the tone of my transmission?
2=variable 3=bad).
The intelligibility of your signals (or those of
What is the intelligibility of my signals
QRK
______) is ______ (1=bad 2=poor 3=fair 4=good
(or those of ______)?
5=excellent)
I am (or the frequency is) busy (with ______);
QRL
Are you (or is the frequency) busy?
Voice usage
please do not interfere.
Your transmission is being interfered with ______
Is my transmission being interfered
QRM
(1=nil 2=slightly 3=moderately 4=severely
Voice usage
with?
5=extremely)
QRN
Are you troubled by static?
I am troubled by static ______ (1-5 as in QRM)
QRO
Shall I increase output power?
Increase output power.
QRP
Shall I decrease output power?
Decrease output power.
Voice usage
QRQ
Shall I send faster?
QRS
Shall I send more slowly?
QRT Voice Shall I stop sending?
usage
Send faster (_____ wpm)
Send more slowly (_____ wpm)
QRU
QRV
QRX
When will you call me again?
QRY
QRZ
What is my turn?
I have nothing for you.
I am ready.
Please inform ______ that I am calling on ______
kHz.
Stand by / I will call you again at ______ hrs (on
______ kHz).
Your turn is number ______.
Who is calling me?
You are being called by ______ (on ______ kHz).
What is the strength of my signals (or
those of ______)?
The strength of your signals (or those of ______) is
______ (1=barely perceptible 2=weak 3=okay
4=good 5=very good)
QRW
Voice usage
QSA
Have you anything for me?
Are you ready?
Shall I inform ______ that you are
calling on ______ kHz?
Stop sending / I am leaving the air.
QSB Voice Are my signals fading?
usage
Your signals are fading.
QSD
Your keying is defective.
QSG
QSK
Is my keying defective?
Shall I send _____ messages at a time?
How many messages should I send at a
time?
Can you hear me between your signals
and if so may I break in on your
transmissions?
QSL Voice Acknowledge receipt.
usage
Send ______ messages at a time.
I can hear you between my signals; break in on my
transmissions.
I acknowledge receipt.
QSM
Shall I repeat?
QSN
QSO
Voice usage
Did you hear me (or ______) on ______
kHz?
Can you communicate with ______
directly or by relay?
Will you relay to ______?
QSP
QST Voice usage
QSU
QSX
QSY Voice
usage
QSZ
QTA
QTB
QTC
QTH
Voice usage
QTR
Repeat the last message you sent me (or message
number ______).
I heard you (or ______) on ______ kHz.
I can communicate with ______ directly (or via
relay ______).
I will relay to ______.
Attention all radio amateurs:
Shall I send or reply on this frequency
(or on ______)?
Will you listen to ______ on ______
kHz?
Shall I (Will you) change frequency (to
______)?
Shall I send each word multiple times?
Shall I cancel message number ______?
Do you agree with my counting of
words?
How many messages do you have?
Send a series of V's on this frequency (or on
______).
Send each word twice (or ______ times).
Cancel message number ______.
I disagree with your count of words. I will repeat
the first letter of each word in the message.
I have ______ messages. (use QRU if none)
What is your location?
My location is ______.
What is the correct time?
The correct time is ______.
I am listening to ______ on ______ kHz.
I am changing frequency (to ______).
The Q-signal procedurals are for use in Morse communications, but some have crept into voice usage as well,
with similar meanings.
is never spoken but it is customary to say "Is this frequency in use?" before making a call on an
apparently-free frequency.
is sometimes spoken as "you're getting QRMd" or "there's a lot of QRM" to indicate that the
frequency is very congested.
has a more absolute "low power operation" meaning rather than a relative "please lower your power"
one. "Operating QRP" refers to the sport of trying to make contacts with a low a power as possible, usually 5
watts or less.
is sometimes used to indicate that one is signing off. "I'm gonna go QRT now."
is always spoken "Q R Zed" and is used when one catches part of a call, particularly on an FM
repeater, but can't tell which station is being called. If I hear a friend of mine call someone, and it might be me,
but I'm not sure, I might say "QRZ for KF9FF?" Can be used this way whenever there is doubt about whom
the calling station is calling or what they want.
when spoken either as a question or a statement has much of the meaning of "okay" or "I understand"
or "I will comply." "I'll meet you later on at the house, QSL?" When communication quality is poor, "QSL" is
sometimes repeated three or more times to indicate that the message was indeed received.
when spoken simply means "2-way contact." "Eyeball QSO" refers to a face-to-face meeting.
is usually used to introduce a broadcast message to all amateurs (the only type of one-way message
allowed on amateur radio). "The following is a QST:".
when spoken is either a suggestion or an announcement that one is changing frequencies. "QSY
simplex?" is a suggestion that the two conversing parties leave the repeater to another non-repeater frequency
in order to free up the repeater resource. Signing off using "this is KF9FF, QSY" conveys that I cannot be
reached on the current frequency any longer (lest anyone try).
has the identical meaning as in Morse. "What's your QTH?" "I'm nearly home."
Decoding the Secrets of CTCSS
While most rigs can send these low-frequency audio tones, decoding them is a handy trick,
too!
By Ken Collier, KO6UX
If you’re an FM operator, you’ll encounter CTCSS—Continuous Tone-Coded Squelch System—early in your ham career. You
may discover it while you’re puzzling over the fact that a particular repeater seems deaf to your signals.
Like most hams, you’ll probably check your Repeater Directory and determine that CTCSS is in use. No problem. Just program
your FM transceiver to send (encode) the proper audio tone and the repeater opens its doors to you. In most cases you won’t hear
the tone because its frequency is quite low, near the bottom end of the range of human hearing. That’s why you’ll often hear CTCSS
tones referred to as subaudible—literally “below audibility.”
This subaudible tone-control system was originally developed by Motorola and marketed under the name Private Line, or just PL
for short. To this day the tone frequencies established by Private Line remain the CTCSS standards (see Table 1). As a result,
many hams refer to CTCSS as “PL”—often without knowing what the letters stand for! You’ll even hear PL used as a verb, as in,
“They PLed the repeater last month.” (Translation: They installed CTCSS on the repeater last month.)
While many hams are familiar with the idea of sending a CTCSS tone to use a repeater, not everyone understands CTCSS
decoding. Virtually all modern FM rigs can send CTCSS tones, but only a few offer the ability to receive and process (decode) such
tones as standard equipment. CTCSS decoders are usually available as options.
If you’re about to purchase an FM transceiver, should you shop for a rig that includes CTCSS decoding? If the radio you already
own offers a CTCSS decoder as an option, should you install it?
Table 1—CTCSS Frequencies (Hz)
69.3
71.9
74.4
77.0
79.7
82.5
85.4
88.5
91.5
94.8
97.4
100.0
103.5
107.2
110.9
114.8
118.8
123.0
127.3
131.8
136.5
141.3
146.2
151.4
156.7
162.2
167.9
173.8
179.9
186.2
192.8
203.5
210.7
December QST: Decoding the Secrets of CTCSS - Page 1
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218.1
225.7
229.1
233.6
241.8
250.3
254.1
An Electronic Gate-Keeper
A CTCSS decoder allows you to choose which signals are heard in your transceiver’s speaker. When you activate the decoder,
your radio will fall silent. Only the signals that carry the CTCSS tone you’ve selected are passed through to your receiver’s audio
amplifiers and, ultimately, to the speaker. All other signals are ignored. They’re still there, but you won’t hear them.
By activating the CTCSS decoder you’re making your transceiver behave like a tone-protected repeater. But why would anyone
want to limit what they hear? There are three good reasons:
Limiting Access
In the beginning, amateur repeaters used CTCSS to restrict access to certain groups or individuals. (Only those who knew the
correct CTCSS tone frequency could use the repeater.) Although some repeaters still use CTCSS in this fashion, they are the
exception. After all, it’s relatively easy these days to determine which CTCSS frequency is in use on a particular repeater. Some
modern radios will even display the frequencies of received CTCSS tones. All you have to do is monitor the repeater input frequency
and, when a user is within range so you can copy him direct, decode the tone from his transmission.
However, CTCSS is still a good way to limit access to other devices such as simplex autopatches, remote bases and so on. If
you are going to use your mobile rig as a temporary cross-band repeater (another feature found in many radios today), it’s a good
idea to use a CTCSS decoder on the input. This will limit access to only you and those you’ve chosen to operate the system.
When used in conjunction with DTMF (touchtone) tones, CTCSS can be a more effective tool to limit access. In fact, many
“closed” repeaters require users to send specific DTMF tones, in addition to a constant CTCSS tone.
Frequency Sharing
To some extent, CTCSS can make it easier for different groups to use the same frequencies without bothering each other. This
application is seen most often in repeater networks.
In heavily populated areas it is not uncommon to find repeaters sharing the same frequency pairs. Coordination groups try to
arrange it so that these systems are separated by a considerable distance, but coverage areas often overlap. This means that some
stations are able to access two or more repeaters at the same time (see Figure 1). By installing CTCSS on both repeaters, stations
are limited to accessing only one repeater at a time. They must send the correct subaudible tone to use the repeater they desire.
(Modern FM transceivers make this easy by allowing you to specify particular CTCSS tones when you program repeater frequencies
into memory.)
CTCSS can also be a big help on simplex. For example, one of the FM simplex nets that I frequent here in southern California
shares the frequency with another group about 75 miles away. Many of us can hear them, and this can be more than a little
annoying!
The solution? Everyone on our net uses CTCSS decoders set to 100 Hz and everyone sends 100-Hz tones whenever they
transmit. As a result, we hear only each other! The only drawback is that it’s difficult for newcomers to join the net unless they know
our system. If they attempt to break in without sending a 100-Hz tone, we probably won’t hear them.
December QST: Decoding the Secrets of CTCSS - Page 2
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Figure 1—CTCSS offers an effective solution for repeater systems with overlapping coverage. In this example, the ham
who lives in the overlapping zone can send a 71.9-Hz tone to use the KX4V repeater, or a 100-Hz tone to use the WA4ABC
machine.
Selective Calling
Sometimes you want to be a little “selective” about the signals you receive. You want to be available when friends call, but you
don’t want to hear all the other noise and chatter on the frequency. CTCSS provides the solution!
If your rig is equipped with a CTCSS decoder, you can switch it on and hear nothing until someone transmits using the correct
tone. This is handy when you’re driving with your family (not everyone appreciates the sounds of Amateur Radio!), or when you’re
busy at home.
This technique often works better on simplex than through repeaters. Many repeater systems will not pass CTCSS tones. So, if
you transmit using a CTCSS tone on the repeater input, it may not be present on the output. The easiest way to find out is to set up
a test with a friend.
Be careful when using CTCSS for selective calling. Most amateur transceivers don’t offer an easy way to disable the CTCSS
decoder. Some H-Ts include a “monitor” button that opens the squelch even when the decoder is on, but most mobiles do not. Just
because your radio is silent, that doesn’t mean that the frequency isn’t in use. Disable your decoder and check the frequency before
you transmit.
CTCSS can also be used for a type of selective paging. For example, some hams live in areas where it is possible to hear more
than two repeaters on the same frequency (although they can usually access only the local machine). To eliminate this irritating
problem, the repeater trustee can set up the system to transmit a continuous CTCSS tone on the output frequency (see Figure 2).
Everyone who owns a rig equipped with a CTCSS decoder can set their decoder to accept signals carrying that tone only. This
automatically screens out transmissions from the distant machine—only the local repeater is heard!
December QST: Decoding the Secrets of CTCSS - Page 3
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Figure 2—Hams in the coverage area of the K3KMO repeater also hear signals from distant machines. To cure the annoying
problem, the trustee of K3KMO switches on a 88.5-Hz tone encoder on the output of the machine. Whenever the K3KMO
repeater is up, the tone is transmitted as well. Anyone who owns a rig equipped with a CTCSS decoder can set it to
respond to the 88.5-Hz tone. Now they only hear transmissions from the K3KMO repeater!
Have You Decided?
Is there a CTCSS decoder in your future? If your favorite repeater is having difficulty with another overlapping system, the
repeater trustee may install a CTCSS system to help cure the problem. If your radio can’t decode the tone, you won’t share the
benefit. As you’ve seen, a CTCSS decoder is also a valuable asset if you’re a busy person who doesn’t want to be bothered by
random chitchat. A CTCSS decoder might allow you to keep the radio “noise” at a tolerable level, while still providing a way for your
buddies to reach you.
Ken Collier, KO6UX, 7510 Rudell Rd, Corona, CA 91719, e-mail: kjcollier@juno.com
December QST: Decoding the Secrets of CTCSS - Page 4
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Sussex an
nd Northwesst Repeaterss & DX Clusster



147.300 (+) 600 khz,, pL 151.4 Can
C be linked
d with 224.500 and/or 4443.000
224.500 (-) 1.6 mhz, pL 151.4 Caan be linked
d with 147.3000 and/or 4443.000
443.000 (+) 5 mhz, pL
p 103.5 Can
n be linked with
w 147.3000 and/or 2244.500
Secoondary voicee repeaters..


147.210 (+) 600 khz,, pL 151.4
147.330 (+) 600 khz,, pL 151.4
W2L
LV APRS Digi
D and wea
ather node - 144.390
W2L
LV DX Clusster






AX.25 Packet on 144
4.910
C KB2S
SYD-5 V W2LV
AX.25 Packet on 144
4.990
C KB2S
SYD-5
telnet dx.scarcnj.org 7300
http://dx..scarcnj.org:7373/cgi-bin
n/spider.cgi
Baofeng UV-5R
Programming VIP Software Guide
John Leahy
Optional Features
Be advised that this is a work in progress and is intended for U.S.A. Ham operation. Any other use may
require adjustments based on your needs and or restrictions. Use of this guide is of course at your own
peril. If you find errors (entirely possible) or have additions, better explanations or comments please
contact me at KK4ITX@arrl.net.
The Baofeng VIP Software Optional Features Screen as accessed through the EDIT dropdown menu .
Ref#
1
Radio
Menu or
Button
9
TOT
2
0
SQL
3
4
Heading
Above
Picture
Range
Use
Notes
Time Out Timer
15 - 600
This feature shuts down
the transmitter after the
selected time (in seconds).
Prevents
overheating and
extended accidental
transmitting
Squelch Level
0-9
VOX
Off 1-10
Keeps weak signals
from opening up the
audio out.
Allows hands free
Reports are that
this feature does
not work.
Use with care.
operation. Off is off
(1) Sensitive (10)
Least Sensitive
4
14
Voice
On or Off
China Girl tells you
what key you have
VOICE Annunciation
pressed. Newer units
appear to have
English voice.
5
6
ABR
Off 1-5
Sets the amount of
time in seconds (?)
ABR
that the screen
remains lit after a key
press, RX or TX.
Work Mode (sets the start up condition each time the unit is turned on.)
6
Select/Not
Sets the unit so that it
VFO/MR Frequency
boots up in the
Frequency Mode.
Select/Not
Sets the unit so that it
7
VFO/MR Channel
boots up in the
Channel Mode.
8
None
CHT
1-128
Sets the end number
of the Channel List ((Ch# 0 = 1)
1) displayed in
software.
Channel Mode (sets the start up condition each time the unit is turned on.)
9
None
Menu
Select/Not
Enable (x)/Disable ( )
Select=Enabled
Menu Button on radio
Unselect=Disable
is disabled. Keylock,
Scan and # keys
function.
10
40
Reset
Select/Not
Enable (x)/Disable ( )
Select=Enabled
Resets some options
RESET
Unselect=Disable
to program at startup.
Check Disable to
prevent a Reset from
the keyboard.
VOX
11
21
MDF-A
“A” Channel
Display Way
Channel
Channel_+_Name
Channel_+_Freq
12
22
MDF-B
“B” Channel
Display Way
Channel
Channel_+_Name
Channel_+_Freq
13
16
DTMFST
DTMF-ST
Off All
KB DTMF Side Tone
Send ANI DTMF ST
Could cause
embarrassing
TX.
Actually helps
our blind Hams
and gives us a
chuckle.
It is a battery
saving feature.
Almost works.
Matter of
preference
Matter of
preference
Not much use.
Keeps folks
away from
settings as none
of the Menus
can be accessed.
Not sure why
you would not
choose to
Disable as
doing so
renders
Menu#40 moot.
Select your preference Handy to have
Ch + Name in
one and Ch +
Freq in other.
Select your preference Handy to have
Ch + Name in
one and Ch +
Freq in other.
Prefer =
Sends DTMF side
KB DTMFST +
tones. Setting
Send ANI
determines if/when
DTMFST
tones are echoed to
14
3
SAVE
Save
Off 1:1, 1:2, 1:3,1:4
15
18
SC-REV
Scan_Rev
TO/SO/CE
16
19
PTT-ID
PTT_ID
OFF/BOT/EOT/BOTH
17
20
PTT-LT
PTT_Delay
0-30ms
18
# Key
K_Lock
Selected or Not
19
# Key
Auto Lock
Selected or Not
20
23
BCL
BCL
Selected or Not
the speaker. Used to
bring up an autopatch
& dialing a phone#.
Intended to prolong
battery charge by
delaying wake-up.
Sets delay on
scanning.
(TO)=Preset Time,
starts automatically
(CO)=Carrier present
auto startup
(SE)=Stops on carrier,
manual restart.
Determines if and
when to send the
programmed ID of
this radio.
Delays sending of ID
to allow the receiving
unit time to listen.
Sets Key Lock to On
when unit is first
powered up.
After a short time the
unit beeps and the
Keypad locks.
Requires an Unlock.
When in use will
prevent talking on a
busy frequency.
Key pad beeps on key
press.
You may miss
first parts of a
reception.
See Page 14 in
manual. (TO)
is not of much
use. (CO) &
(SE) most
useful.
No known Ham
use. Receiving
unit would have
to be able to
decode ID
tones.
See Above Note
in #16.
Once the unit
keypad has
been unlocked
it needs to be
re-locked by the
key pad.
Keeps from
hitting keys in
error.
May help to
prevent
“doubling”
21
8
Beep
OFF/ON with Check
Great for
Box
confirmation,
BEEP
bad if you are
going stealth.
Items 22-32 are used for Frequency modes on both A&B “bands” of VHF/UHF All settings
can/will be overwritten by the Keypad, they will not be reset to these values until the next download
from the software. 22
None
Frequency
Enter the Start
Must be between:
It’s a place to
Frequency for Freq
136 – 174.9950 VHF start if you were
Mode only.
400 – 479.9950 UHF going to just
scan an area.
23
Band
Selects VHF/UHF
Can be changed using
33
the Band key.
BAND
24
None
Freq Range
No Options FYI Only
FYI only.
25
2
TXP
10 / 11
R-DCS
R-CTS
12 / 13
T-DCS
T-CTS
TX Power
High/Low
RX/QT/DQT
OFF/D023N-D7541
OFF/60.0 -259.9
Fixes the power at
desired levels.
Sets the RX tones to
open the receiver.
TX/QT/DQT
OFF/D023N-D7541
OFF/60.0 -259.9
Sets the TX tones to
open the receiver on
the repeater.
W/N
WIDE/NARROR (W)
Sets the bandwidth
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
5
W/N
1
STEP
25
SFT-D
26
OFFSET
None
Work Band
33
29
WT-LED
34
30
RX-LED
35
31
TX-LED
36
35
STE
Step Frequency 2.5/5/6.25/10/12.5/25khz Sets the space
between frequencies
scanned whether by
Up/Dn arrows or the
scan function (*).
SFT_D
OFF/+/Sets the direction of
any shift in TX vs RX
Offset
00.00 – 99.950
Sets the amount of
00.00 -69.990 (manual)
offset. In the US:
VHF=.600 UHF=5.00
Signal Code
1 -15
Special application to
call certain radios
only
Wait Back Lt
RX Back Lt
TX Back Lt
Tail noise
Clear
37
36
RP-STE
Pass Repert
Noise
38
37
RPT-RL
Pass Repert
Noise (ms)
39
38
PONMGS
OFF/Blue/Orange/Purple You get to choose
your own colors !
OFF/Blue/Orange/Purple You get to choose
your own colors !
OFF/Blue/Orange/Purple You get to choose
your own colors !
Eliminates
noise at end
OFF/ON
OFF/1..10 Manual
OFF/100….1000
OFF/1..10 Manual
Power On Disp Full/MSG
Repeater
dependent
Repeater
dependent
Not Ham
related.
See #5 above.
See #5 above.
See #5 above.
Set to OFF
when using
repeaters, so
leave it off.
Eliminates noise at end
Set to OFF
of transmission between when using
repeater & transceiver.
repeaters.
Delays the tone by the Set to OFF
setting. See #37.
when using
repeaters.
Full is a power-on
Gives a brief
LCD test.
sense of
MSG allows for your accomplishment
custom sign on.
& checks LCD.
of transmission between
units of the same breed
using simplex.
OFF/100….1000
Can be changed
using the
“Other” menu
in VIP version.
Good practice
to start on Low.
Usually left to
OFF unless a
noisy/busy area.
Unless your
area uses the
same tones set
to OFF
Most Ham use
is WIDE.
5khz is the
normal for US.
40
None
41
None
42
32
AL-MOD
FM Radio
Enabled
Alarm Sound
On/Off Check Box
Alarm Mode
Site/Tone/Code
Check box to hear.
Leave unchecked to not
hear it.
Controls the ability to
tune FM broadcast.
Allows local hearing
of the alarm or not.
Sets method of alarm.
Site= Only you hear it,
nothing broadcast.
43
39
ROGER
34
TX-AB
Roger
OFF/ON
TX Under
BDR Star
OFF/A Band/B Band
BDR
Check = On
46
7
TDR
None
Default
Click On
47
None
Close
Click On
44
45
Tone= Siren
Code=ID Code +
Roger Beep
See #42
Note: The alarm
can not be
disabled.
Nothing will
disable this
“Feature”
Choose Site and
only you will
hear it/
Not often used.
When in Dual Watch Off= last active
Mode #45, determines Channel.
freq. to transmit on.
A or B selects
the TX band
Dual watch/receive of Doubles your
2 channels.
fun !
Returns to Factory
Settings
Returns to Freq. List
All rights reserved. This document is intended for non commercial free use and may not be sold for gain
as part of a package as an enhancement.
Rev 2/25/2013
CHIRP Programming Reference
Jim Unroe - KC9HI
14-January-2013
(send comments, suggestions or corrections to UV-5R@KC9HI.net)
Column
Values
Description/Comment
Loc
see comment
This cell contains a fixed value (0-127) in each row representing each of the UV-5R's 128 channels
Frequency
see comment
Used for setting the receive (RX) frequency (MHz)
VHF: 136.000000 to 173.997500
UHF: 400.000000 to 519.997500
Name
see comment
Used for setting an optional alpha tag up to 7-characters
Alpha characters: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Numeric digits: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Special characters: ! @ # $ % ^ & * ( ) + - = [ ] < > ? , . /
Tone Mode
(none)
Tone
Used for setting squelch using carrier squelch and/or CTCSS (aka PL) and/or DTS (aka DPL)
No tones or codes are transmitted or received (default)
The radio will use CTCSS for transmit. In this mode, the receiver is carrier squelch
Requires
Tone
TSQL
The radio will use CTCSS for transmit. In this mode, the receiver is CTCSS with the same value as
the transmitter
DTCS
The radio will use DCS for transmit. In this mode, the receiver uses DCS with the same value as the
DTCS Code and DTCS Pol
transmitter
Cross
The radio will use an asymmetric squelch configuration according to the value of 'Cross Mode'
Tone
Sets the transmit CTCSS frequency. Only used when enabled by other options
ToneSql
Sets the receive (and sometimes transmit) CTCSS frequency. Only used when enabled by other
options [UV-5R bug: receive tone frequencies of 136.5 Hz and lower will always be skipped when
scanning regardless of the Skip setting]
DTCS Code
Sets the transmit DCS code. Only used when enabled by other options
DTCS Rx Code
Sets the receive (and sometimes transmit) DCS code. Only used when enabled by other options
DTCS Pol
NN
RN
NR
RR
Sets the DCS code polarity. Only used when enabled by other options
Transmit normal/Receive normal
Transmit reversed/Receive normal
Transmit normal/Receive reversed
Transmit reversed/Receive reversed
ToneSql
Cross Mode
CHIRP Programming Reference
Jim Unroe - KC9HI
14-January-2013
(send comments, suggestions or corrections to UV-5R@KC9HI.net)
Column
Cross Mode
Values
Description/Comment
Used for setting squelch using carrier squelch and/or CTCSS (aka PL) and/or DTS (aka DPL). Only
used when enabled by other options
Tone->Tone
The radio will use CTCSS for transmit and a different CTCSS for receive
Tone->DTCS The radio will use CTCSS for transmit and DCS for receive
DTCS->Tone The radio will use DCS for transmit and CTCSS for receive
->Tone
The radio will not transmit CTCSS or DCS but will enable CTCSS for receive
->DTCS
The radio will not transmit CTCSS or DCS but will enable DCS for receive
DTCS->
The radio will use DCS for transmit. In this mode, the receiver is carrier squelch
DTCS->DTCS The radio will use DCS for transmit and a different DCS for receive
Duplex
(none)
+
split
off
Used for determining the transmit (TX) frequency
Simplex. Sets the transmit frequency to the same value as the receive frequency (aka simplex)
Sets the transmit frequency lower than the receive frequency by the Offset amount (aka - duplex)
Sets the transmit frequency higher than the receive frequency by the Offset amount (aka + duplex)
Sets the transmit frequency to the value in Offset (same value range as the receive frequency)
Receive only (transmit inhibited).
Used for setting the transmit frequency difference (offset) from the receive frequency. When Duplex
is set to 'split' this value is the actual transmit frequency
Offset
Mode
FM
NFM
Sets the transmitter deviation and receiver IF bandwidth
5KHz deviation (for Part 97 - Amateur Radio Service)
2.5KHz deviation (for Part 90 - Private Land Mobile Radio Services)
High
Low
Sets the transmit output power level
4 watts
1 watt
S
Sets the channel scan lockout
Scan channel in scanning mode
Skip (lockout) channel in scanning mode
Power
Skip
Requires
Tone Mode=Cross
Tone (TX) and ToneSql (RX)
Tone (TX), DTCS Rx Code (RX) and DTCS Pol
DTCS Code (TX), DTCS Pol and ToneSql (RX)
ToneSql (RX)
DTCS Rx Code (RX) and DTCS Pol
DTCS Code (TX) and DTCS Pol
DTCS Code (TX), DTCS Rx Code (RX) and DTCS Pol
Offset
Offset
Offset (entered as transmit frequency)
Reference for UV-82 Menus
by Jim Unroe - KC9HI
11-January-2014
(send comments, suggestions or corrections to UV-82@KC9HI.net)
Menu Number
/ Short Name
0
SQL
1
STEP
Long Name / Description / Settings / Notes
Carrier Squelch
Mutes the speaker of the transceiver in the absence of a strong signal. VHF squelch is
either OFF or ON. UHF squelch is either OFF or one of 9 levels. The higher the level, the
stronger the signal must be to un-mute the speaker.
Settings: 0 - 9
Default: 5
Note: The CALL button (FM or ALARM) is not functional when menu 0 = 0
Global
✓
✓
RO
✓
✓
✓
RO
✓
✓
✓
Frequency Step (KHz)
Selects the amount of frequency change in VFO/Frequency mode when scanning or
pressing the [▲] or [▼] keys.
2.5K[0] | 5.0K[1] | 6.25K[2] | 10.0K[3] | 12.5K[4] |
Settings:
Default: 2.5K
20.0K[5] | 25.0K[6] | 50.0K[7]
2
TXP
3
SAVE
Battery Save
Selects the ratio of sleep cycles to awake cycles (1:1, 2:1, 3:1, 4:1). The higher the
number the longer the battery lasts. When enabled, a word or two might be missed when
the frequency being monitored becomes active.
Settings: OFF[0] | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
Default: 3
✓
4
VOX
Voice Operated Transmission
When enabled it is not necessary to push the [PTT] button on the transceiver. Adjust the
gain level to an appropriate sensitivity to allow smooth transmission.
Settings: OFF[0] | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10
Default: OFF
Note: When VOX is not set to OFF, 'VOX' is indicated in the status display
✓
5
WN
Wideband / Narrowband
Wideband (25 kHz bandwidth) or narrowband (12.5 kHz bandwidth).
Settings: WIDE[0] | NARR[1]
Default: WIDE
Emission: 16K0F3E / 11K0F3E (W/N)
Deviation: ≤ ±5 kHz / ≤ ±2.5 kHz (W/N)
Note: When WN is set to NAR, an 'N' is indicated in the status display
Backlight Timeout (seconds)
7
TDR
Separate
VFO
A&B
Settings
✓
Transmit Power
Selects between HIGH and LOW transmitter power when in VFO/Frequency mode. Use
the minimum transmitter power necessary to carry out the desired communications.
Settings: HIGH[0] | LOW[1]
Default: HIGH
HIGH: ≈ 5 watts
LOW: ≈ 1 watt
Note: When TXP is set to LOW, an 'L' is indicated in the status display
The power level can be toggled in MR/Channel mode by tapping the
Note:
[#╓O] key
6
ABR
Settings: OFF[0] | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10
Default: 5
The ABR setting also sets the delay before the radio returns to FM
Note:
broadcast reception after being interrupted
Note: ABR can be set to 24 using CHIRP
Dual Watch / Dual Reception
Monitor [A] and [B] at the same time. The display with the most recent activity ([A] or [B])
becomes the selected display.
Settings: OFF[0] | ON[1]
Default: ON
Note: When TDR is set to ON, an 'S' is indicated in the status display
Note: The selected display can be forced back to [A] or [B] using menu 34
Note: TDR should be set to OFF when manually programming
Note: TDR is inhibited while scanning is in operation
Stored
on a Per
Channel
Basis
VFO/
Frequency
Mode
MR/
Channel
Mode
✓
✓
Reference for UV-82 Menus
by Jim Unroe - KC9HI
11-January-2014
(send comments, suggestions or corrections to UV-82@KC9HI.net)
MR/
Channel
Mode
VFO/
Frequency
Mode
Separate
VFO
A&B
Settings
Stored
on a Per
Channel
Basis
Digital Coded Squelch (DCS) - Receive/Decode
Mutes the speaker of the transceiver in the absence of a specific low level digital signal. If
the station you are listening to does not transmit this specific signal, you will not hear
anything.
Settings: OFF[0] | see DCS Table
Default: OFF
When R-DCS is not set to OFF, 'DCS' is indicated to the left of the
Note:
upper channel display
Note: Setting R-DCS sets menu 11 to OFF
Note: Recommended setting is OFF
RO
✓
✓
✓
Continuous Tone Coded Squelch System (CTCSS) - Receive/Decode
Mutes the speaker of the transceiver in the absence of a specific and continuous subaudible signal. If the station you are listening to does not transmit this specific and
continuous signal, you will not hear anything.
Settings: OFF[0] | see CTCSS Table
Default: OFF
When R-CTCS is not set to OFF, 'CT' is indicated to the left of the
Note:
upper channel display
11
R-CTCS
(R-CTCS ≤ 131.8 Hz) Scanning never stops regardless of the correct
Note:
CTCSS tone being received
(R-CTCS ≥ 141.3 Hz) Scanning stops regardless of the actual
Note:
CTCSS tone being received
Note: R-CTCS works properly (selectively) while not scanning
Note: Setting R-CTCS sets menu 10 to OFF
Note: Recommended setting is OFF
RO
✓
✓
✓
Digital Coded Squelch (DCS) - Transmit/Encode
Transmits a specific low level digital signal to unlock the squelch of a distant receiver
(usually a repeater).
Settings: OFF[0] | see DCS Table
Default: OFF
Note: Setting T-DCS sets menu 13 to OFF
When T-DCS is not set to OFF, 'DCS' is indicated to the left of the
Note:
upper channel display (requires TX or 'reverse' mode)
RO
✓
✓
✓
Continuous Tone Coded Squelch System (CTCSS) - Transmit/Encode
Transmits a specific and continuous sub-audible signal to unlock the squelch of a distant
receiver (usually a repeater).
Settings: OFF[0] | see CTCSS Table
Default: OFF
Note: Setting T-CTCS sets menu 12 to OFF
When T-CTCS is not set to OFF, 'CT' is indicated to the left of the
Note:
upper channel display (requires TX or 'reverse' mode)
RO
✓
✓
✓
Menu Number
/ Short Name
8
BEEP
Long Name / Description / Settings / Notes
Keypad Beep
Allows audible confirmation of a key press
Settings: OFF[0] | ON[1]
Global
Default: ON
✓
Transmission Timer (seconds)
9
TOT
This feature provides a safety switch which limits transmission time to a programmed
value. This will promote battery conservation by not allowing you to make excessively-long
transmissions, and in the event of a stuck PTT switch (perhaps if the radio or a
Speaker/Mic is wedged between car seats) it can prevent interference to other users as
well as battery depletion.
Settings:
15[0] - 600[39] in 15 second steps (set TOT
Table)
✓
Default: 60
Note: (TIMEOUT-15)/15=[n]
The red TX LED begins to flash 10 seconds before the timeout limit
Note:
is reached
10
R-DCS
12
T-DCS
13
T-CTCS
Reference for UV-82 Menus
by Jim Unroe - KC9HI
11-January-2014
(send comments, suggestions or corrections to UV-82@KC9HI.net)
Menu Number
/ Short Name
Long Name / Description / Settings / Notes
Global
14
VOICE
Voice Prompt
Allows audible voice confirmation of a key press
Settings: OFF[0] | ENG[1] | CHI[2]
Default: CHI
Not all voice prompts are easily understandable. Not all key presses
Note:
have a voice prompt.
15
ANI-ID
Automatic Number Identification
Displays the ANI code that has been set by software. This menu can not be used to
change it. The ANI-ID is sent when the alarm is activated and menu 32 = CODE
DTMF Side Tones
Determines when DTMF Side Tones can be heard from the transceiver speaker.
Settings: OFF[0] | DT-ST[1] | ANI-ST[2] | DT+ANI[3]
Default: DT+ANI
OFF: No DTMF Side Tones are heard
DT-ST: Side Tones are heard only from manually keyed DTMF codes
16
ANI-ST: Side Tones are heard only from automatically keyed DTMF codes
DTMFST
DT+ANI: All DTMF Side Tones are heard
Note: Requires the transceiver to be in transmit mode.
Note: Recommended setting is DT+ANI
Note: [MENU]=A, [▲]=B, [▼]=C, [EXIT/AB]=D (†)
MR/
Channel
Mode
VFO/
Frequency
Mode
Separate
VFO
A&B
Settings
Stored
on a Per
Channel
Basis
RO
✓
✓
✓
RO
✓
✓
RO
✓
(†) The Side Tone heard for 'D' is '0' (zero) but 'D' is sent over-the-air
PTT-ID DTMF Code Selection
Selects 1 of 15 DTMF codes. The DTMF codes are programmed with software and are up
to 5 digits each.
17
1[0] | 2[1] | 3[2] | 4[3] | 5[4] | 6[5] | 7[6] | 8[9] | 9[8]
S-CODE
Settings:
Default: 1
| 10[9] | 11[10] | 12[11] | 13[12] | 14[13] | 15[14]
Note: Menu 19 must be enabled for an S-CODE to be transmitted.
Scanning Resume Method
Settings: TO[0] | CO[1] | SE[2]
Default: TO
18
TO: Time Operation - scanning will resume after a fixed time has passed
SC-REV
Carrier Operation - scanning will resume after the active signal
CO:
disappears
SE: Search Operation - scanning will not resume
19
PTT-ID
When to Send PTT-ID
Settings: OFF[0] | BOT[1] | EOT[2] | BOTH[3]
Default: OFF
OFF: No ID is sent
BOT: The selected S-CODE is sent at the Beginning of Transmission
EOT: The selected S-CODE is sent at the End of Transmission
BOTH: The selected S-CODE is sent at the BOT and the EOT
Note: Select S-CODE using menu 17
Note: Recommended setting is OFF
20
PTT-LT
PTT-ID Delay (milliseconds)
Settings: 0 - 50
Note: Requires menu 19 to be enabled
Default: 5
✓
✓
✓
Reference for UV-82 Menus
by Jim Unroe - KC9HI
11-January-2014
(send comments, suggestions or corrections to UV-82@KC9HI.net)
Menu Number
/ Short Name
Long Name / Description / Settings / Notes
Global
MR/
Channel
Mode
VFO/
Frequency
Mode
Separate
VFO
A&B
Settings
21
MDF-A
[A] MR/Channel Mode Display Format
Settings: CH[0] | NAME[1] | FREQ[2]
Default: NAME
CH: Displays the channel number
Displays the channel name. Names must be entered using software.
NAME: A channel without an assigned name with have the channel number
displayed
FREQ: Displays programmed Frequency
✓
22
MDF-B
[B] MR/Channel Mode Display Format
Settings: CH[0] | NAME[1] | FREQ[2]
Default: FREQ
CH: Displays the channel number
Displays the channel name. Names must be entered using software.
NAME: A channel without an assigned name with have the channel number
displayed
FREQ: Displays programmed Frequency
✓
23
BCL
Busy Channel Lock-Out
Disables the [PTT] button on a channel that is already in use. The transceiver will sound a
beep tone and will not transmit if the [PTT] button is pressed when a channel is already in
use.
Settings: OFF[0] | ON[1]
Default: OFF
RO
✓
⦸
✓
✓
⦸
✓
✓
Automatic Keypad Lock
When ON, the keypad will be locked if not used in 8 secs. Pressing the [#╓O] key for 2
seconds will unlock the keypad.
24
Settings: OFF[0] | ON[1]
Default: OFF
AUTOLK
Note: When the keypad is locked, a '╓O' is indicated in the status display
The keypad lock only locks the buttons on the front face of the UVNote: 82. It does not lock the [CALL] button, the [PTT] button or the [MONI]
button.
25
SFT-D
Direction of Frequency Shift
Enables access of repeaters in VFO/Frequency Mode
Settings: OFF[0] | +[1] | -[2]
Default: OFF
OFF: TX = RX (simplex)
+: TX will be shifted higher in frequency than RX
-: TX will be shifted lower in frequency than RX
When SFT-D is set to +, a '+' is indicated in the status display
Note:
(VFO/Frequency mode only)
When SFT-D is set to -, a '-' is indicated in the status display
Note:
(VFO/Frequency mode only)
Used with menu 26 to access repeaters in VFO/Frequency mode (+
Note:
and - only)
SFT-D is not required when storing repeater frequencies into
Note:
channels
Frequency Shift (MHz)
Specifies the difference between the TX and RX frequencies
Settings: 00.000 - 69.990 in 10 kHz steps
Default: 00.600
26
Note: Used with menu 25 to access repeaters in VFO/Frequency mode
OFFSET
Note: Typical ham offsets are: VHF = 00.600 UHF = 05.000
OFFSET is not required when storing repeater frequencies into
Note:
channels
Stored
on a Per
Channel
Basis
✓
✓
Reference for UV-82 Menus
by Jim Unroe - KC9HI
11-January-2014
(send comments, suggestions or corrections to UV-82@KC9HI.net)
Menu Number
/ Short Name
Long Name / Description / Settings / Notes
Global
Memory Channel Programming
This menu is used to either create new or modify existing channels (0 through 127) so that
they can be accessed from MR/Channel Mode. The behavior of menu 27 changes
depending on whether the target channel is empty or has been previously programmed
(see below).
Note: Programming must be done in [A] VFO
Empty Target Channel:
The RX and TX frequencies of the target channel are set to the [A] VFO frequency. The
settings of the following menus are also saved into the target channel. This essentially
creates a fully operational simplex channel.
Menu 2 - TXP
Transmit Power
Menu 5 - WN
Wideband / Narrowband
Menu 10 - R-DCS Digital Coded Squelch (DCS) - Receive/Decode
Continuous Tone Coded Squelch System (CTCSS) Menu 11 - R-CTCS
Receive/Decode
Menu 12 - T-DCS Digital Coded Squelch (DCS) - Transmit/Encode
Continuous Tone Coded Squelch System (CTCSS) Menu 13 - T-CTCS
27
Transmit/Encode
MEM-CH Menu 17 - S-CODE PTT-ID DTMF Code Selection
Menu 19 - PTT-ID When to Send PTT-ID
Menu 23 - BCL
Busy Channel Lockout
Menu 13 - T-CTCS
Note:
Note:
Note:
Digital Coded Squelch (DCS) - Transmit/Encode
Continuous Tone Coded Squelch System (CTCSS) Transmit/Encode
When the TX frequency differs from RX frequency, a '+-' is indicated
in the status display
TDR should be set to OFF when manually programming
It is a good idea to check the above menus prior to using menu 27 to
make sure none of them have an unwanted setting that was left over
from a previous programming session.
Delete a Memory Channel
28
This menu is used to delete the programmed information from the specified channel (0
DEL-CH through 127) so that it can either be programmed again or be left empty.
29
WT-LED
30
RX-LED
31
TX-LED
✓
Back Light Color - Standby
Settings: OFF[0] | BLUE[1] | ORANGE[2] | PURPLE[3]
Default: PURPLE
✓
Back Light Color - Receive
Settings: OFF[0] | BLUE[1] | ORANGE[2] | PURPLE[3]
Default: BLUE
✓
Back Light Color - Transmit
Settings: OFF[0] | BLUE[1] | ORANGE[2] | PURPLE[3]
Default: ORANGE
Alarm Mode
Settings: SITE[0] | TONE[1] | CODE[2]
Default: TONE
SITE: Sounds alarm through your radio speaker only
32
TONE: Transmits a cycling tone over-the-air
AL-MOD
Transmits '119' (911 in reverse?) followed by the ANI code over-theCODE:
air
Recommended setting is OFF... but since that isn't a choice use
Note:
SITE
VFO/
Frequency
Mode
✓
Previously Programmed Target Channel:
The TX frequency of the target channel is set to the [A] VFO frequency. The settings of the
following menus are also saved into the target channel. Uses for this can be to update a
newly created 'simplex' channel into a 'repeater' channel or a 'cross-band' channel.
Another use would be to add, change or remove a TX DCS code or TX CTCSS tone.
Menu 12 - T-DCS
MR/
Channel
Mode
✓
✓
Separate
VFO
A&B
Settings
Stored
on a Per
Channel
Basis
Reference for UV-82 Menus
by Jim Unroe - KC9HI
11-January-2014
(send comments, suggestions or corrections to UV-82@KC9HI.net)
Menu Number
/ Short Name
33
BAND
34
TDR-AB
35
STE
Long Name / Description / Settings / Notes
Global
Band Selection
In VFO/Frequency mode, sets [A] or [B] to the VHF or UHF band.
Settings: VHF[0] | UHF[1]
Default: VHF
When transitioning from VHF to UHF or from UHF to VHF, the
Note: selected band's low frequency limit becomes the displayed frequency
(the original 'scratch' frequency is lost)
Dual Watch / Dual Reception Display Priority
When enabled, priority is returned to selected display once the signal in the other display
disappears.
Settings: OFF[0] | A[1] | B[2]
Default: OFF
Note: Requires menu 7 to be enabled
✓
Squelch Tail Elimination - Transceiver
This function is used eliminate squelch tail noise between UV-5Rs that are communicating
directly (no repeater). A short duration 50Hz tone is transmitted when the PTT key is
released.
Settings: OFF[0] | ON[1]
Default: ON
Note: Set to OFF before communicating through a repeater.
Note: Recommended setting is OFF
✓
Squelch Tail Elimination - Repeater
This function is used eliminate squelch tail noise when communicating through a repeater.
36
RP-STE
37
RPT-RL
Settings:
Note:
Note:
Note:
OFF[0] | 1 - 10
Requires use of a repeater utilizing this feature.
Used with menu 37
Recommended setting is OFF
Delay the Tail Tone of Repeater (X100 milliseconds)
Settings: OFF[0] | 1 - 10
Note: Used with menu 36
Note: Recommended setting is OFF
Default: 5
✓
Default: OFF
✓
Boot Display
Controls the behavior of the display when the transceiver is turned on.
Settings: FULL[0] | MSG[1]
Default: FULL
38
PONMSG
FULL: Performs an LCD screen test at power-on
MSG: Displays a 2-line power-on message
Note: The power-on message must be edited with software
✓
39
ROGER
Roger Beep
Sends an end-of-transmission tone to indicate to other stations that the transmission has
ended.
Settings: OFF[0] | ON[1]
Default: OFF
Note: Recommended setting is OFF
✓
40
A/B-BP
Roger Beep – End of Reception
Emits an end-of-reception tone in the speaker when squelch closes on the selected
display.
Settings: OFF[0] | A[1] | B[2]
Default: OFF
Note: Useful when menu 7 is set to ON
✓
41
RESET
Restore to Default Settings
Settings: VFO[0] | ALL[1]
Default: ALL
Resets all menus to firmware default and sets the [A] and [B] VFO
VFO:
frequencies to firmware default.
Resets all menus to firmware default, sets the [A] VFO frequency to
the VHF band low limit and the [B] VFO frequency to the UHF band
ALL:
low limit, erases all channels and programs channel 0 to 136.025
MHz and channel 127 to 470.625 MHz
✓
MR/
Channel
Mode
VFO/
Frequency
Mode
Separate
VFO
A&B
Settings
Stored
on a Per
Channel
Basis
RO
✓
✓
✓
Reference for UV-82 Menus
by Jim Unroe - KC9HI
11-January-2014
(send comments, suggestions or corrections to UV-82@KC9HI.net)
Menu Number
/ Short Name
Long Name / Description / Settings / Notes
Legend & Definitions
[A] The top/upper VFO/Channel Display
[B] The bottom/lower VFO/Channel Display
RX Receive
TX Transmit
PTT Push-to-talk
RO Read Only
✓ Valid
⦸ Inhibited
[n] Numbers in brackets are shortcuts
YMMV Your Mileage May Vary
Global
MR/
Channel
Mode
VFO/
Frequency
Mode
Separate
VFO
A&B
Settings
Stored
on a Per
Channel
Basis
Time Out Timer Table (Menu 9)
Nº
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Seconds
15
30
45
60
75
90
105
120
135
150
Nº
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
Seconds
165
180
195
210
225
240
255
270
285
300
Nº
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
Seconds
315
330
345
360
375
390
405
420
435
450
Nº
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
Seconds
465
480
495
510
525
540
555
570
585
600
Nº
Tone(Hz)
131.8
136.5
141.3
146.2
151.4
156.7
159.8
162.2
165.5
167.9
Nº
Tone(Hz)
171.3
173.8
177.3
179.9
183.5
186.2
189.9
192.8
196.6
199.5
Note: digits in the 'Nº' column are shortcuts
CTCSS Table (Menu 11 & Menu 13)
Nº
Tone(Hz)
67.0
69.3
71.9
74.4
77.0
79.7
82.5
85.4
88.5
91.5
Nº
Tone(Hz)
94.8
97.4
100.0
103.5
107.2
110.9
114.8
118.8
123.0
127.3
Nº
Tone(Hz)
203.5
206.5
210.7
218.1
225.7
229.1
233.6
241.8
250.3
254.1
DCS Table (Menu 10 & Menu 12)
Nº
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
Code
D023N
D025N
D026N
D031N
D032N
D036N
D043N
D047N
D051N
D053N
D054N
D065N
D071N
D072N
D073N
D074N
D114N
D115N
D116N
D122N
D125N
Nº
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
Code
D131N
D132N
D134N
D143N
D145N
D152N
D155N
D156N
D162N
D165N
D172N
D174N
D205N
D212N
D223N
D225N
D226N
D243N
D244N
D245N
D246N
Nº
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
Code
D251N
D252N
D255N
D261N
D263N
D265N
D266N
D271N
D274N
D306N
D311N
D315N
D325N
D331N
D332N
D343N
D346N
D351N
D356N
D364N
D365N
Nº
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
Code
D371N
D411N
D412N
D413N
D423N
D431N
D432N
D445N
D446N
D452N
D454N
D455N
D462N
D464N
D465N
D466N
D503N
D506N
D516N
D523N
D526N
Nº
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
Code
D532N
D546N
D565N
D606N
D612N
D624N
D627N
D631N
D632N
D645N
D654N
D662N
D664N
D703N
D712N
D723N
D731N
D732N
D734N
D743N
D754N
Nº
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
Code
D023I
D025I
D026I
D031I
D032I
D036I
D043I
D047I
D051I
D053I
D054I
D065I
D071I
D072I
D073I
D074I
D114I
D115I
D116I
D122I
D125I
Nº
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
Code
D131I
D132I
D134I
D143I
D145I
D152I
D155I
D156I
D162I
D165I
D172I
D174I
D205I
D212I
D223I
D225I
D226I
D243I
D244I
D245I
D246I
Nº
Code
D251I
D252I
D255I
D261I
D263I
D265I
D266I
D271I
D274I
D306I
D311I
D315I
D325I
D331I
D332I
D343I
D346I
D351I
D356I
D364I
D365I
Nº
Code
D371I
D411I
D412I
D413I
D423I
D431I
D432I
D445I
D446I
D452I
D454I
D455I
D462I
D464I
D465I
D466I
D503I
D506I
D516I
D523I
D526I
Nº
Code
D532I
D546I
D565I
D606I
D612I
D624I
D627I
D631I
D632I
D645I
D654I
D662I
D664I
D703I
D712I
D723I
D731I
D732I
D734I
D743I
D754I
Note: digits in the 'Nº' column are shortcuts