Dell PowerEdge R910 System information

SERVERS: DATABASE CONSOLIDATION ON
DELL POWEREDGE R910 SERVERS
*See hardware details on Page 3.
A Principled Technologies report commissioned by Dell Inc.
Table of contents
Executive summary ........................................................3
New Dell technology makes major savings easy .................4
Features of the new Dell PowerEdge R910 ........................ 4
Features of the new Intel Xeon Processor 7500 series ........ 4
Features of the new Dell PowerVault MD3220 ................... 5
Features of Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 ........................ 6
The power of consolidation ............................................. 6
Running the numbers ......................................................8
Under 6-month payback ................................................. 8
439 percent ROI in 3 years ........................................... 10
The Dell PowerEdge R910 performance story ................... 10
48 databases, eight instances, one server ...................... 10
We show you how: Preparing the move ........................... 15
Evaluating your databases ............................................ 15
Configuring your storage .............................................. 16
Installing SQL Server 2008 ........................................... 17
Installing the database instances .................................. 18
We show you how: Making the move .............................. 19
Upgrade Advisor makes it easy ..................................... 19
Side-by-side migration ................................................. 21
We show you how: After the move ................................. 23
Logins and dependencies.............................................. 23
Summing it all up ......................................................... 25
Appendix A. Return on investment .................................. 26
Test case ................................................................... 26
Consolidation factor ..................................................... 26
Power savings ............................................................. 27
3-year cost savings ..................................................... 27
Acquisition costs ......................................................... 30
Operating cost savings ................................................. 30
Payback period ........................................................... 31
Assumptions ............................................................... 32
Appendix B. Example database survey ............................ 34
Appendix C. Preparing the storage .................................. 36
Setting up the storage ................................................. 36
Configuring the Dell PowerEdge R910 storage ................. 36
Appendix D. Installing SQL Server 2008 .......................... 38
Appendix E. Installing Upgrade Advisor ........................... 40
Appendix F. Migrating databases .................................... 42
Appendix G. Transferring Windows logins ........................ 45
Appendix H. Transferring SQL Server logins ..................... 46
Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
Executive summary
Advances in processor, server, and database technologies enable
enterprises to reduce costs by consolidating multiple older
databases onto a single newer, faster server. The new Dell
PowerEdge R910 featuring the latest Intel Xeon Processor 7500
series and the new Dell PowerVault MD3220 storage array (which
we refer to as the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution) can let
organizations realize significant consolidation savings.
This Principled Technologies (PT) Guide is the result of performance
tests and consolidation procedures we performed. We provide
concepts and procedures that will help you successfully consolidate
your Microsoft SQL Server 2000 instances from multiple older
servers onto a single Microsoft Windows Server® 2008 R2 system
running SQL Server 2008 R2. We compared the performance and
power consumption of the new and old solutions, and then we
analyzed these and other factors to gauge the level of savings you
could realize by consolidating servers.
As the results from our hands-on tests show, the Dell PowerEdge
R910 solution can run as many as 48 older database workloads,
each of which will perform as well as if it were on an older
dedicated server-and-storage solution. Such consolidation saves
space, reduces system management costs, lowers licensing costs,
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
and decreases power consumption by over 91.5 percent. The result
is an estimated payback period of less than 6 months and a 3-year
return on investment (ROI) of 439 percent.
New Dell technology makes major savings easy
The new Dell PowerEdge R910 features the latest Intel Xeon
Processor 7500 series. It allows organizations to consolidate
unprecedented numbers of SQL Server databases onto a single
server, resulting in significant savings.
Features of the new Dell PowerEdge R910
The Dell PowerEdge R910 offers many new features for maximizing
performance on database and other applications and for minimizing
operational expenses, including the following:
Power. The Dell PowerEdge R910 includes enhancements that let
it use less energy than many older servers. When you consolidate
many legacy servers onto a single Dell PowerEdge R910, the
potential power savings are dramatic.
Processors. The Dell PowerEdge R910 uses the Intel Xeon
Processor 7500 series. These processors automatically adjust their
speed and energy usage to meet the requirements of your
applications, improving performance and saving power. Combined
with support for ever-increasing amounts of memory, this makes
the Dell PowerEdge R910 an excellent database consolidation
platform.
Management. The Dell PowerEdge R910, like all late-model Dell
servers, comes with the Dell Lifecycle Controller. This tool
simplifies management by providing a single interface for
management functions and by storing critical system information in
the system itself. There are no CDs or USB keys to keep track of
for drivers or firmware.
Features of the new Intel Xeon Processor 7500 series
The new Intel Xeon Processor 7500 series offers businesses a
number of advantages, including the following:
Larger cache. The new Intel Xeon Processor 7500 series contains
24 MB of shared L3 cache, increasing the previous-generation
processors’ cache amounts by a significant margin. More L3 cache
means faster processing, and better database performance.
Greater scaling power. The newest generation of Intel
processors brings eight processing cores to each chip, along with
hyper-threading, totaling 16 logical processors per physical
processor. The larger number of logical processors, coupled with
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
the expansion from two-socket (2S) to four-socket (4S) platforms,
elevates the Intel Xeon Processor 7500 series to a new level of
power and scalability.
QuickPath. Intel QuickPath Technology provides fast access to the
increased memory addressable by these processors.
Turbo Boost Technology. Intel Turbo Boost Technology
automatically allows processor cores to run faster than the base
operating frequency if the server is operating below power,
current, and temperature specification limits.
Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS) features.
Intel adds new RAS features to the Xeon Processor 7500 series
platform, such as Machine Check Architecture (MCA). Now the CPU
can isolate issues on the chip or in memory in real time, alert the
operating system to log the error, and avoid crashes.
Features of the new Dell PowerVault MD3220
The Dell PowerVault MD3220 SAS storage array offers many new
features for providing affordable performance with simple
management tools, including the following:
Performance. The Dell PowerVault MD3220 uses the nextgeneration 6Gbps SAS back-end technology to provide maximum
performance for each drive. Four SAS ports and 2GB cache per
controller provide maximum performance for any application. Base
and turbo-mode performance options allow customers to save on
upfront costs and upgrade to turbo mode to provide additional
performance when needed.
Flexibility and scalability. The Dell PowerVault MD3220 allows
you to mix and match drives and Dell PowerVault enclosures to
provide maximum flexibility to meet your storage needs. You can
even use a combination of 2.5" or 3.5" drives.
System management. The Dell PowerVault MD3220 uses the new
MD Storage Manager software, which provides an easy-to-use
interface. The MD Storage Manager lets you manage multiple MD
storage arrays in a single window and the wizard-based array
management lets you manage your array with ease.
Availability and optional data protection. The Dell PowerVault
MD3220 provides fully redundant power supplies and dual
controllers with write-cache mirroring; this means data is always
highly available, even in the case of a component failure, and no
data loss or corruption occurs. The optional snapshot feature lets
you take up to 128 snapshots per system as well as unlimited
virtual disk copies.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
Features of Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2
SQL Server 2008 R2 is the latest release of Microsoft’s database
management platform. As with each release, Microsoft has added
new features to expand on the capabilities of their Database
Management System (DBMS) platform. Where earlier versions of
SQL Server required database administrators to largely rely on
either in-house applications or third-party tools to monitor multiple
instances, SQL Server 2008 R2 simplifies multi-server
management. SQL Server 2008 R2 also introduces the SQL Server
Utility, offering a rapid enterprise view of the complete
environment and utilization statistics. Microsoft scales SQL Server
up with this release, as SQL Server 2008 R2 now supports up to
256 logical processors, which offers organizations extreme
flexibility when planning for new system purchases and
consolidation opportunities.
The power of consolidation
What is consolidation?
Generally speaking, consolidation is the process of combining
multiple items to make a single, more effective unit. In an IT
context, you can consolidate the following:
Physical servers. After a successful server consolidation, all
applications should run on fewer servers than before. Ideally, those
applications should run at least as well as they did previously and
potentially better.
Storage. Depending on your setup, consolidating servers may also
let you consolidate storage by moving data from a number of
servers to a single large-disk storage subsystem in a new server.
Space. As you consolidate servers, you will likely reduce the
number of racks or even the number of locations that house
servers.
In this database-specific Guide, we address the consolidation of
multiple stand-alone SQL Server 2000 server-and-storage solutions
to a server-and-storage solution powered by the latest Intel Xeon
Processor 7500 series and Dell PowerVault MD3220 storage. As we
will demonstrate, consolidating multiple servers to one physical
machine saves on space, hardware costs, licensing costs, power,
cooling, and administrative overhead.
Why consolidate?
An effective server-and-storage solution consolidation effort has
the potential to yield an environment with more consistent
management practices and improved reliability, security, and
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
hardware utilization—all while maintaining the previous level of
application performance.
Consolidation can also yield a variety of cost savings:
Hardware savings. Buying, powering, and supporting fewer
servers brings obvious savings. Other potential hardware cost
savings include the need for fewer racks and network switches: as
the number of servers decreases, these costs decrease as well.
Software license savings. Consolidation can save an
organization significant money in software licenses. We present a
detailed example of potential license savings in our earlier guide,
―Consolidating SQL Server 2000 and SQL Server 2005 databases to
SQL Server 2008 on Windows Server 2008 Enterprise on Dell
Servers.‖1
Maintenance and staff savings. A consolidated infrastructure
offers many opportunities for maintenance, support, and staffing
cost savings. Less hardware and associated equipment means
fewer servers that require security patches, monitoring, and other
ongoing maintenance.
Reduced support costs. The cost of a given level of support is
typically proportional to the size of the installation. By reducing the
number of servers, support costs are also likely to decrease.
Power and cooling savings. Consolidating servers saves power
and cooling by using fewer more efficient systems.
Sizing and baseline performance
One key to a successful consolidation is sizing, the process of
gathering different performance baselines so you have an
approximate set of requirements the new hardware platform must
meet. You do this by determining the performance characteristics
of existing hardware during normal business operations, and then
applying growth and scalability estimates.
Among the characteristics to examine on each server are the
following:






Processor utilization
Memory requirements of the operating system and
applications
Disk layout
Database size
Expected database growth
Maximum concurrent users
1
http://www.dell.com/downloads/global/solutions/public/white_papers/Consolidating
_SQLServer_databases_onto_a_Dell_server.pdf
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers

Types and rates of transactions against the databases
The server you select for consolidation must do more than match
the combined capacity of your older servers today. It must also
have enough excess capacity to still perform well at the end of its
expected life span.
The Dell PowerEdge R910 we tested for this Guide is a highperformance server that can readily support significant
consolidation. It has four Intel Xeon Processors X7560 with eight
cores, 256 GB of RAM, and has been optimized to reduce both
power consumption and heat dissipation. In addition, the Dell
PowerVault MD3220 storage array gives the server access to
multiple terabytes of enterprise storage.
Running the numbers
Under 6-month payback
Payback period
As we discuss above, consolidating older database server-andstorage solutions lets you reduce energy usage, save data center
space, reduce software license costs, and lower management
costs. Tests in PT’s labs show that a four-socket Dell PowerEdge
R910 server with the new Intel Xeon Processor X7560, 256GB
RAM, and the Dell PowerVault MD3220 storage array,
supplemented by three Dell PowerVault MD1220 expansion
enclosures, could consolidate four full racks of older database
servers and storage. These racks we consolidated included 48 AMD
Opteron 254-based HP ProLiant DL385 servers with 4 GB of RAM,
with each pair sharing one of 24 HP StorageWorks MSA30 storage
enclosures (we refer to these as the 48 HP ProLiant DL385
solutions). Such consolidation would deliver rapid return on
investment (ROI) and a quick payback.
We used the open-source DVD Store (DS2) benchmark to provide a
workload representative of a real-world database application. With
it, we measured the database performance of an older server-andstorage solution running Microsoft Windows Server 2003 R2 with
Microsoft SQL Server 2000. We then measured how many of those
workloads the new Dell PowerEdge R910 solution could host. The
new server ran Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 and Microsoft
SQL Server 2008 R2. We detail the test results in The Dell
PowerEdge R910 performance story section of this Guide. The Dell
PowerEdge R910 solution was able to consolidate 48 of these
database workloads while still maintaining the same average
orders per minute (OPM) as the solution it replaced.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
This consolidation could deliver payback in less than 6 months and
an ROI of 439 percent after 3 years.
Dell PowerEdge R910 solution pays back the
initial investment in under 6 months
$900,000
Cumulative costs
$800,000
$700,000
$600,000
$500,000
$400,000
$300,000
$200,000
$124,653
acquisition costs
$100,000
$140,938 savings
at 1 year
$672,121 savings
at 3 years
Payback in 5.6
m onths
$0
1
3
5
7
9
11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35
Months
HP ProLiant DL385 solution x 48
Dell PowerEdge R910 solution
Payback period
Acquisition costs
1st-year savings
3rd-year savings
Figure 1. The payback period and accumulated estimated costs for the 48 HP ProLiant DL385
solutions and the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution. The Dell PowerEdge R910 solution delivers
payback and savings within the first 6 months. Lower costs and higher savings are better.
Figure 1 graphs the payback period and the 3-year cost savings of
the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution. The line representing the Dell
PowerEdge R910 solution accumulates the initial investment cost
and the monthly costs of the solution. The initial investment cost
includes the list price of the server and the storage array as well as
the costs of migrating from the HP ProLiant DL385 solutions to the
newer Dell PowerEdge R910 solution. The line for the HP ProLiant
DL385 solutions shows the accumulated costs of these solutions.
The lines cross at the end of the payback period, the point at which
solution savings equal the initial investment. Savings continue after
the payback period. By the end of year one, we project savings of
$140,938 with the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
The Dell PowerEdge R910 solution uses a little less than 1/12th the
power, 1/48th the Microsoft SQL Server licenses, 1/12th the
Microsoft Windows Server licenses, and about 1/14th the data
center rack space of the 48 HP ProLiant DL385 solutions, and
requires less administrator time to manage fewer servers and
storage arrays.
See Appendix A for more information on these savings and
calculations.
439 percent ROI in 3 years
We calculate the return on the investment in the Dell PowerEdge
R910 solution by dividing the savings after 3 years ($672,121) by
the acquisition costs ($124,653) and subtracting 1. ROI is 439
percent after 3 years.
The Dell PowerEdge R910 performance story
48 databases, eight instances, one server
Our multiple-instance testing with DVD Store
Using our new hardware environment, which consisted of a single
Dell PowerEdge R910 and Dell PowerVault MD3220 array, we
installed multiple instances of SQL Server 2008 R2 to simulate the
benefits of consolidating multiple SQL Server 2000 workloads from
the HP ProLiant DL385 solutions to the Dell PowerEdge R910
solution. To simulate a real-world multi-instance consolidation
effort, we installed eight SQL Server 2008 R2 instances and
consolidated six of the legacy workloads per instance on the Dell
PowerEdge R910. The total number of legacy workloads we were
able to consolidate on the Dell PowerEdge R910 while still
maintaining, on average, the same overall throughput as before,
was 48.
About DVD Store
DVD Store Version 2 is an open-source application with a back-end
database component, a front-end Web application layer, and a
driver layer that actually executes the workload. DS2 models an
online DVD store. Simulated customers log in; browse movies by
actor, title, or category; and purchase movies. The workload also
creates new customers. Browsing movies involves select
operations, some of which use full-text search and some of which
do not. The purchase, login, and new customer stored procedures
involve update and insert statements, as well as select statements.
The DS2 benchmark produces an orders-per-minute metric (OPM),
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
which we report in this Guide. For more details about the DS2 tool,
see http://www.delltechcenter.com/page/DVD+Store.
Our test bed setup
On the HP ProLiant DL385 server running Windows Server 2003 R2
with SP2 and one instance of SQL Server 2000, we used 4 GB of
RAM, allocating 3 GB of RAM to user processes via the boot.ini
/3GB switch as was typical in a server of its time. We used four
internal hard drives (73GB 15,000 RPM SCSI) that we configured in
two RAID 1 volumes, installing the OS on one volume and using
the other volume for SQL Server logs. We configured the external
storage as one large RAID 5 LUN containing seven 146GB 10,000
RPM disks in an HP StorageWorks MSA30 storage enclosure.
Because our goal was to emulate a 3- to 5-year-old database
server, we chose RAID 5 for the external storage, a configuration
typical of the time.
On the Dell PowerEdge R910 server running Windows Server 2008
R2 and eight instances of SQL Server 2008 R2, we used 256 GB of
RAM, allocating equal amounts of RAM to each SQL Server instance
in the properties of each instance. We used two internal hard
drives (146GB 15,000 RPM 6Gb SAS) in a RAID 1 configuration,
installing the OS and SQL Server 2008 R2 instances on that
internal volume. We used eight additional internal drives in a RAID
10 configuration for SQL Server logs (146GB 15,000 RPM 6Gb
SAS). All internal drives were attached to the PERC H700 internal
6Gb SAS storage controller. We configured a Dell PowerVault
MD3220 storage array into four separate RAID 10 disk groups with
24 disks in each group and one volume per group. We placed two
SQL Server instances on each volume. We assigned a minimum of
20 GB of RAM and a maximum of 30 GB of RAM to each SQL
Server instance to ensure equal balancing of memory resources
among SQL Server instances.
We ran only one database workload on the single SQL Server 2000
instance on the HP ProLiant DL385 as the system memory and disk
subsystems of the system were saturated with just one database
workload. We ran eight SQL Server 2008 R2 instances, a real-world
number for the Dell PowerEdge R910, and added database
workloads evenly across the SQL Server instances making sure the
average OPM across all 48 workloads exceeded the original OPM on
the HP ProLiant DL385.
In Figure 2, we show the consolidated SQL Server layout,
consisting of eight distinct SQL Server 2008 R2 instances, each
containing six databases. All of the SQL Server instances’ data
resided on the Dell PowerVault MD3220 array.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
Figure 2. Consolidated SQL Server 2008 R2 instance layout for
our testing.
For client machines, we used desktop systems running Windows
Server 2003 R2 with SP2. Each of these client machines ran the
DS2 workload, which spawned 32 threads against each database
workload and ran with no think time. On the HP ProLiant DL385
server, we used one client and one SQL Server 2000 instance,
containing one database. On the Dell PowerEdge R910 server, we
used eight SQL Server 2008 R2 instances, each containing 6
databases, for a total of 48 databases. We used 23 virtual Hyper-V
clients and one physical client to ensure that the virtualization did
not affect the results. Each client targeted two databases. This
simulated a heavily loaded environment on all of our databases.
We ran the DS2 benchmark with a 10GB database. On average,
each SQL Server 2008 R2 database workload on the Dell
PowerEdge R910 solution delivered better performance than did
the same workload on a single HP ProLiant DL385 solution. We
then estimated the monthly costs for maintaining the 48 HP
ProLiant DL385 solutions and the single Dell PowerEdge R910
solution, and estimated the payback period for the investment in
the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution.
Our testing results
As Figure 3 shows, we were able to run 48 SQL Server 2008 R2
database workloads (six databases on each of eight SQL Server
instances), all simultaneously achieving an average throughput
12
Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
greater than the HP ProLiant DL385 solution’s orders per minute
score. The average OPM delivered by each of the 48 workloads on
the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution was 6,985, while the average
OPM delivered by a single workload on the HP ProLiant DL385
solution was 6,639.
Orders per minute per workload
7,000
6,000
OPM
5,000
4,000
3,000
2,000
1,000
0
1 HP ProLiant
DL385 workload
Dell PowerEdge
R910 (average of
48 workloads)
Figure 3. Average OPM of 48 database workloads on the Dell
PowerEdge R910 solution versus a single database workload on the
HP ProLiant DL385 solution. Greater OPM is better.
As Figure 4 shows, the combined OPM of 48 SQL Server database
workloads on the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution were over 50 times
greater than the single HP ProLiant DL385 solution database
workload.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
Total orders per minute: 1 HP ProLiant
DL385 solution vs. 24 workloads on 1 Dell
PowerEdge R910 solution
OPM
400,000
300,000
200,000
100,000
0
HP ProLiant
DL385
solution
Dell PowerEdge
R910
solution
Figure 4. Combined orders per minute of 48 database workloads on the
Dell PowerEdge R910 solution versus a single HP ProLiant DL385 solution
database workload. Greater OPM is better.
Power savings
As Figure 5 shows, assuming we were running 48 HP ProLiant
DL385 servers, each using half of the HP StorageWorks MSA30
external enclosure, for a total of 24 enclosures, we would
significantly reduce our power consumption. Power consumption at
idle and under load both decreased by over 85 percent when
switching to the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution. We calculated this
by measuring the wattage of a single HP ProLiant DL385 solution,
then multiplying the server wattage times 48 and the storage
wattage times 24. We contrast this with the total power
consumption of the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution. Lower wattage
is better.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
Idle power usage: 48 HP ProLiant DL385
solutions vs. 1 Dell PowerEdge R910
solution
25,000
Watts
20,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
0
48 HP ProLiant
DL385 solutions
1 Dell PowerEdge
R910 solution
Figure 5. Simulated idle power savings – 48 HP ProLiant DL385 solutions
versus a single Dell PowerEdge R910 solution. Lower idle power is better.
We show you how: Preparing the move
We have shown why you should consolidate your older databases
to a single Dell PowerEdge R910 solution with four Intel Xeon
Processor 7500 series. Now we address the next question: How to
accomplish this? We discuss planning issues, setup of the Dell
PowerEdge R910 with Dell PowerVault MD3220 storage, the actual
migration using a simple backup/restore method, and postmigration considerations.
Evaluating your databases
As with any migration or consolidation, planning is a key element.
You must be aware of many specific details related to each physical
server you target for consolidation, including the maintenance
window in which you will migrate the server to its new
environment, the users the move will affect, and the configuration
tasks necessary to assimilate the databases into your consolidated
environment. A more comprehensive example survey appears in
Appendix B. Information to gather before consolidation includes the
following:


Server OS version and patch level
SQL Server version and patch level
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers





Number of logins on this SQL Server instance, and what
type of logins these are (Windows or SQL)
Current backup strategy and schedule for the databases on
this server
Replication details for this SQL instance, if any
Detailed information regarding permissions and roles
SQL Agent jobs on this SQL Server
After moving your databases to their new SQL Server instance, you
must make sure that any system or application using the database
has updated connection information. This includes logins,
permissions, applications, SQL Agent jobs, third-party backup
products, and so on.
Gathering baseline performance data
During your research phase, you should use Performance Monitor,
SQL Server Profiler, and other tools to gather data on the typical
query load and performance statistics on the databases you are
considering moving to the new environment. This effort serves two
purposes. First, it provides a prime opportunity to identify potential
problems before you move to a consolidated solution. Second, you
can use the information you gather to map out your resource
allocation needs, which you can then use to configure your new
instances, either by using memory allocations, CPU affinity, or
Resource Governor settings.
Configuring your storage
In our test bed, we used one Dell PowerVault MD3220 SAS storage
array with three Dell PowerVault MD1220 arrays attached. This
section provides an overview of the Dell PowerVault MD3220
configuration process when used in conjunction with the Dell
PowerEdge R910. Appendix C provides complete, detailed
installation instructions.
1. Power on the Dell PowerVault MD3220 array and all the
attached Dell PowerVault MD1220 arrays. Install the MD
Storage Manager software and use it to set up the array.
2. Connect the Dell PowerVault MD3220 array to the three Dell
PowerVault MD1220 arrays and to the Dell PowerEdge R910.
Use two cables between each Dell PowerVault MD1220 array
and four between the Dell PowerVault MD3220 and Dell
PowerEdge R910.
3. Use the MD Storage Manager's Automatic setup utility to create
necessary volumes. Add a host and map the volumes and the
Dell PowerEdge R910 to that host.
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Installing SQL Server 2008
For this Guide, we assume that Windows Server 2008 R2 is
installed on the server. Although not required, you should, when
possible, deploy SQL Server 2008 R2 on a member server in an
Active Directory domain. Do not make the SQL Server service
domain accounts members of the Domain Administrators group. In
fact, grant only the necessary rights on the local server to the SQL
Server service account as part of your pre-installation checklist.
The SQL Server installation software creates the local groups it
needs for its security purposes.
This section provides an overview of the SQL Server 2008 R2
installation process. Appendix D provides full, detailed installation
instructions.
1. Insert the SQL Server 2008 R2 DVD into the DVD drive. If
prompted to enable the .NET Framework Core role, click OK.
2. On the Installation Center screens, choose Installation, and
choose to proceed with a new installation. (See Figure 6.)
Figure 6. SQL Server 2008 R2 Installation Center options.
3. Proceed through the first several installation steps, entering
license information, and installing prerequisites with default
options specified. On the Setup Role screen, choose a SQL
Server Feature Installation.
4. Proceed through the first several installation steps, entering
license information, and installing prerequisites with default
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
options specified. On the Setup Role screen, choose a SQL
Server Feature Installation.
5. On the Feature Selection screen, select only what you need for
your particular configuration. (See Figure 7.) In our case, we
chose the Database Engine with Full-Text search and the
management tools.
Figure 7. Choosing features for installation.
6. On the first installation, choose to install the default instance.
On subsequent installations on the same server, choose named
instance and provide a name for the instance.
7. Configure the credentials of the SQL Server service account and
SQL Server Agent accounts.
8. Specify SQL Server administrators and also specify the
authentication mode desired for your configuration. Microsoft
recommends Windows Authentication mode, but legacy
applications may require SQL Server authentication.
9. Complete the installation.
Installing the database instances
While there can be only one default instance, SQL Server 2008 R2,
like previous versions of SQL Server, allows you to have multiple
named instances. These instances function largely independently of
one another; each has its own security contexts, collation settings,
etc. (For more information, see http://msdn.microsoft.com/enus/library/ms143531(SQL.105).aspx.)
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To install one or more named instances, as we did for our testing,
follow the same procedures as installing a default instance, with
the exception of a few configuration changes during the process.
First, on the Feature Selection screen, if you are installing a named
instance of the database engine, you need only check the Database
Engine checkbox. The instances share the workstation components,
so you don’t need to install those components a second time.
The second and more important change in the installation
procedure for a named instance is on the Instance Configuration
screen. Here, you must choose the Named Instance option and
supply a name for the instance. Organizations typically have
naming conventions for instances that make instance management
easier, so follow those rules when naming this instance.
We show you how: Making the move
Upgrade Advisor makes it easy
The SQL Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Advisor is a major aid in
migration research. This utility, which the SQL Server 2008 R2
setup wizard includes, scans legacy databases and SQL Server
components for compatibility issues, features, and syntax the
newer DBMS does not support, as well as many other critical
components. The utility lets you view reports quickly in the
Upgrade Advisor interface or save reports for later review.
You can install and execute the Upgrade Advisor on machines
running Windows XP SP3, Windows Vista® SP1, Windows Server
2003 SP2, or Windows Server 2008. The Microsoft .NET TM
framework is also a requirement.
BEST PRACTICE: Use the Upgrade Advisor tool on your
SQL Server 2000 database and import a trace file to the
Upgrade Advisor tool for analysis. The trace file lets the
Upgrade Advisor detect issues that might not show up in a
simple scan of the database, such as TSQL embedded in
applications. Your migration research and planning must
account for such instances. You can capture traces of TSQL
using SQL Server Profiler on your SQL Server 2000 server
during typical hours and analyze these traces using the
Upgrade Advisor.
To install the Upgrade Advisor, use the following steps:
1. Insert the SQL Server 2008 R2 DVD. On the splash screen, click
Install SQL Server Upgrade Advisor.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
2. Click Next to begin the installation wizard, accept the licensing
terms, and click Next.
3. Click Next to accept the default Registration information, click
Next to accept the default installation path, and click Next to
begin the installation.
Once you have installed the SQL Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Advisor,
you can use this software to scan your SQL Server 2000 instances
for potential migration issues. This section provides a brief
walkthrough; Appendix E gives more detailed instructions.
1. Select Start | All Programs | Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 |
SQL Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Advisor.
2. Click the Launch Upgrade Advisor Analysis Wizard link, and click
Next to begin.
3. Enter the SQL Server 2000 server name, and select the
features you want the Upgrade Advisor to analyze.
Alternatively, click Detect to have the Upgrade Advisor
remotely scan the SQL Server 2000 server and detect which
components are running on the SQL Server 2000 server. (See
Figure 8.)
Figure 8. Upgrade Advisor component selection.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
4. Provide proper authentication to SQL Server 2000, and select
the database you want to analyze. If necessary, you can also
input SQL script files and trace files here.
5. You may have legacy Data Transformation Services (DTS)
packages on the SQL Server 2000 server. The DTS packages
may be present in the file system or in the database itself. If
you selected DTS, or if the Upgrade Advisor automatically
detected the presence of DTS packages, you must now select
the DTS location you want to analyze. Click Run to start the
analysis. Run times vary.
6. Following the analysis of your SQL Server 2000 server, you can
view the Upgrade Advisor report, which lists warnings and
errors. (See Figure 9.)
Figure 9. Sample Upgrade Advisor output report.
Side-by-side migration
In this section, we provide an overview of the processes involved in
migrating your database from SQL Server 2000 to SQL Server
2008 R2 on the Dell PowerEdge R910. We provide detailed
instructions in Appendix F.
We performed all SQL Server 2000 administration using Query
Analyzer and Enterprise Manager, the two main tools in the SQL
Server 2000 environment. Likewise, we performed all
21
Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
administration for the SQL Server 2008 R2 installation using SQL
Server Management Studio, the main administration interface for
SQL Server 2008 R2.
NOTE: Be aware that various methods exist for migrating
databases between instances and versions of SQL Server,
including detach/attach, backup/restore, and the copy
database wizard. We chose to use the backup/restore
method.
Backing up your SQL Server 2000 database
Using the SQL Server 2000 server, take the following steps to back
up your database. Backup times vary.
1. To keep users from issuing updates during the migration
process, you can either set the database to read-only mode or
set the access property to SINGLE_USER. Both choices
immediately sever all user connections. See Appendix F for
details on setting the database to single-user mode.
2. Perform a full backup of your SQL Server 2000 database, as we
did in Figure 10. See Appendix F for details.
Figure 10. SQL Server 2000 backup configuration.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
NOTE: If the time a full backup requires is unacceptable
given your migration maintenance schedule, you can take
the full backup at a previously scheduled time, and at this
point of the migration take only a differential or transaction
log backup. If the transaction log size is small relative to the
data file size, this approach can decrease migration time
significantly. If you go this route, however, be certain to
keep your backup chain intact.
Restoring your database to SQL Server 2008 R2 server
On the SQL Server 2008 R2 server, take the following steps:
1. Open SQL Server Management Studio, connect to the SQL
Server 2008 R2 instance, and restore the database. (Restore
times vary.) See Appendix F for details.
NOTE: At this step, you must give your new database the
same name as your SQL Server 2000 database. Changing
the name could break applications that refer to the
database by name.
2. While in SQL Server Management Studio, reset the database
access property to multi-user, and set the compatibility level to
SQL 2008 (level 100). See Appendix F for details.
We show you how: After the move
After you have completed your side-by-side migration, you
typically will need to perform some post-migration tasks. Your
specific list of tasks will depend heavily on your pre-migration
research and planning. In this section, we briefly discuss a couple
of the most common tasks.
Logins and dependencies
Windows and SQL Server logins
As in past versions of SQL Server, there are two methods of
authenticating to SQL Server 2008 R2: Windows logins and SQL
Server logins. You create and administer Windows logins at the
Active Directory domain level, and you can assign those logins
rights to SQL Server resources. You create and manage SQL Server
logins, however, within SQL Server. The processes for extracting
login information and creating the transferred login entities on the
migration server is very similar for both Windows authenticated
logins and SQL Server authenticated logins. You should, however,
take some extra steps to ensure a smooth migration for SQL
Server logins.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
Below, we describe how to script both Windows authenticated
logins and SQL Server authenticated logins to a query window and
recreate them on the new SQL Server 2008 R2 server. Step 6
refers solely to the SQL Server login type.
Please see Appendix G for details on transferring Windows logins
and Appendix H for details on transferring SQL Server logins.
To transfer logins, take the following steps on the SQL Server 2008
R2 server. Note that steps 1 through 5 apply to both Windows
logins and SQL Server logins.
1. In SQL Server Management Studio, in the Object Explorer
pane, connect to both your SQL Server 2000 server and your
SQL Server 2008 R2 server. Be sure to have the Object
Explorer Details tab open (View | Object Explorer Details).
2. Expand the tree view of the SQL Server 2000 server, browse to
the security tab, and click the logins node. In the Object
Explorer Details, you will now see a list of all logins on the SQL
Server 2000 server.
3. If necessary, use the sorting and filtering options in the Object
Explorer Details tab, and take note of which logins you would
like to migrate. Select them by clicking; use the standard
Windows controls (Ctrl key, Shift key, etc.) to select multiple
logins.
4. Right-click the logins you selected, and choose Script Login As |
Create To | New Query Window. Be sure to change the
connection of this query window to connect to your new SQL
Server 2008 R2 server, if it is not doing so already, by rightclicking and selecting Change Connection.
5. Execute the script on your SQL Server 2008 R2 server to create
the logins. If you are transferring Windows-based logins, the
process is complete. If you are transferring SQL Server logins,
continue with Step 6 below.
6. For SQL Server logins, the script you executed in Step 5 creates
the login, marks it as disabled, and assigns it a random
password, but the script does not map the login to the database
user. To avoid having a database user that is ―orphaned‖ from
a login, use the sp_change_users_login stored procedure, to
view orphaned users and to map a user to a login. Appendix H
provides an example of this process.
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SQL Server Agent jobs
Almost all installations schedule SQL Server Agent jobs that run
against their databases. You must migrate these jobs to your new
SQL Server 2008 R2 server. Locate the jobs you need to migrate in
SQL Server Management Studio (on your SQL Server 2000 server)
under the SQL Server Agent, right-click them, and choose Script
Job As | Create To | New Query Window. Connect to the SQL
Server 2008 R2 server, and run the resulting script in a query
window.
Other external dependencies
Your pre-migration research may have yielded a list of items for
you to implement now; the list might include references to file
shares, database mail or SQL Mail configurations, stored
procedures in system databases, and/or linked servers. Addressing
these external dependencies will ensure a smooth finish to your
migration.
Summing it all up
The Dell PowerEdge R910, powered by Intel’s latest generation
Xeon Processor 7500 series, offers a compelling case for
consolidation of your SQL Server resources from a legacy SQL
Server 2000 environment to a new environment with SQL Server
2008 R2. As this Guide has explained, payback is provided in less
than 6 months, application throughput increases, and power
consumption drops dramatically as a result of this migration. In
addition, the tools provided by SQL Server 2008 R2 simplify the
migration of your databases. With careful planning, you can
execute migrations with little difficulty and with no interruption of
service to users.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
Appendix A. Return on investment
This section estimates the return on investment and expected
payback period for a hypothetical enterprise that plans to
consolidate SQL Server databases from multiple legacy servers and
storage solutions onto a single newer, more powerful Dell serverand-storage solution.
The payback period is an estimate of how many months it would
take to recapture initial investment costs when consolidating
multiple 4-year-old HP ProLiant DL385 solutions onto a single Dell
PowerEdge R910 solution.
The ROI analysis projects costs over 3 years for both the legacy
and newer solution and calculates the ratio of the acquisition costs
of the newer solution to the 3-year cost savings.
Test case
We consider the following specific legacy environment running
Microsoft SQL Server 2000 on Microsoft Windows Server 2003 R2
with Service Pack 2:

48 AMD Opteron 254-based HP ProLiant DL385 servers with
4 GB of RAM and 24 HP StorageWorks MSA30 storage
enclosures
We calculate the cost savings for a migration to the following Dell
solution running Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 on Microsoft
Windows Server 2008 R2:

One Dell PowerEdge R910 with four Intel Xeon Processor
X7560s and 256GB of RAM and one Dell PowerVault
MD3220 SAS storage array
Consolidation factor
We used benchmark results from our DS2 testing to determine the
number of older servers with accompanying storage that a Dell
PowerEdge R910 solution could replace. Our results showed that an
enterprise could replace 48 HP ProLiant DL385 solutions with a
single Dell PowerEdge R910 solution. We use 48 as our
consolidation factor. In our tests, one HP ProLiant DL385 server
used half of a HP StorageWorks MSA30 enclosure. We therefore
assume that two HP ProLiant DL385 servers can share each HP
storage array for a total of 48 HP ProLiant DL385 servers and 24
HP StorageWorks MSA30 enclosures.
26
Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
Power savings
We measured power to the test servers and storage when idle and
while running the benchmark under peak load. We measured
energy usage of the HP StorageWorks MSA30 with both a full
enclosure and a half enclosure and use the full enclosure results for
this ROI analysis. We averaged the idle and peak load results to
estimate a power usage under typical load for the test
configurations. We then calculated solution totals for the Dell
PowerEdge R910 solution and the 48 HP ProLiant DL385 solutions
that we compare in this ROI analysis. Figure 11 shows our results.
Typical power usage: 48 HP ProLiant DL385
solutions vs. 1 Dell PowerEdge R910 solution
25,000
Watts
20,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
0
48 HP ProLiant
DL385 solutions
1 Dell PowerEdge
R910 solution
Figure 11. Estimated power usage under typical load for the single Dell PowerEdge R910
solution and 48 HP ProLiant DL385 solutions. Typical power is the average of idle power
and power under load. Lower results are better.
3-year cost savings
We estimated acquisition costs and ongoing operating costs for the
two solutions over a 3-year period. In this analysis, the Dell
PowerEdge R910 solution delivered payback within 6 months,
27
Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
offsetting its acquisition costs by major savings in operating costs
and delivered a significant ROI over 3 years.
Acquisition costs include the purchase price of the server and
storage hardware for the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution as well as
the labor costs to plan and carry out the migration.
Operating costs include hardware support costs, software licenses
and support agreements, facility costs for space and data center
ports, energy costs, and management costs. We assume operating
costs are the same for each of the 3 years. We do not calculate net
present value, internal rate of return, or use other discounted cash
flow methods that factor the time value of money into the
evaluation.
Figure 12 shows the 3-year costs for the two configurations.
Specifically, it shows that acquisition costs of the Dell PowerEdge
R910 server are offset by its savings in operating costs.
3-year costs: 48 HP ProLiant DL385 solutions
vs. 1 Dell PowerEdge R910 solution
$900,000
$800,000
Three-year
savings =
$672,121
$700,000
Dollars
$600,000
$500,000
$865,440
$400,000
$300,000
$193,319
$200,000
$124,653
$100,000
$0
48 HP ProLiant
DL385 solutions
Acquisition costs
1 Dell PowerEdge
R910 solution
3-year operating costs
28
Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
Figure 12. Estimated 3-year costs for the 48 HP ProLiant DL385 solutions and a single
Dell PowerEdge R910 solution. Lower costs are better.
Five benefits of the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution drive the cost
savings for this solution:





Replaces up to 48 HP ProLiant DL385 servers and 24
HP StorageWorks MSA30 storage enclosures. The
increased capabilities of the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution
enable consolidation of multiple older systems for the
specific workload we tested.
Fewer servers and storage arrays lower system
administration labor costs. There is significant savings
for this consolidation in labor costs for server and storage
administration. We estimate that the 48 older servers and
24 older storage arrays require over 18 times more
administration time than the new Dell PowerEdge R910
solution.
Energy consumption is about 1/12 that of the 48 HP
ProLiant DL385 solutions it replaces. The Dell
PowerEdge R910 solution provides considerable energy
savings over the older HP ProLiant DL385 solutions that it
replaces.
Requires only four Windows Server licenses and one
Windows SQL Server license instead of 48 of each for
the legacy solution. Consolidation provides immediate
savings for the organization that maintains software
assurance agreements. We assume the enterprise maintains
Microsoft Software Assurance agreements for the Microsoft
Windows Server 2003 version. After the migration, the
enterprise will realize savings by not renewing the software
agreements, which we assume are due for renewal. We
include both per-server license costs and Software
Assurance costs for four licenses, one per processor, for
Windows Server 2008 Data Center edition for the new
solution. We assume that the enterprise, which is running
SQL Server 2000 on the legacy servers, would not maintain
Software Assurance on a software version that old. We
therefore don’t include any ongoing SQL Server 2000 costs
for the legacy solution. We include both per-server license
costs and Software Assurance costs for Windows SQL
Server 2008 R2 Enterprise edition on the new solution. Even
with that license cost, the enterprise saves on software with
the consolidated solution through the savings in Software
Assurance costs for retired licenses.
Requires approximately 1/21th of the data center
rack space. The legacy solution requires 2u of rack space
for each server and 3u of rack space for each storage array.
The HP ProLiant DL385 solutions use a total of 168u, filling
four 42u racks; the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution requires a
total of only 12u for one 4u server and one 2u Dell
PowerVault MD3220 array, and 2u for each of three Dell
PowerVault MD1220 arrays, filling less than third of a 42u
rack.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
Acquisition costs
Figure 13 details the acquisition costs for the Dell PowerEdge R910
solution.
Category
Server cost
Storage cost
Description
One Intel Xeon Processor X7560-based
Dell PowerEdge R910 server
One PowerVault MD3220 array with 24
146GB 15,000 RPM drives and three
PowerVault MD1220 arrays with 24 73GB
15,000 RPM drives per array
Dell PowerEdge
R910 solution
$52,338
$54,537
Migration planning
and execution
320 hours of staff time for migration
$17,778
Total investment
Server, storage, and migration planning
and execution costs combined
$124,653
Figure 13. Acquisition costs for the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution.
Dell provided the hardware components of the Dell PowerEdge
R910 solution and their list prices. We included Dell installation
services in the purchase cost of the server.
We used our experience to estimate the migration costs. We
assume that the enterprise consolidates the 48 older servers onto
one Dell PowerEdge R910 server-and-storage solution using the
easy and efficient processes described in this document. We
estimate 80 hours of staff time for migration planning and 280
hours to carry out the migration. We include migration of the
hardware, operating system, and SQL Server software, and the
10GB databases we included in our testing. Migration of additional
software would add to the migration time, as would any factors
that add to the complexity of the migration. We estimate all staff
costs based on a loaded annual system administrator cost of
$100,000.
Operating cost savings
Figure 14 shows the 3-year operating costs and operating cost
savings of the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution for the five categories
of operating costs that we consider in this analysis.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
Savings category
Costs for 1 Dell
PowerEdge
R910 solution
Costs for 48
HP ProLiant
DL385
solutions
3-year
savings for
Dell
PowerEdge
R910 solution
$6,807
$117,792
$110,985
$24,036
$108,144
$84,108
$1,179
$29,664
$28,485
$9,144
$69,840
$60,696
$27,500
$540,000
$512,500
$68,666
$865,440
$796,774
Hardware support Servers and storage arrays
Software costs Microsoft Windows Server and
Microsoft SQL Server
Facility costs Rack space and port costs
Energy costs Power and cooling
Management costs Labor for server and storage
array administration
Total
Figure 14. 3-year operating cost savings for the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution vs. the
48 HP ProLiant DL385 solutions.
Payback period
The payback period identifies the point at which we estimate the
operating cost savings equal the acquisition costs and the
acquisition starts to show a cost benefit or profit. In calculating the
estimated payback period, we assume that investment costs occur
at the beginning of the year of the acquisition and annual or 3-year
operating costs spread evenly across the months.
Figure 15 shows the payback calculation for the Dell PowerEdge
R910 solution and the 48 HP ProLiant DL385 solutions.
Payback category
One-time initial investment (includes
server, storage hardware, and migration
costs)
Monthly cost (annual costs divided by 12;
includes hardware support, maintenance
and service contracts, software support
agreements, facility costs, energy costs,
and management costs)
Payback period
Dell
PowerEdge
R910
solution
48 HP
ProLiant
DL385
solutions
Difference
$124,653.00
(HP ProLiant
$124,653.00
$0.00
DL385 is
lower)
$22,132.61
(Dell
$1,907.39
$24,040.00
PowerEdge
R910 is
lower)
($124,653/$22,132.61=5.6 months)
Figure 15. Payback calculation for the Dell PowerEdge R910 solution vs. the 48 HP
ProLiant DL385 solutions.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
Assumptions
We made many assumptions about the hypothetical enterprise that
drives the costs in this analysis. Different assumptions would
create a different cost picture. We made the following assumptions
in estimating acquisition costs:


The enterprise would dedicate the entire newer Dell
PowerEdge R910 server and the Dell PowerVault MD3220
array to the tasks carried out by the 48 HP ProLiant DL385
solutions it was replacing.
The log files would be on two internal disks on each legacy
server, and on four internal disks on the new server.
We made the following assumptions in estimating the support,
maintenance, and service contract costs for hardware:



The enterprise would typically select a 3-year support
package with 7-day, 24-hour mission critical coverage, and
4-hour on-site response time for newer servers and a 3year support package with next business day on-site service
for storage arrays, and would take over support internally
after those agreements expire. Therefore, for the Dell
PowerEdge R910 solution, we included the costs for 3-Year
ProSupport for IT and mission critical 4HR 7x24 onsite pack
in our cost estimates and divided those costs by 3 to show
the annual cost. For storage, we include 3-year ProSupport
for IT and next business day on-site service and divided
those costs by 3 to show the annual cost.
The enterprise would dedicate the HP ProLiant DL385
servers and storage enclosures to the tasks our benchmark
tests model.
For the HP ProLiant DL385 solutions, we estimated an
annual in-house support cost of $400 per server and $300
per storage array, plus costs to replace failed disks based
on PT estimates of a 4 percent annual disk replacement
rate.
We made the following assumptions in estimating the costs of
software support agreements:


The HP ProLiant DL385 solutions used Windows Server 2003
R2 Enterprise Edition with per-server licenses, and the
enterprise kept up-to-date software assurance agreements
for that software.
The business updated the Dell PowerEdge R910 operating
system to Windows Server 2008 R2 DataCenter Edition by
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers



purchasing one license and software assurance agreement
for each processor.
The enterprise saved the cost of the freed up software
assurance agreements. These agreements were due for
renewal at the time of the solution acquisition.
The enterprise purchased a SQL Server 2008 R2 Enterprise
Edition per server license for the Dell PowerEdge R910
solution and software assurance agreement for that
software.
The enterprise already owned the necessary Client Access
Licenses (CALs).
We made the following assumptions in estimating facility costs,
which include rack-based space costs and Ethernet port costs:

We estimated a fixed data center cost per rack, prorated by
the percentage of the rack the solution used. We estimated
an annual per-server data center ports cost of $159 based
on PT’s experience.
We made the following assumptions in estimating energy costs:



We measured energy costs for active and idle power
consumption values and used the average of the active and
idle power from the benchmark runs to calculate year-round
power.
Average cost per kWh of power. Source: National
commercial average reported in February 2010 from
http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/epm/table5_6_a.h
tml. The February 2010 average was $0.973 per kWh.
We estimated the energy cost of cooling the servers and
storage arrays to be equal to the energy cost required for
running the systems.
We used the following assumptions in estimating the management
costs:

Support costs are separate from administration costs and
are included under 3-year support, maintenance, and
service contract costs for newer hardware.
33
Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
Appendix B. Example database survey
In this appendix, we provide an example survey of detailed
information you may want to gather about the SQL Server
instances and databases you’re targeting for consolidation. While
this survey is a good starting point, it may not contain every
relevant detail for your particular environment.
1. Hardware level
a. CPU
i. Vendor
ii. Model
iii. Number of cores per socket
b. Memory
i. Total quantity in GB
ii. Memory speed
c. Storage
i. Quantity, both current and projected growth.
ii. Disk speed
iii. Repository type (Fibre Channel SAN, iSCSI SAN, SCSI
direct-attached)
iv. Disk interface (SCSI, SAS, etc.)
2. OS level
a. Server name
b. IP address, subnet, etc.
c. Domain information
d. Operating system version, build number, and service pack
e. Drive letter information and layout
3. SQL instance level
a. Whether it’s clustered, version, edition (Workgroup,
Standard, Enterprise), 64-bit or 32-bit (and if 32-bit, with or
without AWE), and service pack level
b. Authentication mode (Windows only or Mixed Mode?)
c. Instance name (if not a default instance)
d. SQL port number (i.e., is it the default 1433 or another
port? If a named instance, what is the port?)
e. Communication protocol (named pipes or TCP/IP?)
f. Service account and all service permission information
(does SQL Agent run under a different service account?)
g. Are there any non-default master or model database
objects?
h. Are there any linked server objects?
i. Are other SQL modules involved or dependent on this
instance (e.g., Analysis Services, Reporting Services, etc.)?
j. Default installation directories, data directories, and log
directories
k. Tempdb – highly volatile? Slightly volatile? Medium usage?
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
4. Database level
a. Database properties and options
b. Recovery model, auto-shrink, etc.
c. Files and filegroups (size and location)
d. Backups
i. How many full backups, and on what schedule?
ii. How many differential backups, and on what schedule?
iii. How many log backups, and on what schedule?
iv. Current backup window?
v. Can backup window shift to accommodate the
consolidated backup window?
e. Other database issues
i. Is this database in a replication configuration?
ii. Is this database a partner in a mirroring session
(2005/2008 only)?
iii. Do any SSIS/DTS packages reference this database?
iv. Do any SQL Agent jobs reference this database?
f. Users/Logins
i. Number of users this database affects
ii. Would this database require a login whose name
conflicts with another name on the target consolidation
server? If so, you would need to create the login and
map the database user using sp_change_users_login
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Appendix C. Preparing the storage
For the testing we conducted for this Guide, we used one Dell
PowerVault MD3220 array with three Dell PowerVault MD1220
arrays attached, which we connected to our server directly using
two Dell 6Gbps SAS Adapters with two cables connected to each
adapter. Below are the specifics of setting up your Dell PowerVault
MD3220.
Setting up the storage
1. Connect two SAS cables between each storage controller and
the Dell PowerEdge R910.
2. Connect the Dell PowerVault MD3220 management ports to the
Dell PowerEdge R910.
3. Follow the MD Storage Manager wizard to perform the initial
setup of the array.
4. Use the Automatic Discovery feature of the MD Storage
Manager to find and manage the array.
5. Click Storage ArrayConfigurationAutomatic.
6. Use the Automatic setup wizard to create a custom
configuration with 24 disks per RAID group, RAID 10, and 1
volume per RAID group.
7. Select the Mappings tab, right-click the Storage Array MD3220,
and select DefineHost.
8. Enter a host name, click Next, and add the SAS Initiators to the
host.
9. Click the Undefined Mappings, right-click each volume, select
Define mapping, and select the R910 host.
Configuring the Dell PowerEdge R910 storage
On our server, we used 14 internal 6Gbps 15,000 rpm 146GB SAS
disks, and two 6Gbps 15,000 rpm 73GB SAS Disks. We configured
the two 73GB disks in a RAID 1 configuration and the remaining 14
disks in a RAID 10 configuration. Below, we cover the specifics on
configuring the internal storage, and then connecting to the iSCSI
storage from Windows Server 2008 R2.
Configuring the internal storage
1. On boot, Press Ctrl+R to enter the RAID controller BIOS. Our
controller was a PERC H700.
2. Highlight the controller, press F2, and choose to create the new
virtual disk.
3. Provide the desired RAID setting, such as RAID 1, 5, 10, and so
on. Choose the relevant disks for this volume.
4. Press OK to complete the volume configuration.
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Servers: Database consolidation on Dell PowerEdge R910 servers
5. Highlighting the new virtual disk, press F2, Initialization, and
Start Init. This will fully initialize your virtual disk
6. Repeat steps 2 through 5 for the remaining virtual disks in your
server.
Configuring the storage in Microsoft Windows Server
2008 R2
1. Choose Storage, and choose Disk Management.
2. Right-click the uninitialized external volume, choose Initialize
Disk, and choose MBR.
3. Right-click the volume, and choose New Simple Volume. Click
Next.
4. Keep the default drive space, and click Next.
5. Assign the appropriate drive letter, and click Next.
6. Choose NTFS, assign a 64KB allocation unit size, and check the
Perform a quick format checkbox.
7. Click Next, and click Finish.
8. Repeat steps 2 through 7 for the remaining external volumes.
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Appendix D. Installing SQL Server 2008
Install an instance of Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 by following
these steps. This installation walkthrough only covers the
installation of the Database Engine and Management Components.
For other components, such as Reporting Services, Integration
Services, or Analysis Services, see Microsoft documentation at
http://msdn.microsoft.com/enus/library/ms143219(SQL.105).aspx.
Allow at least 30 minutes to complete the installation.
1. Insert the installation DVD for SQL Server 2008 R2 into the
DVD drive.
2. If autoplay does not begin the installation, navigate to the SQL
Server 2008 R2 DVD, and double-click.
3. If prompted with a .NET installation prompt, click Yes to enable
the .NET Framework Core role.
4. At the SQL Server Installation Center screen, click Installation.
5. Click New installation or add features to an existing installation.
6. At the Setup Support Rules screen, click OK.
7. At the Product Key screen, enter your licensing information, if
applicable, and click Next.
8. At the License Terms screen, accept the license terms, and click
Next.
9. At the Setup Support Files screen, click Install.
10.At the Setup Support Rules screen, click Next.
11.At the Setup Role screen, choose SQL Server Feature
Installation, and click Next.
12.At the SQL Server 2008 R2 Feature Selection screen, select the
features which your organization requires. The features we
chose for our testing were the following: Database Engine
Services, Full-Text Search, Client Tools Connectivity, Client
Tools Backwards Compatibility, Management Tools – Basic,
Management Tools – Complete. Click Next.
13.At the Installation Rules screen, click Next.
14.At the Instance Configuration, enter the appropriate details for
your configuration. For a default instance, leave the defaults
selected. For a named instance, enter a new instance name and
adjust the file paths as necessary.
15.At the Disk Space Requirements screen, click Next.
16.At the Server Configuration screen, choose the service account,
preferably an Active Directory domain account, fill in a
password if necessary, and click Next.
17.At the Database Engine Configuration screen, choose an
authentication mode. If your legacy servers use SQL Server
logins at all, then select Mixed Mode. If you exclusively use
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Active Directory domain accounts in your SQL Server
environment, then choose Windows Authentication.
18.If necessary, enter a password for the system administrator
(SA) account, click Add Current User, and click Next.
19.At the Error Reporting screen, click Next.
20.At the Installation Configuration Rules screen, click Next.
21.At the Installation screen, click Install.
22.At the Complete screen, click Close.
23.After the SQL Server 2008 R2 installation process completes,
check Microsoft’s Web site for the latest SQL Server service
pack. There were none at the time we wrote this Guide.
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Appendix E. Installing Upgrade Advisor
In this example, we walk through the steps to install and run the
SQL Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Advisor and save reports.
1. Insert the SQL Server 2008 R2 DVD. On the Planning screen,
click Install SQL Server Upgrade Advisor.
2. Click Next to begin the installation wizard, accept the licensing
terms, and click Next.
3. Click Next to accept the default Registration information, click
Next to accept the default installation path, and click Next to
begin the installation.
4. At the Completing the Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Upgrade
Advisor screen, click Finish to exit the setup.
5. Start the Upgrade Advisor by selecting Start | All Programs |
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 | SQL Server 2008 R2 Upgrade
Advisor.
6. Click the Launch Upgrade Advisor Analysis Wizard link.
7. On the Welcome screen, click Next.
8. On the SQL Server Components screen, by default the Upgrade
Advisor populates the server name field with the local computer
name. If you need to scan a remote server, type the computer
name or IP address of the SQL Server you want to analyze and
do one of the following:
 Click Detect to allow the Upgrade Advisor to scan the
components on the SQL Server instance you specified. (We
chose this option.)
 Select the components of the SQL Server instance you
would like the Upgrade Advisor to scan.
NOTE: If you are analyzing an instance of SQL Server
Reporting Services, you must install and run the SQL Server
2008 Upgrade Advisor software on the hardware where SQL
Server 2000 Reporting Services is running, because the
Upgrade Advisor cannot scan Reporting Services resources
across the network. Do not enter the SQL Server instance
name. The Upgrade Advisor will scan the server you specify
and check for multiple instances of SQL Server.
If you are scanning clustered components of SQL Server on
a failover cluster SQL Server instance, enter the failover
cluster instance name. If you are scanning non-clustered
components, such as the workstation tools, on a failover
cluster, enter the computer name of the specified node.
9. On the Connection Parameters screen, specify the
Authentication Type and credentials if necessary.
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10.On the SQL Server parameters screen, select one or more
databases and, if you so desire, supply a trace file or SQL script
file to analyze. Should you wish to use a trace file, you must
generate it before you begin the Upgrade Advisor. For
instructions about how to generate a trace file, see
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/enus/library/ms187929(SQL.105).aspx
11.If you specified analysis of Data Transformation Packages (or if
the detection process discovered DTS on the SQL Server 2000
server), you should now choose whether you want the Upgrade
Advisor to scan for (a) DTS packages on the SQL Server 2000
server or (b) DTS package files stored on the file system. We
kept the default of Analyze DTS packages on Server. Click Next
to continue.
12.On the Confirm Upgrade Advisor Settings screen, review your
choices, and click Run to begin the analysis.
13.When the analysis completes, click Launch Report to view the
analysis report.
14.You can now use the drop-down filter tools to view report items
by component or by issue severity.
NOTE: If you want to export the report to comma
separated value (CSV) format, click Export Report in the
lower right corner of the Upgrade Advisor interface.
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Appendix F. Migrating databases
In this appendix, we give detailed instructions about a basic sideby-side migration of a user database from a SQL Server 2000
server to a SQL Server 2008 R2 server. There are multiple
methods of accomplishing this task, including using TSQL
commands and automated tools. Here, we discuss performing the
database migration using the graphical interface tools Microsoft
provides with SQL Server 2000 and SQL Server 2008 R2.
1. Log into Windows on the SQL Server 2000 server as either an
administrative user or a user with full rights on SQL Server
2000.
2. Start Query Analyzer by selecting Start | All Programs |
Microsoft SQL Server | Query Analyzer.
3. Enter your server name, and select Windows Authentication.
4. Set the database to single-user mode to ensure no updates
occur.
NOTE: Setting the database to single-user mode
immediately disconnects all users, causing them to lose any
work in progress. You must notify your users well in
advance of setting the database to single-user mode.
5. To set the database to single-user mode, in the query window,
paste the following command, where <DatabaseName> is the
name of the database you are migrating:
USE [master]
GO
ALTER DATABASE [<DatabaseName>]
SET SINGLE_USER WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE
GO
6. Press F5 to execute the query.
7. Close Query Analyzer. When Query Analyzer gives you the
chance to save the query, click No.
8. To back up the database and prepare for migration, open
Enterprise Manager by selecting Start | All Programs | Microsoft
SQL Server | Enterprise Manager.
9. In the left pane, expand Microsoft SQL Servers | SQL Server
Group | (local) (Windows NT) | Databases.
10.Right-click the database, and select All Tasks | Backup
Database.
11.Keep the default of complete backup.
12.Click Add… to add a backup device, then the ―…‖ button to
browse to the backup location you want to use. Select a folder,
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and enter a filename, such as
DatabaseNameMigrationBackup.bak.
13.Click OK to close the Backup Device Location window, and click
OK to close the Select Backup Destination window.
NOTE: To simplify moving the database later, we
recommend creating the backup in a shared local folder.
14.Optionally, on the Options tab, select the checkbox to Verify
your database backup upon completion.
NOTE: This option increases backup time but checks the
integrity of the backup file. We chose to verify the backup.
15.Click OK to begin the SQL Server 2000 database backup.
(Backup times vary with database size and backup device
configuration.)
16.After the backup completes, in Enterprise Manager, under
Databases, right-click the database, and choose All Tasks |
Take Offline. The old database is now offline, so SQL Server
2000 will not allow any connections to it.
17.Log out of Windows on the SQL Server 2000 server.
18.Log into Windows on the SQL Server 2008 R2 server.
19.In Windows Explorer, navigate to either the shared network
location or the portable storage device that you used to store
your database backup.
20.Copy the backup file, and paste it to a local directory of your
choice. (Copy time varies with network speed and file size.)
21.Open SQL Server Management Studio by selecting Start | All
Programs | Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 | SQL Server
Management Studio.
22.Select Database Engine for Server type, and type the server
name in Server name. For Authentication, we used Windows
Authentication.
23.In the Object Explorer pane, right-click Databases, and select
Restore Database.
24.Enter the name of the database in the To database box.
NOTE: It is critical to use the same database name as on
your SQL Server 2000 server. If the database name does
not match, applications that depend on the database name
may break.
25.Click the From device radio button, and click ―…‖ to browse to
the local folder where you copied the backup file.
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26.Click Add to add the backup file location. Browse to the
appropriate folder, find the backup file, select it, and click OK.
Click OK to return to the Restore Database window.
27.Select the checkbox that now appears in the Restore column.
Optionally, click Options on the left, and ensure the file
locations are appropriate in the Restore As column.
28.Click OK to begin the restore. Note the progress indicator in the
lower left of the Restore window. (Restore time varies with
database size and server and disk subsystem speed.)
29.After the restore is complete, you must change the database
access state back to multi-user and upgrade the compatibility
level by performing the following steps:
a. Right-click the database in Object Explorer, and select
Properties.
b. Click Options on the left side to access database options.
c. Change Compatibility level to SQL Server 2008 (100).
d. Scroll down to Restrict Access, and change to MULTI_USER.
e. Click OK.
f. Click Yes to agree to shutting down other connections.
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Appendix G. Transferring Windows logins
In this appendix, we provide detailed instructions for migrating
transferring Windows-based logins from a SQL Server 2000 server
to SQL Server 2008 R2 in an Active Directory environment. For
information about transferring logins when using SQL Server
authentication, see Appendix H.
1. On the SQL Server 2008 R2 server, log into Windows, and open
SQL Server Management Studio by selecting Start | All
Programs | Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 | SQL Server
Management Studio.
2. On the Connect to Server screen, select Database Engine for
the server type, enter the computer name of your SQL Server
2000 server, and click Connect.
3. Select View | Object Explorer Details to bring up the Object
Explorer Details tab.
4. In the Object Explorer pane, expand the Security folder, and
highlight the Logins folder.
5. Add the Login Type column to the display by right-clicking the
column-header area in the Object Explorer Details pane and
selecting Login Type. Now Windows Logins appear as Login
Type 0. Optionally, use the column headers to sort by Default
Database, or use the filter button to find only logins that you
are interested in migrating.
6. Using the standard Windows multi-select key combinations (Ctrl
key or Shift key), highlight the logins you are interested in
migrating.
7. Right-click the highlighted logins, and select Script Login as |
CREATE To | New Query Editor.
8. On the Connect to Database Engine screen, change the Server
name to your SQL Server 2008 R2 server, and click Connect.
9. Click Execute to run the resulting script.
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Appendix H. Transferring SQL Server logins
In this appendix, we give detailed instructions on transferring SQL
Server logins from a SQL Server 2000 server to SQL Server 2008
R2. For information about transferring logins when using Windows
authentication, see Appendix G.
Transferring logins
1. On the SQL Server 2008 R2 server, log into Windows, and open
SQL Server Management Studio by selecting Start | All
Programs | Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 | SQL Server
Management Studio.
2. On the Connect to Server screen, select Database Engine for
the server type, enter the computer name of your SQL Server
2000 server, and click Connect.
3. Select View | Object Explorer Details to bring up the Object
Explorer Details tab.
4. In the Object Explorer pane, expand the Security folder, and
highlight the Logins folder.
5. Add the Login Type column to the display by right-clicking the
column-header area and selecting Login Type. Now SQL Server
Logins appear as Login Type 2. Optionally, use the column
headers to sort by Default Database, or the Filter button to find
only logins that you are interested in migrating.
6. Using the standard Windows multi-select key combinations (Ctrl
key or Shift key), highlight the logins you are interested in
migrating.
7. Right-click the highlighted logins, and select Script Login as |
CREATE To | New Query Editor Window.
8. On the Connect to Database Engine screen, change the Server
name to your SQL Server 2008 R2 server, and click Connect.
9. Click Execute to run the resulting script.
Mapping transferred logins to database users
After transferring SQL Server logins from server to server, you
must map those logins to the database users that you migrated
during the restore process.
1. On the SQL Server 2008 R2 server, log into Windows. Open
SQL Server Management Studio by selecting Start | All
Programs | Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 | SQL Server
Management Studio.
2. On the Connect to Server screen, select Database Engine for
the server type, enter the computer name of your SQL Server
2008 R2 server, and click Connect.
3. Right-click the relevant database, and select New Query.
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4. Enter the following command, and click Execute:
EXEC sp_change_users_login 'Report';
5. For each user output from the above step, map these
―orphaned‖ users to the appropriate matching SQL Server login
by taking the following steps:
a. Open a query window on the SQL Server 2008 R2 server
using steps 1 through 3 above.
b. For each login you wish to map, enter the following
command, and click Execute:
EXEC sp_change_users_login 'Auto_Fix','SQLLogin';
c. The above command maps the database user ―SQLLogin‖ to
the SQL Server login of ―SQLLogin‖. This procedure
assumes that the database user and SQL Server login have
the same value.
d. To reset the password and enable the account, enter the
following command, and click Execute:
USE [master]
GO
ALTER LOGIN [SQLLogin] WITH PASSWORD=N'Password1'
GO
ALTER LOGIN [SQLLogin] ENABLE
GO
Note: This process assumes that you have already migrated
the applicable database to the new server.
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