Corel PaintShop Pro X4 Specifications

Deployment Guide
Introduction
As you read through this guide,
you’ll find that the right column of
each page contains the main
content, while the left column
contains the following categories of
information:
definition — explains the
italicized term or concept
tip — presents a helpful
detail, such as a shortcut,
variation, or benefit
note — presents an
additional detail about the
specified topic or task
warning — presents a
crucial detail about the
specified topic or task
The left column also gives you room
to jot down notes.
This guide is intended to help you deploy Corel® PaintShop™ Pro X4
(Corporate and Education Edition) to your network as quickly and easily as
possible.
IMPORTANT: This guide describes the “GM3” version of the software
(part number ending with “03” or higher on your Corel PaintShop Pro X4
disc). If you are using an earlier version of the software, please be sure to
download the GM3 patch and apply it to your server image (for general
guidance, see “Patching the server image” on page 14) so that you can
enjoy the new GM3 features described in this guide:
• installing offline Help for all supported languages, and installing the
Brazilian Portuguese language module (see page 10)
• suppressing license-agreement prompts on workstations (see page 11)
• suppressing registration prompts on workstations (see page 12)
Contents
Stage 1: Preparing for deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Stage 2: Creating the server image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Stage 3: Installing the software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Stage 4: Maintaining the installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Additional resources
If you are new to software deployment or otherwise require more basic
information on deploying Corel® software products, please refer to the
Corel® Beginner’s Guide to Network Deployment. You can request a copy of this
guide from your Corel® Support Services representative.
For even more information, see the following Web resources.
Web resource
Description
Corel® website:
Information about Corel Corporation and
its portfolio of software products
Corel® Support Services website:
Information about product features,
specifications, pricing, availability,
services, and technical support
Corel® Knowledge Base™:
A searchable repository of articles written
by the Corel Support Services team
www.corel.com
www.corel.com/support
www.corel.com/kb
For help with the Microsoft® Windows® Installer (MSI) technology that is
used to install the software, please refer to the Microsoft® website.
Deployment Guide
Introduction
1
Stage 1: Preparing for deployment
As used in this guide, the
term “network” signifies two
or more computers that are connected
to each other for the purpose of
exchanging information.
To deploy the software to your network as smoothly as possible, you can
prepare by doing the following:
• Check the system requirements for the software.
• Prepare the server.
• Prepare the workstations.
For details, see below.
Checking the software requirements
Workstations are the
computers from which the
average user works, and servers are
the computers that manage the
shared resources of the network.
To begin, make sure that your server and workstations are eligible for the
software. Consult the following:
• Readme file for the software (if available)
• product-information page on the Corel website (www.corel.com)
• any other special instructions for the software
Preparing the server
• Make sure that the server meets the minimum system requirements for
the software, and that it has enough free disk space for the installation.
• Make sure that the operating system on the server has been updated
with the latest service packs and security patches.
• Make sure that you have the proper permissions for creating a software
image on the server. You must be either a local administrator or an
administrator for the domain that you are managing, and you must have
read/write access to the server location.
Preparing the workstations
To more easily manage the
access rights of workstation
users, you may want to use Group
Policy Objects (GPOs, or “system
policies”). See “Managing
permissions with Group Policy
Objects” on page 5.
• Make sure that the workstations meet the minimum system
requirements for the software, and that they have enough free disk space
for the installation.
• Make sure that the operating systems on the workstations have been
updated with the latest service packs and security patches.
• Make sure that anyone who will be installing the software from the
server image has the proper permissions to do so. To install the software
on a workstation, you must be either a local administrator or an
administrator for the domain that you are managing, and you must have
read access to the server location.
Deployment Guide
Stage 1: Preparing for deployment
2
Stage 2: Creating the server image
A server image, also called
an “administrator image” or
simply an “image,” is a set of
uncompressed application files on the
server that is created from a set of
compressed files on the installation
disc.
After preparing for deployment, you’re ready to create a server image of the
software, from which you can install the software to the workstations. (If
you want to support multiple installation types, you can even create
multiple server images: one for each desired configuration.)
Contents
Creating a server image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Finalizing the server image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Creating a server image
A command line is a textual
command that lets you
specify desired settings.
To create a server image, you run a command line that initializes the software
setup and specifies your desired installation settings.
To run a command line
1
On the Windows® taskbar, do one of the following:
• Windows 7 or Windows Vista® — Click the Start button, and then
click All programs ` Accessories ` Run.
• Windows XP — Click Start ` Run.
2
Type the command line in the Open box, and then click OK.
To create a server image
1
Insert the installation disc into the DVD drive.
If the AutoRun screen opens, click Exit.
2
Run the following command line, where X: is the DVD drive.
X:\Setup.exe /a
3
Type your user name and serial number (with or without hyphens) in the
boxes provided, and then click Next.
The customer information that you provide is passed on to the
workstations when the software is deployed to the network. By default,
users can change the user name but not the serial number.
4
Specify a network location for the server image. To change the default
location, type a valid server path in the Network location box, or click
Browse to browse to a valid network location.
5
If you want to allow workstations to detect and download product
updates, enable the Product updates check box.
6
Click Install to begin copying the files to the server.
Deployment Guide
Stage 2: Creating the server image
3
If you click Cancel, you are prompted whether to cancel creating the
server image. Cancelling “rolls back” the setup and undoes most of the
changes made; however, some manual clean-up may be required.
7
Click Finish.
You can also
Create a server
image silently
(or with limited UI)
Use the following command line (where X: is the DVD
drive, image_location is the desired location of the
server image, and serial_number is the assigned serial
number for the product):
X:\Setup.exe
TARGETDIR="image_location"
SERIALNUMBER="serial_number" /a /q
Proceed with extreme caution
when using the /q switch to
create a server image.
The /q switch is used to restrict the amount of the user
interface that appears during installation. For a list of
switch parameters, see page 7.
Create an error log
Use the following command line (where log_file is the
location and filename of the log file):
X:\Setup.exe /l "log_file" /a
For a list of the parameters that are available for the /l
switch, see page 8.
Finalizing the server image
To change the location of a
server image, you must create
a new image at the new location.
You cannot copy an image from one
location to another.
Before deploying from the server image, you may want to take the
following steps.
Check for software updates
Check for software updates, and apply them to the image as necessary. This
way, you can avoid having to deploy the software twice. For details, see
page 14.
Test the image
Test the image with a small subset of workstations before rolling it out to
your entire organization.
Deployment Guide
Stage 2: Creating the server image
4
Stage 3: Installing the software
Looking for command-line
switches and public
properties? See “Pushing the
software to the workstations” on
page 6.
You can install the software on the workstations in two main ways:
• by having the users themselves install (or “pull”) the software from the
server image to their workstations
• by using a command line to install (or “push”) the software from the
server image to the workstations on the users’ behalf
Contents
Pulling the software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Pushing the software to the workstations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Pulling the software
Pulling the software involves
having the workstation users
themselves execute the software
installation and perhaps even choose
their own installation options.
Workstation users themselves can install (or “pull”) the software by using
one of the following methods:
• browsing to the location of the server image, double-clicking Setup.exe,
and following the instructions in the setup. This is the most common
method for pulling the software.
• running a command line that installs the software from the setup on the
server image. Typically, this method is reserved for push-installation
scenarios (see page 6).
Managing permissions with Group Policy Objects
Group Policy Objects
(sometimes called “system
policies”) reside in a central
location on a Windows-based
network and define how each
workstation is configured.
To install the software, workstation users require administrator-level
privileges. To assign such privileges, Windows-based networks use Group
Policy Objects (or “GPOs”): items stored in a central network location and
used to automatically update the registry settings on each workstation
when its user logs in to the network.
If you want to give users administrator-level access rights (either
temporarily or permanently), you may need to configure the GPOs for your
network by using a Group Policy Editor.
For general help with GPOs, please refer to the Software Development Kit
(SDK) for Group Policy. For help specific to using GPOs with Corel
software, contact Corel Support Services (www.corel.com/support).
Please note that charges will apply.
To access the Group Policy Editor for Windows
On the Windows® taskbar, do one of the following:
• Windows 7 or Windows Vista — Click the Start button, click All
programs ` Accessories ` Run, and then run the file gpedit.msc.
• Windows XP — Click Start ` Run, and then run the file gpedit.msc.
Deployment Guide
Stage 3: Installing the software
5
To let workstation users install software
Enable the following system policies for workstation users:
• Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\
Windows Components\Windows Installer\
Always install with elevated privileges
• Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\
Windows Components\Windows Installer\
Enable user control over installs
• User Configuration\Administrative Templates\
Windows Components\Windows Installer\
Always install with elevated privileges
To let limited-access users patch software
Enable the following system policy for workstation users:
• Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\
Windows Components\Windows Installer\
Enable user to patch elevated products
Pushing the software to the workstations
Pushing the software forces
installation on the
workstations without requiring any
user interaction. Typically, the user
interface for the setup is suppressed.
If you prefer to install the software on behalf of the workstation users, you
can “push” the software from the server image to the workstations. To do
this, you use a command line in conjunction with one of the following:
• a batch file — a text file that can be scripted to run commands
automatically. For help, please visit the Microsoft website.
• a Group Policy Object — an item, stored in a central network location,
that defines how the workstations are configured. For help, please refer
to your Software Development Kit (SDK) for Group Policy.
• a push technology — a third-party tool specially designed for installing
software automatically. For help, please visit the manufacturer’s website.
Command-line switches
typically control the behavior
of the software setup, while public
properties typically pre-configure the
installed software.
As previously stated, all three of these methods involve softwareinstallation command lines, which typically include the following:
• the setup file on the server image
• switches that control the setup behavior
• public properties the pre-configure the installed software
About command lines
Specifying the setup file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Using switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Using public properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Deployment Guide
Stage 3: Installing the software
6
Specifying the setup file
The main item to specify in your command line is the executable file that
you want to use the install the software.
This file is Setup.exe, the executable file for the software setup. Setup.exe
is located on the server image, at the installation path that you chose when
you created the server image.
The basic syntax for a Setup.exe command line is as follows:
\\server\path\Setup.exe
If your server-image path contains spaces, you must place quotation marks
around the entire Setup.exe component:
"\\server\path with spaces\Setup.exe"
Using switches
To customize the behavior of the software setup, you can use a variety of
command-line switches.
Basic syntax
Separate switches from other
command-line elements,
including other switches, with
spaces.
The syntax for a switch consists of a forward slash ( / ) immediately
followed by a character or string — for example, /q or /quiet.
Be sure to separate switches from other command-line elements, including
other switches, with spaces.
Parameters
Do not type a space between
a switch and its parameters
or between the parameters in one
switch, unless otherwise noted.
Some switches have parameters, which let you adjust the settings for the
switch. (In fact, some switches let you use multiple parameters.)
For a list of all switches for
the Microsoft Windows
Installer technology, please see the
Microsoft website.
Available switches, by function
To use a parameter, simply type the parameter immediately after the switch
(that is, without a space), unless otherwise noted. If you do not specify any
parameters, the switch uses its default settings.
Limiting the setup UI with /q . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Creating a log file with /l. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Controlling reboots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Limiting the setup UI with /q
After installation with the
/q switch, it is normal for
the licensing agreement to appear
the first time that users run the
program on their workstations.
The /q switch can be used to restrict the amount of the user interface (UI)
that appears during installation. You can use the switch to prevent users
from entering their own registration information, to help enforce specific
installation options, or even to perform “silent installations” (in which no
user interface is visible during the setup).
Deployment Guide
Stage 3: Installing the software
7
Parameters
The default parameter for
/q is n.
You can specify one of the following parameters for the /q switch.
Parameter
Effect
The /quiet switch can be
used in place of /qn.
n
The user does not see the user interface during installation. Errors
are recorded in a log file (see page 8). This is the default
parameter.
b
The user sees only a progress bar and a Cancel button. If the user
pushes the Cancel button, the installation is rolled back.
r
The user sees a progress bar, along with a page containing
information about the installation. The user can choose to cancel
the installation.
f
The user sees the full user interface.
The /passive switch can
be used in place of /qb.
Syntax
Here’s the command-line syntax:
\\server\path\Setup.exe /q
Creating a log file with /l
Use the /l switch if you want to log general information about the
installation to a log file with the specified path and filename.
Parameters
The default parameters for
the /l switch are iwearmo.
You can specify one or more of the following parameters for the /l switch.
Parameter
Effect
i
Logs status messages
w
Logs nonfatal warnings
e
Logs all error messages
a
Logs initiated actions
r
Logs action-specific records
u
Logs user requests
c
Logs initial user-interface parameters
m
Logs error messages about out-of-memory warnings or fatal exits
o
Logs error messages resulting from insufficient hard disk space
during installation to a server
p
Logs terminal properties
v
Logs very detailed information
Deployment Guide
Stage 3: Installing the software
8
The /log switch can be
used in place of /l*.
Parameter
Effect
*
Applies all parameters except v, recording all information in a
single log file
Location and filename of log file
The /l switch can take an additional parameter: the location and filename
of the log file. Type /l followed by a space; followed by an opening
quotation mark, the path to the log file, the filename of the log file, and a
closing quotation mark. Here’s the command-line syntax (where log_file
is the location and filename of the log file):
\\server\path\Setup.exe /l "log_file"
Syntax
The following sample command line uses the default parameters of the
/l switch to log information in the file C:\install.txt during installation:
\\server\path\Setup.exe /l "C:\install.txt"
Using the /q switch with /l
You can use the /q and /l switches together. The following sample
command line uses /q to suppress the user interface during installation and
record errors in the specified log file:
\\server\path\Setup.exe /q /l "C:\Logs\My_Log.txt"
Controlling reboots
You can force a reboot after installation by using the /forcerestart
switch in your command line. Here’s the command-line syntax:
\\server\path\Setup.exe /forcerestart
You can also suppress a reboot after installation by using the
/norestart switch. Here’s the command-line syntax:
\\server\path\Setup.exe /norestart
Using public properties
Additional information on
the use of public properties is
available online from the MSDN®
developer program.
To customize the installed software, you can use a variety of public
properties in your command line.
Basic syntax
Public properties are case-sensitive; they must be typed in capital letters,
and they cannot contain spaces.
Deployment Guide
Stage 3: Installing the software
9
Be sure to use spaces to
separate public properties
from other command-line elements
(including other public properties).
To use a public property in a command line, you must type the name of the
public property in capital letters, followed directly by an equals sign ( = ),
followed directly by the desired value.
Use quotation marks around
any value that contains
spaces to ensure it is “read” as a
single unit.
Values are also case-sensitive, but they can contain both uppercase and
lowercase letters. A value can be a text string (such as a feature name) or a
number. If a value contains spaces, you must enclose it in quotation marks
to ensure that it is “read” as a single unit.
PROPERTY=value
PROPERTY="value containing spaces"
For a list of all public
properties for the Microsoft
Windows Installer technology,
please see the Microsoft website.
Available public properties, by function
Installing the software at a specified location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Installing language modules for the software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Controlling network-related features of the software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Controlling license-agreement prompts for the software . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Controlling registration prompts for the software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Controlling file associations for the software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Specifying the locations of user resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Installing the software at a specified location
For best results, enclose
location in quotation
marks.
You can use the INSTALLDIR public property to install the software at a
specific location on the workstations. The value for this property is the
desired installation location. Here’s the command-line syntax:
\\server\path\Setup.exe INSTALLDIR="location"
Installing language modules for the software
You can use the INSTLANG public property to install language modules for
the software. A language module typically includes both the user-interface
and (new for GM3) the offline Help for that language.
English (EN) is always
installed, so it does not need
to be specified.
The accepted value for this property is the two-letter code for any of the
following supported languages:
• Brazilian Portuguese (new for GM3): BR
• Chinese Simplified: CS
• Chinese Traditional: CT
• Dutch: NL
• English: EN
• Finnish: SU
• French: FR
• German: DE
• Italian: IT
• Japanese: JP
Deployment Guide
Stage 3: Installing the software
10
•
•
•
•
•
Korean: KR
Polish: PL
Russian: RU
Spanish: ES
Swedish: SV
Here’s the command-line syntax:
\\server\path\Setup.exe INSTLANG=code
Installing more than one language module
You can install multiple languages by using comma separators, as in the
following example:
\\server\path\Setup.exe INSTLANG=EN,FR,DE
If FORCELANG specifies a
language module not also
specified by INSTLANG, the
software defaults to English.
When installing multiple language modules, you can use the FORCELANG
public property to specify the default module. As with INSTLANG, the
accepted value for this property is a two-letter language code.
In the following example, the English, French, and German language
modules are installed, but French is specified as the default:
\\server\path\Setup.exe INSTLANG=EN,FR,DE FORCELANG=FR
Controlling network-related features of the software
Disabling network-related
features with IOFF=1 also
disables in-product messaging,
along with automatic updates.
You can disable ALL network-related features of the installed software by
specifying a value of 1 for the IOFF public property. Here’s the commandline syntax:
\\server\path\Setup.exe IOFF=1
Controlling license-agreement prompts for the software
This feature is new for the
“GM3” version of the
software.
If the software is installed silently, the workstation user will be prompted to
accept the End-User License Agreement (EULA) at first start-up. You can
suppress the EULA prompt on the workstations by specifying a value of 1
for the FORCENOSHOWLIC public property. Here’s the command-line
syntax:
\\server\path\Setup.exe FORCENOSHOWLIC=1
IMPORTANT: Please note that if you choose to suppress the EULA
prompt on the workstations, you are accepting the terms of the EULA on
behalf of all users on your network when you create the server image.
Deployment Guide
Stage 3: Installing the software
11
Controlling registration prompts for the software
This feature is new for the
“GM3” version of the
software.
By default, every workstation is prompted to register the software after its
first few start-ups. You can disable registration prompts by specifying a
value of 1 for the NEVERREGISTER public property. Here’s the commandline syntax:
\\server\path\Setup.exe NEVERREGISTER=1
Controlling file associations for the software
On Windows XP, some file formats are automatically associated with
Corel PaintShop Pro X4. You can disable these file associations by
specifying a value of 0 for the CDS_ASS_IMAGE public property. Here’s the
command-line syntax:
\\server\path\Setup.exe CDS_ASS_IMAGE=0
Specifying the locations of user resources
For details on creating user
resources, please see the
Corel PaintShop Pro X4 Help.
Corel PaintShop Pro X4 supports a variety of user resources — files (such as
workspaces or images) that can be shared among workstation users over the
network, or stored locally for personal use. When deploying to the
workstations, you can specify the locations of the shared and local resource
folders.
Shared resource folder
For best results, enclose
location in quotation
marks.
If you want to provide workstation users with a shared repository of
resources, use the C_GLOBALREAD public property. The value for this
property is the desired location of the shared network folder; all
workstation users can access, but not modify, this folder.
\\server\path\Setup.exe C_GLOBALREAD="location"
Local resource folder
When a workstation user starts Corel PaintShop Pro X4 for the first time, a
local resource folder (Corel PaintShop Pro\14.0) is created in that user’s
Documents (on Windows 7 or Windows Vista) or My Documents (on
Windows XP) folder. The workstation user requires full (read/write) access
to this folder — and is prompted to provide an emergency folder when it is
unavailable.
For best results, enclose
location in quotation
marks.
If you want to customize the location of the resource folder on the
workstations, you can use the MY_PSP_FILES public property. The value
for this property is the desired location to the local folder; the resources
stored in this user folder can be accessed only by that user. Here’s the
command-line syntax:
\\server\path\Setup.exe MY_PSP_FILES="location"
Deployment Guide
Stage 3: Installing the software
12
Stage 4: Maintaining the installations
You can help keep the workstations in top shape by maintaining the
installed software in the following ways:
• repair — to resolve technical issues
• update — to apply patches
• remove (or “uninstall”) — to prepare to upgrade to the newest version
of the software
You can maintain a single installation of the software by using the
Windows Control Panel, or you can maintain multiple installations of the
software by using command lines.
Contents
Maintaining a single installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Maintaining multiple installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Maintaining a single installation
You can use the Windows Control Panel to remove a single installation.
To remove a single installation of the software
1
Log on to the workstation.
2
On the Windows taskbar, click Start ` Control Panel.
3
Do one of the following:
• On Windows 7 or Windows Vista — Click Programs | Uninstall a
program (or click Programs and features if you are using the Classic
view of the Control Panel).
• On Windows XP — Double-click Add or remove programs.
4
Choose Corel PaintShop Pro X4 from the list.
5
Enable the Uninstall option (in Windows 7 or Windows Vista) or the
Remove option (in Windows XP), and then click Yes.
Maintaining multiple installations
You can use a command line to repair, update, or remove the software. By
using a push-installation method to deploy your command line (see
page 6), you can maintain multiple installations of the software.
Command-line functions
Repairing the software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Updating the software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Removing the software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Deployment Guide
Stage 4: Maintaining the installations
13
Repairing the software
You can use the command-line switch /reinstall to repair the software
by reinstalling it from the specified server image.
Here’s the command-line syntax:
\\server\path\Setup.exe /reinstall
To silently repair the software, include the /qn switch:
\\server\path\Setup.exe /qn /reinstall
Updating the software
Corel periodically releases Microsoft patch (MSP) files, or “patches,” for its
products. Installing patches helps keep the software up-to-date.
By default, the software is configured to use an automatic-update feature to
detect when patches are available.
However, if you choose to disable to automatic-update feature (see
“Controlling network-related features of the software” on page 11), you
yourself must deploy updates to the workstations. In this scenario, you
must monitor the website for Corel Support Services (www.corel.com/
support); when a patch is made available, you can then download it to the
server.
Patching the server image
Applying a patch may
require you to re-enter your
customer information and serial
number. Just in case, keep these
details handy.
To apply a patch to the server image, use the following command-line
syntax (where Patch.exe is the filename of the patch):
Patch.exe /a
If desired, you can include the location of the server image:
Patch.exe /a "\\server\path"
Patching the workstations
To deploy the update from the patched server image to the workstations,
use the following command-line syntax:
\\server\path\Setup.exe /reinstall
To silently deploy from the patched server image, include the /qn switch:
\\server\path\Setup.exe /qn /reinstall
Deployment Guide
Stage 4: Maintaining the installations
14
Removing the software
The /uninstall switch
can be used in place of /x.
You can use the command-line switch /x to remove the software.
Here’s the command-line syntax:
\\server\path\Setup.exe /x
Silent removal
For a list of parameters for
/q, see “Limiting the setup
UI with /q” on page 7.
You can include the /q switch in your command line if you want to silently
remove the software:
\\server\path\Setup.exe /x /q
Deployment Guide
Stage 4: Maintaining the installations
15
Copyright © 2011 Corel Corporation. All rights reserved.
Corel® PaintShop™ Pro X4 Deployment Guide
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