Multitech MT5600ZDX User guide

TM
TM
MT5600ZDX
Data/Fax Modem
MT5600ZDXV
Voice/Data/Fax Modem
User Guide
User Guide
Model MT5600ZDX / MT5600ZDXV
PN S0000134 Revision E
This publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior expressed written permission from Multi-Tech Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
copyright © 2005 by Multi-Tech Systems, Inc.
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc. makes no representations or warranties with respect to the contents
hereof and specifically disclaims any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for any
particular purpose. Furthermore, Multi-Tech Systems, Inc. reserves the right to revise this
publication and to make changes in the content hereof without obligation of Multi-Tech Systems,
Inc. to notify any person or organization of such revisions or changes.
Revision
Date
Description
A
B
C
01/14/97
09/15/98
01/22/01
D
06/18/02
E
02/15/05
Manual released
Added #V, Class 2 fax, and V.90 information
Added descriptions of more AT commands, FCC Part 15
regulations, and installation in Linux operating systems
Added Plug-&-Play instructions, revised warranty,
regulatory info, and technical specifications
Remove the AT commands chapter, substitute the AT
Commands Reference Guide, and remove reference to
v.25bis
Trademarks
MultiModem, Multi-Tech, and the Multi-Tech logo are trademarks of Multi-Tech Systems, Inc.
Adobe and Acrobat are trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated. Microsoft, Windows is a
registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other
countries. All other brand and product names mentioned in this publication are trademarks or
registered trademarks of their respective companies.
Patents
This device is covered by one or more of the following patents: 6,219,708; 6,031,867; 6,012,113;
6,009,082; 5,905,794; 5,864,560; 5,815,567; 5,815,503; 5,812,534; 5,809,068; 5,790,532;
5,764,628; 5,764,627; 5,754,589; 5,724,356; 5,673,268; 5,673,257; 5,644,594; 5,628,030;
5,619,508; 5,617,423; 5,600,649; 5,592,586; 5,577,041; 5,574,725; D374,222; 5,559,793;
5,546,448; 5,546,395; 5,535,204; 5,500,859; 5,471,470; 5,463,616; 5,453,986; 5,452,289;
5,450,425; D355,658; 5,355,365; 5,309,562; 5,301,274. Other patents pending.
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc.
2205 Woodale Drive
Mounds View, MN 55112
U.S.A
(763) 785-3500 or (800) 328-9717
Fax (763) 785-9874
Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction ...................................................................................................... 2
Product Description and Features ............................................................................... 2
What’s In Your Modem Package? ................................................................................ 3
Chapter 2: Installation ....................................................................................................... 6
Introduction ................................................................................................................. 6
What You Will Need ..................................................................................................... 6
Safety Warnings .......................................................................................................... 6
Connecting the Modem to Your System ...................................................................... 7
Connections for the MT5600ZDX .................................................................... 7
A Note About Power Connection, Surge Protectors, and Lightning ................ 8
Power-On Test ................................................................................................. 8
Using Your Modem .......................................................................................... 8
Connections for the MT5600ZDXV ................................................................. 9
2. Connect the Microphone ............................................................................. 9
3. Connect the Speaker ................................................................................... 9
Installing the Modem Driver ...................................................................................... 10
Modem Driver Installation for Windows 95/98/Me/2000/Xp ........................... 10
Modem Driver Installation for Windows NT .................................................. 10
Loading Data Communications Software .................................................................. 11
Removing an Old Modem Driver ............................................................................... 11
Connecting to the Internet ......................................................................................... 12
Dial-Up Networking ................................................................................................... 12
Sending a Fax ........................................................................................................... 13
About the LED Indicators .......................................................................................... 13
Chapter 3: Advanced Options ....................................................................................... 15
Introduction ............................................................................................................... 16
Configuring Your Communications Software ............................................................. 16
Configuring Your Modem ........................................................................................... 17
Chapter 4: AT Commands ............................................................................................... 18
Introduction ............................................................................................................... 19
Chapter 5: Troubleshooting ............................................................................................. 20
Introduction ............................................................................................................... 21
None of the Indicators Light ...................................................................................... 21
The Modem Does Not Respond to Commands ........................................................ 22
The Modem Dials But Cannot Connect..................................................................... 23
The Modem Disconnects While Online ..................................................................... 24
The Modem Cannot Connect When Answering ........................................................ 25
File Transfer Is Slower Than It Should Be ................................................................. 25
Data Is Being Lost ..................................................................................................... 26
There Are Garbage Characters on the Monitor ........................................................ 26
The Modem Doesn’t Work with Caller ID .................................................................. 26
Fax and Data Software Can’t Run at the Same Time ............................................... 27
Appendix A: Regulatory Compliance .............................................................................. 29
FCC Part 15 .............................................................................................................. 29
FCC Part 68 Telecom ................................................................................................ 30
Fax Branding Statement ............................................................................................ 31
Canadian Limitations Notice ..................................................................................... 31
International Modem Restrictions ............................................................................. 32
EMC, Safety, and R&TTE Directive Compliance ....................................................... 32
New Zealand Telecom Warning Notice ..................................................................... 32
South African Notice ................................................................................................. 33
Appendix B: Technical Specifications ............................................................................. 34
Appendix C: Loopback Tests ........................................................................................... 37
Introduction .............................................................................................................. 37
Local Analog Loopback Test (V.54 Loop 3) ............................................................... 37
Remote Digital Loopback Test (V.54 Loop 2) ............................................................ 38
Local Digital Loopback Test (V.54 Loop 2) ................................................................ 39
Appendix D: Warranty, Service, and Technical Support .................................................. 41
Warranty .................................................................................................................... 41
Repair Procedures for U.S. and Canadian Customers .............................................. 41
Repair Procedures for International Customers (Outside U.S.A. and Canada) ....... 42
Online Warranty Registration .................................................................................... 42
Replacement Parts .................................................................................................... 43
Technical Support...................................................................................................... 43
Recording Modem Information .................................................................................. 43
Internet Sites ............................................................................................................. 43
Appendix E: Upgrading the Modem ................................................................................ 44
Introduction .............................................................................................................. 44
Upgrade Overview ..................................................................................................... 44
Appendix F: Installing a Modem in Linux ....................................................................... 47
Introduction ............................................................................................................... 47
Standard Linux Serial Port Definitions ...................................................................... 47
Installation ................................................................................................................. 47
Setup ........................................................................................................................ 47
Using the terminal program Minicom to verify operation ........................................... 47
Using the modem to call the Internet ........................................................................ 48
Calling the ISP .......................................................................................................... 48
Index ............................................................................................................................... 49
1 Introduction
Chapter 1: Introduction
1
1 Introduction
Introduction
Congratulations on your purchase of the MultiModemZDX or the
MultiModemZDXV modem. You have acquired one of the finest intelligent data/fax
or voice/data/fax modems available today from one of the world’s oldest modem
manufacturers: Multi-Tech Systems, Inc. This manual will help you install,
configure, test, and use your modem.
Product Description
The MultiModemZDX and MultiModemZDXV modems incorporate the V.90
protocol, which enables Internet connections at data rates up to 56K bps over
standard phone lines. These protocols are able to send data downstream to your
computer at high speeds by taking advantage of the fact that data on the phone network
normally is converted from digital to analog only once before it reaches your modem.
Upstream transmissions and transmissions between client modems have a maximum
data rate of 33.6K bps. Line conditions may cause modems to connect at speeds
lower than the stated data rate maximums.
The MultiModemZDX and MultiModemZDXV modems offer interactive automatic
dialing and command mode configuration. You can store four command lines or
phone numbers of up to 31 characters each in the modem’s nonvolatile memory. The
modem pulse-dials or tone-dials, and recognizes dial tones and busy signals for
reliable call-progress detection. It can also detect AT&T calling card tones. It is FCCregistered for connection to phone networks without notification to the phone
company.
Features
Data Features
• Supports automatic fallback to slower speeds in noisy line conditions, and fall
forward to faster speeds as conditions improve.
• Can autodial, redial, pulse (rotary) and touch-tone dial.
• Detects dial tones and busy signals for reliable call-progress detection.
• Compatible with the standard AT command set used by most communication
programs.
• Supports the H.324 protocol (videophone ready).
• Supports Plug and Play (PnP).
• Routes voice, data, or fax calls on a single phone line using distinctive rings.
• Can be flash upgraded.
Voice Features (Model ZDXV only)
• Supports full-duplex speakerphone. Can record and play back answering
machine messages using optional microphone and speaker.
2
1 Introduction
• Supports telephone answering machine (TAM) including voice mail control,
record/playback, and call screening with the included communications
program.
Software Considerations for the MT5600ZDXV: You will need data communications (datacomm) software, fax communications software, and an appropriate
application to access the Personal Voice Mail features of the MT5600ZDXV. You
will need Microsoft Windows 95 or higher to run these programs. Then you can
use the MT5600ZDXV to:
• speed dial
• mute a phone call
• place a call on hold
• forward or transfer a call
• three-way or conference call
• fax from any Windows application
• record phone conversations
PhoneTools Communications Software Features
Included on the CD with your modem is a communications program. After
installing this program, you can:
• Upload and download data files.
• Send faxes at preset times.
• Upload and download data files.
• Store incoming voice messages and faxes.
• Retrieve stored messages, faxes, and phone numbers (phone number retrieval
requires Caller ID service from your phone company).
• Print a received fax.
For detailed information about operating your modem under the included
communications program, refer to the CD containing the User Guide.
What’s In Your Modem Package?
Your modem package has several components. Make sure you have all of them
before trying to operate your modem. Your package includes:
•
•
•
•
•
•
An MT5600ZDX data/fax modem or an MT5600ZDXV voice/data/fax modem
A DC power transformer
One RJ11 phone cable
A printed Quick Start Guide
A system CD containing modem drivers, this User Guide, a communications
software package (PhoneTools) and other software.
A CD containing a communications program and other programs.
3
1 Introduction
• Four vinyl gripper feet for the bottom of the modem
• Brochure with warranty registration card
If any of these items are missing, please contact Multi-Tech Systems or your dealer/
distributor (see Appendix D for information on contacting Multi-Tech via telephone,
fax, or the Internet).
4
2 Installation
Chapter 2: Installation
5
2 Installation
Introduction
This chapter shows you step-by-step how to set up your Multi-Tech modem, test it,
and make your first calls.
What You Will Need
Before starting, make sure you have everything you will need.
We supply
An MT5600ZDX data/fax modem or a MT5600ZDXV voice/data/fax modem
A DC power transformer
One RJ11 phone cable
A printed Quick Start Guide
An system CD containing modem drivers, this User Guide, a communications
software package (PhoneTools) and other software programs
Four vinyl gripper feet for the bottom of the modem
You supply
A computer with an available serial port. The processor speed should be at least
75 MHz in order to take full advantage of the ZDXV’s telephony features.
A shielded RS232 serial cable with a male DB-25 connector on one end and a
connector to match your computer’s serial port on the other end.
A nearby AC power outlet
A nearby phone jack
(Optional) If you want speakerphone functions along with the ability to record
sound or .WAV files through the sound card at the same time, you will need:
• One stereo PC microphone
• One stereo male to male patch cord
• One sound card
• Speakers
Safety Warnings
• Use this product only with UL- and CUL-listed computers.
• Never install phone wiring during a lightning storm.
• Never install a phone jack in a wet location unless the jack is specifically designed
for wet locations.
• Never touch uninsulated phone wires or terminals unless the phone line has been
disconnected at the network interface.
• Use caution when installing or modifying phone lines.
• Avoid using a phone (other than a cordless type) during an electrical storm; there
is a risk of electrical shock from lightning.
• Do not use a phone in the vicinity of a gas leak.
• To reduce the risk of fire, use only 26 AWG or larger telephone line cord.
6
2 Installation
Connecting the Modem to Your System
Connections for the MT5600ZDX
Turn off your computer. Placing the modem in a convenient location, connect it
to your computer’s serial port, to the phone line, to AC power, and to your phone.
PWR
RS232
PHONE
LINE
Figure 2–1. MT5600ZDX Connections.
1. Connect the Modem to Your PC (RS-232 Connection)
Plug one end of the RS-232 serial cable into the RS-232 connector on the modem, and
plug the other end into a serial port connector on your computer, such as COM1 or
COM2. You supply the RS-232 cable.
2. Connect the Modem to the Phone Jack (Line Connection)
Plug one end of the phone cable into the modem’s LINE jack and the other end into
a phone wall jack. The phone cable is included with your modem.
Note: The LINE jack is not interchangeable with the PHONE jack. Do not plug the
phone into the LINE jack or the line cable into the PHONE jack.
7
2 Installation
3. (Optional) Connect the Modem to the Phone
For voice-only calls, plug a phone into the modem’s PHONE jack.
4. Connect the Modem to the AC Power Outlet
Plug the DC power transformer into an AC power outlet or power strip. Plug the DC
power transformer into the POWER jack on the modem.
Note: Use only the DC power transformer supplied with the modem. Use of any
other transformer voids the warranty and can damage the modem.
A Note About Power Connection, Surge Protectors, and Lightning
Power surges and other transient voltages on power lines, such as those caused by
lightning strikes, can damage or destroy your modem. Therefore, we recommend
that you plug the modem into a surge protector rather than directly into a wall
outlet, preferably a surge protector that provides protection against electrical spikes
on the phone line as well as on the power line. Note that not even a surge protector
can guard against damage from a nearby lightning strike. During an electrical storm,
it is safest to unplug your computer equipment from both the power outlet and the
phone line.
Power-On Test
Test the modem by turning it on (an on-off switch is located on the side panel).
When you apply power, the modem performs a diagnostic self-test. The 56 indicator
lights; and if a terminal program is running, the TR indicator also lights. If this does
not happen, check that the power switch is on, the power supply is solidly
connected, and the AC outlet is live. If these measures do not work, see Chapter 5,
Troubleshooting.
Note: The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and Industry Canada
impose certain restrictions on equipment connected to public phone systems. For
more information, see Appendix A.
Using Your Modem
Right now the modem is set up for the most typical user application, that is, the
modem is set to make dial-up calls to remote installations where the calls are
answered automatically. Therefore, you shouldn’t need to change the current
default configuration.
You will likely use your data communications software to:
• Launch a data communications session through a set of modem configurations
which you select and then associate with a target phone number. Once you have
created, saved, and named this set of information according to your connection
needs and your data communications software’s conventions, the software then
simplifies your dialing. You need not reconfigure the modem nor run the risk of
mistakenly keying-in incorrect information, or
• Enter terminal mode, where you can issue AT commands .
8
2 Installation
Connections for the MT5600ZDXV
PWR
RS232
PHONE
LINE
Figure 2–2. MT5600ZDXV Connections
1. Follow All of the Connection Directions for the MT5600ZDX
The add these steps:
2. Connect the Microphone
For voice mail or speakerphone applications, plug an unamplified microphone into
the MIC jack on the side of the modem. The microphone should have a stereo 1/8inch mini plug. Do not use a monophonic microphone.
3. Connect the Speaker
For speakerphone or voice mail applications, use a 1/8-inch-plug male-to-male
stereo patch cord to connect the SPKR jack on the side of the modem to the LINE IN
jack on your sound card. If your sound card does not have a LINE IN jack, use its
MIC jack. The stereo male-to-male patch cord can be purchased at a local PC retail
store.
If you do not have a sound card, you can plug an amplified speaker directly into the
SPKR jack.
9
2 Installation
Installing the Modem Driver
If you use Windows 98/Me/NT/2000/Xp, you must install the modem driver as
described here. If you use another operating system, see the User Guide. When
operating the modem under Windows 98/Me/2000/Xp, the modem driver can be
installed by using the Plug-and-Play feature. Follow the 4-step procedure below.
For Windows NT, which does not support Plug-and-Play, follow the 8-step
procedure on the next page.
Modem Driver Installation for Windows 98/Me/2000/Xp
1. Make sure your modem is connected properly, and then turn on your computer.
Windows should detect your new modem and open the Install New Modem
wizard.
Note: If Windows cannot find a modem, your modem may be turned off, it may
be plugged into the wrong connector on your computer, or the serial cable may
be faulty. See “None of the LEDs Light When the Modem Is Turned On” and
“The Modem Does Not Respond to Commands” in the “Troubleshooting”
chapter of the User Guide.
2. Insert the system CD-ROM, and then click OK.
3. Windows installs and configures the modem.
4. Click Finish to exit.
Modem Driver Installation for Windows NT
1. Make sure your modem is connected properly, and then turn on your computer.
Windows should detect your new modem and open the Install New Modem
wizard.
Note: If Windows cannot find a modem, your modem may be turned off, it may
be plugged into the wrong connector on your computer, or the serial cable may
be faulty. See “None of the LEDs Light When the Modem Is Turned On” and
“The Modem Does Not Respond to Commands” in the “Troubleshooting” chapter of the User Guide.
2. In the Install New Modem wizard, select Don’t detect my modem; I will select
it from a list, and then click Next. A dialog box with a list of manufacturers and
a list of modem models appears.
3. Insert the system CD-ROM and then click Have Disk.
4. In the Install from Disk dialog box, select the drive that the CD is in, and then
click OK.
5. A list of modems appears. Select your modem and click Next.
6. Select the port that the modem is connected to, and then click Next.
7. Windows installs and configures the modem.
8. Click Finish to exit.
10
2 Installation
Removing an Old Modem Driver
When your new modem replaces another modem, the old modem driver remains
in Windows, and the old modem driver is still selected in HyperTerminal and other
Windows applications. Though you can change the application connection
descriptions one at a time, it is easier to force the Windows applications to use the
new modem by removing the old modem driver from Windows.
1. Click the Start button, point to Settings, and click Control Panel.
2. Double-click the Modems icon to open the Modems Properties dialog box.
3. In the list box, select the old modem.
4. Click Remove, and then click Close.
5. The next time you dial a HyperTerminal connection, it will select your new
modem and ask you to confirm the selection.
Loading Data Communications Software
MultiTech includes a data communications software package on the product CD
shipped with your modem. In general, however, the modem will work with most
data communications software packages. Data communications software gives the
user access to lower-level commands that govern (at a detailed technical level) how
the modem operates, that is, how the modem handles incoming and outgoing data
streams, etc.
Load the software as you would any Windows application program. During installation under Windows NT/2000/Xp, an advisory screen may appear saying “FAX
capture driver installation” and causing a delay in the installation. Be aware that
this is normal and the installation process has not failed or stalled. Simply wait a
few moments until this screen disappears.
11
2 Installation
Installing Your Data Communications Software
Data communications software is designed to send and receive messages. MultiTech includes a data communications program with your modem. However, the
modem will work with any data communications software. To install the data
communications software provided with this modem, insert the CD into the CDROM drive. The software will then install automatically if you have Windows 98/
2000 or Windows NT 4.0.
For other operating systems, insert the CD into your CD-ROM drive, click the Start
button, and then click Run. Type D:\setup.exe, and then click OK. If your CD-ROM
drive uses a different drive letter, type that letter in place of D. The setup wizard on
the CD guides you through the installation.
Note: Data communications software running in a Windows operating system
normally do not have to be configured since they use the Plug and Play
configuration supplied by the Windows modem driver. Data communications
software running in DOS or other operating systems may need to be manually
configured. See Chapter 3, Advanced Options.
Connecting to the Internet
Your Multi-Tech modem is your gateway to the Internet and the World Wide Web.
To access the Internet and Web via your modem, you must establish a dial-up
account with an Internet service provider (ISP). To locate an ISP near you, look in a
local directory or computer publication. Your ISP should provide you with the
following information:
• User name (also called user ID)
• Password
• Access number (the number you call to connect to the server)
• Host name and/or domain name
• Domain Name Server (DNS) server address
If, besides the Web, you use the Internet for e-mail and newsgroups, your ISP should
also provide you with the following information:
• E-mail or POP mail address
• POP server address
• Mail or SMTP address
• News or NNT server address
12
2 Installation
Sending a Fax
With your data communications software, you can use your modem to send and
receive faxes directly from your computer. The following steps show you how to fax a
document directly from a Windows application without opening the data
communications program.
1. Create a document in a Windows application, such as Word, a graphics editor, or
a spreadsheet. Keep the application and the document open, and select Print
from the File menu.
2. Select CAPTURE FAX BVRP as the printer driver, and then click OK. The Send
Fax wizard appears.
3. In the Recipient section, type the required information or extract it from the
Phone Book by clicking this icon.
4. In the Template section, optionally select a cover page and type a cover message.
5. Select the document to be sent. The default file when sending from within a
Windows application is Capture.dgr.
6. Select the date and time to send the document, if you do not want to send it
immediately.
7. Click Finish to start the transmission.
About the LED Indicators
The modem has ten LED indicators on the front panel that indicate status and
activity:
Figure 2–3. Front panel
TR
Transmit Data
Flashes when the modem is transmitting data to another modem.
RD Receive Data
Flashes when the modem is receiving data from another modem.
CD Carrier Detect
Lights when the modem detects a valid carrier signal from another modem. It
is on when the modem is communicating with the other modem, and off
when the link is broken.
13
2 Installation
56 56K Mode (56,000–28,000 bps)
Lights whenever the modem is set for or connects using either the K56flex or
the V.90 protocol. The actual connection speed depends on the ISP server
capabilities and line conditions.
28 V.34 Mode
Lights when the modem in connected in V.34 mode.
14 V.32 bis
Lights when the modem is connected in V.32 bis mode.
OH
Off-Hook
Lights when the modem is off-hook, which occurs when the modem is dialing, online, or answering a call. The LED flashes when the modem pulse-dials.
TR
Terminal Ready
Lights when a communication program is using the modem. It means the
modem is ready for an outgoing or incoming call. It goes off when the
communication program disconnects the serial port. When it goes off, a
connected modem will disconnect.
EC
Error Correction
Lights when the modem is set for V.42 error correction. It flashes on and off
when data compression is activated.
FX
Fax
Lights when the modem is connected in fax mode.
Note: When you turn on the modem, the 56 indicator lights; and if a terminal
program is running, the TR indicator also lights. After a call, the indicator for the
connection’s speed protocol remains lit until another call is made or the modem is
reset. On reset the 56 indicator lights again.
14
3 Advanced Options
Chapter 3: Advanced Options
15
3 Advanced Options
Introduction
Like any modem, your Multi-Tech modem operates only under the control of a
communications program, such as the communications software package
(PhoneTools) included with the modem. It also operates under other generalpurpose data communication programs, such as Windows Terminal and
HyperTerminal. For information on how to use the modem with the
communications program of your choice, please refer to the documentation
provided with the data communications program.
An experienced modem user can configure the program’s software to change the
way the software interacts with a modem and configure the modem to change the
way it operates.
Configuring Your Communications Software
For Windows 95/98/2000 and Windows NT:
Communication programs designed for these operating systems normally do not
need to be manually configured, since they use the Plug and Play configuration of
the Windows modem driver.
For DOS and Other Operating Systems:
Communication programs designed for DOS and other operating systems, however,
may need to be manually configured to work with your modem. Though each
communications program is different, the following procedure should work with
most of them.
1. Turn on your computer and run your communications program.
2. Find the dialog box or menu that lets you select your modem. (In Windows
Terminal select Settings | Modem Commands; in HyperTerminal select File |
Properties | Phone Number; and in the communications program select
Configure | General Configuration | Communication | Change Modem.
3. Choose your modem from the program’s modem list. If it isn’t listed, choose a
generic modem and modify the settings as necessary.
4. Change the modem initialization string, if necessary. The factory default
configuration works well for most purposes. To load the factory default
configuration, use AT&F. To load a custom configuration that was saved using
the &W command, use ATZ. Note that the Z command must be in a command
string by itself. For a Macintosh, the initialization string should include the &D0
command. If you do not want the modem to always answer the phone, add S0=0
to the string. To use Caller ID with the modem, add S0=2 to the string (Caller ID
information is sent between the first and second rings, so the phone must ring at
least twice before the modem picks up the line). Depending on the software, you
might have to end the string with a carriage return character (^M).
Note: To change the modem’s default configuration, type new commands in the
communication program’s terminal window, adding the &W command to store
them in the modem’s nonvolatile memory. For instance, to create a default
configuration for a Macintosh computer that turns off autoanswer, type
AT&F&D0S0=0&W. The new configuration loads automatically whenever the
modem is turned on or receives the ATZ command.
16
3 Advanced Options
5. Select the port the modem is connected to (normally COM1 or COM2).
6. Select your serial port speed. This can be labeled “maximum speed,” “DTE bps,”
or “baud rate.” Ideally, if you use data compression, you should set your serial
port baud rate to four times the modem’s maximum transmission speed or
faster; however, few files can be compressed enough to require speeds that high,
and not all serial ports can handle speeds that high.
• Set the serial port baud rate to 115,200 bps if your computer has a high speed
serial port with a 16550AFN UART or equivalent and Windows 95 or NT 4.0
• Set it to 57,600 bps if it has Windows 3.1x. If you have an older computer with
a 14550 UART, set it to 19,200 bps.
• Older Macintosh computers can use a serial port baud rate of 57,600 bps;
newer ones can use a serial port baud rate of 115,200 bps or 230,400 bps.
To see what UART your serial port uses if you have Windows 3.1x, in Program
Manager select File | Run, type MSD, and press ENTER. Select COM Ports to see
the UART type. If you have Windows 95 or 98, select Start | Settings | Control
Panel, and double-click on the Modems icon. In the Modems Properties dialog
box, click the Diagnostics tab, click the port the modem is connected to, and
click More Info to see the UART type. Note that both programs will identify a
14550 UART as an 8250A UART. If you have an 80386 or later computer, your
UART is most likely a 14550 or 16550AFN.
7. If the communication program has an autobaud selection, make sure it is disabled.
Autobaud applies only to older modems, and can cause problems if enabled.
8. If the program allows you to edit the no-connect messages (NO CARRIER,
BUSY, NO ANSWER, NO DIALTONE), make sure there is no space between
DIAL and TONE in NO DIALTONE.
9. Refer to the program manual or online help for other configuration choices. In
most cases you can accept the default values.
Configuring Your Modem
Your modem normally is configured through Windows or through the
communication program you are using. The default settings work best for most
purposes. However, you also can configure your modem by sending AT commands
to the modem. See Chapter 4 for AT commands.
17
4 AT Commands
Chapter 4: AT Commands
18
4 AT Commands
Introduction
AT commands and Fax commands for the MT5600ZDX/ZDXV are published in a
separate Reference Guide included on the MT5600ZDX/ZDXV CD and posted on the
Multi-Tech Web site.
19
5 Troubleshooting
Chapter 5: Troubleshooting
20
5 Troubleshooting
Introduction
Your modem was thoroughly tested at the factory before it was shipped. If you are
unable to make a successful connection, or if you experience data loss or garbled
characters during your connection, check the list of troubleshooting procedures
before calling Multi-Tech.
• None of the LEDs light when the modem is on.
• The modem does not respond to commands.
• The modem dials but is unable to make a connection.
• The modem disconnects while online.
• The modem cannot connect when answering.
• File transfer is slower than it should be.
• Data is being lost.
• There are garbage characters on the monitor.
• The modem doesn’t work with Caller ID.
• Fax and data software can’t run at the same time.
If you experience problems, please check the following possibilities before calling
Technical Support (see Appendix D).
None of the Indicators Light
When you turn on the modem, the 56 indicator and the terminal turn on. If the LEDs
remain off, the modem is probably not receiving power.
Make sure the modem’s power switch is on, especially if you normally turn the
modem on by turning on a power strip.
If the modem is plugged into a power strip, make sure the power strip is plugged
in and its power switch is on.
Make sure the transformer module is firmly connected to the modem and to the
wall outlet or power strip.
If the power strip is on and the modem switch is on, try moving the transformer
module to another outlet on the power strip.
Test that the outlet is live by plugging another device, such as a lamp, into it.
The modem or the DC power transformer may be defective. If you have another
Multi-Tech modem, try swapping modems. If the problem goes away, the first
modem or the DC power transformer may be defective. Call Technical Support
for assistance.
CAUTION: Do not under any circumstances replace the transformer module with
one designed for another product; doing so can damage the modem and void your
warranty.
21
5 Troubleshooting
The Modem Does Not Respond to Commands
Make sure the modem is plugged in and turned on. (See “None of the Indicators
Light.”)
Make sure you are issuing the modem commands from the data communications
program, either manually in terminal mode or automatically by configuring the
software. (You cannot send commands to the modem from the DOS prompt.)
Make sure you are in terminal mode in your data communications program, then
type AT and press ENTER. If you get an OK response from your modem, your
connections are good and the problem likely is in the connection setup in your
communications program.
Try resetting your modem by turning it off and on. If you are using DOS or
Windows 3.1 communications program, make sure the initialization string
includes &F as the first command, to cancel any “leftover’ command that could
affect the modem’s operation.
If you don’t get an OK, the problem may still be in the communications program.
Make sure you have done whatever is necessary in your software to make a port
connection. Not all communication programs connect to the COM port
automatically. Some connect when the software loads and remain connected
until the program terminates. Others can disconnect without exiting the
program. The modem’s TR indicator lights to show that the software has taken
control of the modem through the COM port.
Your communications program settings may not match the physical port the
modem is connected to. The serial cable might be plugged into the wrong
connector—check your computer documentation to make sure. Or you might
have selected a COM port in your software other than the one the modem is
physically connected to—compare the settings in your software to the physical
connection.
If the modem is on, the cable is plugged into the correct port, the
communications program is configured correctly, and you still don’t get an OK,
the fault might be in the serial cable. Make sure it is firmly connected at both
ends.
Is this the first time you have used the cable? If so, it may not be wired correctly.
Check the cable description on the packaging to make sure the cable is the right
one for your computer.
Peripheral expansion cards, such as sound and game cards, might include a
serial port preconfigured as COM1 or COM2. The extra serial port, or the card
itself, may use the same COM port, memory address, or interrupt request (IRQ)
as your communication port. Be sure to disable any unused ports.
Windows 3.1x: To look for address or IRQ conflicts, in Program Manager select
File | Run, type MSD, and press ENTER. Then select Mouse, COM Ports, and
IRQ Status, and note the addresses and IRQs that are in use. If you find an IRQ
conflict, note which IRQs are not being used, then change one of the conflicting
devices to use one of the unused IRQs. If you find an address conflict, change the
address of one of the conflicting devices.
22
5 Troubleshooting
To change a port address or IRQ in Windows 3.1x, double-click the Control Panel
icon, then the Ports icon. Click on the port you want to change, click Settings,
click Advanced, and select the new port address and/or interrupt. If you wish to
use COM3 or COM4, note that COM3 shares an IRQ with COM1, as does COM4
with COM2, so you should change their IRQs to unused ones, if possible.
Windows 9x and 2000: Right-click on My Computer, select Properties from the
menu, click on the Device Manager tab, double-click on Ports, then double-click
on the communication port your modem is connected to. In the port’s Properties
sheet, click on the Resources tab to see the port’s input/output range and
interrupt request. If another device is using the same address range or IRQ, it
appears in the Conflicting Device List. Uncheck Use automatic settings to
change the port’s settings so they do not conflict with the other device, or select
the port the conflicting device is on and change it instead. If you need to open
your computer to change switches or jumpers on the conflicting device; refer to
the device’s documentation.
Windows NT 4.0: To look for address or IRQ conflicts, click Start, Programs,
Administrative Tools (Common), and Windows NT Diagnostics. In the Windows
NT Diagnostics dialog box, click the Resources tab to see which input/output
ranges and interrupt requests are in use. If you need to open your computer to
change switches or jumpers on the conflicting device; refer to the device’s
documentation.
The serial port might be defective. If you have another serial port, install the
modem on it, change the COM port setting in your software, and try again.
The modem may be defective. If you have another Multi-Tech modem, try
swapping modems. If the problem goes away, the first modem may be defective.
Call Technical Support for assistance (see Appendix D).
The Modem Dials But Cannot Connect
There can be several reasons the modem fails to make a connection. Possibilities include:
• lack of a physical connection to the telephone line.
• a wrong dial tone.
• a busy signal.
• a wrong number.
• no modem at the other end.
• a faulty modem, computer, or software at the other end.
• incompatibility between modems.
You can narrow the list of possibilities by using extended result codes. Extended
result codes are enabled by default. If they have been disabled, include V1X4 in the
modem’s initialization string, or in terminal mode enter ATV1X4 and press ENTER.
When you dial again, the modem reports the call’s progress.
If the modem reports NO DIALTONE, check that the modem’s phone line cable is
connected to both the modem’s LINE jack (not the PHONE jack) and the phone
wall jack. If the cable looks secure, try replacing it. If that doesn’t work, the
problem might be in your building’s phone installation. To test the building
23
5 Troubleshooting
installation, plug a phone into your modem’s phone wall jack and listen for a dial
tone. If you hear a dial tone, your modem might be installed behind a corporate
phone system (PBX) with an internal dial tone that sounds different from the
normal dial tone. In that case, the modem might not recognize the dial tone and
might treat it as an error. Check your PBX manual to see if you can change the
internal dial tone; if you can’t, change your modem’s initialization string to
replace X4 with X3, which will cause the modem to ignore dial tones (note,
however, that X3 is not allowed in some countries, such as France and Spain).
If the modem reports BUSY, the other number might be busy, in which case you
should try again later, or it might indicate that you have failed to add a 9, prefix
to the phone number if you must dial 9 for an outside line.
If you must dial 9 to get an outside line, the easiest way to dial it automatically is
to include it in the modem’s dial prefix, e.g., ATDT9,. Note the comma, which
inserts a pause before the number is dialed. By inserting 9, into the dial prefix,
you do not have to include it in each directory entry.
To change the dial prefix in Windows 95 HyperTerminal, select Connect from
the Call menu, click Dialing Properties, and type 9 in the local and long distance
boxes in How I dial from this location.
If the modem reports NO ANSWER, the other system has failed to go off-hook, or
you might have dialed a wrong number. Check the number.
If the modem reports NO CARRIER, the phone was answered at the other end,
but no connection was made. You might have dialed a wrong number, and a
person answered instead of a computer, or you might have dialed the correct
number but the other computer or software was turned off or faulty. Check the
number and try again, or try calling another system to make sure your modem is
working. Also, try calling the number on your telephone. If you hear harsh
sounds, then another modem is answering the call, and the modems might be
having problems negotiating because of modem incompatibilities or line noise.
Try connecting at a lower speed.
The Modem Disconnects While Online
If you have Call Waiting on the same phone line as your modem, it can interrupt
your connection when someone tries to call you. If you have Call Waiting,
disable it before each call. In most phone areas in North America, you can disable
Call Waiting by preceding the phone number with *70 (check with your local
phone company).
You can automatically disable Call Waiting by including the disabling code in
the modem’s dial prefix (e.g., ATDT*70,—note the comma, which inserts a pause
before the number is dialed). To change the dial prefix in Windows Terminal,
select Settings | Modem Commands. To change it in HyperTerminal, select
Connect from the Call menu, click Dialing Properties, check This location has
Call Waiting, and select the correct code for your phone service.
If you have extension phones on the same line as your modem, you or someone
else can interrupt the connection by picking up another phone. If this is a
frequent problem, disconnect the extension phones before using the modem, or
install another phone line especially for the modem.
24
5 Troubleshooting
Check for loose connections between the modem and the computer, the phone
jack, and AC power.
You might have had a poor connection because of line conditions or the problem
might have originated on the other end of the line. Try again.
If you were online with a BBS or an online service like CompuServe, it might
have hung up on you because of lack of activity on your part or because you
exceeded your time limit for the day. Try again.
The Modem Cannot Connect When Answering
The default DTR Control command (&D2) inhibits autoanswer. To enable
autoanswer, change the DTR Control to &D0, and make sure &Q0, &Q1, &Q5,
or &Q6 is also set. For more information, see the &D command in Chapter 4. For
information on changing the modem’s default configuration, see Chapter 3.
Autoanswer might be disabled. Turn on autoanswer in your data
communications program or send the command ATS0=1 (ATS0=2 if you have
Caller ID service) to your modem in terminal mode.
File Transfer Is Slower Than It Should Be
You might have an older UART. For best throughput, install a 16550AFN UART
or a Multi-Tech ISI serial port card. See the “Advanced Options” chapter for
information on how to identify your UART.
If you are running under Windows 3.1 and have a 16550AFN UART, you must
replace the Windows serial driver, COMM.DRV, to take full advantage of the
UART’s speed.
If you are using a slow transfer protocol, such as Xmodem, try Zmodem or
Ymodem/G instead.
Is your line noisy? If there is static on your line, the modem has to resend many
blocks of data to insure accuracy. You must have a clean line for maximum speed.
Are you downloading a compressed file with MNP 5 hardware compression
enabled? Since hardware data compression cannot compress a file already
compressed by an archiving program, the transfer can be marginally slower with
data compression enabled than with it disabled.
Does your Internet service provider (ISP) use the same 56K protocol as your
modem? The default setting of your modem is to connect using either the K56flex
or the V.90 protocol, depending on which one the ISP modem is using. If your
ISP uses the X2 protocol, the maximum speed you will be able to connect at is
33,600 bps. Check with your ISP to see which protocols it supports, and check the
Multi-Tech Web site for the latest developments in V.90.
Try entering the &V1 command to display information about the last connection,
making a screen print of the connection statistics, and checking for parameters
that might be unacceptable.
25
5 Troubleshooting
Data Is Being Lost
If you are using data compression and a high speed serial port, set the serial port
baud rate to four times the data rate.
Your UART might not be reliable at serial port speeds over 9600 bps or 19,200
bps. Turn off data compression, reset your serial port speed to a lower rate, or
replace your serial port with a faster one.
Make sure the flow control method you selected in software matches the method
selected in the modem. If you are using the modem with a Macintosh, you might
have the wrong cable for hardware flow control.
If you are running under Windows 3.1 and have a 16550AFN UART, you might
need to turn on the 16550’s data buffers and/or replace the Windows serial
driver, COMM.DRV.
Try entering the &V1 command to display information about the last connection,
making a screen print of the connection statistics, and checking for parameters
that might be unacceptable.
There Are Garbage Characters on the Monitor
Your computer and the remote computer might be set to different word lengths,
stop bits, or parities. If you have connected at 8-N-1, try changing to 7-E-1, or
vice-versa, using your communications program.
You might be experiencing line noise. Enable error correction, if it is disabled, or
hang up and call again; you might get a better connection the second time.
At speeds above 2400 bps, the remote modem might not use the same
transmission or error correction standards as your modem. Try connecting at a
slower speed or disabling error correction. (With no error correction, however,
line noise can cause garbage characters.)
Try entering the &V1 command to display information about the last connection,
making a screen print of the connection statistics, and checking for parameters
that might be unacceptable.
The Modem Doesn’t Work with Caller ID
Caller ID information is transmitted between the first and second rings, so if
autoanswer is turned off (S0=0) or if the modem is set to answer after only one
ring (S0=1), the modem will not receive Caller ID information. Check your
initialization string, and if necessary change it to set the modem to answer after
the second ring (S0=2).
Make sure that you have Caller ID service from your telephone company.
26
5 Troubleshooting
Fax and Data Software Can’t Run at the Same Time
Communication devices can be accessed by only one application at a time. Under
DOS or Windows 3.1x, you can run either your fax software or your data
communications program, but not both at the same time, unless you have a
special communication device management application. In Windows 95, 98, and NT
4.0, you can have data and fax communication programs open at the same time,
but they cannot use the same modem at the same time.
27
A Regulatory Compliance
Appendixes
28
A Regulatory Compliance
Appendix A: Regulatory Compliance
Note: Each regulation may not apply to every version of the MultiModemZDX.
FCC Part 15
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential
installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy,
and if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that
interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause
harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by
turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
• Plug the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the
receiver is connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation of this device is subject to the following conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference,
and (2) this device must accept any interference that may cause undesired operation.
WARNING: Changes or modifications to this unit not expressly approved by the
party responsible for compliance could void the user’s authority to operate the
equipment.
Industry Canada
This Class B digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian InterferenceCausing Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B respecte toutes les exigences du Reglement
Canadien sur le matériel brouilleur.
29
A Regulatory Compliance
FCC Part 68 Telecom
1. This equipment complies with part 68 of the Federal Communications
Commission Rules. On the outside surface of this equipment is a label that
contains, among other information, the FCC registration number. This
information must be provided to the telephone company.
2. The suitable USOC jack (Universal Service Order Code connecting arrangement)
for this equipment is shown below. If applicable, the facility interface codes
(FIC) and service order codes (SOC) are shown.
3. An FCC-compliant telephone cord and modular plug is provided with this
equipment. This equipment is designed to be connected to the telephone
network or premises wiring using a compatible modular jack that is Part 68
compliant. See installation instructions for details.
4. The ringer equivalence number (REN) is used to determine the number of
devices that may be connected to the telephone line. Excessive RENs on the
telephone line may result in the device not ringing in response to an incoming
call. In most, but not all, areas the sum of the RENs should not exceed 5.0. To be
certain of the number of devices that may be connected to the line, as
determined by the total RENs, contact the local telephone company.
5. If this equipment causes harm to the telephone network, the telephone company
will notify you in advance that temporary discontinuance of service may be
required. But if advance notice is not practical, the telephone company will
notify you as soon as possible. Also, you will be advised of your right to file a
complaint with the FCC if you believe it is necessary.
6. The telephone company may make changes in its facilities, equipment,
operations, or procedures that could affect the operation of the equipment. If
this happens, the telephone company will provide advance notice in order for
you to make necessary modifications in order to maintain uninterrupted service.
7. If trouble is experienced with this equipment (the model of which is indicated
below) please contact Multi-Tech Systems, Inc. at the address shown below for
details of how to have repairs made. If the trouble is causing harm to the
telephone network, the telephone company may request you remove the
equipment from the network until the problem is resolved.
8. No repairs are to be made by you. Repairs are to be made only by Multi-Tech
Systems or its licensees. Unauthorized repairs void registration and warranty.
9. This equipment should not be used on party lines or coin lines.
10. If so required, this equipment is hearing-aid compatible.
11. This product is labeled with the following information:
Manufacturer:
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc.
Trade Name:
MultiModem
Model Number:
MT5600ZDX, MT5600ZDXe, MT5600ZDXV, or
MT5600ZDXVe
FCC Registration No:
AU7USA-24713-M5-E
Ringer Equivalence No: 0.3B
Modular Jack (USOC):
RJ11C or RJ11W (single line)
Service Center in USA:
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc.
2205 Woodale Drive
Mounds View, MN 55112
U.S.A.
(763) 785-3500
(763) 785-9874 Fax
30
A Regulatory Compliance
Fax Branding Statement
The Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 makes it unlawful for any person to
use a computer or other electronic device, including fax machines, to send any
message unless such message clearly contains the following information:
• Date and time the message is sent
• Identification of the business or other entity, or other individual sending the
message
• Telephone number of the sending machine or such business, other entity, or
individual
This information is to appear in a margin at the top or bottom of each transmitted
page or on the first page of the transmission. (Adding this information in the margin
is referred to as fax branding.)
Since any number of fax software packages can be used with this product, the user
must refer to the fax software manual for setup details. Typically the fax branding
information must be entered via the configuration menu of the software.
Canadian Limitations Notice
Notice: The ringer equivalence number (REN) assigned to each terminal device
provides an indication of the maximum number of terminals allowed to be
connected to a telephone interface. The termination on an interface may consist of any
combination of devices subject only to the requirement that the sum of the ringer
equivalence numbers of all the devices does not exceed 5.
Notice: The Industry Canada label identifies certificated equipment. This
certification means that the equipment meets certain telecommunications network
protective, operational and safety requirements. The Industry Canada label does not
guarantee the equipment will operate to the user’s satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to be
connected to the facilities of the local telecommunications company. The equipment
must also be installed using an acceptable method of connection. The customer
should be aware that compliance with the above conditions may not prevent
degradation of service in some situations. Repairs to certified equipment should be
made by an authorized Canadian maintenance facility designated by the supplier.
Any repairs or alterations made by the user to this equipment or equipment
malfunctions may give the telecommunications company cause to request the user to
disconnect the equipment.
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground connections
of the power utility, telephone lines and internal metallic water pipe system, if
present, are connected together. This precaution may be particularly important in
rural areas.
Caution: Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves, but should
contact the appropriate electric inspection authority, or electrician, as appropriate.
31
A Regulatory Compliance
International Modem Restrictions
Some dialing and answering defaults and restrictions may vary for international
modems. Changing settings may cause a modem to become non-compliant with
national telecom requirements in specific countries. Also note that some software
packages may have features or lack restrictions that may cause the modem to
become non-compliant.
EMC, Safety, and R&TTE Directive Compliance
The CE mark is affixed to this product to confirm compliance with the following
European Community Directives:
• Council Directive 89/336/EEC of 3 May 1989 on the approximation of the laws
of Member States relating to electromagnetic compatibility;
and
• Council Directive 73/23/EEC of 19 February 1973 on the harmonization of the
laws of Member States relating to electrical equipment designed for use within
certain voltage limits;
and
• Council Directive 1999/5/EC of 9 March on radio equipment and
telecommunications terminal equipment and the mutual recognition of their
conformity.
New Zealand Telecom Warning Notice
1. The grant of a Telepermit for any item of terminal equipment indicates only that
Telecom has accepted that the item complies with minimum conditions for
connection to its network. It indicates no endorsement of the product by
Telecom, nor does it provide any sort of warranty. Above all, it provides no
assurance that any item will work correctly in all respects with another item of
Telepermitted equipment of a different make or model, nor does it imply that
any product is compatible with all of Telecom’s network services.
This equipment is not capable under all operating conditions of correct
operation at the higher speed which it is designated. 33.6 kbps and 56 kbps
connections are likely to be restricted to lower bit rates when connected to some
PSTN implementations. Telecom will accept no responsibility should difficulties
arise in such circumstances.
2. Immediately disconnect this equipment should it become physically damaged,
and arrange for its disposal or repair.
3. This modem shall not be used in any manner which could constitute a nuisance
to other Telecom customers.
4. This device is equipped with pulse dialing, while the Telecom standard is DTMF
tone dialing. There is no guarantee that Telecom lines will always continue to
support pulse dialing.
32
A Regulatory Compliance
Use of pulse dialing, when this equipment is connected to the same line as other
equipment, may give rise to ‘bell tinkle’ or noise and may also cause a false
answer condition. Should such problems occur, the user should not contact the
Telecom Faults Service.
The preferred method of dialing is to use DTMF tones, as this is faster than pulse
(decadic) dialing and is readily available on almost all New Zealand telephone
exchanges.
5. Warning Notice: No ‘111’ or other calls can be made from this device during a
mains power failure.
6. This equipment may not provide for the effective hand-over of a call to another
device connected to the same line.
7. Some parameters required for compliance with Telecom’s Telepermit
requirements are dependent on the equipment (PC) associated with this device.
The associated equipment shall be set to operate within the following limits for
compliance with Telecom’s Specifications:
For repeat calls to the same number:
i There shall be no more than 10 call attempts to the same number within any
30-minute period for any single manual call initiation, and
i The equipment shall go on-hook for a period of not less than 30 seconds
between the end of one attempt and the beginning of the next attempt.
For automatic calls to different numbers:
i The equipment shall be set to ensure that automatic calls to different
numbers are spaced such that there is no less than 5 seconds between the
end of one call attempt and the beginning of another.
For automatically answered incoming calls:
i The equipment shall be set to ensure that calls are answered between 3 and
30 seconds of receipt of ringing.
8. For correct operation, total of the RN’s of all devices connected to a single line at
any time should not exceed 5.
South African Notice
This modem must be used in conjunction with an approved surge protection
device.
33
B Technical Specifications
Appendix B: Technical Specifications
The MultiModemZDX modem meets the following specifications:
Trade Name
MultiModemZDX™
Model Number
MT5600ZDX, MT5600ZDXe, MT5600ZDXV, and
MT5600ZDXVe
Client-to-Server
Data Rates
V.90 speeds when accessing a V.90 server (actual
speed depends on server
capabilities and line conditions)*
Client-to-Client
Data Rates
33,600; 31,200; 28,800; 26,400; 24,000; 21,600; 19,200; 16,800;
14,400; 12,000; 9600; 7200; 4800; 2400; 1200; 0-300 bps
Fax Data Rates
14,400; 9600; 7200; 4800; 2400; 300 bps
Data Format
Serial, binary, asynchronous
Commands
AT, TIA/EIA TR.29, Class 2
Command Buffer
60 characters
Modem Compatibility ITU-T V.90, V.42, V.42bis, V.34, V.34bis, V.32, V.32bis,
V.32terbo, V.22, V.22bis, V.21 & V.23 in international
versions, Bell 212A and 103/113
Fax Compatibility
ITU-T Group 3, Class 1 and 2, T.30, T.4, V.29, V.27ter, V.21,
V.17, and TIA/EIA TR29.2
Error Correction
ITU-T V.42 (LAP-M or MNP 3 and 4)
Data Compression
ITU-T V.42bis (4:1 throughput), MNP 5 (2:1 throughput)
Speed Conversion
Serial port data rates adjustable to 300; 1200; 2400; 4800;
9600; 19,200; 38,400; 57,600; 115,200; and 230,400 bps
Mode of Operation
Fax online modes, full duplex over dial-up, AT command
mode
Flow Control
XON/XOFF (software), RTS/CTS (hardware)
Intelligent Features
Plug and play, AT command compatible, autodial, redial,
repeat dial, pulse or tone dial, dial pauses, auto answer,
caller ID, adaptive line probing; automatic symbol and
carrier frequency during start-up, retrain and rate
renegotiation, DTMF detection, call status display, autoparity and data rate selection, keyboard-controlled modem
options, non-volatile memory, storage of up to four
command strings or telephone numbers up to 31 characters
each
*Though these modems are capable of 56K bps download performance, line impairments,
public telephone infrastructure and other external technological factors currently prevent
maximum 56K bps connections.
34
B Technical Specifications
Data Modulation
FSK at 300 bps
PSK at 1200 bps
QAM at 2400, 4800, and 9600 bps (non-trellis);
QAM with trellis-coded modulation (TCM) at 9600; 12,000;
14,400; 16,800; 19,200; 21,600; 24,000; 26,400; 28,800;
31,200; 33,600; 34,000; 38,000; 46,000, 54,000 and
56,000 bps
Fax Modulation
V.21 CH2 FSK at 300 bps (half duplex)
V.27ter DPSK at 4800 and 2400 bps
V.29 QAM at 9600 and 7200 bps
V.17TCM at 14400, 12000, 9600, and 7200 bps
Carrier Frequencies
V.34
1600, 1646, 1680, 1800, 1829, 1867, 1920, 1959, 2000 Hz
Carrier Frequencies
1800 Hz
V.32, V.32bis, V.32terbo
Carrier Frequencies
V.22,V.22bis or
Bell 212A Standard
(2400 &1200 bps)
Transmit originate:
Transmit answer:
Receive originate:
Receive answer:
1200 Hz
2400 Hz
2400 Hz
1200 Hz
Carrier Frequencies
V.23 (1200 bps)
Transmit originate: 390 Hz mark
450 Hz space
Receive originate: 1300 Hz mark
2100 Hz space
Transmit answer: 1300 Hz mark
2100 Hz space
Receive answer:
390 Hz mark
450 Hz space
Carrier Frequencies
V.21 (0-300 bps)
Transmit originate: 980 Hz mark
1180 Hz space
Receive originate: 1650 Hz mark
1850 Hz space
Transmit answer: 1650 Hz mark
1850 Hz space
Receive answer:
980 Hz mark
1180 Hz space
Carrier Frequencies
Bell 103/113
(0–300 bps)
Transmit originate: 1270 Hz mark
1070 Hz space
Receive originate: 2225 Hz mark
2025 Hz space
Transmit answer: 2225 Hz mark
2025 Hz space
Receive answer:
1270 Hz mark
1070 Hz space
Fax Carrier
Frequencies
V.21 Ch2 (half duplex):
1650 Hz mark, 1850 Hz space for transmit originate
1650 Hz mark, 1850 Hz space for transmit answer
V.27ter: 1800 Hz originate/answer
V.29 QAM: 1800 Hz originate/answer
V.17 TCM: 1800 Hz originate/answer
35
B Technical Specifications
Transmission Level
-11 dBm or -12 dBm (dial-up; -11 or -12 determined by
country )
Frequency Stability
±0.01%
Receiver Sensitivity
-43 dBm under worst-case conditions
AGC Dynamic Range
43 dB
Interface
RS-232C/V.24/V.28
Connectors
DB25F RS-232C connector, one RJ-11 phone jack, power connector
Cables
One modular telephone cable (USA); country-specific cord
for UK and International models; one 9-pin to 25-pin serial
cable for UK and International models; external power
transformer and cord
Note: Any cables connected to the computer should be
shielded to reduce interference.
Diagnostics
Power-on self test, local analog loop, local digital loop,
remote digital loop
Indicators
LEDs for Transmit Data, Receive Data, Carrier Detect,
various speed indicators, Off Hook, Terminal Ready, Error
Correction, and Fax
Speaker
1-inch speaker for call progress monitoring
Speaker and
Microphone Jacks
MultiModemZDXV and MultiModemZDXVe
Manual Controls
Power switch
Operating Temperature Temperature range 0°–50°C (32°–120°F); humidity range 20–
90% (non-condensing)
Power Requirement
115 VAC, 60 Hz, 16 W; 230V/50 Hz optional (international)
Power Consumption
5 Watts
Dimensions
cm: 14.8 long × 10.8 wide × 2.6 high
inches: 5.7 long × 4.25 wide × 1.15 high
Weight
grams: 224
ounces: 8
Limited Warranty
10 years
36
C Loopback Tests
Appendix C: Loopback Tests
Introduction
Each time you turn on your modem, it performs an automatic self-test to ensure
proper operation. Your modem also has three diagnostic tests: local analog
loopback, remote digital loopback, and local digital loopback. These ITU-T V.54
loopback tests isolate telephone circuit and transmission problems.
In a loopback test, data from your computer loops through the circuits of your
modem and/or a remote modem before it appears on your monitor. When the loop
has been completed, the data on your PC’s monitor should match the original data.
The local analog loopback test allows you to verify that the modem’s transmitter and
receiver circuits are functioning properly.
The local digital loopback allows you to verify that the local computer or terminal,
the two modems, and the transmission line between them are functioning properly.
The remote digital loopback test allows you to verify that the remote computer or
terminal, the remote modem, the serial ports, the telephone line, and the local
modem are functioning properly.
Note: All loopback tests should be run at 9600 bps without error correction.
Local Analog Loopback Test (V.54 Loop 3)
In this test, data from your computer or terminal is sent to your modem’s
transmitter, converted into analog form, looped back to the modem’s receiver,
converted into digital form, and then sent to your monitor for verification. No
connection to the phone line is required.
AT&T1
CONNECT 9600
UUUUUUUUUUU
UUU
Digital Analog
Computer or Terminal
Local MultiModem
Figure C–1. Local analog loopback test.
37
C Loopback Tests
Test Procedure
1. Connect the modem to your computer. Using your communication program, set
the desired baud rate and go into terminal mode.
2. Type AT and press ENTER; you should get an OK message. Type AT\N and press
ENTER to disable error correction.
3. Type AT&T1 and press ENTER. This places your modem in analog loopback
mode in the originate mode. A CONNECT message should appear on your
display. The modem is now out of command mode and in a pseudo-online
mode.
4. Note that the CD indicator is on. If it is not on, there could be a problem with
your modem.
5. Enter characters from your keyboard. For this test, typing multiple uppercase U
characters is a good way to send an alternating test pattern of binary ones and
zeros. The characters entered should be displayed on your monitor.
6. To exit the test, type the escape sequence +++AT and press ENTER. This puts the
modem in online command mode. Then type either AT&T or ATH to return to
command mode.
7. Your modem passes this test if the data received on your monitor is the same as
the data entered from your keyboard. If different data appears on your monitor,
your modem is probably causing the problem, though it could also be your
computer. If your modem passes this test, but you are receiving errors while on
line, the remote modem or the phone line could be at fault.
Remote Digital Loopback Test (V.54 Loop 2)
The remote digital loopback test tests the phone lines and the circuits of both your
modem and a remote modem. In this test, your modem must be on line with another
modem that is set up to respond to a request for remote digital loopback. (Note that
some modems might not support remote digital loopback or might have it disabled.)
Data from your computer or terminal is transmitted through your modem and over
the phone line to the remote modem, where it is then looped back to your modem.
AT&T4
OK
AT&T6
CONNECT 9600
UUUUUUUUUUU
UUUUU
Digital Analog
Computer or Terminal Local MultiModem
Analog Digital
Remote MultiModem Computer or Terminal
Figure C–2. Remote digital loopback test.
38
C Loopback Tests
Test Procedure
1. Arrange to have &T4 set on the remote test modem. This command enables the
remote modem to respond to an &T6 request for a remote digital loopback test
from the local modem.
2. Open your communications software and go into terminal mode. Type AT and
press ENTER; you should get an OK message. Type AT\N and press ENTER to
disable error correction. Type AT+MS=9,1,9600,9600 and press Enter to set the
local modem to V.32 mode at 9600 bps.
3. Dial the remote modem and establish your online connection.
4. Type the escape sequence +++AT and press ENTER to bring your modem into
online command mode.
5. Type AT&T6 and press ENTER. The local modem responds to this command by
transmitting an unscrambled marking signal, which causes the remote modem
to place itself in digital loopback mode. Then the local modem exits online
command mode and enters data mode.
6. Enter data from your keyboard. For this test, typing multiple uppercase U
characters is a good way to send an alternating test pattern of binary ones and
zeroes. Data received by the remote modem enters its analog receiver, is
converted to digital data, is reconverted into analog, and then is transmitted
back to your modem. Your modem passes this test if the data received on your
monitor is the same as the data entered from your keyboard.
7. To exit the test, type the escape sequence +++AT and press ENTER. This puts the
modem in online command mode. The modem should respond with an OK
message. If you wish to stay on line with the remote modem for normal data
transmission, type AT&T and press ENTER to exit the test, then type ATO and
press ENTER to return on line. If you wish to terminate the call, type ATH and
press ENTER to hang up.
Local Digital Loopback Test (V.54 Loop 2)
The local digital loopback test is identical to the remote digital loopback test with
one exception. Instead of using your modem to signal a remote modem to place
itself in digital loopback mode, your modem is placed in digital loopback mode
while the remote modem is not. Data is entered and transmitted from the remote
modem, sent across the phone line to your modem, and looped back to the remote
modem.
AT&T3
OK
UUUUUUUUUUU
UUU
Digital Analog
Computer or Terminal Local MultiModem
Analog Digital
Remote MultiModem Computer or Terminal
Figure C–3. Local digital loopback test.
39
C Loopback Tests
Test Procedure
1. Open your communications software and go into terminal mode. Type AT and
press ENTER; you should get an OK message. Type AT\N and press ENTER to
disable error correction. Type AT+MS=9,1,9600,9600 and press Enter to set the
local modem to V.32 mode at 9600 bps.
2. Dial the remote modem and establish your online connection.
3. Type the escape sequence +++AT and press ENTER to bring your modem into
online command mode.
4. Type AT&T3 and press ENTER. Once you receive an OK message from your
modem (if responses are enabled), your modem is placed in digital loopback
mode.
5. Have someone enter data from the remote keyboard. For this test, typing multiple
uppercase U characters is a good way to send an alternating test pattern of binary
ones and zeros. The data received by your modem enters its analog receiver, is
converted to digital data, is reconverted into analog, and then is transmitted
back to the remote modem. Your modem passes this test if the data received on
the remote monitor is the same as the data entered from the remote keyboard.
6. To exit the test, turn off the modem.
40
D Warranty, Service, and Technical Support
Appendix D: Warranty, Service, and
Technical Support
Warranty
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc. (MTS) warrants that this product will be free from defects in
material or workmanship for a period of ten years from the date of purchase or, if proof
of purchase is not provided, ten years from the date of shipment.
MTS MAKES NO OTHER WARRANTY, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, AND ALL
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE HEREBY DISCLAIMED.
This warranty does not apply to any products that have been damaged by lightning
storms, water, or power surges, or which have been neglected, altered, abused, used for
a purpose other than the one for which they were manufactured, repaired by the Customer or any party without MTS’s written authorization, or used in any manner inconsistent with MTS’s instructions.
MTS’s entire obligation under this warranty shall be limited (at MTS’s option) to repair or
replacement of any products that prove to be defective within the warranty period, or, at
MTS’s option, issuance of a refund of the purchase price. Defective products must be
returned by Customer to MTS’s factory with transportation prepaid.
MTS WILL NOT BE LIABLE FOR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES AND UNDER NO
CIRCUMSTANCES WILL ITS LIABILITY EXCEED THE PURCHASE PRICE FOR DEFECTIVE PRODUCTS.
Repair Procedures for U.S. and Canadian Customers
In the event that service is required, products may be shipped, freight prepaid, to our
Mounds View, Minnesota factory:
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc.
2205 Woodale Drive
Mounds View, MN 55112
Attn: Repairs, Serial # ____________
A Returned Materials Authorization (RMA) is not required. Return shipping charges
(surface) will be paid by MTS.
Please include, inside the shipping box, a description of the problem, a return shipping
address (must have street address, not P.O. Box), your telephone number, and if the
product is out of warranty, a check or purchase order for repair charges.
For out of warranty repair charges, go to www.multitech.com/documents/warranties
Extended two-year overnight replacement service agreements are available for selected
products. Please call MTS at (888) 288-5470, extension 5308 or visit our web site at
http://www.multitech.com/programs/orc/ for details on rates and coverage’s.
Please direct your questions regarding technical matters, product configuration, verification that the product is defective, etc., to our Technical Support department at (800) 9722439 or email tsupport@multitech.com. Please direct your questions regarding repair
expediting, receiving, shipping, billing, etc., to our Repair Accounting department at
(800) 328-9717 or (763) 717-5631, or email mtsrepair@multitech.com.
41
D Warranty, Service, and Technical Support
Repairs for damages caused by lightning storms, water, power surges, incorrect installation, physical abuse, or user-caused damages are billed on a time-plus-materials basis.
Repair Procedures for International Customers
(Outside U.S.A. and Canada)
Your original point of purchase Reseller may offer the quickest and most economical
repair option for your Multi-Tech product. You may also contact any Multi-Tech
sales office for information about the nearest distributor or other repair service for
your Multi-Tech product.
http://www.multitech.com/COMPANY/offices/DEFAULT.ASP
In the event that factory service is required, products may be shipped, freight prepaid to our Mounds View, Minnesota factory. Recommended international shipment methods are via Federal Express, UPS or DHL courier services, or by airmail
parcel post; shipments made by any other method will be refused. A Returned Materials Authorization (RMA) is required for products shipped from outside the
U.S.A. and Canada. Please contact us for return authorization and shipping instructions on any International shipments to the U.S.A. Please include, inside the shipping box, a description of the problem, a return shipping address (must have street
address, not P.O. Box), your telephone number, and if the product is out of warranty, a check drawn on a U.S. bank or your company’s purchase order for repair charges. Repaired units shall be shipped freight collect, unless other arrangements are
made in advance.
Please direct your questions regarding technical matters, product configuration, verification that the product is defective, etc., to our Technical Support department
nearest you or email tsupport@multitech.com. When calling the U.S., please direct
your questions regarding repair expediting, receiving, shipping, billing, etc., to our
Repair Accounting department at
+(763) 717-5631 in the U.S.A., or email mtsrepair@multitech.com.
Repairs for damages caused by lightning storms, water, power surges, incorrect installation, physical abuse, or user-caused damages are billed on a time-plus-materials basis.
Online Warranty Registration
If you have access to the World Wide Web, you can register your Multi-Tech
product online at the following URL:
http://www.multitech.com/register/
42
D Warranty, Service, and Technical Support
Replacement Parts
SupplyNet, Inc. can supply you with replacement power supplies, cables, and
connectors for select Multi-Tech products. You can place an order with SupplyNet via
mail, phone, fax, or the Internet at the following addresses:
Mail:
SupplyNet, Inc.
613 Corporate Way
Valley Cottage, NY 10989
Phone:
Fax:
800- 826-0279
914-267-2420
Email:
Internet:
info@thesupplynet.com
http://www.thesupplynet.com
Technical Support
Multi-Tech Systems has an excellent staff of technical support personnel available to
help you get the most out of your Multi-Tech product. If you have any questions about
the operation of this unit, please call 800 972-2439 (USA and Canada) or 763 785-3500
(international and local). Please have modem information available. You can also contact
Technical Support by e-mail at the following addresses:
U.S., Canada, and Europe: support@multitech.com
France: support@multitech.fr
India: support@multitechindia.com
U.K.: support@multitech.co.uk
Recording Modem Information
Complete the following information about your Multi-Tech modem before calling Technical Support.
Modem Model No.:___________________
Modem Serial No.:____________________
The model and serial numbers are printed on the bottom of the modem.
Note the status of the modem before calling Technical Support. The status includes information about LED indicators, screen messages, diagnostic test results, problems with
a specific application, etc.
Internet Sites
Multi-Tech has a Web site at:
http://www.multitech.com
and an ftp site at:
ftp://ftp.multitech.com
43
E Upgrading the Modem
Appendix E: Upgrading the Modem
Introduction
Your modem is controlled by semi-permanent software, called firmware, which is
stored in flash memory. Firmware is nonvolatile; that is, it remains stored in memory
when the modem is turned off. However, it can be changed by either the
manufacturer or the user as bugs are fixed or new features are added.
Since the firmware in your modem is stored in flash memory, you can upgrade it
yourself in a few minutes by using the following procedures.
Upgrade Overview
The upgrade procedure consists of the following steps, which are described in greater
detail in the following sections.
1. Identify the model number and firmware version of your modem.
2. Identify the current version of the firmware at the Multi-Tech Web site. If your
modem already has the current firmware, there is no need to update it.
3. Download the upgrade file for your modem.
4. Extract the firmware .HEX file and the appropriate flash upgrade program from
the file you downloaded.
5. Document and clear your stored parameters.
6. Upgrade the modem’s firmware using the .HEX file and the flash upgrade
program.
7. Restore your parameters.
Step 1: Identify the Modem Firmware
You must know the model number and firmware version of your Multi-Tech
modem to know whether or not you should update it.
1. Run your favorite terminal program. If you are using Windows 95, 98, 2000 or
Windows NT, you can use HyperTerminal. If you are using Windows 3.1, you
can use Windows Terminal.
2. In the program’s terminal window, type AT&F. Even if you cannot see the
AT&F command on your screen, be sure to type it completely, and then press
ENTER. If the modem does not respond with OK, repeat the AT&F command.
3. Now type ATI3 and record your results. The firmware version should appear
first in the response, which should look similar to the following:
V2.300G-V90_2M_DLS
44
E Upgrading the Modem
Step 2: Identify the Current Firmware Version
Identify the current version of the firmware at the Multi-Tech Web site. If your
modem already has the current firmware, there is no need to update it.
1. Using your favorite Web browser, go to http://www.multitech.com/support/
MultiModemZDX/firmware.asp.
2. Scroll down the table to your modem model number.
3. Look at the firmware version number for your modem.
4. If the firmware version number matches the firmware version number found in
“Step 1: Identify the Modem Firmware,” your modem has the current firmware
version, and does not need to be updated.
5. If the firmware version number is greater than the firmware version number
found in “Step 1: Identify the Modem Firmware,” your modem has an older
firmware version. Continue with “Step 3: Download the Upgrade File.”
Warning: The first digit of the new firmware must match the first digit of the old
firmware, or the modem may not work properly; e.g., if your current firmware
version is 4.16, replace it only with 4.xx firmware, not 6.xx firmware.
Step 3: Download the Upgrade File
1. If you are not already at the MultiModemZDX firmware page of the Multi-Tech
Web site, follow the procedure in “Step 2: Identify the Current Firmware.”
2. Download the upgrade file for your modem by clicking its name, and save the
file in a temporary folder on your hard disk.
3. In the same section of the Web page, download the Flash Wizard utility for your
operating system by clicking it, and save it in the same folder.
Step 4: Extract the Upgrade Files
1. Install the Flash Wizard utility by double-clicking the file name in Windows
Explorer.
2. Extract the upgrade files by double-clicking the file name. The extracted files
include a .HEX file, which contains the upgrade data, and a Readme file.
3. Copy the upgrade .HEX file into the Flash Wizard folder, which, in a default
installation, is at C:\Program Files\MultiTech Systems\Flash Wizard\.
Step 5: Clear Your Stored Parameters
Before you flash your modem, you should record the parameters that are currently
stored in it, so you can reprogram it after flashing. After you have recorded them,
send the AT&F command to the the modem to clear the stored parameters.
1. Run your favorite terminal program. If you are using Windows 95, 98, 2000, or
Windows NT, you can use HyperTerminal.
2. In the program’s terminal window, type AT&V and press ENTER to list your
modem’s current parameters.
3. Record your parameters by saving the screens and sending them to your printer.
45
E Upgrading the Modem
4. Type AT&F and press ENTER to clear your stored parameters and reset your
modem to factory default.
5. Close the terminal program.
Step 6: Upgrade the Modem’s Firmware
Before you begin the following procedure, read the README.TXT file extracted from
the upgrade archive file. Note the file name for the boot code (e.g., 2MBPFL11.S37) and
the file name for the new firmware (e.g., BkQg300G.hex).
Warning: Never install an older version of firmware over a newer version. Doing so
will destroy the Flash PROM! If the Flash PROM is destroyed, the modem must be
sent in for repair.
1. Run Flash Wizard by double-clicking its icon or file name, or by selecting it
from the Start menu. The Identifying Devices dialog box is displayed as Flash
Wizard locates and identifies the devices connected to your system.
Note: If the message ERROR: No valid devices detected is displayed, verify that the
device is powered on and that all cables are correctly and securely attached.
2. Click the modem to be upgraded, and then click Next to proceed.
3. Select the port to be upgraded from the Port list, select the appropriate .HEX file
from the Hex File list, and then click Next to continue.
Note: Do not use FLASHLDR.HEX. This file is used internally by Flash Wizard.
4. The Progress dialog box appears, showing a status bar that indicates the
progress of the upgrade.
Caution: Any disruption of the program during this stage of the upgrade can
cause your modem to become inoperable. Wait for the Next button to become
active before proceeding.
8. When the flash upgrade is complete, the message Programming Complete
appears. Click Next to continue.
9. The Results dialog box appears next. Click Finish to exit Flash Wizard.
Step 7: Restore Your Parameters
Your modem has been updated. You can now open your terminal program to
reprogram your modem parameters or to confirm the update by typing ATI3 in the
terminal window and pressing ENTER.
46
F Installing a Modem in a Linux PC
Appendix F: Installing a Modem in Linux
Introduction
This appendix explains how to install a modem on a PC operating under the RedHat
Linux 6.2 operating system. Other versions of RedHat and other Linux operating
systems should be similar. Briefly, in Linux, you do not need drivers for most
standard external modems and most internal ISA bus modems. Programs in Linux
commonly call upon the port, rather than the modem.
Standard Linux Serial Port Definitions
Port
Com 1
Com 2
Com 3
Com 4
Linux Port
ttyS0
ttyS1
ttyS2
ttyS3
Installation
Connect the external modem to an available serial port.
Setup
This section describes how to make sure Linux can talk to the modem and be able to
dial up to the Internet.
Using the terminal program Minicom to verify operation
1. At the command prompt, type minicom –s and press ENTER.
2. Select Serial port setup and press ENTER.
3. From Serial port setup, use the A key to access Serial Device, and then press
ENTER.
4. Press ESC.
5. You are now in the Minicom terminal. Type AT and press ENTER. The screen
should display OK to verify the operation. Alternately, dial a phone number to
verify line operation
6. To leave Minicom, press CTRL + A, and then press Z.
7. On the help menu, press X to exit.
47
F Installing a Modem in a Linux PC
Using the modem to call the Internet
Linux allows different graphic user interfaces (GUI). In the following steps, we’ll use
the Gnome Desktop GUI and assume that the Internet Service Provider (ISP) you are
calling assigns you the Domain Name Service (DNS) and Internet Protocol (IP)
addresses. For more information on DNS or IP, see the Linux OS owner’s manual or
contact your ISP.
1. On the Task Bar at the bottom of the screen, select the Gnome Footprint.
2. Select Internet from the menu.
3. Select Dialup Configuration Tool.
4. Select Add, and then click Next.
5. Enter the connection name and phone number, and then click Next.
6. Enter your user name and password, and then click Next.
7. Select Normal ISP if your ISP is not listed, and then click Next.
8. Click Finish.
Calling the ISP
1. On the Task Bar at the bottom of the screen, select the Gnome Footprint.
2. Select Internet from the menu.
3. Select RH PPP Dialer.
4. Select the connection name you entered in step 5 of the previous section.
5. Click OK.
That’s basically it. Linux can use different programs and desktops depending on
who made the Linux operating system and what version it is. The above procedures
use the most commonly installed components of Red Hat 6.2. More details can be
found in in the Linux OS owner’s manual.
To use the system for answering calls, Linux requires other programs to be installed,
such as Mgetty, Mgetty+Sendfax and others, depending what you require. Each
vendor of Linux usually has more than adequate information on installing these
programs.
48
Index
Index
49
Index
A
abort timer 37
analog loopback test 62–63
Answer command 20
Asynchronous Communications
Mode command 26
AT commands
#CID 35
$SB 36
%%%AT 30
%C 29
%E 29
%L 29
%Q 30
%U 30
&C 24
&D 24
&E 25
&F 25
&G 25
&J 26
&K 26
&P 26
&Q 26
&S 27
&T 27
&V 28
&V1 28
&W 28
&Y 29
&Z 29
)M 36
** 35
*B 35
*D 35
*H 36
+++AT 34
+MS= 32
+MS=? 32
+MS? 32
-K 34
-Q 34
-SDR 34
-SEC 35
:E 36
@M 36
\A 30
\B 30
\K 31
\N 31
\V 32
A 20
A/ 20
AT 20
B 20
D 20
definition 19
descriptions 20–36
DS= 21
E 21
H 21
I 21
L5 21
M 22
N 22
O 22
P 22
Q 22, 32
Sr 22
Sr= 23
Sr? 23
T 23
V 23, 32
W 23, 32
X 23, 32
Y 24
Z 24
attention code 20
Auto Sync 26
autoanswer 37, 50
autobaud 17
B
backspace character, setting 37
baud rate 17
Bell 212A mode 20
Break Control command 31
break signal 31
C
Call Waiting 49
Caller ID 50, 51
Caller ID command 35
Canadian Limitations Notice 56
carriage return character 37
carrier loss disconnect time, setting
37
COMM.DRV 50, 51
comma, setting pause time 37
communication programs 16, 47
Communication Standard command
20
compression, data 51
configuration
selecting reset configuration 29
storing 28
configuring software 16
Connect Message Control command
23
connect messages 17, 42–44
connecting the modem 7
country code, displaying 21
D
Data Carrier Detect command 24
data compression 51
selection (S46) 40
Data Compression command 25
Data Compression Control command 29
data mode 64
Data Set Ready Control command
27
Data Terminal Ready command 24
DCD Control command 24
default settings 25
Dial command 20
Dial Stored Telephone Number
command 21
dial string modifiers 20
digital loopback tests 63–65
disconnect delay 37
Display Current Configuration
command 28
Display Last Connection Statistics
command 28
Distinctive Ring Control command
34
driver installation 10
DSR Control command 27
DTE rate 17
DTR (Data Terminal Ready)
AT command 24
timeout (S25) 38
DTR dialing 29
E
Echo Command Mode Characters
command 21
EMC, Safety, and R&TTE Directive
Compliance 57
Enable MNP10 Cellular Power
Level Adjustment comma 36
Enable/Disable MNP10-EC command 35
ENTER key 20
error control, setting 40
error correction
disabling 63, 64, 65
Error Correction Mode Selection
command 31
escape character 37
Escape Sequence command 34
escape sequence guard time (S12)
37
F
fallback 22
Fax Branding Statement 56
fax communications 13
FCC Part 15 regulation 54
FCC Part 68 Telecom regulation 55
firmware
displaying version 21
firmware upgrading 69
flash dial modifier (!) 38
flash memory 69
Flash Memory Download command
35
Flash PROM 71
Flash Wizard 71
50
Index
Flash Wizard upgrade utility 70
flow control 51
Flow Control Selection command
26
front panel 13
G
garbage characters 51
Guard Tone Control command 25
H
handshake 22
hangup command 21
hangup delay 37, 39
Hook Control command 21
MNP10 Enable Fallback command
34
MNP10 Initial Cellular Power Level
Setting command 36
MNP10 Link Negotiation Speed
command 36
modem driver installation 10
modem reset
AT command 24
Modem-Initiated Flow Control
command 25
Modulation Handshake command
22
Modulation Selection command 32
Monitor Speaker Mode command
22
N
I
inactivity timer 38
indicators 13, 46
Information Request command 21
initialization strings 16, 47
installation and setup 6–7
installing the modem driver 10
International Modem Restrictions
57
L
LED indicators 13, 46
line connection 7
line feed character 37
Line Quality Monitor command 29
Line Signal Level command 29
Line Signal Quality command 30
Linux OS 73
List Current Operating Parameters
21
Load Factory Settings command
16, 25
local analog loopback test 62–63
local digital loopback test 64–65
Long Space Disconnect command
24
loopback tests 62–65
lost data 51
M
Make/Break Dial Ratio command
26
MNP 5 data compression 29, 50
MNP error correction 31
MNP Extended Services command
34
MNP10 Compromise Equalizer
Enable command 36
New Zealand Telecom Warning
Notice 57
NO CARRIER message (S86) 40
O
on-hook/off-hook 21
P
package contents 3
patch cord for sound card 9
pause time for comma, setting 37
PCM Code Selection command 30
protocols 50
Pulse Dialing command 20
R
rate, maximum data 39
rcording your modem information
68
Read Register Value command 23
redial last number 20
registering your product 67
regulatory compliance 54–58
related manuals 4
remote configuration
escape sequence 30
remote digital loopback test 63–64
removing a modem from Windows
11
Repeat command 20
replacement parts 68
required equipment 6
resetting the modem 24
Result Code Format command 23
Result Code Selection command 23
result codes 41, 42–44, 48
Result Codes Enable/Disable
command 22
Return Online to Data Mode
command 22
rings, setting number of 37
ROM checksum 21
S
S-registers 37–41
reading 23
S0 37
S1 37
S10 37
S11 37
S12 37
S18 27, 38
S19 38
S2 37
S20 38
S25 38
S29 38
S3 37
S30 38
S32 38
S33 38
S36 39
S37 39
S38 39
S4 37
S46 40
S48 40
S5 37
S6 37
S7 37
S8 37
S86 40
S9 37
S95 32, 41
setting 22, 23
safety 6
Select Maximum MNP Block Size
command 30
Select Profile command 29
serial cable 47
serial port 17, 36, 47, 48, 51
Serial Port Baud Rate command 36
servicing your modem 55
Set Pulse Dial as Default 22
Set Register command 22
Set Register Value command 23
Single Line Connect Message
command 32
software, communication 16
solving problems 46–52
sound card 9
sound card connection 9
South African Notice 58
speaker
connection 9
Speaker Mode command 22
speakerphone 9
51
Index
specifications, technical 59–61
speed
maximum 39
serial port 17, 36
Store Current Configuration
command 28
Store Telephone Number command
29
surge protector 8
T
technical specifications 59–61
technical support 68
Telephone Jack Control command
26
telephone line 48
telephone number storing 29
terminal mode 47, 64
test timer (S18) 38
testing the modem 8, 48
fax 13
loopback tests 62–65
Tone Dialing 23
Tone Dialing command 20
Transmit Break command 30
troubleshooting 46–52
wait time for dial tone 37
warranty 55
Windows 2000 48
Windows 3.1 48, 50, 51
Windows 9x 48
Windows NT 48
Windows operating systems 10
X
Xmodem 50
XOFF character (S33) 38
XON character (S32) 38
Y
Ymodem/G protocol 50
Z
Zmodem protocol 50
U
UARTs 17, 50, 51
uninstalling a modem from Windows 11
upgrading firmware 71
upgrading the modem 69
V
V.22 mode 20
V.22bis Guard Tone Control
command 25
V.42 error correction 31
V.42 error correction mode command 25
V.42bis data compression 29
V.54 Test Commands 27
V.54 tests 62–65
V.90 protocol 2
View Delayed Numbers command
35
View Numbers in Blacklist command 35
voice mail 9
W
Wait for new dial tone 20
52