Safety Warnings
• The wiring of your electrical installation is live (230 V) and extremely dangerous. Never
connect the module when plugged into the mains. Always turn off the main switch before
starting the installation.
• This product is for professional use and should be installed by a certified installer.
• To prevent short circuits, this product should only be used inside and only in dry spaces. Do
not expose the components to rain or moisture. Do not use the product close to a bath,
swimming pool etc.
• Do not expose the components of your systems to extremely high temperatures or bright
light sources.
• In case of improper usage or if you have altered and repaired the product yourself, all
guarantees expire. Marmitek does not accept responsibility in the case of improper usage of
the product or when the product is used for purposes other than specified. Marmitek does not
accept responsibility for additional damage other than covered by the legal product
responsibility.
• This product is not a toy. Keep out of reach of children.
• Keep batteries out of the reach of children. Dispose of batteries as chemical waste. Never
use old and new batteries or different types of batteries together. Remove the batteries when
you are not using the system for a longer period of time. Check the polarity (+/-) of the
batteries when inserting them in the product. Wrong positioning can cause an explosion.
• Only connect the adapter to the mains after checking whether the mains voltage is the same
as the values on the identification tags. Never connect an adapter or power cord when it is
damaged. In that case, contact your supplier.
• Automatic switching devices provide comfort, but can also be dangerous. They can surprise
people or can ignite clothing hanging over an electric heat source. Please be careful and take
appropriate measures to avoid accidents.
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© MARMITEK
Table of Contents
Safety Warnings ......................................................................................................................................2
Table of Contents ....................................................................................................................................3
Chapter One: Introduction .......................................................................................................................6
1.1: Documentation Conventions ......................................................................................................6
1.2: Specifications .............................................................................................................................7
1.3: System Overview .......................................................................................................................7
1.4: Hardware Layout ........................................................................................................................9
Chapter Two: System Installation ..........................................................................................................13
2.1: Pre-Installation Planning ..........................................................................................................13
2.2: Installation Procedure ..............................................................................................................14
2.3: Back Tamper............................................................................................................................17
2.4: Installing HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypads ................................................................................17
Chapter Three: Basic System Operation ...............................................................................................19
3.1: Front Panel Layout ...................................................................................................................19
3.2: System Status LEDs ................................................................................................................19
3.3: Front Panel Keypad .................................................................................................................20
3.4: LCD Display .............................................................................................................................20
3.5: Vocal Message Annunciation...................................................................................................21
3.6: HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad..................................................................................................22
3.7: Arming/Disarming.....................................................................................................................23
3.8: Remote Arming/Disarming via SMS.........................................................................................25
3.9: Remote Arming/Disarming via DTMF ......................................................................................26
3.10: LCD Keypad Alarm Activation................................................................................................26
Chapter Four: Advanced System Operation..........................................................................................28
4.1: Menu Navigation ......................................................................................................................28
4.2: Stop Communications ..............................................................................................................28
4.3: Sensor Bypassing/Unbypassing ..............................................................................................29
4.4: User Codes ..............................................................................................................................29
4.5: Follow Me.................................................................................................................................31
4.6: Event Log .................................................................................................................................31
4.7: Service Menu ...........................................................................................................................32
Chapter Five: Telecontrol and Two-Way Audio .....................................................................................37
5.1: Incoming Calls..........................................................................................................................37
5.2: Outgoing Calls..........................................................................................................................39
Chapter Six: X-10 Home Automation Control ........................................................................................42
6.1: Keypad Control ........................................................................................................................42
6.2: Keyfob Control .........................................................................................................................42
6.3: Telephone Control....................................................................................................................42
6.4: Scheduling ...............................................................................................................................43
Chapter Seven: Devices ........................................................................................................................45
7.1: Device Registration ..................................................................................................................45
7.2: Device Descriptors ...................................................................................................................45
7.3: Device Deletion ........................................................................................................................45
7.4: Supervision Time .....................................................................................................................46
7.5: Re-Synchronization ..................................................................................................................46
7.6: Zones .......................................................................................................................................46
7.7: Keyfobs ....................................................................................................................................49
7.8: Keypads ...................................................................................................................................50
7.9: Repeaters.................................................................................................................................51
7.10: Wireless Siren ........................................................................................................................51
7.11: Smartkeys (for future use)......................................................................................................52
Chapter Eight: Entry/Exit Timers and System Tones ............................................................................53
8.1: Entry/Exit Delay........................................................................................................................53
8.2: Arm on Exit...............................................................................................................................53
8.3: Supplementary Entry Delay......................................................................................................53
8.4: Entry Deviation.........................................................................................................................54
ProGuard800™
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8.5: Exit Restart...............................................................................................................................54
8.6: Arming Tones...........................................................................................................................54
8.7: Home Automation Tones .........................................................................................................55
8.8: System Trouble Tones .............................................................................................................55
8.9: Tones Options..........................................................................................................................56
Chapter Nine: System Options ..............................................................................................................57
9.1: Swinger Setting ........................................................................................................................57
9.2: Code Lockout ...........................................................................................................................57
9.3: Arm/Disarm Options.................................................................................................................57
9.4: Panic Alarm..............................................................................................................................59
9.5: AC Loss Delay .........................................................................................................................59
9.6: Display Options ........................................................................................................................60
9.7: PGM Output Options................................................................................................................61
9.8: Guard Code (for future use) .....................................................................................................62
9.9: “No Arm” Indication ..................................................................................................................62
9.10: Jamming Detection ................................................................................................................62
9.11: “No Motion” Time ...................................................................................................................63
9.12: Microphone/Speaker Options.................................................................................................63
9.13: Vocal Messages.....................................................................................................................63
9.14: Installer Access ......................................................................................................................63
9.15: Auto Log View (for future use) ...............................................................................................63
9.16: Daylight Savings ....................................................................................................................64
9.17: Report Fail Trouble ................................................................................................................64
9.18: Cancel Alarm..........................................................................................................................64
9.19: Cross Zoning (for future use) .................................................................................................65
9.20: Verified Fire............................................................................................................................65
9.21: Battery Type ...........................................................................................................................65
Chapter Ten: Communications ..............................................................................................................66
10.1: Monitoring station Reporting ..................................................................................................66
10.2: General Options for Monitoring station Reporting..................................................................67
10.3: Vocal Message Dialler ...........................................................................................................68
10.4: Remote Programming ............................................................................................................70
10.5: Service Call ............................................................................................................................72
10.6: Communications Options .......................................................................................................72
10.7: GSM Options..........................................................................................................................75
10.8: TWA Event Report Options....................................................................................................76
10.9: Event Options for Monitoring station Reporting .....................................................................77
10.10: Vocal Message Dialler Event Options..................................................................................78
Chapter Eleven: X-10 Home Automation Programming ........................................................................80
11.1: X-10 Overview........................................................................................................................80
11.2: HA Units .................................................................................................................................80
11.3: House Code ...........................................................................................................................83
11.4: HA Control..............................................................................................................................83
Chapter Twelve: System Initialization....................................................................................................84
12.1: Initialization ............................................................................................................................84
12.2: Default Program Restore .......................................................................................................84
12.3: Clear User Codes...................................................................................................................84
12.4: Clear Wireless Transmitters...................................................................................................85
12.5: Find Modules..........................................................................................................................85
Appendix A: Menu Structure..................................................................................................................86
Appendix B: Transmitter Installation ......................................................................................................93
PIR Sensors (MS845) .....................................................................................................................93
Magnetic Contact (DS831)..............................................................................................................96
Universal Transmitter (US832)........................................................................................................98
Glass break Sensor (GB843) ..........................................................................................................99
Smoke Detector (SD833) ..............................................................................................................102
Keyfobs (PR811/KR814) ...............................................................................................................103
Wireless Keypads (WK820/RC840) ..............................................................................................104
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© MARMITEK
Transmitter Specifications.............................................................................................................106
Appendix C: Event Table .....................................................................................................................107
Appendix D: Zone Types .....................................................................................................................109
Declaration of Conformity ....................................................................................................................111
ProGuard800™
-5-
Chapter One: Introduction
This manual is designed to help you install the ProGuard800 control panel. We strongly
urge you to read through this manual, in its entirety, before beginning the installation
process so that you can best understand all that this security system has to offer. This
manual is not intended for end user use. End users are encouraged to read the user manual
provided with the system. If you have any questions concerning any of the procedures
described in this manual please look at www.marmitek.com.
1.1: Documentation Conventions
Throughout the manual, we have tried to include all of the operating and programming
functions using a similar structure and order as they appear in the menu. A detailed
explanation of how to navigate the panel’s menu is included in section 4.1: Menu
Navigation. In order to simplify the procedures that appear in the rest of this manual, the
following conventions are used:
This…
Select…
From the Event Log Menu,
select Clear Log.
From the Service menu, select
Time/Date, Set Date.
[7012]
[#5]
3
5. Interface Test
1
Means…
Use the arrow keys to scroll through the options and press
3.
Enter the main menu by pressing 3 and entering your user
code. Using the arrow keys, navigate until you reach Event
Log and press 3. Using the arrow keys, navigate until you
reach Clear Log and press 3.
The same as above only this time you are navigating through
three menu levels.
The shortcut to a specific menu item from the main menu. In
this case, this is the shortcut for Set Date. These appear in
the procedures as an additional aid to menu navigation.
A shortcut to a specific item in a sub-menu. For example,
[#5] is the shortcut to Bell enable disable in the sub-menu
that is opened once you have selected the sensor you want
to program.
The symbol on a key that appears on the keypad
The text that actually appears on the LCD display (bold
italics).
Important note, please pay attention.
Table 1.1: Documentation Conventions
-6-
© MARMITEK
1.2: Specifications
General
Zones: 32 wireless zones (1 transmitter per zone), 1 hardwire zone (Zone 33)
Wireless Keyfobs: 19 (Controlled or Non-controlled)
Wireless Keypads: 4
HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypads: 2 (PROGUARD800-KPD/L), 3 (PROGUARD800-KPD/S)
Repeaters: 4
Smartkeys (future option): 16 (Controlled or Non-controlled)
Wireless Siren: 1 (1-way or 2-way)
User Codes: 32
Arming Methods: Full, Part or Perimeter
Event Log: 256 event capacity, time and date stamped
Communications
Monitoring station Event Reporting Accounts: 3 (8-digit account number)
Vocal Message Accounts: 3
Telephone Numbers: 3 regular, 3 Vocal Message, RP Callback and Service Call
(16-digits each)
Communication Interface Options: PSTN or GSM (optional expansion module required)
Home Automation
Control Medium: Power-line carrier
Protocol: X-10
HA Units: 16 individually addressed
Receiver
Type: Super-heterodyne, fixed frequency
Frequency: 868.35 MHz FM
Data Encryption: SecuriCode™
Electrical
Power Input: 230VAC, 50Hz
Backup Battery Pack: 7.2V/1.5Ah (6 x 1.2V Ni-MH rechargeable cells, size AA)
Fuse Ratings: 63mA/250V (AC protection fuse), 1A/250V (battery protection fuse)
PGM Relay Output Contact Rating: 100mA (max. load)
Built-in Siren: 105dB or 85dB
Tamper Switch: N.C.
Operating Temperature: 0-60°C
1.3: System Overview
The ProGuard800 is a full-featured wireless control panel that is expected to provide a
solution to the needs of most residential installations. This system has been developed
based upon a design concept geared towards easy installation and use. With this in mind,
the user interface is based on a simple, menu-driven model that suits the essential
requirements of both the user and installer alike. You can program the ProGuard800 on-site
using the on-board LCD keypad or off-site via a PC using the up/downloading software.
Monitoring station communication and up/downloading employ either regular PSTN or highspeed cellular communication. SMS messaging provides an innovative method used for both
monitoring station and Follow-me user monitoring. Additionally, SMS messages can be sent
to the panel enabling the user to send commands to the system from anywhere on the
planet.
ProGuard800™
-7-
The panel’s home automation capabilities provide a wealth of features. The Home
Automation module interfaces with X-10 units over the powerline network and grants the
user appliance control via a number of different media.
The following diagram shows the components that make up the system and the system’s
interaction with external communication networks.
Figure 1.1: System Architecture
-8-
© MARMITEK
1.4: Hardware Layout
The aim of this section is to acquaint you with the various circuit boards that make up the
system. Apart from the Main Board, each peripheral module is available as an optional
extra designed for installation inside the plastic housing.
Figure 1.2: System Layout
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Main Board
PSTN dialer module (optional)
Home Automation module (optional)
Cellular communications module (optional)
Backup battery pack
ProGuard800™
-9-
1.4.1: The Main Board
The Main Board is the brain of the system and connects to various peripheral modules
using a number of interface connectors. Additionally, the Main Board includes a
programmable output, a hardwire zone input and a USB port for PC programming.
Figure 1.3: Main Board
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
-10-
USB port for connection to PC
DIP-switch for flash programming
Connector for on-board transmitter
Flat-cable interface connector to PSTN module
Auxiliary power output (AC Operated:10-15V, Battery Operated: 68V)
Programmable relay output (100mA max. load)
Hardwire zone (Zone 33)
Status LED
Interphone module connector
Flash programming connector for main board
HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad terminal block
Flat-cable interface connector to LCD keypad, built-in speaker,
microphone and siren
Front tamper switch
Programming keypad connector (optional)
Interface connector to Home Automation module
AC power terminal block
Home Automation module terminal block
AC power protection fuse
Backup battery protection fuse
Flat-cable interface connector to GSM module
Backup battery connector
Additional backup battery connector
© MARMITEK
1.4.2: PSTN Module
The PSTN module provides the system with a standard dialer for communication via the
Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN).
1
Do not use VoIP phone lines for communication to the central monitoring station. In certain
cases the system may not transmit alarm signals successfully over the VoIP network.
Alternative
Telephone
Line Socket
Option
Figure 1.4: PSTN Module
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Status LED
Flash programming connector
Telephone line terminal block (Terminals 1 & 2: Incoming line from
telephone company, Terminals 3 & 4: Outgoing line to telephone)
Flat-cable interface connector to Main Board
Telephone socket for incoming line from telephone company
Telephone socket for outgoing line to telephone
1.4.3: Home Automation Module
The Home Automation module provides the system with an interface to the power-line
network, enabling control over 16 home automation units employing the X-10 protocol.
Figure 1.5: Home Automation Module
1.
2.
3.
Interface connector to Main Board
Flash programming connector
Power-line terminal connections to Main Board (1 - Neutral; 2 - Live)
ProGuard800™
-11-
1.4.4: Cellular Communications Module
The Cellular Communications module enables the control panel to communicate via
cellular networks. This offers the ability to send or receive SMS messages, perform
up/downloading, implement cellular 2-way voice applications.
Figure 1.6: Cellular Communications Module
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
-12-
SIM card holder
SIM card release
Status LED
Flash programming connector
Flat-cable interface connector to Main Board
© MARMITEK
Chapter Two: System Installation
The following chapter explains how to install the system and provides guidelines and tips
on how to optimize the installation. It is recommended that you familiarize yourself with
the various circuit boards that make up the system – see 1.4: Hardware Layout.
2.1: Pre-Installation Planning
Before starting the installation procedure, it is worthwhile to draw a rough sketch of the
building and determine the required position for the control panel and each wireless device.
When deciding on the placement for installation, consider the following:
x
Mount the control panel in a location with easy access to telephone and power
connections.
x
If installing with the GSM Cellular Communications module, the control panel
should be mounted in a position where the GSM signal is strong.
x
Refer to the following section in order to choose the optimal location for
wireless devices in relation to the control panel.
2.1.1: Wireless Installation Guidelines
In order to optimize wireless communication, consider the following guidelines:
x
Whenever possible, mount the panel centrally in relation to wireless
sensors.
x
Avoid installation in close proximity to sources of high noise or radio
frequency interference. For example, metal air conditioner/heater ducts
and circuit breaker boxes.
x
Minimize the distance between the panel and transmitters.
x
Minimize the number of obstacles between the panel and transmitters.
Figure 2.1: Minimizing Obstacles
x
Metal based construction materials, such as steel reinforced concrete
walls, reduce the range of radio transmissions.
Figure 2.2: Considering Construction Materials
ProGuard800™
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x
The reduction of the RF signals’ strength is directly proportional to the
thickness of the obstacle, assuming that the obstacles are of identical
material.
Figure 2.3: Considering Thickness of Obstacles
2.2: Installation Procedure
After unpacking the kit and making certain that you have all the necessary equipment, it
is recommended that you install the system as follows:
STEP 1: Open the housing.
STEP 2: Temporarily power up the system.
STEP 3: Register the transmitters.
STEP 4: Test the chosen mounting location.
STEP 5: Permanently install the control panel and transmitters.
2.2.1: Step 1 – Opening the Housing
To open the housing:
1. Remove the housing screw located
at the bottom of the front cover.
2. Using a screwdriver carefully
press the release tabs as shown
in Figure 2.4.
3. Lift the front cover away from the
back of the housing. You will
notice that the front cover is
attached to the back with
two fastening bands and the
keypad’s flat cable.
Housing
Screw
Figure 2.4: Opening the Housing
2.2.2: Step 2 – Powering Up the System
In order to register and test transmitters, it is necessary to temporarily power up the system
before installing the control panel. At this stage, do not connect the backup battery.
Thread the power cable through the wiring hole on the back cover and connect the cable to
the AC power input on the Main board. For the exact location of the AC power input, see
section 1.4.1: The Main Board. Close the front cover and apply AC power. At this stage,
ignore any trouble conditions that may appear on the LCD display (e.g. Low Battery).
-14-
© MARMITEK
2.2.3: Step 3 – Registering Transmitters
For the control panel to recognize a device, its transmitter must be registered. In general
terms, transmitter registration means sending two transmissions from a device when the
control panel is in “Registration” mode.
To register a device:
1. Press 3.
2. Enter your Installer code (the default Installer code is 1111).
3. Enter 91 (Programming, Devices) to enter the Devices menu.
4. Press the menu navigation keys (/), until the type of device you
want to register appears on the LCD display (e.g. Zones or Keypads).
5. Press 3.
6. Press the menu navigation keys (/), until the exact device you
want to register appears on the LCD display (e.g. Zone 3 or Keypad 2).
7. Press 3. If a device has not been registered at the chosen location,
the control panel initiates Registration mode. During Registration
mode, the system waits for two transmissions from the device.
a device has already been registered at the required location, the system will not initiate
1 IfRegistration
mode. If the device has already been registered at another location, attempts
to register are ignored by the system.
8.
9.
10.
Send two transmissions from the device – refer to each device’s
installation instructions in Appendix B for further details.
When Save? is displayed on the control panel’s LCD, press 3. The
display automatically switches to the next option for that device. For
example, pressing 3 to confirm Zone registration automatically moves
you to the Zone Type option.
Continue entering other parameters for the chosen device.
2 returns you to the previous menu level. Press 2when you are in the Main menu
1 Pressing
(Menu Level 1) to exit menu mode.
2.2.4: Step 4 – Testing the Chosen Mounting Location
Once all of the transmitters are registered, it is recommended that you test the chosen
mounting locations before permanently mounting the control panel and wireless devices. You
can test the transmitter signal strength using the TX Test feature.
To test transmitter signal strength.
1. Press 3.
2. Enter your Installer code.
3. Enter 7072 (Service, Transmitters, TX Test) to initiate TX Test mode.
4. Activate the transmitter you wish to test; the transmitter’s details appear
on the control panel’s LCD. Additionally, between one and four tones are
sounded to indicate the transmitter’s signal strength. If four tones are
sounded, the transmitter is in the best possible location – see 4.7.7:
Transmitters for further information.
5. After you have tested each transmitter, press 2 to exit TX Test mode.
If installing with the GSM Cellular Communications module, test the GSM signal strength
using the system’s RSSI meter.
To test the GSM signal strength:
1. Press 3.
2. Enter your Installer code.
ProGuard800™
-15-
3.
Enter 709 (Service, GSM Signal); the signal strength of the cellular
network is displayed – see 4.7.9: GSM Signal Strength for further
information.
2.2.5: Step 5 – Installing the Control Panel and Transmitters
Having chosen and tested the mounting location of the control panel and each
transmitter, you are now ready to permanently install the system.
To permanently install the transmitters, refer to each device’s installation instructions (in
Appendix B of this manual or supplied individually with each product).
To install the control panel:
1. Disconnect AC power from the control panel.
2. Open the housing as explained in section 2.2.1: Step 1 – Opening the
Housing.
3. Remove the backup battery pack. If you want to install the control
panel with back tamper, it is also necessary to disconnect the flat cable
connecting the Main board to the front panel keypad and remove the
Main board. Figure 2.5 shows the control panel with the Main board
and the battery pack removed.
Upper
Mounting
Hole
Upper
Mounting
Hole
Location of
Back Tamper
Screw
Lower
Mounting
Hole
Lower
Mounting
Hole
Figure 2.5: Back Cover (Main Board and Battery Pack removed)
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
-16-
Place the control panel in position against the wall and mark the upper
and lower mounting holes. If using the back tamper, also mark the hole
for the back tamper screw.
Install wall anchors in the appropriate positions.
Thread any required cables through the wiring hole on the back cover
(e.g. AC power and telephone line) and make any necessary wiring
connections.
Connect the power cable to the AC power input on the Main board –
see 1.4.1: The Main Board.
Connect the telephone line to the Telephone Line terminal block on the PSTN
module – see 1.4.2: PSTN Module.
Connect any additional HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypads if required – see 2.4:
Installing HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypads.
© MARMITEK
10.
1
11.
12.
13.
1
14.
15.
16.
Mount the control panel to the wall using four screws and insert the back tamper
screw if required – see 2.3: Back Tamper.
The control panel shall be mounted so that it shall withstand a force of at least three times
its own weight.
Replace the Main Board and reconnect its peripheral modules.
Connect the flat cable connecting the Main board to the front panel keypad and
the replace the front cover’s fastening bands.
Apply AC power.
Always connect AC power before connecting the battery pack. Batteries are supplied
uncharged. When you first connect the battery, it is probable that the system will display a
Low Battery condition. Allow the battery to charge for at least 18 hours before use.
Connect the battery pack to the connector on the Main Board.
Position the front cover’s top holding hooks onto the back cover and snap the
front cover closed.
After installing the control panel, perform the Find Modules function – see 12.5:
Find Modules.
2.3: Back Tamper
The back tamper switch is an optional feature that provides an extra
safeguard in the event that the control panel is removed from the wall.
Figure 2.6: Perforated
Back Tamper Release
The back tamper switch is located on the rear side of the control
panel’s Main Board and is constantly depressed by the section of the
back cover shown in Figure 2.6.
For this feature to operate, you must insert a screw into the back tamper mounting hole –
see section 2.2.5: Step 5 – Installing the Control Panel and Transmitters. When the
control panel is removed from the wall, the screw causes the perforated section of the
plastic to break and remain attached to the wall. As a result, the back tamper switch is
released and an alarm is generated.
2.4: Installing HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypads
The system supports HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypads that may be installed up to 300m
from the control panel.
Flash Programming
Connector
Terminal
Block
LCD Contrast
Potentiometer
Tamper
Switch
Figure 2.7: HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad (back cover off)
ProGuard800™
-17-
To install HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypads.
1. Disconnect all power, both AC and battery, from the control panel.
2. Remove the back cover of the keypad. To do so, press the two snaps
(located at the bottom of the keypad) using a small flat-head
screwdriver and carefully pull the back cover away from the front of the
housing.
3. Place the back cover of the keypad in position against the wall and
mark the upper and lower mounting holes.
4. Install wall anchors in the appropriate positions.
5. Thread the cable from the control panel through the wiring hole on the
back cover and attach the back cover to the wall using four screws.
6. Connect the terminal block on the keypad to the appropriate terminal
block on the control panel’s main board as shown in Figure 2.8.
Figure 2.8: Connections for HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad
7.
8.
9.
10.
-18-
Reapply power to the control panel.
Set the keypad address as follows:
a. Make certain the keypad’s tamper switch is open.
b. On the keypad, press keys 1, 3 and 5
simultaneously.
c. Use the arrow keys (/) to select the keypad
address.
d. Press 3.
Position the front cover’s top holding hooks onto the back cover and
snap the front cover closed.
After installing hardwire keypads, perform the Find Modules function – see
12.5: Find Modules.
© MARMITEK
Chapter Three: Basic System Operation
3.1: Front Panel Layout
The front panel provides a detailed interface for operating and programming the system.
The following diagram will familiarize you with the various elements on the front panel.
LCD
Display
System
Status
LEDs
Arming
Keys
Menu
Navigation
Keys
Alphanumeric
Keypad
Figure 3.1: Front Panel
3.2: System Status LEDs
The two LEDs, Armed and Power, provide essential information on the status of the
system.
If the Armed LED is…±
Off
On
Flashing
It means…
The system is disarmed.
The system is armed.
An alarm has occurred. Alarm indication is cleared the next time
that an arming sequence is initiated or after the relevant event has
been viewed in the event log.
Table 3.1: Armed LED Indication
1
Alarm indication is not displayed after a silent panic alarm.
If the Power LED is… a
Off
On
Flashing (slow)
Backup battery low or low battery from transmitters.
Flashing (fast)
AC loss.
It means…
Both AC and Battery power are disconnected.
System Power is OK.
Table 3.2: Power LED Indication
ProGuard800™
-19-
3.3: Front Panel Keypad
The alphanumeric keypad on the front panel enables you to perform various operation
and programming tasks. Apart from the regular functions of a standard alphanumeric
keypad, the keypad offers a number of special functions. These functions are listed in the
following table.
Key
1
0
2
3
Special function
Used to enter symbols in descriptor editing.
Used to enter symbols in descriptor editing.
Used to cancel the current selection.
Used to return to the previous menu level.
Used to enter Menu mode.
Used to select the current menu item.
Used to signify the end of an entered value.
Toggles status in Zone Bypass/Unbypass function.
Used to switch Home Automation units on.
In descriptor editing, used to insert a space before the current character.
In phone number editing, used to enter “T”, “,”, “P”, “+”, “*”, “#”.
In account number editing, used to enter Hexadecimal digits (A-F).
Toggles item descriptors and default names.
In the event log, toggles the time/date stamp.
Toggles AM and PM when setting the time in 12hr format.
Used to switch Home Automation units off.
In descriptor and phone number editing, used to delete the current character.
Used to scroll backwards in the current menu level.
For Global Chime and Message Center features, used to access shortcuts.
+ (Global Chime shortcut)
+ 2 (Record Message shortcut)
+ 3 (Play Message shortcut)
Used to scroll forwards in the current menu level.
During standby, used to scroll through the list of system trouble conditions.
Table 3.3: Front Panel Keypad Functions
3.4: LCD Display
The LCD display provides you with a detailed interface for operation and programming.
3.4.1: Standby Mode
Standby mode can be defined as the state the
system is in when it is disarmed and not in Menu
mode. In Standby mode, the armed status,
system status or banner are displayed. If system
status is normal, the current time is displayed.
-20-
DISARMED
11:22:02
Figure 3.2: Typical Standby Display
© MARMITEK
This…
DISARMED
FULL ARMED
PART ARMED
PERIMETER ARMED
FULL ARMING
PART ARMING
PERIMETER ARMING
PART ARMED INST
PERIM ARMED INST
PART ARMING INST
PERI ARMING INST
Means…
The system is disarmed.
The system has been armed using the displayed arming method.
The system is in the process of arming (displayed during exit delay).
The system has been armed using the displayed arming method with
the Instant arm feature activated.
The system is in the process of arming with the Instant arm feature
activated.
Table 3.4: Armed Status
This…
ZONES IN ALARM
TAMPER ALARM
56 TO EXIT
11 TO DISARM
SYSTEM NOT READY
KEYPAD LOCKED
SYSTEM TROUBLE
Means…
Zones have been violated.
The system has been tampered with.
The exit delay is counting down (56 seconds remaining).
The entry delay is counting down (11 seconds remaining).
The system is not ready to arm, check that all doors and windows
are closed.
Five unsuccessful attempts were made to enter a user code, the
keypad is locked for 30 minutes.
A trouble condition has been detected, press for further details.
Table 3.5: System Status
3.4.2: System Trouble Tones
In the event of system trouble, the ProGuard800 sounds a series of tones to alert the user.
To silence these tones, press and scroll through the system trouble list displayed on the
LCD. When the trouble condition is restored, it is removed from the system trouble list.
1
For this feature to function, Trouble Tones must be enabled in programming
– see 8.8.1: Trouble Tones.
System trouble tones are not sounded from 10:00pm to 7:00am so as not to disturb
household members who may be asleep. However, you can program the system to
immediately annunciate telephone trouble at all times – see 8.8.2: Telephone Trouble Tones.
3.5: Vocal Message Annunciation
Certain versions of the ProGuard800 hardware, support vocal annunciation of system
status. If this feature is enabled in programming (see 9.13: Vocal Messages), the system
plays short messages to indicate arming, disarming, bypassed zones, system trouble,
water alarm and message waiting.
1 The availability of the Vocal Message annunciation feature is hardware dependent.
ProGuard800™
-21-
3.6: HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad
In addition to the front panel keypad, you can install up to three, individually addressed,
HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypads (or two keypads with large LCD). The layout of the
HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad is similar to the front panel keypad and most of the
functionality is identical. The following diagram shows the layout of the HK855 Keypad.
LCD
Display
System
Status
LEDs
Menu
Navigation
Keys
Alphanumeric
Keypad
Arming
Keys
Menu
Navigation
Keys
Figure 3.3: HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad (PROGUARD800-KPD/S)
As with the front panel keypad, the HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad also provides a
number of special functions that are listed in the following table.
Key
1
0
2
3
FULL
PART
Special function
Used to enter symbols in descriptor editing.
Used to enter symbols in descriptor editing.
Used to cancel the current selection.
Used to return to the previous menu level.
Used to enter Menu mode.
Used to select the current menu item.
Used to signify the end of an entered value.
Toggles status in Zone Bypass/Unbypass function.
Used to arm the system fully.
In descriptor editing, used to insert a space before the current character.
In phone number editing, used to enter “T”, “,”, “P”, “+”, “*”, “#”.
In account number editing, used to enter Hexadecimal digits (A-F).
Toggles item descriptors and default names.
In the event log, toggles the time/date stamp.
Toggles AM and PM when setting the time in 12hr format.
Used to arm the system partially (Part or Perimeter).
In descriptor and phone number editing, used to delete the current character.
Used to scroll backwards in the current menu level.
Used to access the Global Chime shortcut ( + ).
Used to scroll forwards in the current menu level.
During standby, used to scroll through the list of system trouble conditions.
Table 3.6: HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad Special Functions
-22-
© MARMITEK
3.7: Arming/Disarming
The following section explains how to arm and disarm the control panel using the LCD
keypad.
The ProGuard800 offers three arming modes that you can define to suit the application.
Figure 3.4 illustrates the three arming modes. In each diagram, the protected area is shaded.
Full
Part
Perimeter
Figure 3.4: Arming Modes
The arming options are entirely flexible. You can program each sensor to be included in
any combination of the three arming modes – see section 7.6.2: Arm Set. Additionally,
each arming mode has a separate exit and entry delay.
The arming functions are only available while the system is in Standby mode.
3.7.1: Arming Keys
The Arming keys enable you to arm the system using any of the three arming methods:
Full, Part and Perimeter.
Full
Part
Perimeter
Figure 3.5: Arming Keys
3.7.2: Full Arming
Full arming is designed for when the occupant vacates the premises.
To fully arm the system:
1. Check if the system is ready to arm.
2. Press the Full arming key on the keypad.
3. If One-Key Arming is disabled, enter your user code. See 9.3.2: OneKey Arming
3.7.3: Part Arming
Part arming is designed for when the occupant intends to remain inside one part of the
premises and secure another part.
ProGuard800™
-23-
To partially arm the system using the front panel keypad:
1. Check if the system is ready to arm.
2. Press the Part arming key on the keypad.
3. If One-Key Arming is disabled, enter your user code.
To partially arm the system using the HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad:
1. Check if the system is ready to arm.
2. Press PART on the keypad.
3. Select Part arming.
4. If One-Key Arming is disabled, enter your user code.
3.7.4: Perimeter Arming
Perimeter arming is designed for when the occupant intends to remain inside the
premises and secure the perimeter.
To arm the system’s perimeter using the front panel keypad:
1. Check if the system is ready to arm.
2. Press the Perimeter arming key on the keypad.
3. If One-Key Arming is disabled, enter your user code.
To arm the system’s perimeter using the HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad:
1. Check if the system is ready to arm.
2. Press PART on the keypad
3. Select Perimeter arming.
4. If One-Key Arming is disabled, enter your user code.
3.7.5: Combination Arming
The system allows you to activate a combination of two arming modes. If you Perimeter
arm the system, you may also activate Full or Part arming. Likewise, you can Perimeter
arm the system after activating Full or Part arming. It is not important which arming mode
you choose first.
You can activate the second arming mode during the exit delay of the first arming mode.
If the first exit delay expires, you cannot activate a second arming mode.
To arm the system using two arming modes:
1. Check if the system is ready to arm.
2. Activate the first arming mode.
3. If One-Key Arming is disabled, enter your user code.
4. While the exit delay of the first arming mode is counting down, activate
the second arming mode.
5. If One-Key Arming is disabled, enter your user code.
1
It is not possible to activate Full and Part arming modes simultaneously.
It is necessary to disarm first when changing from one arming mode to another arming mode.
The exit delays of the two arming modes are entirely independent. The moment an arming
mode is activated, its exit delay begins to count down. The entry delay depends on which
sensor was tripped first. For example, if the sensor is included in Full arming, the entry
delay for Full arming counts down – see 7.6.2: Arm Set. If the sensor is included in both
activated arming modes, the entry delay for Perimeter arming counts down.
If, due to open zones, the system is not ready to activate the second arming mode then
both arming methods are cancelled. In this case, check that the relevant entrances are
secured and start the entire arming sequence again.
-24-
© MARMITEK
Disarming cancels both active arming modes.
3.7.6: Forced Arming
Forced arming enables you to arm the system when the system is not ready. For
example, if a door protected by a magnetic contact is open, you may arm the system on
condition that the door will be closed by the end of the Exit delay. If the door is still open
after the exit delay expires, an alarm is generated.
Two conditions enable you to perform Forced arming:
x
Forced arming is enabled – see section 9.3.1: Forced Arm.
x
The sensor that is causing the System Not Ready condition is Force
Arm enabled – see section 7.6.5: Force Arm.
3.7.7: Instant Arming
Instant arming is a feature that allows you to cancel the entry delay after Part or
Perimeter arming the system. For this feature to function, it must be enabled in
programming – see 9.3.4: Instant Arm.
To instantly arm the system.
1. Check if the system is ready to arm.
2. Press the Part or Perimeter arming key on the keypad and enter your
user code if One-Key Arming is disabled.
3. Press and hold down on your keypad until the message Instant
Arming, OK? is displayed
4. Press 3; the exit delay for the current arming period is cancelled.
3.7.8: Disarming
When a sensor is tripped, the entry delay counts down; each arming method has its own
entry delay.
To disarm the system:
x
Enter a valid user code.
1
If the Cancel Alarm feature is enabled (see 9.18: Cancel Alarm), disarming the system
within five minutes of an alarm causes the control panel to send an Alarm Cancelled event
to the monitoring station. In this case, a message is displayed on the keypads’ LCD and
the control panel does not allow any local function to be performed until 9 is pressed for
confirmation.
3.8: Remote Arming/Disarming via SMS
You can arm and disarm the system remotely by sending the SMS commands from a
cellular phone to the cellular communications module. Additionally, you can check the
arm status of the system by sending an Arm Status request message.
Each SMS command contains the following elements:
X
Y
Z
[
SMS Command Descriptor (up to 43 characters of free text)
# (delimiter – separates the descriptor from the actual command)
User Code (4 digits)
Command (120=Disarm, 121=Full Arm, 122=Part Arm, 123=Perimeter Arm,
124=Full + Perimeter Arm, 125=Part + Perimeter Arm, 200 = Arm Status)
The following example shows the format of an SMS command for arming the system:
ProGuard800™
-25-
X
F
1
u
L
l
Y
A
r
m
Z
#
1
2
[
3
4
1
2
1
While the SMS Command Descriptor is optional, you must start the SMS command with
the # symbol for the system to accept the command.
After an SMS command is executed by the system, you can program the system to
return a confirmation message to the sender – see 10.7.5: SMS Confirmation.
3.8.1: Arm Status Reply
On receiving an Arm Status request message, the system returns a status message to
the sender. This message includes the system status and the descriptor of the user or
the device used to arm/disarm the system.
The following example shows an Arm Status reply where the system has been fully
armed by a user named Mark.
F
U
L
L
A
R
M
E
D
-
M
A
R
K
3.9: Remote Arming/Disarming via DTMF
Using the Telecontrol feature, you can fully arm and disarm the system via the telephone
with DTMF commands. For further information on the Telecontrol features, see Chapter
Five: Telecontrol and 5.1.5: Arm/Disarm DTMF Commands.
3.10: LCD Keypad Alarm Activation
In the event of an emergency, the user can generate three kinds of alarm from the front panel
keypad and the HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypads.
To activate an SOS alarm from the front panel keypad:
x
Press both Home Automation keys simultaneously.
Figure 3.6: SOS Alarm Activation (front panel keypad)
To activate an SOS alarm from the HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad:
x
Press 2 and 3 simultaneously.
Figure 3.7: SOS Alarm Activation (HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad)
To activate a Fire alarm from the front panel or HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad:
x
Press keys 1 and 3 simultaneously.
-26-
© MARMITEK
Figure 3.8: Fire Alarm Activation
To activate a Medical alarm from the front panel or HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad:
x
Press keys 4 and 6 simultaneously.
Figure 3.9: Medical Alarm Activation
ProGuard800™
-27-
Chapter Four: Advanced System Operation
Besides the basic arming functions described in the previous chapter, you can access
additional functions via the menu. This chapter describes these functions and the menu
navigation procedure.
4.1: Menu Navigation
Alphanumeric
Keypad
Menu
Navigation
Keys
HA Off Key
HA On Key
Service Call Key
Figure 4.1: On-board Keypad Layout
The LCD keypad’s friendly, menu-driven interface is designed to facilitate operation and
provide a gentler learning curve for first-time users. You can navigate through the menus
using the arrow navigation keys (/) and make simple yes/no decisions using the
3and 2 keys.
For example, perform the following procedure to navigate to Service, Interface Test.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Press 3 to enter Menu mode.
Enter an authorized user code; the first menu item, 1. Stop Comm., is
displayed.
Press until 7. Service is displayed.
Press 3 to enter the Service menu.
Press until 5. Interface Test is displayed.
Press 3 to choose the displayed function.
As an alternative to scrolling through menu options, you may enter a function’s shortcut
once you have entered Menu mode. Shortcut numbers appear in square brackets in the
procedures throughout this manual.
1
Press the 2 key to return to the previous menu level. Press this key when you are in the
main menu to exit Menu mode.
4.1.1: Menu Mode Timeout
Menu mode automatically terminates a certain amount of time after the last keystroke.
The duration of this timeout depends upon which code is used to enter the menu. Usually
the Menu Mode Timeout is two minutes but if you enter menu mode using the Installer
code, the timeout is extended to fifteen minutes.
4.2: Stop Communications
To stop communications:
x
From the main menu, select Stop Com. [1]; all communication buffers
are cleared and all pending messages are cancelled.
-28-
© MARMITEK
4.3: Sensor Bypassing/Unbypassing
When a sensor is bypassed, it is ignored by the system and does not generate an alarm
when triggered.
To bypass or unbypass a sensor:
1. From the Bypass Zones menu, select Bypass/Unbyp. [21].
2. Using the arrow keys, scroll to the sensor you want to bypass or
unbypass.
3. Press 3 to change the bypass status.
4. Press 2; Save Changes? is displayed.
5. Press 3 to confirm the changed bypass status.
To unbypass all sensors:
1. From the Bypass Zones menu, select Unbypass All [22].
2. Press 3; all sensors are unbypassed
1
All bypassed zones are automatically unbypassed when the system is disarmed.
A fire zone cannot be bypassed.
4.4: User Codes
The control panel supports up to 32 individual user codes. Each of these codes is four
digits long. Most system operations require you to enter a valid user code. The ability to
perform an operation is defined by your user code’s authorization level. These
authorization levels are pre-defined for each code as explained below.
Code 1: Master Code
The Master code is the highest user authorization level. With the Master code, you can
edit all other user codes except the Installer code, the Guard code and the Monitoring
station TWA Code. Additionally, the Master code grants access to the Event Log, the
Service menu and Home Automation Schedule programming. The Master code is a
“controlled” code. Arming and disarming using this code causes the panel to notify the
monitoring station with an Arm/Disarm event message * .
1
The default Master code is 1234. Change this code immediately after installing the
system!
Codes 2-19: Controlled Codes
When you use a controlled user code for arming and disarming, the panel notifies the
monitoring station with an Arm/Disarm event message.
Codes 20-25: Non-controlled Codes
Non-controlled codes do not cause the panel to send Arm/Disarm event messages to the
monitoring station. The panel sends a Disarm message only if you use this code to
disarm the system after an alarm occurrence.
Codes 26-27: Limited Codes
A Limited code enables the user to issue a code that is valid for one day only. This code
automatically expires 24 hours after it has been programmed. These codes are
“controlled” in that their use for Arm/Disarm is notified to the monitoring station.
*
Only if arm/disarm reporting is enabled during System Programming
ProGuard800™
-29-
Code 28: Duress Code
The Duress code is designed for situations where the user is being forced to operate the
system. This user code grants access to the selected operation, while sending a Duress
event message to the monitoring station.
Code 29: Telecontrol Code
The Telecontrol code is designed to enable the user to perform a number of tasks via their
telephone using DTMF commands. Using this code, the user can call their system to arm
and disarm, control HA Units, cancel siren activation or establish Two-Way Audio
communication.
Code 30: Monitoring station TWA Code
The Monitoring station TWA code is designed to enable the monitoring station operator
to establish Two-Way Audio communication with the control panel after an alarm. This
code is valid for use for the first ten minutes after an alarm has occurred. This code can
only be used for this specific purpose and does not grant access to any additional system
functions such as disarming.
Code 31: Guard Code (for future use)
The Guard Code is a future option that is not available in the current firmware.
Code 32: Installer Code
The Installer code grants access to the Programming menu and the Service menu.
Additionally, this code enables you to view and clear the Event Log.
1
The default Installer code is 1111. Change this code immediately after installing the
system!
4.4.1: Editing User Codes
To edit a user code:
1. From the main menu select, User Codes [4].
2. Select the code you want to edit.
3. From the code’s sub-menu, select Edit Code [#1]; the 4-digit code is
displayed with the cursor flashing on the first digit.
4. Edit the code.
5. Press 3; the new code is stored in the memory.
1
If you enter a code that is identical to an existing user code, the panel sounds an error
tone and the new code is not accepted.
Codes 1-29 can be edited only by the Master code. The Installer code, Guard Code and
the Monitoring station TWA Code can be edited only by the installer.
4.4.2: Deleting User Codes
To delete a user code:
1. From the main menu select, User Codes [4].
2. Select the code you want to delete.
3. From the code’s sub-menu, select Edit Code [#1]; the 4-digit code is
displayed with the cursor flashing on the first digit.
4. Enter 0000.
5. Press 3; the code is deleted.
1
-30-
The Installer and Master codes cannot be deleted.
© MARMITEK
4.4.3: User Code Descriptors
Each user code can be assigned a 16-character descriptor. These descriptors help to
identify users in the event log and in SMS Follow Me messages.
To edit a code descriptor:
1. From the main menu, select User Codes [4].
2. Select a code.
3. From the code’s sub-menu, select Descriptor [#2].
4. Edit the descriptor using the alphanumeric keypad.
5. Press 3 when you have finished editing.
4.5: Follow Me
The Follow Me feature is designed to notify the user that certain events have occurred.
The events that are sent to the Follow Me telephone number are those events that the
user is authorized to view in the event log; events that can be viewed only by the installer
are not sent to the Follow Me number – see Appendix C: Event Table. If using the TWA
Follow Me feature, the audio channel is opened after alarm events only.
To edit the Follow Me number:
1. From the main menu, select Follow Me [5].
2. Enter a telephone number for Follow Me communication. If using the
SMS Follow Me feature, this number must be for a cellular phone with
the capability to receive SMS messages.
1
You may only access Follow Me programming if the protocol for Account 3 is programmed
as SMS or TWA Follow Me.
4.6: Event Log
The event log records the last 256 events the system has undergone. The log uses the
FIFO (First In, First Out) method, automatically erasing the oldest event when the log is full.
To view the event log:
1. From the Event Log menu, select View Log [61]; a summarized version of
the most recent event is displayed. Press the key to view the time/date
stamp or the device/user number on the second row of the display.
2. Use the arrow keys to scroll through the events.
3. When you have finished viewing, press 2to exit the log.
The event log displays the following information for each event:
x
The event descriptor – a brief
X
description of the event that occurred.
FIRE ALARM
x
The zone where the event occurred.
Y14/11/07 12:34 R Z
x
Time/date stamp – the exact time the
event occurred.
X Event Descriptor
x
Report details – a single character
Y Time/Date Stamp
indicating whether the event was
Z Report Details
reported to the monitoring station. The
Figure 4.2: Detailed Event Log Display
options available are R: Report Sent,
F: Report Failed, C: Report Cancelled
or N: No Report.
ProGuard800™
-31-
Figure 4.2 shows the detailed event log entry for a Fire alarm on November 14th 2007.
The event was successfully reported to the monitoring station.
4.6.1: Event Log Authorization Levels
Every event that occurs is recorded in the event log. However, certain events are
intended for the installer only. Those events include various service messages that are of
little interest to the regular user. The View Log function requires you to enter either the
Master or Installer code. The events that are displayed depend on which code you use to
enter the log – see Appendix C: Event Table.
4.6.2: Clearing the Event Log
The Clear Log function erases all events from the log. After performing this function, a
Clear Log event is recorded in the log. The Clear Log function is accessible using the
Installer code only.
To clear the event log:
1. From the Event Log menu, select Clear Log [62]; the OK? confirmation
message is displayed.
2. Press 3; the log is cleared.
1
For certain versions of the ProGuard800 software, the Clear Log function may be
disabled.
4.7: Service Menu
The Service menu is accessible using either the Installer or Master code. This menu
includes various functions that enable you to test the system effectively.
4.7.1: Set Time & Date
The time and date are used to time stamp events in the event log. Additionally the time is
also displayed on the LCD display.
To set the time:
1. From the Service menu, select Set Time/Date, Set Time [7011].
2. Enter the current time.
3. Press 3; the time is modified.
To set the date:
1. From the Service menu, select Set Time/Date, Set Date [7012].
2. Enter the current date.
3. Press 3; the date is modified.
1
-32-
The format of the time and date is defined in the System Options – see 9.6.3: Time/Date
Format. If you are setting the time in 12hr format, use the key to toggle between AM and PM.
© MARMITEK
4.7.2: Message Center
The ProGuard800 Message Center is designed to allow the user to record a short
message that may be played back later by another user. After a message is recorded,
Message Waiting is displayed on the LCD until the message is played back.
To play back a recorded message:
x
From the Service menu, select Messages, Play Message [7021].
To record a message:
1. From the Service menu, select Messages, Record Message [7022].
2. Press 3 to start recording the message.
3. Record your message. The message may be up to twenty seconds
long.
4. Press 3 to stop recording; the message is automatically played back
and OK? is displayed.
5. Press 3 to save your recording.
To delete a message:
1. From the Service menu, select Messages, Delete Message [7023];
OK? is displayed.
2. Press 3; the message is deleted.
1
The Record and Play options can also be accessed via a convenient shortcut without
needing to enter a valid user code.
To access the Record Message option from Standby mode, press then 2.
To access the Play Message option from Standby mode, press then 3.
4.7.3: Wireless Siren Test
To test the wireless siren:
x
From the Service menu, select WL Siren Test [703]; the external siren
is sounded briefly.
4.7.4: Siren Test
To test the control panel’s built-in siren:
x
From the Service menu, select Siren Test [704]; the control panel’s
built-in siren is sounded briefly.
4.7.5: Interface Test
The Interface test enables you to check if the speaker, LEDs and LCD are functioning
correctly.
To test the system interface:
x
From the Service menu, select Interface Test [705]; a short sequence
of chimes are sounded from the speaker, all LEDs flash and the LCD is
tested on all connected LCD keypads.
ProGuard800™
-33-
4.7.6: Walk Test
To initiate Walk Test mode:
1. From the Service menu, select Walk Test [706]; a list of registered
sensors appears.
2. Trigger each sensor; when the system receives a successful
transmission from a sensor, the sensor is removed from the list.
3. When all the sensors are removed from the list, End Walk Test is
displayed.
4. Press 2 to exit Walk Test mode.
4.7.7: Transmitters
The Transmitters menu offers two utilities that serve as a valuable aid during installation.
The first utility, TX List, is a scrollable inventory of all registered transmitters and their last
reported status.
To view the TX list:
1. From the Service menu, select Transmitters, TX List [7071]; the first
transmitter on the list is displayed.
2. Using the arrow buttons, scroll through the transmitter list.
3. When you have finished viewing, press 2to exit the list.
The TX list displays the following information for
each transmitter:
x
The zone/device number or descriptor.
Press the key to toggle the display.
x
The signal strength of the last received
transmission.
x
An abbreviation indicating the last
received status of the transmitter – see
Table 4.1.
This…
OK
TA
BT
OS
NA
X ZONE #2
Y S=6 OK Z
X
Y
Z
Descriptor
Signal Strength
Status
Figure 4.3: TX List Display
Means…
The transmitter is functioning correctly
Tamper condition
Battery low
The transmitter is out of synchronization
The transmitter is inactive – see section 7.4: Supervision Time
Table 4.1: Transmitter Status Abbreviations
1
In most cases, an “out of synchronization” condition indicates that an unauthorized
attempt at grabbing the transmission has occurred – i.e. a previous transmission has been
recorded and sent by somebody trying to violate the system.
The second utility, TX Test, enables you to identify transmitters and test their signal
strength.
In TX Test mode, each time a transmission is received, the activated transmitter is
displayed.
-34-
© MARMITEK
If you enter this function using the Master code, a
chime is sounded every time a transmission is
received. If you enter this function using the
Installer code, a sequence of tones are sounded
indicating the transmitter’s signal strength – see
Table 4.2. This feature helps you to determine the
best location to install a transmitter.
Signal Strength
0-2
3-5
6-8
8-9
Tones
1 Tone
2 Tones
3 Tones
4 Tones
Table 4.2: Signal Strength Tones
To initiate TX Test mode:
1. From the Service menu, select Transmitters, TX Test [7072].
2. Activate a transmitter; the transmitter’s details are displayed.
3. When you have finished, press 2 to exit TX Test mode.
4.7.8: Audio Volume
To adjust the sensitivity of the microphone and the volume of the speaker:
1. Establish a two-way audio connection.
2. From the Service menu, select Audio Volume [708].
3. Adjust the setting according to the following table.
Press…
1
4
3
6
To…
Increase microphone sensitivity
Reduce microphone sensitivity
Increase speaker volume
Reduce speaker volume
Table 4.3: Voice Level Adjustment
4.
Press 3; the new settings are stored in the memory.
4.7.9: GSM Signal Strength
You can measure the GSM signal strength using the system’s RSSI (Received Signal
Strength Indication) meter. This function enables you to calculate the optimal location to
install the control panel with the Cellular Communications module.
To view the GSM signal strength reading:
x
From the Service menu, select GSM Signal [709]; the signal strength
of the cellular network is displayed.
This Reading…
8 to 9
5 to 7
Less than 5
Means…
The location is good
The location is acceptable
Unacceptable – choose another location!
Table 4.4: GSM Signal Strength
1
For Remote Programming over GSM, a signal strength of 7 and above is required.
4.7.10: Display Version
To display the system’s software and hardware versions.
x
From the Service menu, select Version [710]; the hardware (HW) and
software (SW) versions are displayed.
ProGuard800™
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4.7.11: Enable Programming
The Enable Programming command enables a user with Master code authorization to grant
access to system programming. This feature is relevant only if the Installer Access and/or the
RP Access options are programmed as “User Initiated” – see 9.14: Installer Access and
10.4.4: RP Access Options.
To grant access to the installer or remote programmer:
x
From the Service menu, select Enable Prog. [711]; a 30-minute time
window is opened during which the Installer Code is valid or RP
communication may be established.
4.7.12: Global Chime
The Chime feature causes the control panel’s built-in siren to ring when specific zones
are triggered. Using the Global Chime option, you can enable or disable this feature for
all zones that are defined as Chime enabled – see 7.6.4: Chime.
To enable or disable Global Chime:
1. From the Service menu, select Global Chime [712].
2. Select either Enabled or Disabled.
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
1
-36-
Though the Service menu is accessible to the Master and Installer only, Global Chime can
also be accessed via a convenient shortcut without needing to enter a valid user code. To
access the Global Chime option from Standby mode, press then.
© MARMITEK
Chapter Five: Telecontrol and Two-Way Audio
The ProGuard800 control panel offers a range of Telecontrol features that provide remote
access via the telephone. These features include Two-Way Audio, remote
arming/disarming and cancel siren activation. This chapter explains these features and
their operation procedures.
Telecontrol features can be separated into two fundamental groups; incoming and
outgoing calls. These groups differ in their associated features.
5.1: Incoming Calls
The control panel can receive incoming calls from either the user or monitoring station
operator. Users may use this feature as a convenient way of contacting their family,
operating their system or to check their home when they are away. Additionally, the
monitoring service can contact the user in the event of an emergency or use this feature
for listen-in alarm verification.
For any of the incoming Telecontrol features to function, Telecontrol must be enabled in
the Communication Options section of the Programming menu – see 10.6.10: Incoming
Calls.
5.1.1: User Code Verification
To prevent unauthorized attempts to connect with the control panel, there are two user
codes designed for use with the Telecontrol features. The Telecontrol code enables the
user to establish communication with the control panel at any time. Additionally, the
Monitoring station TWA Code is used exclusively for Two-Way Audio alarm verification
and is only valid for a ten-minute period following an alarm.
5.1.2: Incoming Calls via PSTN
In the case of PSTN communication, the control panel often shares a line with regular
telephone handsets, an answering machine or a fax machine. It is therefore important
that the control panel distinguish between calls so that it knows when to pick up the
relevant call. For this purpose the ProGuard800 employs a double call method.
To connect to the control panel using the double call method:
1. Dial the telephone number of the line connected to the control panel.
2. Wait for two or three rings and hang-up.
3. Wait at least five seconds and dial the number again; on the second
ring, the control panel picks up and sounds two DTMF tones.
5.1.3: Incoming Calls via a Cellular Network
The Cellular Communications Module has its own individual telephone number and
therefore, the double call method is not needed. In this case, the user or monitoring
station operator may call the control panel directly.
ProGuard800™
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5.1.4: Telecontrol Call Procedure
The following procedure explains how to make a Telecontrol call. The conditions and
procedure differ when using PSTN or Cellular communication. For further information,
read sections 5.1.1, 5.1.2. and 5.1.3 above.
To make a Telecontrol call:
1. Call the control panel either using the double call method (PSTN) or
directly (Cellular); when the control panel picks up, two DTMF tones
are sounded.
2. Enter the Telecontrol code (Code 29) on your telephone within 15
seconds.
1
3.
1
4.
5.
Do not enter your user code until you hear the two DTMF tones. Any digits entered before
the tones are sounded are disregarded by the system.
A DTMF tone is sounded to indicate that the system is ready to receive
commands.
The following DTMF commands are available:
x Press “2” for Two-Way Audio.
o
If the TWA mode is defined as
“Simplex” (see 10.6.12: TWA Mode),
the audio channel opens in Listen
mode (microphone active/speaker
mute). To switch to Speak mode,
press “1” on your telephone. To
switch back to Listen mode, press “0”
on your telephone.
x Press “3” to fully arm the system.
x Press "4XX" to turn HA unit #XX ON
x Press "5XX" to turn HA unit #XX OFF
x Press “6” to disarm the system.
x Press “9” to cancel the siren.
The commands “3” (Full Arm),"4" (HA On), "5" (HA Off), “6” (Disarm) and “9” (Bell Cancel)
can also be executed at any time during a Two-Way Audio session.
The duration of the call is determined by the TC/VM Timeout (see
10.6.11: Telecontrol/Vocal Message Timeout). Ten seconds before the
timeout expires, two short DTMF tones are sounded. To extend the
call, press “7” on your telephone. This command restarts the timeout.
To disconnect before the end of the timeout, press “*” then “#” on your
telephone.
5.1.5: Arm/Disarm DTMF Commands
During a Telecontrol call, you can arm and disarm the system remotely using the DTMF
commands “3” (Arm) and “6” (Disarm). When arming the system in this way, the system
is armed immediately without an exit delay.
5.1.6. HA DTMF commands
During a Telecontrol call, you can turn On and Off the Home Automation units using the
DTMF commands “4XX” (HA unit #XX On) and “5XX” (HA unit #XX Off).
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© MARMITEK
5.1.7: Siren Muting
The siren is muted during Two-Way Audio communication. At the end of the call, the
siren is re-activated (if the Siren Cut-Off has not yet expired). During the call, pressing “9”
on your telephone cancels the re-activation of the siren.
5.1.8: Monitoring station Two-Way Audio
Monitoring station Two-Way Audio is an alarm verification feature that enables the
monitoring station operator to establish Two-Way Audio communication with the control
panel within ten minutes of an alarm.
To make a Monitoring station TWA call:
1. Call the control panel either using the double call method (PSTN) or
directly (Cellular); when the control panel picks up, two DTMF tones
are sounded.
2. Enter the Monitoring station TWA code (Code 30) on your telephone
within 15 seconds.
1
3.
4.
5.
Do not enter your user code until you hear the two DTMF tones. Any digits entered before
the tones are sounded are disregarded by the system.
If the TWA mode is defined as “Simplex” (see 10.6.12: TWA Mode),
the audio channel opens in Listen mode (microphone active/speaker
mute). To switch to Speak mode, press “1” on your telephone. To
switch back to Listen mode, press “0” on your telephone.
The duration of the call is determined by the TC/VM Timeout (see
10.6.11: Telecontrol/Vocal Message Timeout). Ten seconds before the
timeout expires, two short DTMF tones are sounded. To extend the
call, press “7” on your telephone. This command restarts the timeout.
To disconnect before the end of the timeout, press “*” then “#” on your
telephone.
5.2: Outgoing Calls
The ProGuard800 control panel can make Two-Way Audio calls to the user or monitoring
station in the event of an alarm. This feature is designed for applications such as alarm
verification, panic and medical emergency.
5.2.1: Service Call
The Service Call feature enables the user to establish a two-way audio
connection with the monitoring station operator. For further information
on how to program this feature, see section 10.5: Service Call.
To initiate a Service Call:
x
Press and hold down the Service Call key for a few seconds.
Figure 5.1:
Service Call Key
If the TWA mode is defined as “Simplex” (see 10.6.12: TWA Mode), the audio channel
opens in Listen mode (microphone active/speaker mute). The operator may switch to
Speak mode, by pressing “1” on their telephone. Pressing “0” switches back to Listen mode.
ProGuard800™
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5.2.2: TWA Alarm Reporting
In the event of Burglary, Fire and Medical alarms, the control panel is able to report the
events and then stay on the line after ACK 2 is received. This allows the operator to
verify the alarm or provide assistance in the event of an emergency.
For this feature to function, you must enable Two-Way Audio for both the account and
the event group.
The sequence for Two-Way Audio during alarm reporting is as follows:
1. An alarm event is sent to the monitoring station and acknowledgment
is received (ACK 2).
2. If Two-Way Audio is enabled for the account and event group, the
control panel stays on the line and opens the audio channel.
3. If the TWA mode is defined as “Simplex” (see 10.6.12: TWA Mode),
the audio channel opens in Listen mode (microphone active/speaker
mute). The operator may switch to Speak mode, by pressing “1” on
their telephone. Pressing “0” switches back to Listen mode.
4. The duration of the call is determined by the TC/VM Timeout. Ten
seconds before the timeout expires, two short DTMF tones are
sounded. To extend the call, the operator presses “7” on their
telephone. This command restarts the timeout.
5. To disconnect before the end of the timeout, the operator presses “*”
then “#” on their telephone.
If multiple events are sent, the control panel sends all the events before opening the
audio channel.
1
When using the SIA protocol for event reporting, this feature functions in “listen-in” mode
only.
5.2.3: Two-Way Audio after Vocal Messages
If Two-Way Audio is enabled for a Vocal Message account, the user can open the audio
channel by pressing “2” on their telephone after the system has played all of the event
messages.
The sequence for Two-Way Audio after a vocal message is as follows:
1. An event occurs and the control panel calls the telephone number of
VM Account 1.
2. When the user answers the call, the Home ID message and the
relevant event message are played.
3. If Two-Way Audio is enabled for the VM account, the user presses “2”
on their telephone to open the audio channel.
4. The duration of the call is determined by the TC/VM Timeout. Ten
seconds before the timeout expires, two short DTMF tones are
sounded. To extend the call, the user presses “7” on their telephone.
This command restarts the timeout.
5. To disconnect before the end of the timeout, the user presses “*” then
“#” on their telephone.
-40-
© MARMITEK
5.2.4: TWA Follow-Me
The TWA Follow-Me feature is designed to establish a Two-Way Audio connection with
the user in the event of an alarm. For this feature to function, the account’s protocol must
be defined as TWA Follow-Me.
The sequence for a Two-Way Audio Follow-me call is as follows:
1. An alarm occurs.
2. The control panel dials the programmed telephone number and
sounds two DTMF tones when you pick up the call.
3. Press any key on your telephone; the control panel opens the audio
channel.
1
4.
5.
6.
If you press “9” to answer the call, the control panel simultaneously cancels the siren
when opening the audio channel.
If the TWA mode is defined as “Simplex”, (see 10.6.12: TWA Mode),
the audio channel opens in Listen mode (microphone active/speaker
mute). To switch to Speak mode, press “1” on your telephone. To
switch back to Listen mode, press “0” on your telephone.
The duration of the call is determined by the TC/VM Timeout. Ten
seconds before the timeout expires, two short DTMF tones are
sounded. To extend the call, press “7” on your telephone. This
command restarts the timeout.
To disconnect before the end of the timeout, press “*” then “#” on your
telephone.
ProGuard800™
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Chapter Six: X-10 Home Automation Control
The purpose of this chapter is to explain the various methods used to control X-10 Home
Automation (HA) units installed around the home. For further information on the X-10
protocol and the choice of options that are available in programming, see Chapter
Eleven: Home Automation Programming.
6.1: Keypad Control
Using either the front panel keypad or the wireless keypad, you can control HA units with
the dedicated Home Automation keys – see Figure 6.1.
On
Off
Figure 6.1: LCD Keypad Home Automation Keys
To control HA units via the front panel keypad or the wireless keypad:
1. Press one of the two Home Automation keys on the keypad (On or
Off).
2. Enter the number of the required HA unit in two-digits (01-16); the
command is sent to the HA unit.
To control HA units via the HK855 Hardwire LCD Keypad:
1. From the main menu, select Home Automat. [3]; HA Unit #1 is
displayed.
2. Use the arrow keys to scroll to the unit you want to control.
3. Press 3 to select the HA unit.
4. Use the arrow keys to toggle the ON/OFF command.
5. Press 3 to select the command.
6. Scroll to the next unit you want to control or press 8 to exit this feature.
6.2: Keyfob Control
You can control up to two different HA units using any of the four button Keyfobs
registered to the system. For further information on how to assign Keyfob buttons to HA
units, see section 7.7.2: Button Assignment.
6.3: Telephone Control
You can send On and Off commands to HA units using SMS messages sent from a
cellular phone to the cellular communications module. Alternatively, the HA unit can be
controlled by using DTMF commands during Telecontrol call (either to the cellular or
PSTN communications modules). For this feature to function correctly, Telephone control
must be enabled for the specific HA units you want to control – see 11.2.6: Telephone
Control
6.3.1: DTMF command
Using the Telecontrol feature, you can turn on and off the HA units via the telephone with
DTMF commands. For further information on the Telecontrol features, see Chapter Five:
Telecontrol and 5.1.6. HA DTMF commands.
-42-
© MARMITEK
6.3.2: SMS Command Format
Each SMS command contains the following elements:
X
Y
Z
[
\
SMS Command Descriptor (up to 43 characters of free text)
# (delimiter – separates the descriptor from the actual command)
User Code (4 digits)
Command (0=Off, 1=On)
Device Number (HA Units: 01-16)
The following example shows the format of an SMS command to switch on a water boiler
controlled by HA unit 8.
Y
X
B
1
o
i
l
e
r
O
n
#
Z
1
2
[
3
4
1
\
0
8
While the SMS Command Descriptor is optional, you must start the SMS command with
the # symbol for the system to accept the command.
6.3.3: SMS Confirmation Message Format
After an SMS command is executed, the system can return a confirmation SMS
message to the sender. This message includes the HA unit’s descriptor and the
command that was sent. For further information on how to enable this feature, see
10.7.5: SMS Confirmation.
The following example shows the confirmation message the sender receives for the
sample command from the previous section.
B
O
I
L
E
R
-
O
N
6.4: Scheduling
Scheduling allows you to program the panel to send On/Off commands to HA units at
specific times. You can also program the days of the week that the schedule is active.
6.4.1: On Time
To edit an HA unit’s “On” Time:
1. From the main menu, select HA Schedules [8].
2. Select an HA unit.
3. From the X-10 unit’s sub-menu, select On Time [#1].
4. Enter a time (HH:MM).
5. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
ProGuard800™
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6.4.2: Off Time
To edit an HA unit’s “Off” Time:
1. From the main menu, select HA Schedules [8].
2. Select an HA unit.
3. From the HA unit’s sub-menu, select Off Time [#2].
4. Enter a time (HH:MM).
5. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
6.4.3: Weekly Schedule
To program the days of the week that the schedule is active:
1. From the main menu, select HA Schedules [8].
2. Select an HA unit.
3. From the HA unit’s sub-menu, select Schedule [#3].
4. Use keys 1 to 7 to toggle the days on and off.
Press…
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
To toggle…
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Table 6.1: Weekly Schedule
5.
-44-
Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
© MARMITEK
Chapter Seven: Devices
This chapter explains how to register devices to the system and the programming options
for each device. For further information, please refer to the installation instructions
included with each device.
7.1: Device Registration
For the system to recognize individual devices, each device must be registered to the
system. For example, if the device is a wireless transmitter, registration enables the system
to identify the source of a received transmission. Each device has an individual encrypted
ID code. Registering the device to the system familiarizes the system with this code.
1
It is not necessary to register hardwire sensors connected to Zone 33.
To register a device to the system:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices [91].
2. Select the type of transmitter you want to register. For example, if you
want to register a wireless sensor to a zone, select Zones.
3. Select the specific device you want to register (for example, Zone 4);
the system initiates Registration mode. During Registration mode, the
system waits for two transmissions from the device.
1
4.
5.
6.
If a device has already been registered at the required location, the system will not initiate
Registration mode. If the device has already been registered at another location, attempts
to register are ignored by the system
Register the device – refer to each device’s installation instructions in
Appendix B for further details.
When two transmissions have been received, Save? is displayed.
Press 3to confirm registration, or 2 to cancel.
7.2: Device Descriptors
You can assign a 16-character descriptor to each device except the wireless siren.
These descriptors help identify the devices when you operate and program the system.
To edit a device descriptor:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices [91].
2. Select a device type.
3. From the device’s sub-menu, select Descriptor.
4. Edit the descriptor using the alphanumeric keypad.
5. Press 3 when you have finished editing.
7.3: Device Deletion
When you want to remove a device from the system, you have to delete the device. It is
important to delete unused devices for two reasons. Firstly, you have to delete a device
before you can register a new transmitter in its place. Secondly, if the device is a wireless
sensor, it is important to delete the device so that the system will not react to the
transmitter’s failure to send supervision signals.
ProGuard800™
-45-
To delete a device:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, [91].
2. Select the type of wireless device you want to delete.
3. From the device’s sub-menu, select Delete.
4. Press 3 to confirm; the device is deleted.
7.4: Supervision Time
The sensors in Marmitek’s ProGuard800 supervised wireless range send a supervision
signal approximately one hour after its last transmission. If the system does not receive
supervision signals from a specific transmitter, the transmitter is regarded as inactive.
The amount of time after which a transmitter is considered inactive is called the
Supervision Time. There is a separate supervision time for general transmitters and
devices that are registered to Fire zones.
To program the Supervision Time for general transmitters:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Superv. Time, General
[9161].
2. Enter a supervision time between 04:00 and 23:59 hours.
To program the Supervision Time for transmitters registered to Fire zones:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Superv. Time, Fire
[9162].
2. Enter a supervision time between 02:00 and 23:59 hours.
7.5: Re-Synchronization
Transmissions that are out of synchronization are rejected by the system. For example, it
is not possible to arm or disarm the system using a keyfob that is out of synchronization.
In the event that a transmitter is out of synchronization, it is possible to re-synchronize
the transmitter and restore normal operation.
To re-synchronize transmitters:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, TX Re-synch [917]; a
10-minute time window is opened.
2. During the 10-minute time window, if a transmission is received that is
out of synchronization, the transmitter is re-synchronized.
7.6: Zones
The ProGuard800 includes 33 security zones. Zones 1-32 are intended for wireless
sensors. One sensor can be registered to each wireless zone. The system supports
Marmitek’s ProGuard800supervised wireless range of transmitters that includes various
PIR sensors, magnetic contacts and smoke detectors. All these transmitters send
supervision signals to the panel’s receiver in order to indicate that the transmitter is
functional.
Zone 33 is an on-board hardwire zone. This zone is programmed in the same way as the
wireless zones with the exception of registration and deletion.
-46-
© MARMITEK
This section explains the sections of programming exclusive to sensors. For information
on registration, descriptor editing and deletion, see sections 7.1, 7.2 and 7.3,
respectively.
7.6.1: Zone Type
The zone type defines the type of alarm the system generates when the sensor is tripped.
To program a zone type:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Zones [911].
2. Select the sensor you want to program.
3. From the sensor’s sub-menu, select Zone Type [#02].
4. Select one of the following zone types:
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Normal
Entry/Exit
Follower
Panic
Medical
Fire
24Hr
x
x
x
x
x
x
24Hr-X (future option)
Gas
Flood
Environmental
No Motion
Not Used
For a detailed explanation on the function of each zone type, see Appendix D:
Zone Types
7.6.2: Arm Set
The Arm Set option allows you to define the arming methods in which the zone is included.
To program the Arm Set option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Zones [911].
2. Select the sensor you want to program.
3. From the zone’s sub-menu, select Arm Set [#03]; the zone’s current
Arm Set setting is displayed.
Arm Set
1 (F)
2 (P)
3 (PE)
Description
The zone is included in Full arming.
The zone is included in Part arming.
The zone is included in Perimeter arming.
Table 7.1 Arm Set Options
4.
5.
1
Use the keys 1, 2 and 3 to toggle the current setting.
Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
It is not necessary to program this option for Panic, Medical, Fire, 24Hr, Gas, Flood and
Environmental zones.
7.6.3: Bell
Each zone can be programmed to activate the siren when triggered or to generate a
silent alarm where only a message is sent to the monitoring station.
To program the Bell option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Zones [911].
2. Select the zone you want to program.
3. From the zone’s sub-menu, select Bell [#05]; the zone’s current Bell
setting is displayed.
ProGuard800™
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4.
1
Select either Enabled or Disabled.
Fire zones always activate the siren regardless of what is programmed for this option.
If the bell is disabled for Panic zones, this also disables all forms of alarm indication from
the on-board keypad in the event of a Panic alarm.
If the Bell option is enabled for Environmental or Flood zones, the system sounds trouble
tones from the keypad.
7.6.4: Chime
When Chime is enabled, triggering the zone when the system is disarmed causes the
internal siren to chime.
To program the Chime option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Sensors [911].
2. Select the zone you want to program.
3. From the zone’s sub-menu, select Chime [#06]; the zone’s current
Chime setting is displayed.
4. Select either Enabled or Disabled.
7.6.5: Force Arm
Force arming enables you to arm the system when the system is not ready. For example,
a door that is protected by a magnetic contact is open. You may arm the system on
condition that the zone is defined as Force Arm enabled. This door must be closed by
the end of the Exit delay otherwise an alarm is generated. If the magnetic contact’s zone
is defined as Force Arm disabled, the system will not be ready to arm until you close the
door.
To program the Force Arm option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Zones [911].
2. Select the zone you want to program.
3. From the zone’s sub-menu, select Force Arm [#07]; the zone’s current
Force Arm setting is displayed.
4. Select either Enabled or Disabled.
1
For the Force Arm feature to function, you must also enable Force Arming in System
Options (see 9.3.1: Forced Arm).
7.6.6: Swinger
A zone defined as Swinger enabled can generate only a limited number of alarms
during a specific time period. The Swinger setting is defined in System Options – see
9.1: Swinger Setting.
To program the Swinger option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Zones [911].
2. Select the zone you want to program.
3. From the zone’s sub-menu, select Swinger [#08]; the zone’s current
Swinger setting is displayed.
4. Select either Enabled or Disabled.
1
-48-
Do not enable the Swinger option for zones that are always active (Panic, Medical, Fire,
24-hr, Gas, Flood and Environmental zones).
© MARMITEK
7.6.7: Repeater
The RP835 repeater is an additional module that extends the range of the wireless
transmitters. For a sensor to use the repeater to relay transmissions to the system, you
must define the Repeater option for its zone as “Use Repeater”.
To program the Repeater option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Zones [911].
2. Select the zone you want to program.
3. From the zone’s sub-menu, select Repeater [#09]; the zone’s current
Repeater setting is displayed.
4. Select either No Repeater or Use Repeater.
7.7: Keyfobs
The ProGuard800 supports two types of Keyfob transmitter, PR811 and KR814. You can
register up to 19 Keyfobs to the system. Figure 7.1 illustrates these transmitters and the
functions assigned to their buttons. For information on registration, descriptor editing and
deletion, see sections 7.1, 7.2 and 7.3, respectively.
Arm
Disarm
B1:
Part
B2:
Perimeter
Medical
Emergency
PR811
KR814
Figure 7.1: Keyfob Button Assignments
The following sections explain the programming options exclusive to the KR814 Keyfob
transmitter. These programming options are not relevant to the PR811.
7.7.1: Keyfob Type
You can define each registered Keyfob as Controlled or Non-controlled. A Controlled
Keyfob causes the system to send arm/disarm event messages to the monitoring station.
Non-controlled Keyfobs never send arm messages and send a disarm message only if
the system is disarmed after an alarm occurrence.
To program a Keyfob type:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Keyfobs [912].
2. Select the Keyfob you want to program.
3. From the keyfob’s sub-menu, select Type [#2]; the current setting is
displayed.
4. Select either Controlled or Non-controlled.
7.7.2: Button Assignment
The KR814 includes two buttons (B1 and B2) that you can program individually. The
default functions for B1 and B2 offer different arming methods. Alternatively, you can
program these buttons to control a specific HA unit.
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To program buttons B1 and B2:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Keyfobs [912].
2. Select the Keyfob you want to program.
3. From the keyfob’s sub-menu, select either B1 Assign [#4] or B2 Assign
[#5].
4. Select the HA unit you want the button to control (01-16) or enter 00 to
program the button’s default function.
The default functions are as follows:
B1: Part arming
B2: Perimeter arming
7.7.3: SOS Panic Alarm Activation (KR814)
Using the four-button Keyfob, you can activate
an SOS Panic alarm by pressing two buttons
simultaneously. Figure 7.2 illustrates how to
activate an SOS Panic alarm on the KR814
wireless Keyfob.
Figure 7.2: SOS Panic
Alarm Activation
7.8: Keypads
Up to four wireless keypads are supported by the system. With the exception of the
Cancel key, operation is identical for both WK820 and RC840 keypads.
For information on registration, descriptor editing and deletion, see sections 7.1, 7.2 and
7.3, respectively.
HA
On Key
Numeric
Keypad
Arming
Keys
HA
Off Key
Cancel
Key
Figure 7.3: WK820 Keypad Layout
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© MARMITEK
7.8.1: Keypad SOS Panic Alarm Activation
Using any of the wireless keypads, you can
activate an SOS Panic alarm by pressing the
Full and Perimeter arming keys simultaneously.
Figure 7.4 illustrates how to activate an SOS
Panic alarm on the WK820 wireless keypad.
7.9: Repeaters
Repeaters are designed to extend the wireless range of the control panel. Up to four
repeaters may be registered to the system with a maximum of 32 transmitters associated
with each receiver. For information on registration, descriptor editing and deletion, see
sections 7.1, 7.2 and 7.3, respectively.
7.10: Wireless Siren
For the wireless siren to function, the control panel must have the on-board transmitter
installed on the Main board – see 1.4.1: The Main Board for the location of the on-board
transmitter connector.
Using this transmitter, the system sends alarm and arm status information to the wireless
siren’s receiver. This requires that you register the transmitter to the wireless siren’s
receiver.
To register the on-board transmitter to the wireless siren’s receiver:
1. Set the wireless siren’s receiver to Registration mode – refer to the
siren’s installation instructions for further information.
2. Activate the siren using the WL Siren Test feature – see 4.7.3:
Wireless Siren Test.
3. Activate the siren again; the on-board transmitter is registered to the
siren’s receiver.
When installing 2-way sirens, the wireless siren also includes a transmitter that must be
registered to the control panel. For information on registration and deletion, see sections
7.1 and 7.3, respectively.
7.10.1: Wireless Siren Type
The control panel supports both 1-way and 2-way wireless sirens. For this feature to
function correctly, you must define the wireless siren type in programming.
The following options are available:
x
x
x
1-Way Siren – if using the ProGuard800 SI825 status indicator.
2-Way Siren – if using the OS826 wireless siren.
2-Way Siren/Kpd – if using the OS826 wireless siren and the 2-way
WK820SI keypad (this option is for future use).
To program the wireless siren type:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Siren, WL Siren Type
[9152].
2. Select a siren type or No WL Siren if no siren is installed.
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7.10.2: Wireless Siren Delay
The Wireless Siren Delay is the period of time during which the wireless siren is not
sounded after an alarm is triggered by normal, follower or 24Hr zones. This feature is
implemented only when the system is not fully armed. During the Wireless Siren Delay,
the control panel’s built-in siren is sounded but the alarm report is not sent until the delay
has expired. This gives the user enough time to disarm in the event that the alarm was
accidentally triggered during Part or Perimeter arming. If the user disarms the system
during the Siren Delay, an alarm event is not reported to the monitoring station.
To program the Wireless Siren Delay time:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Siren, WL Siren Delay
[9153].
2. Enter a Siren Delay time (00-63 seconds).
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
7.10.3: Siren Cut-Off
The Siren Cut-Off is the period of time the sirens are activated after an alarm has
occurred. You may program a Siren Cut-Off time of between ten seconds to twenty
minutes.
To program the Siren Cut-Off time:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Siren, Cut-Off [9154].
2. Enter a Siren Cut-Off time (00:10 - 20:00).
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
7.10.4: Wired Siren
When the system generates an audible alarm, both the wired built-in siren and the
wireless siren are sounded. This option allows you to disable the alarm from the control
panel’s built-in siren. If disabled, the control panel’s built-in siren may still be used to
sound arm/disarm and entry/exit tones.
To program the Wired Siren option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Wired Siren [9155].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
7.11: Smartkeys (for future use)
Smartkeys enable the user to arm and disarm the system without needing to enter a
code. You can register up to 16 smartkeys to the system. For information on registration,
descriptor editing and deletion, see sections 7.1, 7.2 and 7.3, respectively.
7.11.1: Smartkey Type
You can define each registered smartkey as Controlled or Non-controlled. A Controlled
smartkey causes the system to send arm/disarm event messages to the monitoring
station. Non-controlled smartkeys never send arm messages and send a disarm
message only if the system is disarmed after an alarm occurrence.
To program the smartkey type:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Smartkeys [918].
2. Select the smartkey you want to program.
3. From the smartkey’s sub-menu, select Type [#2]; the current setting is
displayed.
4. Select either Controlled or Non-controlled.
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© MARMITEK
Chapter Eight: Entry/Exit Timers and System Tones
This chapter explains how to program the time of the Entry/Exit delays and the tones
sounded by the built-in siren and wireless siren during Exit/Entry delays, arming,
disarming, home automation operation and when a trouble condition is present.
8.1: Entry/Exit Delay
The Entry/Exit delay timers determine the amount of time the user has to arm or disarm the
system before an alarm is activated.
You can program separate Entry and Exit delays for each arming method.
To program Exit delay timers:
1. From the Programming menu, select Entry/Exit, Exit Delays [921].
2. Select the Exit delay you want to program: Full [#1], Part [#2] or
Perimeter [#3].
3. Enter a delay time (000-255 seconds).
4. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
To program Entry delay timers:
1. From the Programming menu, select Entry/Exit, Entry Delays [922].
2. Select the Entry delay you want to program: Full [#1], Part [#2] or
Perimeter [#3].
3. Enter a delay time (000-255 seconds).
4. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
8.2: Arm on Exit
The Arm on Exit feature cancels the unnecessary remainder of the Exit delay that
continues to count down after the user has vacated the premises. This feature
automatically arms the system when an Entry/Exit zone is closed during the Exit delay.
To program the Arm on Exit option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Entry/Exit, Arm On Exit [923].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
8.3: Supplementary Entry Delay
The Supplementary Entry Delay is a pre-alarm feature that is employed in the event that
the system is not disarmed during the entry delay. When the entry delay expires, the
control panel’s built-in siren is sounded during an additional entry delay period. At the
end of the supplementary entry delay, the system generates a full alarm condition; the
wireless siren is sounded and an alarm event is reported to the monitoring station.
To program the Supplementary Entry Delay setting:
1. From the Programming menu, select Entry/Exit, Supp. Ent. Delay [924].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
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8.4: Entry Deviation
Entry Deviation is a pre-alarm feature employed in the event that a sensor defined with
the “Normal” zone type is opened during the entry delay. In this case, the control panel’s
built-in siren is sounded until the end of the entry delay period. Failure to disarm by the
end of the entry delay causes the system to generate an alarm.
To program the Entry Deviation setting:
1. From the Programming menu, select Entry/Exit, Ent. Deviation [925].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
8.5: Exit Restart
Exit Restart is a feature that is designed to prevent false alarms caused by user error
during exit. If this feature is enabled, re-opening a closed Entry/Exit zone during the
remainder of the Exit delay causes the Exit delay to re-start. For example, the Exit delay
is programmed as 60 seconds. The user arms the system and leaves the premises. With
10 seconds remaining, the user re-enters the premises and the Exit delay starts to count
down again from 60 seconds.
To program the Entry Deviation setting:
1. From the Programming menu, select Entry/Exit, Exit Restart [926].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
8.6: Arming Tones
Arming tones are the tones sounded by the control panel’s built-in siren and/or the
wireless siren when arming and disarming the system. Each set of tones can be enabled
or disabled according to the requirements of the installation.
8.6.1: Exit Delay Tones
To program tones sounded by the wireless siren during the Exit delay:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, Exit Tones, WL Siren [9311].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
To program tones sounded by the built-in siren during the Exit delay:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, Exit Tones, Siren [9312].
2. Select No Tones, Four Tones or Continuous Tones.
8.6.2: Entry Delay Tones
To program tones sounded by the wireless siren during the Entry delay:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, Entry Tones, WL Siren [9321].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
To program tones sounded by the built-in siren the Entry delay:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, Entry Tones, Siren [9322].
2. Select No Tones, Four Tones or Continuous Tones.
8.6.3: Arming Tones
To program tones sounded by the wireless siren on arming:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, Arm Tones, WL Siren [9331].
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© MARMITEK
2.
Select Enabled or Disabled.
To program tones sounded by the built-in siren on arming:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, Arm Tones, Siren [9332].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
8.6.4: Disarming Tones
To program tones sounded by the wireless siren on disarming:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, Disarm Tones, WL Siren [9341].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
To program tones sounded by the built-in siren on disarming:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, Disarm Tones, Siren [9342].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
8.7: Home Automation Tones
Home Automation tones are sounded when you control HA units using keypads or keyfob
transmitters.
To program built-in siren Home Automation tones:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, HA Tones [935].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
8.8: System Trouble Tones
System trouble tones are sounded to provide an audible indication that a system trouble
condition exists. On hearing these tones the user is then able to determine which trouble
condition is present from the LCD keypad on the front panel. For additional information,
see 3.4.2: System Trouble Tones.
8.8.1: Trouble Tones
The Trouble Tones option allows you to enable or disable audible trouble annunciation.
To program the Trouble Tones option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, Trouble Tones [936].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
8.8.2: Telephone Trouble Tones
Most trouble tones are not sounded between 10:00pm and 7:00am so as not to disturb
the user late at night. Telephone trouble, however, may be an attempt to sabotage the
system by cutting the telephone wires. For this reason, you can program telephone
trouble tones to sound at all times.
To program the Telephone Trouble Tones option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, Tel. Trb. Tones [937].
2. Select Immediate or Delayed.
8.8.3: Fire Trouble Tones
The Fire Trouble Tones option is a feature designed to repeat fire-related trouble tones
until the problem has been taken care of. If this feature is enabled, fire trouble tones shall
be repeated 3½ hours after the user has manually silenced the tones if the trouble
condition has not been restored.
ProGuard800™
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To program the Fire Trouble Tones option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, Fire Trb. Tones [938].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
1
It is not necessary to program the Telephone Trouble Tones and Fire Trouble Tones
options if the Trouble Tones option is programmed as disabled.
8.9: Tones Options
8.9.1: Tones Output
The Tones Output option enables you to determine whether the tones sounded when
arming and disarming are sounded by the control panel’s built-in siren or its built-in
speaker.
To program the Tones Output option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, Tones Options, Tones Output [9391].
2. Select Siren or Speaker.
8.9.2: Speaker Volume
The Speaker Volume option determines the volume level of the tones sounded by the
speaker.
To program the Speaker Volume option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, Tones Options, Speaker Vol. [9392].
2. Select High or Low.
1
It is not necessary to program the Speaker Volume option if “Siren” is selected for the
Tones Output option.
8.9.3: Keypad Selection
The Keypad Selection feature enables you to enable or disable tones sounded by
hardwire LCD keypads.
To program the Keypad Selection option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Tones, Tones Options, Keypad Sel. [9393].
2. Use the 2, 3 and 4 keys to toggle keypad tones on or off for each keypad. If the
number of the keypad appears on the display, tones will be sounded from that
keypad.
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
1
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It is not possible to disable tones for the front panel keypad (Keypad #1).
© MARMITEK
Chapter Nine: System Options
As the name suggests, System Options are settings that affect the entire system. This
chapter offers explanations and programming instructions for each of these options.
9.1: Swinger Setting
A sensor defined as Swinger enabled can generate only a limited number of alarms during
a specific time period or during an arming period. The following options are available:
x
One alarm per arming period
x
One alarm per hour
x
One alarm per day
x
One alarm per week
x
No swinger
To program the Swinger setting:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Swinger [9401].
2. Select a Swinger setting from the above list.
9.2: Code Lockout
The Code Lockout option locks the keypad for 30 minutes if five unsuccessful attempts
are made to enter the user code.
To program the Code Lockout setting:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Code Lockout
[9402].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
1
During the 30-minute lockout period, you can still arm and disarm the system using
keyfobs and smartkeys. If one key arming is enabled, you may still arm the system using
the wireless keypad.
9.3: Arm/Disarm Options
The options offered in this section relate to arming and disarming the system.
9.3.1: Forced Arm
Forced arming enables you to arm the system when the system is not ready. This option
allows you to enable or disable Forced arming for the entire system. Additionally, you can
enable or disable Forced arming for each individual zone. For further information, see
section 7.6.5: Force Arm.
To program the Forced Arm setting:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Arm/Disarm,
Forced Arm [94031].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
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9.3.2: One-Key Arming
You can arm the system by pressing any of the three arming keys on the keypad. If OneKey Arming is enabled, the system does not prompt you for a user code.
To program the One-Key Arming setting:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Arm/Disarm, OneKey Arming [94032].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
9.3.3: Supervised Arm
The Supervised Arm option is a feature designed to supervise intrusion sensor activity
before you arm the system.
If the system has not received a transmission from a sensor during the interval defined
for this option, all arming methods that include that sensor shall not be available.
Medical, Panic, Fire, Gas, Flood and Environmental zones are not included in this
supervision and do not affect the system’s ability to arm.
Press to check which sensor is causing the “System Not Ready” condition.
To make the required arming method available, activate the sensor. It is important to
remember that the PIR sensors have a four-minute delay between transmissions.
If activating the sensor does not help, there may be a problem with the sensor. You can
bypass the faulty sensor’s zone to allow system arming until the problem is remedied.
1
Zone bypassing is valid for one arming period only. All bypassed zones are automatically
unbypassed when the system is disarmed.
To program the Supervised Arm interval:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Arm/Disarm,
Superv. Arm [94033].
2. Enter a Supervised Arm interval (001-255 minutes or 000 to disable
the Supervised Arm option).
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
1
Do not program a Supervised Arm interval that is less than the sensor’s supervision time.
9.3.4: Instant Arming
Instant arming is a feature that allows you to cancel the entry delay after arming the system
– see 3.7.7: Instant Arming. The feature is designed for use in situations where the system’s
perimeter is armed and nobody is expected to enter the premises from outside.
To enable/disable the Instant Arm option:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Arm/Disarm,
Instant Arming [94034].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
9.3.5: Keyfob Disarm
The Keyfob Disarm option enables you to determine whether it is possible for the user to
disarm the system using their keyfob at all times or during the entry delay only.
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Arm/Disarm,
KF Disarm [94035].
2. Select Always or On Entry.
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© MARMITEK
9.3.6: Keyfob Arm
The Keyfob Arm option offers two options concerning the behaviour of the system when
arming with a Keyfob. These options are as follows:
x
x
With Exit Delay – when arming with a Keyfob, the system initiates the Exit delay
of the chosen arming method.
No Exit Delay – when arming with a Keyfob, the system arms instantly without
initiating the Exit delay.
To program the Keyfob Arm option:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Arm/Disarm, KF Arm
[94036].
2. Select With Exit Delay or No Exit Delay.
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
9.4: Panic Alarm
SOS Panic alarms generated from the front panel, keypads or keyfobs can be defined as
either audible or silent.
To program the Panic Alarm setting:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Panic Alarm
[9404].
2. Select Audible or Silent.
9.5: AC Loss Delay
The AC Loss Delay is the amount of time that has to elapse before an AC Loss report is
sent to the monitoring station. If AC power is restored before the event message is sent,
the event message is cancelled and will not be sent. You can program an AC Loss Delay
to be between 1 and 255 minutes after the system first senses the AC loss condition.
Alternatively you can program a random AC Loss Delay.
The AC Restore message is also sent using the same method described above. AC
Restore is reported only if the AC Loss report was sent.
To program the AC Loss Delay:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, AC Loss Delay
[9405].
2. Enter a delay time (001-255 minutes) or enter 000 if you require the
system to choose a random AC Loss Delay.
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
9.5.1: Random AC Loss Delay
In the event of AC loss, an event message is sent to the monitoring station between 15
and 30 minutes after the AC loss condition is sensed. The system chooses this delay at
random in order to prevent the monitoring station being inundated by simultaneous AC
Loss reports in the event of a regional power cut.
ProGuard800™
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9.6: Display Options
The following options relate to the information the system displays on the LCD keypad.
9.6.1: Arm Status Display
The Arm Status Display includes the current arm status and any trouble conditions that
may exist within the system. You can program the system to display this information at all
times or only for two minutes after arming or disarming the system.
To program the Arm Status Display options:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Display, Arm
Status [94061].
2. Select Display Always or Display 2 Min.
9.6.2: Banner
The Banner is the 16-character text that you can program to appear on the top row of the
LCD display. This text replaces the arm status if it is programmed to display for two
minutes only – see 9.6.1: Arm Status Display.
To edit the Banner text:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Display, Banner
[94062].
2. Edit the Banner text using the alphanumeric keypad.
3. Press 3 when you have finished editing.
1
The system never displays the Banner text if the Arm Status Display option is
programmed as Always.
9.6.3: Time/Date Format
This option determines the format in which the time and date are displayed.
The following options are available:
x
x
DD/MM/YY, 24Hr
DD/MM/YY, 12Hr
x
x
MM/DD/YY, 24Hr
MM/DD/YY, 12Hr
To program the Time/Date format:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Display, Time
Format [94063].
2. Select the required format from the options available.
9.6.4: Supervision Loss Indication
This option enables you to select whether transmitter supervision loss shall be indicated
to the user in the system trouble display.
To program the Supervision Loss Indication setting:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Display, SV Loss
Ind. [94064].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
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© MARMITEK
9.7: PGM Output Options
The PGM is a programmable output that is triggered according to specific system status
conditions.
9.7.1: Output Trigger
The Output Trigger option determines the conditions that activate and deactivate the
PGM output.
To program the Output Trigger:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, PGM Options,
Output Trigger [94071].
2. Select an Output Trigger option from the following table.
Trigger Option
PGM Not Used
Full Arm
Perimeter Arm
Part Arm
Arm Status
Power Trouble
Tel. Line Trouble
System Trouble
Medical
Burglary
Fire Alarm
Zone Status*
Entry/Exit
Siren
WL Siren
Tone Follower
Activated by…
The PGM output is disabled
System “Full” armed
System “Perimeter” armed
System “Part” armed
Any arming method
AC Loss or Low Battery conditions
Telephone line supervision trouble
System trouble condition
Medical alarm
Burglary alarm
Fire alarm
Open zones (steady)
Bypassed zones (pulsing)
Entry/Exit delay follower
Built-in siren follower
Wireless siren follower
Keypad Tone Follower
Deactivated by…
System disarmed
or
PGM Cut-off
AC restore or Battery restore
Telephone line restore
System trouble restore
Any arming method,
system disarmed
or PGM Cut-off
All zones closed and no
zones bypassed
Table 9.1: PGM Output Trigger Options
* Functions only when the system is disarmed.
For certain trigger options, deactivation may be determined by the PGM Cut-off (see
1 9.12.4:
PGM Cut-off). If the PGM Cut-off is programmed as 000 (continuous activation),
the PGM output shall remain activated until it is toggled by the relevant change in system
status.
9.7.2: Output Type
The Output Type option determines whether the PGM output produces a steady or
pulsed output.
To program the Output Type:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, PGM Options,
Output Type [94072].
2. Select Steady or Pulsed.
1
The Zone Status, Siren and WL Siren trigger options have a fixed Output Type; there is
no need to program an Output Type for these options.
ProGuard800™
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9.7.3: Polarity
You can determine the polarity of the PGM output from the following two options:
x
x
Active High: The output is normally off and is switched on when
activated.
Active Low: The output is normally on and is switched off when
activated.
To program the Output Type:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, PGM Options,
Polarity [94073].
2. Select Active High or Active Low.
9.7.4: PGM Cut-off
The PGM Cut-off is the duration for which the PGM is activated. Certain Output Trigger
types, are deactivated after the PGM Cut-off time has expired– see Table 9.1: PGM
Output Trigger Options. For those Output Trigger types that are not affected by the PGM
Cut-off, there is no need to program this option.
To program the PGM Cut-off time:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, PGM Options,
PGM Cut-off [94074].
2. Enter a PGM Cut-off time (001-255 seconds or 000 for continuous
activation).
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
9.8: Guard Code (for future use)
The Guard Code is a future option that is not available in the current firmware. The
default setting for this option is disabled. Marmitek recommend that you do not change
this setting.
9.9: “No Arm” Indication
The “No Arm” indication is a feature designed to inform the monitoring station that the
system has not been armed for a specified period of time.
To define the “No Arm” indication interval.
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, No Arm Ind.
[9409].
2. Select 1 Week, 2 Weeks, 3 Weeks, 4 Weeks or Disabled.
1
The No Arm event message is an unclassified event. This means that it does not belong
to any event group. If the No Arm option is programmed with any option other than
“Disabled”, the event message shall be sent.
9.10: Jamming Detection
The system is able detect RF Jamming that is usually caused by an intruder attempting
to compromise the security system.
To program the Jamming Detection setting:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Jamming Det.
[9410].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
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© MARMITEK
9.11: “No Motion” Time
The No Motion feature is designed to monitor the activity of disabled or elderly people. If
a sensor defined as “No Motion” (see 7.6.1: Zone Type) has not detected within a predefined period of time, a No Motion event message is sent to the monitoring station.
To program the No Motion time:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, No Motion
[9411].
2. Select 6 Hours, 12 Hours, 24 Hours, 48 Hours, 72 Hours or Disabled.
9.12: Microphone/Speaker Options
In addition to the built-in microphone and speaker, the ProGuard800 control panel supports
an external microphone/speaker unit called the “ProGuard800 IP850-Interphone”. The
Microphone/Speaker option allows you to choose which microphone and speaker are in use.
You can choose one mic./speaker (internal or external) to function exclusively or both may
function simultaneously.
To program the Microphone/Speaker option:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Mic./Speaker
[9412].
2. Select Internal, External or Internal & External.
9.13: Vocal Messages
The Vocal Messages option allows you to enable/disable vocal annunciation of system
status. When this feature is enabled, the system plays a short message to announce
events such as arming and disarming.
To program the Vocal Messages option:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Vocal Message
[9413].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
1 The availability of the Vocal Message annunciation feature is hardware dependent.
9.14: Installer Access
The Installer Access option determines if the Installer code can access the system at all
times or only after the Master code provides authorization with the Enable Programming
command – see 4.7.11: Enable Programming.
To program the Installer Access option:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Instal. Access
[9414].
2. Select Always or User Initiated.
9.15: Auto Log View (for future use)
Auto Log View is a future option that is not available in the current firmware. The default
setting for this option is disabled. Marmitek recommend that you do not change this
setting.
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9.16: Daylight Savings
Using the Daylight Savings option, the system is able to automatically adjust its clock twice
a year according to the national adjustment to Daylight Saving Time.
Two options are available:
x
x
1
Europe – the clock is adjusted forward 1hr on the last Sunday in March
at 2am, the clock is adjusted back 1hr on the last Sunday in October at
3am.
USA– the clock is adjusted forward 1hr on the first Sunday in April at
2am, the clock is adjusted back 1hr on the last Sunday in October at
2am.
From 2007, Daylight Saving Time in the USA begins on the second Sunday in March and
ends on the first Sunday of November. This modification has been accounted for in the
firmware and the time shall be updated automatically according to the new dates from
2007 onwards.
To program the Daylight Savings option:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Daylight
Savings [9416].
2. Select Europe, USA or Disabled.
9.17: Report Fail Trouble
If the Report Fail Trouble option is enabled, failure to report an event displays System
Trouble on the LCD display. Report Fail Trouble is displayed after the control panel has
exhausted all message attempts and report cycles when trying to report the event. To
restore a System Trouble condition caused by failure to report, press until you have
scrolled through the entire system trouble list. If the Report Fail Trouble is disabled,
failure to report an event does not cause a system trouble condition.
To program the Report Fail Trouble option:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Rep. Fail Trb. [9417].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
9.18: Cancel Alarm
The Cancel Alarm feature is an option that allows the user to cancel a false alarm by
disarming the system within five minutes of reporting the alarm. Cancelling an alarm
causes the control panel to report a Cancel event to the monitoring station and an enter
an Alarm Cancelled event in the event log. Following a cancelled alarm, the message
Alarm Cancelled, OK? appears on the keypads’ LCD until the user presses 3 to
confirm. Until confirmation is received, the control panel does not allow any local function
to be performed. However, the control panel may perform remote commands received
via Telecontrol or Remote Programming regardless of this system status. Please note
that alarm indication has higher priority and overrides the “Alarm Cancelled” display.
As this control panel has been designed to meet the requirements of the ANSI/SIA
CP-01 standard for false alarm reduction, it is not possible to disable the Cancel Alarm
feature. Consequently, the system will reject any attempt to change the default setting of
the menu item System Options, Cancel Alarm [9418].
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© MARMITEK
9.19: Cross Zoning (for future use)
Cross Zoning is a future option that is not available in the current firmware. The default
setting for this option is disabled. Marmitek recommends that you do not change this
setting.
9.20: Verified Fire
The Verified Fire feature is an option that is designed to delay Fire alarm reports to the
monitoring station until the alarm condition has been verified. Local Fire alarm indication
is not affected by this option and the control panel shall sound the siren instantly on
receiving an alarm from a smoke detector. You can program a Verified Fire timeout of
between 00 and 60 seconds (00 = disabled).
If the Verified Fire feature is enabled, a Fire alarm event shall be reported if…
x
An alarm occurs from a Fire zone and the alarm has not been restored by the
end of the Verified Fire timeout – in this case, the alarm is reported at the end of
the Verified Fire timeout.
x
An alarm occurs from a Fire zone, the alarm is restored and then a second
alarm occurs from the same zone during the Verified Fire timeout – in this case,
the alarm is reported immediately on receiving the second alarm.
x
An alarm occurs from a Fire zone and a second alarm occurs from an additional
fire zone within the Verified Fire timeout – in this case, the alarm is reported
immediately on receiving the second alarm.
To program the Verified Fire timeout:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Verified Fire [9420].
2. Enter a value between 00 and 60 seconds (00 = disabled).
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
9.21: Battery Type
The battery type shall be defined according to the battery supplied with the
system (for example, if the battery sticker reads 1500 mAh, choose 1.5 Ah, if
3000 mAh, choose 3.0 Ah)
To program the battery type:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, Battery Type [9421].
2. Select the battery type.
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
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Chapter Ten: Communications
This section explains how to determine the way the control panel communicates via the
GSM and PSTN modules.
10.1: Monitoring station Reporting
The control panel supports three customer accounts for monitoring station reporting.
Each account has its own telephone number and communications options. An
explanation of each of these options is included in this section.
10.1.1: Telephone Number
To edit an account’s telephone number:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Accounts [951].
2. Select a CS account (1-3).
3. From the account’s sub-menu, select Phone Number [#1].
4. Enter up to 16 digits. Use the key to enter “*”, “#”, “,” (pause), “T”
(switch to DTMF tone dialling), “P” (switch to pulse dialling) or “+”
(international code). Use the key to delete one character at a time.
5. Press 3 when you have finished editing.
10.1.2: Account Number
To edit an account number:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Accounts [951].
2. Select a CS account (1-3).
3. From the account’s sub-menu, select Account Number [#2].
4. Enter up to eight digits. Enter leading zeros for account numbers of
less than eight digits. Use the key to enter hexadecimal digits.
1
5.
If the programmed protocol is Contact ID, “A” is not a valid entry in the account number.
Press 3 when you have finished editing.
10.1.3: Protocol
To program an account’s communication protocol:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Accounts [951].
2. Select a CS account (1-3).
3. From the account’s sub-menu, select Protocol [#3].
4. Select a protocol from the options available.
1
Account number 3 is designed for use with the Follow me feature. It is the only telephone
number that can be programmed by the user.
10.1.4: Communication Interface
For each account, you can choose whether the system employs cellular or PSTN
communication.
To program an account’s communication interface:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Accounts [951].
2. Select a CS account (1-3).
3. From the account’s sub-menu, select Interface [#4].
4. Select either GSM or PSTN.
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© MARMITEK
10.1.5: Call Attempts
The Call Attempts option determines the number of times the system tries to call a
telephone number before moving on to the next number in sequence.
To program the number of call attempts for an account:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Accounts [951].
2. Select a CS account (1-3).
3. From the account’s sub-menu, select Call Attempts [#5].
4. Enter a value between 01 and 15.
5. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
10.1.6: Two-Way Audio
The Two-Way audio option determines whether Two-Way Audio is enabled for the
account. For further information, see section 5.2.2: TWA Alarm Reporting.
To program the Two-Way Audio option for an account:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Accounts [951].
2. Select a CS account (1-3).
3. From the account’s sub-menu, select Two-Way Audio [#6].
4. Select Enabled or Disabled.
10.2: General Options for Monitoring station Reporting
The options included in this section concern the three accounts used for monitoring
station reporting.
10.2.1: Call Continue
When reporting an event, the system attempts to call Telephone #1. If the system fails in
its attempt to report the event, it dials Telephone #2 then Telephone #3, respectively. If
the Call Continue feature is active, the control panel sends a duplicate report to the
accounts that are selected. For example, using this feature, the system can send an
alarm report to the monitoring station then notify the user by sending an SMS message
to their mobile phone.
To program the Call Continue option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Accounts, Call
Continue [9517]; the current Call Continue setting is displayed.
Press…
1
2
3
To…
Toggle Account #1 in the Call Continue sequence.
Toggle Account #2 in the Call Continue sequence.
Toggle Account #3 in the Call Continue sequence.
Table 10.1: Call Continue Options
2.
3.
Use keys 1, 2 and 3 to toggle the account numbers.
Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
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10.2.2: Report Cycles
The system’s attempts to report events are organized in cycles. A report cycle is a set of
call attempts. If the system does not succeed in sending a report to any of the telephone
numbers, it tries to dial the entire report cycle again until it sends a successful report.
You can determine the number of times the system attempts to dial this sequence by
programming the Report Cycle option.
To program the number of Report Cycles:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Accounts,
Report Cycles [9518].
2. Enter a value between 01 and 03.
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
In the example illustrated in Figure 10.1, Account 1 is programmed with 2 call attempts,
Account 2 is programmed with 3 call attempts and the number of report cycles
programmed is 3.
Figure 10.1: Typical Report Cycle Sequence
10.3: Vocal Message Dialler
The Vocal Message Dialler is a feature that calls the user’s telephone number when
specific events occur and plays pre-recorded messages. These calls are made after the
system has reported the events to the monitoring station. Additionally, in the event of an
alarm, the user is able to establish a Two-Way Audio connection on receiving the vocal
message in order to check the premises.
The system supports three Vocal Message (VM) accounts. Each account has its own
telephone number, communication interface and Two-Way Audio options.
The types of event that are reported using the Vocal Message Dialler feature are
determined in VM Event Options – see 10.10: Vocal Message Dialler Event Options. If
one of these events occurs, the control panel dials the phone number for VM Account 1.
1 The availability of the Vocal Message Dialler feature is hardware dependent.
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© MARMITEK
The sequence for a vocal message call is as follows:
1. An event occurs and the control panel calls the telephone number of
VM Account 1.
2. When the user answers the call, the Home ID message and the
relevant event message are played.
3. The user presses 1 on their telephone; if there are additional events to
report the next message is played. Otherwise, “No Further Messages”
is announced.
-orIf Two-Way Audio is enabled for the VM account, the user may open the audio
channel by pressing 2 on their telephone. If the user does not want to open the
audio channel they may press “*” then “#” on their telephone to hang up.
The Vocal Message Dialler feature implements 3 call cycles when attempting to call the
Vocal Message (VM) accounts.
If a call to VM account 1 is not answered or the TC/VM Timeout (see 10.6.11:
Telecontrol/Vocal Message Timeout) expires before the message is acknowledged by
the user pressing 1, the control panel calls the telephone number programmed for VM
Account 2 then VM account 3.
If none of the calls are acknowledged, this cycle is repeated twice.
This means that the control panel performs a maximum of three call attempts to each VM
account.
10.3.1: Telephone Number
To edit a Vocal Message account’s telephone number:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Accounts [951].
2. Select a VM account (4-6).
3. From the account’s sub-menu, select Phone Number [#1].
4. Enter up to 16 digits. Use the key to enter “*”, “#”, “,” (pause), “T”
(switch to DTMF tone dialling), “P” (switch to pulse dialling) or “+”
(international code). Use the key to delete one character at a time.
5. Press 3 when you have finished editing.
10.3.2: Communication Interface
For each Vocal Message account, you can choose whether the system employs cellular
or PSTN communication.
To program a Vocal Message account’s communication interface:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Accounts [951].
2. Select a VM account (4-6).
3. From the account’s sub-menu, select Interface [#2].
4. Select either GSM or PSTN.
10.3.3: Two-Way Audio
The Two-Way audio option determines whether Two-Way Audio is enabled for the Vocal
Message account. For further information, see section 5.2.3: Two-Way Audio after Vocal
Messages.
To program the Two-Way Audio option for a VM account:
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1.
2.
3.
5.
From the Programming menu, select Communications, Accounts [951].
Select a CS account (4-6).
From the account’s sub-menu, select Two-Way Audio [#3].
Select Enabled or Disabled.
10.3.4: Home ID
The Home ID is a short message that is played at the beginning of a vocal message call
in order to identify the system to the user. For example, at the beginning of the vocal
message call, the message “Michael’s House” shall be played before the event
messages.
To play back the Home ID message:
x
From the Programming menu, select Communications, Accounts,
Home ID, Play Message [95191].
To record a Home ID message:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Accounts,
Home ID, Record Message [95192].
2. Press 3 to start recording the message.
3. Record your message. The message may be up to ten seconds long.
4. Press 3 to stop recording; the message is automatically played back
and OK? is displayed.
5. Press 3 to save your recording.
10.4: Remote Programming
Marmitek’s ProGuard800 Remote Programmer (RP) software enables you to operate and
program the system from a PC either on-site or from a remote location. The software
provides a comprehensive interface to the ProGuard800 control panel designed to facilitate
programming.
You can connect to the panel from a PC using one of three methods:
x
x
x
Direct Call: The RP calls the site, the system picks up and RP
communication is established.
Call-back: The RP calls the site, the system picks up then hangs up.
The system then calls the Call-back telephone number to establish a
connection.
USB Connection: The RP connects directly via the Main board’s USB
port (this method requires that you buy a USB Interface).
The following programming options relate to the method in which the Remote
Programmer software connects with the system.
10.4.1: Call-back Telephone Number
RP Call-back is a security feature that helps ensure that remote programming is only
performed by authorized personnel. When the Remote Programmer contacts the panel,
the panel hangs up and calls the Call-back telephone number.
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© MARMITEK
To edit the Call-back telephone number:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Remote Prog.,
Call-Back # [9521].
2. Enter up to 16 digits. Use the key to enter “*”, “#”, “,” (pause), “T”
(switch to DTMF tone dialling), “P” (switch to pulse dialling) or “+”
(international code). Use the key to delete one character at a time.
3. Press 3 when you have finished editing.
1
If there is no Call-back telephone number programmed, RP Call-back is disabled and the
system connects to the Remote Programmer software using the “direct call” method.
10.4.2: RP Pass code
The RP pass code is a six-digit code that grants access to remote programming. When
establishing an RP connection, the pass code programmed in the RP customer file on the
PC must be identical to the system’s RP pass code.
To edit the RP pass code:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Remote
Prog.,
RP Passcode [9522].
2. Enter six digits.
3. Press 3 when you have finished editing.
10.4.3: RP Communication Interface
The ProGuard800 can employ either cellular or PSTN communication during remote
programming.
For PSTN communication, the RP uses a double call method so that the line can be shared
with regular telephone handsets, an answering machine or fax. The Cellular Communications
Module has its own individual telephone number for data transfer and therefore, the double
call method is not needed. In this case, the RP calls the control panel directly.
To program the RP communication interface:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Remote Prog.,
RP Interface [9523].
2. Select either GSM or PSTN.
10.4.4: RP Access Options
Options are available to enable, disable or limit access to remote programming.
To program RP Access Options:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Remote Prog.,
RP Access [9524].
2. Select an RP access option from the following table.
Access option
Always Enable
During Disarm
Disable
User Initiated
Description
Up/downloading is always possible.
The system must be disarmed in order to establish a connection.
Up/downloading is disabled.
The user must perform Enable Programming from the Service menu
in order to establish a connection – see 4.7.11: Enable Programming.
Table 10.2: RP Access Options
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10.5: Service Call
The Service Call feature is designed to enable the user to call the monitoring service at
the push of a button. When the user presses and holds down the Service Call button (0)
for a few seconds, a two-way audio connection is established with the monitoring station.
10.5.1: Service Call Telephone Number
To edit the Service Call telephone number:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Service Call,
Phone Number [9531].
2. Enter up to 16 digits. Use the key to enter “*”, “#”, “,” (pause), “T”
(switch to DTMF tone dialling), “P” (switch to pulse dialling) or “+”
(international code). Use the key to delete one character at a time.
3. Press 3 when you have finished editing.
10.5.2: Service Call Interface
For the Service Call feature, you can choose whether the system employs cellular or
PSTN communication.
To program the Service Call interface:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Service Call,
Interface [9532].
2. Select either GSM or PSTN.
10.6: Communications Options
10.6.1: Line Monitor
The Line Monitor feature monitors both the PSTN telephone line and the GSM network. If
a problem is detected with either of these, a Media Loss event is registered in the log.
To program the Line Monitor setting:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, Line Monitor [95401].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
10.6.2: Periodic Test Interval
The Periodic Test is a test transmission the system sends to notify the monitoring station
that its reporting capability is fully functional.
Two options are available for the Periodic Test:
x
x
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You can program the system to send a Periodic Test message
according to a chosen time interval. This time interval can be between
1 and 254 hours (approximately 10 days).
The system calculates automatically the time the Periodic Test is sent
according to the last four digits of the account number. Automatically
calculated tests can be sent daily, weekly or monthly according to the
Auto Interval option – see 10.6.4: Auto Interval. This feature ensures
that the monitoring station is not inundated by test reports at any given
time.
© MARMITEK
1
The Periodic Test event message is an unclassified event. This means that it does not
belong to any event group. If the Periodic Test Interval is programmed with any value
other than 000, the event message shall be sent.
To program the Periodic Test Interval:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, Test Interval [95402].
2. Enter the test interval (001-254 hours) or 255 for an automatically
calculated test interval.
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
To disable the Periodic Test:
x
Program the Periodic Test Interval as 000.
10.6.3: First Test
If the Periodic Test Interval is programmed as 001-254 hours, you must also program the
time that the first Periodic Test is sent.
To program the First Test Time:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, First Test [95403].
2. Enter a time (HH:MM).
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
10.6.4: Auto Interval
The Auto Interval option determines the frequency of automatically calculated periodic
test messages.
To program the Auto Interval:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, Auto Interval [95404].
2. Select Daily, Weekly or Monthly.
10.6.5: Call Timeout
The Call Timeout is the amount of time the system waits for the first acknowledgement
(ACK1) from the monitoring station when reporting using the PSTN module. If ACK1 is
not received during this time, the system regards the call as a failed dialing attempt.
To program the Call Timeout:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, Call Timeout [95405].
2. Enter a time (001-255 seconds).
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
10.6.6: ACK. Timeout
The ACK Timeout is the amount of time the system waits for the second acknowledgement
(ACK2) from the monitoring station when reporting using the PSTN module. If ACK2 is not
received during this time, the system regards the call as a failed dialing attempt.
To program the ACK Timeout:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, ACK Timeout [95406].
2. Enter a time (001-255 seconds).
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
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10.6.7: PSTN Country
In order to meet the requirements of local telecommunications authorities, default
telephone line parameters have been chosen for a number of different countries.
To program the PSTN Country:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, PSTN Country [95407].
2. Select your country from the options available.
1
Marmitek offers custom telephone line parameter settings for countries that do not appear
in the list of pre-defined options. If your country does not appear among the available
options, select the option Custom Settings.
10.6.8: Dial Tone Wait
This option determines whether the system dials only when the dial tone is present or if
the dialling is initiated regardless of the dial tone.
To program the Dial Tone Wait option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, Dial Tone Wait [95408].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
10.6.9: RDM Period
Remote Diagnostics and Maintenance (RDM) session is a feature that is designed to
enable automated maintenance of installed control panels. During a maintenance session,
the control panel automatically dials the RP Call-back number and connects to the RDM
server. The time interval between maintenance sessions is called the RDM period.
To program the RDM period:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, RDM Period [95409].
2. Enter the required RDM period (001-255 days or 000 to disable RDM
communication).
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
10.6.10: Incoming Calls
This option determines whether the panel is able to receive incoming Telecontrol/TwoWay Audio calls.
To program the Incoming Calls option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, Incoming Call [95410].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
10.6.11: Telecontrol/Vocal Message Timeout
The Telecontrol/Vocal Message Timeout (TC/VM Timeout) determines the duration of a
Telecontrol, Two-Way Audio or Vocal Message call. In the case of a Telecontrol or TwoWay Audio call, when the time out expires, the system automatically disconnects unless
the call is manually extended by the operator. For Vocal Message calls, if the time out
expires and the user has not acknowledged the message, the system attempts to call the
next VM account’s telephone number. During a Vocal Message call, the timeout is reset
each time a message is acknowledged.
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© MARMITEK
To program the Telecontrol/Vocal Message Timeout:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, TC/VM Timeout [95411].
2. Enter a time (001-255 seconds).
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
10.6.12: TWA Mode
The Two-Way audio features offer a choice of two operation modes:
x
Duplex – both parties may speak at once just like a regular telephone.
x
Simplex – one party may speak while the other party listens.
To program the TWA mode option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, Two-Way Audio, TWA Mode [95412].
2. Select Duplex or Simplex.
10.7: GSM Options
10.7.1: GSM RX Report
The GSM RX Report is a feature that periodically reads the GSM signal strength of the
Cellular Communications module – see 4.7.9: GSM Signal Strength. This reading occurs
at the times programmed for the Periodic Test – see 10.6.2: Periodic Test Interval &
10.6.3: First Test. This means that each time the periodic test is sent, the system also
sends a GSM signal strength report to the monitoring station. The system also enters the
GSM signal strength in the event log.
1
If the Periodic Test is disabled, the GSM RX Report feature will not function.
The GSM RX report belongs to the Peripherals event group – see 10.9: Event Options for
Monitoring station Reporting. If this event group is disabled, the GSM signal strength is
still recorded in the event log.
To program the GSM RX Report option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, GSM Options, GSM RX Report [954131].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
10.7.2: PIN Code
The PIN (Personal Identity Number) is a four-digit code that protects the SIM card from
unauthorized use if lost or stolen.
To program the PIN code:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, GSM Options, PIN Code [954132].
2. Edit the four-digit PIN code.
3. Press 3 when you have finished editing.
10.7.3: SMS Center
To edit the SMS Centre telephone number:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, GSM Options, SMS Center [954133].
2. Enter up to 16 digits. Use the key to enter “*”, “#”, “,” (pause), “T”
(switch to DTMF tone dialling), “P” (switch to pulse dialling) or “+”
(international code). Use the key to delete one character at a time.
3. Press 3 when you have finished editing.
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10.7.4: SMS Command
The SMS Command option enables you to enable or disable the ability to send
commands to the system via SMS. For further information on SMS commands, see 3.8:
Remote Arming/Disarming via SMS and 6.3: Telephone Control
To enable/disable SMS commands:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, GSM Options, SMS Command [954134].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
10.7.5: SMS Confirmation
After an SMS command is executed by the system, a confirmation message is returned
to the sender’s mobile phone. You can enable or disable this feature using this option.
To enable/disable SMS confirmation:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, GSM Options, SMS Confirm. [954135].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
10.7.6: GSM Media Loss Time
The GSM Media Loss Time is a feature that is designed to reduce the amount of GSM
media loss events registered in the log and sent to the monitoring station. This feature is
recommended for use in cases of wide fluctuation of GSM signal strength.
If a problem is detected with the GSM, a Media Loss event is registered in the log and
sent to the monitoring station after the time defined in the GSM ML Time parameter.
GSM Media Restore will be registered in the log and sent to monitoring station always 3
minutes after GSM media restore is detected.
This feature is implemented only when the Line Monitor feature is enabled (see 10.6.1
Line Monitor).
To disable the GSM Media Loss feature (cancel the GSM Media Loss events) enter 000.
To program the GSM Media Loss Time:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, GSM Options, GSM ML Time. [954136].
2. Enter time (003-255 minutes or 000 to disable).
3. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
10.8: TWA Event Report Options
10.8.1: TWA Event Report
The TWA Event Report is an event report that is sent to the monitoring station to indicate
that Two-Way Audio communication is about to commence. If enabled, the system sends
the Contact ID event code 606000 before establishing Two-Way Audio communication.
1
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This option affects Contact ID only. If using SIA, a TWA event report is always sent
together with the TC/VM timeout, regardless of the configuration for this option.
© MARMITEK
To program the TWA Event option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, TWA Event Rept. [95414].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
10.8.2: TWA Time Report
If the TWA Time Report option is enabled, the last three digits of the TWA Event Report
are replaced with the amount of seconds programmed for the TC/VM Timeout – see
10.6.11: Telecontrol/Vocal Message Timeout. For example, if the TC/VM Timeout is
programmed as 120 seconds, the Contact ID event code that shall be sent for the TWA
Event Report shall be 606120.
To program the TWA Time Report option:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Comm.
Options, TWA Time Rept. [95415].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
10.9: Event Options for Monitoring station Reporting
System events are divided into a number of different event groups. This division allows
you to enable or disable reporting or Two-Way Audio for a specific group of events.
The different event groups are as follows:
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Burglary [#1]
Fire [#2]
Open/Close (arm/disarm) [#3]
Service [#4]
Power [#5]
Peripherals [#6]
RF Jamming [#7]
Medical [#8]
10.9.1: Event Reporting
You can enable or disable event reporting per Event Group. This allows you to filter the
type of events that are reported to the monitoring station.
To enable/disable reporting for an event group:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Event Options
[955].
2. Select an Event Group.
3. From the event group’s sub-menu, select Report [#1].
4. Select Enabled or Disabled.
10.9.2: Restore Reporting
For each event group, you can determine whether restore messages shall be sent.
To enable/disable restore reporting for an event group.
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Event Options
[955].
2. Select an event group.
3. From the event group’s sub-menu, select Report Restore [#2].
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4.
Select Enabled or Disabled.
10.9.3: Two-Way Audio
For Burglary, Fire and Medical event groups, there is an additional option that enables
Two-Way Audio for that event group – see 5.2.2: TWA Alarm Reporting.
To enable/disable Two-Way Audio for an event group:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, Event Options
[955].
2. Select an Event Group (Burglary, Fire or Medical).
3. Select TWA [#3].
4. Select Enabled or Disabled.
10.10: Vocal Message Dialler Event Options
Events reported using the Vocal Message Dialler are divided into event groups that
correspond with the pre-recorded event messages. This allows you to enable or disable
the Vocal Message feature for a specific group of events. For further information on this
feature, see 10.3: Vocal Message .
The vocal message event groups and their associated system events are as follows:
x
x
x
x
x
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Burglary [#1]
o
Alarm from Zone (excluding Gas, Flood and
Environmental zones)
o
Zone Tamper
o
Tamper
o
Duress
Fire [#2]
o
Zone Fire Alarm
o
User Activated Fire Alarm
Panic [#3]
o
Zone Panic Alarm
o
User Activated Panic Alarm
Medical [#4]
o
Zone Medical Alarm
o
User Activated Medical Alarm
o
No Motion
System Trouble [#5]
o
Battery Low
o
Transmitter Low Battery
o
AC Loss
o
Media Loss
o
Device Trouble
o
Communication Trouble
o
Transmitter Out of Synch.
o
Control Panel Transmitter Out of Synch.
o
Supervision Loss
o
Zone Trouble
o
FM Jamming
© MARMITEK
x
x
x
Arm [#6]
o
Full Arm
o
Part Arm
o
Perimeter Arm
Disarm [#7]
o
Disarm
o
Disarm after Alarm
Water [#8]
o
Zone Water Alarm (Flood)
To enable/disable the vocal message for an event group:
1. From the Programming menu, select Communications, VM Event Opt.
[956].
2. Select an event group.
3. Select Enabled or Disabled.
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Chapter Eleven: X-10 Home Automation Programming
This chapter explains the programmable options for the system’s home automation
features. The Home Automation module is an add-on optional extra that you can install
inside the panel’s plastic housing.
11.1: X-10 Overview
The control panel’s home automation feature employs the X-10 protocol and this enables
compatibility with a wide variety of readily available home automation products.
Before you can start programming the system’s Home Automation features, you should
be familiar with the basic concept behind X-10 automation.
X-10 is a protocol that enables you to send commands and other data over regular
existing power lines. This means that, using an X-10 transmitter (the panel’s Home
Automation module), you can send On/Off commands to X-10 receivers (lamp and
appliance modules) that are plugged into electricity outlets around the home. From here
on, we shall refer to these X-10 receivers as “HA units”.
Each HA unit has two codes that are used for identification. These codes are known as
the House code and the Unit code and are usually defined by adjusting the dials that
appear on the X-10 unit. In Figure 11.1, the HA unit is set to House A, Unit 3.
Figure 11.1: HA Unit Dials
The control panel supports sixteen HA units on one House code. To ensure that the
Home Automation features function correctly, you must abide by the following guidelines.
x
x
The House code must be the same on each HA unit.
The House code on the HA units must be identical to the House code
programmed in the panel’s memory – see section 11.3: House Code.
11.2: HA Units
The following sections explain the programming options available for HA units.
11.2.1: Scheduling
Scheduling allows you to program the panel to send On/Off commands to an HA unit at
specific times. The Scheduling section of Home Automation programming is identical to
that described in Chapter Six: X-10 Home Automation Control. For further information on
programming the On Time, Off Time and Schedule for each HA unit, see section 6.4:
Scheduling.
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© MARMITEK
11.2.2: On by Zone
The On by Zone feature allows you to choose two zones that activate the HA unit when
triggered. When either one of these zones is triggered, the system sends an On
command to the HA unit according to the unit’s programmed Pulse Time – see 11.2.8:
Pulse Time. For example, you have a magnetic contact installed above the front door.
When the door is opened, the hall light is lit.
To select the sensors that activate an HA unit:
1. From the Programming menu, select HA Programming, HA Units
[961].
2. Select an HA unit (01-16).
3. From the HA unit’s sub-menu, select On by Zone [#04].
4. Enter up to two zone numbers.
5. Press 3 when the desired setting is displayed.
11.2.3: On by Arm
The On by Arm feature activates the HA unit when the system is armed using any of the
arming methods. The amount of time the HA unit is activated is determined by the Pulse
Time – see 11.2.8: Pulse Time. If the Pulse Time is programmed as “Toggle”, disarming
the system switches the HA unit off.
To program the On by Arm feature:
1. From the Programming menu, select HA Programming, HA Units
[961].
2. Select an HA unit (01-16).
3. From the HA unit’s sub-menu, select On by Arm [#05].
4. Select Enabled or Disabled.
11.2.4: On by Alarm
On by Alarm is a feature designed for use with X-10 sirens. When an alarm occurs, the
HA unit (i.e. siren) is activated for the duration of the siren cutoff – see 7.10.3: Siren CutOff. The X-10 siren sounds a continuous pattern for intrusion/panic alarms and a pulsed
pattern for fire alarms.
To program the On by Alarm feature:
1. From the Programming menu, select HA Programming, HA Units
[961].
2. Select an HA unit (01-16).
3. From the HA unit’s sub-menu, select On by Alarm [#06].
4. Select Enabled or Disabled.
1
If an HA unit is programmed to be activated by the On by Alarm feature, program all other
operation modes (On by Arm, Randomize, etc.) as disabled.
Do not program more than one HA unit to be activated by the On by Alarm feature. If more
than one siren is required, set all sirens with the same House and Unit code.
11.2.5: Keyfob Control
Each KR814 Keyfob, offers control of up to two individual HA units. This programming
option allows you to enable or disable this feature per HA unit.
To program the Keyfob control option for an HA unit:
1. From the Programming menu, select HA Programming, HA Units
[961].
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2.
3.
4.
Select an HA unit (01-16).
From the HA unit’s sub-menu, select KF Ctrl [#07].
Select Enabled or Disabled.
11.2.6: Telephone Control
Via SMS or DTMF, you can send commands to the system in order to control various HA
units. This option allows you to enable or disable this feature for each HA unit.
To program the SMS control option for an HA unit:
1. From the Programming menu, select HA Programming, HA Units
[961].
2. Select an HA unit (01-16).
3. From the HA unit’s sub-menu, select TEL CTRL [#08]. [#08].
4. Select Enabled or Disabled.
11.2.7: Randomize
When the system is fully armed between the hours 9:00pm and 6:00am, the Randomize
feature turns HA units on and off at random. This gives the impression that the house is
occupied and acts as a deterrent against potential intruders.
To program an HA unit to be included in the Randomize feature:
1. From the Programming menu, select HA Programming, HA Units
[961].
2. Select an HA unit (01-16).
3. From the HA unit’s sub-menu, select Randomize [#09].
4. Select Enabled or Disabled.
11.2.8: Pulse Time
The Pulse Time determines the manner in which an HA unit responds to the On
command. You can program each HA unit switch on momentarily. This means that, on
receiving the On command, the unit will be switched on for a programmed amount of time.
For example, you can program the hall light to switch on for 1 minute and automatically
switch itself off. Alternatively, the HA unit can be programmed to toggle on and off.
To program the Pulse Time for an HA unit:
1. From the Programming menu, select HA Programming, HA Units
[961].
2. Select an HA unit (01-16).
3. From the HA unit’s sub-menu, select Pulse Time [#10].
4. Select 5 sec, 30 sec, 1 min, 2 min or Toggle.
11.2.9: Descriptor
You can assign a 16-character descriptor for each HA unit. These descriptors help the
user to identify the various HA units installed around the home.
To edit an HA unit descriptor:
1. From the Programming menu, select HA Programming, HA Units
[961].
2. Select an HA unit (01-16).
3. From the HA unit’s sub-menu, select Descriptor [#11].
4. Edit the descriptor using the alphanumeric keypad.
5. Press 3 when you have finished editing.
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© MARMITEK
11.3: House Code
The House code is part of the identification code of each HA unit. For the Home
Automation features to function correctly, the House code on each HA unit must be
identical to the House code programmed in the system’s memory.
To program the system House code:
1. From the Programming menu, select HA Programming, House Code
[962].
2. Using the arrow keys, select a House code from the options available
(A-P).
11.4: HA Control
The HA Control option allows you to enable or disable all Home Automation features for
the entire system.
To program the Home Automation setting:
1. From the Programming menu, select System Options, HA Control
[963].
2. Select Enabled or Disabled.
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Chapter Twelve: System Initialization
The Initialization menu offers a number of options that enable you to reset the system.
This menu is particularly useful when re-installing a panel at a new site. The Initialization
function clears the entire system. This restores programming defaults, clears the log,
user codes and the transmitter register. Options are also available that enable you to
clear a specific section of the system’s memory separately.
12.1: Initialization
The Initialization function clears the entire system and resets factory defaults. If your
system does not include multi-default and multi-language support, skip steps 2 and 3 of
the following procedure.
To initialize the control panel:
1. From the Programming menu, select Initialize, Init All [971]; the
system prompts you for confirmation.
2. For firmware versions that include multi-default and multi-language
support, select the set of programming defaults that you want to load.
3. For firmware versions that include multi-default and multi-language
support, select the required interface language.
4. Press 3 to confirm; factory programming defaults are restored, the
event log is cleared, user codes and wireless transmitters are
deleted.
1
During system initialization, recorded vocal messages (Message Centre and Home ID)
are not deleted.
12.2: Default Program Restore
Loading the system’s default program enables you to restore the factory-set
programming defaults.
To load the default program:
1. From the Programming menu, select Initialize, Load Defaults [972];
the system prompts you for confirmation.
2. Press 3 to confirm; factory programming defaults are restored.
12.3: Clear User Codes
Clear User Codes deletes all programmed user codes and restores the default Master
and Installer codes.
To clear user codes:
1. From the Programming menu, select Initialize, Clear Users [973]; the
system prompts you for confirmation.
2. Press 3 to confirm; all user codes are deleted and default codes are
restored.
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© MARMITEK
12.4: Clear Wireless Transmitters
The Clear Wireless Transmitters function enables you to delete all registered transmitters
at once.
To clear the transmitter register:
1. From the Programming menu, select Initialize, Clear Wireless [974];
the system prompts you for confirmation.
2. Press 3 to confirm; the transmitter register is cleared.
12.5: Find Modules
The Find Modules function runs a diagnostic test that identifies the modules and keypads
that are connected to the system bus. With this information, the system knows which
add-on modules should be present, enabling supervision for those modules.
To run the Find Modules test:
1. From the Programming menu, select Initialize, find Modules [975]; the
system prompts you for confirmation.
2. Press 3 to confirm; the system begins to search for the connected
modules. At the end of the search, the modules that are present are
displayed and the system asks if you want to save the displayed list.
3. Press 3; the list is saved.
1
If a connected module is not included in the list, check the wiring connections and run this
test again.
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Appendix A: Menu Structure
Legend:
Installer code required
Master code required
-86-
© MARMITEK
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© MARMITEK
ProGuard800™
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© MARMITEK
ProGuard800™
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© MARMITEK
Appendix B: Transmitter Installation
PIR Sensors (MS845)
The MS845 are intelligent wireless PIR sensors for use with the ProGuard800 system. All of
these sensors implement a feature to combat the problem of multiple transmissions, which
drastically reduce the life of the batteries. After each transmission, there is a four-minute
delay during which further transmissions will not be sent.
The MS845 are designed for installations prone to nuisance alarms caused by pets or
small animals.
Mounting
Hole
LED
Jumper
LED
Indicator
Battery
Holder
Easy
Lock
Mode
Jumper
Tamper
Switch
Pulse Count
Jumper
Antenna
Vertical
Adjustment
Scale
Pyro
Sensor
Considerations Before Installation
x
x
x
x
Select a location from which the pattern of
the detector is most likely to be crossed by a
burglar, should there be a break in.
Do not place bulky objects in front of the
detector.
Avoid a location which comes in direct
contact with radiators, heating/cooling ducts,
mirrors and air conditioners.
Select an appropriate installation height
from Table B1.
Lens
Standard
Long
Range
Curtain
Animals
Mounting
Height
2.2m (6.6’)
2m (6.5’)
1m (3.25’)
2m (6.5’)
Table B.1: Recommended Mounting Height
Pet Immunity Guidelines
It is expected that the MS845 will eliminate false alarms caused by:
x
x
x
1
Animals up to 45kg (PI)
Several small rodents
Random flying birds.
The weight of the animal should only be used as a guide, other factors su
the length and color of fur also affect the level of immunity.
For maximum pet immunity the following guidelines are recommended:
ProGuard800™
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x
x
x
x
Mount the center of the unit at a height of 2m with the PCB vertical setting at -4.
Set the pulse counter to 2.
Do not aim the detector at stairways that can be climbed by an animal.
Avoid a location where an animal can come within 1.8m of the detector by
climbing on furniture, boxes or other objects.
INSTALLATION PROCEDURE
To install PIR sensors:
1. Open the housing by removing the front cover. To do so, insert a screwdriver in
the release slot (located at the bottom of the detector between the front and
back cover). Turn the screwdriver 90º to release the cover.
2. Remove the PCB by turning counter-clockwise and removing the Easy Lock –
do not touch the face of the pyro sensor!
3. Apply battery power by removing the isolator that separates the battery from the
contacts on the battery holder. (Note: Due to the occurrence of voltage delay
in lithium batteries that have been in storage, the batteries may initially
appear to be dead. In this case, leave the unit in Test mode for a few
minutes until the battery voltage level is stabilized.)
4. Place the Mode jumper over pins 2 & 3 (Radio Mode); the LED flashes.
1
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Install the Mode jumper only after applying battery power.
From the Programming menu, select Devices, Zones [911].
Select the zone to which you want to register the transmitter; the system initiates
Registration mode. When Save? appears on the panel’s LCD display, press 9.
Remove the Mode jumper and place it over one pin for storage.
Choose an appropriate mounting height from Table B.1 and test the transmitter
from the exact mounting position before permanently mounting the unit.
Knock out the mounting holes and attach the base to the wall.
Mount the PCB at the required vertical adjustment and replace the PCB screw.
Write the number of the zone on the sticker provided. Affix the sticker inside the
front cover for future reference and replace the front cover.
Warm-Up Time
The detector will need to warm up for the
first 90 seconds after applying power.
Pulse Counter
Switch 2
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
Switch 3
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
Pulse Count
1
2
3
Adaptive
Table B.3: Pulse Count Setting (MS845)
The pulse counter determines the amount of beams that need to be crossed before the
detector will generate an alarm. To set the pulse counter, refer to table B.3.
Adaptive Pulse Count
Using the Adaptive pulse count feature, the detector chooses between 1 or 2 pulses
based on its analysis of the received signal.
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© MARMITEK
Vertical Adjustment
To position the PCB, turn the Easy Lock counterclockwise and slide the PCB up or down to the required
setting using the vertical adjustment scale. The
detector’s coverage area is 12m x 12m when the PCB is
positioned at 0. Slide the PCB up towards the -8 position
to decrease the coverage area bringing the beams closer
to the mounting wall.
Walk Test Mode
A walk test is performed in order to determine the lens
coverage pattern of the detector – see Figure B.2. Walk
Test mode cancels the delay time between detections,
enabling you to perform an efficient walk test.
To perform a Walk Test.
1. Place the Mode jumper over pins 1 & 2.
2. Walk across the scope of the detector
Figure B.2: Lens Coverage Diagrams
according to the detection pattern selected.
3. Confirm that the LED activates and deactivates accordingly. Wait five seconds
after each detection before continuing the test.
4. After completing the walk test, remove the jumper and place it over one pin for
storage – see Mode Jumper Safeguard.
LED Indication
The LED indicator is lit twice every time a
transmission is made. To enable or disable LED
indication, refer to Table B.4 below.
LED Indication
MS845
Disabed
Enabled
DIP-Switch 1 OFF
DIP-Switch 1 ON
Table B.4: LED Indication Settings
1
The LED should only be disabled after successfully walk testing the detector.
Mode Jumper Safeguard
During normal operation, the Mode jumper should be placed over one pin for storage.
When the mode jumper is placed over two pins, the detector is either in Radio or Walk
Test Mode. As a precaution, these modes are limited to three minutes. After three
minutes have expired, the detector switches back to normal operation. If this happens,
you can reset a mode by removing and replacing the mode jumper.
ProGuard800™
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Antenna
Magnetic Contact (DS831)
The DS831 is a magnetic contact designed for
installation on doors and windows.
LED
Indicator
INSTALLATION PROCEDURE
Battery
Holder
To install magnetic contacts.
1.
To open the housing, insert a small
screwdriver at the bottom of the unit
between the front and back cover and twist
the screwdriver to release the cover.
Tamper
Switch
Loop
Terminals
1cm max
Operation
Mode Jumper
PCB
Release
Tab
Location
of wiring
knockout
Figure B.3: DS831 (cover off)
2.
Remove the divider separating the battery from the contacts on the battery holder.
When you apply power and the Tamper switch is open, the DS831 enters Test mode
during which a transmission is sent every few seconds. You can terminate Test
mode by closing the Tamper switch.
Note: Due to the occurrence of voltage delay in lithium batteries that have been in
storage, the batteries may initially appear to be dead. In this case, leave the unit in
Test mode for a few minutes until the battery voltage level is stabilized.
1
When handling the PCB, do not apply pressure on the antenna.
3.
From the Programming menu, select Devices, Zones [911].
4.
Select the zone to which you want to
register the transmitter; the system initiates
Registration mode. When Save? appears
on the panel’s LCD display, press 9.
After registration, press the DS831’s
tamper switch to terminate Test mode.
5.
Jumper Position
Pins 1&2
Pins 2&3
Jumper
Removed
Operation Mode
Universal Transmitter
Magnetic Switch
Magnetic
Switch/
Universal Transmitter
Table B.5: Operation Mode Jumper
6.
Before permanently mounting the unit, test the transmitter from the exact
mounting position.
PCB
7. To remove the PCB, press the PCB release tab and carefully lift the
board and slide the board away from the back cover.
8. The DS831 is able to operate in three modes: Magnetic Switch,
Universal Transmitter or a combination of the two. If connecting a wired
contact loop (N.C.), connect the terminal block as follows: 1 - Alarm; 2 GND. For this purpose, a wiring knockout is provided in the back cover.
9. Mount the back cover using two screws and
HOUSING
replace the PCB. Use ISO 7050 (ST3.5 x 22) or
Figure B.4:
Mounting
similar countersunk screws so that the screw head
Screw Position
will not touch the PCB – see Figure B.4.
10. To open the magnet’s housing, insert a small screwdriver into one of the pry-off slots
located at either end of the magnet’s back cover and lift to separate from the front
cover.
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© MARMITEK
11. Mount the back cover of the magnet using two screws. Make sure that the guideline
on the magnet is correctly aligned with the guideline on the transmitter.
1
Do not install the magnet further than 1cm from the transmitter.
12. Test the transmitter, making certain that the LED is lit when opening the door/window
and again when closing.
13. Close the front covers of the transmitter and the magnet.
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Universal Transmitter (US832)
The US832 is a universal transmitter that includes a single output for use in a wide range
of wireless applications.
Installation Procedure
Antenna
Battery
Holder
To install universal transmitters:
LED
1. To open the housing, insert a small
Indicator
screwdriver at the bottom of the unit
between the front and back cover
and twist the screwdriver to release
Tamper
the cover.
Switch
2. Remove the divider separating the
battery from the contacts on the
battery holder. When you apply power
Loop
and the Tamper switch is open, the
Terminals
US832 enters Test mode during which
PCB
Location
a transmission is sent every few
Release
of wiring
seconds. You can terminate Test
Tab
knockout
mode by closing the Tamper switch.
Figure B.5: US832 (cover off)
Test mode is automatically terminated
after approximately five minutes.
3. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Zones [911].
4. Select the zone to which you want to register the transmitter; the system
initiates Registration mode. When Save? appears on the panel’s LCD
display, press 3.
5. After registration, press the US832’s tamper switch to terminate Test
mode.
6. Before permanently mounting the unit, test the transmitter from the
exact mounting position.
7. To remove the PCB, press the PCB release tab, carefully lift the board
and slide the board away from the back cover.
1
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
-98-
When handling the PCB, do not apply pressure on the antenna.
Knockout the wiring hole in the back cover.
Thread the wires through the wiring hole.
Mount the back cover to the wall using two screws and
replace the PCB. Use ISO 7050 (ST3.5 x 22) or similar
countersunk screws so that the screw head will not touch the
PCB – see Figure B.4.
Connect the terminal block as follows: 1 - Alarm; 2 - GND.
Test the transmitter, making certain that the LED is lit during
transmissions.
Close the front cover of the US832.
PCB
HOUSING
Figure B.4:
Mounting
Screw Position
© MARMITEK
Glass break Sensor (GB843)
The GB843 is an intelligent acoustic glass break sensor with an incorporated wireless
transmitter.
Mounting Considerations
The GB843 acoustic sensor is omnidirectional, providing 360º coverage.
The coverage is measured from the
sensor to the point on the glass
farthest from the sensor. The sensor
can be mounted as close as 1m from
Figure B.6: Acoustic Sensor Range Measurement
the glass.
(plate, tempered, laminated and wired glass)
Sensor range:
x
If mounting on the ceiling, the opposite wall or adjoining walls, the
maximum range is 6m for plate, tempered, laminated and wired glass.
x
For armor-coated glass, the maximum range is 3.65m.
Minimum recommended glass size:
x
0.3m x 0.6m
Glass thickness:
x
Plate: 2.4mm to 6.4mm
x
Tempered: 3.2mm to 6.4mm
x
Wired: 6.4mm
x
Laminated: 3.2mm to 6.4mm
For best detection:
x
The sensor must always be in direct line of sight of all windows to be
protected.
x
If mounting on the wall, try to install the sensor directly opposite the
protected window. If this is not possible, adjoining side walls are also a
good location.
x
If mounting on the ceiling, install the sensor 2-3m into the room.
x
Avoid installing in rooms with lined, insulating or sound deadening
drapes.
x
Avoid installing in rooms with closed wooden window shutters inside.
x
Avoid installing in the corners of a room.
The GB843 is best suited to rooms with moderate noise.
1
The sensor may not consistently detect cracks in the glass, bullets which break through the glass or
glass breaking around corners and in other rooms. Glass break sensors should always be backed up
by interior protection.
For best false alarm immunity:
x
Locate the sensor at least 1.2m away from noise sources (televisions,
speakers, sinks, doors, etc.).
x
Avoid rooms smaller than 3m x 3m and rooms with multiple noise
sources.
x
Do not use where white noise, such as air compressor noise, is
present (a blast of compressed air may cause a false alarm).
ProGuard800™
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x
x
Do not define the zone as 24hr. It is recommended to register the GB843
to a perimeter arming group that arms the perimeter doors and windows of
the premises.
Avoid humid rooms – the GB843 is not hermetically sealed. Excess
moisture can eventually cause a short and a false alarm.
Areas to avoid:
x
Glass airlocks and
glass vestibule areas
x
Noisy kitchens
x
Residential car
garages
x
Small utility rooms
x
x
x
Stairwells
Small bathrooms
Other small
acoustically live
rooms
For glass break protection in such applications, use shock sensors on the windows or
window frames connected to an US832 universal transmitter.
Installation Procedure
Tamper
Switch
Battery
Holder
Terminal
Block
LED
Indicator
Antenna
Mounting
Knockout
Mounting
Knockout
Acoustic
Sensor
Figure B.7: GB843 (cover off)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
-100-
Open the housing using a small flat-head screwdriver to separate the
base from the cover.
Remove the insulator separating the battery from the contacts on the
battery holder. When you apply power and the Tamper switch is open,
the GB843 enters Test mode during which a transmission is sent every
few seconds. You can terminate Test mode by closing the Tamper
switch. Test mode is automatically terminated after approximately five
minutes.
From the Programming menu, select Devices, Zones [911].
Select the zone to which you want to register the transmitter; the system
initiates Registration mode. When Save? appears on the panel’s LCD
display, press 3.
After registration, press the GB843’s tamper switch to terminate Test
mode.
Choose a suitable mounting location according to the guidelines in the
previous section.
© MARMITEK
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Before permanently mounting the unit, test the acoustic sensor and the
transmitter from the exact mounting position. For further information on
testing the acoustic sensor, refer to the following section, Hand Clap
Test.
Knock out the required mounting holes on the back cover.
Mount the unit to the wall using the mounting screws provided.
Write the number of the zone on the sticker provided and affix the
sticker inside the front cover for future reference.
Close the front cover making sure that it snaps shut.
Hand Clap Test
The Hand Clap test enables you to test the GB843 while in Normal mode. This test
checks the sensors power supply, microphone and circuit board.
To perform a Hand Clap test
Clap your hands loudly under the sensor; the LED flashes twice but an alarm is not
generated.
ProGuard800™
-101-
Smoke Detector (SD833)
The SD833 is a brand-name smoke detector with an integrated Marmitek transmitter.
Installation Procedure
The following procedure explains the installation of the SD833 wireless smoke detector
and its registration to the receiver. For further information regarding the smoke detector’s
location, test procedures, maintenance and specifications, refer to the manufacturer’s
installation instructions provided with this product.
To install smoke detectors:
1. Open the cover by lifting the opening Opening
Tab
tab while firmly holding the base with
your other hand.
2. Push the cover backwards to
separate the cover from the base.
3. Install a 9V battery into the detector’s
battery snap.
4. Insert the Test jumper; the SD833
enters Test mode and the LED
flashes every few seconds.
LED
5. From the Programming menu, select Indicator
Devices, Zones [911].
Test
6. Select the zone to which you want to Jumper
register the transmitter; the system
9V
initiates Registration mode. When Battery
Save? appears on the panel’s LCD
display, press 3.
Figure B.9: SD833 (cover open)
7. After registration, remove the Test
jumper and place it over one pin for
storage.
8. Before permanently mounting the unit, test the transmitter from the
exact mounting position.
9. Attach the mounting base to the ceiling using the screws provided.
10. Replace the cover onto its hinges and close the cover until it snaps
together with the base.
-102-
© MARMITEK
Keyfobs (PR811/KR814)
The PR811 and KR814 are keyfob transmitters that are supported by the system.
REGISTRATION PROCEDURE
To register keyfobs:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Keyfobs [912].
2. Select the keyfob you want to register; the system initiates Registration mode.
3. Press a button, making sure that the keyfob’s LED lights up when the button is
pressed.
4. Press the same button again. When Save? appears on the panel’s LCD display,
press 9.
PR811
The PR811 is a one-button transmitter that generates a Medical
Emergency alarm when pressed. The transmitter is water resistant
and can be worn around the neck. Its large button makes it ideal
for elderly or sight-impaired users.
When the battery is low, the PR811’s LED flashes during
transmission and a Low Battery signal is sent to the receiver. When
either of these two indications are observed, replace the unit.
Figure B.10: PR811
KR814
The KR814 is a four-button keyfob transmitter that offers a
number of functions including arm, disarm and SOS Panic.
When the battery is low, the KR814’s LED flashes during
transmission and a Low Battery signal is sent to the receiver.
When either of these two indications are observed, replace
the batteries.
Figure B.11: KR814
To replace the batteries:
1. Insert a small screwdriver into the pry-off slot – see
Figure B.12 Carefully twist the screwdriver to
separate the front and back of the casing.
2. Observing correct polarity, replace the batteries
(3V lithium, size: CR1225).
3. Close the casing making sure that the front and
back click shut.
ProGuard800™
Figure B.12: Opening the
KR814’s Casing
-103-
Wireless Keypads (WK820/RC840)
INTRODUCTION
The WK820 and RC840 are one-way wireless
keypads primarily designed as additional arming
stations, including three arming keys that enable Full,
Part or Perimeter arming modes. Pressing the Full
and Perimeter buttons simultaneously generates an
SOS panic alarm. Additionally, the keypad may be
used to control Home Automation modules.
Figure B.13: WK820
The WK820 also includes an additional Cancel key 9 that clears the keypad in the event
that a key is pressed by mistake while entering a code, for example. This key causes the
keypad to disregard what was previously entered enabling the user to start again.
REGISTRATION PROCEDURE
To register wireless keypads:
1. From the Programming menu, select Devices, Keypads [913].
2. Select the keypad you want to register; the system initiates
Registration mode.
3. Press a button on the keypad making sure that a LED lights up
when the button is pressed.
4. Press the same button again. When Save? appears on the
panel’s LCD display, press 9.
BATTERY REPLACEMENT (WK820)
Figure B.14: RC840
Every time a key is pressed, one of the battery status LEDs is lit. When the battery needs
to be replaced, the red Low Battery LED is lit.
To replace the battery:
1. Insert a small screwdriver into the pry-off slots at the bottom of the unit and twist
to remove the back cover.
2. Observing correct polarity, replace the battery (9V, alkaline).
3. Replace the back cover making sure that the two covers click shut.
9V
Alkaline
Battery
Tamper
Switch
Buzzer
Figure B.15: WK820 (back cover off)
-104-
© MARMITEK
BATTERY REPLACEMENT (RC840)
When the battery is low, the RC840’s LED flashes during transmission.
To replace the battery:
1. Remove the battery cover located at the rear of the unit. To do so, press the
release tab using a small screwdriver and lift the cover away from the RC840’s
plastic housing.
2. Observing correct polarity, replace the battery (9V, alkaline).
3. Replace the battery cover making sure that it clicks shut.
9V Alkaline
Battery
Figure B.16: RC840
(battery cover off)
ProGuard800™
-105-
Transmitter Specifications
The technical specifications for the transmitters that appear in this appendix are listed
below. All transmitters are available in 868.35 MHz FM frequencies. Specifications may
be modified without prior notice.
MS845
Antenna: Built-in Whip
Power: 3.6V ½ AA Lithium Battery
Current Consumption: 30mA (transmission),
6µA (standby)
Pyroelectric Sensor: Dual Element
Maximum Coverage: 12 x 12m
Pulse Count: 1, 2, 3 or Adaptive
LED Indicator: Selectable
Adaptive Temperature Compensation
RFI Immunity: 30V/m
Operating Temperature: -10 to 60°C
Fire Protection: ABS Plastic Housing
Dimensions: 110 x 60 x 45mm
DS831/US832
Antenna: Built-in Whip
Power: 3.6V ½ AA Lithium Battery
Current Consumption: 25mA (transmission)
10µA (standby)
Loop Input Voltage Range: 0-15VDC/AC (peak
to peak)
RFI Immunity: 40V/m
Operating Temperature: 0 to 60°C
Dimensions: 65 x 30 x 25mm
SD833
Antenna: Built-in Internal Whip
Current Consumption: 30mA (transmission),
20µA (standby)
Power: 9V Alkaline Battery
RFI Immunity: 40V/m
Ambient temperature: 0° C to + 60° C
(operation)
Dimensions: 138 x 118 x 44mm
GB843
Antenna: Built-in Whip
Power: 3.6V ½ AA Lithium Battery
Current Consumption: 25mA (transmission)
30µA (standby)
-106-
Microphone: Omni-directional electret
Maximum Range: 6m (plate, tempered,
laminated and wired glass)
3.65m (armor-coated glass)
RFI Immunity: 20V/m
Operating Temperature: 0 to 50°C
Dimensions: 80 x 108 x 43mm
PR811
Antenna: Built-in Whip
Power: Non-replaceable battery
RFI Immunity: 40V/m
Operating Temperature: 0 to 60°C
Dimensions: 60 x 40 x 15mm
KR814
Antenna: Built-in Whip
Power: 2 x 3V Lithium Battery Size CR1225
Current Consumption: 16mA (transmission)
2µA (standby)
RFI Immunity: 40V/m
Operating Temperature: 0 to 60°C
Dimensions: 62 x 42 x 15mm
WK820
Antenna: Printed on PCB
Current Consumption: 26mA (transmission)
2µA (standby)
Power: 9V Alkaline Battery
RFI Immunity: 40V/m
Operating Temperature: 0 to 60°C
Dimensions: 130 x 110 x 28mm
RC840
Antenna: Printed on PCB
Current Consumption: 25mA (transmission)
3µA (standby)
Power: 9V Alkaline Battery
RFI Immunity: 40V/m
Operating Temperature: 0 to 60°C
Dimensions: 128 x 49 x 27mm
© MARMITEK
Appendix C: Event Table
Burglary
Description
Restore
Alarm from Zone
Zone Alarm Restore
Contact ID
Address Field
NBA
1130
Device Number
Š
Š
NBR
3130
Device Number
NUB
1570
Device Number
Š
Š
NUU
3570
Device Number
NTA
1137
Device Number
Zone Bypassed
Zone Unbypassed
SIA
Zone Tamper
Š
Š
NTR
3137
Device Number
NPA
1120
Device Number
Š
Š
NPR
3120
Device Number
Panic Alarm
NPA
1120
Device Number
Tamper
NTA
1137
Device Number
Device Number
Zone Tamper Restore
Zone Panic Alarm
Zone Panic Restore
Tamper Restore
Š
Š
Duress
Bell Cancel
Š
Disarm after Alarm
Water Alarm
Water Alarm Restore
Š
Š
Environmental Alarm
Environmental Alarm Restore
Š
Š
Alarm Cancel
NTR
3137
NHA
1121
—
NBC
1521
User Number
NOR
1458
User Number
NWA
1154
Device Number
NWH
3154
Device Number
NUA
1150
Device Number
NUH
3150
Device Number
NOC
1406
User Number
NFA
1110
Device Number
Device Number
Fire
Fire Alarm
Fire Alarm Restore
Š
Š
NFR
3110
NGA
1151
Device Number
Š
Š
NGH
3151
Device Number
NCL
3401
User Number
Gas Alarm
Gas Alarm Restore
Open/Close
Full Arm
Part Arm
NCG
3456
User Number
Perimeter Arm
NCG
3441
User Number
Disarm
NOP
1401
User Number
Service
Edit User Code
Š
NJV
1462
User Number
Delete User Code
Š
NJX
3462
User Number
System Programming
Š
NLB
1627
End System Programming
Š
NLX
1628
Remote Programming
Š
NRB
1412
End Remote Programming
Š
NRS
3412
—
—
—
—
Walk Test
Š
NTS
1607
User Number
End Walk Test
Š
NTE
3607
—
Set Time
Š
NJT
1625
User Number
Set Date
Š
NJD
1625
User Number
NLB
1621
User Number
Clear Log
= Events that are displayed in the event log only when viewed by the installer.
Power
Description
Restore
Battery Low
Š
Battery Restore
Transmitter Low Battery
Š
Transmitter Battery Restore
AC Loss
Š
AC Restore
SIA
Contact ID
Address Field
NYT
1302
Device Number
NYR
3302
Device Number
NXT
1384
Device Number
NXR
3384
Device Number
NAT
1301
Device Number
NAR
3301
Device Number
NLT
1351
Device Number
NLR
3351
Device Number
NET
1330
Device Number
Peripherals
Media Loss
Media Loss Restore
Š
Š
Device Trouble
Device Trouble Restore
Š
Š
Transmitter Out of Synch.
Transmitter Re-synch.
Š
Š
CP Transmitter Out of Synch.
CP Transmitter Re-synch.
Š
Š
Supervision Loss
Supervision Restore
Š
GSM Signal Level
Š
Š
Zone Trouble
Zone Trouble Restore
Š
Š
NER
3330
Device Number
NUT
1341
Device Number
NUR
3341
Device Number
NUT
1341
Device Number
NUR
3341
Device Number
NUS
1381
Device Number
NUR
3381
Device Number
NYY
1605
Signal Level (0-9)
NBT
1380
Device Number
NBJ
3380
Device Number
NXQ
1344
Device Number
NXH
3344
Device Number
NMA
1100
Device Number
NMR
3100
Device Number
NNA
1102
Device Number
RF Jamming
FM Jamming
FM Jamming Restore
Š
Š
Medical
Medical Alarm
Medical Alarm Restore
Š
No Motion
Š
Unclassified Events
Periodic Test
Š
NRP
1602
No Arm
Š
NCD
1654
—
—
Address Field
The address field provides additional information regarding the event. This information is forwarded as
numeric data according to the following tables.
Value
00
01-32
33
41-59
65
77-80
81-84
91
92-98
110
243
244
DEVICE NUMBER
Description
Control Panel
Wireless Zones
Hardwire Zone
Keyfobs
Home Automation Module
Repeaters
Wireless Keypads
Front Panel Keypad
Hardwire Keypads
Wireless Siren
PSTN Module
Cellular Communications Module
Value
00
01-32
34
41-59
61-76
81-84
91
92-98
USER NUMBER
Description
Control Panel
Users
Remote Access
Keyfobs
Smartkeys
Wireless Keypads
Front-panel Keypad
Hardwire Keypads
Appendix D: Zone Types
Normal
A Normal zone is active when the system is armed. This zone generates a Burglary
alarm instantly when triggered. Normal zones are designed for detectors installed inside
the protected site or doors/windows that are never used to enter the premises.
Event Group: Burglary
Entry/Exit
When the system is armed, Entry/Exit zones initiates the entry delay when triggered. If
the system is not disarmed by the time the entry delay expires, a Burglary alarm is
generated. These zones are designed for detectors protecting the entrance to the
protected site
Event Group: Burglary
Follower
If an Entry/Exit zone is triggered first, Follower zones do not generate an alarm when
triggered during the entry delay. If the system is not disarmed by the end of the entry
delay, the Follower zone generates an alarm. A Follower zone instantly generates an
alarm if triggered when the entry delay is not active. These zones are designed for
detectors protecting the area in which a keypad has been installed or the area crossed in
order to reach the keypad.
Event Group: Burglary
Panic
Panic zones are always active. When a Panic zone is triggered, a Panic alarm is
generated. This zone type is designed for panic buttons that may be pressed in a hold-up
situation. If the Bell option is disabled for Panic zones, in addition to the siren not
sounding, all forms of alarm indication from the keypad are also disabled.
Event Group: Burglary
Medical
Medical zones are always active. When triggered, Medical zones generate a Medical
alarm. These zones are used typically with panic buttons that may be pressed in the
event of a medical emergency.
Event Group: Medical
Fire
Fire zones are always active. When triggered, Fire zones generate a Fire alarm. These
zones are designed for use with smoke detectors and panic buttons that may be pressed
in the event of a fire. A Fire zone always activates the siren even if the Bell option is
programmed as disabled. Fire alarms sound a pulsating siren to distinguish them from
other alarms.
Event Group: Fire
24Hr
24Hr zones are always active. When triggered, 24Hr zones generate a Burglary alarm.
These zones are used for applications that require constant protection.
Event Group: Burglary
ProGuard800™
-109-
24Hr-X
The 24Hr-X zone is a future option that is not available in the current firmware.
Event Group: Not applicable
Gas
Gas zones are always active. In the event of a gas leak, these zones generate a Gas
alarm. Gas zones are typically used with methane/propane/butane or carbon monoxide
gas detectors. Gas alarms sound a distinctive siren pattern to easily distinguish them
from other alarms. A gas alarm causes the siren to sound until the alarm is restored; the
siren cut-off does not apply to gas alarms.
Event Group: Fire
Flood
Flood zones are always active. When triggered, Flood zones generate a Water alarm.
These zones are designed for use with WD861 flood sensors.
Event Group: Burglary
Environmental
Environmental zones are always active. When triggered, these zones generate an
Environmental alarm. These zones are designed for applications that monitor
environmental conditions such as temperature or humidity. If the Bell option is enabled
for Environmental zones, the system sounds trouble tones from the keypad. These tones
are sounded until the user presses on their keypad. Environmental alarms are not
affected by the expiry of the siren cut-off.
Event Group: Burglary
No Motion
No Motion zones are used to monitor the activity of disabled or elderly people. If a No
Motion zone has not been triggered within a pre-defined period of time (6, 12, 24, 48 or
72 hours), a No Motion event message is sent to the monitoring station.
Event Group: Medical
Not Used
This zone type disables the sensor output. All alarm transmissions from the sensor are
ignored though the sensor may still be used to activate HA units in Home Automation
applications.
Event Group: Not applicable
Declaration of Conformity
Hereby, Marmitek BV, declares that this PROGUARD800 is in compliance with the
essential requirements and other relevant provisions of the following Directives:
Directive 1999/5/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 March 1999 on
radio equipment and telecommunications terminal equipment and the mutual recognition
of their conformity
Council Directive 89/336/EEC of 3 May 1989 on the approximation of the laws of the
Member States relating to electromagnetic compatibility
Council Directive 73/23/EEC of 19 February 1973 on the harmonization of the laws of
Member States relating to electrical equipment designed for use within certain voltage
limits
868.35MHz is not intended for use in BG, GR, PL & SI.
Environmental Information for Customers in the European Union
European Directive 2002/96/EC requires that the equipment bearing this symbol on the product and/or its
packaging must not be disposed of with unsorted municipal waste. The symbol indicates that this product
should be disposed of separately from regular household waste streams. It is your responsibility to
dispose of this and other electric and electronic equipment via designated collection facilities appointed by
the government or local authorities. Correct disposal and recycling will help prevent potential negative
consequences to the environment and human health. For more detailed information about the disposal of
your old equipment, please contact your local authorities, waste disposal service, or the shop where you
purchased the product.
Copyrights
Marmitek is a trademark of Marmidenko B.V. ProGuard800 is a trademark of Marmitek B.V. All rights
reserved.
Copyright and all other proprietary rights in the content (including but not limited to model numbers,
software, audio, video, text and photographs) rests with Marmitek B.V. Any use of the Content, but without
limitation, distribution, reproduction, modification, display or transmission without the prior written consent
of Marmitek is strictly prohibited. All copyright and other proprietary notices shall be retained on all
reproductions.
ProGuard800™
-111-