Cub Cadet Domestic Series 7000 Service manual

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Service Manual
Domestic Series 7000 Compact Tractor
NOTE: These materials are prepared for use by trained technicians who are experienced in the service and repair of equipment of the
kind described in this publication, and are not intended for use by untrained or inexperienced individuals. Such individuals should seek
the assistance of an authorized service technician or dealer. Read, understand, and follow all directions when working on this equipment. This includes the contents of the Operators Manual, which came with your equipment. No liability can be accepted for any inaccuracies or omission in this publication, although every care has been take to make it as complete and accurate as possible. The right
is reserved to make changes at any time to this document without prior notice and without incurring an obligation to make such
changes to previously published documents. All information contained in this publication is based on product information available at
the time of publication. Photographs and illustrations used in this publication are for reference use only and may not depict actual
model and component parts.
MTD Products Inc. - Product Training and Education Department
FORM NUMBER - 769-01634
12/2004
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Domestic Series 7000 Hydraulics
Orientation ................................................................................................................. 1
Hydrostatic Drive: Basic Operation ............................................................................ 4
External Checks ......................................................................................................... 6
Best Practices: Hydraulic Systems ............................................................................ 8
Flow and Pressure tests: Hydrostatic Drive ............................................................... 8
Auxiliary Pumps ....................................................................................................... 11
Steering Pump and Cylinder .................................................................................... 14
Hydraulic Lift Cylinder and Control Valve ................................................................ 18
Tandem Pump ......................................................................................................... 22
Loader Valve ............................................................................................................ 24
Component Breakdown: Auxiliary Pump (tandem pump similar) ............................. 26
Component Breakdown: Steering Unit ..................................................................... 28
Domestic Series 7000 MFD
Identify the MFD: ...................................................................................................... 31
MFD Removal: Preparation ..................................................................................... 33
Removal ................................................................................................................... 34
MFD Installation ....................................................................................................... 36
In-Frame Repairs: Drop Axle Service ...................................................................... 37
In-Frame Repairs: Drop Axle Cover ......................................................................... 38
In-Frame Repairs: Drop-Axle Removal .................................................................... 40
Bench Repairs: Drop axle and kingpin housing assemblies .................................... 42
Bench Repair: Axles and Differential. ...................................................................... 46
Torque Specifications .............................................................................................. 57
Domestic Compact Dash and Steering Pump
Dash Panel Removal ............................................................................................... 59
The Dash Panel ....................................................................................................... 63
Steering Shaft and Pump: Sauer ............................................................................. 65
Steering Shaft and Pump: Ross ............................................................................... 67
Domestic Series 7000 Damped Driveshaft
Preparation: ............................................................................................................. 69
Driveshaft Removal .................................................................................................. 69
Electrical System
Electrical System ...................................................................................................... 72
Componants.............................................................................................................. 73
Eelstric Clutch and Fuel Pump.................................................................................. 81
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Domestic Series 7000 Hydraulics
Domestic Series 7000 Hydraulics
1.
1.4.
STANDARD HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS ON THE
DOMESTIC SERIES 7000: ORIENTATION
NOTE: Subsections 1 and 2 of the Domestic
Series 7000 Hydraulics portion of this manual
provide a basic orientation to the system. Subsection 3 and those that follow it contain specific
test procedures.
The hydrostatic drive is a Sauer model BDU15.
It has an integrated gerotor charge pump that
draws fluid up the suction pipe from the base of
the transmission housing. See Figure 1.4.
Auxiliary
pump
Second auxiliary
pump
NOTE: Hydraulic diagrams are contained in an
apendix to this section.
1.1.
The transmission housing acts as a reservoir for
all of the hydraulic systems on the tractor: hydrostatic drive pump, hydrostatic steering system,
lift cylinder, and accessories.
1.2.
Fluid: the transmission and hydraulic system are
filled with 6.5 gallons (24.6 L) of Cub Cadet
Hydraulic Transmission Fluid (P/N: 737-3025
1Qt., 737-3062 1Gal., 737-3063 10 Qt., 7373035 5 Gal.).
1.3.
Hydrostatic
drive pump
Figure 1.4
Filtration: The hydraulic system filter (P/N:7230405) is located on a boss on the front surface of
the transmission housing, adjacent to the midmount, 2000 R.P.M. P.T.O. shaft. The hydrostatic drive filter (P/N: 723-3014) is located on
the front surface of the hydrostatic pump.
See Figure 1.3.
1.5.
The steering and lift cylinder are powered by a
Sauer-Danfoss SKP 1/4.3 S auxiliary pump.
1.6.
If hydraulically powered accessories are
installed, they are driven by a second auxiliary
pump that mounts to and is driven by the standard auxiliary pump. The add-on auxiliary pump
is a Sauer-Danfoss model SNP 1/7.8 S.
NOTE: Domestic Series 7000 tractors produced
before 2004 included a single auxiliary pump as
standard equipment. Later tractors include both
auxiliary pumps and the valve used to operate a
front-end loader.
Hydrostatic
Drive Filter
Hydraulic system
filter
Figure 1.3
NOTE: Other than sharing a reservoir, the
hydrostatic drive operates independently of the
rest of the hydraulic system.
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1.7.
1.11. The hydraulic fluid flow is as follows:
The steering pump, located in the dash pedestal
contains it’s own back-up gerotor charge pump
that will enable steering control when the engine
is not running. See Figure 1.7.
1.12. Through the pick-up tube from the transmission
sump and filter, to the auxiliary pump.
See Figure 1.12.
Auxiliary pump
Steering
pump
Flow
Filter
Figure 1.7
Figure 1.12
1.8.
The steering pump directs fluid pressure to one
end of the double-acting differential steering cylinder while allowing it to return from the other
end of the cylinder in order to provide steering
action.
1.9.
The lift cylinder is operated by a control valve
and feedback rod under the right rear fender.
See Figure 1.9.
1.13. Under pressure from the auxiliary pump the fluid
goes to the steering pump, connecting to the “P”
port on Sauer steering pumps. On Ross steering pumps, it connects to the “IN” port.
To return manifold
Direct return
Line to
steering
unit
Auxiliary pump
(steering and
lift cylinder)
From Steering
unit
Figure 1.13
To lift cylinder
Figure 1.9
1.10. The control valve directs fluid pressure to a single-acting hydraulic cylinder that lifts the threepoint lift arms.
2
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1.14. The steering unit distributes pressure to the
steering cylinder according to the position of the
steering wheel. On Sauer pumps this involves
the ports labeled “L” and “R”. See Figure 1.12.
1.16. The power steering unit is first in line, and has
priority over the rest of the system. From the
steering unit, the fluid may follow one of two
return paths:
1.17. The fluid may pass through the return manifold,
through the oil cooler, then back to the transmission. See Figure 1.17.
Sauer steering unit:
note labeled ports
Return
manifold
To cooler
From lift
valve
From steering unit
“T” port on Sauer
“OUT” port on Ross
Figure 1.14
1.15. On Ross pumps, this involves the ports labeled
“LT” and “RT”. See Figure 1.14.
Unused ports
capped
Figure 1.17
1.18. The oil cooler is located on the front of the radiator. See Figure 1.18.
Oil
cooler
RT
LT
IN
OUT
AUX
Figure 1.15
Figure 1.18
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1.19. If the fluid is required by the lift cylinder, it will go
to the bottom port of the lift valve instead of the
return manifold.
1.20. The lift valve sends fluid to the single-acting lift
cylinder when operator demand and the feedback rod direct it to do so. See Figure 1.20.
2.
HYDROSTATIC DRIVE: BASIC OPERATION
2.1.
The input shaft to the D15U turns a shaft that
passes completely through the housing of the
hydro., driving an engine speed input shaft in the
transmission.
2.2.
The input shaft drives the auxiliary hydraulic
pump and the P.T.O. They are driven at relatively constant engine speed, rather than in relation to ground speed. See Figure 2.2.
Auxiliary
hydraulic
pump
Feedback
rod
Hydro.
Lift
cylinder
Input
shaft
for PTO
Figure 1.20
1.21. Fluid not required to lift the cylinder will be
directed back to the transmission through the
return manifold, via the cooler. See Figure 1.21.
Figure 2.2
2.3.
Line from return
manifold and oil cooler
The input shaft also turns a gerotor style charge
pump and an axial piston variable displacement
hydraulic pump. See Figure 2.3.
Fixed displacement
motor
Direct return line from
lift cylinder (when lowered)
Charge
pump
To return
manifold
Lift valve
Figure 1.21
Charge check valves
1.22. Excess fluid volume beyond normal return flow
rate is generated when the lift arms are lowered.
This flow is exhausted directly back into the
transmission housing.
Figure 2.3
NOTE: Figure 2.3 is a similar model hydrostatic
drive unit with some see-through components.
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2.4.
The lower part of the pump contains a fixed displacement axial piston hydraulic motor. The
motor is driven by the output of the variable displacement pump.
2.5.
The hydro. control arm (scissors bracket) moves
a swash plate that controls the output of the
pump: tilting the swash plate in one way causes
the variable displacement pump to drive fluid
through the fixed displacement pump in one
direction. See Figure 2.5.
Variable displacement pump
2.6.
Tilting the swash plate the other way causes the
variable displacement pump to drive fluid
through the fixed displacement pump in the
opposite direction. See Figure 2.6.
Fixed displacement
motor
Swash plate
angle
Input shaft
Fixed displacement
motor
Pistons
Pistons
Swash
plate
Figure 2.6
Pump
block
2.7.
When the swash plate is flat, the pump pistons
do not move up and down, no fluid is displaced
and no power is transmitted to the fixed displacement pump.
2.8.
NOTE: In figure 2.5, the pistons in the variable
displacement pump are alternately pressed into
the bores, and then released from bores of the
rotating pump block by the tilt of the swashplate.
The charge pump maintains a supply of pressurized fluid to the variable displacment pump to
feed and lubricate the pump.
2.9.
The charge check valves direct the flow of pressurized fluid to the ports that feed the pistons of
the variable displacement pump.
•
On the right side of the pump block in figure 2.5,
the pistons are down.
•
•
The pistons are extended on the left side of the
pump block. They are forced up by springs contained in the pistons.
When driving forward, fluid flows into the
varaible displacment pump thorugh one set of
ports, and out through a second set.
•
When driving backwards, the flow is reversed.
•
One check valve opens and the other one
closes, depending on the direction of fluid flow.
•
If the hydro. is in “neutral”, lubrication is provided
to ths spinning (but not pumping) pump and
motor blocks through separate channels in the
housing.
Swash plate
angle
Motor block
Figure 2.5
•
This action causes the pistons to pump fluid in
one direction.
•
The further the swash plate is tilted, the greater
the movement of the pistons as the pump block
rotates.
•
As the travel of the pistons is increased, the displacement of the pump is increased, and more
fluid is pumped.
•
The more fluid is pumped, the faster the fixed
displacement motor is driven.
2.10. If the hydrostatic drive is not performing correctly, begin diagnosing with simple things that
can bee seen with minimal disassembly.
5
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3.
3.3.
EXTERNAL CHECKS
NOTE: Linkage adjustment procedures are covered in the 2003 Cub Cadet Technical Handbook, pages 6-129 through 6-131.
3.1.
If the brake and drive pedals “fight” with each
other, the drive control linkage is out of adjustment. See Figure 3.3.
Brake shaft
assembly
Remove the fender cover using a phillips head
screwdriver and a 1/2” wrench. See Figure 3.1.
Forward shaft
assembly
Hydro control
rod
Adjustment
ferrule
Fender cover
Bolts
Holes for
screws
Figure 3.3
Foot pad
3.4.
If the tractor fails to achieve normal ground
speed, and the hydro pump emits an unusual
amount of noise, check for brake drag:
•
Confirm that the neutral return and hydro control
linkages are correctly adjusted.
•
With the tractor on a smooth, firm, level surface,
place the gear selector in neutral, release the
parking brake, and attempt to push the tractor.
•
If the tractor does not roll with a reasonable
amount of effort, check the brakes.
•
The left and right brakes can be checked individually by jacking-up the rear of the tractor and
attempting to rotate the rear wheels individually.
Leave the transmission in neutral.
•
If either or both brakes drag, confirm that the
linkage moves firmly and is properly adjusted.
•
If the linkages are properly adjusted, and brake
drag is still present, remove the wheel and brake
assembly on the side that drags. Inspect the
brake assembly.
Figure 3.1
NOTE: It will be necessary to pry-up the inside
edges of the black rubber floor pads to get the
fender cover off.
3.2.
If the transmission creeps, or the tractor fails to
achieve normal ground speed, check the neutral
control adjustment and control linkages to the
hydro. See Figure 3.2.
Shoulder
bolt
Neutral
return
assembly
NOTE: Complete brake adjustment procedures
can be found in the 2003 Cub Cadet Technical
Handbook, page 6-131 through 6-133.
Figure 3.2
NOTE: Complete neutral control adjustment procedures can be found in the 2003 Cub Cadet
Technical Handbook, page 6-129 through 6-131
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3.5.
If there is no drive at all, confirm whether the
problem lies in the hydro or elsewhere.
•
With the engine running, confirm that the PTO
operates when it is turned-on. This confims that
the input shaft is turning.
•
On smooth, firm, level ground, with the engine
turned-off and the parking brake released:
•
Place the gear selector in high range and
attempt to push the tractor. It should not roll.
•
Place the gear selector in low range and attempt
to push the tractor. It should not roll.
•
If the tractor rolls, the problem is gear-related.
•
Place the gear selector in neutral and attempt to
push the tractor. It should roll. If it does not, the
problem may be gear or brake related.
3.6.
3.8.
Visually inspect the suction tube that feeds fluid
to the hydrostatic drive from the sump of the
transmission. If it is kinked or crushed, replace
it. See Figure 3.8.
Hydro.
Suction tube
Check the fluid by removing the plug / fluid level
gauge on the back of the transmission. Check
the level, and compare the fluid to a sample of
Cub Cadet Hydraulic Transmission Fluid. Topup or replace the fluid as necessary.
See Figure 3.6.
Filter
Figure 3.8
NOTE: Drain the transmission fluid before
removing the suction tube.
3.9.
Check that the set screw holding the control arm
to the hydro control shaft has not backed-out,
worn, or sheared. See Figure 3.9.
Neutral
return arms
Figure 3.6
Set screw
3.7.
Replace the hydrostatic filter if there is any question of it’s condition.
Hydro control arm
Figure 3.9
7
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4.
BEST PRACTICES: HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS
NOTE: TESTS All hydraulic tests should be
done with the fluid at normal operating temperature, and the engine at normal operating speed.
In practical terms, normal operating temperature
means that the tractor should be operated (if not
disabled) for about 5 minutes before testing in
normal temperate climates. This should achieve
a fluid temperature of 180 deg. f. (82 deg. c.) If
the tractor has been sitting outside for a week
during February in Green Bay, Wisconsin, it is
advisable to store the tractor in a heated shop
for 12 hours before testing. Normal operating
speed is 3,000RPM.
5.
FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS:
HYDROSTATIC DRIVE
5.1.
If the problem is not revealed by any of the
external checks, check the charge-pump pressure.
5.2.
Clean the area surrounding the set screw in the
top of the hydrostat. Remove the set screw
using a 3/16” allen wrench. See Figure 5.2.
Port
Set screw
NOTE: CLEANLINESS It is very important to
keep dirt out of hydraulic systems.
•
Cleaning the areas around any joint to be disconnected, or component to be removed is
advisable.
•
Contaminated fluid should be disposed of properly, not re-used.
•
Tools and work benches used for work on
hydraulic systems should also be kept clean.
•
Catch pans beneath work will ease clean-up.
Figure 5.2
NOTE: CAUTION High pressure hydraulic
leaks can be dangerous.
•
Wear eye protection while performing tests.
•
Do not operate any equipment with obvious
damage to parts such as hoses.
•
Do not disconnect any fittings that may be under
pressure. Turn-off the engine and operate the
circuit to relieve pressure.
•
NOTE: The port accessed by removing the set
screw will be pressurized by the charge pump
when the engine is running.
5.3.
NOTE: The gauge should be equipped with a
hydraulic snubber or needle valve to damp the
pressure pulses created by the pump.
Remember that anything (front-end loaders,
backhoe buckets, three-point hitches, etc....) that
is supported by hydraulic pressure will be subject to gravitational force when that pressure is
relieved.
CAUTION: Confirm that no unsafe conditions
will be created by starting the engine or operating the drive system before perfoming the test.
Remember that the front drive axle on fourwheel drive Domestic Series 7000 tractors will
engage automatically.
NOTE: Sealants
•
O-ring fittings require no sealant, though light
lubrication with the fluid used in the system is
sometimes helpful.
•
Teflon tape is to be avoided. “Flash” from the
tape can dislodge, blocking valves and damaging pumps.
Connect a gauge that is capable of reading
1,000 PSI (69 Bars) to the port that the set screw
was removed from. The port is threaded to
accept a 1/8” pipe thread.
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5.4.
The charge pump should generate between 70
and 150 PSI (4.8 to 10.3 Bars) @ 1,200 RPM.
See Figure 5.4.
5.7.
Assuming the supply to the pump is good, low
pressure or a complete lack of pressure at this
port indicates a charge pump that is not working.
5.8.
The charge pump could be disabled by a sticking charge pump relief valve. See Figure 5.8.
Figure 5.4
5.5.
Figure 5.8
As the RPM is increased to the governed top noload sped, the pressure may increase somehwat. If pressure goes down as engine speed
increases, turn-off the engine and determine the
cause. See Figure 5.5.
•
This valve is located under the hexagonal cap
next to the pressure test port for the charge
pump.
•
The valve consists of a light compression spring
and a ball that seats in a bore.
•
The cap can be easily removed to inspect the
valve using a 5/8” wrench. Failure of this valve
would be unusual, but if the ball fails to seat,
charge pump pressure will leak off.
NOTE: The charge pump is not available separately through Cub Cadet.
NOTE: The reason for testing the charge pump
is to help distinguish between a problem within
the hydrostatic drive and a problem that lies
elsewhere in the drive system.
Figure 5.5
5.6.
Operate the system at full input and output
speeds in both directions,and confirm that
charge pressure is maintained.
9
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5.9.
5.11. When removed, each charge relief valve comes
out as a cartridge. See Figure 5.11.
If the charge pump is working, but drive has
been lost in one direction only, one of the charge
check valves may not be working.
See Figure 5.9.
Charge
check valves
Figure 5.11
Figure 5.9
•
There is a charge relief valve located in each circuit: one for forward, one for reverse.
•
These check valves enable the charge pump to
provide charge oil to the side of the circuit that
has the lowest pressure, while sealing-off the
side that has higher pressure.
•
The charge check valves are located on either
side of the hydrostatic drive.
•
The one on the left side maintains pressure in
the forward circuit, the one on the right side
maintains pressure in the reverse circuit.
5.12. The output of the variable displacement pump is
dependent upon the performance of the check
valves
5.13. If the hydrostatic drive must be replaced, it can
be removed from the tractor without removing
the fenders.
5.10. The charge check valves can be removed using
a 5/16” allen wrench.
NOTE: The one on the right side is easy to
reach. The one on the left side will be obscured
by the auxiliary pump and a steel hydraulic line if
the tractor is equipped with a second auxiliary
pump to operate a loader or backhoe.
10
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6.
AUXILIARY PUMPS
6.1.
The standard auxiliary pump provides pressure
for the hydrostatic power steering unit and the lift
cylinder attached to the three-point hitch.
6.2.
Domestic Series 7000 tractors produced before
the 2004 season came with a single auxiliary
pump. See Figure 6.2.
Auxiliary pump
to drive steering
and lift cylinder
Hydraulic pressure
to steering unit
6.5.
As with the hydrostatic drive, confirm that the
pump drive and supply are intact before drawing
conclusions about the pump itself by making
these preliminary checks:
•
Check the fluid. If the fluid level is low, or the
fluid is not the correct type, both the hydrostat
and the auxiliary pump will perform poorly.
•
Replace the hydraulic filter if there is any question of its condition.
•
Confirm that the suction tube that provides fluid
to the auxiliary pump from the sump of the transmission is not crushed or kinked, and that the
connections are free of leaks.
•
If there is no hydraulic pressure, confirm that the
pump drive is intact. The auxiliary pump is
driven by a series of gears at the front of the
transmission.
6.6.
The filter and suction tubes are easily reached
for inspection with little or no disassembly.
See Figure 6.6.
Figure 6.2
6.3.
Current production Domestic Series 7000 tractors are fitted with a tandem auxiliary pump to
power attachments such as a back-hoe or frontend loader. See Figure 6.3.
Suction tube
for auxiliary
pump
Suction tube for
hydrostatic drive
Hydraulic pressure
to steering unit
First auxiliary
pump
Tandem
auxiliary pump
Suction tube
for tandem
pump
Hydraulic
filter
Hydraulic
pressure to
loader valve
Figure 6.6
Figure 6.3
6.4.
If performance of hydraulic features (steering or
lift cylinder) or attachments (front-end loader or
back-hoe) is poor, it is necessary to confirm that
sufficient hydraulic power is being supplied by
the pump that drives it.
11
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6.7.
6.11. The rear fenders must be removed to access the
auxiliary pump itself. Fender removal is detailed
in the 2003 Cub Cadet Technical Handbook on
pages 6-21 through 6-27.
If the tractor has a speed sensor mounted in the
transmission cover, it is a hall effect device that
employs the auxiliary pump drive gear as a tonering to generate a tachometer signal. This was
done on early (2003 production) tractors.
See Figure 6.7.
6.12. If the tractor has an engine mounted speed sensor, the pump drive can be inspected with a
flashlight and probe.
6.13. Remove the pipe plug that fills the hole previously used for the speed sensor.
6.14. The auxiliary pump drive gear should be visible
through the hole. See Figure 6.14.
Eary style
speed sensor
Plug (removed)
Auxilieary pump
drive gear (visible
through port)
Auxiliary pump
drive gear
NOTE: see-through
transmission coverissi
Figure 6.7
6.8.
6.9.
On tractors with the transmission mounted
speed sensor, if the tachometer works, the pump
drive is confirmed to be working as well.
Transmission
cover
The speed sensor is visible without removing the
fenders. It is located on the transmission cover,
directly above the auxiliary pump.
Figure 6.14
6.15. To test the auxiliary pump that powers the steering and lift cylinder, use a flow and pressure
gauge set. See Figure 6.15.
6.10. Current production uses an engine-mounted
speed sensor, or an ignition generated tachometer signal on gasoline engines. See Figure 6.10.
Engine
mounted
speed sensor
(front of
crankshaft on
CAT engine)
Figure 6.15
Figure 6.10
NOTE: Equipment will vary from shop to shop,
but operating principles are similar.
12
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6.16. Disconnect the output line from the top of the
pump using a 3/4” wrench and a 9/16” wrench.
•
6.17. Install the gauge set in-line between the auxiliary
pump and the steering pump. The pressure
gauge should be near the auxiliary pump, and
the flow meter should be near the steering unit.
Set the throttle to maintain an engine speed in
this range, and note the reading on the flow
meter.
6.21. Close the flow valve until the pressure gauge
reads 1,500 PSI (103 Bar). Note the flow reading. See Figure 6.21.
6.18. Set the parking brake, place the gear selector in
neutral, open the flow valve on the gauge set all
the way, and confirm that no unsafe conditions
will be created by starting the tractor engine.
See Figure 6.18.
Flow
meter
Flow
valve
Pressure
guage
Figure 6.21
6.22. As soon as the flow reading is noted, open the
the flow valve completely, relieving pressure
from the system. Turn -off the engine.
Figure 6.18
6.23. The flow readings noted at zero pressure and
1,500 PSI (103 Bars) should not vary significantly. Flow is more related to engine RPM than
to pressure.
6.19. Start the engine, allow the engine and hydraulics
to warm-up.
6.20. Performance:
•
The SKP1/4.3 S auxiliary pump does not contain
a relief valve. It is capable of producing roughly
3600 PSI (250 bars) at engine speeds beyond
1,200 RPM.
•
This is far in excess of the needs of the rest of
the system, which is designed to operate at
1,500 PSI (103 Bars).
•
For our purposes, it is not necessary to test the
pump to its full capacity, only to establish that it
produces enough flow and pressure to operate
the hydrostatic steering and hydraulic lift cylinder.
•
The auxiliary pump was observed to move about
4.6 Gal./min. (15 L/min.) at an engine speed of
3,000 RPM, with no load applied.
•
Flow will vary with engine speed, but pressure
tests can be done at lower engine speeds:
1,200-1,500 RPM.
13
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7.
STEERING PUMP AND CYLINDER
•
7.1.
Two steering units have been used in domestic
Series 7000 production: one produced by Sauer/
Danfoss, and one produced by Ross (ParkerHannifin).
Cause 1: The auxiliary pump is not supplying sufficient
fluid to the steering unit. Confirm by testing auxiliary
pump out-put.
Solution 1: Correct the problem with the auxiliary
pump.
NOTE: It is normal for the spokes of the steering
wheel on an open-center hydrostatic power
steering system to change orientation with use.
There is no mechanical connection between the
steering wheel and the front wheels.
7.2.
High Effort Required to Turn Steering Wheel:
Cause 2: The priority spool within the steering unit is
not moving, causing fluid to be directed to other parts
of the system when the steering system needs it.
Solution 2: Internal problem; priority spool.
Identification: The Sauer OSPM 63 PB unit has
a round body. The Ross steering unit has a
square body.
See Figure 7.2.
Cause 3: The relief valve in the steering unit is stuck
open.
Solution 3: Internal problem; relief valve.
•
“Motoring” Steering Wheel: rotates on its
own:
Cause 1: Bad leaf spring in steering unit.
Solution 1: Internal problem; leaf spring.
Cause 2: The relief valve is stuck open.
Solution 2: Internal problem: relief valve.
Sauer Steering Unit
•
Ross Steering Unit
Poor Straight Line Steering Charactersistics:
Cause 1: There is a bind in the steering column.
Figure 7.2
Solution 1: Binds may be created by angular or radial
misalignment between the steering column and the
steering unit. Binds may also be created by a lack of
axial clearance between the steering column and the
steering unit. Correct any situation that may create
friction or binding in the steering column.
7.3.
R&R: instructions for removal and replacement
of the steering units can be found in the DASH
PANEL AND STEERING PUMP section of this
manual.
7.4.
If there is a warrantable problem with the power
steering unit, it is to be replaced as a complete
unit. Cub Cadet does not stock any internal
components for the steering units.
Cause 2: Bad leaf spring in steering unit.
The following set of symptoms, causes, and
solutions has been adapted from a list compiled
by Sauer-Danfoss to aid in the diagnosis of
hydrostatic steering issues. Internal steering
unit problems are described to aid technicians in
distinguishing internal steering unit problems
from problems that lie elswhere in the system.
Internal problems dictate replacement of the
steering unit.
•
7.5.
Solution 2: Internal problem; leaf spring.
Backlash
Cause 1: Wear or play between the steering column
and the cardan shaft.
Solution 1: If the wear is in the steering column,
replace the steering column (steering shaft per Cub
Cadet IPL). If the wear is in the cardan shaft, this is an
internal problem.
Cause 2: Bad leaf spring in steering unit.
Solution 2: Internal problem; leaf spring.
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•
•
Shimmy:
Cause 1: Air in steering system.
The Steering Wheel Does Not Return to Center:
Cause 1: There is a mechanical bind in the steering
column.
Solution 1: Repair any leaks in the hydraulic system.
Be aware that a leak on the suction side of the auxiliary
pump would entrain air into the hydraulic fluid, but may
not display significant fluid loss.
Solution 1: Repair or adjust the steering column
(steering shaft) to eliminate the bind.
Cause 2: Worn mechanical connections.
Cause 2: Bad leaf springs.
Solution 2: Inspect the MFD and steering linkage for
sources of excessive play: worn wheel bearings, worn
tie rod ends, worn king pins, worn steering cylinder
mounting points, etc... Replace the worn components.
Solution 2: Internal problem; leaf springs.
Cause 3: The spool is pressing against the sleeve in
the steering unit.
Solution 3: Internal problem; relief valve causing too
much pressure to build, displacing the spool.
•
Steering Wheel Input Does Not Cause Steering cylinder to Move:
Cause 4: Binding between spool and sleeve caused by
fluid contamination.
Cause 1: No fluid in the system.
Solution 4: Internal problem; contamination. If this is
a possibility, cleaning, fluid replacement, and filter
replacement will help prevent a repeat failure.
Solution 1: Fill the system.
Cause 2: Worn steering cylinder / blow-by. Confirm
with flow test in line to cylinder.
•
Solution 2: Replace the steering cylinder.
•
Steering Action is Opposite of Input:
Cause 1: The “L” and “R” hoses are reversed at their
conections to tht steering cylinder or steering unit.
Heavy Impacts to Steering Wheel in Both
Directions:
Solution 1: Correct the connections of the hydraulic
lines from the steering unit to the steering cylinder.
Cause 1: The hydraulic hoses are incorrectly connected; the hose that should connect to the “P” port is
connected to the “ L” port or the “R” port.
Cause 2: Incorrect setting of cardan shaft to gear
wheel.
Solution 2: Internal problem; cardan shaft / gear wheel
timing.
Solution 1: Correct the hydraulic connections.
Cause 2: Incorrect setting of the cardan shaft to the
gear wheel (timing).
Solution 2: Internal problem; cardan shaft / gear wheel
timing.
•
Steering Power Too Low:
•
Solution 1: Internal problem; relief valve.
Cause 1: The relief valve is set too low or malfunctioning.
Slow Steering:
Cause 1: Insufficient fluid flow to the steering unit.
Confirm by testing the out-put of the auxiliary pump.
•
Solution 1: Repair of replace the auxiliary pump or
delivery line from the pump to the “P” port on the steering unit.
Fluid Leakage:
Cause 1: The seal around the cardan shaft is leaking.
Solution 1: Internal problem; cardan shaft seal.
Cause 2: The port fittings are leaking.
Cause 2: The priority valve in the steering unit is not
working properly. This valve normally maintains precidence of the steering system over all subsidiary systems (lift cylinder).
Soluton 2: Replace port adaptors or O-rings. Tighten
the fittings to a maximum torque of 221 in-lbs. (25 NM)
on the “T”, “R”, and “L” ports. Tighten the fittings to a
maximum of 239 in-lbs. (27 Nm) on the “P”, and “E”
ports.
Solution 2: Internal problem; priority valve.
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7.6.
7.11. Disconnect the hydraulic line between the steering unit and the steering cylinder using a 5/8”
wrench and a 3/4” wrench. See Figure 7.11.
Engine-off test: With the engine turned-off so
that no pressure is supplied by the auxiliary
pump, the pump within the steering unit should
work well enough in manual mode to turn the
front wheels from one steering stop to the other
(full travel) with roughly 2.75 turns of the steering
wheel.
Hydraulic line
(pressurized
to turn right)
NOTE: The tractor was engineered to comply
with German TUV directive #38stVZo. It will provide steering action without pressure from the
auxiliary pump, maintaining steering wheel force
within a specified limit.
7.7.
If there is air in the system, it will not perform to
design intent:
•
If there are any leaks in the steering hydraulics,
air will be drawn into the system, degrading preformance.
•
Hydraulic line
(pressurized
to turn left)
Steering cylinder
If the system has been disassembled for any
reason, the engine must be started to provide
pressure from the auxiliary pump. With auxiliary
pump pressure to assist, turn the steering wheel
lock-to-lock three times, to purge air from the
steering system.
•
After the air is purged, the engine-off test can be
performed with validity.
7.8.
If the hydraulic steering lacks speed, test the
auxiliary pump as described in the previous section of this manual.
7.9.
Once it has been established that the auxiliary
pump is developing enough flow and pressure,
then test the steering unit.
Figure 7.11
7.12. Connect the test kit so that the pressure gauge
side (as opposed to the flow meter side) is near
the source (steering unit). See Figure 7.12.
Pressure test kit
installed in right
turn hydraulic line
7.10. Install the hydraulic test kit in either one of the
two hydraulic lines leading from the steering
pump to the steering cylinder.
Figure 7.12
7.13. Confirm that the test kit valve is all the way open,
and that no unsafe conditions will arise from
starting the tractor engine.
7.14. Start the engine, warm-up the engine and
hydraulic system, then position the throttle to
1,200-1,500 RPM.
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7.15. Have an assistant slowly turn the steering wheel
until the steering linkage hits the end of its travel.
Applying pressure to the steering wheel while
the linkage is at full lock will build pressure in the
system.
7.16. Observe the pressure reading on the test kit, at
full-lock. The pressure should be in the range of
1,087 to 1,160 PSI (75 to 80 Bars) for the Sauer
unit, and 1,450 PSI (100 Bars) for the Ross unit.
See Figure 7.16.
•
If the test kit is attached (as illustrated in figure
7.11) to the fitting at the base end of the cylinder,
turn the steering wheel to the right.
•
If the flow meter is attached to the fitting at the
rod end of the steering cylinder, turn the wheel to
the left.
7.21. If the steering hits the end of its travel, builds terminal pressure, and the flow meter continues to
have a reading above zero, then fluid is blowingby the seals on the piston.
7.22. If the flow meter falls to zero and remains there
as pressure builds, then fluid is not blowing-by
the seals on the steering cylinder piston.
7.23. If blow-by exists, the steering cylinder is bad.
NOTE: A steering cylinder can get “blown-out”
by a steering pump with a relief valve that fails to
keep the pressure below 1,500 PSI (103 bars).
If this is the case, replacing the cylinder without
replacing the pump will result in rapid failure of
the replacement cylinder.
7.24. If the hydraulic system (Auxiliary pump, steering
unit, cylinder, lines) is all good, then the problem
may be a mechanical bind in the steering linkage.
Figure 7.16
NOTE: The wheel can be turned in either direction to get a pressure reading.
NOTE: The Sauer steering pump is equipped
with a relief valve that will not permit the pressure to rise above 1,087 to 1,160 PSI (75 to 80
Bars). The Ross steering pump is equipped with
a relief valve that will not permit the pressure to
rise above 1,450 PSI (100 Bars).
7.17. If steering pressure is low, and the auxiliary
pump has been confirmed to be functioning
properly, then the steering unit is the problem.
NOTE: Steering unit failure is a rare occurrence.
7.18. If the pressure is good between the steering unit
and the steering cylinder, but the steering system lacks power, then the steering cylinder is the
most likely hydraulic problem.
7.19. It is possible for the piston seals in the steering
cylinder to experience “blow-by” without creating
an externally visible leak.
7.20. To check for blow-by, turn the steering wheel in
whichever direction causes the flow meter on the
test kit to rise:
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8.
HYDRAULIC LIFT CYLINDER AND CONTROL VALVE
8.1.
If the hydraulic lift cylinder does not work or is
low on power, begin by making a visual inspection of the cylinder, linkage, and feedback rod.
See Figure 8.1.
8.3.
Orientation of the valve: See Figure 8.3.
Return line directly to
transmission housing
(when arms are
owered)
Fluid return line
via: return manifold
and cooler
Hydraulic line
from
steering unit
Feedback
rod
Lift
cylinder
Hydraulic
line to cylinder
Hydraulic line
from control valve
Figure 8.3
8.4.
Hydraulic Connections:
•
The flexible line to the bottom of the valve provides pressure from the steering pump.
•
A second flexible line leads back to the lift cylinder.
•
The travel of the lift arms should be directly
related to the height of the lift arms.
The steel line leading from the top of the valve
forward directs fluid through the oil cooler, via
the return manifold, and back to the transmission
housing.
•
In all positions, the lift cylinder will apply only
upward force to the lift arms. It is a single-acting
cylinder.
Fluid is constantly circulating through this path,
from the steering pump, through the valve, then
to the return manifold.
•
When the valve is actuated to raise the lift arms,
it redirects fluid from this path to the lift cylinder.
•
When the valve is actuated to lower the lift arms,
fluid is allowed to empty from the lift cylinder
through the steel line leading from the top of the
valve to the transmission cover.
Figure 8.1
8.2.
•
•
•
If the lift cylinder is operable, run it through the
full range of travel to confirm that the feedback
rod is working correctly. Normal operating characteristics include:
Downward travel is not under hydraulic force,
and is only caused by the weight of the lift arms
and any accessories mounted to them.
•
At any point in their travel, the lift arms may be
manually lifted beyond the point that the hydraulic system is holding them at. They will always
“float”.
•
Because the steering system has priority over
the lift cylinder, it is normal for the lift cylinder to
have less power when the steering system is in
motion.
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8.5.
Control Linkage Description:
•
The feedback rod and link assembly governs the
motion of the lift arms. It transmits motion from
the lift arms back to the pin that provides the fulcrum point that the bottom end of the feedback
link pivots on.
•
A pin on the operator controlled linkage engages
the top end of the feedback link.
•
The valve link is connected to the center point of
the feedback link.
•
The control input to the valve is determined by
the balance between the two ends of the feedback link.
•
8.9.
8.10. Confirm that the lift cylinder control valve is getting pressure from the steering pump:
8.11. Remove any rear mounted attachments that are
supported by the lift arms or will interfere with
access to the lift cylinder and control valve.
8.12. Lift and safely support the rear of the tractor.
8.13. Remove the right rear wheel using a 21mm
wrench.
As the arms aproach the position set by the
operator controlled lever, the feedback rod
moves the feedback link back to a position that
returns the control valve to neutral.
8.6.
If a high pitched squeal emanates from the control valve after repositioning the lift arms, the
feedback rod is not working properly.
8.7.
Inspect the feedback rod and link. If there is any
sign of damage (bent rod, worn ferrule, stripped
threads, etc....) or corrosion, repair the linkage.
See Figure 8.7.
The category 1 three point hitch system on the
domestic Series 7000 tractor should be capable
of lifting 950 lbs. (430 Kg.), 24 in. (61 cm.)
behind the hitch. If it does not perform as
designed, use the following procedure to diagnose it.
8.14. Lower the lift arms to the bottom of their travel,
and confirm that the lift cylinder is fully retracted.
See Figure 8.14.
Control input to valve
Operator
controlled
linkage
Feedback
link
Figure 8.14
Feedback
rod
8.15. Disconnect the flexible hydraulic line from the
bottom of the control valve using a 3/4” wrench
and a 5/8” wrench.
Fulcrum point
(moves with feedback rod)
Figure 8.7
8.8.
The length of the feedback rod is not adjustable.
Only the load on the compression springs at
each end is adjustable. The locking nuts should
each be.25 inch (.65 cm.) from the end of the
rod.
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8.21. Carefully close the valve on the test kit. Do not
close the valve all the way. It is not necessary to
move the lift cylinder to generate pressure.
See Figure 8.21.
8.16. Install the test kit with the flexible line connected
to the pressure gauge end of the kit, and the
control valve connected to the flow meter end of
the kit. See Figure 8.16.
Test kit connection
to lift control valve
Figure 8.16
Figure 8.21
8.17. Confirm that the test kit valve is all the way open,
and that no unsafe conditions will arise from
starting the tractor engine.
8.22. The flow should remain constant, while the pressure climbs to 1,500 PSI (103 Bars). Open the
valve a soon as the readings are confirmed.
NOTE: Remember, the flow varies with engine
RPM, but does not vary with pressure generated
unless the auxiliary pump is failing.
8.18. Start the engine, warm-up the engine and
hydraulic system, then position the throttle to
3,000 RPM.
8.23. Turn off the engine.
8.19. The flow meter should rise to 4 GPM (15 L/m)
and hold steady at that level. See Figure 8.19.
8.24. Remove the test kit from the line between the
steering unit and the lift control valve, and connect the hydraulic line to the control valve.
8.25. Install the test kit between the control valve and
the lift cylinder. See Figure 8.25.
NOTE: Fender removal is not necessary
Test kit installed in-line between
valve and cylinder.
Figure 8.19
8.20. After the flow rate is established, lower the throttle setting to 1,200-1,500 RPM
Figure 8.25
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8.26. Set the parking brake, place the gear selector in
neutral, open the flow valve on the gauge set all
the way, and confirm that no unsafe conditions
will be created by starting the tractor engine.
8.30. The pressure should approach but not exceed
1,500 PSI (103 Bars).
8.31. If the pressure delivered to the control valve is
low, the auxiliary pump has tested good, and the
hydraulic lines show no signs of physical damage or leakage, then the problem lies in the
steering unit.
8.27. Start the engine, allow it to warm-up. Set the
throttle to maintain 1,200-1,500 RPM.
8.28. Have an assistant move the hydraulic lift lever
rearward to raise the lift arms.
8.32. If the pressure delivered to the control valve is
sufficient, but the pressure delivered to the cylinder is low, then the problem is likely to be in the
control valve.
8.29. As the lift arms travel upward, close the valve on
the test kit. Note the pressure. See Figure 8.29.
8.33. If the pressure delivered to the cylinder is sufficient, yet the cylinder does not perform adequately, look for leakage from the cylinder.
8.34. If all pressures are O.K., no leakage exists, yet
the cylinder does not perform adequately, there
may be a mechanical bind, or the operator may
be overloading the equipment.
Figure 8.29
NOTE: It will take several successive steps to
close the valve far enough to reach maximum
pressure:
•
Close the valve partially while the cylinder is
extending.
•
Note the pressure reading and the color of the
highest exposed colored band on the valve.
•
Open the valve completely.
•
Lower the lift arms completely.
•
Close the valve to the point that was reached on
the previous lift, as indicated by the exposed colored bands.
•
Extend the cylinder, and close the valve further
to build more pressure: repeat the process until
maximum pressure is achieved.
•
Open the valve on the test kit immediately after
the pressure reading is noted.
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9.5.
9.
TANDEM PUMP
9.1.
Attachments are covered in a separate section.
This section covers the portions of the hydraulic
system that remain permanently attached to the
tractor.
NOTE: Unless stated otherwise, it is not necessary to remove the fenders to perform the tests
described in this section. Some of the figures in
this section show the fenders removed. This
was done for photographic purposes, not for
mechanical purposes.
9.2.
If there is a performance problem with an attachment controlled by the loader valve, confirm that
adequate flow and pressure are being delivered
to the loader control valve by the tandem pump.
9.3.
The output of the tandem pump may be checked
at the line to the loader valve, or at the line from
the loader valve to the return manifold.
See Figure 9.3.
Disconnect either hydraulic tube between the
bracket / bulkhead fitting on the frame, and the
loader valve. Use a 7/8” wrench and a 1”
wrench to disconnect the tube. See Figure 9.5.
Pressure line from
tandem pump
Line to return
manifold
Figure 9.5
Return
manifold
Bulkhead fittings
9.6.
Install the test kit with the pressure gauge nearest the source of pressure.
•
If testing on the line from the pump to the valve,
the pressure gauge should be near the pump.
•
If testing on the line from the valve to the return
manifold, the pressure gauge should be near teh
valve.
9.7.
Confirm that no unsafe conditions will result from
starting the tractor and operating the hydraulic
system. Confirm that the valve on the test kit is
fully open.
9.8.
Start the engine, and allow the hydraulic fluid to
warm-up if necessary.
9.9.
Set the throttle to maintain 3,000 RPM.
Figure 9.3
NOTE: Because there is no power beyond from
the loader control valve, there is only one return
path for the hydraulic fluid.
NOTE: A pressure and flow test performed in
either line will yield valid results.
9.4.
To gain easy access to the loader valve:
•
Lift, and safely suppport the right rear of the tractor.
•
Remove the right rear tire using a 21mm
wrench.
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9.10. Observe the flow rate. It should be in the 6.5
GPM (25 L/m) range. See Figure 9.10.
25 L/m flow
Flow valve open
No pressure
•
System pressure is regulated by a relief valve in
the loader valve.
•
In this test, we have effectively disabled that
relief valve. Use caution not to overload the
system by closing the valve farther or longer
than necessary to test pump performance.
9.13. If the tandem pump fails to perform as specified,
confirm that the problem is not due to external
factors such as:
•
Insufficient or incorrect working fluid.
•
Blocked filter.
•
Pump drive failure.
•
Crushed, kinked, or blocked suction tube.
•
Crushed, kinked or blocked return path.
9.14. If external factors do not account for the lack of
performance, replace the tandem pump.
Figure 9.10
9.11. Set the throttle to maintain 1,200-1,500 RPM,
and observe the flow rate.
9.12. Close the valve on the test kit until it is confirmed
that the pump will generate at least 1,500 PSI
(103 Bars). Observe the flow rate.
See Figure 9.12.
Pressure builds
Flow
remains
steady
Flow valve partially closed
Figure 9.12
•
The flow rate should not be significantly reduced
from the initial 1,200-1,500 RPM observation by
the increase in pressure.
•
Like the auxiliary pump, the tandem pump is
capable of generating pressure well in excess of
the intended operating pressure of the rest of the
system.
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10.
10.5. With the test kit installed as shown, pushing the
loader valve forward to the detent will generate a
reading on the flow meter of about 6.6 GPM (25
L/m) when the test kit flow valve is open. Pressure will be zero. See Figure 10.5.
LOADER VALVE
10.1. the simplest way to check pressure to the
attachment is by connecting the test kit to the
Quick Disconnect ports. See Figure 10.1.
Connected to
inboard couplers
Connected to
outboard couplers
Figure 10.1
•
Connecting to the outboard pair of hydraulic
tubes will give a reading when the loader valve
lever is moved forward or back.
•
Connecting to the inboard pair of hydraulic tubes
will give a reading when the loader valve lever is
moved from side to side.
•
Connect to the inboard set of tubes, or the outboard set of tubes. Do not connect to the top set
or the bottom set.
•
One female quick disconnect and one male
quick disconnect will be required on the test kit.
Figure 10.5
NOTE: Pushing the loader valve lever all the
way forward, past the detent, will put the valve
into “float” mode. This is reflected by a flow
meter reading that falls to zero, and a pressure
gauge reading falls to zero.
NOTE: Pushing the loader valve lever forward,
but not all the way to the detent will produce
readings with less flow, but increased pressure.
10.6. Reducing throttle to the 1,200-1,500 RPM range,
observe the flow while pushing the loader valve
lever forward to the detent. The flow should be
around 4 GPM (15 L/m).
10.2. If the performance problem is isolated to one
dimension of movement, connect first to the set
of tubes that is associtated with that dimension.
10.3. After the test kit is connected, confirm that no
unsafe conditions will result from starting the
engine or operating the hydraulic system.
10.4. Open the flow valve on the test kit completely,
then start the engine, and set the throttle to
maintain 3,000 RPM.
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10.7. While holding the loader valve lever forward,
close the flow valve on the test kit. Because
there is a pressure relief feature in the loader
valve, the pressure should rise to 1,500 PSI (103
Bars) and hold steady. See Figure 10.7.
10.10. It is necessary to unbolt the pivot bracket
assembly from the loader valve in order to get a
wrench on the relief valve adjustment screw.
The pivot bracket can be unbolted using a 3/8”
wrench. See Figure 10.10.
Flow valve
closed
Pivot bracket
Pressure
gauge at
1,500 PSI
(103 Bars)
Pivot bracket
bolts
Flow meter
at zero
Releif valve
adjustment
screw
Figure 10.7
Figure 10.10
NOTE: Because of the relief feature built into the
loader valve, as pressure aproaches the relief
point of 1,500 PSI (103 Bars) more fluid will be
diverted to the return manifold. As more fluid is
diverted, the flow meter will show progressively
lesser readings. If the flow valve on the test kit
is closed completely, flow will stop completely.
10.11. The pivot bracket bolts are inaccessible without
removing the fender. See Figure 10.11.
Pivot
bracket
bolts
CAUTION: If pressure rises substantially above
1,500 PSI (103 Bars) discontinue the test immediately. Correct the pressure relief issue before
continuing.
10.8. If the pressure varies slightly in either direction,
the relief valve can be adjusted. It is located on
the top, outboard corner of the loader valve.
10.9. In order to adjust the relief valve, it is necessary
to remove the fenders. The fender removal process is described in detail in the 2003 Cub Cadet
Technical Handbook, page 6-21 through page 626.
Figure 10.11
10.12. Once access is gained to the adjustment screw,
index the screw, jam nut, and housing using a
marker.
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11.
10.13. Loosen the jam nut using a 7/8” wrench and turn
the adjuster screw using a 7/16” wrench.
See Figure 10.13.
COMPONENT BREAKDOWN: AUXILIARY
PUMP (TANDEM PUMP SIMILAR)
NOTE: The auxiliary pump is to be replaced as a
unit if it fails. Dissassembling it will VOID the
warrantee. The pump has been disassembled
here to illustrate how it works.
NOTE: Individual pump components will not be
available through Cub Cadet.
11.1. The gear must be removed from the pump in
order to remove the pump from the transmission.
See Figure 11.1.
Auxiliary pump drive gear
Auxiliary pump
Figure 10.13
Nut
Lock tab
10.14. Make adjustments to the relief valve in singlefacet increments:
•
Loosen the jam nut.
•
Make adjustment: 1/6th turn or less.
•
Tighten jam nut.
•
Install pivot bracket.
•
Test relief valve pressure.
•
Repeat as necessary.
•
•
O-ring seal
Figure 11.1
•
The gear is a taper-fit to the pump shaft, and it is
keyed to the shaft.
DO NOT “crank-up” the pressure beyond 1,500
PSI (103 Bars).
•
The lock tab, key, and nut are included with the
pump.
Install the fenders when adjustment is completed.
•
The nut and shaft have a non-standard metric
thread. They will not be commonly available.
•
An O-ring seal and Ultra-black sealant are used
to seal the pump to the front of the transmission.
10.15. The pressure readings at both sets of ports
should respond equally to adjustments made to
the relief valve. If there is substantial difference
between the pressures found at the two sets of
ports, there is an internal problem with the
loader valve.
10.16. If the loader valve does not respond to adjustment, or does not perform as described in this
section, replace the valve.
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11.2. The back cover can be removed from the pump
by removing the four socket head cap screws.
See Figure 11.2.
11.7. There is a cartridge that slides into the pump
body. See Figure 11.7.
Second
pump gear
Pump with back
cover removed
Splined shaft
Shaft with
pump gear
Bearing
cartridge
Figure 11.7
Figure 11.2
11.3. Removing the rear cover reveals an O-ring seal,
the splined shaft that transmits power to the tandem pump (when fitted), and four more socket
head cap screws.
•
The gears operate within, and are located by the
cartridge.
•
The cartridge end is partially sealed. Lubrication
channels direct a metered amount of pressurized oil to the bearings and thrust surfaces.
11.4. The second set of socket head cap screws holds
the two housing ends to the body of the pump.
See Figure 11.4.
Housing end: back
Housing end:
mounting
Pump body
Figure 11.4
11.5. Both ends of the pump have O-ring type seals
where they meet the pump body.
11.6. The body contains a simple gear pump.
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12.
12.2. With the fittings removed, the three sections of
the steering unit can be separated.
See Figure 12.2.
COMPONENT BREAKDOWN: STEERING
UNIT
NOTE: The steering unit is to be replaced as a
unit if it fails. Dissassembling it will VOID the
warrantee. The steering unit has been disassembled here to illustrate how it works.
NOTE: Individual components of the steering
unit are not available through Cub Cadet.
12.1. The fittings on the end of the steering unit extend
through the first two sections of the body, into
the third and largest section. They hold all three
sections of the steering unit body together.
See Figure 12.1.
Figure 12.2
12.3. The first two sections comprise a gerotor pump
and end plate to pressurise the system using
steering wheel motion. See Figure 12.3.
Figure 12.1
•
O-rings seal the lines to the steering unit.
•
O-rings also seal the fittings to the end of the
steering unit.
•
There are two sizes of fitting: 9/16”-18 and 11/
16”-16
•
If a 9/16”-18 fitting should come loose, tighten it
to a torque of 25 in-lbs. (221 Nm).
•
Figure 12.3
If an 11/16”-16 fitting should come loose, tighten
it to a torque of 27 in-lbs (239 Nm).
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12.6. The spool and sleeve can be easily tapped-out
of the housing. A thrust bearing assembly fits
between the spool and sleeve assembly and the
housing. See Figure 12.6.
12.4. The cardan shaft transfers motion from the
steering wheel, through the body of the steering
unit, to the pump. See Figure 12.4.
Figure 12.4
Figure 12.6
12.5. The relief valve ball and retaianer live in one of
the fittinig bores. Carefully extract tehm with a
magnet while the steerin unit is in the upright
position. See Figure 12.5.
12.7. A circular retaioner holds the leaf springs in
place. See Figure 12.7.
Figure 12.7
Figure 12.5
•
The leaf springs transmit steering force from the
sleeve to the spool.
•
The effort it takes to deflect the leaf springs
determines the amount of force that must be
applied to the steering wheel before hydraulic
force is applied to the steering.
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12.10. There are two types of leaf spring: flat and
bowed. A pair of each goes together, back-toback. See Figure 12.10.
12.8. A dowell pin connects the spool and sleeve axially, and transmits steering force to the sleeve
from the cardan shaft. See Figure 12.8.
Figure 12.10
Figure 12.8
12.9. Removing the dowel pin allows the spool to separate from the sleeve. See Figure 12.9.
Figure 12.9
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Domestic Series 7000 MFD
Domestic Series 7000 MFD
ABOUT THIS SECTION:
1.
TO IDENTIFY THEM MFD:
Early (2002 and 2003) production of the domestic
Series 7000 four wheel drive tractors used an MFD
(Mechanical Front Drive) sourced from another manufacturer. Beginning with serial number 1B014G20001
(February 1st, 2004) domestic Series 7000 tractors
were built using an MFD assembled in Cub Cadet’s
transmission plant in Leitchfield, KY. It will be found
primarily in CAT TM powered tractors.
1.1.
The out-sourced MFD is part number 618-3207.
The Cub Cadet built MFD is 618-0484. The outsourced MFD can be distinguished from the Cub
Cadet MFD in the following ways:
1.2.
The out-source MFD has numbers embossed on
most major components, the Cub Cadet Unit
does not. See Figure 1.2.
A similar appearing, but not identical MFD has been
used in the Cub Cadet Series 5000 since the start of
that models production. It will be mentioned in this
section so that it can be distinguished from the unit
used in the Series 7000.
Service of the earlier MFD is covered in the 2003 Cub
Cadet technical Handbook. This section covers the
MFD produced by Cub Cadet. The two MFDs are very
similar in appearance and function. Removal and
replacement procedures for the two units are not substantially different from one-another, and they are
directly inter-changeable in application. The brackets
are different. If one is to be used in place of the other,
they must be changed complete with the brackets.
Casting numbers
= out-sourced MFD
Cub produced unit is blank
Service Policy on the Cub Cadet produced MFDs will
be to establish a pool of rotable exchange units that
can be ordered by dealers to replace damaged MFDs.
This applies to the Cub Cadet produced MFDs only,
NOT to the outsourced MFDs that were used in some
early production domestic Series 7000 tractors.
Figure 1.2
1.3.
The Octagonal “pumpkin” is roughly 2” wide on
the out-sourced MFD. It is roughly 4” wide on
the Cub Cadet MFD. See Figure 1.3.
For tractors with warrantable repairs required to a
Cub Cadet built MFD:
•
The complete assembly is to be removed and
replaced.
•
The core shall be returned to Cub Cadet for
rebuilding. It is not to be disassembled in any
way.
•
The determination as to whether a new or factory rebuilt MFD is to be installed under warranty
will be made on a case-by-case basis.
•
Outside of warranty, the dealer is free to repair a
worn or damaged MFD, replace a worn or damaged MFD with a factory rebuilt unit, or to
replace a worn or damaged MFD with a new
one.
2”
4”
Figure 1.3
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1.4.
The MFD manufactured by Cub Cadet is
mounted to two one-piece brackets.
See Figure 1.4.
1.7.
To visually distinguish the Series 5000 MFD from
the Series 7000 MFD: the Series 5000 unit has
four tapped holes or wheel studs on the axle
flanges, while the Series 7000 has five tapped
bolt holes on the axle flanges.
1.8.
The Series 5000 MFD is wider than the Series
7000 MFD. While the main castings are the
same, the outside edge (measured at the top) of
the axle flanges on the 7000 are 2” (5 cm) outboard of the seam where the axle cover meets
the drop axle housing. See Figure 1.8.
Figure 1.4
1.5.
The out sourced MFD is mounted to a pair of
two-piece brackets.
See Figure 1.5.
Figure 1.8
1.9.
The outside edge (measured at the top) of the
axle flanges on the 5000 are 3 1/2” (8.9 cm) outboard of the seam where the axle cover meets
the drop axle housing. See Figure 1.9.
Figure 1.5
1.6.
The MFD produced by Cub Cadet for the four
wheel drive Series 7000 tractors is part number
618-0484. The Cub Cadet Series 7000 MFD
(618-0484) uses many of the same castings as
the Cub Cadet Series 5000 MFD (618-0428).
The Series 5000 has a different ring and pinion
gear orientation and the out-put to the wheels is
in the opposite direction.
Figure 1.9
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2.
1.10. The difference in widths is accounted for by the
fact that axle flanges protrude visibly further out
of the housing on the 618-0428 (5000 MFD)
than they do on the 618-0484 (7000 MFD).
NOTE: This procedure can be done on tractors
that are equipped with cutting decks, front-end
loaders, and other attachments. It is not necessary to remove the attachments in order to
remove and replace the MFD.
1.11. To mechanically distinguish between a Series
7000 MFD and a Series 5000 MFD, rotate the
input (pinion) shaft. Clockwise rotation (looking
at the end of the pinion shaft) will result in forward tractor motion on the Series 7000 (6180484 or 618-3207). Clockwise rotation will result
in reverse tractor motion on the Series 5000
(618-0428).
Tractor
7000 Cub
7000 Outsourced
618-0484
618-3207
618-0428
Input
Clockwise
Clockwise
C.C.W.
Axle
Stubby
Mounting 1 piece
2 piece
Wheel
5 bolt
5 bolt
2.1.
Park the tractor on a firm level surface. Lower
any attachments to the ground.
2.2.
Place a drain pan under each final drive housing. Remove the drain plugs using an 11 mm
wrench. Remove the fill plugs using a 16 mm
wrench. See Figure 2.2.
5000 Cub
Part #
Stubby
MFD REMOVAL: PREPARATION
Extended
1 piece
4 stud
Fill plug
Drain plug
Figure 2.2
2.3.
Place a drain pan under the differential housing,
and remove the drain plug using a 16 mm
wrench. Remove the oil level gauge to allow
faster draining. See Figure 2.3.
Differential
drain plug
Oil level
gauge
Figure 2.3
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3.5.
3.
REMOVAL
3.1.
Loosen the set screw that secures the back end
of the 4 W.D. drive shaft to the splined output
shaft on the front of the transmission.
See Figure 3.1.
4 W.D.
Drive shaft
Remove the four bolts holding the steering cylinder bracket to the MFD housing using a 19 mm
wrench. See Figure 3.5.
Lock washers
Set screw
Steering cylinder
mounting bracket
Transmission
Figure 3.5
Figure 3.1
NOTE: Only the inner two bolts (closer to the
axle mounting bracket) have lock washers.
3.2.
Slip the 4 W.D. drive shaft back to disengage it
from the MFD.
3.3.
If the tractor is equipped with a cutting-deck,
loosen the two nuts on the front of the “U” bar
using a 3/4” wrench. Remove the “U” bar.
3.4.
Remove the nut that secures the ram of the
steering cylinder to the steering cylinder mounting stud using a 24 mm wrench. See Figure 3.4.
3.6.
Lower the steering cylinder carefully off of the
mounting stud, and position it safely out of the
way. See Figure 3.6.
Steering
Cylinder
Stud
Mounting
stud
Figure 3.6
Steering
cylinder
NOTE: Do not allow the steering cylinder to
hang on the hydraulic hoses.
Nut
3.7.
Figure 3.4
Remove the steering cylinder mounting stud
using a 1” wrench and a 1 1/16” wrench.
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3.8.
3.12. Remove the four nuts that secure the front axle
bracket to the frame using a pair of 3/4”
wrenches. See Figure 3.12.
Lift and support the front of the tractor by the differential housing. Leave the hydraulic jack in
place. See Figure 3.8.
Front axle
mounting
bracket
Figure 3.12
Figure 3.8
3.13. Remove the four nuts that secure the rear axle
bracket (of the front axle) to the frame using a
pair of 3/4” wrenches. See Figure 3.13.
NOTE: If the MFD is being replaced because the
housing is broken, an alternative jacking point
may need to be identified by the technician.
3.9.
Bolts
(nuts removed)
Support the front cross-member of the tractor
frame on one or two jackstands.
3.10. Remove the front wheels using a 19 mm
wrench.
3.11. Remove the battery:
•
Remove the wing-nuts and hold down bar that
secure the battery.
•
Disconnect the negative terminal using a 3/8”
wrench.
•
Disconnect the positive terminal using a 3/8”
wrench.
•
Rear axle
mounting bracket
Carefully lift the battery out of the tractor.
NOTE: Removing the battery yields access to
two of the bolts that hold the front MFD bracket.
Figure 3.13
3.14. Lower the MFD to the ground.
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4.4.
3.15. Remove the axle brackets from the MFD, for
transfer to the replacement MFD.
See Figure 3.15.
Lift the replacement MFD into position.
See Figure 4.4.
Tapered alignment pin
Figure 4.4
Figure 3.15
NOTE: A tapered pin can be used to help align
the brackets with the bolt holes.
4.
MFD INSTALLATION
4.1.
Lubricate the pivot bosses on the new MFD with
a good all-purpose grease.
4.2.
Confirm that the thrust washers are in place in
both front axle brackets. See Figure 4.2.
Rear bracket
for front axle
Thrust washer
Install the nuts that secure the axle brackets.
tighten them to a torque of 75 ft.-lbs. (100 Nm).
If the nylon locking ring has worn, replace the
nut with a new one, or apply a small amount of
thread locking compound such as loctite 242
(blue) to the threads on assembly.
4.6.
Install the front wheels.
4.7.
Lower the tractor to the ground, and tighten the
lugs to a torque of 55 ft.-lbs. (63 Nm). Re-torque
the wheels after 10 hours of operation.
4.8.
Remove the fill plugs from the final drive housings. Fill each housing to the bottom of the fill
plug hole with Cub Cadet 85W140 Gear Lube
(P/N: 737-3065 for 1 qt.). Install the fill plugs.
4.9.
Remove the oil level gauge from the main housing, and install sufficient Cub Cadet Gear Lube
to reach the “FULL”, mark on the oil level gauge.
NOTE: Total lube capacity of the MFD is approximately 82 fl. oz. (2.5 qts.) or (2.37 liters).
Figure 4.2
4.10. Install the steering cylinder stud in the replacement MFD steering knuckle. Tighten the nut to
at torque of 100 ft.-lbs. (136 Nm).
NOTE: The flat side of the thrust washers goes
into the brackets first, so that the dimpled side
faces the pivot boss on the MFD.
4.3.
4.5.
Position the front axle brackets on the replacement MFD.
NOTE: Tie-down straps or heavy cable ties will
help hold them in place temporarily.
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4.11. Install the steering cylinder:
5.
•
Lubricate the shoulder of the steering cylinder
stud with grease.
•
Apply a small amount of thread locking compound such as loctite 242 (blue) to the threads of
the four bolts that secure the steering cylinder
bracket to the MFD.
•
Lift the steering cylinder into position, with the
eyelet of the ram seated over the stud.
•
Install the four bolts that secure the steering cylinder bracket. Tighten them to a torque of 75 ft.lbs (100 Nm). The lock washers go on the
inboard bolts.
•
Install the nut that secures the steering cylinder
ram to the stud. Tighten the nut to a torque of
150 ft.-lbs. (200 Nm).
IN-FRAME REPAIRS: DROP AXLE SERVICE
NOTE: Within the warranty period of the
domestic Series 7000 tractor, repairs to the MFD
will be accomplished by replacement of the complete assembly. Refer to the Service Policy
portion of the MFD section of this manual.
NOTE: Repairs to the drop-axle assembly are
most easily performed without removing the
MFD from the tractor.
5.1.
Lift and safely support the side that is to be serviced. See Figure 5.1.
Travel stop bolt
and spacer
4.12. Connect the 4 W.D. driveshaft:
•
Apply a small amount of anti-seize to the splines
of the MFD pinion shaft.
•
Install the 4 W.D. driveshaft on the pinion shaft
of the MFD.
•
Position it so that the end of the pinion shaft is
even with the rear edge of the front U-joint yoke.
•
Tighten the set screw on the rear U-joint to
secure the 4 W.D. drive shaft.
Jackstand
Figure 5.1
NOTE: By lifting the side of the axle to be serviced as far as it can go before the stop hits the
frame, the gear lube in the center section will
move to the lower side. This will allow the drop
axle assembly to be removed with minimal loss
of gear lube, without draining the main housing.
End of
pinion shaft
Front U-joint yoke
Figure 4.12
5.2.
Remove the wheel using a 19 mm wrench.
5.3.
Clean the area surrounding the drop axle
assembly, and drain the gear lube from it.
•
Place a clean catch pan under the drop axle
assembly.
•
Remove the drain plug using an 11mm wrench.
•
Remove the fill plug using a 16 mm wrench.
NOTE: The steps above are preliminary to any
in-frame drop axle service. Specific procedures
are outlined in the following sections; In-frame
repairs: drop axle cover, In-frame repairs: drop
axle cover, In-frame repairs: drop axle removal.
Bench repairs: kingpin and drop axle housings.
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6.
IN FRAME REPAIRS: DROP AXLE COVER
6.1.
If there is an obvious problem within the drop
axle housing, or for purposes of inspection, the
axle cover is easily removed.
6.2.
Remove the axle cover bolts using a 13 mm
wrench. See Figure 6.2.
6.5.
The inner axle bearing is a slip fit on the axle. It
can be removed with light pressure on the bearing, or (preferably) by lifting the axle bevel gear.
See Figure 6.5.
Inner axle bearing
(flange axle)
Flange axle
Drop axle
housing
Axle cover
34 tooth bevel gear
Axle cover
Figure 6.5
6.6.
Figure 6.2
6.3.
From this point, the contents of the drop axle
housing are visible. See Figure 6.3.
Lift the gear off of the splined portion of the
flange axle to gain access to the retaining ring
that secures the flange axle and the outer axle
bearing to the axle cover. See Figure 6.6.
Retaining
ring
Kingpin shaft
Outer axle
bearing
13 tooth pinion
bevel gear
Figure 6.6
Figure 6.3
6.7.
6.4.
The axle cover assembly may be serviced on
the bench.
The axle should push out of the bearing and
cover with light pressure.
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6.8.
After the axle is separated from the bearing and
cover, the bearing, and the seal that protects it
may be easily removed from the cover.
See Figure 6.8.
6.10. To reassemble the axle cover: See Figure 6.10.
Seal driver
Straight bore for seal:
no stop shoulder
Outer axle bearing: slip fit in bore,
stops against shoulder
Shoulder
Figure 6.10
Figure 6.8
6.9.
Clean and inspect all of the components and
sealing surfaces on mating components:
See Figure 6.9.
•
Bearings should turn smoothly and freely.
•
The splines, wheel mounting flange, bearing
journals, lug threads, splines and seal surface of
the axle should all be in good condition.
•
Check the axle cover for damage.
•
Use a seal driver to install a new seal in the
cover. There is no shoulder for the seal to seat
against, so it must be driven far enough that the
outer edge of the seal is flush with the outer
edge of the machined bore that the seal seats in.
•
Lubricate the lip of the seal.
•
Assemble the axle, bearings, and axle bevel
gear to the axle cover. Be certain that the retaining ring is properly seated in its groove on reassembly.
6.11. On installation to the drop axle housing:
Splines
Seal surface
Lug bolt
threads
•
Apply a small bead of sealant such as Black
Loctite # 5900 to the mating surfaces.
•
Apply a small amount of thread locking compound such as Loctite 242 (blue) to the threads
of the bolts that secure the axle cover.
•
Install the cover to the drop axle housing, and
tighten the bolts to torque of 160-220 in-lbs. (1825 Nm). There is an embossed square on the
cover, but there is no need to orient it in any specific location.
•
Refill the drop axle housing with 85W140 gear
lube.
Figure 6.9
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7.
IN-FRAME REPAIRS: DROP-AXLE REMOVAL
7.1.
The drop axle assembly can also be removed
complete.
7.2.
If working on the left side drop axle, disconnect
the cylinder mounting stud from the steering arm
using a 24 mm wrench to hold the bottom nut
and a 1 1/16” wrench to turn the top nut.
7.3.
7.5.
Lift the steering arm off of the kingpin housing
and the stud for the steering cylinder.
See Figure 7.5.
Stub shaft bearing
Stub shaft
Kingpin
housing
Remove the nut from the tie rod end, using a 19
mm wrench for the nut and a 17 mm wrench to
hold the stud. See Figure 7.3.
Tie rod end
(loose)
Steering arm
Steering cylinder
mounting stud
(nut removed)
Figure 7.5
7.6.
At this point, the most common service procedure will be to remove the kingpin housing and
drop axle housing as a unit.
7.7.
If there is obvious damage that is isolated to the
drop axle housing, it is possible to separate the
two at this point without removing the kingpin
housing.
7.8.
Grip the stub shaft and pull it out of the kingpin
housing. It is retained by the friction of a rubber
o-ring that also serves as a seal.
See Figure 7.8.
Figure 7.3
7.4.
Support the drop axle housing, and remove the
four bolts that hold the steering arm to the king
pin housing using a 17 mm wrench.
See Figure 7.4.
Stub shaft
Washer
O-ring seal
Figure 7.8
Figure 7.4
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7.9.
The drop axle housing can then be pushed down
off of the kingpin housing with some twisting and
light force. See Figure 7.9.
7.12. Support the drop axle housing, and separate it
from the axle housing. See Figure 7.12.
Pry bar
Kingpin housing
Drop axle housing
Figure 7.12
Figure 7.9
7.13. With the kingpin housing removed, access is
gained to the bevel gear on the end of the axle
shaft, and the bearing that supports the outer
end of the axle shaft. See Figure 7.13.
7.10. Most service that requires the removal of the
drop axle housing is most easily performed by
removing the drop axle housing along with the
kingpin housing.
7.11. To separate the kingpin housing from the axle
housing, loosen all four bolts that secure the two
together using a 16 mm wrench.
See Figure 7.11.
Axle bearing
(outboard)
Washer
14 tooth
bevel gear
Bolts
Figure 7.13
7.14. The gear and bearing are easily removed.
Figure 7.11
NOTE: It may be useful to use the head of a
loosened bolt to pry or drive against to loosen
the sealant between the two castings.
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8.4.
7.15. To remove the bearing it may help to slide the
axle shaft out roughly 1/4” (6mm). Once sufficient grip is available to withdraw the bearing,
push the axle back into place.
With the kingpin shaft removed, the 14 tooth
bevel gear can be removed. See Figure 8.4.
Long spline
NOTE: If the axle shaft is pulled-out too far, the
shims that are used to set ring gear component
of the differential back-lash may fall out of place.
If this happens, the axle housing must be
removed from the tractor and separated to repositions the shims.
8.
BENCH REPAIRS: DROP AXLE AND KINGPIN HOUSING ASSEMBLIES
8.1.
Once on the bench, the drop axle housing and
the kingpin housing are easily separated from
each other by twisting and pulling.
8.2.
To remove the kingpin shaft, bearing, and gear
from the kingpin housing, fixture it in a soft-jaw
vise.
8.3.
Kingpin shaft
14 tooth
bevel gear
Short spline
/ pilot
Figure 8.4
Carefully drive the kingpin shaft out the bottom
of the kingpin housing. See Figure 8.3.
8.5.
The bearing that supports the top of the kingpin
shaft can also be pushed out of the kingpin
housing with light pressure. See Figure 8.5.
Drift
Kingpin shaft
Figure 8.3
Figure 8.5
NOTE: There is a snap ring in the bore of the
kingpin housing that provides a stop for the bottom of the stub shaft, and locates the top of the
bearing. Ensure that it is securely in place when
reassembling the kingpin housing.
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8.6.
To disassemble the drop axle housing, fixture it
in a soft-jaw vise.
8.7.
Remove the axle cover using a 13mm wrench.
8.8.
There are two seals to be removed from the top
bore of the drop axle housing. See Figure 8.8.
8.11. Carefully pry the gear and bearing out of the
bore at the base of the drop axle housing.
See Figure 8.11.
13 tooth
pinion bevel gear
Seals
Bearing
Pry up
to remove
Figure 8.11
8.12. Use a bearing puller to separate the gear from
the bearing. See Figure 8.12.
Figure 8.8
NOTE: The lips of both seals face inward.
8.9.
After the seals are removed, the tapered roller
bearing can be lifted out. See Figure 8.9.
Tapered
roller bearing
Figure 8.12
8.13. To assemble the drop axle housing:
Figure 8.9
8.10. The 13 tooth bevel gear that is driven by the bottom of the kingpin shaft, and the bearing that
supports the gear are in the bottom of the drop
axle housing.
•
Clean and inspect all components-replace any
that are suspect.
•
If the tapered roller bearing needs to be
replaced, drive the outer race of the old bearing
out of the drop axle housing.
•
Replace all seals and o-rings with new ones.
•
Clean all traces of old sealant from sealing surfaces, including those on mating parts (axle
housings).
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8.18. Install the two seals above the tapered roller
bearing using an appropriate driver.
See Figure 8.18.
8.14. Carefully press the 13 tooth pinion bevel gear
into the bearing that carries it. Use care to isolate pressing force to the inner race of the bearing. See Figure 8.14.
13 tooth pinion
bevel gear
Seal driver
Universal press arbor
(aka: large socket)
Bearing
Figure 8.18
Figure 8.14
NOTE: The “open” side of both seals faces into
the casting. The first seal should be driven
roughly 1/4” into the machined bore. The second seal should be driven flush with the top of
the machined bore. The top edge of the
machined bore is beneath the top lip of the casting.
8.15. Position the bearing and bevel gear in the base
of the bore in the drop axle housing.
8.16. If the tapered roller bearing required replacement, drive or press the outer race of the new
bearing into the bore at the top of the drop axle
housing using an appropriate tool.
See Figure 8.16.
8.19. Confirm that the retaining ring in the kingpin
housing is properly seated.
Hammer
Bearing
driver
8.20. Install the bearing and 14 tooth bevel gear in the
kingpin housing. See Figure 8.20.
Figure 8.16
8.17. Install the tapered roller bearing in the bearing
race.
Figure 8.20
44
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8.21. Install the kingpin shaft in the kingpin housing.
The end of the shaft with the pilot nose should
engage the 14 tooth bevel gear.
8.22. Lubricate the shoulder of the kingpin housing
that will ride against the seals.
•
Apply a small amount of thread locking compound such as Loctite 242 (blue) to the threads
of the bolts that secure the steering arm to the
kingpin housing.
•
Install the steering arm. Tighten the bolts to a
torque of 220-280 in-lbs. (25-34 Nm).
8.23. Slip the kingpin housing and kingpin shaft into
the drop axle housing:
•
Twisting and light pressure are better than brute
force.
•
The splines on the bottom end of the kingpin
shaft must engage the splines on the 13 tooth
bevel gear for the two housings to fully seat.
NOTE: If working on the left steering arm, position the steering cylinder mounting stud in the
steering arm before installing the bolts.
8.24. Fixture the housings in a soft-jaw vice.
•
Apply a small amount of thread locking compound such as Loctite 242 (blue) to the threads
of the nut that secures the steering cylinder
mounting stud.
•
Install the nut using a 1 1/16” wrench to turn the
nut and a 24 mm wrench to hold the nut on the
bottom of the stud. Tighten the nut to a torque of
150 ft.-lbs (200 Nm).
•
Apply a small amount of thread locking compound such as Loctite 242 (blue) to the threads
of the nut that secures the tie-rod end stud.
•
Connect the tie-rod end to the steering arm, and
tighten the nut to a torque of 49 ft-lbs (66 Nm)
using a 19 mm wrench.
8.25. Install the drop axle cover:
•
Apply a small bead of sealant such as Black
Loctite # 5900 to the mating surface.
•
Apply a small amount of thread locking compound such as Loctite 242 (blue) to the threads
of the bolts that secure the axle cover.
•
Install the cover to the drop axle housing, and
tighten the bolts to torque of 160-220 in-lbs. (1825 Nm). There is an embossed square on the
cover, but there is no need to orient it in any specific location.
8.27. Final assembly:
8.26. Install the drop axle assembly to the axle housing:
•
Apply a small bead of sealant such as Black
Loctite # 5900 to the mating surface.
•
Apply a small amount of thread locking compound such as Loctite 242 (blue) to the threads
of the bolts that secure the axle cover.
•
Confirm that the axle bearing, washer, and 14
tooth bevel gear, are in place at the end of the
axle shaft.
•
Position and support the drop axle assembly
against the axle housing.
•
Install the bolts that joint the kingpin housing to
the axle housing, and tighten the bolts to torque
of 220-280 in-lbs. (25-34 Nm).
•
Lubricate the o-ring seal that fits tin the groove in
the plug shaft, and slip it into position on the plug
shaft.
•
Install the plug shaft in the top of the kingpin
housing.
•
Position the washer on the plug shaft.
•
Install the drain plug and sealing washer in the
drop axle housing using an 11 mm wrench.
•
Fill the housing to level with the fill plug with
85W140.
•
Install the fill plug using a 16 mm wrench.
8.28. Lower the tractor to the ground, and tighten the
lugs to a torque of 55 ft.-lbs. (63 Nm) using a 21
mm wrench. Re-torque the wheels after 10
hours of operation.
8.29. Test the operation of the tractor before returning
it to service. Carefully check all serviced items
for:
•
Leaks
•
Looseness
•
Unusual noises
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9.
BENCH REPAIR: AXLES AND DIFFERENTIAL.
9.1.
Remove the MFD complete, as described in the
“REMOVAL” section of this manual.
9.2.
Lift and safely support the MFD on a convenient
work surface.
9.5.
Remove both drop-axle housings using a 17 mm
wrench. See Figure 9.5.
Drop axle housing separated
NOTE: Get assistance or use mechanical lifting
equipment. The MFD complete weighs roughly
150 lbs. (68 Kg.).
9.3.
If not previously done, drain the gear lube from
main housing and drop-axle housings, as
described in the “REMOVAL” section of this
manual. See Figure 9.3.
Steering arms
Tie rod
Figure 9.5
9.6.
NOTE: alternatively, the drop axles can be taken
off of the MFD before it is removed from the tractor.
Drain plug
removed
9.7.
Figure 9.3
9.4.
With both drop axle assemblies removed, the
MFD can be placed directly on the bench, at the
technician’s discretion.
The axles, outer axle bearings, 14 tooth bevel
gears, and washers can be removed from the
MFD at this point. See Figure 9.7.
Perimeter bolts
Disconnect the tie-rod ends from both steering
arms using a 16 mm wrench and a 17 mm
wrench.
NOTE: Drop axle gear lube:
•
If the drop axles are to be serviced, or there is a
chance that the gear lube they contain is contaminated, drain them as well.
•
If the drop axles are undamaged, and the gear
lube they contain is not contaminated, they need
not be drained for removal.
Figure 9.7
9.8.
Slightly loosen the perimeter bolts that hold the
axle housings together using a 13 mm wrench.
NOTE: The two axle housings are most easily
separated in the vertical position.
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9.9.
Separating the housings is best done in a vertical position. After the sealant between the two
housings is broken, securely stand the assembly
on-end to remove the bolts and separate the
housings.
See Figure 9.9.
Left side axle bearing
(inboard)
Shim washers
spacer
9.12. With the differential bearing removed, the 16
tooth miter gear can be lifted out of the differential housing. See Figure 9.12.
16 tooth
Miter gear
Right side
housing
Left side
housing
Figure 9.12
Figure 9.9
9.13. With the 16 tooth miter gear removed, the differential housing can be easily grasped and lifted
out of the right side axle housing.
See Figure 9.13.
9.10. Lift the smaller left housing off of the larger right
housing.
NOTE: The left housing at this point contains
only an inner axle bearing and a sleeve that fits
into that bearing. Both can be removed with light
pressure.
NOTE: Washers reside between the inner axle
bearing and the differential bearing. Keep track
of the size and number of these washers.
9.11. The left side differential bearing can lifted out of
the differential housing. See Figure 9.11.
Left side
differential
bearing
Ring gear
Figure 9.13
9.14. Beneath the differential housing are more washers, between the right side differential bearing
and the right side inner axle bearing.
NOTE: Keep track of the size and number of
these washers.
Differential
Figure 9.11
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9.18. After the nut is de-staked, use the front wheel
drive shaft to hold the pinion shaft, while tuning
the nut with a 1 1/4” wrench. See Figure 9.18.
9.15. The shim washers and inner axle bearing can be
easily removed from the right side axle housing. See Figure 9.15.
Right side axle
bearing (inboard)
Shim washers
Pinion
gear
Figure 9.15
Figure 9.18
NOTE: A damaged driveshaft, cut-off to a length
of 1’ may be kept as a permanent pinion tool.
9.16. The right side axle housing also contains the
pinion gear and bearings.
9.19. Remove the nut and washers from the pinion
shaft. keep track of the size, quantity, and position of the washers. See Figure 9.19.
9.17. The nut that holds the pinion assembly in place
is staked into position. The staking must be
chiseled-out. See Figure 9.17.
Pinion shaft
Staked nut
Washers
Seal
Spacer
Figure 9.17
Figure 9.19
9.20. Drive the pinion gear into the inside of the differential using a soft hammer or drift.
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9.21. Remove the spacer that fits between the pinion
shaft and the seal. See Figure 9.21.
9.23. If the pinion bearings are suspect, drive the
outer races from the pinion bore as well. Keep
the races associated with the same bearings
that originally ran in them. See Figure 9.23.
Soft drift
Inner pinion race
Spacer
Figure 9.21
Figure 9.23
9.22. Pry out the pinion seal. The outer pinion bearing
will come out when the seal is removed.
See Figure 9.22.
9.24. To disassemble the differential, fixture the differential assembly in a soft-jaw vice.
9.25. Drive the roll pin from the cross pin that the miter
gears ride on using a flat-nosed drift.
See Figure 9.25.
Bearing race
Tapered
roller bearing
Seal
Cross pin
Figure 9.22
Roll pin
Miter gears
Figure 9.25
9.26. When the roll pin is out, the cross pin can be
withdrawn through the side of the differential
housing.
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9.30. Clean and inspect all components.
9.27. With the cross pin removed, the 10 tooth miter
gears, and the spherical thrust bearings that fit
behind them can be removed. See Figure 9.27.
Spherical
thrust
washer
16 tooth
miter gear
10 tooth miter gear
•
Replace all of the seals and o-rings.
•
Replace the stake nut that goes on the pinion
shaft.
•
If the bearings show signs of damage, wear, or
roughness, replace them.
NOTE: Do not spin bearings with an air gun to
dry them.
Cross pin
10 tooth
miter gear
•
Replace any components that show wear or
damage.
•
Replace the ring and pinion gears as a set if
either shows signs of wear or damage.
•
Replace the miter gears as a complete set of
any show wear or damage.
9.31. To assemble the differential:
Figure 9.27
•
9.28. The second 16 tooth miter gear can be removed,
along with the second differential bearing (right
side), after the 10 tooth miter gears are out.
See Figure 9.28.
Install the ring gear to the differential housing.
Apply a small amount of thread locking compound such as Loctite 242 (blue), and tighten
the bolts to a torque of 160-220 in-lbs. (18-25
Nm).
•
Install the differential bearing and 14 tooth miter
gear that go in the back of the housing, behind
the 10 tooth miter gears.
•
Install the two 10 tooth miter gears (flanking the
14 tooth miter gear), spherical thrust washers,
and cross shaft.
•
Secure thrust shaft by driving in the roll pin with
a flat-nosed drift.
Right side
differential bearing
Hardened
washer
9.32. Install the pinion assembly: gear, washers, bearings, spacer, o-ring.
Washers
Pinion gear (input shaft)
groove
for O-ring
Ring
gear bolt
Figure 9.28
O-ring
9.29. The ring gear bolts can be removed using a 13
mm wrench.
Spacer
Tapered roller bearings
(pinion bearings)
Figure 9.32
50
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Domestic Series 7000 MFD
9.33. Drive new outer races into place if the pinion
bearings have been replaced.
9.40. Install the axle shaft, inner and outer axle bearings, washer, and 14 tooth bevel gear, into the
right side axle housing. See Figure 9.40.
9.34. Install the inner pinion bearing on the pinion
shaft, and install the shaft from the inside of the
right axle housing.
9.35. Slip the outer pinion bearing onto the pinion
shaft.
9.36. Lubricate the new o-ring, and slide it into position on the pinion shaft.
9.37. Twist and push the spacer over the o-ring. The
o-ring forms the seal between the O.D. of the
pinion shaft and the I.D. of the spacer.
9.38. Install the washers and pinion nut onto the pinion gear.
9.39. Tighten the pinion nut until the pinion gear is
subject to 25-30 in-lbs (2.825-3.40) of drag. To
measure pinion drag: See Figure 9.39.
Figure 9.40
Checking pinion
drag
9.41. Install the right side drop axle assembly to the
right side axle housing. See Figure 9.41.
Drop axle assembly
mounted
without sealant
Figure 9.39
•
•
Slip a shop towel over the splines on the pinion
shaft.
Figure 9.41
Use a 19 mm 12 point socket, on a torque
wrench to turn the pinion shaft.
•
Read the pinion drag on the scale of the torque
wrench.
•
Tighten the nut to increase drag, loosen the nut
to decrease drag.
•
Mark the position of the nut in relation to the
shaft once the correct drag is achieved. This
can be done with a paint marker or marker pen.
•
It is not necessary to use thread locker or sealant at this point, but they must be applied before
the tractor is returned to service.
•
For the sake of orientation: the stop bolts are on
the top of the axle housing, the drive shaft enters
from the rear of the housing, and the steering
arms extend to the rear of the drop axle housings.
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9.44. Place the differential assembly into the right side
axle housing. See Figure 9.44.
9.42. The final assembly is easiest to perform with the
axle housing in a vertical position.
See Figure 9.42.
Roll pin
14 tooth
miter gear
Cross
shaft
Right
side
axle
Figure 9.44
Figure 9.42
NOTE: Any number of means can be improvised
to suspend the axle housing by the pivot journal,
with the drop axle housing on the ground for stability.
•
The 14 tooth miter gear in the differential must
seat over the splined end of the axle shaft.
•
The roll pin in the differential cross pin must seat
into the bore in the end of the axle shaft.
9.45. Install the left side differential bearing wrongway-around in the differential housing: the narrow margin of the outer bearing race should be
seated in the differential, with the wide margin
facing up. See Figure 9.45.
9.43. Install the washers originally removed from
between the right differential bearing and the
right inner axle bearing. See Figure 9.43.
Differential set-up
plate tool
Shim washers
Left side
differential bearing
Figure 9.43
Figure 9.45
NOTE: If no major components have been
replaced, this is likely to result in the correct ring
and pinion gear back-lash setting. Otherwise,
some adjustment may be necessary.
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9.46. Position the differential set-up plate tool over the
dowel pins and differential bearing.
See Figure 9.46.
9.49. If it is necessary to remove the differential to add
or remove washers, the axle shaft must be held
down until it the 14 tooth miter gear is clear of
the axle. See Figure 9.49.
Differential set-up
plate tool dimensions CL
2.440” DIA.
.315” DIA.
1.730”
CL
Screwdriver
used to
hold axle shaft
1.730”
.315” DIA.
Figure 9.46
Figure 9.49
9.47. Set-up a dial indicator to read the rotational
movement of one of the ring gear bolts.
See Figure 9.47.
NOTE: If the differential draws the axle shaft up
with it, the far end of the axle may slip out of the
splines on the 14 tooth bevel gear that transmits
power to the drop axle. If this happens, the
washer behind the gear will slip out of place, and
it will be necessary to remove the drop axle
assembly to reposition it.
9.50. Once the back-lash is set, then the correct
amount of shimming can be determined for the
left side of the differential. See Figure 9.50.
Shim
washers
Right side
axle housing
Figure 9.47
9.48. Holding the input pinion stationary, wiggling the
ring gear lightly back and forth to find the amount
of play between the teeth of the two gears
should produce a backlash reading on the dial
indicator of .005”-.015” (.127-.381 mm).
•
If the dial indicator reads less, add washers
beneath the differential, and re-measure.
•
If the dial indicator reads more, remove washers
from beneath the differential, and re-measure.
Figure 9.50
NOTE: For the previous measurement, the right
side differential bearing was to be installed
upside down. Correct it before proceeding.
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9.53. Position the left side axle bearing and axle in the
differential. The shim washers should be
between the differential bearing and the bearing
that supports the inboard end of the axle.
See Figure 9.53.
9.51. To determine the amount of shimming necessary
to maintain .003”-.010” (.076-.254 mm) end play,
it is necessary to intentionally over-shim, creating a gap between the left and right housings.
See Figure 9.51.
Shim washers
Checking the gap
between the housings
Figure 9.53
Figure 9.51
NOTE: Confirm that the axle shaft is fully seated
in the differential assembly, with the roll pin in
the bore in the end of the axle.
•
Position the shims, bearings, and left side
(small) axle housing as they would be for final
assembly.
•
Start 4 of the 8 bolts that hold the two housings
together. Tighten them far enough to obtain an
even gap between the two housings. Do not
exceed 20 in-lbs. of torque at this stage.
•
Measure and record the gap between the housings with a feeler gauge.
9.55. Place the axle housing over the axle shaft and
bearing. The stop bolts on the top of each housing can be used to confirm correct orientation.
•
Carefully remove the bolts, left side axle housing, bearings, and washers.
9.56. Install the bearing that supports the outboard
end of the axle shaft. See Figure 9.56.
•
From the shim washers between the left side
axle bearing and the right side axle bearing,
remove an amount of washers having a total
thickness equal to the gap between the housings
plus .003”-.010” (.076-.254 mm).
9.54. Apply small bead of sealant such as Loctite
5900 to the mating surfaces where the left and
right axle housings join.
9.52. Install the correct amount of shim washers to
achieve the specified end play.
Figure 9.56
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9.57. Apply a small amount of threadlocking compound such as Loctite 242 (blue) to the threads
of the 8 bolts used to fasten the left and right
axle housings together.
9.62. Install the drop axle and secure it with the four
bolts. Tighten the bolts to a torque of 220-280
in-lbs. (25-34 Nm) using a 16 mm wrench.
See Figure 9.62.
9.58. Install the bolts, and tighten them to a torque of
160-220 in-lbs. (18-25 Nm) using a 13 mm
wrench.
9.59. Install the washer and 14 tooth bevel gear on the
end of the axle shaft. See Figure 9.59.
Figure 9.62
NOTE: Orientation: the steering arms should
extend to the rear. The drop axle should extend
downward. The input shaft on the axle points to
the rear, and the travel stop bolts are on the top
of the axle housings. There is a dowel pin at the
bottom mating surface of the axle housing. The
drop axle housings will only fit in the correct
direction if they are on the correct sides of the
axle assembly.
Figure 9.59
9.60. Apply a thin bead of sealant to the mating surface where the drop axle assembly meets the
left axle housing.
9.61. Apply a small amount of threadlocking compound such as Loctite 242 (blue) to the threads
of the 4 bolts used to fasten the drop axle housing to the left axle housing.
9.63. Position the MFD assembly so that the right side
drop axle housing is up.
9.64. Remove the right side drop axle housing using a
16 mm wrench.
9.65. Apply sealant to the mating surface, apply
threadlocking compound to the bolt threads, and
install the right side drop axle housing in the
same manner as the left side drop axle housing.
9.66. To install the pinion seal, position the MFD so
that the pinion shaft is easily accessible, and the
MFD is supported in a safe and stable position.
55
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9.70. Install the washers and nut. tighten them until
the match marks made previously align.
9.67. Use the front wheel drive shaft to hold the pinion
shaft, while using a 1 1/4” wrench to loosen the
nut from the pinion shaft. See Figure 9.67.
9.71. Stake the nut so that it does not loosen.
See Figure 9.71.
Remove pinion stake nut
Figure 9.67
Figure 9.71
9.68. Remove the nut and washers from the pinion
shaft.
9.72. Install the tie rod. See Figure 9.72.
9.69. Lubricate the lip of the seal, and install it in the
housing. See Figure 9.69.
Spacer
Seal
Figure 9.72
Figure 9.69
NOTE: It may be easier to get the lip positioned
correctly if the pinion spacer is pulled-out
slightly.
NOTE: Use a seal driver that applies force to the
outer edge of the seal to seat it into the housing.
•
Use a 17 mm wrench to turn the tie rod end nuts,
and a 16 mm wrench to keep the studs from
turning in the tie rod ends.
•
Tighten the nuts to a torque of and tighten the
nut to a torque of 264-312 in.-lbs (30-35 Nm)
using a 3/4” wrench.
NOTE: If the nylon locking ring on the tie-rod
end nuts is worn, replace the nuts or apply a
small amount of threadlocking compound such
as Loctite 242 (blue) before installation.
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10.
9.73. Install the MFD in the tractor as described in the
MFD INSTALLATION section of this manual.
Item
Ring Gear Bolts
Perimiter Bolts (axle housing)
Kingpin Housing to Axle Housing
Axle Cover
Stop Bolts (top of axle housings)
Steering Arm to Kingpin Housing
Tie Rod End Nuts
Tie Rod End Jam Nuts
Steering Cylinder Stud to Housing
Steering Cylinder Stud Nut
Steering Cylinder Mounting Bracket
Axle Mounting Bracket
Fill Plug
Drain Plug
Pinion Drag (Not tightening troque)
Lug Nuts
Torque SAE
160-220 in-lbs
160-220 in-lbs
220-280 in-lbs
160-220 in-lbs
220-280 in-lbs
220-280 in-lbs
49 ft-lbs
360-420 in-lbs
267 ft-lbs
150 ft-lbs
75 ft-lbs
75 ft-lbs
220-280 in-lbs
220-280 in-lbs
25-30 in-lbs
55 ft-lbs
TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS
Torque Metric
18-25 Nm
18-25 Nm
25-34 Nm
18-25 Nm
25-34 Nm
25-34 Nm
66 Nm
488-570 Nm
362 Nm
136 Nm
100 Nm
100 Nm
25-34 Nm
25-34 Nm
2.825-3.4 Nm
63 Nm
Loctite
242 blue
242 blue
242 blue
242 blue
242 blue
242 blue
242 blue *
242 blue *
242 blue *
242 blue *
242 blue
242 blue
no
no
stake
re-torque*
Notes:
242 blue*: Loctite may be applied if
nylon locking feature is worn.
Replacement preferred.
re-torque*: Re-torque after 10 hrs. of operation.
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Domestic Compact Dash and Steering Pump
Domestic Compact Dash and Steering Pump
1.4.
ABOUT THIS SECTION:
The parking brake linkage, throttle lever and cable,
power steering pump, and portions of the electrical system are accessible by removing the dash panel. It may
be possible to service these systems without removing
the dash panel. Removing the dash is a relatively simple procedure, and the ease of access provided by
doing so will save time.
1.
DASH PANEL REMOVAL
1.1.
Park the tractor on a firm level surface, open the
hood, and disconnect the negative battery cable.
1.2.
Removing the two phillips head screws at the
top of the insert panel will allow the panel to be
tilted back and lifted out of the dash panel.
See Figure 1.2.
The switches can be removed by squeezing the
tabs on the short sides of the switch body, and
pushing them up through the dash panel.
See Figure 1.2.
Hazard flasher switch
Headlight switch
PTO switch
Figure 1.4
NOTE: It is not necessary to disconnect or
remove the switches to remove the dash panel.
Screws
Insert
panel
1.5.
Disconnect the wiring harness from the instrument panel. The plug can be reached from
under the hood.
See Figure 1.5.
Instrument panel
Harness
connector
Figure 1.2
1.3.
With the insert panel removed, the fuse and
relay center can be easily reached in the lower
right corner of the dash.
Instrument
panel mounting
screws
Figure 1.5
NOTE: If the instrument panel is to be removed,
the three screws that secure it can be removed
using a 7/16” wrench.
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Domestic Compact Dash and Steering Pump
1.6.
Use a pair of 1/2” wrenches to loosen the bolts
flanking the instrument panel on the inside of the
dash panel. The mounting holes in the dash
panel are slotted, so the bolts need not be completely removed.
1.7.
There are tabs on the perimeter of the steering
wheel cover that clip into each spoke of the
steering wheel. Depress these tabs and pry off
the cover.
See Figure 1.7.
1.11. There is a shoulder bushing and flat washer on
the steering shaft. They provide support for the
steering shaft boot, and reduce friction between
it and the steering shaft. Remove them.
See Figure 1.11.
Shoulder bushing
Steering wheel cover
Steering shaft
Flat washer
Nut
Belleville
Washer
Steering shaft
Figure 1.11
1.12. Remove the side panels from the engine compartment.
Figure 1.7
1.8.
The nut and belleville washer that secure the
steering wheel can be removed using a 1/2”
wrench.
1.9.
Remove the steering wheel. It may be necessary to drive the steering wheel off of the splined
steering shaft using a soft dead-blow hammer.
1.13. Disconnect the throttle cable from the injector
pump on diesel powered tractors. On Caterpillar
engines, the cable is connected to the pump with
a hairpin clip and clevis pin. Use a 5/16” wrench
and a 3/8” wrench to loosen the cable clamp.
See Figure 1.13.
1.10. The bottom lip of the steering shaft boot can be
easily separated from the dash panel.
Clevis
pin
Cable
clamp
Figure 1.13
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1.14. On Briggs & Stratton / Daihatsu engines, a Z-fitting connects the cable to the pump. An 8mm
wrench will fit the screw on the cable clamp.
See Figure 1.14.
1.16. Remove the two phillips head screws that
secure the lower rear corners of the dash panel.
See Figure 1.16.
Screw
Cable
clamp
Z-fitting
Figure 1.16
Figure 1.14
1.17. Disconnect the dash wiring harness from the
main wiring harness by unplugging the connector that is near the fuse / relay center.
1.15. On gasoline powered tractors, the choke cable
must also be disconnected. Use an 8mm
wrench to loosen the cable clamps, then unhook
the z-fittings. See Figure 1.15.
1.18. Use a 1/2” wrench to remove the two screws
holding the base of the dash panel to the pedestal. See Figure 1.18.
Fuse and relay
center
Throttle cable
Screws
Choke
cable
Main harness
Figure 1.15
Connector
Figure 1.18
1.19. Close the hood.
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1.23. The choke cable on gasoline engined tractors
passes through the large opening in the pedestal, below and to the left of the steering column
bracket. See Figure 1.23.
1.20. Carefully lift the dash panel and remove it from
the tractor. Confirm that the wiring harness and
control cables do not snag as they pull out with
the dash panel. See Figure 1.20.
2 Back
1 Up
Choke cable
Figure 1.20
Figure 1.23
1.24. The choke cable then passes through the grommeted hole at the lower right corner of the lower
heat shield. See Figure 1.24.
1.21. Dash panel installation is essenitally the the
reverse of the removal process. The following
tips may ease the installation:
1.22. Route the control cables as the dash panel is
lowered into place. The throttle cable passes
through the grommeted hole at the top right corner of the lower heat shield. See Figure 1.22.
Throttle cable
Choke cable
Throttle cable
Figure 1.24
1.25. Lower the dash panel into positon, so that the
slotted holes flanking the instrument panel slip
over the bolts between the heavy flat washers
and the pedestal.
Figure 1.22
1.26. Confirm that the lower rear cornerof the dash
panel has cleared the brake pedal.
1.27. Confirm that the lower right mounting point has
cleared the fuse and relay center.
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1.28. Connect the choke and throttle control cables in
the slack position.
2.
THE DASH PANEL
2.1.
The primary reason to remove the dash panel
would be to gain access to the following items:
•
parking brake linkage, mounted to the pedestal
•
steering shaft & pump, mounted to the pedestal
•
throttle assembly, mounted to the dash panel
2.2.
There are electrical components (instrument
panel, key switch, dash panel wire harness, PTO
switch , hazard flasher switch, headlight switch,
hazard flasher relay) mounted to the dash panel.
It is not necessary to remove the dash panel to
service any of these components.
See Figure 2.2.
1.29. On gasoline powered tractors:
•
Apply full choke, confirm that the choke plate is
fully closed, tighten the choke cable clamp.
•
Release the choke, confirm that the choke plate
in the carburetor opens fully.
NOTE: If the choke does not fully close, the tractor will be extremely difficult to start when the
engine is cold.
1.30. Adjust the throttle cable so that the wide open
throttle travel stop on the injector pump or carburetor coincides with the full throttle travel stop on
the control lever.
Hazard
flasher switch
Throttle
1.31. Tighten the throttle cable clamp.
1.32. If the throttle lever has been disassembled, confirm that sufficient friction exists to maintain a
throttle setting. Do not apply so much friction
that the throttle lever becomes difficult to move.
PTO switch
Headlight
switch
1.33. If throttle tension needs to be adjusted, do so
before the dash panel is fastened down. It will
be necessary to lift the dash panel to reach the
adjustment nut with a 9/16” wrench.
See Figure 1.33.
Flasher
relay
Key switch
Nut to adjust
throttle tension
Figure 2.2
2.3.
When in position on the tractor, access to the
throttle assembly is blocked by the heat shield.
Belleville washers
Flat washer
Nut
Figure 1.33
Throttle cable
Figure 2.3
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2.4.
The throttle cable can be removed from the
throttle assembly by squeezing the barbs on the
cable end.
2.5.
The lock nut, flat washer and two bellville washers can be removed from the base of the throttle
lever, using a 9/16” wrench. See Figure 2.5.
2.7.
The throttle assmebly can be unbolted fromt he
dash panel using a 7/16” wrench.
See Figure 2.7.
Mounting bolts
Throttle assembly:
nut, flat washer & cable
removed
Notch
Two belleville
washers:
face-to-face
Figure 2.7
2.8.
Figure 2.5
2.6.
The throttle lever can then be removed from the
throttle assembly. See Figure 2.6.
The correct order of assembly for the throttle is:
throttle tab, friction washer, mounting plate, two
bellville washers (face-to-face), flat washer ,
locking nut. The throttle lever passes through all
of these parts, with the ears on the lever engaging the slots in the throttle tab. See Figure 2.8.
Throttle lever
Throttle tab
Arm on
throttle tab
Friction
washer
Ears
Belleville
washers
Nut
Figure 2.6
Flat washer
Figure 2.8
NOTE: The throttle lever should be extend in the
same direction as the arm on the throttle tab.
The ears on the throttle lever allow it to be
installed in one of two positions: aligned with the
arm, or 180 out, facing the opposite direction.
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3.
STEERING SHAFT AND PUMP: SAUER
3.1.
Identification: Series 7000 tractors built before
the 2004 model year are equipped with a Sauer
steering pump. The body of the Sauer pump is
round in cross-section. O-ring fittings for the
hydraulic lines are located on the bottom surface
of the pump. See Figure 3.1.
3.4.
Remove the hairpin clip and clevis pin that
secure the brake lever bracket to the steering
column bracket. The steering shaft passes
through the brake lever bracket.
3.5.
Remove the four bolts that hold the steering column bracket to the pedestal using a 3/8” wrench.
See Figure 3.5.
Bolts
Steering
column
bracket
Ross pump:
round body
Pump mounting
bracket
Hydraulic connections:
bottom of pump
Figure 3.1
Figure 3.5
3.2.
To access the steering shaft and pump, remove
the dash panel as described in the dash panel
removal section.
3.3.
Remove the hairpin clips and spring that secure
the parking brake rod to the brake lever bracket.
See Figure 3.3.
Lift the steering column bracket and steering
shaft off of the pedestal.
3.7.
Slide the brake lever bracket to the right to
remove it from the parking brake rod.
NOTE: If the plastic parking brake lever needs to
be replaced, it is not necessary to remove the
brake lever bracket.
Spring
Parking
brake rod
3.6.
Hairpin clips
Figure 3.3
3.8.
Clean the area surrounding the steering pump
hydraulic connections and mark the hydraulic
lines connected to the steering pump to ease
installation:
•
The small hose on the front left side of the steering pump (“L” port) goes to the shaft end of the
steering cylinder.
•
The small hose just behind the front left hose
(“R” port) goes to the base end of the steering
cylinder.
•
Large hose at the rear of the pump (“E” port)
goes to the bottom port on the hydraulic control
valve.
•
The large hose at the front of the pump (“P” port)
goes to the top fitting on the hydraulic pump.
•
The small hose on the right side of the pump (“T”
port) goes to the forward-facing elbow on the
return manifold.
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Domestic Compact Dash and Steering Pump
3.9.
3.12. The ports are labeled on the bottom of the steering pump. See Figure 3.12.
Place a drain pan under the steering pump.
3.10. Working from back to front, disconnect the
hydraulic lines fromthe steering pump. Cap the
lines as they are removed.
See Figure 3.10.
•
On the large lines, use a 13/16” wrench to turn
the fitting while holding the adaptor with a 3/4”
wrench.
•
On the small lines, use an 11/16” wrench to turn
the fitting while holding the adaptor with a 5/8”
wrench.
•
After the front-most line is loosened, it may be
easiest to unbolt the pump before the line is
removed completely.
NOTE: O-ring adaptors
NOTE: labeled
ports
Figure 3.12
3.13. Intallation is the reversal of the removal process.
The following are notes on installation:
•
Attach the steering pump to the pump mounting
bracket. Tighten the bolts to a torque of 10 ft.lbs.
•
Position the steering shaft and steering coulmn
bracket as an assembly, connecting the parking
brake lever and parking brake rod in the process. It will be neccesssary to rotate the steering shaft until the base of the shaft engages the
steering pump
•
Bolt the steering column bracket to the pedestal.
•
Connect all of the hydraulic fittings previously
removed from the the pump.
•
Install the dash panel and steering wheel on the
tractor, but do not fasten the dash panel in place.
•
Connect the main wire harness to the dash
panel wire harness and the instrument panel.
•
Test run the tractor in a safe area to check the
operation of the steering and to confirm that
there are no hydraulic leaks. Repair any problems that are identified.
•
After successful testing, complete final assembly.
Figure 3.10
3.11. Unbolt the steering pump from the pump mounting bracket using and 10mm wrench.
See Figure 3.11.
Pump mounting bolts
Figure 3.11
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4.
STEERING SHAFT AND PUMP: ROSS
4.4.
4.1.
Series 7000 tractors built during and after the
2004 model year, and all 5000 series tractors
are equipped with a Ross steering pump. The
body of the Ross pump is square in cross section. Flare fittings that connect to the hydraulic
lines are located on the bottom end of the pump.
See Figure 4.1.
Remove the hairpin clip and clevis pin that
secure the brake lever bracket to the steering
column bracket. The steering shaft passes
through the brake lever bracket.
4.5.
Remove the four bolts that hold the steering column bracket to the pedestal using a 3/8” wrench.
4.6.
Clean the area surrounding the steering pump
hydraulic connections and mark the hydraulic
lines connected to the steering pump to ease
installation: See Figure 4.6.
•
The hose at the top left side of the steering
pump (“RT” port) goes to the base end of the
steering cylinder.
•
The hose at the top right side of the steering
pump (“LT” port) goes to the shaft end of the
steering cylinder.
•
The hose beneath the “RT” port of the steering
pump (“IN” port) goes to the top fitting on the
hydraulic pump.
•
The hose beneath the “LT” port of the steering
pump (“OUT” port) goes to the forward-facing
elbow on the return manifold.
•
The hose beneath all of the others (“AUX” port)
goes to the bottom port on the hydraulic control
valve.
•
An 11/16” wrench will fit the fittings and the
adaptors.
Sauer pump: square body
Figure 4.1
4.2.
4.3.
To access the steering shaft and pump, remove
the dash panel as described in the dash panel
removal section.
Remove the hairpin clips that secure the parking
brake rod to the brake lever bracket.
See Figure 4.3.
Clevis pin
VIEW: Front side
of Sauer pump,
accessible behind
dash panel
Brake lever
bracket
Steering
column
bracket
Figure 4.6
Hairpin clips
Parking brake rod
NOTE: There is a port diagram on the steering
pump.
Figure 4.3
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4.7.
4.11. At the technician’s discretion, the retaining ring
securing the steering shaft to the steering column bracket can be removed, and the two parts
separated before this stage, but it is not essential to removing the steering pump or shaft.
After the lines are disconnected, and the lines
and fittings are capped, remove the nuts that
secure the steering pump to the pump mounting
bracket using a 1/2 wrench.
4.12. Intallation is the reversal of the removal process.
The following are notes on installation:
Pump
mounting
bracket
Groove in
steering
shaft
•
Position the steering shaft and steering coulmn
bracket as an assembly.
•
Attach the steering pump to the pump mounting
bracket, connecting the parking brake lever and
parking brake rod in the process . It will be neccesssary to rotate the steering shaft until the
base of the shaft engages the steeering pump
before the nuts that secure the pump can be
tightened.
•
If the nylon locking feature of the nuts has wornout, replace them with new nuts or apply a small
amount of threadlocking compound such as Loctite 242 (blue) to the threads. Tighten the nuts to
a torque of 17 ft.-lbs.
•
Bolt the steering column bracket to the pedestal.
Figure 4.7
4.8.
As the pump is lowered away from the bracket, it
will separate from the steering shaft.
•
The steering shaft has a “Double-D” section at
the end of the shaft that engages the pump.
•
Connect all of the hydraulic fittings previously
removed from the the pump.
•
A groove in the steering shaft engages the pump
bracket. The steering shaft cannot be removed
until the pump is lowered.
•
Install the dash panel and steering wheel on the
tractor, but do not fasten the dash panel in place.
•
Connect the main wire harness to the dash
panel wire harness and the instrument panel.
•
Test run the tractor in a safe area to check the
operation of the steering and to confirm that
there are no hydraulic leaks. Repair any problems that are identified.
•
After successful testing, complete final assembly.
4.9.
Once the pump is separated from the shaft, the
pump can be removed from the tractor.
4.10. The steering shaft can be lifted out of the tractor
along with the steering coumn bracket. See Figure 4.10.
Steering column
bracket
Steering shaft
Brake lever bracket
Brake lever
Double D end
Figure 4.10
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Domestic Series 7000 Damped Driveshaft
Domestic Series 7000 Damped Driveshaft
ABOUT THIS SECTION:
2.
DRIVESHAFT REMOVAL
Domestic Cub Cadet Series 7000 tractors equipped
with the Caterpillar diesel engine may exhibit an objectionable level of driveline vibration at low engine
speeds.
2.1.
Loosen the two clamp bolts on the rear driveshaft yoke using a pair of 9/16” wrenches.
See Figure 2.1.
Introducing a flexible coupling in the driveshaft
between the engine and the transmission damps the
power pulses transmitted through the driveshaft. This
lowers the frequency of the vibrations to a level that
does not correspond with the frequency of resonance
of other tractor components.
1.
PREPARATION:
1.1.
Park the tractor on firm, level ground so that no
hazard will exist from the tractor rolling.
1.2.
Open the hood and remove the side panels from
the engine compartment.
See Figure 1.2.
Clamp
bolts
Driveshaft
Negative
battery
cable
Figure 2.1
2.2.
Remove the three bolts that fasten the drive
flange at the front of the driveshaft to the flywheel, using a 16 mm wrench and a long extension.
See Figure 2.2.
Side panel
Flywheel
Figure 1.2
1.3.
Disconnect the negative battery cable using a 3/
8” wrench.
1.4.
Remove the fender cover using a 1/2” wrench
and a phillips head screwdriver.
Driveshaft mounting bolts
NOTE: It will be necessary to lift the inside
edges of the black floor pads.
1.5.
Remove the hose from the radiator over-flow
bottle.
1.6.
Lift the over-flow bottle off of its bracket, and
remove it from the tractor.
Figure 2.2
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Domestic Series 7000 Damped Driveshaft
2.3.
2.6.
Slide the back end of the driveshaft off of the
splined input shaft on the hydrostatic drive, and
remove the driveshaft.
NOTE: The original driveshaft is a two-piece
assembly. At the technician’s discretion, it may
be removed intact, or separated then removed.
2.4.
Slide the engine as far forward as possible. The
left side of the engine goes slightly farther than
the right side because of interference between
the engine speed sensor and the fan shroud on
the right side. See Figure 2.6.
Remove the four bolts, nuts, and large flat washers that are used to secure the engine compression mounts to the tractor frame. This can be
done using a pair of 9/16” wrenches.
See Figure 2.4.
Figure 2.6
Compression
mount
2.7.
On the left side, the engine can be pushed forward until the engine RPM plate (tone ring)
nearly touches the fan shroud. See Figure 2.7.
Fan
shroud
Figure 2.4
2.5.
Of the four bolts, the one at the right front corner
of the engine also holds the negative battery
cable. The cable will come off when the nut is
removed, and there is a star-type lock-washer
between the cable eyelet and the frame to
ensure good electrical contact. See Figure 2.5.
RPM plate
Figure 2.7
Nut
Cable eyelet
Star washer
Figure 2.5
2.8.
Apply a small amount of anti-seize compound to
the splined input shaft on the hydrostatic drive.
2.9.
Apply a small amount of threadlocking compound such as Loctite 242 (blue) to the clean
threads of the three bolts that hold the flange on
the front to the replacement driveshaft to the flywheel.
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Domestic Series 7000 Damped Driveshaft
2.10. Slide the replacement driveshaft into position.
the flange should nest into the recess in the flywheel.
2.14. Prevent the flywheel from turning using a flywheel tool or by blocking the driveshaft, and
tighten the flange-to-flywheel bolts to a torque of
27-33 ft.-lbs (37-45 Nm).
Drive flange
2.15. Make the final alignment of the engine so that
the engine mount bolts can be installed. A
tapered alignment pin is extremely useful for
this. See Figure 2.15.
Inset: bolts and
hardened washers
Compression
mount
Flywheel
Figure 2.10
Frame
2.11. Fasten the driveshaft to the flywheel using the
three loctited bolts with hardened washers.
Engine bracket
2.12. Slip the back end of the driveshaft onto the
splined input shaft on the hydrostatic drive.
See Figure 2.12.
Figure 2.15
2.16. Secure the engine compression mounts to the
frame using the nuts, bolts, and large flat washers previously removed. Tighten the nuts to a
torque of 23-31 ft.-lbs (31-40 Nm).
Splined input
shaft
NOTE: If the locking feature on the nuts has
worn and they turn easily, replace them with new
ones, or apply a small amount of threadlocking
compound such as loctite 242 (blue) to the
threads.
NOTE: Do not forget the ground cable and startype lock washer on the right front mounting bolt.
2.17. Install the new fender cover that provides additional clearance for the flexible coupling on the
new driveshaft.
2.18. Connect the negative battery cable to the battery.
Figure 2.12
2.19. Install the over-flow bottle and hose.
2.13. Slide the engine back into position, so that the
mounting holes in the frame align with the holes
in the engine compression mounts.
2.20. Install the engine compartment side covers.
2.21. Close the hood.
NOTE: This will bring the rear yoke on the driveshaft into full engagement on the splines of the
hydrostatic drive.
2.22. Run and test the tractor in a safe area before
returning it to service.
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Domestic Compact Electrical Systems
Domestic Compact Electrical Systems
About this section:
1.8.
This part of the manual provides verbal descriptions of
the function of each electrical component in the system. It is best used to compliment the Cub Cadet Wiring Schematics found on disc 772-9085A-CD, available
through Cub Cadet.
Gasoline engines will have a magneto ground
and after-boom solenoid power-off to turn-off the
engine.
1.9.
Diesel engines will have a stop solenoid on the
injector pump to shut-off the fuel supply and
turn-off the engine. See Figure 1.9.
The intent is to help orient the skilled but unfamiliar
technician with the electrical system on these Cub
Cadet tractors.
1.
SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES
BETWEEN SYSTEMS:
1.1.
Series 5000, series 6000, and domestic series
7000 tractors have similar electrical systems.
They share a common dash panel and instrument cluster, and are similar in operation.
1.2.
The instrument cluster contains a logic board
that monitors and controls safety and operating
circuits.
1.3.
CAT Injector
pump
Stop
solenoid
Because the instrument cluster contains circuits
that may be over-loaded by a standard test light,
it is recommended that a high-impedance test
light, or DVOM be used in diagnosing most electrical circuits on the domestic Cub Cadet compact tractors.
Figure 1.9
1.10. Charging systems differ between the engines:
the diesel engines have stand-alone alternators
with integrated voltage regulator-rectifiers.
See Figure 1.10.
NOTE: Typical of these is Thexton part #125
High Impedance Computer Circuit Tester. This
tool is available at reasonable cost through
many truck vendors, and auto-parts stores such
as NAPA.
1.4.
Early versions of the Series 7000 used a halleffect sensor mounted in the transmission to
send a tachometer signal.
1.5.
There are variations between models and within
model lines, primarily according to the engine
that is used. Various gas and diesel engines
have been sourced from Briggs& StrattonDaihatsu, Caterpillar, Kawasaki, and Kohler.
1.6.
Current gasoline-powered domestic compact
tractors get a tachometer signal from the ignition
system.
1.7.
Current diesel powered domestic compact tractors get a tachometer signal from a hall-effect
sender on the crankshaft.
CAT alternator
Tone ring for hall-effect
tachometer
Figure 1.10
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Domestic Compact Electrical Systems
1.14. As with all electrical systems, do not neglect the
basics: clean connections and good ground
paths. See Figure 1.14.
1.11. The gasoline engines use flywheel mounted
rotors and engine mounted stators to generate
A.C. current. The current is processed through
regulator-rectifier modules before being passed
to the main harness of the tractor.
See Figure 1.11.
Regulator
/ rectifier
Mag.ground
(kill) wire
Charging
circuit fusible
link (40A)
Magneto
Figure 1.14
Kawasaki starter
Connector(raw alternator power)
Figure 1.11
1.12. Systems vary slightly between engine manufacturers, but principles of operation are comparable. See Figure 1.12.
Raw Alternator
out-put
2.
COMPONENTS
2.1.
The heart of the electrical system is in the dash
panel. It is some components are accessible
from beneath the hood, others may be reached
by removing the access panel. See Figure 2.1.
Regulator / rectifier (Kohler engine)
Figure 1.12
1.13. Charging system diagnosis: Flywheel charging
systems can be diagnosed using the Briggs &
Stratton shunt (B & S part # 19468) or inductive
ammeter and DVOM. Charging systems on the
diesel engines are similar enough to automotive
designs that an automotive type AVR tester (eg.
Snap-On MT3750) can be a feasible alternative
Figure 2.1
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2.2.
Behind the access panel is a fuse center.
See Figure 2.2.
2.4.
Diesel powered tractors will have the following
components at the right rear corner of the
engine bay:
•
A single relay to power the glow-plug circuit.
(P/N: 725-04164)
•
A glow-plug timer that supplies power to the
windings of the glow plug relay during the prestart cycle. Caterpillar and Briggs & Stratton Daihatsu each use different glow-plug timers.
•
A main fuse (30A)
•
A glow-plug timer fuse (5A)
2.5.
Kawasaki powered tractors will have a single
relay and main fuse (30A) at the right rear corner
of the engine bay.
See Figure 2.5.
Engine stop relay
(Kawasaki Application)
Figure 2.2
•
The two fuses (3A) in the right side positions at
the top of the center protect the instrument
panel.
•
The left-most position is empty.
•
The right relay, below the fuses, controls the
PTO. (P/N: 725-1648)
•
The left relay, below the fuses, controls the
starter circuit. (P/N: 725-1648)
•
Below the relays are unused positions for additional fuses.
2.3.
Taped to the harness, just above the fuse center
is the flasher relay, in the hazard light circuit.
See Figure 2.3.
Transmission
Figure 2.5
Flasher relay
(seen from inside
dash panel)
•
The windings of the relay are energized by the
after-fire solenoid circuit.
•
When the key switch is turned to the OFF position, power to the after-fire solenoid circuit is cut,
de-energizing the relay as well.
•
The relay common connection (ground) and the
normally closed contact (held open when the
windings are energized) connect when power is
taken from the windings.
•
The normally closed contact leads to the magneto primary windings. When it is grounded, the
magneto stops producing sparks.
Figure 2.3
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2.6.
2.7.
Kohler powered tractors use a similar engine kill
relay arrangement. See Figure 2.6.
Kill relay
Located on the dash panel are the hazard
flasher switch, light switch, PTO switch, Key
switch, and instrument panel. See Figure 2.7.
Lights
Hazard
PTO
Charge
relay
Kohler-powered
tractor
Main fuse
Key switch
Figure 2.6
Figure 2.7
•
Engine kill relay has red, green, and black wires.
•
When the red wires are hot, the relay is energized, pulling the normally closed contact open,
breaking the path that grounds-out the magneto.
•
When power is taken away from the red wire by
turning the key switch to OFF, the relay de-energizes, and the magneto is grounded when the
normally closed contact (magneto primary windings) connects with the common contact
(ground)
•
A second relay controls the charge circuit and
after-fire solenoid (red wires, and red wires with
white trace).
•
When the key is ON, regulator out-put and the
after-fire solenoid are connected to the battery:
charging the battery and powering the solenoid.
•
When the key is OFF, the relay is de-energized,
breaking contact with the battery. With the afterfire solenoid receiving power only from the regulator, the fuel flow stops when the rotor (flywheel) stops turning.
2.8.
With the access panel removed, any of the
rocker switches can be taken out of the dash
panel by squeezing the retaining tabs.
See Figure 2.8.
Figure 2.8
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2.9.
The hazard flasher draws constant hot through
the red wire with white trace. See Figure 2.9.
Headlight
switch
2.10. The PTO switch is more complex.
See Figure 2.10.
Hazard flasher
switch
PTO switch
Figure 2.9
•
When the contacts are closed (hazard switch
ON), power is passed to the hazard lights via
flasher relay through the blue wire with white
trace.
•
The hazard circuit extends beyond the lights,
back to the instrument panel, illuminating
arrows: pin #10 = left arrow Pin #21 = right
arrow.
•
The headlight switch gets power from the red
wire with black trace when the key switch is ON.
•
When the contacts are closed (headlight switch
ON), power is passed to the headlights through
the blue wire.
•
The headlight circuit extends beyond the lights,
to the instrument panel (pin # 3) where it illuminates a headlight indicator.
•
Not all Series 5000 tractors are equipped with
hazard flashers.
•
The female spade connectors are color coded:
Red for the Hazard circuit and Blue for the Headlight circuit.
Figure 2.10
•
The PTO switch contains two sets of contacts:
one in the starter circuit, and the other in the
engine shut-down and PTO circuits.
•
The orange wire (starter circuit) brings power
form the key switch in the START position.
•
If the PTO switch is turned OFF, the contacts
close, passing power to the orange and black
wire.
•
The orange and black wire conducts power to
the brake switch.
•
The red wires with black traces conduct power to
the second set of contacts within the PTO switch
when the key switch is ON.
•
If the PTO switch is ON, contact is made to the
yellow wire with white trace, providing power to
the common terminal on the PTO relay
•
If the PTO switch is OFF, contact is made to the
plain yellow wire, leading to the brake switch.
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2.13. The pin numbers are indicated on the molded
connector. See Figure 2.13.
2.11. The key switch has four spade terminals.
See Figure 2.11.
back row: # 16 -> # 23
center row: # 9 -> # 15
near row: # 1 -> # 8
“16”
“23”
“1”
“8”
Figure 2.13
Figure 2.11
•
The red wires with white trace (terminal A & B)
are fused constant hot-leads.
•
In the OFF position, no terminals are connected.
•
In the RUN position, only terminals B and C are
connected to, sending power through the red
wire with black trace to the lighting and accessory circuits and pin # 18 (run input) on the
instrument panel.
•
The START position makes the “RUN” contacts, and A terminal and D terminal are connected to each other, sending power through the
orange wire to pin #16 (start input) on the panel.
2.14. Each number corresponds to a pin position on
the instrument panel. See Figure 2.13.
Pins on instrument
panel connection
2.12. The instrument panel is easily unplugged or
removed with the hood open. See Figure 2.12.
Molded connector
Figure 2.14
Mounting Bolts
Figure 2.12
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2.15. The pin identities are as follows:
See Figure 2.15.
2.17. On Series 6000 and domestic Series 7000, there
are four wires to the switch. See Figure 2.17.
P in -o u t ch art
P in
S ig n al
1
C ruise Control Input
2
O il pressure
3
H eadlights
4
R ev erse ov er-ride
5
PT O O N
6
PT O relay
7
F uel G auge unit
8
G round, 9
R ev erse
10
Left arrow
11
G low plugs
12
T achom eter sending unit
13
M agneto
14
C ruise control m agnet
15
12 v olts, +
16
Start input
17
T em p sender unit
18
R un input
19
O pen
20
Brake on
21
R ight arrow
22
O pen
23
O pen
Four-wire reverse
over-ride:Series
6000 and 7000
Two-wire reverse
over-ride: series 5000
Figure 2.17
Figure 2.15
2.16. The reverse over-ride switch is located on the
rear fender. On all Series 5000, 6000 and
domestic 7000 tractors, the fenders must be
removed to reach the switch. See Figure 2.16.
•
There are two sets of contacts in the reverse
over-ride switch on the series 7000 tractor: one
set normally open, and one set normally closed
•
Engaging the reverse over-ride sends a groundsignal to the instrument panel through the
orange and black wire by closing contacts that
connect it to the green ground wire.
•
Engaging the reverse over-ride breaks the second set of contacts, between red wire with black
trace (auxiliary power) the blue wire with white
trace (pin #1 on instrument panel). This shutsoff power to a cruise control feature that was
facilitated in the wiring harness but did not go
into production.
2.18. On series 5000 tractors, only the orange wire
with black trace and the green wire are present.
Engaging the reverse over-ride sends a groundsignal to the instrument panel through the
orange and black wire by closing contacts that
connect it to the green ground wire.
Reverse
over-ride
Figure 2.16
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2.21. The reverse switches differ between the Series
5000 tractor and the other domestic compact
tractors. See Figure 2.21.
2.19. The fuel tank sender unit also lives under the
fender, on the left hand side. It is basically a
potentiometer actuated by a float. It creates
more or less resistance between the white wire
leading to pin #7 on the instrument panel and a
ground circuit.
See Figure 2.19.
Figure 2.21
Figure 2.19
2.20. The seat switch contains a set of normally open
contacts. When the seat is occupied, power is
sent to the PTO relay windings. When the seat
is empty, the PTO relay is de-energized, braking
the contact that provides power to the PTO. We
never want the PTO running with the seat
empty. See Figure 2.20.
•
The series 5000 reverse switch is located on the
right hand side frame channel, just in front of the
pedal linkage.
•
There are two sets of contacts in the switch, but
only one is used: normally closed.
•
When the plunger is depressed (in reverse), the
contacts connecting the red wire with black trace
(power) and the orange wire with black trace (pin
# 9 on the instrument panel) are broken.
•
When the instrument panel sees no power signal
from the reverse switch and sees no ground signal from the reverse over-ride, it breaks the
ground path for the windings on the PTO relay
(pin # 6). This de-energizes the relay, breaking
the contacts that provide power to the PTO
clutch.
Figure 2.20
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2.22. The reverse switch on the series 6000 and 7000
tractors operates in the same manner to control
the PTO clutch. See Figure 2.22.
2.24. The brake switch on the Series 5000 tractor contains three sets of contacts. See Figure 2.24.
Reverse switch:
Series 6000 and 7000
Plunger up:
Open Line
Figure 2.24
Figure 2.22
•
•
The reverse switch on Series 6000 and Series
7000 domestic compact tractors is located on
the right side frame channel, just ahead of the
pedal linkage.
•
The second set of contacts in the switch is normally open.
•
When the plunger is depressed (in reverse), the
contacts close, enabling power to pass form the
red wire with black trace (power) to the white
wire that feeds power to the back-up lights.
All three sets are normally open: when the brake
is not applied, the plunger is up, and none of the
circuits connected to the switch have continuity
through the switch.
2.25. Depressing the plunger (brake applied) closes
all three sets of contacts. See Figure 2.25.
Plunger down:
contacts closed
2.23. The brake switch for the Series 5000 compact
tractor is located on the left hand side frame
channel, just in front of the pedal linkage, with
the plunger vertical (up). See Figure 2.23.
Brake switch:
Series 5000
Figure 2.25
•
With the plunger depressed, each pair of spade
terminals that are adjacent to one another (flat
side to flat side) will have continuity.
Figure 2.23
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2.26. The circuits completed by the closing of the
three sets of contacts in the Series 5000 domestic compact are as follows:
2.28. The circuits completed by the closing of the
three sets of contacts in the Series 5000 domestic compact are as follows:
•
The red wire with black trace connects to the
blue wire, sending power to the instrument panel
(pin # 20) telling it that the brake is on. This illuminates a “brake” lamp in the panel.
•
•
The starter circuit (orange wire with black trace)
connects from the PTO switch (PTO OFF),
through the brake switch contacts, to the orange
wire with white trace that energizes the windings
of the starter relay. Energizing the starter relay
passes power to the other orange and white wire
on the relay, triggering the starter solenoid and
motor.
The Starter circuit (orange wire with black trace)
delivers power from PTO switch (PTO OFF)
through the brake switch contacts, to the orange
wire with white trace. This sends power to trigger the starter solenoid and to the instrument
panel (pin # 20) telling it that the brake is on.
This illuminates a “brake” lamp in the panel.
•
The yellow wire gets power from the PTO switch
when the PTO is off. When the brakes are
applied, the power passes to the red wire on the
brake switch. The red wire takes power to the
after-fire solenoid.
•
If this circuit is broken, the engine will stop
from lack of fuel.
•
The seat switch feeds this circuit between the
brake switch and the after-fire solenoid. Either
the seat most be occupied -or- the brake must
be applied -and- the PTO must be off to keep the
after-fire solenoid energized.
3.
ELECTRIC CLUTCH AND FUEL PUMP
3.1.
The electric PTO clutch on the Series 6000 and
domestic Series 7000 compact tractors is contained inside the transaxle. The wire that provides power to it enters the transaxle housing
through a notch in the top edge of the right side
of the housing. See Figure 3.1.
•
The yellow wire gets power from the PTO switch
when the PTO is off. When the brakes are
applied, the power passes to the red wire on the
brake switch. The red wire takes power to the
after-fire solenoid.
•
If this circuit is broken, the engine will stop
from lack of fuel.
•
The seat switch feeds this circuit between the
brake switch and the after-fire solenoid. Either
the seat most be occupied -or- the brake must
be applied -and- the PTO must be off to keep the
after-fire solenoid energized.
2.27. The Series 6000 and Series 7000 brake switch
has two sets of contacts. It is mounted to the
right hand side frame channel, in front of the
pedal linkages. See Figure 2.27.
Brake switch:
Series 6000 and 7000
Electrical connection
for PTO
Figure 2.27
Figure 3.1
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3.2.
The Electric PTO clutch on Series 5000 compact
tractors is external, but requires some transaxle
disassembly to remove. See Figure 3.2.
3.3.
The electric fuel pump is mounted to the left
hand side frame channel on all gasoline powered domestic compact tractors. See Figure 3.3.
PTO clutch
Power to PTO
(blue)
Flow
PTO Ground
wire (green)
Figure 3.3
Figure 3.2
•
It is possible to set the clutch air-gap in-situ,
without removing the fenders.
•
R&R instructions are contained in the 2004 Cub
Update material.
•
Diesel powered tractors in the Series 5000,
6000, and domestic 7000 line do not have electric fuel pumps.
•
Caterpillar engines have a mechanical lift pump
feeding the high-pressure injector pump, and
Briggs & Stratton Daihatsu pumps are able to
self-feed.
•
The electric fuel pump is powered whenever the
key switch is ON. When they run there is an
audible clatter. The noise is louder when there
is air in the system, and quiets-down as the system fills with gasoline. This may take 10-15 seconds after the key switch is turned-on.
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