White CLASSMATE 1570 Instruction manual

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_______________________
TO OUR VALUED CUSTOMER...
You are now the owner of a new zig zag sewing machine, the most
versatile type of its kind you can possess,
Buttonholes, monogramming, overcasting and creative embroidery
are done with ease and speed.
To aid you in obtaining the greatest performance from your new
sewing machine, this book on its care and use has been written for
you. Read the instructions carefully, as a thorough understanding of
your machine will reward you with many hours of trouble4ree
creative sewing.
This manual is divided into seven separate sections. Each section
deals with one special portion of your sewing machine. For example:
1. “GETTING READY TO SEW” explains the basic functions’of
your machine; how to thread your machine, wind bobbins, etc.
2. “STRAiGHT AND ZIG ZAG” explains the uses of straight sewing,
zig zag stitches and use of the built in utility stitches.
3. “TWIN NEEDLE SEWING” explains how to use a twin needle and
the application of twin needle sewing.
4. “BUTTONHOLES” explains four different styles of buttonholes.
5. “STRETCH UTILITY STITCHES” explains the use of elastic triple
stretch stitches.
6. “FEATURES AND PARTS” explains many parts and features of
your machine.
7. “CARE OF YOUR MACHINE” explains maintenance, oiling,
minor problems and solutions, alphabetical index.
Also included in the front portion of this manual is a table of
contents and glossary of terms to further aid you to enjoy your
sewing machine.
SEWING MACHINE
Record in space provided below the Serial No.
and Model No. of this appliance.
The Serial No. is located Rear of arm.
The Model No. is located Rear of am,
Serial No.
Model No.
Retain these numbers for future reference.
CONTENTS
Cover page
Introduction/Contents
1.6
Glossary of sewing machine
SEW
TO
READY
GETTING
7
Using the foot control
7
To Connect the foot control wires
7
To use the toot pedal
8
sewing
tree-arm
Converting to
9
Winding the bobbin
10
Threading of top thread
11
threading
upper
needle
Twin
12
Lower threading
12
Inserting bobbin
13
Picking-up lower bobbin thread
CONTROLS
14
Top tension control
15
Checking tensions
16
control
stitch
Reverse
OTHER ADJUSTMENTS OF MACHINE IN SEWING
17
Presser foot pressure regulator
17
Darning plate
18
Changing the needle
19
Fabric, thread and needle chart
20
Free-Arm sewing
21
Pattern setting
22
Presser feet
22
Changing toot
23
Starting to sew
STRAIGHT AND ZIGZAG
APPLICATIONS OF THE STRAIGHT STITCH
24
Seams
24
Basting/topstitching
24
Darning
25
Elastic thread shining
25
Holding the fabric
25
Turning corners
25
seams
Curved
26
Ending seam/removal of fabric
APPLICATIONS OF THE ZIGZAG STITCH
26
Overcasting
26
Seeming knits
27
Sewing on buttons
28
Forming thread shank on button
28
Satin stitching
28
Tapering/creative embroidery
28
Manual embroidery designs
29
Free hand monogrammirig
29
Applique
30
Gathering over cord
APPLICATIONS OF THE MULTIPLE STITCH ZIGZAG
30
Overcasting
30
Patching
31
Mending a tear or instant darning
31
Lace applications
32
Flutter hem
32
Elastic application
33
Understitching facings
33
Decorative effects
APPLICATIONS OF THE BLIND HEM STITCH
34
Blind hemming
35
Shell tuck
35
Decorative effects
35
Topstitching elfects
36
Shell tuck
APPLICATIONS OF THE INTERLOCK
Lingerie seam
Inserting lace
TWIN NEEDLE SEWING
Twin needle upper threading
Twin needle sewing effects
Decorative tucks or designs
Pin Tucks
BUTTONHOLES
Buttonholes
Preparation
Built-in buttonholer
Turn-around buttonholes
Corded buttonholes
Stretch buttonholes
STRETCH UTILITY STITCHES
APPLICATIONS OF THE STRAIGHT TRIPLE STRETCH
STITCHES
Seams
Topstitching (stretch stitches)
APPLICATION OF THE RICK-RACK
TopstitchinglRick-rack
Tapering/Rick-rack
APPLICATION STRETCH OVERLOCK
APPLICATIONS SMOCKING STITCH
Seaming smocking stitch
Elastic thread shirning
APPLICATIONS DOUBLE OVERLOCK STITCH
Seaming double overlock stitch
Hemstitching effect
Topstitching double overlock
APPLICATIONS ULTRA STRETCH
Seaming ultra stretch
FEATURES-f-PARTS+ACCESSORIES
Accessories
KNOWING YOUR SEWING MACHINE
Front view
Back view
The all purpose foot
The button sewing foot
The buttonhole foot
Changing foot
Buttonhole foot
Button sewing foot
Cloth guide
Zipper sewing foot
lnisertcording
The Ouilting guide
Buttonhole cutter
Straight stitch foot
CARE OF YOUR MACHINE
Maintenance
Take out tangled thread in bobbin case
Trouble chart
36
36
37
37
38
38
39
39
40
41
42
43
44
44
45
45
46
46
46
47
47
48
49
so
51
52
53
53
53
53
54
55
56
57
57
58
58
58
59-60
61
62
GLOSSARY OF SEWING MACHINE TERMS
ACCESSORY BOX
For storage of extra feet, needles, bobbins
and accessories.
BOBBIN CASE
TENSION SPRING
Holds thread in bobbin case and balances
upper and lower tension threads.
BOBBIN TENSION SCREW
To adlust the tension of bobbn thread
BOBBIN WINDING
SPINDLE
For winding bobbin with thread.
BOBBIN WINDING STOP
For automatically stopping bobbin at full
capacity
CABINET
Used to mount sewing machine in furniture;
also a storage area to’ machine.
FACE COVER
Snaps open for changing the bulb
Also provides easy access to needle and
presser bar assembly for oiling.
FEED DOG
For feeding material through machine
FOOT CONTROL
For activating power to the machine, amount
of pressure exerted on the foot pedal controls
the speed; attached wires plug into machine
and wall socket.
HANDWHEEL
For turning mechanism by hand to bring
needle and take up to hgh position. This
wheel turns toward operator.
LIGHT SWITCH
On face cover, back portion;
turn on or off
NEEDLES
Used to form a lock stitch on your machine,
variations are many;
example: sharp, ball, leather, etc
NEEDLE CLAMP
For attaching the needle to the lower end
of the needle bar,
NEEDLE CLAMP
THUMB SCREW
For fastening needle into needle clamp,
NEEDLE PLATE
For supporting material when sewing. This
plate is marked for several hem sizes
PORTABLE CASE
PRESSER BAR
PRESSER FOOT
PRESSER FOOT LIFTER
9 machine when
A receptacle to store a sewn
not in use.
s
Controls the pressure exerted on variou
materials being sewn.
the
When lowered onto material it holds
material against the feed dog.
bar and
For raising the lowering the presser
is
presser foot. When raised, the tension
is
released and when lowered, the tension
engaged
PRESSER FOOT
THUMB SCREW
ents
For fastening presser foot and attachm
to the presser bar.
RACE
Groove in which shuttle turns.
REVERSE STITCH
BUTTON
For changing from forward to reverse
fur
directiun, button must be held down
continuous reverse sewing.
SHUTTLE
For forming lock stitch.
SLIDE PLATE
Access to bobbin case and bobbin.
SOCKET
SPOOL PINS
IRETRACTABLEi
STITCH LENGTH DIAL
STOP MOTION KNOB
TAKE UP LEVER
THREAD CUTTER
THREAD GUIDE FOR
BOBBIN WINDING
THREAD GUIDE FOR
UPPER THREADING
TWIN NEEDLES
UPPER THREAD TENSION
UPPER THREAD TENSION
DIAL
the
Located under the face cover to change
light bulb.
, or
One for sewing one for winding bohbin
twin
and
threads
two
with
both for sewing
needle.
For changing the length of stitch in either
forward and reverse direction
For disengaging the handwheel from
mechanism when winding the bobbin
without the needle moving up and down.
For drawing up the top thread to form a
tight stitch.
the
For cutting excess thread, located on
back and into the presser bar
Holds thread taut for even winding.
.
Guides thread from spool pins to the tension
Two needles with one thank making it
possible to sew with two top threads.
Use separately for single or two thread
sewing.
Used to change upper tension numbered
from “0” to “9”.
width of zigzag stitching.
ZIGZAG WIDTH CONTROL For setting
—2—
GLOSSARY OF SEWING TERMS
APPLIQUE
BASTING
BLIND HEM
Applying a material with a specific design
onto another material by using a straight
or zigzag stitch.
To sew with a temporary stitch that can be
removed with ease. This is possible by using
the longest straight stitch, setting your top
tension on “0” and sewing a line of stitches.
The top stitch will be loose and the bottom
stitch tight; this allows you to be able to
remove the lower thread by pulling, It may
be necessary to cut the lower thread at
different points for easier removal.
A variation of the zigzag stitch used to
finish a hem where you can control the
holding stitch.
BUTTONHOLE
A means of strengthening the sides of a hole
in cloth by a zigzag stitch to hold a button.
COUCHING
,
To fasten down another material, like a ribbon
ace, with a fine zigzag stitch.
DARNING
A method of repairing a rip or sear by
stitching over the flaw.
EMBROIDERY
To decorate with stitching, using either a
straight or zigzag stitch.
FACING
The addition of another piece of material to
increase the body or edge of material.
GATHERING
Forming a zigzag stitch over cord, elattic,
or any separate material.
Another term for shirring.
HEM
A fold, sewn down an edge of cloth.
MONOGRAMMING
Using a straight stitch for tracery or zigzag
stitching to form a design.
OVERCASTING
The use of a zigzag stitch to finish a seam
or edge of cloth, or to prevent the ravelling
of a loose weave cloth.
OVER LOCK STRETCH)
A triple stretch pattern used to finish
seams or stretch buttonholes.
PATCHING
Same as darning but covering the hole with
a piece of cloth.
PICOT STITCH
A triple stretch pattern used similar to a
tricot stretch giving a hand stitch effect.
QUI LTING
Joining several cloths together to form a
bulk cover for beds, furniture or clothing.
RICK RACK
A triple stretch pattern using a basic zigzag
to give a RICK RACK effect.
—3--
SATIN STITCH
A solid tine of zig zag stitching formed by a
zigzag stitch sewn very close together.
SEAM
A line formed when sewing two pieces of
material together.
SHELL TUCK
SHIRRING
STRAIGHT STITCH
The use of the zigzag or variation of the
zigzag stitch to give a shell effect to the
edge of material.
To gather cloth by drawing two or more
threads together.
A forward or reverse single line of sewing
which may vary from 6 to 8 stitches per
inch to “0” stitches.
STRETCH BUTTONHOLE
A buttonhole made with a stretch stitch
pattern to be used on double knits,
sweaters, etc.
STRETCH STITCH
A combination of stitches formed by a
forward and backward motion which
allows the stitches to flex and not break,
used on stretch materials, double knits,
tricot, lingerie, etc.
TAPERING
A line of zigzag sewing varying from a
narrow to a wide range.
THREAD SHANK
A space composed of thrçad between the
button and cloth to engage button to
buttonhole on bulky material.
A line or series of lines of straight or zigzag
sewing which enhances a border gwlng
the stitching a raised effect.
TOPSTITCHING
TRICOT STITCH
A triple stretch pattern used to finish
delicate fabrics or lace.
TRIPLE STRETCH
A term used for stretch patterns, a pattern
formed by a forward, sideward and
backward combination of stitches.
ULTRA STRETCH
A triple stretch pattern which is excellent
to make seams in bulk materials like
sweater and swimwear,
UNDERSTITCHING
Using a variation of the zig zag stitch to
finish a hem or seam that is hidden.
VARIEGATED THREAD
A single strand of thread with varying
colors, used for a decorative effect.
ZIGZAG
A term which describes the side to side
motion of the needle which creates width
to straight sewing.
—.4—
THIS INSTRUCTION MANUAL IS DESIGNED TO
ND
GIVE BASIC INFORMATION, TO UNDERSTA
SEWING MACHINE,
A
OF
FUNCTIONS
THE
THREAD, AND NEEDLES.
B
A
For sewing a normal seam, the material must be fed
regularly for the formation of each stitch. The feed dog
does the conveying, together with the presser bar on
which a presser foot has been fastened.
Feed Dog
The task of the feed dog is to move the cloth on for a
certain distance after each stitch. This distance, called
stitch length, can be accurately adjusted by means of
a lever or a knob, which acts on the feed mechanism.
The feed dog is equipped with small, sharp teeth. Fig. 1
shows the most common types of feed dogs.
Fig. 2
A thread is left-twist if, when held horizontally, the
individual strands slant to the left from bottom to
top.
A thread is right-twist if, when held horizontally, the
individual strands slant to the right from bottom to
A.
B.
top.
Parts Necessary for Forming a Stitch
tion.
1. The Needle:
A.
F
Fig. 1
A.
B.
C.
The “L” shaped feed dog is the oldest type and
common to sewing machines with vibrating shuttles.
It has the disadvantage that it does not feed all kinds
of work, such as f ii. collar points, evenly.
The “H” shaped feed dog, with a row of teeth on
either side of the needle plate hole, is an improve
ment on the former, but does not feed narrow strips
or hems well.
The “M” and “0” shaped feed dogs guarantee the
uniform feed of any kind of work or material.
Aim:
-—
Stitch Forma
To become acquainted with the structure of the
sewing machine needle in detail, so as later on
to be able to understand better how the stitch
is formed. Different systems and sizes.
As has already been mentioned, needles have existed since
the most ancient times. They were made of thorns, horn,
fish-bones, gold and ivory. The first steel rteedles were
made in Germany.
The needle with the eye near the point became more
widely used with the introduction of the Iockstitch
sewing machine. At first, each manufacturer used a needle
which could only be used on his own models. The differ
ent kinds of needles have since been standardized by an
International Agreement,
There exist approximately 2000 rliffer
Needle Systems
ent types of needles, amongst which system 705 (U.S.A.:
style 15 x 1) is the most frequently used for household
sewing machines. This needle is also used for the ELNA!
WHITE and is described below in detail:
Twist of the Thread
Depending on the kind of shuttle used, the twist of the
thread is of a certain importance.
If thread with a right-hand twist is used, it will unravel
slightly, when the stitch is formed, due to the direction
of rotation of the shuttle. This naturally reduces the
tensile strength of the thread. For sewing, the question,
whether left- or right- hand twist is used, is of lesser
importance. t is strongly recommended, however, to use
left-twist thread for darning with fine thread.
The difference between the two kinds of twist is best
determined in the following manner:
S
A
C
D
G
F
Fig. 3
A) eye
B) point
—5—
C) body
0) shaft
E) short groove
F) long groove
G) flat
A
Fig. 6
THE TENSION
r tension is too weak?
What happens now, if the uppe
thread should he drawn from
At the moment the lower
h, its resistance becomes too
the bobbin to finish the stitc
r tension. Thus the upper
uppe
strong in relation to the
the lower thread is drawn into
thread in unwound before
up lever no longer meets
the material. The thread takeupper tension to enable
with enough resistance from the
and the hewer thread
rial
the thread to cross in the mate
remains tretched (Fig. 4 C).
on is too tight?
What happens, if the upper tensi
d should be drawn from
At the moment the lower threa
its resistance is too weak in
the bobbin to finish the stitch,
The lower thread thus un
relation to the upper tension.
offer enough resistance to
not
winds too freely and does
upper thread withdraws
the pull of the upper thread. The
remains stretched on top
entirely from the material and
crosses right through it
of it. whilst the lower thread
(Fig. 4 8).
the functioning of the upper
It is most important that
adjusted be explained in
tension and how it should be
detail to the user.
the material, the thread
When a threaded needle pierces
on the needle, in order
will slip into the two grooves
passing through the
when
thus to offer the least resistance
ases on the side
incre
tance
material. However, this resis
s in the materi
pear
disap
r
latte
the
of the short groove, as
longer in the groove but
al, because the thread is now no
of the needle and the
is jammed between the body
ins stretched, until the
material. Thus the thread rema
. 6>.
needle reaches its lowest point (Fig
upwards again, the thread
When the needle starts moving
without difficulty be
in the long groove (F) can slide
rial (Fig. 7). As on the
tween the needle and the mate
d is jammed, it can not
short-grooved side (E) the threa
therefore, forms a small
slide along with the needle and,
loop on the same side.
P
F
Fig. 5
, then a skipped
Fig. 5 starts by showing a perfect seam
Skipped stitches
d
(B).
threa
en
stitch (A) and then a brok
the point of
her,
anot
n
or
reaso
one
for
are caused when,
the upper thread.
the hook does not catch the loop of
s of what shuttle
On all lock-stitch machines, regardles
r thread has to form the
systems they may have, the uppe
loop explained in detail below.
V
Fig. 7
ms come into play. They
syste
tle
shut
Now the different
is to pass the bobbin with
h
whic
task,
same
all have the
. This is what is called
loop
the
gh
throu
d
threa
r
the lowe
stitch formation.
4
—6-—
1
USING THE FOOT CONTROL
TO CONNECT THE FOOT CONTROL WIRES:
*
*
Connect special plug to block on machine as shown in diagram above.
Connect outlet plug to electrical outlet.
wiring.
When sewing, keep children’s hands away from toot control and
outlet.
electrical
from
plug
nect
After sewing, discon
l, the
Your sewing machine is equipped with a grounded foot contro
outlet plug will have a third round prong which acts as ground. Your
electrical outlet must have a matching recepticle.
TO USE THE FOOT PEDAL:
*
*
you and apply gradu
Begin sewing by turning the hand wheel toward
pedal.
foot
to
pressure
ally increasing
Sewing at a constant speed will give best results.
—
7—
CONVERTING TO FREEARM SEWING
(Fig. 1)
a
(Fig. 2)
2. To replace the table, simply slide it
along the free arm to its original
position. (Fig. 1)
1. Remove the table from the machine
by pulling the base to the left.
(Fig. 1,2)
—8—
WINDING THE BOBBIN
0
0
0
-
--
Release clutch by turning clutch
knob toward you.
2. Draw thread from spool through
bobbin winder tension discs as
shown.
3. Pull end of thread through hole
in bobbin as shown.
4. Place bobbin onto bobbin winder
shaft with end of thread coming
from the top of the bobbin.
1
0
0
push bobbin winder latch against
Holding
bobbin until it clicks.
onto end of thread, start machine.
When bobbin is slightly filled, snip
off end of thread.
5. Start machine. Wind thread until
bobbin winder latch releases.
6. Tighten clutch knob and remove
bobbin.
to and in bobbin winding. By placing a
Two spool pins have been included with thIs machine
your bobbin without unthreading the
wind
may
you
pin
spooi
second
the
on
spool of thread
machine.
—9—
THREADING OF TOP THREAD
a
Fig 3
the back of the
1. Place thread on spool pin as shown, with the thread coming from
1—b & c).
(Fig
spool (Fig. 1—a). Draw thread through the top thread guide
Pass thread through top thread guide (Fig. 1-d)
tension discs.
2. Holding the spool with the right hand, pull the thread through the
the beak
beyond
passes
thread
the
until
up
pulled
be
The spring wire loop should
2.
of the hook. Fig.
return to
3. After the thread has slipped into the hook, allow the spring wire to
position by releasing the thread spool. Fig. 3.
down
4. Continue threading through the front thread guide, takeup lever, and
through path shown in Fig. 4 and 5.
5. Always thread needle in direction as shown in Fig. 5.
—10—
Twin Needle Upper Threading
U
*
*
*
*
exceptions.
FoHow threading instruction for single needle with these
pins.
spool
Place thread, matching or contrasting in color, on both
te the threads at the
separa
but
l,
norma
Draw hreads through the thread guides as
position. 1
through the right disc.
Pass one thread through the left disc and one thread
Tension is divided in center by a larger disc.
thread guides on the needle
Now treat both threads as one until you reach the
cIa ii p.
guide.
At needle clamp 2, pass hnth of the threads on needle
n ‘0” and “2”, if you
betwee
width
desired
at
Set
ROL:
ZIGZAG WIDTH CONT
plate and break.
set the control higher than 2, the needle will hit the needle
.
STITCH LENGTH: Set at desired stitch length
—11—
LOWER THREADING
Removing the Bobbin
Pick the metal plate upward towards you
and remove the bobbin with your finger,
as shown, or you may use the opposite
end of your button hole cutter to extract
the bobbin.
INSERTING BOBBIN
(1) Insert the bobbin into the shuttle
with the thread end in direction
of the arrow. Bobbin should rotate
clockwise.
(2) Grasp thread, pass the thread around
the front, from right to left and
through the slot (a>.
I
(3) Change direction and continue
pulling the thread from left to
right across the front 3A until it
engages into slot (b) 38
(3B)
(4) Pull the thread towards the needle
and back for about six (6> inches,
release the thread and close the metal
plate.
—12—
Picking-Up Lower Bobbin Thread
Hold end otupper thread with left hand.
Turn handwheel slowly towards you until needle moves down and up again.
Pull upper thread slowly and lower thread will be brought up in a loop.
Pull out both threads to about 15cm (6”) and place them together under
presser foot and to the left.
—13—
CONTROLS
TOP TENSION
CONTROL
Probably the most important control on your machine is this one that
regulates your top thread tension. It consists of discs between which
the thread passes. The pressure on these discs is regulated by turning
the turning the dial on the front of the control. The higher the number,
the tighter the tension.
There are many reasons for having to reset your tension. The best
tension for one fabric may not be correct for another. The required
tension depends upon the stiffness of the fabric, thickness of the
fabric, numbers of layers of fabric being sewn, as well as the type of
stitch you are making.
It is best to test the stitching on a scrap of the fabric you are using
before starting to make a garment. To adjust for the correct stitch:
Normal
tension sewing will be in the
range of 456,
CORRECT
Decreasing Tension:
Turn thread tension dial towards “0”this is normal for basting.
INCORRECT
TOP TENSION TIGHT
BOTTOM TENSION LOOSE
Increasing Tension:
Turn thread tension dial
INCORRECT
TOP TENSION LOOSE
BOTTOM TENSION TIGHT
towards “9”this is used for rolled hem, shell tuck,
etc.
—14—
CHECKING TENSIONS
is to sew a medium zigzag stitch on
The easiest way to check tensions
appropriate type of thread and
the fabric you will be using. Use the
d on the bobbin and upper
threa
needle. Use different colors of
spool.
bobbin thread should not show on
Sew a line of zigzag stitches. The
the top of the fabric.
ssary to achieve the stitch balance
Adjust the top tension if nece
mentioned above.
UNBALANCED
BALANCED
Lower Tension
Correct Tension:
Pull end of lower thread backwards
away from plate. You should feel a slight
steady pressure.
Adjustment:
Note sketch showing correct tensions.
Remove cover plate and insert small
and
C
screwdriver into shuttle area
locate adjusting screw. Turn adjusting
if lower thread
A
screw clockwise
B
is too loose and counterclockwise
A
it lower thread is too tight.
—15—
REVERSE STITCH CONTROL
reverse.
It is best to begin and end seams with a few stitches taken in
seams
the
of
end
the
fastens
tacking
Back
tackinq.
This is called back
raveling.
preven
i’
firmly and
When everse stitching is needed, simply press and hold the control down
dui ing sewing. The fabric will immediately start feeding backward and
seam will be fastened.
Reverse Stitch Control
NEEDLE GUARD
Youi roach
pressei hai
.
is eqtiippi’cJ with a Iinqei quai if tI a
cccii ted cii tli’
This goal U ccii be swung to the iett niiLiicj t aciessalile ci
lie
thi cad the needle
}
—16—
OTHER ADJUSTMENTS OF MACHINE IN SEWING
In addition to the obvious controls of your machine there
are other small regulators and controls to aid you in using
your sewing machine.
PRESSER FOOT PRESSURE REGULATOR
or
Push down outer ring of presser foot pressure regulat
of
re
pressu
release
will
This
(See above illustration).
pin
inner
down
push
re,
pressu
e
increas
To
presser foot.
until suitable pressure is obtained. For ordinary sewing,
the inner pin should be all the way down.
Insufficient pressure may cause poor feeding of the fabric,
skipped stitches, or difficulty in guiding the fabric.
When sewing multiple thickness or heavy fabric reduce
Increase pressure when sewing lighter
the pressure.
weight fabrics. If feed dog or presser toot marks appear
on the fabric, reduce the pressure.
DARNING PLATE
When you need to feed the fabric by hand
as in darning, or sewing on buttons, attach
the darning plate over the needle plate as
shown in Fig. 1. Be sure you have the needle
raised to its highest position when doing
this.
Fig. 1
—17—
Changing The Needle
Proper needle
straight shaft
Always make sure needle is straight.
surface and see that
To check straightness of needle, lay needle on a flat
.
needle is straight and parallel as shown in above diagram
*
II
Flat
side
away
from
you.
highest position.
Turn hand wheel toward you to raise needle bar to its
far as it will go,
as
upward
needle
insert
and
screw
clamp
Loosen needle
e as shown in
making sure flat side of needle is towards back of machin
the above diagram.
Tighten needle clamp screw with screwdriver.
.
Follow the same procedure for insertion of twin needle
*
*
*
*
*
wheel
To make sure that needle has been inserted correctly, turn hand
of
the
center
h
the
throug
toward you and see that needle comes down
.
diagram
above
in
the
shown
as
needle hole in the needle plate
n when
Stitch selector dial must be set in straight stitch needle positio
ent.
alignm
checking needle
If skipped stitches occur, needle may be incorrectly inserted.
—18—
sharp point
Fabric, Thread And Needle Chart
NEEDLE (Long Scarf)
130/705H
1
European
FABRIC
STITCH
LENGTH
SETTING
THREAD
—
3
crepe, taffeta
DELICATE—tulle, chiffon, node, fine lace, organdy, lawn,
ercerized6O
70
KNITS—sheer tricot
11
crepe, chiffon, velvet
LIGHTWEIGHT---batiste, organdy, voile, taffeta, silk.
net
tricot, brushed tncotjerseys, syntheUcIeather power
80
ligheball point
14
90
-
-
KNITS--jersey, double knit power net, bathing suits
light or medium ball point
Wedge point
LEATHERS---vrnylv, plastic film
drapery
MEDIUM HEAVY—gabardine, tweed sailcloth, denim, duck, coatings, wools,
KNITS- double knit, power net
100
16
—
heavy ball point
18
—
110
heavy ball point
KNITS—fake furs, velours, sweater
Wedgepoirii
LEATI’thRS—viiiylsplastics
Mercerized 50
European30
“A” Silk
Synthetic
1-3/4—2
2-1/2—3
Mercerized 50
HeavyDutyMercerized
European 30
2—2-1/2
Synthetic
21/2—3
DutyMercenized
European 30
Synthetic
21/24
-
Wedge Pwflt
LEATHER—vinyl, rubber backed drapery fabric
HEAVY-—overcoatnigs, canvas, upholstery, awning
2-1/2—3
“A” Silk
.
-
13,4 2
——
Wedge point
LEATHERS—plastic film, vinyls
faille, satin, corduroy, velvet,
MEDIUM WEIGHT-—gingham, percale, linen, chintz,
irigs,voospn4u terry
1 1/4—1-3,4
A Silk
Fine Synthetics
Fine mercerized 60
Euiopean50—70
light ball point
——
Body
Eye
Point
Long Groove
(Round Side of Needle)
Short Groove
(Flat Side of Needle)
Long Groove
Elongated Scarf
Short Groove
Eye
Flat
\/
Regular Sharp
Needle
All-purpose
Needle
Medium Ball
Wedge Point
Point Needle
Needle
—19—
Free-Arm Sewing
buttonholes or
For sewing tubular and hard-to-reach areas, use your machine as a free-arm. Stitching
and waistlines;
pantlegs
sleeves,
on
finishes
edge
sleeve;
a
topstitching
neckband;
sewing buttons on a cuff or
easy as sewing
as
become
clothing
children’s
on
wear
of
areas
other
and
elbows;
kness,
patching
darning and
of sewing
examples
a common seam when you have the free-arm at you fingertips. illustrations show some
with the free-arm.
—20—
PATTERN SETTING
TWI N
NEEDLE
—21—
PRESS FEET
your Sewing
The Various presser feet that come with
every kind
do
to
you
help
to
ed
design
Machine are
ly.
perfect
and
easily
of sewing
THE ALL PURPOSE FOOT
wide hole to
This foot is flat on the bottom and has a
be used for
accomodate wide stitches. This foot should
all normal sewing.
Changing Foot
Raise presser foot lifter
0
1
handwheel
Set needle in the highest position by turning
2
towards you
driver.
Remove foot by loosening screw with screw
Replace new foot and tighten screw.
9
—22—
Starting to Sew
Now that you are familiar with the controls on your machine and
with the accessories provided for the machine, you are ready to
start to sew.
Below are some good habits to follow each time you sitdown to sew:
1. Test the needle-it should be straight, properly set and sharp on
the point. It should be the correct size for the fabric and thread
being used. Do not be afraid to change your needle frequently.
Many of the new fabrics made of synthetic blends tend to dull
the needles more easily than fabrics made of natural fibers.
2. Before placing the material on the machine, see that the ends
of the threads have been drawn about 4 inches to the rear of
the machine. Hold on to threads during the sewing of the first
3 or 4 stitches of the seam.
3. Test the machine stitch on a scrap of fabric you plan to use.
The fabric should be double thickness. Adjust the machine
for the length of stitch and tension suitable to your fabric.
4. Fabric should be placed under the presser foot with the bulk
of the material to the left of the needle and the right edge of
the material placed on the 5/8” seam marking on the needle
plate when making a simple seam.
5. Run the machine at a slow even speed. The more pressure
you put on the speed control, the taster the machine will sew.
6. Fasten each seam by back tacking at the beginning and end
of the seam.
7. Always finish sewing each seam with the needle at its highest
point.
8. Guide the fabric gently with your hand in front of the needle.
Never pull or hold the fabric in such a way that the normal
feeding is alltered.
9. When turning the hand wheel manually, always turn it toward
you.
—23----
APPLICATIONS OF THE STRAIGHT STITCH
SEAMS
The normal stitch length for most fabrics is 3, but the length chosen should
depend on the fabric and area of usage. Usually, heavier fabrics require longer
stitches, and lighter weight fabrics require shorter stitches.
For curved seams and bias cut areas use a shorter stitch length to add strength
and elasticity to the seam.
Pattern:
Length: 2—4
Width: 0
Special stitch selector
Pressure: Nor,..
utility
stitch upward
Foot: All Purpose
BASTING/TOPSTITCHING
Sewing a seam with a longer stitch s useful for temporary seams prior to fitting.
Basting stitches also may be done very effectively with the long straight stitch.
For a bolder stitch, two threads of the same type can be threader! through one
needle (size 14 or 16). A heavier thread such as buttonhole twist may be used
for topstitching, but be sure to use a larger needle (sze 16 or 18). Left needle
position may be used for more support of fabric.
Pattern
Length: 4
Width: 0
Special stitch selector
Pressure: Normal
Utility stitch upward
Foot. All Purpose
DARNING
Worn spots or small holes can be darned very easily. Use of an embroidery
hoop is optional depending on the fabric. A fine thread is recommended so that
the fabrica and thread will blend together invisibly. Trim the ragged edges from
the area to be darned, Hold the threads to start, then move the fabric slowly back
and forth while running the machine very fast to fill the area. More professional
results will be attained by moving the fabric in a figure eight pattern while sewing.
After filling in the area lengthwise, reweave with crosswise stitches in the same
manner.
Pattern:
Length: 0
Width: 0
Special stitch
Pressare: Uarn
selector
Utility stitch upward
Foot: None or All
Purpose
—24—
ELASTIC THREAD SHIRRING
letting
Wind elastic thread onto bobbin, as shown,
thread
The
.
fingers
your
h
throug
pass
the thread
ing.
should be wound smoothly without stretch
the
that
sure
being
usual,
s
place
in
Place bobbin
regular
elastic is drawn through the tension. Use
run
thread on the top of the machine. Do a trial
Lai a
stitch.
of
length
test
to
fabric
chosen
the
on
it from
piece of paper under the fabric to keep
ou
enable
will
This
sew:
you
as
up
gathering
without
to sew many parallel rows of stitching
the
difficulty. Afterwards tear out the paper and
fabric will be gathered.
Pattern
Length: 3—4
Width: 0
Special stitch
selector
Utility stitch upward
Normal
Foot: All Purpose
Pressure
HOLDING THE FABRIC
For most fabrics, it is not necessary
to hold th fabi ic in both front and
back. Merely guide the fabric with
one hand from the front.
For the fine delicate fabrics, such
as chiffon, geogrette, and tricot,
the best reslts will be attained by
holding the fabric in front and
back of the needle without pulling
*
on it.
TURNING CORNERS
To pivot at a corner, leave the
needle in the fabric while on the
upswing so that the stitch is almost
completed, thus preventing the pos
sibility of skipped stitches in the
corner, Lift the presser foot and
pivot the fabric. Then, lower the
presser foot and continue sewing.
*
CURVED SEAMS
than you are using for the
On a curved seam use a slightly shorter stitch length
for the seams, a 1-1/2
used
rest of the seams, For example, if length 2 is being
stitch length will add
r
smalle
A
.
stitch length would be preferred for curves
seam.
strength and elasticity to the
the etched seam guide line
When guiding the fabric, keep your fabric edge on
forward part of the line. The
directly across from the needle rather than on the
seam guide may be used on an angle as shown.
*
—25—
*
ENDING SEAM/REMOVAL OF FABRIC
Stitch to the edge of the fabric, then press the reverse stitch button and
backstitch for a few stitches to reinforce the end of the seam.
Turn the hand wheel until the take-up lever is in its highest position so
that the stitch is completed and the threads will pull freely. Lift the presser
foot and remove the fabric by drawing the threads to the left and back,
keeping them under the foot so as not to bend the needle. Cut the threads
with the thread cutter on the back of the presser bar. Leave the thread ends
three to four inches fong.
APPLICATIONS OF THE ZIGZAG STITCH
OVERCASTING
Place the edge of the material underneath the
opening of the sewing foot and guide raw edge along
the center groove of the foot, allowing stitch to form
half on and half off the fabric. The multiple stitch
zigzag is a wiser choice for most fabrics.
Pattern:
A’W
Lenght: 2-4
Special stitch
selector
Utility stitch upward
Pressure Normal
Foot: All Purpose
SEAMING KNITS
The narrow zigzag can be used in seams of firm knits
for added strength. After sewing, open seam and
press flat. Tiny zigzag stitches can hardly be seen
and the seam will give when stretched
Pattern:
Length: 2
Width: 1-2
Special stitch selector
Pressure: Normal
Utility stitch upward
Foot: All Purpose
—26—
SEWING ON BUTTONS
Zigzag stitching is a very easy and convenient
method of sewing A button without a shank.
Place the button so its left hole comes directly
under the needle, then gently lower the button
sewing foot. Take a stitch in the hole.
Raise the needle and move zigzag width dial to
the right until the needle comes down exactly
over the right hole in the button
Note Be sure the needle clears the holes of the
button by moving the hand wheel by hand
before running the machine fast.
Usually 6 to 8 stitches are adequate for securing a
button in place. Stop with the needle in the left
hole. To lock the threads, set the stitch width at
0, and take a few stitches in the left hand hole.
Pattern:
/‘VV/
Lenght: 0
Width: 2-5
Special stitch
selector
Utility stitch upward
Pressure: Normal
Foot: Button Foot
FORMING THREAD SHANK ON BUTTON
Buttons sewn on coats or jackets should have a
thread shank to make them stand away from the
fabric. To form a thread shank, sew over a pin or
rounded toothpick which can be inserted directly
irto the button sewing foot.
After stitching the button to the fabric, remove
work from under the presser foot leaving threads
Remove pin or
about six inches from fabric,
toothpick. Pull the threads to back of button and
form a shank between button and fabric by winding
threads tightly around the attaching stitches. Pull
threads to hack of the fabric and then tie thread
ends securely.
—27—
SATIN STITCHING
This is useful for decoration such as tapering, manual
designed embroidei y, monogramming, and applique.
The satin stitch, which is a very close zigzag stitch,
is obtained by setting the stitch length as near toO”
as possible without stopping the feeding action The
setting will vary for different fabrics. It may be
desirable to loosen the upper tension slightly to
cause the threads to lock underneath, in ordei to
make the top surface look especially smooth For
lightweight fabrics, place paper underneath the
fabric while sewing for best results.
Pattern
Length: 1’4- 13
Width. 1-5
Special stitch selector Utility stitch upward
Pressure Normal
Foot. All Purpose
TAPERING/CREATIVE EMBROIDERY
Tapet ing is done by qi adually
increasing and
decreasing the stitch width while sewing.
By
this method, tapered monograms and othei in
teresting designs can be created.
For tapeied
monograms run the machine fast while turning
the width dial slowly from narrow to wide and
back.
First, learn this stroke by letting the fabric guide
straight. Then, learn to pivot the fabric as you
ale tapering by holding the fabric at one point.
Vai ous sti okes can be combined to form letters
and designs.
Variegated thread can give attrac
tive results.
Pattern
Length: 1/2 13
Width: 0-5
Special stitch selector
Pressure: Normal
Foot: All Purpose
-
MANUAL EMBROIDERY DESIGNS
Diffeient designs can be made by turning the
stitch width dial between 0 and 5. By running the
machine at a constant speed and turning the dial
in a definite rhythm, various designs can be created.
Pattern:
/\‘VV
Length: 1/2-1/3
Width: 0-5
Special stitch selector
Pressure: Normal
Foot All Puipose
Utility STitch upward
—28--
Uti
ity
srtch upward
Pattern
/A/\
Length: 0
Width.I 5
Spec ai stitch
Pressure
selector
Darn
Foot: None
FREE HAND MONOGRAMMING
to the
For giving garments and linens a personaiized touch, first tiansfe; the design
soft
for
especially
d
recommende
is
hoop
embroidery
An
fabric.
of
the
right side
and
slowly
fabric
move
the
must
you
fabrics and toweling. In order to monogram,
a
under
paper
the
moving
by
writing
like
is
ing
Monogramm
rapidly.
run the machine
like a
stationary pen. Guide the fabric slowly so that the zigzag falls close together
side
satin stitch, but be careful that the stitches do not pile up, When guiding from
to side, move fabric slightly faster to avoid a heavy area.
Sometimes
Practice by forming loops. Once this is accomplished any letter is easy.
guiding the
make
may
fabric
the
under
interfacing
woven
non
or
paper
of
use
the
of
fabric easier. The paper or interfacing may be torn or cut away at the completion
help
will
tup
the
on
placed
cellophane
towels,
ing
monogramm
When
the monogram.
cover loops and make the monogram smooth. Pu,i or cut away temaining cellophane
when finished.
Step I
Pattern:
Lenath: 1
Width: 0-1
Special stitch
Pressure
selector
Ut’Hty stitch upward
Normal
Foot: All Purpose
Step 2
Pattern:
f’\/
Length: 1/4”, 1/3”
Width: 24
Special stitch
selector
Utility stitch upward
Pressure: Normal
Foot. All Purpose
APPLIQUE
clothing is a
Applying decotative shapes of fabric scraps to household articles and
trace the design
First,
article.
plain
otherwise
an
trimming
of
way
interesting
very
garment. With a
on fabric to be appliqued, then pin or baste it securely in place on
design. After
transferred
the
around
sew
zigzag,
narrow
or
straight
stitch
small
For a
excess fabric is trimmed away, sew around the applique with a satin stitch.
fabric
the
pivot
to
curve
the
of
edge
inside
the
at
smooth curve, stop frequently
rather than
slightly. Corners look much better when the point is stitched by pivoting
just turned.
the fabric
As with all decorative stitches, paper may be used to give more body to
when stitching and can be torn away when the applique is completed.
—29—
Utility stitch upward
GATHERING OVER CORD
stitch often
Ordinary gathering with a basting
small zigzag
A
breaks while pulling in fullness.
or carpet
thread
crochet
as
across a cord such
for gathering
cord
stronger
much
a
gives
thread,
have been
fullness into fabrics. Once the gathers
pulled out in
be
can
cord
the
place,
in
stitched
order to eliminate bulk.
Pattern: AM
Length: 2
Width: 3
Special stitch selector
Pressure: Normal
Foot: All Purpose
Utility stitch upward
APPLICATIONS OF THE MULTIPLE STITCH ZIGZAG
OVERCASTING
The multiple stitch zigzag is an excellent choice
for overcasting. It keeps the fabric flat and prevents
raveling. For most fabrics, this stitch is better thafl
the zigzag stitch for overcasting.
The stitch should fall right at the raw edge of the
fabric, Feed the fabric under the presser foot by
guiding the raw edge along the right hand side of
the hole in the presser foot.
,,‘
Pattern:
V V V
Length: 1/2- 14
Width: 4-5
Special stitch selector Utility stitch upward
Pressure: Normia
Foot: All Purpose
‘AA
A A-A”! A
A
A
A
A A
A
I! ! , A A!,
Al Ad IA Ad A
A
PATCHING
The multiple stitch zigzag is an excellent stitch
for patching. It is stronger than the zigzag and
the tiny stitches bury into the fabric to make an
almost invisible stitch when using matching thread.
Place the patch over the right side of the worn of
damaged area. Sew around the patch with the
multiple stitch zigzag letting the last stitch to the
right overcast the edge of the patch. When turn
ing corners leave the needle in the fabric at the
corner. Usually this will be the furthest stitch to
the right or left. In this way, the corners are doubly
stitched and very strong. When the patch is stitched
in place, trim away the excess worn fabric on the
wrong side of the patch.
Note: Try Smocking Stitch for knits.
A
IA
‘
A
p
Pattern:
A
A
11111’!
Length: ;-i
Width: 4-5
Special stitch selector
Pressure: Normal
Foot: All Purpose
Utility stitch upward
—30—
MENDING A TEAR OR INSTANT DARNING
The multiple stitch zigzag provides a strong and
easy repair for torn garments. It gives an almost
invisible mend, especially when a fine darning
thread is used.
To mend a tear, hold the torn edges close together
and stitch down the middle.
If the tear is guided under the slot in the middle of
the presser foot, stitching will be equal on both
sides. If necessary, sew again on either side of the
first row of stitching making sure the needle catches
the stitch in the center. With very worn or frayed
fabric, place a piece of light-weight interfacing or
cotton batiste under the tear for reinforcement.
Note: Try Smocking Stitch for knits.
ccç
Pattern:
Length: Near O-Y
Width: 4-5
Special stitch
selector
Utility stitch upward
Pressure: Normal
Foot: All Purpose
—
LACE APPLICATIONS
Attaching laces or trims adds a special touch to
lingerie, dresses, or linens. Pin or baste laces in
place easing or mitering corners where necessary.
A straight edged lace of braid has a convenient line
to follow when sewing. When using a scalloped
edged lace follow the design of the lace for an almost
Pattern: ,/V\
Length: 1
Width: 1-2
Special stitch selector
Pressure: Normal
Foot: All Purpose
invisible application.
Note:Try Multiple Stitch Zigzag, Overlock, Elastic
Edge Stitch, Smocking stitch, Stretch Overlock
or Rick-Rack for different effects.
—31—
Utility stitch upwai
Pattern:
/V’.
Length: 1/2
Width: 4-6
Special stitch selector
Pressure: Normai
Foot: All Purpose
Utility stitch upward
FLUTTER HEM
An unusual way of hemming or finishing edges of
tricot or soft knits is by a flutter edge. Hemm
ing in this manner is just like overcasting an edge,
but the fabric is stretched in back and in front of
the needle as you sew. For best results, pull the
fabric equally, making sure the needle goes over the
edge. When you stop to reposition your hands,
keep the needle in the fabric.
ELASTIC APPLICATION
Applying elastic to lingerie or soft knit fabrics is
easy when using the multiple stitch zigzag. Cut
the elastic 2 inches smaller than your Waist measure
ment. Overlap the raw ends to form a circle and
stitch with a tiny zigzag to form a box as shown.
Fold the elastic into quarters of eighths and mark
with pins. Do the same with the waistline of the
garment. Place the elastic about 1/2 inch from the
top edge of the fabric, matching the pins. Place
under the presser foot and begin stitching. As
you stitch, place the forefinger of each hand on the
fabric at either side of the presser foot. Pull the
fabric out exactly at the point where the needle is
sewing over the elastic and the fabric. This will
ease your fabric and elastic together as you sew.
The amount of ease is dependent on how much
you ease the fabric. In this way you never need to
stretch the elastic, which can be damaged and
stretched out of shape. Trim off excess fabric above
elastic near the stitches.
Note: Try Overlock stitch or Smocking stitch for
girdles.
Patjern:
Length: 3/41Y
Width: 4.5
Speciai stitch selector
LJtiIty sPtch upward
Pressure: Normal
Foot: All Purpose
—32—
UNDERSTITCHING FACINGS
for
The multiple stitch zigzag is an excellent choice
seam
facing
in
bulk
undersitching and eliminating
allowances.
and
After attaching the facing to the garment, trim
seam
the
Press
usual.
as
nce
allowa
seam
the
clip
le
allowances toward the facing and use the multip
the
h
g
throug
stitchin
stitch zigzag close to the seam,
ng
facing and the seam allowances. Using a matchi
and
fabric
the
in
to
blend
will
stitch
thread, the
sful
prevent excess bulk. This is much more succes
really
It
g.
than a straight stitch for understitchin
helps to keeØ the facings from rolling.
Note: Try Smocking Stitch for knits,
Step 1
Patterns
Lengths 1-2
Widths 4-5
Special stitch
selector
Utility stitch upward
Pressures Normal
Foot: All Purpose.
Step 2
DECORATIVE EFFECTS
As with the blind hem stitch, the multiple stitch
zigzag can be used for many decorative combi
If the stitch is pivoted when the needle
nations.
far left or right of its swing, and the
the
s
reache
points are carefully matched, a tracery diamond
shape results.
On the other hand, if rows of the multiple stitch
zigzag are sewn with the points falling directly
under each other, a wavy pattern is produced.
Flowers may also be produced. Start in center;
pivot at points shown. Add four more petals if
desired.
Patterns
Length: 1-234
Width: 3.5
Special stitch selector
Pressure: Normal
Utility stitch upward
Foot: All Purpose
—33—
APPLICATIONS OF THE BLIND HEM STITCH J’J’
BLIND HEMMING
The blind hem stitch provides a durable hem finish
that is almost invisible on garments, drapes, and
y
curtains. It is done easily with straight of slightl
curved hems. With a little practice it will be a
very quick and easy hem application and the hem
will never need repairing.
Step 1
Procedure:
Prepare raw edge of hem in desired manner,
such as overcast, 1/4 inch sttched under, pinked,
hem tape, or just plain. (Step 1)
Step 2
Fold hem up desired length. Baste or pin 1/2
inch from upper edge. Press in place. (Step 2)
*
Fold hem back toward right side of fabric leav
ing about 1/4 inch extended. (Step 3)
Adjust your stitch width and needle position
so that the zigzag bite of the stitch just slightly
The straight
catches the fold of the fabric.
stitches should be formed on the single thickness
of fabric, and the zigzag bite should catch
just barely into the fold of the fabric at the left.
When stitching is completed, remove
from machine and turn to right side.
completed hem.
Step 3
fabric
Press
When hemming an A-line skirt, place a machine
basting stitch along the raw edge of the hem. At
an ironing board, fold up the hem, matching the
Ease in the excess fabric by pulling on
seams.
basting thread. Press with steam, then apply hem
tape. Baste or pin hem 1/2 inch from taped edge,
then continue into step 3.
Pattern:
Length: 1-2
Width :3-5
Special stitch selector
Pressure: Normal
Foot: All Purpose
UtiliW stitch upward
—34—
SHELL TUCK
The blind hem stitch gives a very effective and easy
way to make a shell tuck for lingerie, pillowcases,
and decorative finishes. This works well on knits or
on the bias of soft,woven fabrics, A single folded
bias tape may be tucked in this manner, and then
applied under a fold for a decorative hem on pillow’
cases or applied with the facings at the neckline or
armhole for a decorative finish.
Set the upper tension dial to a little bit tighter
position than normal. Fold under the edge where
the shell tuck is to be created. Place the bulk of the
fabric to the right of the needle with the folded
edge to the left. Place the fabric so that the folded
edge will be guiding into the center cut of the foot.
The straight stitches will form on the fabric, and
the zigzag bite will swing to the left off of the
folded edge. The shell edge is created as the needle
swings back onto the fabric. The size of the “shell”
can be varied by changing the stitch length.
Pattern
..1Lj\_.
Length. 1-2
Width- 4-5
Speciai stitch
selector
Utility stitch upward
Pressure; Normal
Foot; Au
Purpose
DECORATIVE EFFECTS
By sewing two adjacent rows of blind hem stitching
on lace or ribbon attractive decorations are created.
The stitch may be pivoted when the zigzag bite
swings to the left and the points matched in the
second row.
Another variation alternates the zigzag bites in the
center of the straight stitched segment. The stitch
may also be pivoted after two straight stitches to
form a snowflake-like pattern,
Pattern
..AJti....
Length; 1-2
Width; 4-5
Speciai stitch
selector
Utiiity stitch upward
Pressure- Normai
Foot; Au Purpose
TOPSTITCHING EFFECTS
A new kind of topstitching effect can be produced
by couching a stiand or two of pearl cotton em
broidery floss, or yarn with the blind hem stitch.
Simply guide the cord through the left groove of
the embroidery foot so that the blind hem stitch
sews over tile cord and not through it. The straight
stitches of the blind hem stitch will bury themselves
along the right side of the cord. The sewing thread
should match as closely as possible to blend into the
fabric.
Pattern;
.A.A,,
Length; 1-2
Width; 2-4
Special stitch
selector
Pressure; Normai
Foot; All Purpose
—35—
Utiiity stitch upward
SHELL TUCK
The reverse blind stitch gives a very effective and
easy way to make a shell tuck for lingerie, pillowcases,
and decorative finishes. This works well on knits
or on the bias of soft, woven fabrics. A single folded
bias tape may be tucked in this manner, and then
applied under a fold for a decorative hem on pillow
cases or applied with the facings at the neckline or
armhole for a decorative finish.
Set the upper tension dial to a little bit tighter position
than normal. Fold under the edge where the shell
tuck is to be created. Place the bulk of the fabric to
the left of the needle with the folded edge to the
right. Place the fabric so that the folded edge will be
guiding into the center cut of the foot. The straight
stitches will form on the fabric, and the zigzag bite
will swing to the right off of the folded edge. The
shell edge is created as the needle swings back onto
the fabric. The size of the “shell” can be varied by
changing the stitch length.
APPLICATIONS OF THE INTERLOCK
Pattern:
Width: 5
Special stitch selector
Pressure: Normai
Foot: AH Purpose
Jtfu
LINGERIE SEAM
For a very fine, delicate seam in nylon tricot or
Lingerie or tricot
jersey, the interlock is used.
seams should only he about 1/8 inch in finished
width.
If your pattern has wide seams, trim them down
to 1/4 inch while cutting out the pattern. Guide
the raw edges of the fabric into the center slot of
On the right, the needle will
the presser foot.
stitch over the edge resulting in a finished 1/8
inch.
Pattern.
.R.PJ
Length: 11Y
Width: 4 5
Special stitch
selector
Utility stitch upward
Pressure: Normal
Foot: AU Purpose
INSERTING LACE
A very fine lace insertion can be made with the
As in applying lace with the zigzag
interlock.
stitch, follow the straight line or the design of the
lace. Sew so that the straight stitch of the interlock
is on the fabric and the small zigzag catches into the
lace.
Pattern:
.TVT\.T
Length: 113
Width: 2
Special stitch selector
Pressure: Normai
\PJ
Length: 2-3
Utility stitch upward
Foot: All Purpose
—36—
Utility stitch upward
Twin Needle Upper Threading
H
‘Ri
Follow threading instruction for single needle with
these exceptions.
*
Place thread, matching or contrasting in color, on both
spool pins.
Draw threads through thread guides as normal, but
separate the threads at the position I.
* Pass one thread through the left disc and one thread
through the right disc.
Tension is divided in center by a larger disc.
*Now treat both threads as one until you reach the
thread guides on the needle clamp.
*At needle clamp 2, pass both threads on needle clamp
guide.
*At the needle points 3, separate threads from needle
clamp guide to right needle eye and left needle eye.
*ZIGZAG WIDTH CONTROL: Set at desired width
between “0” and “2”, it you set the control higher
than 2, the needle will hit the needle plate and break.
STITCH LENGTH: Set at desired stitch length.
2
Twin Needle Sewing Effects
To use twin needle in the machine, remove the single
needle, and insert the twin needle into clamp with the
flat side to the back. Threading of the machine when
using a twin needle is the same as normal with these
exceptions:
1. Place threads, matching or contrasting in color, on
each spool pin.
2. Hold both threads together as you follow through
thread guides as normal, but separate the threads at
the tension. Pass on thread through the left disc and
one thread through the right disc. Tension is divided
in center by a larger disc.
3. Then pass threads through arm thread guide. When
using a twin needle, set the stitch width control at 2
or less to prevent needle breakage with a wide stitch.
Pattern: Any
Length: >t.5
Width: O2
Foot: All Purpose
—37—
Decorative Tucks Or Designs
for decorative
Any stitch can be used with the twin needle
effects.
h 7igzag and blind
Most attractive are the multiple stitc
stitch or tapered
satin
The
tucks.
fancy
hem stitch for
tive for creative
zigzag designs in two colors are effec
trims.
than a 2 zigzag
Caution: Remember to use no more
.
width for twin needle sewing
Pin Tucks
matches the
Narrow tucks, sewn with thread that
fabric. Using
plain
on
n
ratio
le
deco
subt
uce
prod
c,
fabri
fabric guiding
the twin needle, sew straight lines on the
sive tuck to
succes
each
along
foot
presser
the
of
the edge
d to form a
pulle
be
will
cs
make parallel rows. Soft fabri
e the
increas
c,
fabri
a
on
tuck
a
e
achiev
To
soft crease.
produce two
lower tension slightly. Heavier fabrics will
are made
lines of straight stitching. Attractive pin tucks
with a straight
with the multiple stitch zigzag as well as
stitch.
lines easy to
NOTE: Transparent tape makes straight
g along the
guidin
foot
er
sew. Just sew with the press
d peel off
plete
com
is
sewing
When
edge of the tape.
tape.
Pattern:
Length: 24
Width: 02
Foot: Au
Purpose
—38—
=: ::
BUTTONHOLES
Various fabrics require various methods of
sewing buttonholes. Four different methods
are given below, with suggested uses. If you
are in doubt as to which method is best for
your fabric, test the methods in question and
choose the best according to the finished
appearance.
PREPARATION
For the best results, a good quality merceriz
ed cotton thread should be used. Polyester
threads often result in puckered or heavy
The finer your
unattractive buttonholes.
fabric is, the finer your cotton thread should
be. An interfacing should be used under the
buttonholes to give body, to strengthen, and
to help them withstand wear. To establish the
correct length of the buttonhole, add the
diameter of the button (A), plus the thickness
of the button (B), plus 1/8 inch for the bartacks.
The length may be marked on the garment
with a basting stitch, tailors chalk, or transparent
tape, as shown. Another way to make sure that
all buttonholes will be the same size is to cut a
piece of cardboard as wide as the buttonhole
foot and long enough to make the distance
between the toe of the white slide and the card
board the size buttonhole needed. This method
works for buttonholes up to 1-1/8 inches long.
Horizontal buttonholes should extend 1/8 inch
beyond the center line of the garment. Vertical
buttonholes are placed so that the cutting space
of the buttonhole is directly on the center line.
Always make a practice buttonhole on a scrap
of the garment fabric before making any
buttonholes on your garment. On your test
sample, duplicate the thickness found in the
garment and be sure to include the interfacmg.
The test sample should help determine the length
needed for the button to pass through easily,
and the stitch length for the particular fabric.
As withthe satin stitch, the stitches should be
close together, but not so close that they pile
up. Be sure to use the buttonhole foot.
1HHI
B
I
inch
Center line of garment
—39—
BUILT-IN BUTTONHOLER
g
This buttonhole eliminates the need for pivotin
and
light
on
often
most
used
is
It
fabric.
the
medium woven fabrics.
1. Set the buttonhole control dial at the
Lower the
buttonhole picture.
needle into the mark at the top end of the
Lower the presser foot. A
buttonhole.
be made for the bartack,
will
s
few stitche
than the stitching will
turn to j
sew the left side in forward.
Stop when the stitching reaches the bot
tom end of marked buttonhole. At this
position the machine will be sewing In for
ward.
) but
2. With the needle up, select the (
s
stitche
bartack
few
A
.
picture
e
tonhol
than the stitching
will be made, turn to
will sew the right side in reverse.
J
If using cardboard the white nylon slide
will run into the carboard to prevent sew
ing into the bartack.
is
3. To lock the stitch, make sure the needle
out of the fabric. Make sure the pattern
control dial is at straight stitch and take a
few stitches.
of
4, Score the buttonhole with the back edge
t
preven
To
times.
l
severa
ripper
seam
the
cutting through the bartack, insert a straight
pin through the bartack. Cut buttonhole
open with the seam ripper.
Note: Pattern selector should always be at a
while sewing this buttonhole.
stitch on special stitch variegator should
Utility
always on upper position
be
Adjustment of stitch density:
Check the stitch density on a scrap of fabric.
If density is too open or too close, re-adiust by
turning stitch length dial.
—
—
Pattern:
‘“
i areal
Length: Around 4(green symho
stitch upward
Utility
r
stitch
l
selecto
Specia
Pressur: Norrnai
Foot: Buttonhole
Zigzag width controi dial
[
I
/
—40---
TURN-AROUND BUTTONHOLES
It is possible to make small and dainty but
tonholes if you desire or repair damaged but
tonholes. This entails a slight shifting of the
cloth but with some practice, good buttonholes
can be achieved.
1. Mark the length of the buttonhole on the
cloth as shown in figure.
2. Set the needle position to the left and your
stitch length dial near “1/4” or the density
your desire.
3. Choose the desired width of your buttonhole.
Examp e: if you want a buttonhole with a
width of# 3 setting on the stitch width dial,
divide this setting in half, or 11/2
4. Start at your marked position, sew down on
the left side of buttonhole to the other end
of marking. Leave the needle in the cloth at
the right side of stitches and rotate your
cloth. Lift the presser foot and slide the
bottom of the foot back to the front.
5. Lower the foot and raise the needle. Reset
your stitch width dial to bartack, in this case
the
if 3 setting.
sew several stitches.
Pdirerr,
Special stitch
Foot: Buttonho’e
buttonholes.
-1-
I
Step 2
selector
Pressure: Normel
When using this method over a buttonhole
which has already been slit or damaged, be sure
to hold the buttonhole open and allow the
needle to go off the edge of the fabric. Step 4
is all that may be needed to repair damaged
Step 1
1
Width: 2-b-2.-5-O
viously.
4
“i/,
Length: 0—
6. Riase the needle, reset the zigzag width to
the initial setting, in this case 1-1/2 and sew
the other side of buttonhole to your mark,
then repeat your bartack (5).
7. Lock thread by stitching a few stitches at 0
Cut buttonhole as indicated pre
width.
Step 4
Step 3
—41—
Strectch stitch pwar
CORDED BUTTONHOLES
hole.
Cording gives a reinforced raised button
fabric,
woven
bulky,
on
use
for
nt
It is excelle
gets
or knits in which the stitching often
a
knits,
On
lt.
difficu
cutting
buried and makes
fabric
corded buttonhole will help keep the
from stretching out shape.
or but
Choose a heavy cotton crochet thread
d as
Procee
g.
cordin
the
tonhole twist to use for
und
turnaro
the
or
hole
button
for either built-in
presser
the
under
cord
the
Having
hole.
button
foot in such a way that the zigzag stitch covers
the cord. When pivoting the bottonhole, also
the
swing the cord around to follow under
second side.
the
At the completion of the buttonhole snip
woven
on
bartack
the
to
close
cord
excess
fabrics. For knitted garments, always pull the
g
cords to the wrong side by using a darnin
cord
the
knot
and
r,
needle or needle threade
ends before clipping.
Built-in Buttonholer:
fl
Pattern: wi
Length: Around 4 (green symble area)
Width:
upward
Special stitch selector Utility stitch
Pressure: Normal
Foot: Buttonhole
Pattern Selector:
j
Turn-around Buttonhole:
Pattern: /W/
Length: 0-1
upward
Special stitch selector Stretch stitch
Pressure: Normal
Foot: Buttonhole
fl
1H4
—42—
STRETCH BUTTONHOLES
Step 1
This buttonhole is used on knit fabrics when it
is desirable to omit interfacing or cording.
This buttonhole will stretch and return to
shape unlike an ordinary zigzag buttonhole.
pattern of the stitch makes the
The
buttonholes nearly invisible when using mat
ching thread. It is excellent to use on jerseys,
double knits, and sweater fabrics.
1. Mark the leng th of the buttonhole on the
cloth as shown in.
2. Select the overlock stitch N’
3. Set the needle to the left and the stitch
length dial to 4.
4. The width should be set at 21/2.
5. Start at the marked position, sew down
the left side of the buttonhole to the other
end of the marking. Leave the needle in the
cloth at the right side of the stitches and
rotate your cloth. Lift the presser foot and
slide the bottom of the foot back.
6. Lower the presser foot and raise the needle.
Reset your stitch width to make a bartack at
width 5.
Step 2
—
—
-
Step 3
Step 4
7. Raise the needle, reset the width to 2-1/2
and sew second side of the buttonhole, to
the end of the buttonhole mark, reset the
width to 5, and sew a few stitches for the
second bartack.
8. Lock threads by stitching a few stitches at 0
Cut the buttonhole as indicated
width.
previously,
Step 5
Pattern: Z7
Length: 4
Width 2-5-2’/-5-O
Special stitch selector Stretch stitch upward.
Pressure Normal
Foot: Buttonhole
—43—
Step 6
APPLICATIONS OF THE STRAIGHT TRIPLE STRETCH STITCH
Seams
This stitch may be used on knits and woven
fabrics, in areas of stress as a reinforcement
stitch. It is excellent for curved seams such as
armholes and crotch seams. For active wear
such as ski pants and girdle fabrics which endure
a lot of stress in bending and stretching, this
stitch may be used for seaming throughout
the garment.
Caution: It is difficult to remove this stitch
from fabric. Pre-fit garment before using this
stitch.
Pattern:
Length: 4
Width: 0
Special stitch selector Stretch stitch upward
Foot: All Purpose
Topstitching (Stretch Stitches)
Because this stitch is heavier than an ordinary
straight stitch, it is ideal for topstitching,
particularly on knits.
PROCEDURE:
*
The elastic triple straight stitch is used
when a straight line of stitching is desired
so that seams may be pressed open (slacks
for example).
This stitch is especially useful where the tiny
zigzag seam will not hold its shape and the
straight stitch will break.
*
Apply this stitch to areas of stress on both
wovens and knits (crotch seam and under
arm for example).
*
Use this stitch for rightly fitted garments
that need a lot of stretch, such as ski pants,
girdles and bathing suits.
Elastic Triple Straight Stitcr
Regular Straight Stitch
—44—
CK //A\V/A\
APPLICATION OF THE PICK-RA
Topstitching/Rick-Rack
produced with
A decorative topstitch can be
the structural
nd
arou
h
Stitc
h.
the nc-rack stitc
effect, To
ial
spec
a
for
ent
garm
lines of the
to add an
pstitch braid or a decorative inset
additional creative flair.
Pattern: ‘//\\\
Length: 4
Special stitch selector
Foot: All Purpose
Stretch stitch upward
Pattern:
Length: 4
Special stitch selector Stretch stitch upward
Foot: All Puropse
Tapering? Rick-Rack
ed to form
The rick-rack stitch may be taper
roidered
emb
ers,
creative stems and petals of flow
ing the
taper
in
As
.
ings
pictures and wall hang
width
h
stitc
the
turn
[y
slow
25,
zigzag, see page
group of
A
0.
to
back
and
5
to
0
from
control
form a
these tapered rick-rack stitch will
bouquet-like effect,
PROCEDURE:
g line of
The elastic rick-rack stitch is a zigza
may be
s
stitching that is desired so that seam
pressed open.
on both
Apply this stitch to areas of stress
.
wovens and knits
y duty
Use narrow width of zigzag as a heav
triple stitch for seams,
g for
Use medium and wide widths of zigza
hems
and
gs
facin
s,
seam
overcasting edges of
,
cloth
terry
as
such
cs
fabri
ht
of heavier weig
for
also
Use
ic.
elast
hing
attac
and for
decorative stitching.
, Do not
Guide your fabric from the front
stitching.
poor
e
caus
pull or push as it will
Elastic Triple Zigzag Stitch
Regular Zigzag Stitch
—45—
APPLICATION STRETCH OVER LOCK
-/V
stretch
On fabrics that are bulkier or heavier, the
In all
ck.
overlo
the
than
choice
overlock is a better
ck,
overlo
dcuble
the
for
would
you
d
as
procee
ds
metho
bulk
the
right.
the
to
with
fabric
the
except feed
will prevent from rippling.
The stitch is less dense and
y
knits
soft stretch
Pattern:
Length: 4
Width: 45
Special stitch
selector
Stretch stitch upward
Pressure: Normal
Foot: All Purpose
APPLICATIONS SMOCKING STITCH
2S
or
This stitch is very versatile and can be corded
s.
pattern
stitch
reverse
other
used as a topstitch as
SEAMING SMOCKING STITCH
The smocking stitch can be used to seam fine gauze
less
type fabrics or bulky sweater knits, this results in
ons
directi
the
Follow
seam.
inch
1/4
d
finishe
bulk for a
for double overlock seam
Pattern:
6
Length: 4
Width: 4-5
Special stitch
selector
Stretch stitch upward
Pressure: Normal
Foot: All Purpose
4’
/1
/
ii
ELASTIC THREAD SHIRRING
Cuffs and bodices of little girls dresses can be shirred
of
easily with the smocking stitch. Place the right side
Place
the garment down on the bed of the machine.
two strands of elastic thread under the foot. Stretch
ing
the elastic thread while sewing with the smock
stitch to gather cuffs or bodice for a feminine effect.
pattern Selector
Overlap seam
PROCEDURE:
The smocking stitch is a very useful special ultrastretch stitch.
Lingerie or tricot seams should only be about 1/8
inch finished width.
*
Fagoting can be achieved by joining the folded edge
n
of two piece of fabric together with a gap betwee
Use a sheer flesh colored piece of fabric
them.
r
underneath to make the fagoting much stronge
r.
and prettie
eath
Do the fagoting with a piece of paper undern
g.
washin
hand
by
paper
and remove the
Fagoting
—46--
APPLICATIONS DOUBLE OVERLOCK
STITCH
SEAMING DOUBLE OVERLOCK STITCH
This stitch gives a finished 1/4 inch seam in one
step. For knits, it gives strength and elasticity
to the seams and prevents the curling of the
fabric that often occurs with 5/8 inch opened
It is most applicable to soft, thin knits
seams.
such as nylon or acetate knits, but may be used
Always make test
on other fabrics as well.
seams with this stitch.
For woven fabric, the double overlock stitch
gives strength and prevents raveling.
It can be
used on woven goods to replace flat or French seams.
For patterns with 1/4 inch seams. Place the raw edge
of the fabric under the presser foot so that as the needle
swings to the right, it comes down at the raw edge.
This will result in an enclosed seam allowance.
For patterns with 5/8 inch seams:
The seam allowances may be trimmed to 1/4 inch
If trimming before
either before or after sewing.
sewing, proceed as above. Otherwise, sew the seam
with the raw edge of the fabric on the etched guide
line “1/2”. (Any time you use the full width of a
particular stitch, you should readjust the raw edge of
the fabric 1/8 inch to the left.) Afterward, trim the
excess fabric near the stitching. This method is actually
easier than the overedge method for fabrics that curl.
Note:On soft, loose knits, the fabric may seem to wave
or ripple. If this occurs, reduce the pressure.
Pattern:
7v
Length: 4
Width. 4-5
Special stitch
selector
Stretch stitch upwaid
Pressure: Normal
Foot: A Purpose
HEMSTITCHING EFFECT
By using a very large needle and a fine thread an
openwork effect can be attained which is beautiful
for sewing the hems into tablecloths, napkins, placemats,
handkerchiefs, etc. Use a large needle, size 18 or 20.
and a fine cotton thread. Tighten the upper tension
slightly, until the stitch looks better on the underside
than on top, (You will be sewing with your fabric face
sice down.)
Turn up 1 rich then turn up 1 inch again to form a
hem of a double thickness of fabric. The bulk in cor
ners can be eliminated by trimming away the excess,
as shown, after having folded the fabric on all sides.
Stitch from the wrong side, so that the straight stitch
forms on the single layer and the zigzag bites on the
double layer. Stitch all the way to the edge of the
fabric along all sides.
Pattern:
AAi
I,
Length: 4
Width: 3 5
Speciai stitch
selector
Pressure: Normal
Foot: All Purpose
—47—
Stretch stitch upward
TOPSTITCHING DOUBLE OVERLOCK
The double overlock stitch can be used to topstitch
nonraveling fabrics such as felt or leather into place for
appliques or pockets.
Stitch so that the straight part of the stitch is formed
over the edge of the leather, and only the zigzag part
holds it in place.
—
—— — —
Pattern:
N\z
Length: 4
Width: 3-S
Special stitch
selector
Stretch stitch upward
Pressure: Normal
Foot: All Purpose
Zigzag Foot
PROCEDURE:
Double overlock stitching is used for sewing overlap
ping seams, decorative hems, binding and edges on
woven and elastic fabrics.
To sew an overlapping seam, place one piece of
fabric 1 cm over the other piece and sew the flatlock
stitch over the fabric edge on the right side.
You can produce a decorative hem by folding a
single hem on the wrong side and sewing the flatlock
from the right side.
*Use knit trim or bias binding when binding curved
edges, like round necks and armhols.
—48—
APPLICATIONS ULTRA STRETCH
SEAMING ULTRA STRETCH
On most knits, a 1/4 inch finished seam, such as
ultra stretch or the double overlock stitch, is
more desirable than a 5/8 inch opened seam al
lowance. These stitches can create a neater, more
professional finish, eliminate bulky seams, prevent
curling, permit the garment to “give” under stress,
and at the same time they cut down on the amount
of work involved in making a garment, If ever in
doubt as to which of the two stitches to use, test
both on the particular fabric in question and
choose according to their performance.
The stitch and overcast stitch is excellent for
stretch fabrics such as sweater knits, bathing suit
knits, and cotton knits. It has the greatest strength
and elasticity of all.
For patterns with 1/4 inch seam allowances: Feed
the fabric such that the needle goes over the raw
edge of the fabric when it swings to the right.
For patterns with 5/8 inch seam allowances: Feed
the raw edge of the fabric along the etched guide
line “1/2”, then trim away the excess fabric close
to the stitching.
Pattern:
Length: 4
Width: 45
Special stitch selector Stretch stitch upward
Pressure: Normal
Foot: All Purpose
Pattern Selector and
Zigzag Width Control Dial
Stitch Length Control lii
Ziqzdu Foot
PROCEDURE:
Overlock stitching is used for seaming and
finishing the cut edge of knit fabrics, all in
one operation.
This overlock ttitch is especially good for stretch
fabrics such as double knit and jersey and will
give a firm, neat edge finish.
Overcasting
0,
0
liii
liii
III!
g
z
—
z
I.
KNOWING YOUR SEWING MACHINE
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Needle plate
Feed dogs
Presser foot screw
Seam guide lines
Thread guide
Needle clamp screw
Face cover thread guide
Top thread tension control
Front thread guide
Thread take-up lever
Top thread guide
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
—51—
Bear thread guide
Stitch selector
Stitch width control
Special stitch selector
Reverse stitch control
Stitch length control
Extension table
Shuttle cover
Free arm
Finger guard
Leg
BACK VIEW
25
24
26
\/\
\
23
31
-.-
22
27
3/
22,
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
Clutch knob
Hand wheel
Bobbin winder
Thread spool pins
Presser regulator
Face cover plate
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
—52--
Presser toot lever
Thread cutter
Presser toot
Light switch
Nomenclature plate
The all purpose foot
This foot is flat on the bottom and has a wide a wide
hole to accommodate wide stitches. This foot should be
used for all normal sewing.
Zigzag foot
Ion machine)
The button sewing foot
Button sewing
This foot has a piece of plastic inserted on the bottom
to hold buttons securely.
foot
The buttonhole foot
Buttonhole
This foot has a frame which holds the fabric taut enough
to produce a good buttonhole. The markings on the side
allow exact buttonhole length to be made.
Changing Foot
Raise presser foot lifter
C 1 ).
Set needle in the highest position by turning handwheel
towards you ( 2 )
Remove foot by loosening screw with screwdriver.
Replace new foot and tighten screw.
9
-53-
foot
buttonhole Foot
This foot has a frame which holds the fabric taut enough
Buttonhole foot
produce a good buttonhole. The markings on the side
Iow exact buttonhole length to be made.
Bar tacking: Set pattern selection dial to and sew
stitches.
5-6
Sew left side from
Left side: Change pattern to
line.
end
reaches
it
until
back
front to
Remember the point where arrow shows so that it is
not necessary to mark end lines for all buttonholes.
Bar tacking: Change pattern to
stitches.
Right side: Change pattern to El
side until it catches first bar tack.
and sew 5-6
and sew right
Quick finish: To prevent unstitching, set zigzag width
at 0 and sew a few stitches.
—54—
[cii
Button Sewing Foot
Button sewing
foot
THE BUTTON SEWING FOOT
This foot has a piece of plastic inserted on the bot
torn to hold buttons securely.
Set machine as shown.
Position a button and material under foot. When
needle comes to left side of stitch, lower foot.
Raise needle and adjust zigzag width so that needle
comes to right hole of button.
Run machine at medium speed and sew 5-6 zigzag
stitches.
Abb. B
Stop machine when needle is
Set zigzag width control to
prevent unstitching,
OR
b Draw out work and cut
Draw thread ends through
knot.
—55—
in upper position. a
0 and sew 34 stitches to
otf threads.
to wrong side and tie a
Cloth Guide
Use cloth guide when sewing a long seam of regular
distance from edge of material.
Set guide in hole on arm, at right of needle plate, and
adjust distance.
Run machine with edge of fabric touching guide.
Position cloth guide at an angle to sew a curved seam.
Cloth guide
—
JL
Sew reverse stitches for reinforcement at end of seam.
Draw fabric to left when sewing is finished.
Cut threads with thread cutter behind presser bar.
*
—56—-
Zipper Sewing Foot
Zipper Foot
Set machine as shown.
By using special zipper foot with sliding adjuster, zipper
sewing can be easily done without turning fabric.
Loosen screw a
into position b
and set (oot so that needle comes
Tighten screw.
Sew right side of zipper guiding fabric carefully so that
right side teeth of zipper are parallel with left edge of
foot.
Re-set foot so that needle comes into position
Sew left side of zipper in the same way.
c
Insert Cording
Loosen the
(A) Fold bias strip of fabric over cord.
adjusting screw on the back of cording zipper
foot and set the foot to the left of needle.
(B) Sandwich the welting between two layers of fabric
with right sides together. Stitch a second lime with
cording/zipper foot to the right of needle so that
the needle stitches close to the cord through all
thicknesses.
—57—
The Quilting Guide
Parallel straight lines are easy to sew with the quilting
guide. To attach the guide, loosen thumb screw and slip
the U-shaped holder of the guide between presser foot
and thumb screw. Tighten the thumb screw securely.
Adjust the curved bar to the desired distance from the
needle. Sew the first line of stitching as desired, then,
for the succeeding rows let the guide follow along the
previous stitch line. A straight stitch, zigzag, or any
other stitch may be used.
Buttonhole Cutter
Stick a needle through bar tacks to prevent over-cutting.
Cut buttonhole along center with buttonhole cutter.
Straight Stitch Foot
This has only a narrow hole to accommodate only
It may be used on sheer or soft
straight stitching.
fabrics for more control. When using this foot, the
Stitch Width should be “0” to avoid hitting the foot and
breaking the needle.
—58—
MAt NTENANCE
Your new macnine requires regular cleaning
and oiling for satisfactory performance.
A machine which is used for a few hours
a day needs to be cleaned and oiled once
a month.
Unplug machine before cleaning or oiling.
A. Disassemb’ing Shuttle
(for cleaning)
Turn hand wheel toward you to raise needle
to highest position.
Remove bobbin cover plateLift up bobbin
cover plate and slips it out
/
1
1. Detach needle plate using large screw
driver and take out bobbin.
2. Turning hand wheel toward you, align
three red dots in line, push stopper (A)
to left as far as it will to go.
3. Lift upper part of shuttle (B) and
remove it.
2N<j<A
B. Cleaning
1. Brush off I nt and dust from
shuttle
and wipe with a piece of cloth.
2. Brush off lint and dust on feed dog
towards you.
3. Clean hook
C
and wipe with a
piece of cloth.
—59-—
C. Oiling
Apply a few drops of oil around face
E
of hook and to center hole
D
after oiling, wipe with a piece of cloth.
D. Assembling Shuttle
Reverse procedure used for disassembling
shuttle.
E. Changing Light Bulb
Open face cover
Unplug machine.
Unscrew bulb counterclock
plate.
wise to remove it. Install new bulb.
Plug in machine.
—60—
TAKE OUT TANGLED THREAD
IN BOBBIN CASE
1
Remove bobbin cover plate A
Insert the cleaning brush end
bobbin B
and lift it up.
2. Cut tangled upper thread
Buttonhole Cutter.
C
into
with
3 Take out bobbin from bobbin case
D
and cut lower thread with
Buttonhole Cutter.
4 Take otf pieces of waste threads on
bobbin case.
—61--
TROUBLE CHART
Probable Cause
Trouble
Machine does
not sew
Bobbin winder
Making noise
Running slowly
Correct Operation
Not plugged in properly.
Power supply switch is not on.
Thread is stuck in the hook groove.
Spindle is pushed to the right.
See Page 7-9-12-59
Lack of oil.
Lint or thread stuck in rotary hook.
Lint stuck in feed dog.
Machine kept in avery cold or very
See Page 12-59
hot place.
Leave machine in a normally
warm room for a few hours
before use.
Breaking upper
thread
Improper upper threading.
Upper thread tension too tight.
Bent or blunt needle.
Improper needle setting
Removing fabric when take-up lever
is not in the highest position.
Upper thread toothick or too thin for
needle used.
Needle hole on needle plate damaged.
See Page 9-10-12-18
Breaking lower
thread
Thread not wound evenly on bobbin
or not drawn up correctly.
Lower thread tension too tight.
See Page 9-14
Lint stuck in bobbin case and inside
tension spring.
Improper lower threading.
Skipping
stitches
Improper needle setting
Bent needle.
Improper needle and/or thread for fabric.
—62—
See Page 18-19
Improper upper threading.
Not using a ball point needle for elastic
and thin fabric.
Improper tension.
Sewing foot not suitable for the work.
See Page 9-10-15
Stitches not
locked
Upper thread tension too loose.
Improper tension of lower thread.
Improper needle for thread.
See Page 10
Wrinkled
fabrics
Upper or lower thread tension too
tight.
Improper threading of upper or lower
thread
Needle too thick for fabric.
Stitch length too long for fabric.
-
See Paqe
i
-
Fabric not
moving
Lint jamming on feed dog.
Feed dog is lowered.
Stitches too close.
Pressure regulator too light.
Breaking
Improper needle setting
Needle bent.
Needle clamp screw too loose.
Upper thread tension too tight.
Needle too thin for fabric or/and thread.
Changing pattern or width of stitch
when needle is down in fabric,
Setting stitch width more than 3.5
when sewing with twin needle.
Presser foot attached improperly.
needle
Light going
out
Not plugged in properly.
Power supply switch is not on.
Light bulb burnt out.
—63--
See Page 59
Bring needle to high test
position.
See Page 7