Directed Audio 250d Installation manual

TRT 250D
TRANSPONDER
OPERATION/INSTALLATION MANUAL
Trimble
2105 Donley
Austin, Texas 78758
(512) 432-0400
PRINTED IN U.S.A.
PUBLICATION NUMBER 1910-0009-01
TRT 250D
TRANSPONDER
OPERATION/INSTALLATION MANUAL
PUBLICATION NUMBER 1910-0009-01
Trimble
2105 Donley
Austin, Texas 78758
(512) 432-0400
PRINTED IN U.S.A.
REVISION H
AUGUST 19, 1996
Title Page
T-1
TRT 250D TRANSPONDER
OPERATION/INSTALLATION MANUAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION I .................................................................................................................................. 1
1.
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................. 1
1.1
SCOPE ................................................................................................. 1
1.2
DESCRIPTION .................................................................................... 1
1.3
SPECIFICATIONS .............................................................................. 1
1.4
EQUIPMENT SUPPLIED ................................................................... 3
1.5
ADDITIONAL EQUIPMENT REQUIRED ........................................ 3
1.6
LICENSE REQUIREMENTS .............................................................. 4
SECTION II ................................................................................................................................. 5
2.
INSTALLATION .............................................................................................. 5
2.1
GENERAL ........................................................................................... 5
2.2
PREPARATION FOR USE ................................................................. 5
2.3
GENERAL INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
FOR AVIONICS .................................................................................. 5
2.4
INSTALLATION ............................................................................... 10
2.5
ANTENNA INSTALLATION .......................................................... 11
2.6
OPERATIONAL CHECK-OUT ........................................................ 12
2.7
FINAL INSPECTION ........................................................................ 12
SECTION III ............................................................................................................................. 15
3.
INSTALLATION DRAWINGS ..................................................................... 15
SECTION IV ............................................................................................................................. 25
4.
OPERATION .................................................................................................. 25
4.1
SCOPE ............................................................................................... 25
4.2
OPERATION ..................................................................................... 25
4.3
SQUAWK MODE ............................................................................. 25
4.4
NORMAL OPERATION ................................................................... 26
4.5
CODE TRANSFER............................................................................ 27
4.6
TO CHOOSE VFR MODE ................................................................ 27
4.7
EMERGENCY OPERATION ........................................................... 27
4.8
FAILURE MODE OPERATION ....................................................... 27
Revision H
August 19, 1996
1
SECTION IVA .......................................................................................................................... 28
4A.
OPERATION (MOD STATUS 3 AND ABOVE) .......................................... 28
4.1A SCOPE ............................................................................................... 28
4.2A OPERATION ..................................................................................... 28
4.3A SQUAWK MODE ............................................................................. 28
4.4A NORMAL OPERATION ................................................................... 29
4.5A CODE TRANSFER............................................................................ 30
4.6A TO CHOSE VFR MODE ................................................................... 30
4.7A EMERGENCY MODE OPERATION ............................................... 30
SECTION V .............................................................................................................................. 33
5.
WARRANTY .................................................................................................. 33
5.1
LIMITED WARRANTY OF TERRA BY TRIMBLE PRODUCTS 33
Revision H
August 19, 1996
2
SECTION I
1.
INTRODUCTION
1.1
SCOPE
This manual provides installation and operation instructions for the Terra by Trimble Model
TRT 250D ATC Radar Transponder designed and manufactured by Trimble, Austin, Texas.
1.2
DESCRIPTION
The Terra by Trimble TRT 250D Transponder is designed for mounting in the instrument
panel or radio panel of General Aviation aircraft and functions in the environment of the Air
Traffic Control Radar Beacon System (ATCRBS). In response to interrogations from the
ground based secondary radar transmitter, the TRT 250D is capable of replying with coded
Mode A and/or Mode C transmissions that are received and processed at the Air Traffic
Control Center. The aircraft’s position relative to the airway route structure is displayed on
the Air Traffic Controller’s radarscope and, if the Center is equipped with ARTS-III
computers, the aircraft’s discrete assigned identification is also displayed. If the aircraft is
equipped with an altitude/encoder, the aircraft Mode C altitude is also displayed in 100 foot
increments on the ground radarscope.
The TRT 250D Transponder is entirely solid state in construction. It uses a small number of
integrated circuits and one microprocessor to accomplish the many steps in the decodeencode process involved in detecting interrogations and generating the proper reply codes.
Front panel controls permit selection of four-digit reply codes in response to ATC
instructions, selection of OFF, ON, or ALTitude as well as automatic VFR squawk. In the
ALT mode, the TRT 250D responds to interrogations for both identification and altitude
replies; this is known as mode A/C. In the ON mode, only the identification is transmitted
(mode A).
Because of its solid-state design, the TRT 250D begins operating immediately after being
switched to ON or ALT. A “T” illuminates each time the unit replies to an interrogation.
When the ID switch is depressed, it causes the unit to develop the SPIP (IDENT) pulse for a
period of 20 seconds. The display is dimmed by a photocell to compensate for ambient light
conditions.
The TEST switch initiates a complete internal interrogate/response cycle, performing a test of
all circuits within the unit and verifying readiness for use. The “T” will come on if the unit
is operating satisfactorily. This feature will verify the operational readiness of the unit prior
to every flight.
1.3
SPECIFICATIONS
The following are pertinent specifications for the FCC type-accepted Terra by Trimble
Model TRT 250D Transponder. The Terra by Trimble Model TRT 250D Transponder is
approved by the Federal Aviation Administration under the Technical Standard Order (TSO)
Revision H
August 19, 1996
1
1.3
SPECIFICATIONS (CONTINUED)
C74c of Part 37 of its Rules and Regulations. It may, therefore, be installed and operated in
civil aircraft of United States registry and in aircraft of other countries that accept FAA TSO
approval.
1.3.1
MECHANICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Mounting:
Mounted in the avionics panel using the mounting tray or
ATI-3 adapter as provided.
Overall Dimensions:
12.80" long, 3.125" wide, 1.625" high (32.512 cm long,
7.938 cm wide, 4.128 cm high).
Mounting Dimensions: 11.45" long, 3.125" wide, 1.625" high (29.083 cm long,
7.938 cm wide, 4.128 cm high).
Panel Cutout:
3.03" wide, 1.54" high (7.696 cm wide, 3.912 cm high).
Weight:
1.84 lb. (.835 kg.)
Connectors:
Antenna input/output; BNC Interconnect; 25 pin “D” type
1.3.2
POWER REQUIREMENTS
The Terra by Trimble Model TRT 250D is designed for 11-33 volt DC input at .75
amps maximum load condition.
1.3.3
ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIFICATIONS
Maximum Operating Conditions
Altitude:
To 55,000 feet
Environmental
Category:
DO-160A Env. Cat.
A1F1/A/PKS/XXXXXX/BBBA
1.3.4
ELECTRICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Frequency Range
Transmit:
Receive:
Sensitivity:
Power Output:
1.3.5
1090 MHZ +3 MHZ
1030 MHZ +3 MHZ
-72 dBm nominal
200 watts nominal
LIMITATIONS
The TRT 250D, when subjected to power interruptions below 9 V for less than 20
milliseconds, will blank the display and may give erroneous channeling. When this
occurs it is necessary only to turn the TRT 250D off and then back on to reset the
unit. After reset the operator must re-channel the correct code previously assigned
by ATC.
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2
1.4
EQUIPMENT SUPPLIED
The equipment supplied will depend upon the “system” you have ordered. The part numbers
and descriptions listed below indicate the equipment supplied with the TRT 250D only. If a
system other than those listed below was ordered, additional equipment will have been
supplied and listed in another manual.
0990-5304-00 TRT 250D, Single System
1.
1 ea.
2.
1 ea.
3.
1 ea.
4.
1 ea.
5.
1 ea.
6.
7.
1 ea.
1 ea.
Transponder, Terra by Trimble TRT 250D
P/N 0900-0250-30
Mounting Tray, Single
P/N 1900-0366-00
Antenna Kit, TRT 250D
P/N 1901-0730-00
Installation Kit
P/n 1901-2671-10
Operation/Installation Manual
TRT 250D P/N 1910-0009-01
Warranty Card
FCC Form 404
0990-5314-00 TRT 250D, 3" System
1.
1 ea.
Transponder, Terra by Trimble TRT 250D
P/N 0900-0250-30
3" Mod. Kit for TRT 250D
P/N 1901-5312-00
Operation/Installation Manual
TRT 250D P/N 1910-0009-01
Warranty Card
FCC Form 404
2.
1 ea.
3.
1 ea.
4.
5.
1 ea.
1 ea.
1.4.1
OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT
Encoding Altimeter or Terra by Trimble AT 3000 Blind Encoder P/N 0900-4099-01
1.5
ADDITIONAL EQUIPMENT REQUIRED
1.
2.
Revision H
August 19, 1996
Sufficient antenna cable to reach from the transponder to the antenna. The cable
types and lengths which are permissible are listed in Figure 3-5, Note 2.
Connector for antenna end of the cable. Again, the permissible types are listed in
Figure 3-5, Note 2.
3
1.6
LICENSE REQUIREMENTS
The owner of the aircraft in which the Terra by Trimble TRT 250D is installed is required by
the FCC to hold an Aircraft Station License. This license may be obtained by filing an FCC
Form 404. The transponder should be identified as CCX8G1TRT250 under Type
Acceptance Number, frequency is 1090 MHZ and the power output at 200 watts peak. If a
copy of the filed Form 404 is kept in the aircraft, the TRT 250D may be operated up to 30
days while awaiting the formal license. Although an Aircraft Radio Station License may
currently be in effect, the FCC rules require that when a transponder is installed, the aircraft
owner must apply for modification of his/her license.
Revision H
August 19, 1996
4
SECTION II
2.
INSTALLATION
2.1
GENERAL
This section contains all necessary installation instructions and check-out procedures for the
Terra by Trimble TRT 250D Transponder.
2.2
PREPARATION FOR USE
Every precaution has been taken to protect the TRT 250D during shipment. Upon receipt of
the equipment, perform the following inspection:
1.
2.
3.
Remove the unit from the shipping container and visually inspect for damage.
Check controls and switches to determine if they may have been damaged.
Make sure that all hardware and connectors listed in Section I, under “Equipment
Supplied” are present.
If the unit is damaged, notify the carrier and file a claim. The carrier assumes title of the unit
when accepted for shipment. DO NOT return the unit to Trimble or its representative until
the carrier has authorized the claim. It is suggested that the package be retained for
inspection by the carrier in the case of damage or for future use should it be necessary to ship
the unit for service or to transfer to another location.
2.3
GENERAL INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR AVIONICS
The following paragraphs contain pertinent hints, advice, and guidance intended for use by
installers of avionics equipment. These have been drafted to address common problems
encountered during the installation process. Specific questions may be addressed to Trimble
for technical assistance by calling 1-800-487-4662 and requesting Technical Assistance.
2.3.1
COAXIAL CABLES AND CONNECTORS
Improper installation of coaxial cables and connectors create many of the problems
encountered during avionics installations. Refer to Figure 3-4 for instructions about
connecting coax cable to the BNC connector(s) mounted at the rear of Terra by
Trimble mounting trays. Problems to avoid include twisted, chafed, or pinched
cables, sharp bends in cables, open or shorted center conductors or shield braid, and
improper grounding of shields. Also, proper termination of antenna coaxial cables at
the antenna should be carefully checked. After installing connectors, pull firmly to
ensure good mechanical bonding (particularly if you use crimp-on connectors) and
use your ohmmeter to insure good electrical connection with no shorting. Be sure
that coax lengths and types follow the avionics manufacturer’s recommendations.
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2.3.2
ANTENNAS
The three cardinal points for antenna installation are location, mounting and
electrical characteristics.
Antenna Location:
Select a location that provides an adequate ground plane, a continuous unbroken
surface of metal. Provide an area where shadowing of the antenna will not occur
(e.g. blocking of the signal by other parts of the aircraft). Remember that at VHF
frequencies and above, direct line of sight signals are required from ground stations
to the antenna and vice-versa for maximum effective range. Consider that close
proximity of an antenna to other antennas or noise sources may create interference
problems. Read carefully and follow closely the recommendations of the avionics
manufacturer about antenna location.
Serious problems are often encountered in aircraft which include composite materials
or fabric surfaces and in many cases ground plane should be added if normal range is
to be achieved.
Antenna Mounting:
Proper attachment of any antenna to the aircraft surface is of primary importance.
Carefully clean all paint and corrosion off the mounting surface and apply an anticorrosion treatment. Do the same to the inside surface if a backing or nut plate is to
be used. Mount the antenna securely per the antenna manufacturer’s
recommendations and check carefully to insure good electrical bonding. Do not
mount any antenna to doors, hatches, inspection plates or other moveable surfaces
because proper bonding to the aircraft surface cannot be accomplished. After proper
mounting and bonding is achieved, a bead of high quality RTV around the junction
of the antenna base and the aircraft surface will prevent water seepage and corrosion
between the antenna base and aircraft surface.
Antenna Electrical Characteristics:
Use the antenna supplied with the avionics equipment, or if not supplied, the
antenna(s) recommended by the avionics manufacturer.
Simple antenna problems such as shorting or open circuit problems can be
determined by use of an ohmmeter, although certain types of antennas may require
use of ramp test equipment to check radiation. But, by far, the most common antenna
problems are diagnosed to be coax or connectors, antenna bonding, or signal splitters.
Never paint an aircraft antenna.
6
Revision H
August 19, 1996
2.3.3
WIRING AND HARNESSING
Construct the installation wiring harness carefully from the avionics manufacturer’s
wiring diagram. Be extremely careful to note recommended wire sizes, the need for
shielded wiring (if any), and decide upon any optional wiring to be included.
Measure carefully and plan the harness layout to avoid interference of cable harness
with existing avionics, instruments or controls.
Remove the connector plates from the rear of the trays. Connect all wires to the
proper pin of each connector, checking as you go to insure that no loose strands
cause shorting to adjacent pins or to ground surfaces. Be particularly careful with the
shield braids of shielded wires. Do not expose any more of the conductor than is
absolutely necessary and keep the braid connection as short as possible. Remember
that on shielded wires only one ground point is recommended. Follow
manufacturer’s recommendation about where the ground point should be located.
After completing all connections, check wiring with an ohmmeter again to
ascertain that all connections are as desired and that no undesired shorting to
ground or other pins has occurred. Visually double check to see that braids on
shields are not creating shorting, that no insulator melting has occurred during
soldering and pull firmly on all connections to insure good mechanical bond.
Install the harness and connectors/connector plates in the aircraft with very loose
dress only.
Solder all connections to power and ground and install panel components/controls
and safety devices (e.g. fuses or breakers). It is desirable at this point to insert all
equipment in trays and perform preliminary check-out. Following a satisfactory
check-out, and with all equipment in the properly installed location, complete the
final dressing and routing of the harness and secure in place.
Note:
It is extremely important that units should be installed in trays while final dress
and bundling of the harness is accomplished to assure proper alignment of
connectors between tray and unit. Failure to do this may cause problems when
unit is initially inserted into tray due to misalignment of connectors!
The final step is to perform a complete check of all avionics operations and insure
that free movement of all cockpit controls is available.
The typical airframe is a small and imperfect platform for providing all of the
antenna ground planes and power sources and inter-wiring required for avionics
operations, particularly for a low noise and interference free expectation. This
subject is far too broad and complex to address in detail in a few paragraphs.
However, an approach to categorizing and defining the problem can be outlined.
Revision H
August 19, 1996
7
Noise and/or interference are usually heard in the audio systems, although it may also
be detected as an interference to indicator operation. Unless a strong suspicion of the
exact source is suspected, it is best to begin a process of elimination, in the following
order:
2.3.4
NOISE AND INTERFERENCE
1.
2.
3.
8
Power Source: Check for low voltage when the avionics load is
applied. A high resistance battery cell in the A/C can cause
numerous problems. View the avionics power line at the avionics
master and at the affected unit for noise on the power line. If
present, try to categorize the frequency (e.g. alternator whine, which
may be caused by one or more bad alternator diodes, or if
interference is present only when a communication unit is
transmitting, etc.). If the noise is present or worse at the affected
unit than at the avionics master, investigate the harness for noise
coupling between wires. If necessary, disconnect the affected unit
power from the aircraft power source and connect to an external
power supply or battery.
Power Ground: View the power ground line at the avionics master
and the affected unit. If noise is discerned at the master source,
ground strapping may be corroded or partially broken. If only at
unit, a larger wire size or wire re-routing may be required.
Interference: Both noise and interference may be either conducted or
radiated, and in some cases electromagnetically coupled between
units. If it is determined that the noise or interference is eliminated
whenever another avionics unit is not transmitting, first investigate
the radiated alternative. Insure complete and proper bonding of
antennas to the aircraft surface, and check the coaxial cable and all
shield connections and connectors. Review the manufacturer’s
recommendations for antenna separations. Be aware that antenna
radiation directly to conductors at the rear of mounting trays or units
may occur if shields are stripped too far back from the connector or
are improperly grounded. Disconnecting the interfering antenna and
substituting an external dummy load may assist diagnosis.
Conducted interference usually occurs through paths which are
shared by the avionics equipment such as power lines, ground points,
audio equipment, or induced interference between adjacent wires or
harnesses. Review the manufacturer’s recommendations for shielded
wiring and ground points, and for separation of specific wires.
Measure ground points for a small but perceptible resistance to true
ground and view power lines with an oscilloscope, turning each unit
on and off to detect changes. Recheck common or adjacent
connections to jacks, plugs, or shared equipment such as power
converters, breakers, or audio panels.
Revision H
August 19, 1996
2.3.4
NOISE AND INTERFERENCE (Continued)
4.
2.3.5
Compromise: In some cases noise or interference may be subdued
but not eliminated. With the inefficient and imperfect platform
provided by the aircraft for antennas and power source, etc, complete
elimination of the problem may be very expensive or impossible (e.g.
if there is simply not enough space to provide ground plane or
antenna separation as recommended). Or, the aircraft strobe noise is
audible but not objectionable, etc. These problems should be
discussed early and thoroughly with the customer.
SUMMARY
The paragraphs above are not intended to be highly technical, completely thorough,
or extensive, but serve as a reminder for certain precautionary or follow-up
procedures for general avionics installations. Trimble is prepared to assist at any
point with additional information, hints, or literature. Simply call 1-800-487-4662
and ask for technical assistance.
Revision H
August 19, 1996
9
2.4
INSTALLATION
Installation of any equipment in an aircraft requires that the work be performed by a
Certificated Radio Repair Station with appropriate ratings. The installing agency must
complete an FAA Form 337 and compute a new weight and balance for the aircraft for
insertion in the Aircraft Flight Manual. Unless the mechanic is the designated inspector for a
Certificated Radio Repair Station or holds an Inspection Authorization, the work is subject to
inspection and approval of an FAA inspector.
The following items and suggestions should be considered prior to the installation of the
Terra by Trimble TRT 250D Transponder:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Discuss the location of the transponder with the customer, preferably in a position
that provides ease of operation. The location of the TRT 250D in relation to the
pilots viewing angle is very important. Due to the small size of the TRT 250D, the
vertical viewing angle for the display should not exceed 30 degrees.
Avoid installing the TRT 250D near heat sources. If unavoidable, insure that
additional cooling is provided.
Insure that adequate clearance exists behind the panel for connectors and cable
bends, and additional cooling if required.
Refer to Terra by Trimble TRT 250D outline drawings for panel cut-out details and
mounting dimensions as well as pertinent notes.
Remove the transponder from the mounting tray and place the tray in the panel radio
rack in the desired location. Make allowances for required spacing from other
equipment, air circulation, and for the height of the transponder panel, which is
greater than that of the mounting tray. Remove the tray and drill the angles (number
27 drill) along their centerline where intersected by the marks made from the tray.
All electrical connections, except for the antenna, are made through a single, 25 pin,
D connector furnished as a part of the mounting hardware kit. If routing the wires
from the transponder requires that they be bent in close proximity to the connector,
individual wires must have ˚ inch minimum bend radius.
If the harness is bent as a unit, the bend radius should be a minimum of 1 ˚ inches.
The power input and power ground should be No. 20 AWG, all other interconnect
wiring can be 24 AWG, of a type approved for use in aircraft installations.
ALTITUDE INPUTS (Pins 2-5, 9, 14-18) - Standard TTL input characteristics with
4.7 K OHM internal pull-up resistors and negative logic: i.e., low level (1 V or less)
is recognized as a “1” (not diode isolated).
SWITCHED POWER (Pins 8, 20) - May be used to power encoder if total current
drain is less than 0.4 ampere. The TRT 250D is compatible with all currently
manufactured aircraft encoding altimeters utilizing gray code. The encoding
altimeter manufacturer designates the connector pin numbers for his equipment’s
control lines (A2, A1, D2 etc).
10
Revision H
August 19, 1996
2.4
INSTALLATION (Continued)
7.
8.
2.5
EXTERNAL SUPPRESSION IN (Pin 6) - Accepts standard (ARINC) suppression
pulses from DME. Interference may be noted when the transponder is turned on with
the DME tuned to certain frequencies. Though such interference is rare, a
suppression circuit is included in the TRT 250D. When connected to the DME
suppression output, this circuit will suppress the transponder at appropriate times to
eliminate the interference. Input characteristics of the DME suppression circuit are
in accordance with ARINC standards.
POWER INPUT (Pin 7, 19) - 11-33 VDC. A circuit breaker or fuse not greater than
2-ampere must be installed between the aircraft’s electrical buss and the TRT 250D.
Do not connect other equipment to the same circuit protector. The circuit protector
must be labeled.
GROUND (Pins 11,21) - Power Ground. Do not rely upon the mechanical
attachment of the mounting tray for an electrical ground. It is necessary that a
ground wire be installed on the connector. The other end must be properly bonded to
the aircraft structure.
Install the tray in the rack using 6-32 flat head screws, flat washers, lock washers and
hex nuts. Alternately, flat washers and AN 365-6 nuts may be used.
If using the 3" mounting kit, the transponder unit is mounted behind the instrument
panel. The unit is screw mounted in place through the front of the panel using the 3
1/8" round hole. The unit can also be front mounted in an ATI-3 hole with the use of
a mooring plate.
CAUTION: If additional hardware is to be installed determine that it will not
interfere with the installation of the TRT 250D in the tray. Slip the TRT 250D into
place and lock it by turning the recessed Allen head screw to the right. Do not overtighten. The TRT 250D is removed from the instrument panel in the following
manner: loosen the Allen head screw and slide the unit out of its mounting tray. This
removal also disconnects the power, encoding altimeter, and antenna connections.
Replacement is accomplished in the reverse manner.
ANTENNA INSTALLATION
The antenna should be mounted on the underside of the aircraft as far removed from the
DME and ADF antennas as possible, keeping the cable length between the TRT 250D and
the antenna as short as possible to minimize signal losses. The antenna should be clear of
antenna masts, landing gear doors, and other major protrusions that could alter its radiation
pattern or present a major obstruction between it and the ground-radar antenna. The antenna
must be mounted so that its polarization axis (vertical) lies within an angle of 15 degrees
from the true vertical in level flight altitude.
The antenna lead should be routed separately from any other antenna leads or electrical wires
or cables, particularly those associated with the ADF.
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August 19, 1996
11
2.5
ANTENNA INSTALLATION (Continued)
CAUTION: Before drilling any mounting hole for the antenna, determine that there is
adequate clearance inside the fuselage for the antenna and its cable connector.
NOTE: To protect the aircraft skin from damage, install a 2 inch square or circular doubler
of the same thickness as the aircraft skin on the inside of the aircraft skin. Attach with rivets
of type and quantity as required by current FAA regulations.
To ensure that a good electrical connection exists between the antenna and the skin of the
aircraft, all paint or protective coatings should be removed from the aircraft skin prior to
installation of the antenna and the doubler. The doubler should not be painted before
installation. Tighten the nut securely to insure that the lock washer completes the electrical
connection between the antenna assembly and the aircraft skin.
The antenna cable is critical if the requirements under which the unit was TSO approved are
to be maintained. Permissible types of connectors and cable types are listed in Figure 3-5.
See Figure 3-4 for coax connector instructions as necessary. Because of the high frequencies
at which the transponder operates, antenna-cable losses can materially affect the overall
performance of the system if an excessively long cable or a cable of the wrong type is used.
NOTE: It is crucial to make the antenna lead a maximum of 9 feet, unless using RG8 A/U or
equivalent.
2.6
OPERATIONAL CHECK-OUT
1.
2.
3.
2.7
FINAL INSPECTION
1.
12
Rotate function/power knob in a clockwise manner to turn the unit on. Selections are
OFF, ON, and ALT.
Rotate “Code Selector” knob to obtain the desired code in the right-hand window.
Verify that the faster the knob is rotated, the faster the code changes with each
detent. Verify that when the Test switch is depressed and held for three seconds, a
complete receive, decode, encode, and transmit cycle is checked. A “T” indicator is
confirmation of a valid test.
Press the “<—>” (TRANSFER) button and verify that the two codes “swap” sides in
the display.
Insure that all wiring is properly routed and secure. Dress harnessing neatly and
secure in place with cable ties. Check connector integrity and locking devices.
Insure locking devices are functioning properly and are secured. Verify cabling is
not “clotheslined” and provisions have been made for service loops. Pull yoke to its
maximum travel. While slowly returning yoke to its normal position, rotate yoke left
and right to insure all cabling is routed and tied up properly. Cycle rudder pedals and
verify that they are free and cables are unobstructed. Install gust locks; perform
complete check-out of all avionics including dimmers. Secure aircraft power and all
master switches.
Revision H
August 19, 1996
2.7
FINAL INSPECTION (Continued)
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Revision H
August 19, 1996
Have installation inspected by someone authorized under Federal Aviation
Regulation Part 65.
Add the Terra by Trimble TRT 250D to the aircraft equipment list, including serial
number. Complete FAA Form 337 and make required airframe logbook entries. A
weight and balance change will be required.
Complete FCC Form 404 as required and file. The Type Acceptance Number for the
application is CCX8GITRT250.
Complete warranty card and return to Trimble.
A correspondence check is also required to insure the altimeter, encoder, and
transponder are generating the same data. See current FARS for required
compliance.
13
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14
Revision H
August 19, 1996
SECTION III
3 .
INSTALLATION DRAWINGS
Figure 3-1
Outline Dimensions
Revision H
August 19, 1996
15-16
Figure 3-2
Outline Dimensions
Revision H
August 19, 1996
17-18
Figure 3-3
Outline Dimensions
Revision H
August 19, 1996
19-20
Figure 3-4
Coax Connector Instructions
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August 19, 1996
21
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22
Revision H
August 19, 1996
Figure 3-5
Interconnect Drawing
Revision H
August 19, 1996
23-24
SECTION IV
4.
OPERATION
4.1
SCOPE
This section is to instruct the owner/operator in the proper use and care of their new Terra by
Trimble TRT 250D Transponder with a Mod level of 2 or below. If your TRT 250D is a
Mod level 3 or above use section 4A for operation instructions.
4.2
OPERATION
NOTE: See Figure 4-1 for locations and descriptions of Front Panel Controls.
The TRT 250D Transponder is designed to operate in the environment of the Air Traffic
Control Radar Beacon System (ATCRBS). The secondary radar system interrogates
transponders such as the TRT 250D. They in turn reply with discrete coded signals that can
identify the aircraft from all others in the same area if the ground facility has ARTS-III
equipment installed. Additionally, if an encoding device is installed in the aircraft, the air
traffic controller is supplied with the altitude of the aircraft on his radarscope along with the
primary position and identification information.
The TRT 250D is useful to pilots, though they may not be instrument rated, in that it permits
the center to identify their aircraft and furnish radar advisories on conflicting traffic. There is
a proliferation of Class B Airspace around the United States and it is necessary that all
aircraft entering these areas be equipped with radar transponders. Transponders are also
required in Class C Airspace. For the instrument pilot, the need for a radar transponder is as
great as the instrument rating itself. Few flights operate under Instrument Flight Rules
without a functioning transponder. It eliminates the need for identifying turns as the aircraft
is immediately identified by its discrete code or by response to “IDENT” from the controller.
CAUTION: Insure your new TRT 250D is turned off until after engine start-up procedures
are completed. This simple precaution will greatly improve the lifetime of all of your
avionics as well as the TRT 250D.
4.3
SQUAWK MODE
The function control should not be turned to ON or ALT while the aircraft is on the ground
before take-off except when performing a ramp check. Such operation will produce
confusing returns on the radarscope if the radar transponder is within range of the radar.
The function control should be turned to ON after take-off clearance has been received. To
turn the power on, turn the function control knob (located on the left hand side) in a
clockwise direction. If an encoding device is installed, the function control should be turned
to ALT after take-off clearance is received.
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25
4.3
SQUAWK MODE (Continued)
Left to right, the following will be displayed in the window:
8888T 8888
After 5 seconds the display will revert to:
1200
0000
Enter your desired code by turning the code knob on the right-hand side. The faster the knob
is turned the faster the code changes for each detent.
After the desired code is obtained, simply press the <—> (TRANSFER) button to move the
code into the left-hand or “active” window.
NOTE: Upon power down or power interruption, the TRT 250D will reset the codes to 1200
and 0000. If this situation occurs, you must reset the code previously assigned by ATC.
4.4
NORMAL OPERATION
If the flight is to be conducted under Visual Flight Rules, select code 1200 with the Code
selector switch or the VFR button. If the aircraft climbs to 10,000 feet MSL or above,
current FAR/AIM procedures should be utilized. If the flight is to be conducted under
Instrument Flight Rules, the code will be assigned by ATC in the clearance delivery. As the
flight progresses, ATC will assign different codes which are then selected by the pilot.
Care should be taken in selecting codes so that codes 0000, 7777, or 7700 are never
momentarily transferred to the active (left) window while changing from one assigned code
to another. 7700 is the emergency or distress code.
The “T” indicator comes on each time the TRT 250D replies to a ground-radar interrogation,
indicating to the pilot that he is being “seen” on the radarscope.
On occasion, the controller will request “IDENT”. The correct response is to depress and
then release the ID button (left hand knob). This starts a timer that runs for 15-30 seconds.
During this period, the SPIP pulse is added to the normal reply information and produces a
“bloom” at a point on the radarscope corresponding to the position of the aircraft.
If the aircraft is equipped with an encoder and you are using the ALT position, the controller
may request “stop altitude squawk” indicating that he does not desire to see the altitude
information. The function selector should then be turned from ALT to ON until requested to
“squawk altitude”.
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4.4
NORMAL OPERATION (Continued)
There are two occasions when the TEST switch (right hand knob) is used. First, it is
advisable to turn the TRT 250D unit to ON briefly during a ramp check and depress the
TEST switch. The “T” indicator should come on indicating that the unit is operational. The
second occasion will occur when the “T” indicator has not come on for sometime.
Depressing the TEST switch determines whether the unit is or is not functioning.
Periodically, the aircraft will be out of range of radar. Depressing the TEST switch and
obtaining verification that the unit is working can be very reassuring.
4.5
CODE TRANSFER
As previously described in Section 4.3, simply pressing this button will “swap” codes
between active and standby windows.
4.6
TO CHOOSE VFR MODE
Depress the VFR button and the code displayed in the standby window automatically is
changed to 1200. Use the transfer button to bring 1200 to the active window.
4.7
EMERGENCY OPERATION
In the event of an actual emergency, consult the FAR/AIM manual for codes to be utilized.
4.8
FAILURE MODE OPERATION
In the unlikely event of complete sudden display failure, the following procedure can be
used:
Turn the unit power OFF. Wait 5 seconds then turn unit power back ON. The left hand side
of the display will automatically revert to 1200, the right hand side will be 0000. By turning
the code selector slowly one click at a time and pausing between each click, the desired
standby code can be obtained by “counting clicks”. Then simply press the <—> button to
transfer the code to the active window.
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27
SECTION IV(A)
4A.
OPERATION
4.1A
SCOPE
This section is to instruct the owner/operator in the proper use and care of their new Terra by
Trimble TRT 250D Transponder with a Mod level 3 or above.
4.2A
OPERATION
NOTE: See Figure 4-1 for locations and descriptions of Front Panel Controls.
The TRT 250D Transponder is designed to operate in the environment of the Air Traffic
Control Radar Beacon System (ATCRBS). The secondary radar system interrogates
transponders such as the TRT 250D. They in turn reply with discrete coded signals that can
identify the aircraft from all others in the same area if the ground facility has ARTS-III
equipment installed. Additionally, if an encoding device is installed in the aircraft, the air
traffic controller is supplied with the altitude of the aircraft on his radarscope along with the
primary position and identification information.
The TRT 250D is useful to pilots, though they may not be instrument rated, in that it permits
the center to identify their aircraft and furnish radar advisories on conflicting traffic. There is
a proliferation of Class B Airspace around the United States and it is necessary that all
aircraft entering these areas be equipped with radar transponders. Transponders are also
required in Class C Airspace. For the instrument pilot, the need for a radar transponder is as
great as the instrument rating itself. Few flights operate under Instrument Flight Rules
without a functioning transponder. It eliminates the need for identifying turns as the aircraft
is immediately identified by its discrete code or by response to “IDENT” from the controller.
CAUTION: Insure your new TRT 250D is turned off until after engine start-up procedures
are completed. This simple precaution will greatly improve the lifetime of all of your
avionics as well as the TRT 250D.
4.3A
SQUAWK MODE
The function control should not be turned to ON or ALT while the aircraft is on the ground
before take-off except when performing a ramp check. Such operation will produce
confusing returns on the radarscope if the radar transponder is within range of the radar.
The function control should be turned to ON after take-off clearance has been received. To
turn the power on, turn the function control knob (located on the left hand side) in a
clockwise direction. If an encoding device is installed, the function control should be turned
to ALT after take-off clearance is received.
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4.3A
SQUAWK MODE (Continued)
Left to right, the following will be displayed in the window:
8888T 8888
After 5 seconds the display will revert to:
ZZZZ
XXXX
ZZZZ represents the VFR code that is programmed into the VFR memory. XXXX is the
code that was in the active window when the unit was powered down.
Enter your desired code by one of the following methods:
1)
The code can be selected by simply turning the code knob on the right-hand
side. The faster the knob is turned the faster the code changes for each detent. However, if
the knob is turned too fast, a “debounce” routine in the software will ignore the input.
2)
The second method is to press and release the code knob; the left hand digit
in the standby window will start to flash. Then the code knob can be turned to increase or
decrease the value of that digit. Pressing the code knob again will cause the second digit
from the left to blink. This digit can now be selected. Digits can be passed over by simply
pressing the knob without changing the digit. When the code is correct simply press the knob
until all digits are not blinking, let the blinking stop, or transfer the code to the active
window.
After the desired code is obtained, press the <—> (TRANSFER) button to move the code
into the left-hand or “active” window.
NOTE: Upon power down or power interruption, the TRT 250D will reset the codes to
ZZZZ and XXXX. If this occurs, press the transfer (<—>)button to transfer the code
previously assigned by ATC.
4.4A
NORMAL OPERATION
If the flight is to be conducted under Visual Flight Rules, select code 1200 with the Code
selector switch or the VFR button. NOTE: The VFR Code can be user programmed as
described in Section 4.6A. If the aircraft climbs to 10,000 feet MSL or above, current FAR/
AIM procedures should be utilized. If the flight is to be conducted under Instrument Flight
Rules, the code will be assigned by ATC in the clearance delivery. As the flight progresses,
ATC will assign different codes which are then selected by the pilot.
Care should be taken in selecting codes so that emergency or distress codes are never
momentarily transferred to the active (left) window while changing from one assigned code
to another.
The “T” indicator comes on each time the TRT 250D replies to a ground-radar interrogation,
indicating to the pilot that he is being “seen” on the radarscope.
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29
4.4A
NORMAL OPERATION (Continued)
On occasion, the controller will request “IDENT”. The correct response is to depress and
then release the ID button (left hand knob). This starts a timer that runs for 15-30 seconds.
During this period, the SPIP pulse is added to the normal reply information and produces a
“bloom” at a point on the radarscope corresponding to the position of the aircraft.
If the aircraft is equipped with an encoder and you are using the ALT position, the controller
may request “stop altitude squawk” indicating that he does not desire to see the altitude
information. The function selector should then be turned from ALT to ON until requested to
“squawk altitude”.
There are two occasions when the TEST switch (right hand knob) is used. First, it is
advisable to turn the TRT 250D unit to ON briefly during a ramp check and depress the
TEST switch for at least three seconds. The “T” indicator should come on indicating that the
unit is operational. The second occasion will occur when the “T” indicator has not come on
for sometime. Depressing the TEST switch, for at least three seconds, determines whether
the unit is or is not functioning. Periodically, the aircraft will be out of range of radar.
Depressing the TEST switch and obtaining verification that the unit is working can be very
reassuring.
4.5A
CODE TRANSFER
As previously described in Section 4.3A, simply pressing this button will “swap” codes
between active and standby windows.
4.6A
TO CHOOSE VFR MODE
Depress the VFR button and the code displayed in the standby window automatically is
changed to 1200 or a user programmed VFR code. To program the VFR code, press and hold
the VFR button. Using either method of tuning described above in section 4.3A, select the
code desired for VFR. Release the VFR button and the code is programmed into memory as
the VFR Code. Use the transfer button to bring the VFR code to the active window.
4.7A
EMERGENCY OPERATION
In the event of an actual emergency, consult the FAR/AIM manual for codes to be utilized.
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Figure 4-1
Front Panel Controls
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THREE YEAR UNLIMITED WARRANTY TRIMBLE
What does your warranty cover?
Any defect in materials or workmanship of Terra by Trimble equipment.
This warranty applies only to equipment sold after January 1, 1993.
How does your warranty become effective?
Your warranty does not become effective unless you mail your completed Warranty Registration card to us within 15 days after installation of your Terra
by Trimble equipment.
For how long?
Three years from date of original installation of the equipment, but not more than four years from date of purchase.
If you receive repair or replacement of equipment under this warranty, the warranty remains in effect on the repaired or replaced equipment for the
remainder of the original three-year term.
What will we do to correct problems?
Repair any equipment found to be defective in materials or workmanship.
If we choose, we may replace the equipment rather than repairing it.
We will be responsible for the cost of labor and materials for repair or replacement of any equipment found to be defective in materials or workmanship.
How do you make a warranty claim?
Contact your nearest Authorized Terra by Trimble dealer for repair or replacement of any equipment defective in materials or workmanship.
If directed by your Authorized Terra by Trimble dealer, or if you are unable to contact a Terra by Trimble dealer, send the equipment to our factory:
Properly pack your equipment; we recommend using the original container and packing materials.
Include in the package a copy of the sales receipt or other evidence of date of original purchase and installation. If the equipment was a gift, provide a
statement specifying the date received and installed. Also note your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a description of the defect.
Ship the equipment UPS or equivalent. You must prepay the shipping charges. Ship to:
Trimble
2105 Donley Dr.
Austin, TX 78758
(512) 432-0400 Phone (512) 836-9413 FAX
We will pay surface shipping charges to return the equipment to you.
What does your warranty not cover
Terra by Trimble equipment purchased "As New" from other than an Authorized Terra by Trimble Dealer or Distributor.
Malfunctions or failures resulting from the way the equipment was installed or from installation not in accordance with factory instructions.
Certificated Aircraft: Installation by other than an FAA Repair Station (USA), approved installation facility (non-USA) and/or without
— Appropriate air-worthiness approval(s) as required by governing aviation authority;
— Form 337;
— Logbook entry.
Experimental Category Aircraft: Installation without
— Appropriate air-worthiness approval(s) as required by governing aviation authority;
— Form, 8130-(x).
— Logbook entry.
Fuses and batteries.
Use of equipment for purposes other than those for which is was designed.
Accidental or deliberate damage, alterations of any kind, inadequate storage or maintenance.
Warranty repair by anyone other than Trimble or Terra by Trimble Authorized Dealer with factory approval.
For conditions not covered by this warranty, you will receive an estimate of costs before the repair is initiated. Repairs will be billed to you at the normal
repair rates of the facility that performs the repairs.
Are there any other limitations or exclusions?
Any implied warranties are in effect only as long as this warranty is in effect.
This warranty does not cover incidental or consequential damage such as damage to other equipment or to your aircraft that results from defects
covered by this warranty.
Some states do not allow limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts, or allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages,
so the above limitation or exclusion may not apply to you.
How does state law relate to this warranty?
This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state.
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