Regal Marine Industries, Inc.
2300 Jetport Drive
Orlando, FL 32809-7895
(407) 851-4360
Internet Address: http://www.RegalBoats.com
EMail Address: Regal@RegalBoats.com
OWNER’S MANUAL
2200-2250
OWNER’S MANUAL
OWNER’S MANUAL
2200/2250
2200/2250
REGAL# 783067
10/06 REVISION
REGAL# 783067
10/06 REVISION
INTRODUCTION
5 VESSEL OPERATION
INTRODUCTION
5 VESSEL OPERATION
Your Regal Owner’s Manual
General Information
Regal Warranty
Getting Underway
Fueling
Starting & Stopping
Steering
Fenders
Dock Line Basics
Steps To Stern Drive Docking
Stern Drive Maneuvering
Trim Angle
Anchoring
Emergencies
First Aid
Hypothermia
Environmental Awareness
Your Regal Owner’s Manual
General Information
Regal Warranty
Getting Underway
Fueling
Starting & Stopping
Steering
Fenders
Dock Line Basics
Steps To Stern Drive Docking
Stern Drive Maneuvering
Trim Angle
Anchoring
Emergencies
First Aid
Hypothermia
Environmental Awareness
1 SAFETY ON BOARD
Safety Labels
General Boating Safety
Required Safety Equipment
Fire Extinguishers
Visual Distress Signals
Sound Protecting Devices
Navigation Lights
Marine Sanitation Devices
Exhaust & Carbon Monoxide
Boating Under The Inflluence
Boating Accidents
Water Sports
Weather & Water Conditions
1-1
1-3
1-7
1-10
1-12
1-15
1-15
1-17
1-21
1-25
1-27
1-29
1-34
2 RULES OF THE ROAD
Navigation Rules Defined
Navigation Rules
Night Running
2-1
2-2
2-9
3 ENGINES & CONTROLS
Engines
Propulsion
Controls
Remote Control
3-1
3-3
3-5
3-13
4 SYSTEMS
Electrical
Fuel
Water
Waste
4-1
4-10
4-13
4-13
5-1
5-3
5-6
5-8
5-10
5-11
5-14
5-16
5-19
5-24
5-27
5-28
5-29
5-30
6 EQUIPMENTOPERATION
Drain Plug
Bilge Pump
Chemical Toilet
Fresh Water System
Compasss
Bucket Seat Operation
Swim Platform/Ladder
Center Windshield Latch
Gas Grill
Cabin Door
Berth Set-Up
Cockpit Table
Stereo
Sirius Satellite Radio
Performance Package
Ipod Adapter
Electronics
Canvas
Volvo Neutra-Salt System
6-1
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-6
6-7
6-7
6-7
6-8
6-8
6-9
6-18
6-19
6-19
6-20
6-42
6-46
1 SAFETY ON BOARD
Safety Labels
General Boating Safety
Required Safety Equipment
Fire Extinguishers
Visual Distress Signals
Sound Protecting Devices
Navigation Lights
Marine Sanitation Devices
Exhaust & Carbon Monoxide
Boating Under The Inflluence
Boating Accidents
Water Sports
Weather & Water Conditions
1-1
1-3
1-7
1-10
1-12
1-15
1-15
1-17
1-21
1-25
1-27
1-29
1-34
2 RULES OF THE ROAD
Navigation Rules Defined
Navigation Rules
Night Running
2-1
2-2
2-9
3 ENGINES & CONTROLS
Engines
Propulsion
Controls
Remote Control
3-1
3-3
3-5
3-13
4 SYSTEMS
Electrical
Fuel
Water
Waste
4-1
4-10
4-13
4-13
5-1
5-3
5-6
5-8
5-10
5-11
5-14
5-16
5-19
5-24
5-27
5-28
5-29
5-30
6 EQUIPMENTOPERATION
Drain Plug
Bilge Pump
Chemical Toilet
Fresh Water System
Compasss
Bucket Seat Operation
Swim Platform/Ladder
Center Windshield Latch
Gas Grill
Cabin Door
Berth Set-Up
Cockpit Table
Stereo
Sirius Satellite Radio
Performance Package
Ipod Adapter
Electronics
Canvas
Volvo Neutra-Salt System
6-1
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-6
6-7
6-7
6-7
6-8
6-8
6-9
6-18
6-19
6-19
6-20
6-42
6-46
Table Of Contents
7 COSMETIC CARE &
MAINTENANCE
Cosmetic Care
Maintenance
Table Of Contents
7 COSMETIC CARE &
MAINTENANCE
7-1
7-11
Cosmetic Care
Maintenance
7-1
7-11
8 TROUBLESHOOTING
8 TROUBLESHOOTING
Diagnostic Charts
Diagnostic Charts
8-1
9 STORAGE/WINTERIZATION
Decomissioning Checklist
Recomissioning Checklist
9 STORAGE/WINTERIZATION
9-2
9-5
10 TRAILERING
Before Trailering
Driving
Launching
Loading Boat
8-1
Decomissioning Checklist
Recomissioning Checklist
9-2
9-5
10 TRAILERING
10-1
10-5
10-6
10-8
Before Trailering
Driving
Launching
Loading Boat
10-1
10-5
10-6
10-8
11 GLOSSARY & INDEX
11 GLOSSARY & INDEX
Glossary
Index
Glossary
Index
11-1
11-5
12 TECHNICAL INFORMATION
11-1
11-5
12 TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Welcome To Regal
Welcome To Regal
Dear Regal Owner,
Dear Regal Owner,
I know I speak for everyone at Regal when I welcome you to the ever-growing family of Regal boat
owners. You’ve chosen a craft that is recognized
worldwide for its standard of excellence. Each step
in construction has been carefully scrutinized to
assure comfort, performance, reliability and safety
for both your passengers and yourself.
I know I speak for everyone at Regal when I welcome you to the ever-growing family of Regal boat
owners. You’ve chosen a craft that is recognized
worldwide for its standard of excellence. Each step
in construction has been carefully scrutinized to
assure comfort, performance, reliability and safety
for both your passengers and yourself.
Your boat is certified by the National Marine
Manufacturers Association. It also complies with
the applicable standards set by the United States
Coast Guard and the American Boat and Yacht
Council. Your Regal boat was built with the same
attention to detail and quality of construction that
we would expect in a boat we would purchase ourselves.
Your boat is certified by the National Marine
Manufacturers Association. It also complies with
the applicable standards set by the United States
Coast Guard and the American Boat and Yacht
Council. Your Regal boat was built with the same
attention to detail and quality of construction that
we would expect in a boat we would purchase ourselves.
Whether you’re a veteran boater or a newcomer,
we strongly urge you to read this boat owner’s
manual thoroughly. Familiarize yourself with the
various components of your boat, and heed the
safety precautions noted herein.
Whether you’re a veteran boater or a newcomer,
we strongly urge you to read this boat owner’s
manual thoroughly. Familiarize yourself with the
various components of your boat, and heed the
safety precautions noted herein.
If you have questions that are not covered in this
manual, please consult your authorized Regal
dealer for assistance or phone the Regal factory at
407-851-4360.
If you have questions that are not covered in this
manual, please consult your authorized Regal
dealer for assistance or phone the Regal factory at
407-851-4360.
Thank you, and welcome to the “World of Regal !”
Thank you, and welcome to the “World of Regal !”
Paul Kuck
Paul Kuck
Founder
Founder
INT-4
INT-4
Mission Statement
Mission Statement
With God’s help
With God’s help
and a steadfast commitment to integrity,
and a steadfast commitment to integrity,
we will develop a team
we will develop a team
of exceptional people and relationships
of exceptional people and relationships
to provide exceptional customer
to provide exceptional customer
satisfaction.
satisfaction.
INT-5
INT-5
Notes
INT-6
Notes
INT-6
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Boating is becoming more popular every year. There are numerous types
of recreational vessels on our waterways today involved in an every
growing number of activities. Therefore, as a new boat owner it is of the
highest priority to learn about general boating practices before operating
your craft.
Your Regal dealer will answer many questions and provide valuable
“hands on” information during the completion of the new boat delivery
process. In addition, your dealer has received special factory training on
the product line and his services should be employed to solve technical
problems and periodic maintenance beyond the scope of this manual.
Also, your Regal dealer carries a line of factory approved parts and
accessories.
Your Regal dealer can provide information regarding national training
organizations such as the U.S. Power Squadron and United States Coast
Guard Auxiliary. Along with other organizations and literature, they
can help build your “boating savvy” by developing the necessary skills
and awareness to be a safe and component skipper. Your local library
can also help in providing recommended boating literature such as
Chapman Piloting (Seamanship & Boat Handling by Elbert S. Maloney).
Remember, the waterways can change from normal to abnormal
conditions in a heartbeat. Knowing how to react quickly comes from
experience and knowledge which can be gained through boating
education.
Boating is becoming more popular every year. There are numerous types
of recreational vessels on our waterways today involved in an every
growing number of activities. Therefore, as a new boat owner it is of the
highest priority to learn about general boating practices before operating
your craft.
Your Regal dealer will answer many questions and provide valuable
“hands on” information during the completion of the new boat delivery
process. In addition, your dealer has received special factory training on
the product line and his services should be employed to solve technical
problems and periodic maintenance beyond the scope of this manual.
Also, your Regal dealer carries a line of factory approved parts and
accessories.
Your Regal dealer can provide information regarding national training
organizations such as the U.S. Power Squadron and United States Coast
Guard Auxiliary. Along with other organizations and literature, they
can help build your “boating savvy” by developing the necessary skills
and awareness to be a safe and component skipper. Your local library
can also help in providing recommended boating literature such as
Chapman Piloting (Seamanship & Boat Handling by Elbert S. Maloney).
Remember, the waterways can change from normal to abnormal
conditions in a heartbeat. Knowing how to react quickly comes from
experience and knowledge which can be gained through boating
education.
Welcome aboard!
Welcome aboard!
INT-7
INT-7
YOUR REGAL OWNER’S MANUAL
YOUR REGAL OWNER’S MANUAL
Your Regal owner’s manual has been developed to assist you in operating
your vessel with safety and pleasure. Be sure to read and become
familiar with the contents before operating your craft. Your owner’s
manual has been divided into general chapters to assist you in becoming
more knowledgable with your Regal boat. Also, we have added a special
technical drawing chapter which can be valuable in maintenance and
troubleshooting. This manual is not intended to be a complete source
of boating maintenance, boat handling techniques, boating safety or
seamanship. These skills require education and experience levels
beyond this manual.
In keeping with its commitment to continued improvement, Regal
notes that all drawings, specifications, models, standard and optional
equipment referred to in this manual are subject to change without
notice.
Your Regal owner’s manual has been developed to assist you in operating
your vessel with safety and pleasure. Be sure to read and become
familiar with the contents before operating your craft. Your owner’s
manual has been divided into general chapters to assist you in becoming
more knowledgable with your Regal boat. Also, we have added a special
technical drawing chapter which can be valuable in maintenance and
troubleshooting. This manual is not intended to be a complete source
of boating maintenance, boat handling techniques, boating safety or
seamanship. These skills require education and experience levels
beyond this manual.
In keeping with its commitment to continued improvement, Regal
notes that all drawings, specifications, models, standard and optional
equipment referred to in this manual are subject to change without
notice.
OWNER’S INFORMATION PACKET
OWNER’S INFORMATION PACKET
Regal has provided an information pouch aboard the vessel. Read and
become familiar with the materials. This packet contains valuable
literature on your propulsion package, standard and optional equipment,
systems and various care and cleaning instructions. Be sure to store
the information pouch in a clean dry area for quick reference.
Regal has provided an information pouch aboard the vessel. Read and
become familiar with the materials. This packet contains valuable
literature on your propulsion package, standard and optional equipment,
systems and various care and cleaning instructions. Be sure to store
the information pouch in a clean dry area for quick reference.
GENERAL INFORMATION
GENERAL INFORMATION
Hull Identification Number (HIN)
Hull Identification Number (HIN)
The United States Coast Guard has established a universal system of
numerically identifying vessels by using a hull identification number or
“HIN.” This number identifies your Regal boats model, hull number,
month and year of manufacture. The HIN is found on your boat’s
transom, on the starboard side, just below the rub rail on the transom
The United States Coast Guard has established a universal system of
numerically identifying vessels by using a hull identification number or
“HIN.” This number identifies your Regal boats model, hull number,
month and year of manufacture. The HIN is found on your boat’s
transom, on the starboard side, just below the rub rail on the transom
INT-8
INT-8
Introduction
Introduction
vertical surface. The HIN consists of 12 alpha or numeric characters.
It is recommended that you locate and write down the HIN for future
reference. It can be especially useful when ordering parts from your
Regal dealer. A second HIN number is found in a hidden location.
This second HIN is useful to authorities if for example the boat is
stolen and the original transom HIN is modified or eliminated.
vertical surface. The HIN consists of 12 alpha or numeric characters.
It is recommended that you locate and write down the HIN for future
reference. It can be especially useful when ordering parts from your
Regal dealer. A second HIN number is found in a hidden location.
This second HIN is useful to authorities if for example the boat is
stolen and the original transom HIN is modified or eliminated.
RUB RAIL
RUB RAIL
TRANSOM
TRANSOM
RGMDK0000G405
RGMMA0000C202
RGMDK0000G405
RGMMA0000C202
HULL IDENTIFICATION NUMBER
HULL IDENTIFICATION NUMBER
Vessel Information Sheet
Vessel Information Sheet
It is recommended that you fill out the information on the following
page. It will supply vital statistics on your vessel. Make a copy of the
data for safe keeping at home.
It is recommended that you fill out the information on the following
page. It will supply vital statistics on your vessel. Make a copy of the
data for safe keeping at home.
Vessel Float Plan
Vessel Float Plan
Fill out the float plan on the following page before departing. Leave it
with a responsible person who will notify the United States Coast
Guard or local law enforcement authorities if you do not return as
planned. If you change your plans be sure to notify this person. Make
copies of the float plan and use one each time you go boating. This
will help people know where to find you should you not return on
schedule. Do not file the float plan with the United States Coast Guard.
Fill out the float plan on the following page before departing. Leave it
with a responsible person who will notify the United States Coast
Guard or local law enforcement authorities if you do not return as
planned. If you change your plans be sure to notify this person. Make
copies of the float plan and use one each time you go boating. This
will help people know where to find you should you not return on
schedule. Do not file the float plan with the United States Coast Guard.
INT-9
INT-9
VESSEL INFORMATION SHEET
VESSEL INFORMATION SHEET
Owner:
Owner:
Address:
Address:
City & State:
City & State:
Home Phone:
Business Phone:
Home Phone:
Business Phone:
In Case Of Emergency Notify:
In Case Of Emergency Notify:
Address:
Address:
City:__________________________________State:
City:__________________________________State:
Phone:
Phone:
Insurance Agent’s Name:
Insurance Agent’s Name:
Policy#:
Policy#:
USCG Phone: ___________ Local Police:
USCG Phone: ___________ Local Police:
Marina Phone: _________________ Slip (Dock#):
Marina Phone: _________________ Slip (Dock#):
Hull Serial #: RGM __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
Key #:__________ Engine Serial #:
Outdrive Serial #:
Key #:__________ Cabin Door: (If Applicable)
Hull Serial #: RGM __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
Key #:__________ Engine Serial #:
Outdrive Serial #:
Key #:__________ Cabin Door: (If Applicable)
Selling Dealer:
Address:
City & State:
Phone: ______________________ Fax:
Selling Dealer:
Address:
City & State:
Phone: ______________________ Fax:
Servicing Dealer:
Address:
City & State:
Phone:
Servicing Dealer:
Address:
City & State:
Phone:
INT-10
Fax:
INT-10
Fax:
Introduction
FLOAT PLAN
FLOAT PLAN
Owner:
Address:
City & State:
Telephone#:
Cell Phone#:
Safety Equipment Aboard:
Life Jackets
First Aid Kit
Flares
Flashlight
VHF Radio
Anchor
Compass
Food
Person Filing Report:
Name:
Home Telephone#:
Cell Phone #:
Water
Make Of Boat:
Registration#:
Length:
Boat Name:
Gel Color:
Trim Color:
Inboard/Outboard:
Hull I.D.#:
Fuel Capacity:
Destination:
Leave From:
Time Left:
Going To:
Fuel Level: 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, F
Est. Time Of Arrival:
Return:
Est. Time of Arrival:
If not back by
o’clock
call Coast Guard
Other Information:
Name Of Person Aboard
Introduction
Owner:
Address:
City & State:
Telephone#:
Cell Phone#:
Safety Equipment Aboard:
Life Jackets
First Aid Kit
Flares
Flashlight
VHF Radio
Anchor
Compass
Food
Person Filing Report:
Name:
Home Telephone#:
Cell Phone #:
Water
Make Of Boat:
Registration#:
Length:
Boat Name:
Gel Color:
Trim Color:
Inboard/Outboard:
Hull I.D.#:
Fuel Capacity:
Destination:
Leave From:
Time Left:
Going To:
Fuel Level: 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, F
Est. Time Of Arrival:
Return:
Est. Time of Arrival:
If not back by
o’clock
call Coast Guard
Other Information:
Age
Address
Phone#
Name Of Person Aboard
INT-11
Age
Address
Phone#
INT-11
LAUNCH & CRUISE CHECKLIST
INT-12
LAUNCH & CRUISE CHECKLIST
Obtain a current weather report.
Obtain a current weather report.
Inspect the hull and propeller for damage.
Inspect the hull and propeller for damage.
Check all electrical system switches for proper operation.
Check all electrical system switches for proper operation.
If your boat has been in the water, run the bilge pump until
the flow of water stops.
If your boat has been in the water, run the bilge pump until
the flow of water stops.
If your boat has been out of the water, check to see that all
bilge water has drained out. Install the drain plug.
If your boat has been out of the water, check to see that all
bilge water has drained out. Install the drain plug.
Check that all required safety equipment is on board and in
good working condition.
Check that all required safety equipment is on board and in
good working condition.
Check that all other equipment is on board such as mooring
lines, first aid kit, tool kit and extra parts.
Check that all other equipment is on board such as mooring
lines, first aid kit, tool kit and extra parts.
Open engine compartment. Inspect for fuel odors and visible
leaks in the fuel, oil, exhaust & power steering systems.
Open engine compartment. Inspect for fuel odors and visible
leaks in the fuel, oil, exhaust & power steering systems.
Visually inspect engine for cracked hoses, defective belts,
loose fasteners such as bolts, nuts and hose clamps.
Visually inspect engine for cracked hoses, defective belts,
loose fasteners such as bolts, nuts and hose clamps.
Check fuel level. Fuel tanks should be filled to near full capacity.
Check fuel level. Fuel tanks should be filled to near full capacity.
Make sure all navigation charts, equipment and vessel
registration paperwork are onboard.
Make sure all navigation charts, equipment and vessel
registration paperwork are onboard.
Check operation of bilge blower, steering system, navigation
lights and horn.
Check operation of bilge blower, steering system, navigation
lights and horn.
Make sure passengers and crew know how to operate safety
equipment and react toan emergency.
Make sure passengers and crew know how to operate safety
equipment and react toan emergency.
File a float plan with a responsible party ashore.
File a float plan with a responsible party ashore.
INT-12
Introduction
Introduction
SUGGESTED TOOLS, PARTS & GEAR
SUGGESTED TOOLS, PARTS & GEAR
SUGGESTED TOOLS
SPARE PARTS
SUGGESTED TOOLS
SPARE PARTS
Allen Wrenches
Jack Knife
Phillips Screwdriver Set
Slotted Screwdriver Set
Regular Pliers
Combination Wrench Set
Ratchet & Socket Set
Hammer
Wire Crimpers
Vise Grip Pliers
Floating Flashlight
Nut Driver Set
Oil Filter Wrench
Fuel Filter Wrench
Fuel Filter
Spark Plugs
Water Pump Belt
Propellers
Alternator Belt
Anti-Siphon Set
Propeller Nut & Hardware
Penetrating Oil
Extra Light Bulbs
Extra Batteries
Duct Tape
Electrical Tape
Power Steering Fluid
Water Pump Impeller
Spare Keys On Floater
Allen Wrenches
Jack Knife
Phillips Screwdriver Set
Slotted Screwdriver Set
Regular Pliers
Combination Wrench Set
Ratchet & Socket Set
Hammer
Wire Crimpers
Vise Grip Pliers
Floating Flashlight
Nut Driver Set
Oil Filter Wrench
Fuel Filter Wrench
Fuel Filter
Spark Plugs
Water Pump Belt
Propellers
Alternator Belt
Anti-Siphon Set
Propeller Nut & Hardware
Penetrating Oil
Extra Light Bulbs
Extra Batteries
Duct Tape
Electrical Tape
Power Steering Fluid
Water Pump Impeller
Spare Keys On Floater
BASIC GEAR
BASIC GEAR
Tie Lines
Mooring Lines
Dock Fenders
First Aid Kit
Boat Hook
Foul Weather Gear
VHF Radio, EPIRB, GPS, Cell Phone
Charts & Plotting Instruments
Emergency Water & Food
Bailer Or Hand Pump
Fire Extinguisher
Personal Flotation Devices
Anchor & Line
Life Raft
Tie Lines
Mooring Lines
Dock Fenders
First Aid Kit
Boat Hook
Foul Weather Gear
VHF Radio, EPIRB, GPS, Cell Phone
Charts & Plotting Instruments
Emergency Water & Food
Bailer Or Hand Pump
Fire Extinguisher
Personal Flotation Devices
Anchor & Line
Life Raft
INT-13
INT-13
Capacity Plate
Capacity Plate
Close to the helm on Regal boats up to 26’ in length is a capacity plate.
This plate represents manufacturers who participate in the National
Marine Manufacturer’s Association small boat certification program.
A similar yacht certification plate for boats over 26’ covers many of
the above guidelines and othes from ABYC into the yacht program.Your
boat has been certified by NMMA approved inspectors to be in
compliance with their system guidelines along with federal safety
regulations. The driver of the craft must read the plate information
before operating the vessel.
The capacity plate data applies under normal conditions. Be sure to
read and abide by the capacity limits. Remember, the boat operator is
responsible for the vessel and passengers.
Close to the helm on Regal boats up to 26’ in length is a capacity plate.
This plate represents manufacturers who participate in the National
Marine Manufacturer’s Association small boat certification program.
A similar yacht certification plate for boats over 26’ covers many of
the above guidelines and othes from ABYC into the yacht program.Your
boat has been certified by NMMA approved inspectors to be in
compliance with their system guidelines along with federal safety
regulations. The driver of the craft must read the plate information
before operating the vessel.
The capacity plate data applies under normal conditions. Be sure to
read and abide by the capacity limits. Remember, the boat operator is
responsible for the vessel and passengers.
Note the following typical capacity plate information below:
Note the following typical capacity plate information below:
• The plate states the maximum number of persons allowed on the
boat.
• The total weight of persons, gear and other items under normal
conditions that the boat is capable of carrying.
• Overloading, improper loading and weight distribution are well
documented causes of accidents. Provide for an extra margin of safety
in rough sea conditions.
• The plate states the maximum number of persons allowed on the
boat.
• The total weight of persons, gear and other items under normal
conditions that the boat is capable of carrying.
• Overloading, improper loading and weight distribution are well
documented causes of accidents. Provide for an extra margin of safety
in rough sea conditions.
TYPICAL EXAMPLES SHOWN
INT-14
TYPICAL EXAMPLES SHOWN
INT-14
Introduction
Introduction
Owner’s Registration & Systems Checklist
Owner’s Registration & Systems Checklist
Please note that your Regal boat requires the proper registration by
your authorized Regal dealer. To initiate your warranty the dealer must
complete the owner’s registraiton form and systems checklist at the
time of delivery. The owner must sign the paperwork to acknowledge
that the dealer has reviewed the boat systems and warranty provisions
with the owner. The owner should keep the original paperwork that
features a temporary warranty registration. A Regal express limited
warranty certificate containg all relevant boat and engine serial numbers
will be sent after the factory receives the paperwork.
Please note that your Regal boat requires the proper registration by
your authorized Regal dealer. To initiate your warranty the dealer must
complete the owner’s registraiton form and systems checklist at the
time of delivery. The owner must sign the paperwork to acknowledge
that the dealer has reviewed the boat systems and warranty provisions
with the owner. The owner should keep the original paperwork that
features a temporary warranty registration. A Regal express limited
warranty certificate containg all relevant boat and engine serial numbers
will be sent after the factory receives the paperwork.
Dealer’s Responsibility
Dealer’s Responsibility
Your boat has undergone rigid quality assurance inspections before
leaving the factory. However, your dealer has been trained to perform
final pre-delivery checks and to service your Regal boat prior to your
pick-up. Your dealer’s responsibilities include:
Your boat has undergone rigid quality assurance inspections before
leaving the factory. However, your dealer has been trained to perform
final pre-delivery checks and to service your Regal boat prior to your
pick-up. Your dealer’s responsibilities include:
♦ A complete orientation in the operation of your Regal boat,
including matters relating to the safe operation of your craft.
♦ A complete orientation in the operation of your Regal boat,
including matters relating to the safe operation of your craft.
♦ Completion and mailing of your boat
registration warranty form to Regal.
♦ Completion and mailing of your boat
registration warranty form to Regal.
♦ Warranties, registration materials, owner’s manual, operation,
installation and maintenance instructions for all auxiliary equipment
supplied with or installed on your Regal boat.
♦ Warranties, registration materials, owner’s manual, operation,
installation and maintenance instructions for all auxiliary equipment
supplied with or installed on your Regal boat.
INT-15
INT-15
Owner’s Responsibility
Owner’s Responsibility
You are entitled to all the benefits and services outlined in your Regal
boat warranty. However, you have certain responsibilities to ensure
warranty satisfaction. These are:
You are entitled to all the benefits and services outlined in your Regal
boat warranty. However, you have certain responsibilities to ensure
warranty satisfaction. These are:
♦ To read the warranty materials and understand them fully.
♦ To read the warranty materials and understand them fully.
♦ To examine the boat in detail at the time of delivery.
♦ To examine the boat in detail at the time of delivery.
♦ Apply the following: boating rules and regulations, safety equipment,
environmental regulations, accident reports and warranty
regulations terms and conditions.
♦ Apply the following: boating rules and regulations, safety equipment,
environmental regulations, accident reports and warranty
regulations terms and conditions.
♦ To read throughly all literature supplied with your boat, including
this owner’s manual and to follow the recommendations in the
literature.
♦ To read throughly all literature supplied with your boat, including
this owner’s manual and to follow the recommendations in the
literature.
♦ To return the boat after the recommended hours of engine operation
for the proper dealer service inspections.
♦ To return the boat after the recommended hours of engine operation
for the proper dealer service inspections.
♦ To provide proper maintenance and periodic servicing of your boat
and equipment as set forth in the various manuals supplied.
♦ To provide proper maintenance and periodic servicing of your boat
and equipment as set forth in the various manuals supplied.
INT-16
INT-16
Introduction
INT-17
Introduction
INT-17
REGAL MARINE INDUSTRIES, INC.
LIFETIME PLUS LIMITED HULL WARRANTY
REGAL MARINE INDUSTRIES, INC.
LIFETIME PLUS LIMITED HULL WARRANTY
Welcome to the Worldwide Family of Regal Owners! We are very pleased that you have chosen a Regal
Powerboat!
Welcome to the Worldwide Family of Regal Owners! We are very pleased that you have chosen a Regal
Powerboat!
This document is your Warranty Registration Certificate and Statement of Warranty. Please check the
registration information section for accuracy. If this information is not correct or if you change your
address at some future date, please notify us at the following address: Regal Marine Industries, Inc.
Attention: Warranty Registrations, 2300 Jetport Drive, Orlando, Florida 32809
This document is your Warranty Registration Certificate and Statement of Warranty. Please check the
registration information section for accuracy. If this information is not correct or if you change your
address at some future date, please notify us at the following address: Regal Marine Industries, Inc.
Attention: Warranty Registrations, 2300 Jetport Drive, Orlando, Florida 32809
Please read the warranty carefully. It contains important information on Regal's claims procedures and
your rights and obligations under this warranty.
Please read the warranty carefully. It contains important information on Regal's claims procedures and
your rights and obligations under this warranty.
WHAT IS COVERED: This Limited Warranty applies only to Regal
WHAT IS COVERED: This Limited Warranty applies only to Regal
beginning with model year
beginning with model year
2005.
2005.
LIFETIME LIMITED STRUCTURAL HULL WARRANTY:
Regal Marine
Industries, Inc. warrants to the original retail purchaser of this boat if purchased from an authorized
Regal dealer that the selling dealer or Regal will repair or replace the fiberglass hull if it is found to be
structurally defective in material or workmanship for as long as the original retail purchaser owns the boat.
For purposes of this warranty, the hull is defined as the single fiberglass casting which rests on the water.
This limited warranty is subject to all limitations and conditions explained below.
LIFETIME LIMITED STRUCTURAL HULL WARRANTY: Regal Marine
Industries, Inc. warrants to the original retail purchaser of this boat if purchased from an authorized
Regal dealer that the selling dealer or Regal will repair or replace the fiberglass hull if it is found to be
structurally defective in material or workmanship for as long as the original retail purchaser owns the boat.
For purposes of this warranty, the hull is defined as the single fiberglass casting which rests on the water.
This limited warranty is subject to all limitations and conditions explained below.
FIVE-YEAR TRANSFERABLE LIMITED STRUCTURAL HULL
WARRANTY: In addition to the Lifetime Limited Structural Hull Warranty, Regal offers a Transferable
FIVE-YEAR TRANSFERABLE LIMITED STRUCTURAL HULL
WARRANTY: In addition to the Lifetime Limited Structural Hull Warranty, Regal offers a Transferable
Five-Year Limited Structural Hull Warranty. Under the Five-Year Transferable Limited Structural Hull
Warranty, Regal will repair or replace the fiberglass hull if it is found to be structurally defective in
material or workmanship within the first (5) years after the date of delivery to the original retail purchaser.
Any remaining term of this Five-Year Limited Hull Warranty may be transferred to a second owner if
within 60 days of purchase, the new owner registers the transfer with Regal and pays the established
warranty transfer fee. Contact Regal Customer Service at the above address for details.
Five-Year Limited Structural Hull Warranty. Under the Five-Year Transferable Limited Structural Hull
Warranty, Regal will repair or replace the fiberglass hull if it is found to be structurally defective in
material or workmanship within the first (5) years after the date of delivery to the original retail purchaser.
Any remaining term of this Five-Year Limited Hull Warranty may be transferred to a second owner if
within 60 days of purchase, the new owner registers the transfer with Regal and pays the established
warranty transfer fee. Contact Regal Customer Service at the above address for details.
FIVE-YEAR LIMITED HULL BLISTER WARRANTY: Regal will Warrant to the
FIVE-YEAR LIMITED HULL BLISTER WARRANTY: Regal will Warrant to the
original retail purchaser, any underwater gelcoated surfaces of the hull against laminate blisters which
occur as a result of defects in material or workmanship within (5) years of the date of delivery, provided
that the original factory gelcoat surface has not been altered. Alternation would include but is not limited
to damage repair; excessive sanding, scraping, sandblasting; or from improper surface preparation for
application of a marine barrier coating or bottom paint, any of which shall void this Five-Year Limited
Hull Blister Warranty. Regal Marine shall repair or cause to be repaired any covered laminate blisters
based on the following prorated schedule. Less than two (2) years from delivery date - 100%, Two (2) to
three (3) years from delivery date - 75%, Three (3) to four (4) years from delivery date - 50%, Four (4) to
five (5) years from delivery date - 25%.
Reimbursement shall be limited to one repair, not to exceed ($80.00) dollars per foot of boat length
prior to prorating. Regals prior authorization for the method and cost of repair, must be obtained before
repairs are commenced. All costs to transport the boat for repairs are the responsibility of the owner.
original retail purchaser, any underwater gelcoated surfaces of the hull against laminate blisters which
occur as a result of defects in material or workmanship within (5) years of the date of delivery, provided
that the original factory gelcoat surface has not been altered. Alternation would include but is not limited
to damage repair; excessive sanding, scraping, sandblasting; or from improper surface preparation for
application of a marine barrier coating or bottom paint, any of which shall void this Five-Year Limited
Hull Blister Warranty. Regal Marine shall repair or cause to be repaired any covered laminate blisters
based on the following prorated schedule. Less than two (2) years from delivery date - 100%, Two (2) to
three (3) years from delivery date - 75%, Three (3) to four (4) years from delivery date - 50%, Four (4) to
five (5) years from delivery date - 25%.
Reimbursement shall be limited to one repair, not to exceed ($80.00) dollars per foot of boat length
prior to prorating. Regals prior authorization for the method and cost of repair, must be obtained before
repairs are commenced. All costs to transport the boat for repairs are the responsibility of the owner.
INT-18
INT-18
Introduction
Introduction
LIMITED GENERAL WARRANTY: In addition to above hull warranties, Regal warrants
to the original purchaser of this boat if purchased from an authorized dealer that the dealer or Regal will
repair or replace any parts found to be defective in materials or workmanship for a period of one (1) year
from the date of delivery, subject to all limitations and conditions contained herein.
LIMITED GENERAL WARRANTY: In addition to above hull warranties, Regal warrants
to the original purchaser of this boat if purchased from an authorized dealer that the dealer or Regal will
repair or replace any parts found to be defective in materials or workmanship for a period of one (1) year
from the date of delivery, subject to all limitations and conditions contained herein.
LIMITED EXTERIOR FINISH WARRANTY: Regal warrants that the selling dealer
LIMITED EXTERIOR FINISH WARRANTY: Regal warrants that the selling dealer
or Regal will repair cosmetic defects in the exterior gelcoated finish including cracks or crazing reported
to Regal within 90 days from the date of delivery to the original purchaser, subject to all limitations and
conditions contained herein. All warranty work is to be performed at a Regal dealership or other location
authorized by a Regal Customer Service Manager after it is established to Regal's satisfaction that there is
a defect in material or workmanship.
or Regal will repair cosmetic defects in the exterior gelcoated finish including cracks or crazing reported
to Regal within 90 days from the date of delivery to the original purchaser, subject to all limitations and
conditions contained herein. All warranty work is to be performed at a Regal dealership or other location
authorized by a Regal Customer Service Manager after it is established to Regal's satisfaction that there is
a defect in material or workmanship.
REGISTRATION INFORMATION:
REGISTRATION INFORMATION:
CUSTOMER OBLIGATIONS: The following are conditions precedent
CUSTOMER OBLIGATIONS: The following are conditions precedent
to the availability of any benefits under these limited warranties:
(a) The purchaser must sign and the dealer must submit to Regal the "OWNER
REGISTRATION AND SYSTEMS CHECKLIST
FORM within ten (10) days of the date of delivery and such information must be on
file at Regal.
(b) The purchaser must first notify the dealer from whom the boat was purchased of
any claim under this warranty within the applicable warranty period and within a
reasonable period of time (not to exceed thirty (30) days) after the defect is or should
have been discovered.
(c) Regal will not be responsible to repair or replace any part, (1) if the use of the
boat is continued after the defect is or should have been discovered; and (2) if such
continued use causes other or additional damage to the boat or component parts of
the boat.
(d) Based on the dealer's knowledge of Regal's warranty policy and/or consultations
with Regal, the dealer will accept the claim and arrange for appropriate repairs to be
performed, or deny the claim if it is not within the warranty.
(e) The dealer will contact the Regal boat owner regarding instructions for delivery
of boat or part for warranty repair if it is covered by the limited warranty.
ALL COSTS TO TRANSPORT THE BOAT FOR REPAIRS ARE THE
RESPONSIBILITY OF THE OWNER;
(f) If the Regal boat owner believes a claim has been denied in error or the dealer has
performed the warranty work in an
unsatisfactory manner, the owner must notify Regal's Customer Service Department
in writing at the address listed for further consideration. Regal will then review the
claim and take appropriate follow-up action.
to the availability of any benefits under these limited warranties:
(a) The purchaser must sign and the dealer must submit to Regal the "OWNER
REGISTRATION AND SYSTEMS CHECKLIST
FORM within ten (10) days of the date of delivery and such information must be on
file at Regal.
(b) The purchaser must first notify the dealer from whom the boat was purchased of
any claim under this warranty within the applicable warranty period and within a
reasonable period of time (not to exceed thirty (30) days) after the defect is or should
have been discovered.
(c) Regal will not be responsible to repair or replace any part, (1) if the use of the
boat is continued after the defect is or should have been discovered; and (2) if such
continued use causes other or additional damage to the boat or component parts of
the boat.
(d) Based on the dealer's knowledge of Regal's warranty policy and/or consultations
with Regal, the dealer will accept the claim and arrange for appropriate repairs to be
performed, or deny the claim if it is not within the warranty.
(e) The dealer will contact the Regal boat owner regarding instructions for delivery
of boat or part for warranty repair if it is covered by the limited warranty.
ALL COSTS TO TRANSPORT THE BOAT FOR REPAIRS ARE THE
RESPONSIBILITY OF THE OWNER;
(f) If the Regal boat owner believes a claim has been denied in error or the dealer has
performed the warranty work in an
unsatisfactory manner, the owner must notify Regal's Customer Service Department
in writing at the address listed for further consideration. Regal will then review the
claim and take appropriate follow-up action.
INT-19
INT-19
WARRANTY EXCEPTIONS: THIS LIMITED WARRANTY does not cover and the
following are not warranted:
(a) Engines, metal plating or finishes, windshield breakage, leakage, fading and deterioration of paints, canvas, upholstery and fabrics;
(b) Gelcoat surfaces including, but not limited to, cracking, crazing, discoloration or blistering except as noted above;
(c) Accessories and items which were not part of the boat when shipped from the Regal
factory, and/or any damage caused thereby;
(d) Damage caused by misuse, accident, galvanic corrosion, negligence, lack of proper
maintenance, or improper trailering;
(e) Any boat used for racing, or used for rental or commercial purposes;
(f) Any boat operated contrary to any instructions furnished by Regal, or operated in violation of any federal, state, Coast Guard or other governmental agency laws, rules, or regulations;
(g) The limited warranty is void if alterations have been made to the boat;
(h) Transportation of boat or parts to and/or from the REGAL factory or service location;
(i) Travel time or haul outs, loss of time or inconvenience;
(j) Any published or announced catalog performance characteristics of speed, fuel and oil
consumption, and static or dynamic transportation in the water;
(k) Any boat that has been repowered beyond Regal's power recommendations;
(1) Boats damaged by accident and boats damaged while being loaded onto, transported
upon or unloaded from trailers, cradles, or other devices used to place boats in water,
remove boats from water or store or transport boats on or over land;
(m) Water damage to, dry rot to, condensation to, or absorption by interior surfaces, wood
structures or polyurethane foam;
interior wood including, but not limited to, bleeding and/or discoloration as a result of condensation or moisture or water continually contacting the plywood causing staining to upholstery, carpet or other interior surfaces;
(n) Costs or charges derived from inconveniences or loss of use, commercial or monetary
loss due to time loss, and any other special, incidental or consequential damage of any kind
or nature whatsoever.
WARRANTY EXCEPTIONS: The terms, conditions, limitations and disclaimers contained herein cannot be wavered except by the Customer Service Manager of Regal. Any
such wavier must be in writing. Neither the dealer, nor the customer, nor any service, sales
and/or warranty representative of Regal is authorized to waive and/or modify these conditions, limitations and/or disclaimers.
WARRANTY EXCEPTIONS: THIS LIMITED WARRANTY does not cover and the
GENERAL PROVISIONS:
ALL GENERAL, SPECIAL, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL AND/OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARE EXCLUDED FROM THIS WARRANTY
AND ARE TOTALLY DISCLAIMED BY REGAL. IT IS THE INTEREST
OF THE PARTIES THAT THE OWNER'S SOLE REMEDY IS THE REPAIR OR REPLACEMENT OF THE VESSEL OR ITS ALLEGEDLY DEFECTIVE COMPONENT PARTS AND THAT NO OTHER LEGAL OR
EQUITABLE REMEDIES SHALL BE AVAILABLE TO SAID OWNER.
SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OF INCIDENTAL
OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES SO THE FOREGOING MAY NOT
APPLY TO YOU.
GENERAL PROVISIONS:
ALL GENERAL, SPECIAL, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL AND/OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARE EXCLUDED FROM THIS WARRANTY
AND ARE TOTALLY DISCLAIMED BY REGAL. IT IS THE INTEREST
OF THE PARTIES THAT THE OWNER'S SOLE REMEDY IS THE REPAIR OR REPLACEMENT OF THE VESSEL OR ITS ALLEGEDLY DEFECTIVE COMPONENT PARTS AND THAT NO OTHER LEGAL OR
EQUITABLE REMEDIES SHALL BE AVAILABLE TO SAID OWNER.
SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OF INCIDENTAL
OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES SO THE FOREGOING MAY NOT
APPLY TO YOU.
INT-20
INT-20
following are not warranted:
(a) Engines, metal plating or finishes, windshield breakage, leakage, fading and deterioration of paints, canvas, upholstery and fabrics;
(b) Gelcoat surfaces including, but not limited to, cracking, crazing, discoloration or blistering except as noted above;
(c) Accessories and items which were not part of the boat when shipped from the Regal
factory, and/or any damage caused thereby;
(d) Damage caused by misuse, accident, galvanic corrosion, negligence, lack of proper
maintenance, or improper trailering;
(e) Any boat used for racing, or used for rental or commercial purposes;
(f) Any boat operated contrary to any instructions furnished by Regal, or operated in violation of any federal, state, Coast Guard or other governmental agency laws, rules, or regulations;
(g) The limited warranty is void if alterations have been made to the boat;
(h) Transportation of boat or parts to and/or from the REGAL factory or service location;
(i) Travel time or haul outs, loss of time or inconvenience;
(j) Any published or announced catalog performance characteristics of speed, fuel and oil
consumption, and static or dynamic transportation in the water;
(k) Any boat that has been repowered beyond Regal's power recommendations;
(1) Boats damaged by accident and boats damaged while being loaded onto, transported
upon or unloaded from trailers, cradles, or other devices used to place boats in water,
remove boats from water or store or transport boats on or over land;
(m) Water damage to, dry rot to, condensation to, or absorption by interior surfaces, wood
structures or polyurethane foam;
interior wood including, but not limited to, bleeding and/or discoloration as a result of condensation or moisture or water continually contacting the plywood causing staining to upholstery, carpet or other interior surfaces;
(n) Costs or charges derived from inconveniences or loss of use, commercial or monetary
loss due to time loss, and any other special, incidental or consequential damage of any kind
or nature whatsoever.
WARRANTY EXCEPTIONS: The terms, conditions, limitations and disclaimers contained herein cannot be wavered except by the Customer Service Manager of Regal. Any
such wavier must be in writing. Neither the dealer, nor the customer, nor any service, sales
and/or warranty representative of Regal is authorized to waive and/or modify these conditions, limitations and/or disclaimers.
Introduction
Introduction
THIS IS A LIMITED WARRANTY; REGAL MAKES NO WARRANTY,
OTHER THAN CONTAINED HEREIN; TO THE EXTENT ALLOWED
BY LAW ANY WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARISING IN STATE LAW ARE EXPRESSLY EXCLUDED TO THE EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW. ANY
IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY IS LIMITED TO THE
PERIOD OF THIS LIMITED WARRANTY. ALL OBLIGATIONS OF
REGAL ARE SPECIFICALLY SET FORTH HEREIN. REGAL DOES NOT
AUTHORIZE ANY PERSON OR DEALER TO ASSUME ANY LIABILITY IN CONNECTION WITH REGAL BOATS. Some states do not allow limita-
THIS IS A LIMITED WARRANTY; REGAL MAKES NO WARRANTY,
OTHER THAN CONTAINED HEREIN; TO THE EXTENT ALLOWED
BY LAW ANY WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARISING IN STATE LAW ARE EXPRESSLY EXCLUDED TO THE EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW. ANY
IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY IS LIMITED TO THE
PERIOD OF THIS LIMITED WARRANTY. ALL OBLIGATIONS OF
REGAL ARE SPECIFICALLY SET FORTH HEREIN. REGAL DOES NOT
AUTHORIZE ANY PERSON OR DEALER TO ASSUME ANY LIABILITY IN CONNECTION WITH REGAL BOATS. Some states do not allow limita-
tions on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the above limitation may not apply to you. Regal's
obligation with respect to this warranty is limited to making repairs to or replacing the defective parts and
no claim for breach of warranty shall be cause for cancellation or rescission of the contract or sale for
any boat manufactured by REGAL MARINE INDUSTRIES, INC.
Regal will discharge its obligations under this warranty as rapidly as possible, but cannot guarantee any
specific completion date due to the different nature of claims which may be made and services which
may be required. Regal reserves the right to change or improve the design of its boats without obligation
to modify any boat previously manufactured. This limited warranty gives you specific legal rights, and
you may also have other rights which may vary from state to state. Regal shall in no way be responsible
for any repairs not PRE-AUTHORIZED by a Regal Customer Service Manager or repairs performed by a repair shop not PRE- AUTHORIZED by a Regal Customer Service Manager.
tions on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the above limitation may not apply to you. Regal's
obligation with respect to this warranty is limited to making repairs to or replacing the defective parts and
no claim for breach of warranty shall be cause for cancellation or rescission of the contract or sale for
any boat manufactured by REGAL MARINE INDUSTRIES, INC.
Regal will discharge its obligations under this warranty as rapidly as possible, but cannot guarantee any
specific completion date due to the different nature of claims which may be made and services which
may be required. Regal reserves the right to change or improve the design of its boats without obligation
to modify any boat previously manufactured. This limited warranty gives you specific legal rights, and
you may also have other rights which may vary from state to state. Regal shall in no way be responsible
for any repairs not PRE-AUTHORIZED by a Regal Customer Service Manager or repairs performed by a repair shop not PRE- AUTHORIZED by a Regal Customer Service Manager.
INT-21
INT-21
Notes
INT-22
Notes
INT-22
Safety On Board
Safety On Board
Safety awareness can’t be over emphasized. Safety on board needs to
be the skippers number one priority. In this manual you will find many
safety precautions and symbols to identify safety related items. Heed
all safety precaution information. Remember, the skipper is responsible
for the safety of his passengers and crew.
Safety awareness can’t be over emphasized. Safety on board needs to
be the skippers number one priority. In this manual you will find many
safety precautions and symbols to identify safety related items. Heed
all safety precaution information. Remember, the skipper is responsible
for the safety of his passengers and crew.
SAFETY LABELS
SAFETY LABELS
Safety Precaution Definition
Safety Precaution Definition
Safety precautions are stated as caution, warning and danger signal
words. They are highlighted in this manual by font design and symbol
usage. Also, a notice heading is included which provides operation
and maintenance information but is not hazard-related.
Safety precautions are stated as caution, warning and danger signal
words. They are highlighted in this manual by font design and symbol
usage. Also, a notice heading is included which provides operation
and maintenance information but is not hazard-related.
Become familiar and understand all safety precaution labels!
Become familiar and understand all safety precaution labels!
!
DANGER
!
Immediate hazardous situation that, if not avoided, will result in
death or serious injury.
!
WARNING
Immediate hazardous situation that, if not avoided, will result in
death or serious injury.
!
Potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, could result
in death or serious injury.
1-1
DANGER
WARNING
Potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, could result
in death or serious injury.
1-1
CHAPTER 1
!
CHAPTER 1
CAUTION
!
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation or unsafe practice that, if
not avoided, may result in injury or property or product damage..
CAUTION
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation or unsafe practice that, if
not avoided, may result in injury or property or product damage..
NOTICE
NOTICE
General or specific information which is important to correct
operation or maintenance, but is not hazard related.
General or specific information which is important to correct
operation or maintenance, but is not hazard related.
Precautionary Labels
Precautionary Labels
Read and understand all safety labels affixed to your Regal boat. Most
of the safety labels are found close to the helm, aft cockpit and or
swim platform. The location of the labels may vary by model. The
label list does not cover everything! Use common sense to analyze the
result of an action on board your vessel. Always think safety first!
Read and understand all safety labels affixed to your Regal boat. Most
of the safety labels are found close to the helm, aft cockpit and or
swim platform. The location of the labels may vary by model. The
label list does not cover everything! Use common sense to analyze the
result of an action on board your vessel. Always think safety first!
NOTICE
NOTICE
DO NOT REMOVE OR COVER ANY
PRECAUTIONARY LABELS.
KEEP HARSH CHEMICALS AWAY FROM LABELS.
IF A LABEL BECOMES ILLEGIBLE, CONTACT YOUR
REGAL DEALER
FOR ORDERING REPLACEMENTS.
1-2
DO NOT REMOVE OR COVER ANY
PRECAUTIONARY LABELS.
KEEP HARSH CHEMICALS AWAY FROM LABELS.
IF A LABEL BECOMES ILLEGIBLE, CONTACT YOUR
REGAL DEALER
FOR ORDERING REPLACEMENTS.
1-2
Safety On Board
Safety On Board
GENERAL BOATING SAFETY
GENERAL BOATING SAFETY
We understand that you are eager to get your Regal boat on the water.
However, we strongly suggest that you thoroughly familiarize
yourself and friends or members of your family with safe boating
practices before setting out.
Remember, that along with the freedom and exhilaration of boating
comes the responsibility that you have for the safety of your passengers
and other boaters who share the water with you.
Boating regulations vary from state to state. Check with your local
state and local authorities for the regulations pertaining to your area.
We understand that you are eager to get your Regal boat on the water.
However, we strongly suggest that you thoroughly familiarize
yourself and friends or members of your family with safe boating
practices before setting out.
Remember, that along with the freedom and exhilaration of boating
comes the responsibility that you have for the safety of your passengers
and other boaters who share the water with you.
Boating regulations vary from state to state. Check with your local
state and local authorities for the regulations pertaining to your area.
♦ Check with local weather stations, the U. S. Coast Guard, or weather
station broadcasts for the latest conditions. Remember getting caught
in sever weather is hazardous, Check weather conditions periodically
while you are boating and before your outing. If you are forced to
operate your boat in a storm condition, take common sense
precautions; wear PFD’s, store gear, reduce speed and head for safe
refuge.
♦ Check with local weather stations, the U. S. Coast Guard, or weather
station broadcasts for the latest conditions. Remember getting caught
in sever weather is hazardous, Check weather conditions periodically
while you are boating and before your outing. If you are forced to
operate your boat in a storm condition, take common sense
precautions; wear PFD’s, store gear, reduce speed and head for safe
refuge.
♦ It is best to avoid operating your boat in foggy weather. When fog
sets in, take bearings, log courses and speeds. You are required to
emit a five second blast from your horn or whistle once every minute.
Also, have your passengers wear PFD’s and observe for oncoming
vessels.
♦ It is best to avoid operating your boat in foggy weather. When fog
sets in, take bearings, log courses and speeds. You are required to
emit a five second blast from your horn or whistle once every minute.
Also, have your passengers wear PFD’s and observe for oncoming
vessels.
♦ Operate in shallow water presents a number of hazards including
sand bars and water levels influenced by tides. If the vessel strikes
an underwater hazard, check for boat and engine damage. If the
engine vibrates excessively after striking an underwater obstruction,
it may indicate a damaged propeller. If you run aground, seek help
by radio or flares.
♦ Operate in shallow water presents a number of hazards including
sand bars and water levels influenced by tides. If the vessel strikes
an underwater hazard, check for boat and engine damage. If the
engine vibrates excessively after striking an underwater obstruction,
it may indicate a damaged propeller. If you run aground, seek help
by radio or flares.
♦ Make sure your boat and equipment are in top condition. Do this by
frequently inspecting the hull, engine and all the gear.
1-3
♦ Make sure your boat and equipment are in top condition. Do this by
frequently inspecting the hull, engine and all the gear.
1-3
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
♦ You must provide a Coast Guard approved personal flotation
device (PFD) for every person on board. These PFD’s should
be in good condition and easily accessible.
♦ You must provide a Coast Guard approved personal flotation
device (PFD) for every person on board. These PFD’s should
be in good condition and easily accessible.
♦ Insist that non-swimmers and children on board weara PFD at all
times. Any time you encounter rough weather conditions, make
sure everyone on board is wearing a PFD, including yourself.
Instruct your passengers in how to put on their PFDs and be sure
they know their storage location on the boat. Remember, in an
emergency, a PFD that cannot be quickly located and worn is
useless.
♦ Insist that non-swimmers and children on board weara PFD at all
times. Any time you encounter rough weather conditions, make
sure everyone on board is wearing a PFD, including yourself.
Instruct your passengers in how to put on their PFDs and be sure
they know their storage location on the boat. Remember, in an
emergency, a PFD that cannot be quickly located and worn is
useless.
♦ Never allow anyone to sit anywhere on the boat not specifically
designed seating. While underway, ALWAYS insist passengers
sit in the provided seating and set an example by doing this yourself.
♦ Never allow anyone to sit anywhere on the boat not specifically
designed seating. While underway, ALWAYS insist passengers
sit in the provided seating and set an example by doing this yourself.
♦ Use maximum caution when fueling. Never allow any smoke or
flame nearby while you are fueling. ALWAYS check for fuel leaks
and fumes when fueling is completed.
♦ Use maximum caution when fueling. Never allow any smoke or
flame nearby while you are fueling. ALWAYS check for fuel leaks
and fumes when fueling is completed.
!
WARNING
!
GASOLINE VAPORS CAN EXPLODE.
BEFORE STARTING ENGINE, OPERATE
BLOWER 4 MINUTES AND CHECK
ENGINE COMPARTMENT FOR GASOLINE FUMES
OR LEAKS. RUN BLOWER MOTOR
BELOW CRUSING SPEED.
!
1-4
GASOLINE VAPORS CAN EXPLODE.
BEFORE STARTING ENGINE, OPERATE
BLOWER 4 MINUTES AND CHECK
ENGINE COMPARTMENT FOR GASOLINE FUMES
OR LEAKS. RUN BLOWER MOTOR
BELOW CRUSING SPEED.
WARNING
USE OF ALCOHOL ENHANCED FUEL, OR ANY FUEL
OTHER THAN GASOLINE,
CAN LEAD TO DETERIORATION OF THE FUEL
SYSTEM COMPONENTS.
CAN RESULT IN FIRE AND POSSIBLE EXPLOSION
WARNING
!
WARNING
USE OF ALCOHOL ENHANCED FUEL, OR ANY FUEL
OTHER THAN GASOLINE,
CAN LEAD TO DETERIORATION OF THE FUEL
SYSTEM COMPONENTS.
CAN RESULT IN FIRE AND POSSIBLE EXPLOSION
1-4
Safety On Board
Safety On Board
♦ Never drink and drive! As captain, you are
responsible for the safety of your passengers
and yourself. Alcohol and boating can be a
dangerous combination. DO NOT mix them.
Alcohol impairs the boat operators ability to
make conscious decisions and react to
emergency situations quickly.
♦ Never drink and drive! As captain, you are
responsible for the safety of your passengers
and yourself. Alcohol and boating can be a
dangerous combination. DO NOT mix them.
Alcohol impairs the boat operators ability to
make conscious decisions and react to
emergency situations quickly.
♦ Never overload your boat! An overloaded boat, or one with uneven
weight distribution can be difficult to steer.
♦ Never overload your boat! An overloaded boat, or one with uneven
weight distribution can be difficult to steer.
♦ Be certain there is enough fuel aboard
for your cruising needs. Include any reserve
that might be needed should you change your
plans due to weather or emergency. Practice
the “one-third rule: Use one-third of your
fuel going out, one-third to return and keep
one- third as a reserve.
♦ Be certain there is enough fuel aboard
for your cruising needs. Include any reserve
that might be needed should you change your
plans due to weather or emergency. Practice
the “one-third rule: Use one-third of your
fuel going out, one-third to return and keep
one- third as a reserve.
♦ Always check the weather before departure. Be particularly cautious
of electrical storms and high winds.
♦ Always check the weather before departure. Be particularly cautious
of electrical storms and high winds.
♦ Αlways have up-to-date charts aboard. You will need current charts
of the area you’ll be cruising to stay on proper course. Charts can
be obtained at your closet marine outlet or store or by contacting
one of three federal government agencies.
♦ Αlways have up-to-date charts aboard. You will need current charts
of the area you’ll be cruising to stay on proper course. Charts can
be obtained at your closet marine outlet or store or by contacting
one of three federal government agencies.
♦ Α lways file a float plan. Leave details of your trip with someone
responsible who will be remaining on shore. Include expected return,
plus name and phone number of a contact person in case of
emergency.
♦ Α lways file a float plan. Leave details of your trip with someone
responsible who will be remaining on shore. Include expected return,
plus name and phone number of a contact person in case of
emergency.
♦ Use care, courtesy and common sense when launching, docking or
operating your boat.
♦ Use care, courtesy and common sense when launching, docking or
operating your boat.
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1-5
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
♦ Learn and obey the “Rules of the Road”. A copy of the “Rules
of the Road” can be obtained from the U. S. Coast Guard Auxillary
or local Power Squadron.
♦ Learn and obey the “Rules of the Road”. A copy of the “Rules
of the Road” can be obtained from the U. S. Coast Guard Auxillary
or local Power Squadron.
♦ Ιn case of emergency: Know the international distress signals if you
have a VHF radio aboard. The spoken word “MAYDAY” is the
international signal of distress and is for emergency use only. Under
no circumstances should this word be used, unless there is danger
at hand.
♦ Ιn case of emergency: Know the international distress signals if you
have a VHF radio aboard. The spoken word “MAYDAY” is the
international signal of distress and is for emergency use only. Under
no circumstances should this word be used, unless there is danger
at hand.
♦ Posted speed limits, swimming areas, “no wake” zones and other
restrictions should be red-flagged. They are so noted for a reason.
Sensible boat use, plus courtesy, equals enjoyable and safe boating.
♦ Posted speed limits, swimming areas, “no wake” zones and other
restrictions should be red-flagged. They are so noted for a reason.
Sensible boat use, plus courtesy, equals enjoyable and safe boating.
♦ It is your responsibility to stay abreast of all federal, state and local
rules, as some laws or regulations may change or be different from
state to state. Contact your local boating agencies for updated
information.
♦ It is your responsibility to stay abreast of all federal, state and local
rules, as some laws or regulations may change or be different from
state to state. Contact your local boating agencies for updated
information.
♦ We can not stress safety enough! Remember, there are no brakes on
your boat, and the water current and wind velocity all affect your
ability to respond. The driver must use caution at all times to maintain
control of his vessel and especially to maintain a safe distance from
other boats and obstacles.
♦ We can not stress safety enough! Remember, there are no brakes on
your boat, and the water current and wind velocity all affect your
ability to respond. The driver must use caution at all times to maintain
control of his vessel and especially to maintain a safe distance from
other boats and obstacles.
♦ Always keep all safety gear in optimum condition. Pay special
attention to attached tags and plates indicating expiration dates on
equipment such as fire extinguishers, and personal flotation devices.
Encourage a periodic maintenance check on all safety equipment.
Contact your Regal dealer or marine professional for more
information. Again, remember that the captain is responsible for
his passengers and vessel.
♦ Always keep all safety gear in optimum condition. Pay special
attention to attached tags and plates indicating expiration dates on
equipment such as fire extinguishers, and personal flotation devices.
Encourage a periodic maintenance check on all safety equipment.
Contact your Regal dealer or marine professional for more
information. Again, remember that the captain is responsible for
his passengers and vessel.
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1-6
Safety On Board
Safety On Board
REQUIRED SAFETY EQUIPMENT
REQUIRED SAFETY EQUIPMENT
Personal Flotation Devices
Personal Flotation Devices
All personal flotation devices (PFD’s) must be Coast Guard approved,
in good working condition, and must be the correct size for the wearer.
All PFD’s must be readily accessible. This means being able to wear
them in a reasonable amount of time in case of an emergency (fire,
boat sinking, etc.). They should not be stored or locked in closed areas
Also, make sure that all coverings are removed such as plastic from any
PFD’s. Throwable devices such as a ring buoys need to be available for
immediate deployment. A PFD should be worn at all times when your
boat is operating on the water. A PFD may save your life, but it must
be worn to do so.
As minimum U. S. Coast Guard requirements all recreational
boats must carry one type I, II, III, or V PFD (wearable) for each
person aboard. See the explaination following for each type. For type
V to be counted they must be used according to the label instructions.
In addition, all boats over 16’ must carry one Type IV (throwable)
PFD.
Some states require that PFD’s be worn by children of specific ages at
all times. Check with state boating agencies for particular requirements
in your state before taking children on the water.
Remember PFD’s will not necessarily keep you from drowning, even
though they are designed to keep a person from sinking. When
purchasing PFD’s make sure it safely fits the person wearing it. It is a
good idea to test PFD’s in a lifeguarded shallow pool before venturing
on the water.
All personal flotation devices (PFD’s) must be Coast Guard approved,
in good working condition, and must be the correct size for the wearer.
All PFD’s must be readily accessible. This means being able to wear
them in a reasonable amount of time in case of an emergency (fire,
boat sinking, etc.). They should not be stored or locked in closed areas
Also, make sure that all coverings are removed such as plastic from any
PFD’s. Throwable devices such as a ring buoys need to be available for
immediate deployment. A PFD should be worn at all times when your
boat is operating on the water. A PFD may save your life, but it must
be worn to do so.
As minimum U. S. Coast Guard requirements all recreational
boats must carry one type I, II, III, or V PFD (wearable) for each
person aboard. See the explaination following for each type. For type
V to be counted they must be used according to the label instructions.
In addition, all boats over 16’ must carry one Type IV (throwable)
PFD.
Some states require that PFD’s be worn by children of specific ages at
all times. Check with state boating agencies for particular requirements
in your state before taking children on the water.
Remember PFD’s will not necessarily keep you from drowning, even
though they are designed to keep a person from sinking. When
purchasing PFD’s make sure it safely fits the person wearing it. It is a
good idea to test PFD’s in a lifeguarded shallow pool before venturing
on the water.
Refer to the USCG minimum equipment requirements at the end of
this chapter. It is meant to be a guide only. Contact state and local
agencies for additional equipment requirements. Remember as the
captain of your vessel you are responsible for its safe operation.
Refer to the USCG minimum equipment requirements at the end of
this chapter. It is meant to be a guide only. Contact state and local
agencies for additional equipment requirements. Remember as the
captain of your vessel you are responsible for its safe operation.
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1-7
CHAPTER 1
TYPE I PFD
TYPE II PDF
BUOYANT VEST
TYPE III PDF
TYPE IV PDF
1-8
CHAPTER 1
• TYPE I- Also known as an off-shore jacket,
it provides the most buoyancy. It is a PFD for
all waters and is especially useful in rough
waters where rescue may encompass
additional time. It is designed to turn most
unconscious users in the water to a face-up
position. Type I PFD is available in adult &
child sizes.
TYPE I PFD
• TYPE II- Also known as near-shore buoyant
vest, it is recommended for calm, inland water
where rescue time will be minimal. It will turn
some unconscious people face-up in the water
but not as numerous as Type I. They are
available in adult, medium child, along with
infant and small child sizes.
TYPE II PDF
BUOYANT VEST
• TYPE III- Known as a flotation aid it is
good for calm, inland water or where there is
a chance for quick rescue. It is designed so
wearers can place themselves in a face-up
position in the water. The wearer may have to
tilt their head back to avoid turning face-down
in the water.
TYPE III PDF
• TYPE IV- Intended for calm, inland water
with heavy vessel traffic, where help is
constantly present. It is designed to be thrown
into the water for someone to grab on to and
held until rescued. It should not be worn.
Type IV includes ring buoys, buoyant cushions,
and horseshoe buoys.
TYPE IV PDF
1-8
• TYPE I- Also known as an off-shore jacket,
it provides the most buoyancy. It is a PFD for
all waters and is especially useful in rough
waters where rescue may encompass
additional time. It is designed to turn most
unconscious users in the water to a face-up
position. Type I PFD is available in adult &
child sizes.
• TYPE II- Also known as near-shore buoyant
vest, it is recommended for calm, inland water
where rescue time will be minimal. It will turn
some unconscious people face-up in the water
but not as numerous as Type I. They are
available in adult, medium child, along with
infant and small child sizes.
• TYPE III- Known as a flotation aid it is
good for calm, inland water or where there is
a chance for quick rescue. It is designed so
wearers can place themselves in a face-up
position in the water. The wearer may have to
tilt their head back to avoid turning face-down
in the water.
• TYPE IV- Intended for calm, inland water
with heavy vessel traffic, where help is
constantly present. It is designed to be thrown
into the water for someone to grab on to and
held until rescued. It should not be worn.
Type IV includes ring buoys, buoyant cushions,
and horseshoe buoys.
Safety On Board
TYPE V HYBRID
• TYPE V- This is the least bulky of all
PFD’s. It contains a small amount of inherent
buoyancy, and an inflatable chamber. It is
rated even to a Type I, II, or III PFD (as noted
on the jacket label) when inflated. Hybrid
PFD’s must be worn to be acceptable.
Safety On Board
TYPE V HYBRID
• TYPE V- This is the least bulky of all
PFD’s. It contains a small amount of inherent
buoyancy, and an inflatable chamber. It is
rated even to a Type I, II, or III PFD (as noted
on the jacket label) when inflated. Hybrid
PFD’s must be worn to be acceptable.
Maintaining your PFD’s
Maintaining your PFD’s
A PFD is only useful if it is well maintained. Always be aware of PDF
age since it has a life expectancy like any other piece of equipment.
A PFD is only useful if it is well maintained. Always be aware of PDF
age since it has a life expectancy like any other piece of equipment.
√ Do a periodic operation check of all PFD’s in shallow water.
√ Do a periodic operation check of all PFD’s in shallow water.
√ Be sure to air dry all PFD’s after each use. Store in a dry, easily
accessible location.
√ Be sure to air dry all PFD’s after each use. Store in a dry, easily
accessible location.
√ Check periodically for broken zippers, frayed webbing, water soaked
kapok bags, missing straps, and sewing that has become undone.
√ Check periodically for broken zippers, frayed webbing, water soaked
kapok bags, missing straps, and sewing that has become undone.
√ Clean each PFD with mild soap and water only. Again, let dry
sufficiently before storing.
√ Clean each PFD with mild soap and water only. Again, let dry
sufficiently before storing.
√ Keep PFD’s out of grease and oil since they can deteriorate the
jacket inner and outer materials.
√ Keep PFD’s out of grease and oil since they can deteriorate the
jacket inner and outer materials.
√ Check any kapok-bagged jackets by squeezing. If you hear air
escaping the bag is defective and the PFD should be thrown away.
√ Check any kapok-bagged jackets by squeezing. If you hear air
escaping the bag is defective and the PFD should be thrown away.
√ Grab the cover with the fingers. If the cover material rips, the PFD
is rotted and should be thrown away.
√ Grab the cover with the fingers. If the cover material rips, the PFD
is rotted and should be thrown away.
√ If the kapok bag is hard the PFD should be discarded.
√ If the kapok bag is hard the PFD should be discarded.
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1-9
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
General Information
General Information
Fire extinguishers are classified by a letter and numeric symbol. The
letter references the type of fire the unit is designed to extinguish.
(For example, type B extinguishers commonly used on boats are
designed to put out flammable liquids such as grease, oil and gasoline.
The number indicates the general size of the extinguisher (minimum
extinguishing agent weight).
Fire extinguishers are classified by a letter and numeric symbol. The
letter references the type of fire the unit is designed to extinguish.
(For example, type B extinguishers commonly used on boats are
designed to put out flammable liquids such as grease, oil and gasoline.
The number indicates the general size of the extinguisher (minimum
extinguishing agent weight).
FIRE EXTINGUISHER CONTENTS
FIRE EXTINGUISHER CONTENTS
CLASS
FOAM
IN GALS.
C02
IN LBS.
DRY CHEM
IN LBS.
HALON
IN LBS.
B-I
1.25
4
2
2.5
B-II
2.5
15
10
10
CLASS
FOAM
IN GALS.
C02
IN LBS.
DRY CHEM
IN LBS.
B-I
1.25
4
2
2.5
B-II
2.5
15
10
10
MINIMUM PORTABLE FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
REQUIRED
VESSEL
LENGTH
NO FIXED
SYSTEM
LESS THAN 26’
1 B-1
26’ TO LESS THAN 40’ 2 B-1 OR 1 B-II
40’ TO 65’
3 B-1 OR 1 B-II
AND 1 B-1
1-10
WITH FIXED
SYSTEM
0
1 B-1
2 B-1
OR 1 B-II
HALON
IN LBS.
MINIMUM PORTABLE FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
REQUIRED
VESSEL
LENGTH
NO FIXED
SYSTEM
LESS THAN 26’
1 B-1
26’ TO LESS THAN 40’ 2 B-1 OR 1 B-II
40’ TO 65’
3 B-1 OR 1 B-II
AND 1 B-1
1-10
WITH FIXED
SYSTEM
0
1 B-1
2 B-1
OR 1 B-II
Safety On Board
Safety On Board
U. S. Coast Guard approved fire extinguishers are required on all Regal
boats. Besides the minimum Coast Guard requirements always check
state and local agencies for additional requirements and equipment.
Coast Guard approved extinguishers are hand-portable, either B-I or
B-II classification. U. S. Coast Guard approved hand-portable and
semi-portable extinguishers contain a metal plate that shows the
manufacturers name and extinguisher type, capacity and opearting
instructions. They have a special marine type mounting bracket which
keeps the extinguisher solidly mounted until needed. The extinguisher
needs to be mounted in a readily accessible location but one out of
being bumped by people while underway. All approved extinguishers
need to have an indication gauge.
U. S. Coast Guard approved fire extinguishers are required on all Regal
boats. Besides the minimum Coast Guard requirements always check
state and local agencies for additional requirements and equipment.
Coast Guard approved extinguishers are hand-portable, either B-I or
B-II classification. U. S. Coast Guard approved hand-portable and
semi-portable extinguishers contain a metal plate that shows the
manufacturers name and extinguisher type, capacity and opearting
instructions. They have a special marine type mounting bracket which
keeps the extinguisher solidly mounted until needed. The extinguisher
needs to be mounted in a readily accessible location but one out of
being bumped by people while underway. All approved extinguishers
need to have an indication gauge.
USCG- Approved Fire Extinguisher Types & Features
USCG- Approved Fire Extinguisher Types & Features
The dry chemical agent is widely used
because of its convenience and low cost. The
extinguisher canister is filled with a white dry
chemical power along with a pressurized gas. It
is a good idea to shake this type periodically
because they tend to “pack” on the canister bottom.
The dry chemical agent is widely used
because of its convenience and low cost. The
extinguisher canister is filled with a white dry
chemical power along with a pressurized gas. It
is a good idea to shake this type periodically
because they tend to “pack” on the canister bottom.
The foam type uses a chemical foaming
agent plus water and is best when used for fires
involving flammable liquids- solvents, gasoline,oil,
grease and various paints. It will work on fires
involving rubber, plastics, cloth wood, and paper.
It leaves a messy residue. Not for electric fires.
The foam type uses a chemical foaming
agent plus water and is best when used for fires
involving flammable liquids- solvents, gasoline,oil,
grease and various paints. It will work on fires
involving rubber, plastics, cloth wood, and paper.
It leaves a messy residue. Not for electric fires.
The carbon dioxide unit uses CO2 gas under
high pressure, with a funnel discharge hoseusually
swivel mounted. This extinguisher leaves no
residue and does not cause interior engine harm.
To ensure workability, weigh the unit annually. A
10% max. wt. variance is allowed.
1-11
The carbon dioxide unit uses CO2 gas under
high pressure, with a funnel discharge hoseusually
swivel mounted. This extinguisher leaves no
residue and does not cause interior engine harm.
To ensure workability, weigh the unit annually. A
10% max. wt. variance is allowed.
1-11
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
Another type of liquified gas used today is Halon.This gas is
colorless and odorless, heavier than air and sinks to the lower bilge to
extinguish fires. Since the year 2000 ingredients for Halon has changed
to a more environmental friendly formula. Halon is used in portablehand units along with making up the majority of boat automatic fire
extinguishing systems. The canister needs to be weighed once a year.
Halon units must feature a dash mount indicator.
Refer to the information regarding fire prevention in this manual.
Another type of liquified gas used today is Halon.This gas is
colorless and odorless, heavier than air and sinks to the lower bilge to
extinguish fires. Since the year 2000 ingredients for Halon has changed
to a more environmental friendly formula. Halon is used in portablehand units along with making up the majority of boat automatic fire
extinguishing systems. The canister needs to be weighed once a year.
Halon units must feature a dash mount indicator.
Refer to the information regarding fire prevention in this manual.
VISUAL DISTRESS SIGNALS
VISUAL DISTRESS SIGNALS
All vessels used on coastal waters, any of the Great Lakes, territorial
seas, and those waters connected directly to them , up to point where
a body of water is less than two miles wide, must have Coast Guard
approved visual distress signals.
All vessels used on coastal waters, any of the Great Lakes, territorial
seas, and those waters connected directly to them , up to point where
a body of water is less than two miles wide, must have Coast Guard
approved visual distress signals.
Pyrotechnic Devices
Pyrotechnic Devices
Pyrotechnic visual distress signals must be Coast Guard approved, be
ready for service and must be readily accessible. They all display a
marking which is the service life, which must not have expired. A
minimum of 3 devices are required for the day and 3 devices for night.
Some devices meet both day and night requirements. Pyrotechnic
devices should be stored in a cool, dry location. Most of these devices
can be purchased in an highly visible (orange) watertight container.
Types of Coast Guard approved pyrotechnic distress signals and
associated devices are:
Pyrotechnic visual distress signals must be Coast Guard approved, be
ready for service and must be readily accessible. They all display a
marking which is the service life, which must not have expired. A
minimum of 3 devices are required for the day and 3 devices for night.
Some devices meet both day and night requirements. Pyrotechnic
devices should be stored in a cool, dry location. Most of these devices
can be purchased in an highly visible (orange) watertight container.
Types of Coast Guard approved pyrotechnic distress signals and
associated devices are:
Pyrotechnic red flares, hand- held or aerial type.
Pyrotechnic red flares, hand- held or aerial type.
Pyrotechnic orange smoke, hand-held or floating type.
Pyrotechnic orange smoke, hand-held or floating type.
Launchers for parachute flares or aerial red meteors.
Launchers for parachute flares or aerial red meteors.
1-12
1-12
Safety On Board
Safety On Board
All in all, each distress signal has certain advantages and disadvantages.
There is no distress signal that is best under all situations. Pyrotechnics
are recognized world-wide as superior distress signals. A downfall is
they emit a very hot flame that can cause burns and or ignite flammable
materials. Pistol launched and hand-held parachute flares operate
consistant with firearms and therefore must be carefully handled. Check
with local and state regulations since since some of these device are
considered firearms and are prohibited.
All in all, each distress signal has certain advantages and disadvantages.
There is no distress signal that is best under all situations. Pyrotechnics
are recognized world-wide as superior distress signals. A downfall is
they emit a very hot flame that can cause burns and or ignite flammable
materials. Pistol launched and hand-held parachute flares operate
consistant with firearms and therefore must be carefully handled. Check
with local and state regulations since since some of these device are
considered firearms and are prohibited.
Non-Pyrotechnic Devices
Non-Pyrotechnic Devices
Non-pyrotechnic devices must all be in serviceable condition, readily
accessible, and must be certified by the manufacturer to comply with
Coast Guard standards. They include:
Non-pyrotechnic devices must all be in serviceable condition, readily
accessible, and must be certified by the manufacturer to comply with
Coast Guard standards. They include:
Orange distress flag.
Orange distress flag.
Electric distress flag.
Electric distress flag.
The distress flag is for day use only. It must be 3 x 3 or larger with a
black square and ball on an orange background. It can be spotted when
attached to a boat hook, long fishing rod, or paddle with the person
waving the flag back and forth overhead.
The electric distress flag is for night use only flashing the international
SOS distress signal (..._ _ _ ...).
Under Inland Navigation Rules, a high intensity white light that flashes
at regular intervals from 50-70 times per minute is considered a distress
signal.
Remember that regulations prohibit the display of visual distress signals
on the water under any circumstances except when assistance is
required to prevent immediate or potential danger to passengers on a
vessel.
The distress flag is for day use only. It must be 3 x 3 or larger with a
black square and ball on an orange background. It can be spotted when
attached to a boat hook, long fishing rod, or paddle with the person
waving the flag back and forth overhead.
The electric distress flag is for night use only flashing the international
SOS distress signal (..._ _ _ ...).
Under Inland Navigation Rules, a high intensity white light that flashes
at regular intervals from 50-70 times per minute is considered a distress
signal.
Remember that regulations prohibit the display of visual distress signals
on the water under any circumstances except when assistance is
required to prevent immediate or potential danger to passengers on a
vessel.
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1-13
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
INTERNATIONAL DISTRESS SIGNALS
POSITION
INDICATING
RADIO BEACON
1-14
DYE MARKER
(ANY COLOR)
INTERNATIONAL DISTRESS SIGNALS
POSITION
INDICATING
RADIO BEACON
HAND-HELD
FLARE
1-14
DYE MARKER
(ANY COLOR)
HAND-HELD
FLARE
Safety On Board
Safety On Board
SOUND PRODUCING DEVICES
SOUND PRODUCING DEVICES
According to both Inland and International Rules,
all boats must carry some way of producing an
efficient sound signal. If your vessel is 12 meters
(39’ 4”) or longer, a power whistle, power horn
or bell must be carried. The bell must be 7 7/8”
in diameter.
Boats less than 12 meters a horn or whistle is
recommended to signal intentions or signal
position. The sound signal made in all cases must be capable of a four
or six second blast audible for one half mile. See the section discussing
bridge and whistle signals for more information.
According to both Inland and International Rules,
all boats must carry some way of producing an
efficient sound signal. If your vessel is 12 meters
(39’ 4”) or longer, a power whistle, power horn
or bell must be carried. The bell must be 7 7/8”
in diameter.
Boats less than 12 meters a horn or whistle is
recommended to signal intentions or signal
position. The sound signal made in all cases must be capable of a four
or six second blast audible for one half mile. See the section discussing
bridge and whistle signals for more information.
RADIO COMMUNICATIONS
RADIO COMMUNICATIONS
VHF radios are used for distress and ship to shore and ship to ship
communications today. Learn the specialized messages such as
Mayday, Mayday, Mayday is only used when life or vessel is in
imminent danger.
VHF radios are used for distress and ship to shore and ship to ship
communications today. Learn the specialized messages such as
Mayday, Mayday, Mayday is only used when life or vessel is in
imminent danger.
NAVIGATION LIGHTS
NAVIGATION LIGHTS
The U. S. Coast Guard requires recreational boats operating at night to
display navigation lights between sunset and sunrise. Navigation lights
help avoid collisions by improving the night visibility of vessels. Red
and green directional lights, white stern lights, white masthead lights
and white all-around lights must be displayed in specified positions,
depending on boat size, and mode of operation. The configuration of
visible lights tells and operator the size, direction of travel and means
of propulsion (sail, power, rowing or at anchor) of another vessel.
Larger boats are required to carry larger, brighter lights that are visible
over longer distances. See the light requirement chart for pleasure craft.
The U. S. Coast Guard requires recreational boats operating at night to
display navigation lights between sunset and sunrise. Navigation lights
help avoid collisions by improving the night visibility of vessels. Red
and green directional lights, white stern lights, white masthead lights
and white all-around lights must be displayed in specified positions,
depending on boat size, and mode of operation. The configuration of
visible lights tells and operator the size, direction of travel and means
of propulsion (sail, power, rowing or at anchor) of another vessel.
Larger boats are required to carry larger, brighter lights that are visible
over longer distances. See the light requirement chart for pleasure craft.
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1-15
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
NAVIGATION LIGHT RULES
NAVIGATION LIGHT RULES
1-16
1-16
Safety On Board
Safety On Board
MARINE SANITATION DEVICES
MARINE SANITATION DEVICES
Recreational vessels under 65’ with installed toilet facilities must have
an operable marine sanitation device (MSD) on board. Vessels 65’ and
under may use Type I, II, or III MSD. All installed MSD’s must be U.S.
Coast Guard certified. Most of the devices are labeled to show
conformity to the regulations.
Recreational vessels under 65’ with installed toilet facilities must have
an operable marine sanitation device (MSD) on board. Vessels 65’ and
under may use Type I, II, or III MSD. All installed MSD’s must be U.S.
Coast Guard certified. Most of the devices are labeled to show
conformity to the regulations.
POLLUTION REGULATIONS
POLLUTION REGULATIONS
The Federal Water Pollution Control Act prohibits the discharge of oil
or hazardous substances which may be harmful into U. S. navigable
waters. Vessels 26’ and over must display a placard at least 5” x 8”, made
of durable material, fixed in conspicuous spot in the machinery space,
stating the following:
The Federal Water Pollution Control Act prohibits the discharge of oil
or hazardous substances which may be harmful into U. S. navigable
waters. Vessels 26’ and over must display a placard at least 5” x 8”, made
of durable material, fixed in conspicuous spot in the machinery space,
stating the following:
NOTICE
NOTICE
DISCHARGE OF OIL PROHIBITED
DISCHARGE OF OIL PROHIBITED
THE FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ACT
PROHIBITS THE DISCHARGE OF OIL OR OILY WASTE
INTO OR UPON THE NAVIGABLE WATERS AND
CONTIGUOUS ZONE OF THE UNITED STATES IF
SUCH DISCHARGE CAUSES A FILM OR SHEEN
UPON, OR DISCOLORATION OF THE SURFACE OF
THE WATER, OR CAUSES A SLUDGE OR EMULSION
BENEATH THE SURFACE OF THE WATER.
THE FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ACT
PROHIBITS THE DISCHARGE OF OIL OR OILY WASTE
INTO OR UPON THE NAVIGABLE WATERS AND
CONTIGUOUS ZONE OF THE UNITED STATES IF
SUCH DISCHARGE CAUSES A FILM OR SHEEN
UPON, OR DISCOLORATION OF THE SURFACE OF
THE WATER, OR CAUSES A SLUDGE OR EMULSION
BENEATH THE SURFACE OF THE WATER.
VIOLATORS ARE SUBJECT TO
A PENALTY OF $5,000
VIOLATORS ARE SUBJECT TO
A PENALTY OF $5,000
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CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
You must immediately notify the U. S. Coast Guard if your vessel
discharges oil or hazardous substances in the water. Call toll free 800424-8802. Report the following information: location, source, size,
color, substances and time observed.
You must immediately notify the U. S. Coast Guard if your vessel
discharges oil or hazardous substances in the water. Call toll free 800424-8802. Report the following information: location, source, size,
color, substances and time observed.
Garbage
Garbage
The Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships places limitations on the
discharge of garbage from vessels. It is illegal to dump plastic trash
anywhere in the ocean or navigable waters of the United States. Also,
it is illegal to discharge garbage in the navigable waters of the United
States, including the Great Lakes. The discharge of other types of
garbage is allowed outside certain specified distances from shore as
determined by the nature of that garbage.
The Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships places limitations on the
discharge of garbage from vessels. It is illegal to dump plastic trash
anywhere in the ocean or navigable waters of the United States. Also,
it is illegal to discharge garbage in the navigable waters of the United
States, including the Great Lakes. The discharge of other types of
garbage is allowed outside certain specified distances from shore as
determined by the nature of that garbage.
Garbage Type
Discharge
Garbage Type
Discharge
Plastics- includes synthetic ropes,
fishing nets, and plastic bags
Prohibited in all areas
Plastics- includes synthetic ropes,
fishing nets, and plastic bags
Prohibited in all areas
Floating dunnage, lining and
packing materials
Prohibited less than 25 miles
from nearest land
Floating dunnage, lining and
packing materials
Prohibited less than 25 miles
from nearest land
Food, waste, paper bags, rags,
glass, metal, bottles, crockery
Prohibited less than 12 miles
from nearest land
Food, waste, paper bags, rags,
glass, metal, bottles, crockery
Prohibited less than 12 miles
from nearest land
Comminuted or ground food
waste, paper, rags, glass, etc
Prohibited less than 3 miles
from the nearest land
Comminuted or ground food
waste, paper, rags, glass, etc
Prohibited less than 3 miles
from the nearest land
United States vessels of 26 feet or longer must display in a prominent
location, a durable placard at least 4” x 9” notifying crew and passengers
of discharge restrictions.
United States vessels of 26 feet or longer must display in a prominent
location, a durable placard at least 4” x 9” notifying crew and passengers
of discharge restrictions.
1-18
1-18
Safety On Board
1-19
Safety On Board
1-19
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
Communications
Communications
It is a good idea to carry communication gear
such as a VHF-FM and/or HF transceivers set
EPIRB
up for your operating area. Also, cell phones
are useful in many coastal areas. Be sure to
carry extra batteries. Also, mainly for offshore
vessels, EPIRBs are designed to quickly and
accurately alert rescue forces, indicate an
accurate distress position, and guide units to
the distress scene.These devices operate from
satellite signals sent to a ground station where the signal is downloaded.
The downside is that they are relatively expensive but they are reliable
even when other communications have been exhausted.
It is a good idea to carry communication gear
such as a VHF-FM and/or HF transceivers set
EPIRB
up for your operating area. Also, cell phones
are useful in many coastal areas. Be sure to
carry extra batteries. Also, mainly for offshore
vessels, EPIRBs are designed to quickly and
accurately alert rescue forces, indicate an
accurate distress position, and guide units to
the distress scene.These devices operate from
satellite signals sent to a ground station where the signal is downloaded.
The downside is that they are relatively expensive but they are reliable
even when other communications have been exhausted.
Life Rafts
Life Rafts
Inflatable life rafts are
recommended for oceangoing and
operating a vessel in a large body
of water like the Great Lakes.
They provide a shelter for
extended periods. If used, make
sure it is large enough for all
aboard and contains the proper
emergency equipment pack. Also, get the unit professionally serviced.
Make sure the life raft is Coast Guard approved.
Inflatable life rafts are
recommended for oceangoing and
operating a vessel in a large body
of water like the Great Lakes.
They provide a shelter for
extended periods. If used, make
sure it is large enough for all
aboard and contains the proper
emergency equipment pack. Also, get the unit professionally serviced.
Make sure the life raft is Coast Guard approved.
Remember the U. S. Coast Guard requirements are minimal
standards. They are an excellent starting point. Check with local and
state boating agencies for further required safety equipment. You are
best prepared for emergencies by a well equipped vessel. Don’t skimp
when purchasing equipment for your boat.!
Remember the U. S. Coast Guard requirements are minimal
standards. They are an excellent starting point. Check with local and
state boating agencies for further required safety equipment. You are
best prepared for emergencies by a well equipped vessel. Don’t skimp
when purchasing equipment for your boat.!
1-20
1-20
Safety On Board
Safety On Board
EXHAUST & CARBON
MONOXIDE
EXHAUST & CARBON
MONOXIDE
Carbon monoxide(CO) in exhaust can be hazardous. It is important
for you and your passengers to be aware of the potential safety hazard
created by exhaust gases. Familiarize yourself with the symptoms of
carbon monoxide poisoning.
For safety sake avoid the following:
Carbon monoxide(CO) in exhaust can be hazardous. It is important
for you and your passengers to be aware of the potential safety hazard
created by exhaust gases. Familiarize yourself with the symptoms of
carbon monoxide poisoning.
For safety sake avoid the following:
1. Do not allow the boat to remain stationary with the engine
idling for an extended period of time.
2. Do not disable the carbon monoxide alarms that come with
your Regal boat. Test the unit in accordance with the alarm
manufacturers instructions.
1. Do not allow the boat to remain stationary with the engine
idling for an extended period of time.
2. Do not disable the carbon monoxide alarms that come with
your Regal boat. Test the unit in accordance with the alarm
manufacturers instructions.
3. Do not operate the engine for extended periods of time
while in a confined area or where exhaust outlets face a wall or bulkhead.
3. Do not operate the engine for extended periods of time
while in a confined area or where exhaust outlets face a wall or bulkhead.
4. Do not operate the engine for an extended period of time
with the canvasin the upright and installed position.
4. Do not operate the engine for an extended period of time
with the canvasin the upright and installed position.
5. Have the engine exhaust system inspected when the boat is
in for service.
5. Have the engine exhaust system inspected when the boat is
in for service.
6. Persons sleeping can easily be overcome by carbon monoxide
without realizing it. Do not sleep on board while the engine is running.
6. Persons sleeping can easily be overcome by carbon monoxide
without realizing it. Do not sleep on board while the engine is running.
!
WARNING
!
AVOID SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH
FROM CO POISONING!
DO NOT OPERATE THE BOAT WITH PEOPLE
HOLDING ON TO THE SWIM PLATFORM
WHILE IN THE WATER.
WARNING
AVOID SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH
FROM CO POISONING!
DO NOT OPERATE THE BOAT WITH PEOPLE
HOLDING ON TO THE SWIM PLATFORM
WHILE IN THE WATER.
1-21
1-21
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
Blockage of exhaust outlets can cause carbon
monoxide to accumulate in the cabin and
cockpit area even when the hatches, windows,
portholes and doors are open.
Blockage of exhaust outlets can cause carbon
monoxide to accumulate in the cabin and
cockpit area even when the hatches, windows,
portholes and doors are open.
Exhaust from another vessel alongside your
boat, while docked or anchored, can emit
poisonous CO gas inside the cabin and
cockpit areas of your boat.
Exhaust from another vessel alongside your
boat, while docked or anchored, can emit
poisonous CO gas inside the cabin and
cockpit areas of your boat.
The “station wagon effect” or backdrafting
can cause CO gas to accumulate inside the
cabin, cockpit or bridge areas when the boat
is under-way, using protective weather
coverings, high bow angle, improper or heavy
loading, slow speeds, or when boat is at rest.
The “station wagon effect” or backdrafting
can cause CO gas to accumulate inside the
cabin, cockpit or bridge areas when the boat
is under-way, using protective weather
coverings, high bow angle, improper or heavy
loading, slow speeds, or when boat is at rest.
Typical Carbon Monoxide Label At Helm
Typical Carbon Monoxide Label At Helm
Typical Carbon Monoxide Label At Transom
Typical Carbon Monoxide Label At Transom
1-22
1-22
Safety On Board
Safety On Board
Typical Carbon Monoxide Label In Cabin Or Head
Typical Carbon Monoxide Label In Cabin Or Head
Symptoms of excessive exposure to carbon monoxide are:
Symptoms of excessive exposure to carbon monoxide are:
• Dizziness
• Drowsiness
• Nausea
• Headache
• Ringing in the ears
• Throbbing temples
• Dizziness
• Drowsiness
• Nausea
• Headache
• Ringing in the ears
• Throbbing temples
• Watering, itchy eyes
• Flushed appearance
• Inattentiveness
• Incoherence
• Fatigue or vomiting
• Convulsions
Carbon monoxide accumulation requires immediate attention!
Thoroughly ventilate cabin and cockpit areas. Determine the probable
source of the carbon monoxide and correct the condition immediately.
Regal has installed CO detectors on your boat. Have these detectors
professionally calibrated at regular intervals.
To help prevent carbon monoxide
accumulation, ventilate your cabin and
cockpit while underway. Open a
forward hatch, porthole or window to
allow air to travel through the boat’s
interior.
DESIRED AIR FLOW
THROUGH BOAT
• Watering, itchy eyes
• Flushed appearance
• Inattentiveness
• Incoherence
• Fatigue or vomiting
• Convulsions
Carbon monoxide accumulation requires immediate attention!
Thoroughly ventilate cabin and cockpit areas. Determine the probable
source of the carbon monoxide and correct the condition immediately.
Regal has installed CO detectors on your boat. Have these detectors
professionally calibrated at regular intervals.
To help prevent carbon monoxide
accumulation, ventilate your cabin and
cockpit while underway. Open a
forward hatch, porthole or window to
allow air to travel through the boat’s
interior.
DESIRED AIR FLOW
THROUGH BOAT
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1-23
CHAPTER 1
!
CHAPTER 1
WARNING
!
EXHAUST FUMES CAN KILL!
INSPECT THE EXHAUST SYSTEM
COMPONENTS BEFORE EACH OUTING.
WARNING
EXHAUST FUMES CAN KILL!
INSPECT THE EXHAUST SYSTEM
COMPONENTS BEFORE EACH OUTING.
Each Outing
Each Outing
Make sure all exhaust clamps are in place and secure.
Make sure all exhaust clamps are in place and secure.
Look for exhaust leaking from the exhaust system components,
indicated by rust and or black streaking, water leaks, or corroded
or cracked fittings.
Look for exhaust leaking from the exhaust system components,
indicated by rust and or black streaking, water leaks, or corroded
or cracked fittings.
Inspect all rubber exhaust hoses for burned or cracked areas.
All rubber hoses should feel soft and and be free of kinks.
Inspect all rubber exhaust hoses for burned or cracked areas.
All rubber hoses should feel soft and and be free of kinks.
Visually verify that water exits at the engine exhaust outlet.
Visually verify that water exits at the engine exhaust outlet.
Keep an ear tuned for any change in exhaust sound that could
indicate an exhaust component malfunction.
Keep an ear tuned for any change in exhaust sound that could
indicate an exhaust component malfunction.
At Least Annually
At Least Annually
Replace exhaust hoses, mufflers, or fasteners if any evidence
of cracking, charring or deterioration is found.
Replace exhaust hoses, mufflers, or fasteners if any evidence
of cracking, charring or deterioration is found.
Replace the engine water pump impeller along with the plate
and housing if necessary. This will help prevent cooling
system and in turn exhaust system overheating.
Replace the engine water pump impeller along with the plate
and housing if necessary. This will help prevent cooling
system and in turn exhaust system overheating.
Inspect each of the metallic exhaust components for cracking,
rusting, leaking or looseness. Pay detailed atttention to the
exhaust manifold, cylinder head, water injection elbows.
Inspect each of the metallic exhaust components for cracking,
rusting, leaking or looseness. Pay detailed atttention to the
exhaust manifold, cylinder head, water injection elbows.
1-24
1-24
Safety On Board
Safety On Board
BOATING UNDER THE INFLUENCE
BOATING UNDER THE INFLUENCE
!
WARNING
!
WARNING
FEDERAL LAWS PROHIBIT OPERATING A VESSEL
UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ALCOHOL OR DRUGS.
THESE LAWS ARE VIGOROUSLY ENFORCED
BY ALL ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES.
FEDERAL LAWS PROHIBIT OPERATING A VESSEL
UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ALCOHOL OR DRUGS.
THESE LAWS ARE VIGOROUSLY ENFORCED
BY ALL ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES.
Operating a vessel while intoxicated became a specific federal offense
effective in 1988. The ruling set federal standards for determining when
an individual is intoxicated. If the blood alcohol content (BAC) is .10%
(.08 in some states) or higher for operators of recreational vessels being
used only for pleasure are subject to a civil penalty up to $1,000 or
criminal penalty up to $5,000, one year imprisonment or both. In some
states the fines and imprisonment may increase significantly.
The effects of alcohol and drugs account for the highest single cause
of marine accidents and deaths. Most deaths in boating accidents occur
when someone falls into the water. Balance is one of the first things
you lose when drinking alcohol or under the influence of drugs. The
problem arises out of not knowing your balance is restricted.
Overall vision is reduced by alcohol especially at night, along
with double or blurred vision. Peripheral vision is lessened which
restricts seeing vessels or objects on the side. Also, color awareness
decreases especially with red and green which happen to be the colors
of boat navigation lights, buoys, and channel markers.
Alcohol will greatly increase your heat loss so it increases the effects
of hypothermia. Finally, your ability to make correct judgements in
emergency situations is greatly reduced. Alcohol takes away the brains
ability to process information quickly and delays a persons reaction
time. Don’t drink and drive!
Operating a vessel while intoxicated became a specific federal offense
effective in 1988. The ruling set federal standards for determining when
an individual is intoxicated. If the blood alcohol content (BAC) is .10%
(.08 in some states) or higher for operators of recreational vessels being
used only for pleasure are subject to a civil penalty up to $1,000 or
criminal penalty up to $5,000, one year imprisonment or both. In some
states the fines and imprisonment may increase significantly.
The effects of alcohol and drugs account for the highest single cause
of marine accidents and deaths. Most deaths in boating accidents occur
when someone falls into the water. Balance is one of the first things
you lose when drinking alcohol or under the influence of drugs. The
problem arises out of not knowing your balance is restricted.
Overall vision is reduced by alcohol especially at night, along
with double or blurred vision. Peripheral vision is lessened which
restricts seeing vessels or objects on the side. Also, color awareness
decreases especially with red and green which happen to be the colors
of boat navigation lights, buoys, and channel markers.
Alcohol will greatly increase your heat loss so it increases the effects
of hypothermia. Finally, your ability to make correct judgements in
emergency situations is greatly reduced. Alcohol takes away the brains
ability to process information quickly and delays a persons reaction
time. Don’t drink and drive!
1-25
1-25
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
Alcohol Myths And Facts
Alcohol Myths And Facts
Myth: Beer is less intoxicating than other alcoholic beverages.
Fact: One 12 oz. can of beer has about the same amount of alcohol as
a 5oz. glass of wine or a shot of liquor.
Myth: Beer is less intoxicating than other alcoholic beverages.
Fact: One 12 oz. can of beer has about the same amount of alcohol as
a 5oz. glass of wine or a shot of liquor.
Myth: Black coffee, fresh air, and a shower will sober the effects of
alcohol.
Fact: After consuming alcohol time is the only thing that will sober
you up. Our bodies average burning 1 oz. of alcohol every hour. If a
person is drunk, it will take a person seven or more hours to sober up.
Myth: Black coffee, fresh air, and a shower will sober the effects of
alcohol.
Fact: After consuming alcohol time is the only thing that will sober
you up. Our bodies average burning 1 oz. of alcohol every hour. If a
person is drunk, it will take a person seven or more hours to sober up.
Myth: Telling if a person is too drunk to operate a vessel is easy.
Fact: Many experienced drinkers have learned to compensate for the
visual effects of alcohol and can disguise their drunk condition.
Myth: Telling if a person is too drunk to operate a vessel is easy.
Fact: Many experienced drinkers have learned to compensate for the
visual effects of alcohol and can disguise their drunk condition.
Myth: You can judge if you are fit to operate a boat.
Fact: Judgement is one of the first elements you lose when drinking.
Myth: You can judge if you are fit to operate a boat.
Fact: Judgement is one of the first elements you lose when drinking.
BLOOD ALCOHOL CONTENT CHART
Body Weight In
Pounds
100
BLOOD ALCOHOL CONTENT CHART
Body Weight In
Pounds
Number of Drinks In A 2 Hour Period
(12 oz. beer=5 oz. wine=1 oz. 80 proof liquor)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
100
(12 oz. beer=5 oz. wine=1 oz. 80 proof liquor)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
120
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
120
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
140
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
140
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
160
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
160
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
180
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
180
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
200
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
200
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
220
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
220
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
240
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
240
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
BAC to .05%
BAC .05% to .10%
Be Careful- Loss of Judgement & Coordination
Abilities Impaired- Accident Chance Increased
BAC to .05%
BAC .05% to .10%
Do Not Operate A Boat- High Accident Risk
BAX. Over 10%
1-26
Number of Drinks In A 2 Hour Period
Be Careful- Loss of Judgement & Coordination
Abilities Impaired- Accident Chance Increased
Do Not Operate A Boat- High Accident Risk
BAX. Over 10%
1-26
Safety On Board
BOATING ACCIDENTS
Safety On Board
BOATING ACCIDENTS
The following is a list of common causes of
boating accidents. Be aware of them and take the
necessary steps to ensure that yourself and crew
are educated and prepared to act in an emergency.
The following is a list of common causes of
boating accidents. Be aware of them and take the
necessary steps to ensure that yourself and crew
are educated and prepared to act in an emergency.
♦ Mixing boating and alcohol. Remember the
skipper is responsible for his boat and crew.
♦ Mixing boating and alcohol. Remember the
skipper is responsible for his boat and crew.
♦ Trying to reach the bow by the deck walk-around while the boat is
moving too fast.
♦ Trying to reach the bow by the deck walk-around while the boat is
moving too fast.
♦ Someone sitting on the bow, deck, or swim platform while underway.
♦ Someone sitting on the bow, deck, or swim platform while underway.
♦ Choosing a boating outing day with inclement weather, especially
with high winds and thunderstorms in the forecast or staying out when
bad weather is approaching..
♦ Choosing a boating outing day with inclement weather, especially
with high winds and thunderstorms in the forecast or staying out when
bad weather is approaching..
♦ Disembarking without checking all fluids or systems,and especially
fuel system componets.
♦ Disembarking without checking all fluids or systems,and especially
fuel system componets.
♦ Not monitoring the boating traffic or possible obstructions around
you.
♦ Not monitoring the boating traffic or possible obstructions around
you.
♦ Emergency communications equipment, signaling devices, and
navigation lights not working.
♦ Emergency communications equipment, signaling devices, and
navigation lights not working.
♦ Improper boat handling especially high speed turns in rough water.
Improper trim.
♦ Improper boat handling especially high speed turns in rough water.
Improper trim.
♦ Being too far from shore with inadequate fuel supply or navigational
aids..
♦ Being too far from shore with inadequate fuel supply or navigational
aids..
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1-27
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
♦ Passengers, especially children that are not wearing the proper life
saving devices.
♦ Passengers, especially children that are not wearing the proper life
saving devices.
♦ Skipper or passengers not seated in the boat.
♦ Skipper or passengers not seated in the boat.
♦ Running a craft that is mechanically marginal.
♦ Running a craft that is mechanically marginal.
Reporting Boating Accidents
Reporting Boating Accidents
According to the Federal Boat Safety Act of 1971 involving collision,
accident or other casualty, the operator must make a formal report
within 48 hours to the nearest state boating authority when the incident
involves:
According to the Federal Boat Safety Act of 1971 involving collision,
accident or other casualty, the operator must make a formal report
within 48 hours to the nearest state boating authority when the incident
involves:
1. Death
2. Injury requiring treatment other than first aid
3. The disappearance of someone from a boat under death or injury
circumstances.
1. Death
2. Injury requiring treatment other than first aid
3. The disappearance of someone from a boat under death or injury
circumstances.
A formal report must be made within 10 days for accidents involving
more than $500 damage or complete loss of vessel.
For information regarding accident reporting, plaease call the Boating
Safety Hotline at 800-368-5647.
A formal report must be made within 10 days for accidents involving
more than $500 damage or complete loss of vessel.
For information regarding accident reporting, plaease call the Boating
Safety Hotline at 800-368-5647.
Rendering Assistance
Rendering Assistance
The operator of a vessel is obligated by law to provide assistance that
can be provided safely to any individuals in dangerous situation on the
waterways. The operator is subject to fine and or imprisonment for
failure to do so. Move cautiously and think before acting.
The operator of a vessel is obligated by law to provide assistance that
can be provided safely to any individuals in dangerous situation on the
waterways. The operator is subject to fine and or imprisonment for
failure to do so. Move cautiously and think before acting.
!
DANGER
AVOID BODILY INJURY OR DEATH!
STAY SEATED IN THE COCKPIT
WHILE THE BOAT IS RUNNING TO AVOID FALLING.
1-28
!
DANGER
AVOID BODILY INJURY OR DEATH!
STAY SEATED IN THE COCKPIT
WHILE THE BOAT IS RUNNING TO AVOID FALLING.
1-28
Safety On Board
Safety On Board
WATER SPORTS
WATER SPORTS
Besides learning the safety precautions for safe boating, as well as
understanding and knowing required rules and regulations, you are
obligated to be particularly careful around other water sportsman, such
as scuba divers, water skiers, wakeboarders, and fisherman.
Besides learning the safety precautions for safe boating, as well as
understanding and knowing required rules and regulations, you are
obligated to be particularly careful around other water sportsman, such
as scuba divers, water skiers, wakeboarders, and fisherman.
Skin & Scuba Divers
Skin & Scuba Divers
Whenever you see a “Diver Down” flag, maintain
a distance of at least 100 feet on inland waters. In
bays and open waters stay 300 feet away. The flag
indicates a diver in the water. If a diver is operating
from your boat, be certain to use this flag and post
a lookout on board for a divers air bubbles.
Sometimes divers stray from the flag area.
Water Skiers & Wakeboarders
Whenever you see a “Diver Down” flag, maintain
a distance of at least 100 feet on inland waters. In
bays and open waters stay 300 feet away. The flag
indicates a diver in the water. If a diver is operating
from your boat, be certain to use this flag and post
a lookout on board for a divers air bubbles.
Sometimes divers stray from the flag area.
Water Skiers & Wakeboarders
For information on water skiing and how to get
started, we recommend you contact the American
Water Ski Association, P. O. Box 191, Winter
Haven, Florida 33880. They offer pamphets and
instructional materials.
For wakeboarding infor mation there are
numerous training schools throughout the country
along with instructional videos and the internet.
For information on water skiing and how to get
started, we recommend you contact the American
Water Ski Association, P. O. Box 191, Winter
Haven, Florida 33880. They offer pamphets and
instructional materials.
For wakeboarding infor mation there are
numerous training schools throughout the country
along with instructional videos and the internet.
1-29
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CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
General safety procedures for towing skiers and wakeboarders include
the following:
General safety procedures for towing skiers and wakeboarders include
the following:
♦ Know your hand signals and make sure all your passengers know
them. See the illustration.
♦ Know your hand signals and make sure all your passengers know
them. See the illustration.
♦ Do not allow non-swimmers to ski or wakeboard. You’re asking for
trouble!
♦ Do not allow non-swimmers to ski or wakeboard. You’re asking for
trouble!
♦ Always have an observer onboard whose sole job is to watch the
skier/wakeboarder and communicate with the driver.
♦ Always have an observer onboard whose sole job is to watch the
skier/wakeboarder and communicate with the driver.
♦ If you plan to do alot of sking/wakeboarding, it is advisable to have
a ski pylon and driver’s rear view mirror installed.
♦ If you plan to do alot of sking/wakeboarding, it is advisable to have
a ski pylon and driver’s rear view mirror installed.
♦ Acquaint yourself with the ski site before skiing/wakeboarding.
♦ Acquaint yourself with the ski site before skiing/wakeboarding.
♦ Follow the speed limits and all posted signs- i.e. no wake, etc.
♦ Follow the speed limits and all posted signs- i.e. no wake, etc.
♦ Keep the boat away from swimmers or other people in the water.
♦ Keep the boat away from swimmers or other people in the water.
♦ Avoid running near the shoreline or in heavily congested areas with
skier/wakeboarder in tow.
♦ Avoid running near the shoreline or in heavily congested areas with
skier/wakeboarder in tow.
♦ Do not allow skier/wakeboarder to spray fisherman or other parties.
♦ Do not allow skier/wakeboarder to spray fisherman or other parties.
♦ Keep the engine speed steady while towing a skier/wakeboarder.
♦ Keep the engine speed steady while towing a skier/wakeboarder.
♦ Make wide turns with skier/wakeboarder in tow.
♦ Make wide turns with skier/wakeboarder in tow.
♦ Instruct skier/wakeboarder in case of a fall to raise his ski in the air
to ensure his visibility.
♦ Instruct skier/wakeboarder in case of a fall to raise his ski in the air
to ensure his visibility.
♦ Always turn your engine off when the skier/wakeboarder is near
the platform or transom.
♦ Always turn your engine off when the skier/wakeboarder is near
the platform or transom.
1-30
1-30
Safety On Board
Safety On Board
♦ If the skier falls, return promptly to retrieve him, circling wide from
the starboard side, to bring his rope within easy grasp. See illustration.
♦ If the skier falls, return promptly to retrieve him, circling wide from
the starboard side, to bring his rope within easy grasp. See illustration.
Ski Tow
Ski Tow
Insert the ski tow line as shown for safe operation. It
provides a tight fastening for sking while allowing
the line to be readily removed if needed. Check your
tow line for adbrasion and tow ring for tightness
periodically. The illustration is a typical hook-up.
WARNING
!
AVOID SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH!
DO NOT USE SKI TOW FITTING
FOR LIFTING OR PARASAILING.
FITTING COULD PULL OUT OF DECK
Insert the ski tow line as shown for safe operation. It
provides a tight fastening for sking while allowing
the line to be readily removed if needed. Check your
tow line for adbrasion and tow ring for tightness
periodically. The illustration is a typical hook-up.
WARNING
!
AVOID SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH!
DO NOT USE SKI TOW FITTING
FOR LIFTING OR PARASAILING.
FITTING COULD PULL OUT OF DECK
Swim Platform
Swim Platform
On integrated or extended swim
platforms you should make periodic
inspections of the swim ladder and
hardware that supports the platform to
ensure that all connections and fittings
are tight and in good When fishing from
your boat, never anchor in a shipping
channel or tie up to any navigational aids. These must be kept clear of
at all times. Use heed when operating the boat in reverse to insure that
water does not accumulate excessively on the platform or transom,
especially in rough seas or strong currents. Do not exceed the platform
recommended maximum capacity label! Typical label shown above.
1-31
On integrated or extended swim
platforms you should make periodic
inspections of the swim ladder and
hardware that supports the platform to
ensure that all connections and fittings
are tight and in good When fishing from
your boat, never anchor in a shipping
channel or tie up to any navigational aids. These must be kept clear of
at all times. Use heed when operating the boat in reverse to insure that
water does not accumulate excessively on the platform or transom,
especially in rough seas or strong currents. Do not exceed the platform
recommended maximum capacity label! Typical label shown above.
1-31
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
WATER SKI & WAKEBOARD SIGNALS
WATER SKI & WAKEBOARD SIGNALS
FASTER
FASTER
SLOWER
SLOWER
CAUTION OR FALLEN
SKIER; PICK ME UP
SKIER OK
AFTER FALL
STOP
CAUTION OR FALLEN
SKIER; PICK ME UP
SKIER OK
AFTER FALL
STOP
SHUT ENGINE
OFF
SPEED OK
RETURN TO DROP
OFF AREA
PORT TURN
1-32
SHUT ENGINE
OFF
SPEED OK
RETURN TO DROP
OFF AREA
STARBOARD
TURN
PORT TURN
1-32
STARBOARD
TURN
Safety On Board
!
Safety On Board
WARNING
!
AVOID SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH!
DO NOT OPERATE THE BOAT
WITH PEOPLE IN THE WATER
OR ON TOP OR HOLDING ON TO
THE SWIM PLATFORM STRUCTURE OR HARDWARE.
WARNING
AVOID SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH!
DO NOT OPERATE THE BOAT
WITH PEOPLE IN THE WATER
OR ON TOP OR HOLDING ON TO
THE SWIM PLATFORM STRUCTURE OR HARDWARE.
Fishing
Fishing
Most boaters fish from time to time. With the
propulsion systems of today it is possible to fish
in out-of-the-way places. When crusing, stay clear
of fisherman. They may have lines or nets out
which might be cut or get caught in your
propeller if you come too close. Slow down
when approaching fishing boats.
Do not return to cruising speed until the boats
have been passed. If a fishing boat should be anchored, a large wake
could flip or swamp the boat, upset fishing gear, pull the anchor loose
from the bottom or worse yet cause someone to fall overboard.
When fishing from your boat, never anchor in shipping channel or tie
up to any navigational aids. These must be kept clear of at all times.
Be sure to carry a chart of the area and be on the lookout for shallow
water and hidden obstructions. Pick up a local tidal chart if appropriate
so you do not end up grounded.
Most boaters fish from time to time. With the
propulsion systems of today it is possible to fish
in out-of-the-way places. When crusing, stay clear
of fisherman. They may have lines or nets out
which might be cut or get caught in your
propeller if you come too close. Slow down
when approaching fishing boats.
Do not return to cruising speed until the boats
have been passed. If a fishing boat should be anchored, a large wake
could flip or swamp the boat, upset fishing gear, pull the anchor loose
from the bottom or worse yet cause someone to fall overboard.
When fishing from your boat, never anchor in shipping channel or tie
up to any navigational aids. These must be kept clear of at all times.
Be sure to carry a chart of the area and be on the lookout for shallow
water and hidden obstructions. Pick up a local tidal chart if appropriate
so you do not end up grounded.
Remember, the skipper is responsible for any damage caused by his
wake. Use common sense and be a responsible captain!
Remember, the skipper is responsible for any damage caused by his
wake. Use common sense and be a responsible captain!
1-33
1-33
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
WEATHER & WATER CONDITIONS
WEATHER & WATER CONDITIONS
Before a boating outing check the weather conditions. As we all know
the weather can change rapidly in many parts of the country. It does
so sometimes without being predicted. NOAA weather radio reports
are continuously available on designated frequencies installed on VHF
radios and various handhelds. Also, many local radio stations carry
weather reports .
Before a boating outing check the weather conditions. As we all know
the weather can change rapidly in many parts of the country. It does
so sometimes without being predicted. NOAA weather radio reports
are continuously available on designated frequencies installed on VHF
radios and various handhelds. Also, many local radio stations carry
weather reports .
Cloud Formations
Cloud Formations
Clouds indicate the type
of current weather and
cirrus
upcoming changes in the
cumulonimbus
(thunderstorm)
weather. Knowing the
cirrostratus cirrocumulus
type of cloud formations
20,000 Ft.
MIDDLE CLOUDS
can assist you in
altostratus
choosing the appropriate
altocumulus
6,500 Ft.
LOW CLOUDS
boating day or if already
on the water will help
stratocumulus
you understand any
upcoming
weather
cumulus
changes
Flat clouds (stratus)
nibostratus
stratus
normally indicate stable
catspaw
air. Cumulus clouds
indicate unstable air.
Many times a “cottonball” or cumulus cloud builds vertical height in
the afternoon and the result is a thunderstorm with increased winds
and waves; sometimes these storms are quite violent. You can find
additional information on weather (meteorology) at your local library.
Clouds indicate the type
of current weather and
cirrus
upcoming changes in the
cumulonimbus
(thunderstorm)
weather. Knowing the
cirrostratus cirrocumulus
type of cloud formations
20,000 Ft.
MIDDLE CLOUDS
can assist you in
altostratus
choosing the appropriate
altocumulus
6,500 Ft.
LOW CLOUDS
boating day or if already
on the water will help
stratocumulus
you understand any
upcoming
weather
cumulus
changes
Flat clouds (stratus)
nibostratus
stratus
normally indicate stable
catspaw
air. Cumulus clouds
indicate unstable air.
Many times a “cottonball” or cumulus cloud builds vertical height in
the afternoon and the result is a thunderstorm with increased winds
and waves; sometimes these storms are quite violent. You can find
additional information on weather (meteorology) at your local library.
1-34
1-34
HIGH CLOUDS
HIGH CLOUDS
Safety On Board
Safety On Board
Waves & Fog
Waves & Fog
As the wind blows across water waves are created.
The stronger the wind and increased distance across
the water enlarges the wave action.
Other factors that can cause problem situations for
vessels are fog, currents, and tidal changes.
Fog can develop inland on clear, calm mornings.
Coastal areas see large “blankets” of fog roll in
and stay for extended time periods causing
sometimes hazardous navigation conditions. If you are caught in the
fog, do not panic. Think of the best plan of action and proceed carefully.
If you are limited in navigation equipment at the first sign of fog
proceed to the nearest shoreline and wait until the fog lifts.
Boats equipped with navigation equipment, local waterway experience
and charts should proceed to a safe harbor. Use extreme caution, signal
as needed, and reduce to a speed where you can stop within half of
your forward vision range.
As the wind blows across water waves are created.
The stronger the wind and increased distance across
the water enlarges the wave action.
Other factors that can cause problem situations for
vessels are fog, currents, and tidal changes.
Fog can develop inland on clear, calm mornings.
Coastal areas see large “blankets” of fog roll in
and stay for extended time periods causing
sometimes hazardous navigation conditions. If you are caught in the
fog, do not panic. Think of the best plan of action and proceed carefully.
If you are limited in navigation equipment at the first sign of fog
proceed to the nearest shoreline and wait until the fog lifts.
Boats equipped with navigation equipment, local waterway experience
and charts should proceed to a safe harbor. Use extreme caution, signal
as needed, and reduce to a speed where you can stop within half of
your forward vision range.
If foul weather catches you at sea do the following:
If foul weather catches you at sea do the following:
1. Slow down. Proceed with caution and put on your life vests.
1. Slow down. Proceed with caution and put on your life vests.
2. Try to reach the nearest safe shoreline.
2. Try to reach the nearest safe shoreline.
3. Navigate your vessel slowly into the waves at a 45 degree angle.
3. Navigate your vessel slowly into the waves at a 45 degree angle.
4. Passengers should sit low in the center of the vessel.
4. Passengers should sit low in the center of the vessel.
5. Monitor your bilge pump. Make sure sump stays free of water.
5. Monitor your bilge pump. Make sure sump stays free of water.
6. Secure loose gear. Make ready emergency equipment.
6. Secure loose gear. Make ready emergency equipment.
7. If the engine stops, throw the anchor over the bow. If needed
use a sea anchor. Never anchor off the stern.
7. If the engine stops, throw the anchor over the bow. If needed
use a sea anchor. Never anchor off the stern.
1-35
1-35
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 1
Marine Weather Symbols
Marine Weather Symbols
Although the National Weather Service has discontinued the use of
the day flags and night lights, many marinas and ports of call still use
them.
Although the National Weather Service has discontinued the use of
the day flags and night lights, many marinas and ports of call still use
them.
1-36
1-36
Rules Of The Road
Rules Of The Road
NAVIGATION RULES DEFINED
NAVIGATION RULES DEFINED
The Navigation Rules set forth actions to be followed by boats to
avoid collision. They are referred to as the “Rules of the Road”. There
are two main parts referred to as the inland and international rules.
The inland rules apply to vessels operating inside the boundaries of
the United States. The international rules (referred to as72 COLREGS)
apply to vessels operating on the high seas and all connected waters
outside the established demarcation boundaries. Most navigational
charts show the demarcation lines by red dotted lines and are published
in the navagation rules. Remember to consult state and local agencies
since areas such as “no wake zones” , swimming beaches, “diver down
flag” and inland landlocked lakes fall under their juristriction. This
section is only an introduction to the “rules of the road”. We strongly
recommend additional training before getting behind the “wheel” of
your boat.
The Navigation Rules set forth actions to be followed by boats to
avoid collision. They are referred to as the “Rules of the Road”. There
are two main parts referred to as the inland and international rules.
The inland rules apply to vessels operating inside the boundaries of
the United States. The international rules (referred to as72 COLREGS)
apply to vessels operating on the high seas and all connected waters
outside the established demarcation boundaries. Most navigational
charts show the demarcation lines by red dotted lines and are published
in the navagation rules. Remember to consult state and local agencies
since areas such as “no wake zones” , swimming beaches, “diver down
flag” and inland landlocked lakes fall under their juristriction. This
section is only an introduction to the “rules of the road”. We strongly
recommend additional training before getting behind the “wheel” of
your boat.
!
WARNING
!
WARNING
AVOID INJURY AND DEATH!
FOLLOW THE NAVIGATION“RULES OF THE ROAD”
TO PREVENT COLLISIONS.
AVOID INJURY AND DEATH!
FOLLOW THE NAVIGATION“RULES OF THE ROAD”
TO PREVENT COLLISIONS.
You can order the Inland & International Navigation Rules from:
Superintendent of Documents
U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington, DC 20402
Tel: (202-512-1800) Fax:(202-512-2250
You can order the Inland & International Navigation Rules from:
Superintendent of Documents
U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington, DC 20402
Tel: (202-512-1800) Fax:(202-512-2250
2-1
2-1
CHAPTER 2
CHAPTER 2
NAVIGATION RULES
NAVIGATION RULES
Right Of Way
Right Of Way
1. Cross waves at right angles.
1. Cross waves at right angles.
2. When caught in heavy water or squalls, head either directly into the
waves or at a slight angle. Reduce speed, but maintain enough power
to maneuver your boat safely.
2. When caught in heavy water or squalls, head either directly into the
waves or at a slight angle. Reduce speed, but maintain enough power
to maneuver your boat safely.
3. Keep your speed under control. Respect the rights of other boaters
engaged in all water sports. Give them a “wide berth”.
3. Keep your speed under control. Respect the rights of other boaters
engaged in all water sports. Give them a “wide berth”.
4. Whenever meeting a boat head on, keep to the right where possible.
4. Whenever meeting a boat head on, keep to the right where possible.
5. When two boats cross, the boat to the right (starboard) has the right
of way.
5. When two boats cross, the boat to the right (starboard) has the right
of way.
6. When overtaking or passing, the boat being passed has the right of
way.
6. When overtaking or passing, the boat being passed has the right of
way.
In general, boats with less maneuverability have right-of-way over
more agile craft. The skipper must keep his craft clear of the following
vessels:
In general, boats with less maneuverability have right-of-way over
more agile craft. The skipper must keep his craft clear of the following
vessels:
• A vessel not under command or aground; due to their circumstances,
these vessels have no maneuverability.
• A vessel not under command or aground; due to their circumstances,
these vessels have no maneuverability.
• A vessel restricted in its maneuverability; these vessels usually are
performing work which limits their maneuverability such as surveying,
dredging, laying pipe or cable, or servicing navigational markers among
others.
• A vessel restricted in its maneuverability; these vessels usually are
performing work which limits their maneuverability such as surveying,
dredging, laying pipe or cable, or servicing navigational markers among
others.
• A vessel engaged in fishing; these include boats fishing with lines,
trawls or nets, but not trolling lines.
2-2
• A vessel engaged in fishing; these include boats fishing with lines,
trawls or nets, but not trolling lines.
2-2
Rules Of The Road
Rules Of The Road
• Sailboats; they have the right-of-way over powerboats. However, if a
sailboat is using a prop to move forward, it is considered a powerboat
even if the sails are up.
• Sailboats; they have the right-of-way over powerboats. However, if a
sailboat is using a prop to move forward, it is considered a powerboat
even if the sails are up.
• Remember the unwritten “rule of tonnage”. Basically a smaller
tonnage vessel should take every effort to avoid close quarters with a
larger tonnage vessel. One way to accomplish this is to have a designated
human lookout to “eyeball” the horizon for any developing collision
course.
• Remember the unwritten “rule of tonnage”. Basically a smaller
tonnage vessel should take every effort to avoid close quarters with a
larger tonnage vessel. One way to accomplish this is to have a designated
human lookout to “eyeball” the horizon for any developing collision
course.
• Use defensive driving skills on the waterway just as you do on the
roadway. The other vessel may not know the “rules of the road” Be
alert and ready to take immediate action.
• Use defensive driving skills on the waterway just as you do on the
roadway. The other vessel may not know the “rules of the road” Be
alert and ready to take immediate action.
• If a collision course is unavoidable neither boat has the right of way.
Both boats must react to avoid an accident according to the rules of
the road.
• If a collision course is unavoidable neither boat has the right of way.
Both boats must react to avoid an accident according to the rules of
the road.
Signals
Signals
2-3
2-3
CHAPTER 2
CHAPTER 2
NAVIGATION RULES
NAVIGATION RULES
The Navigation Rules set forth 3 types
of crossing situations- crossing, meeting,
and overtaking. In each case, both boats
are governed by special procedures.
The Navigation Rules set forth 3 types
of crossing situations- crossing, meeting,
and overtaking. In each case, both boats
are governed by special procedures.
In a head-on meeting, both vessels must
sound a single blast to give way toward
starboard and pass to port.
In a head-on meeting, both vessels must
sound a single blast to give way toward
starboard and pass to port.
These rules appear when there is a risk
of collision. In a crossing situation be
aware of the other craft’s position. For
safety, there should be a noticeable
change in the angle, bow or stern; a
gradual change in position indicates possible danger.
These rules appear when there is a risk
of collision. In a crossing situation be
aware of the other craft’s position. For
safety, there should be a noticeable
change in the angle, bow or stern; a
gradual change in position indicates possible danger.
2-4
2-4
Rules Of The Road
Rules Of The Road
NAVIGATION RULES
NAVIGATION RULES
An overtaking boat is burdened, and is not the
priveleged craft, enen though it approaches the
danger zone of the overtaken boat.
An overtaking boat is burdened, and is not the
priveleged craft, enen though it approaches the
danger zone of the overtaken boat.
The overtaking boat first signals with a single blast if
that boat desires to pass on the starboard side of the
boat ahead, or a double blast if passing to port. The
overtaken craft responds with the same signal if it is
safe, or with the danger signal (5 short blasts or more)
if unsafe. The boat overtaking must not pass unless
the appropriate signals are sounded.
The overtaking boat first signals with a single blast if
that boat desires to pass on the starboard side of the
boat ahead, or a double blast if passing to port. The
overtaken craft responds with the same signal if it is
safe, or with the danger signal (5 short blasts or more)
if unsafe. The boat overtaking must not pass unless
the appropriate signals are sounded.
2-5
2-5
CHAPTER 2
CHAPTER 2
Navigation Aids
Navigation Aids
Navigation aids are placed along coasts and navigable waters as a guide
for mariners in determining their position in reference to land and
hidden danger. Each aid provides specific information. They form a
continous system of charted markers for accurate piloting on paper
and on the water.
Nautical charts are provided by the National Ocean Service (NOS)
and are distributed nationwide through marinas and outlet stores. These
charts show the geography of the coast, water depth, landmarks,
navigation aids (buoys and markers), marine hazards, and port facilities.
Use only up-to-date charts for navigation. We recommend when
purchasing a chart to look for the weather resistant ones.
Buoys provide a roadmap to keep the skipper on course and to avoid
hazards. Buoys are identified by light, shape, color and in severe weather
conditions by sound.
Buoys or beacons called lateral markers indicate the port and starboard
sides of the waterway to be followed. U. S markers follow the buoyage
system known as Red Right Returning. When returning from sea or
traveling upstream, the green markers are to port (on your left) and the
red markers are to the starboard side (on your right). When traveling
downstream or out to sea the marker color would be reversed.
Before operating your vessel, learn to identify the various navigational
aids such as lateral aids, mid-channel markers, information and
regulatory markers.
Navigation aids are placed along coasts and navigable waters as a guide
for mariners in determining their position in reference to land and
hidden danger. Each aid provides specific information. They form a
continous system of charted markers for accurate piloting on paper
and on the water.
Nautical charts are provided by the National Ocean Service (NOS)
and are distributed nationwide through marinas and outlet stores. These
charts show the geography of the coast, water depth, landmarks,
navigation aids (buoys and markers), marine hazards, and port facilities.
Use only up-to-date charts for navigation. We recommend when
purchasing a chart to look for the weather resistant ones.
Buoys provide a roadmap to keep the skipper on course and to avoid
hazards. Buoys are identified by light, shape, color and in severe weather
conditions by sound.
Buoys or beacons called lateral markers indicate the port and starboard
sides of the waterway to be followed. U. S markers follow the buoyage
system known as Red Right Returning. When returning from sea or
traveling upstream, the green markers are to port (on your left) and the
red markers are to the starboard side (on your right). When traveling
downstream or out to sea the marker color would be reversed.
Before operating your vessel, learn to identify the various navigational
aids such as lateral aids, mid-channel markers, information and
regulatory markers.
NOTICE
SKIPPERS MUST NOT RELY ON BUOYS ALONE
TO MARK THEIR POSITION.
SEVERE WEATHER CONDITIONS
AND WAVE ACTION CAN ALTER A BUOYS POSITION.
NEVER TIE UP TO A BUOY.
IT IS ILLEGAL AND EXTREMELY DANGEROUS.
2-6
NOTICE
SKIPPERS MUST NOT RELY ON BUOYS ALONE
TO MARK THEIR POSITION.
SEVERE WEATHER CONDITIONS
AND WAVE ACTION CAN ALTER A BUOYS POSITION.
NEVER TIE UP TO A BUOY.
IT IS ILLEGAL AND EXTREMELY DANGEROUS.
2-6
Rules Of The Road
LATERAL AIDS
Port Side
Odd Numbers
LATERAL AIDS
Starboard Side
Even Numbers
Chart Symbol
Lighted Buoy
(Green Light Only)
Starboard Side
Even Numbers
Chart Symbol
Lighted Buoy
(Green Light Only)
Lighted Buoy
(Red Light Only)
Chart Symbol
Lighted Buoy
(Red Light Only)
Chart Symbol
Chart Symbol
Can Buoy
(Unlighted)
Nun Buoy
(Unlighted)
Chart Symbol
Daymark
Port Side
Odd Numbers
Chart Symbol
Chart Symbol
Can Buoy
(Unlighted)
Rules Of The Road
Chart Symbol
Nun Buoy
(Unlighted)
Chart Symbol
Chart Symbol
Daymark
Daymark
2-7
Chart Symbol
Daymark
2-7
CHAPTER 2
CHAPTER 2
MID-CHANNEL MARKERS
MID-CHANNEL MARKERS
Chart Symbol
Chart Symbol
Chart Symbol
Chart Symbol
Chart Symbol
REGULATORY MARKERS
Diamond Shape
Warns Of Danger
Circle Marks Area Controlled
As Indicated
2-8
Chart Symbol
REGULATORY MARKERS
Diamond Shape With CrossBoats Keep Out
Diamond Shape
Warns Of Danger
For showing information such as
locations, distances and directions
Circle Marks Area Controlled
As Indicated
2-8
Diamond Shape With CrossBoats Keep Out
For showing information such as
locations, distances and directions
Rules Of The Road
Rules Of The Road
NIGHT RUNNING
NIGHT RUNNING
Boats operating between sunset and sunrise ( hours vary by state), or
in conditions of reduced visibility, must use navigation lights. Nighttime
operation, especially during bad weather and fog, can be dangerous.
All Rules of the Road apply at night, but it is best to slow down and
stay clear of all boats regardless of who has the right-of-way.
To see more easily at night, avoid bright lights when possible. Also, it is
helpful to have a passenger keep watch for other boats, water hazards
and navigational aids.
To determine the size, speed and direction of other vessels at night,
you should use the running lights. A green light indicates starboard
side, and a red light indicates port side. Generally, if you see a green
light, you have the right-of-way. If you see a red light, give way to the
other vessel.
Boats operating between sunset and sunrise ( hours vary by state), or
in conditions of reduced visibility, must use navigation lights. Nighttime
operation, especially during bad weather and fog, can be dangerous.
All Rules of the Road apply at night, but it is best to slow down and
stay clear of all boats regardless of who has the right-of-way.
To see more easily at night, avoid bright lights when possible. Also, it is
helpful to have a passenger keep watch for other boats, water hazards
and navigational aids.
To determine the size, speed and direction of other vessels at night,
you should use the running lights. A green light indicates starboard
side, and a red light indicates port side. Generally, if you see a green
light, you have the right-of-way. If you see a red light, give way to the
other vessel.
WHITE
WHITE
GREEN
GREEN
IF YOU SEE GREEN;
CAUTIOUSLY HOLD
WHITE
COURSE
IF YOU SEE GREEN;
CAUTIOUSLY HOLD
WHITE
COURSE
RED
RED
IF YOU SEE RED;
GIVE WAY!
IF YOU SEE RED;
GIVE WAY!
2-9
2-9
CHAPTER 2
CHAPTER 2
BRIDGE CLEARANCE
BRIDGE CLEARANCE
Be aware that your vessel requires a specified bridge clearance height.
This height is a measured estimate from the waterline to the top of the
highest object usually the radar arch, radar or the masthead light
depending on what arch equipment is installed. The estimated height
can change because of variances in the loaded condition of the vessel.
Consult the bridge clearance specifications located in Chapter 12
(technical information section). An easy way to measure bridge clearance
is to have someone place a long straightedge such as a piece of wood
at a 90 degree angle across the highest point of the boat. Then with a
tape rule measure the distance straight down to the waterline. Take
this measurement with the fuel and water tanks 1/2 full and only 1
person besides yourself on board. This will give you a safe measurement.
As your boat is loaded down with people the bridge clearance will
become somewhat lower.
Some bridges are tendered. Know and use the proper bridge signals
when approaching these bridges (see bridge signals in this chapter).
You can also monitor and communicate on channel 13 of a VHF radio
for bridge information in most domestic locals. Other bridges are
marked with a clearance measurement and you are on your own. After
determining your vessel will clear the bridge proceed with caution at a
safe idle speed. Keep your eye on vessel traffic at all times in order to
react quickly. Resume a safe speed once clear of the bridge structure
and acknowledgment of clear visibility.
Use common sense regarding bridge clearance because bodily injury
and property damage could result if a mishap occurs with a bridge
structure.
Be aware that your vessel requires a specified bridge clearance height.
This height is a measured estimate from the waterline to the top of the
highest object usually the radar arch, radar or the masthead light
depending on what arch equipment is installed. The estimated height
can change because of variances in the loaded condition of the vessel.
Consult the bridge clearance specifications located in Chapter 12
(technical information section). An easy way to measure bridge clearance
is to have someone place a long straightedge such as a piece of wood
at a 90 degree angle across the highest point of the boat. Then with a
tape rule measure the distance straight down to the waterline. Take
this measurement with the fuel and water tanks 1/2 full and only 1
person besides yourself on board. This will give you a safe measurement.
As your boat is loaded down with people the bridge clearance will
become somewhat lower.
Some bridges are tendered. Know and use the proper bridge signals
when approaching these bridges (see bridge signals in this chapter).
You can also monitor and communicate on channel 13 of a VHF radio
for bridge information in most domestic locals. Other bridges are
marked with a clearance measurement and you are on your own. After
determining your vessel will clear the bridge proceed with caution at a
safe idle speed. Keep your eye on vessel traffic at all times in order to
react quickly. Resume a safe speed once clear of the bridge structure
and acknowledgment of clear visibility.
Use common sense regarding bridge clearance because bodily injury
and property damage could result if a mishap occurs with a bridge
structure.
2-10
2-10
Engines & Controls
Engines & Controls
ENGINE
ENGINE
Engine Basics
Engine Basics
It is important that you read the engine manual carefully and become
completely familiar with the operation as well as necessary maintenance
on the engine and propulsion systems. Pay careful attention to the
sections on winterization if you live in freezing climates. Extensive
damage can result if proper winter storage is not followed. Your
Regal dealer has been factory trained on Regal boat systems. Consult
your Regal dealer for futher information regarding technical issues
and parts..
It is important that you read the engine manual carefully and become
completely familiar with the operation as well as necessary maintenance
on the engine and propulsion systems. Pay careful attention to the
sections on winterization if you live in freezing climates. Extensive
damage can result if proper winter storage is not followed. Your
Regal dealer has been factory trained on Regal boat systems. Consult
your Regal dealer for futher information regarding technical issues
and parts..
!
WARNING
AVOID SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH!
READ ALL MANUFACTURERS ENGINE AND
PROPULSION OWNER MANUALS
BEFORE OPERATING YOUR VESSEL.
!
WARNING
AVOID SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH!
READ ALL MANUFACTURERS ENGINE AND
PROPULSION OWNER MANUALS
BEFORE OPERATING YOUR VESSEL.
Engine Mounts
Engine Mounts
The engines are placed in the boat on a set of metal or wooden
platforms called mounts. These rubber isolation mounts keep the
engine from moving laterally and athwartships (right angles to the
centerline). The mounts help reduce the vibration caused by the engine
and drive. Periodically, the mount hardware should be checked for
tightness.
3-1
The engines are placed in the boat on a set of metal or wooden
platforms called mounts. These rubber isolation mounts keep the
engine from moving laterally and athwartships (right angles to the
centerline). The mounts help reduce the vibration caused by the engine
and drive. Periodically, the mount hardware should be checked for
tightness.
3-1
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 3
Engine Alignment
Engine Alignment
The engine uses a rubber splined hub to which the outdrive driveshaft
is attached. This alignment specification between the engine and
outdrive needs to checked periodically. It should be checked after each
50 hours of operation or if the vessel has run aground or hit a
submerged object. Alignment should be checked by a Regal dealer or
marine professional since special tools and procedures are required.
The engine uses a rubber splined hub to which the outdrive driveshaft
is attached. This alignment specification between the engine and
outdrive needs to checked periodically. It should be checked after each
50 hours of operation or if the vessel has run aground or hit a
submerged object. Alignment should be checked by a Regal dealer or
marine professional since special tools and procedures are required.
Engine Removal
Engine Removal
In the event the engine or outdrive (sometimes referred to as sterndrive)
requires major service where it needs to be removed, consult your
Regal dealer.
In the event the engine or outdrive (sometimes referred to as sterndrive)
requires major service where it needs to be removed, consult your
Regal dealer.
Engine Ventilation
Engine Ventilation
Ventilation systems are required for engine compartments. Most Regal
boats feature a set of deck vent shrouds which supply fresh air
constantly to the engine compartment. A powered blower motor
connected to ducts in the lower one third of the bilge evacuates air to
the atmosphere. Understand the following warning:
Ventilation systems are required for engine compartments. Most Regal
boats feature a set of deck vent shrouds which supply fresh air
constantly to the engine compartment. A powered blower motor
connected to ducts in the lower one third of the bilge evacuates air to
the atmosphere. Understand the following warning:
!
WARNING
!
WARNING
GASOLINE VAPORS CAN EXPLODE. BEFORE STARTING
ENGINE, OPERATE BLOWER 4 MINUTES AND CHECK
ENGINE COMPARTMENT FOR GASOLINE LEAKS OR
VAPORS. RUN BLOWER BELOW CRUSING SPEED.
GASOLINE VAPORS CAN EXPLODE. BEFORE STARTING
ENGINE, OPERATE BLOWER 4 MINUTES AND CHECK
ENGINE COMPARTMENT FOR GASOLINE LEAKS OR
VAPORS. RUN BLOWER BELOW CRUSING SPEED.
All owners are responsible for keeping their boat’s ventilation systems
in operating condition. This means making sure the ventilation openings
are obstruction free, ducts are not blocked or tore, blower operates
properly and any worn parts are replaced with approved marine parts.
All owners are responsible for keeping their boat’s ventilation systems
in operating condition. This means making sure the ventilation openings
are obstruction free, ducts are not blocked or tore, blower operates
properly and any worn parts are replaced with approved marine parts.
3-2
3-2
Engines & Controls
!
WARNING
Engines & Controls
!
PREVENT INJURY OR DEATH!
USE ONLY APPROVED MARINE REPLACEMENT
PARTS THAT ARE IGNITION PROTECTED.
WARNING
PREVENT INJURY OR DEATH!
USE ONLY APPROVED MARINE REPLACEMENT
PARTS THAT ARE IGNITION PROTECTED.
PROPULSION
PROPULSION
Stern Drive
Stern Drive
It is important that you read the stern drive manual carefully and
become familiar with the operation as well as necessary maintenance
on the drive unit components. Pay careful attention to the sections on
winterization if you live in freezing climates. Extensive damage can
result if proper winter storage is not followed. Refer to the maintenance
section of this manual for more information or call your nearest Regal
dealer.
It is important that you read the stern drive manual carefully and
become familiar with the operation as well as necessary maintenance
on the drive unit components. Pay careful attention to the sections on
winterization if you live in freezing climates. Extensive damage can
result if proper winter storage is not followed. Refer to the maintenance
section of this manual for more information or call your nearest Regal
dealer.
Propellers
Propellers
We have carefully tested and chosen the propellers
to give your stern drive boat the best possible
performance and have allowed for the additional
weight in equipment that might be added to the
boat. It is a good idea to carry a spare set of
propellers and hand tools in order to handle an
emergency propeller change. Refer to the engine manual for proper
procedures since each stern drive application is unique. Call a marine
professional or your Regal dealer for further information.
We have carefully tested and chosen the propellers
to give your stern drive boat the best possible
performance and have allowed for the additional
weight in equipment that might be added to the
boat. It is a good idea to carry a spare set of
propellers and hand tools in order to handle an
emergency propeller change. Refer to the engine manual for proper
procedures since each stern drive application is unique. Call a marine
professional or your Regal dealer for further information.
3-3
3-3
CHAPTER 3
!
CHAPTER 3
DANGER
!
PREVENT INJURY OR DEATH!
SHUT OFF ENGINE NEAR SWIMMERS
TO AVOID ROTATING PROPELLER BLADES.
Propeller Checklist
At least twice a year check the propeller for:
DANGER
PREVENT INJURY OR DEATH!
SHUT OFF ENGINE NEAR SWIMMERS
TO AVOID ROTATING PROPELLER BLADES.
Propeller Checklist
At least twice a year check the propeller for:
Loose, missing or corroded hardware.
Loose, missing or corroded hardware.
Knicks, dings or missing propeller material
Knicks, dings or missing propeller material
Bent propeller blades.
Bent propeller blades.
Objects wrapped around the prop such as fishline.
Objects wrapped around the prop such as fishline.
Decomposing propeller blades (electrolyisis symptom).
Decomposing propeller blades (electrolyisis symptom).
Aluminum prop with paint coming off near blade tip
(ventilation symptom).
Aluminum prop with paint coming off near blade tip
(ventilation symptom).
Check the propeller pressed in rubber hubfor slippage.
Check the propeller pressed in rubber hubfor slippage.
Contact a propeller shop or your closest Regal dealer if any of
the above symptoms exist. They have special equipment to
refurbish both stainless steel and aluminum propellers. After
making any blade alternations the propellers are “repitched” in
special prop jigs.
3-4
Contact a propeller shop or your closest Regal dealer if any of
the above symptoms exist. They have special equipment to
refurbish both stainless steel and aluminum propellers. After
making any blade alternations the propellers are “repitched” in
special prop jigs.
3-4
Engines & Controls
Engines & Controls
CONTROLS
CONTROLS
Instrumentation
Instrumentation
The helm station is equipped with a complete set of instruments that
allows you to monitor the condition of the engines. Close observation
of the gauges may save the engines from damage.
The dash instrument panel is powered and protected by a main 20
amp ignition breaker located at the dash itself. It is connected through
the key switch.
The engine wiring is protected by a main breaker with a push button
reset mounted on the engine. Refer to your specific engine manual for
information on type and location. If a breaker “pops” figure out the
reason why before resetting it.
Each dash switch is also protected by a breaker.
The helm station is equipped with a complete set of instruments that
allows you to monitor the condition of the engines. Close observation
of the gauges may save the engines from damage.
The dash instrument panel is powered and protected by a main 20
amp ignition breaker located at the dash itself. It is connected through
the key switch.
The engine wiring is protected by a main breaker with a push button
reset mounted on the engine. Refer to your specific engine manual for
information on type and location. If a breaker “pops” figure out the
reason why before resetting it.
Each dash switch is also protected by a breaker.
NOTICE
NOTICE
WITH BATTERY SWITCH IN THE “OFF” POSITION
THERE IS NO POWER TO THE DASH
WITH BATTERY SWITCH IN THE “OFF” POSITION
THERE IS NO POWER TO THE DASH
Your boat may feature an instrument panel containing two large multifunction gauges along with a trim and depth gauge. Otherwise, your
dash will feature individual gauges. We will show overviews of both
gauge layouts in the following pages along with descriptions of
individual gauge functions regardless of their dash location.
Your boat may feature an instrument panel containing two large multifunction gauges along with a trim and depth gauge. Otherwise, your
dash will feature individual gauges. We will show overviews of both
gauge layouts in the following pages along with descriptions of
individual gauge functions regardless of their dash location.
3-5
3-5
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 3
TYPICAL HELM
Tachometer
TYPICAL HELM
Speedometer
Depth Sounder
Trim
Tachometer
Temperature
Speedometer
Depth Sounder
Trim
Temperature
Remote
Control
Ignition Panel
Switch Panel
3-6
Remote
Control
Ignition Panel
Fuel
Volts
Switch Panel
Oil
3-6
Fuel
Volts
Oil
Engines & Controls
Engines & Controls
Gauge Operation
Gauge Operation
Following is a general description of gauge operations. An alert skipper
monitors his gauges constantly for any system malfunctions. The gauges
are lighted for night operation. Gauges are an early warning system
for engines just as they are for an automobile. For more information
refer to the engine manufacturer’s manual in the owner’s pouch.
Following is a general description of gauge operations. An alert skipper
monitors his gauges constantly for any system malfunctions. The gauges
are lighted for night operation. Gauges are an early warning system
for engines just as they are for an automobile. For more information
refer to the engine manufacturer’s manual in the owner’s pouch.
Tachometer:
Tachometer:
The tachometer indicates the speed of
the engine in revolutions per minute
(rpm). The tachometer allows you to
monitor the engine speed so you can
be sure not to exceed the
recommended limits of the engine
manufacturer. Selected tachometers
have built in hour meters.
The tachometer indicates the speed of
the engine in revolutions per minute
(rpm). The tachometer allows you to
monitor the engine speed so you can
be sure not to exceed the
recommended limits of the engine
manufacturer. Selected tachometers
have built in hour meters.
Oil Pressure:
Oil Pressure:
The oil pressure gauge indicates the
pressure of the oil inside the gengine
lubrication system. A drop in oil
pressure may be an indication of a
low oil situation or a leak. Continued
operation of the engines with low
oil pressure could lead to engine
damage. Refer to appropriate
manufacturer’s engine manual for
more information..
The oil pressure gauge indicates the
pressure of the oil inside the gengine
lubrication system. A drop in oil
pressure may be an indication of a
low oil situation or a leak. Continued
operation of the engines with low
oil pressure could lead to engine
damage. Refer to appropriate
manufacturer’s engine manual for
more information..
3-7
3-7
CHAPTER 3
3-8
CHAPTER 3
Temperature Gauge:
Temperature Gauge:
The temperature gauge monitors the
cooling system of the engine. A
sudden increase in the temperature
could be a sign that the engine
cooling system is malfunctioning.
Shut down the engine immediately
and investigate the problem. Consult
your engine manual for allowable
limits.
The temperature gauge monitors the
cooling system of the engine. A
sudden increase in the temperature
could be a sign that the engine
cooling system is malfunctioning.
Shut down the engine immediately
and investigate the problem. Consult
your engine manual for allowable
limits.
Fuel Gauge:
Fuel Gauge:
The fuel gauge indicates the level of
fuel inside the fuel tank(s). It is a
good idea to keep the fuel tanks
“topped off ” when possible to
reduce fuel vapors inside the tank.
It is also a good idea not to run the
fuel level close to empty in order to
leave an adequate “safety” factor.
The fuel gauge indicates the level of
fuel inside the fuel tank(s). It is a
good idea to keep the fuel tanks
“topped off ” when possible to
reduce fuel vapors inside the tank.
It is also a good idea not to run the
fuel level close to empty in order to
leave an adequate “safety” factor.
Volt Meter:
Volt Meter:
The volt meter monitors the battery
condition as well as the alternator
performance. Normal voltage is
between 12.0 and 15.0 volts. Readings
outside of this range may indicate a
charging system or battery problem.
The volt meter monitors the battery
condition as well as the alternator
performance. Normal voltage is
between 12.0 and 15.0 volts. Readings
outside of this range may indicate a
charging system or battery problem.
3-8
Engines & Controls
Engines & Controls
Trim Gauge:
This gauge measures the stern drive
tilt and indicates the relative position
of the bow, up or down when the
boat is on plane. The power trim
normally begins in the down position
when used to accelerate the boat onto
a plane position.The gauge can be
helpful in achieving the most
economical running condition.
Trim Gauge:
This gauge measures the stern drive
tilt and indicates the relative position
of the bow, up or down when the
boat is on plane. The power trim
normally begins in the down position
when used to accelerate the boat onto
a plane position.The gauge can be
helpful in achieving the most
economical running condition.
Depth Gauge:
Depth Gauge:
The depth gauge is standard
equipment on selected models. The
depth gauge indicates the water
depth under the keel of the boat. It
features an shallow water alarm. By
monitoring the water depth closely,
damage to props and underwater
hardware can be avoided.
The depth gauge is standard
equipment on selected models. The
depth gauge indicates the water
depth under the keel of the boat. It
features an shallow water alarm. By
monitoring the water depth closely,
damage to props and underwater
hardware can be avoided.
Speedometer:
Speedometer:
The speedometer used on selected
models indicates kilometers per hour
and miles per hour by measuring
water pressure against a small hole
in a device mounted under the boat.
Consult the owner’s packet for
further information.
3-9
The speedometer used on selected
models indicates kilometers per hour
and miles per hour by measuring
water pressure against a small hole
in a device mounted under the boat.
Consult the owner’s packet for
further information.
3-9
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 3
Optional Gauges & Indicators
Optional Gauges & Indicators
The optional gas vapor detector
determines if there is a level of
gasoline vapors that is unsafe in the
engine room of the boat. If installed,
turn on the unit and wait about one
minute for it to do its safety test. If all
is well it will give you a green light.
You must run the test before you start
the engines. In the event you don’t
get a green light, you must investigate
the bilge of the boat for gas fumes or signs of a fuel leak before
starting the engines. If uncertain, consult a marine service professional.
The optional gas vapor detector
determines if there is a level of
gasoline vapors that is unsafe in the
engine room of the boat. If installed,
turn on the unit and wait about one
minute for it to do its safety test. If all
is well it will give you a green light.
You must run the test before you start
the engines. In the event you don’t
get a green light, you must investigate
the bilge of the boat for gas fumes or signs of a fuel leak before
starting the engines. If uncertain, consult a marine service professional.
The optional automatic fire
extinguishing system utilizes an
instrument display unit (gauge) that
provides the operator with a system
status of charged or uncharged
condition by an audible alarm. With
the ignition turned on the indicator
light shows system is charged and
operating properly. With the ignition
on and no light indicates the system
has discharged. If the system should discharge the ignition system will
be instantaneously interrupted. Should this occur shut down the engine,
ventilation blower and any electrical system components. Investigate
the source of the shutdown immediately and take appropriate action.
For more information, refer to the owner’s pouch.
The optional automatic fire
extinguishing system utilizes an
instrument display unit (gauge) that
provides the operator with a system
status of charged or uncharged
condition by an audible alarm. With
the ignition turned on the indicator
light shows system is charged and
operating properly. With the ignition
on and no light indicates the system
has discharged. If the system should discharge the ignition system will
be instantaneously interrupted. Should this occur shut down the engine,
ventilation blower and any electrical system components. Investigate
the source of the shutdown immediately and take appropriate action.
For more information, refer to the owner’s pouch.
3-10
3-10
Engines & Controls
Engines & Controls
Audible Alarms
Audible Alarms
Most Mercruiser and Volvo engines use audible alarms. They are
designed to use sensors which pick up deviations from the normal
operating parameters. Oil pressure and temperature sensors send a
signal to a buzzer under the dash which sounds a high pitched alarm
indicating a possible problem. In addition to the dash, some engines
use buzzers at the engine itself.
Most Mercruiser and Volvo engines use audible alarms. They are
designed to use sensors which pick up deviations from the normal
operating parameters. Oil pressure and temperature sensors send a
signal to a buzzer under the dash which sounds a high pitched alarm
indicating a possible problem. In addition to the dash, some engines
use buzzers at the engine itself.
NOTICE
NOTICE
PREVENT POSSIBLE ENGINE DAMAGE.
WHEN AN AUDIBLE ALARM SOUNDS
SHUT DOWN ENGINE IMMEDIATELY,
INVESTIGATE & REPAIR THE PROBLEM.
PREVENT POSSIBLE ENGINE DAMAGE.
WHEN AN AUDIBLE ALARM SOUNDS
SHUT DOWN ENGINE IMMEDIATELY,
INVESTIGATE & REPAIR THE PROBLEM.
On start up it is not unusual to hear an audible alarm sound when
cranking the engine over. This occurs normally because it takes a second
or two to build up the engine oil pressure. Then the alarm will stop.
A seasoned skipper monitors his instrument panel often while cruising.
On start up it is not unusual to hear an audible alarm sound when
cranking the engine over. This occurs normally because it takes a second
or two to build up the engine oil pressure. Then the alarm will stop.
A seasoned skipper monitors his instrument panel often while cruising.
Instrument Lighting
Instrument Lighting
Each gauge is designed with back lighting so it can be seen at night.
On most models you activate the instrument lighting by energizing
the navigation light switch. Eliminate condensation inside the gauges
by activating the gauge lights.
Each gauge is designed with back lighting so it can be seen at night.
On most models you activate the instrument lighting by energizing
the navigation light switch. Eliminate condensation inside the gauges
by activating the gauge lights.
3-11
3-11
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 3
Ignition Switch
Ignition Switch
The ignition switch features 4 positions. In a clockwise direction they
are auxillary, off, run, and start. The start position is spring loaded and
the key should be held in this position to engage the starter. Once the
engine has started release the key from the start position. The electrical
system will then be energized in the run position. The auxillary position
is counterclockwise from the “off ” position. When it is activated the
stereo and dash switches can be activated without the instrumentation
engine ignition wiring and engine warning buzzers being energized.
Be a smart skipper and remove the ignition key from the ignition switch
with children aboard and/or when there are people in the water.
The ignition switch features 4 positions. In a clockwise direction they
are auxillary, off, run, and start. The start position is spring loaded and
the key should be held in this position to engage the starter. Once the
engine has started release the key from the start position. The electrical
system will then be energized in the run position. The auxillary position
is counterclockwise from the “off ” position. When it is activated the
stereo and dash switches can be activated without the instrumentation
engine ignition wiring and engine warning buzzers being energized.
Be a smart skipper and remove the ignition key from the ignition switch
with children aboard and/or when there are people in the water.
AUX
AUX
TYPICAL IGNITION SWITCH
WITH 4 KEY POSITIONS
TYPICAL IGNITION SWITCH
WITH 4 KEY POSITIONS
NOTICE
NOTICE
TO AVOID DRAINING THE BATTERY
DO NOT LEAVE IGNITION KEY
IN THE “ON” POSITION
WITH THE ENGINE NOT RUNNING.
3-12
TO AVOID DRAINING THE BATTERY
DO NOT LEAVE IGNITION KEY
IN THE “ON” POSITION
WITH THE ENGINE NOT RUNNING.
3-12
Engines & Controls
Engines & Controls
REMOTE CONTROL
REMOTE CONTROL
Your vessel uses a single
lever remote control
NEUTRAL RELEASE
similar to the illustration.
12 LEVER
To help visualize the
11
1
operating principals we
have used a clock mode.
The lever in the straightup or 12 o’clock (neutral)
position is detended and
9
3 features a push button
(see illustration)which
SAFETY
LANYARD (PUSH BUTTON)
allows advancing the
throttle for neutral or
starting the engine without engaging the gearshift. This feature
is useful when trying to start a cold engine.
Pushing the throttle lever forward from the neutral 12 o’clock
position to the 11 o’clock position will engage forward gear
with minimum throttle. From the 11 o’clock position to the 9
o’clock position the vessel is in forward gear with forward
throttle selections.
Pulling the throttle back from the neutral 12 o’clock position
to the 1 o’clock position will engage reverse gear with minimum
throttle. From the 1 o’clock position to the 3 o’clock position
the vessel is in reverse gear with reverse throttle selections.
As you shift from neutral to forward or reverse positions, push
up on the neutral release lever located under the gearshift knob.
This will allow the control to shift into the desired gear.
Your vessel uses a single
lever remote control
NEUTRAL RELEASE
similar to the illustration.
12 LEVER
To help visualize the
11
1
operating principals we
have used a clock mode.
The lever in the straightup or 12 o’clock (neutral)
position is detended and
9
3 features a push button
(see illustration)which
SAFETY
LANYARD (PUSH BUTTON)
allows advancing the
throttle for neutral or
starting the engine without engaging the gearshift. This feature
is useful when trying to start a cold engine.
Pushing the throttle lever forward from the neutral 12 o’clock
position to the 11 o’clock position will engage forward gear
with minimum throttle. From the 11 o’clock position to the 9
o’clock position the vessel is in forward gear with forward
throttle selections.
Pulling the throttle back from the neutral 12 o’clock position
to the 1 o’clock position will engage reverse gear with minimum
throttle. From the 1 o’clock position to the 3 o’clock position
the vessel is in reverse gear with reverse throttle selections.
As you shift from neutral to forward or reverse positions, push
up on the neutral release lever located under the gearshift knob.
This will allow the control to shift into the desired gear.
Neutral Safety Switch
Neutral Safety Switch
The remote control features a neutral safety switch which ensures
the stern drive and control are in the detented neutral position for
starting the engine.
The remote control features a neutral safety switch which ensures
the stern drive and control are in the detented neutral position for
starting the engine.
Forward
Reverse
3-13
Forward
Reverse
3-13
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 3
You will hear a distinct sound and will “feel” the remote control in
the detended neutral position. If you turn the key to the “start”
position and the engine starter doesn’t crank over the engine make
sure the remote control is in the detented neutral position.
You will hear a distinct sound and will “feel” the remote control in
the detended neutral position. If you turn the key to the “start”
position and the engine starter doesn’t crank over the engine make
sure the remote control is in the detented neutral position.
Remember these points when shifting :
Remember these points when shifting :
1. Do not shift quickly from forward to reverse gear postitions.
Drive system damage may occur.
1. Do not shift quickly from forward to reverse gear postitions.
Drive system damage may occur.
2. Do not “pump” the throttle in neutral or flooding will result.
The same thing will happen if you keep pumping the automobile
accelerator pedal. Today’s engines use an enrichment valve system
that requires very little starting throttle.
2. Do not “pump” the throttle in neutral or flooding will result.
The same thing will happen if you keep pumping the automobile
accelerator pedal. Today’s engines use an enrichment valve system
that requires very little starting throttle.
3. Do not try to shift into forward or revese gear at high rpm’s.
Personal injury, drive system or property damage may result.
3. Do not try to shift into forward or revese gear at high rpm’s.
Personal injury, drive system or property damage may result.
4. Only use idle throttle positions when docking or maneuvering in
tight quarters.
4. Only use idle throttle positions when docking or maneuvering in
tight quarters.
5. Wear your safety lanyard at all times.
5. Wear your safety lanyard at all times.
6. Never shift the controls with the engine not running. Control,
inkage and or stern drive damage may occur.
6. Never shift the controls with the engine not running. Control,
inkage and or stern drive damage may occur.
7. For more information read your engine manufacturer’s manual
before operating the remote control.
7. For more information read your engine manufacturer’s manual
before operating the remote control.
3-14
3-14
Engines & Controls
Engines & Controls
Safety Lanyard (Interrupt Switch)
Safety Lanyard (Interrupt Switch)
The safety lanyard (used on selected remote controls) is sometimes
called an interrupter switch is attached to the operator and the
remote control panel (See the illustrations). Should the operator
lose control of the vessel and become dislodged from his seat or fall
overboard the lanyard will shut the engine off.
The safety lanyard (used on selected remote controls) is sometimes
called an interrupter switch is attached to the operator and the
remote control panel (See the illustrations). Should the operator
lose control of the vessel and become dislodged from his seat or fall
overboard the lanyard will shut the engine off.
ATTACH TO
OPERATOR
ATTACH TO
OPERATOR
Make sure the lanyard is installed to a part of clothing such as a belt
or belt loop before operating the vessel. Never disconnect the hook
from attached clothing while the engine is running.
Make sure the lanyard is installed to a part of clothing such as a belt
or belt loop before operating the vessel. Never disconnect the hook
from attached clothing while the engine is running.
NOTICE
NOTICE
IF THE INTERRUPT SWITCH IS IN THE “OFF” POSITION
THE ENGINE WILL CRANK OVER
BUT WILL NOT START.
!
WARNING
IF THE INTERRUPT SWITCH IS IN THE “OFF” POSITION
THE ENGINE WILL CRANK OVER
BUT WILL NOT START.
!
INTERRUPT SWITCH MUST BE ATTACHED TO
OPERATOR WHILE ENGINE IS RUNNING.
QUALIFIED OPERATOR MUST BE IN CONTROL
AT ALL TIMES. READ OWNER'S MANUAL BEFORE USE
3-15
WARNING
INTERRUPT SWITCH MUST BE ATTACHED TO
OPERATOR WHILE ENGINE IS RUNNING.
QUALIFIED OPERATOR MUST BE IN CONTROL
AT ALL TIMES. READ OWNER'S MANUAL BEFORE USE
3-15
CHAPTER 3
3-16
CHAPTER 3
Notes
3-16
Notes
Systems
Systems
ELECTRICAL
ELECTRICAL
There are two types of electrical systems available on most vessels.
One is called direct current ( DC for short). Regal boats primarily use
12 volt DC current. It is called DC because in a circuit it flows one way
only. Your automobile is a typical example of 12 volt DC current.
Alternating current is used on boats with shore power capacity. It is
called alternating current (AC) because it travels in one direction and
then in a fraction of a second reverses its flow. Shorepower uses
alternating current on selected boats. It is normally 120 volts and 60
cycles per second in the United States. Your home is an example of
alternating current. In this manual, we will focus on direct current.
There are two types of electrical systems available on most vessels.
One is called direct current ( DC for short). Regal boats primarily use
12 volt DC current. It is called DC because in a circuit it flows one way
only. Your automobile is a typical example of 12 volt DC current.
Alternating current is used on boats with shore power capacity. It is
called alternating current (AC) because it travels in one direction and
then in a fraction of a second reverses its flow. Shorepower uses
alternating current on selected boats. It is normally 120 volts and 60
cycles per second in the United States. Your home is an example of
alternating current. In this manual, we will focus on direct current.
Direct Current (12 volt DC)
Direct Current (12 volt DC)
Storage batteries (sometimes called wet- lead cell
batteries) furnish 12 volt electricity to boat
components. Storage batteries use 2 dissimilar
metals immersed in an liquid to carry current
(acid). The engines require large reverse amounts
of battery power for starting purposes. Check
the maintenance chapter for battery information.
The automobile battery is charged up by the engine alternator. The
same holds true for the marine battery. The dash volt meter displays
the battery voltage. If the volt meter shows below 12 volts there could
be a charging system malfunction. This condition needs to be
investigated before the batteries become completely drained.
Storage batteries (sometimes called wet- lead cell
batteries) furnish 12 volt electricity to boat
components. Storage batteries use 2 dissimilar
metals immersed in an liquid to carry current
(acid). The engines require large reverse amounts
of battery power for starting purposes. Check
the maintenance chapter for battery information.
The automobile battery is charged up by the engine alternator. The
same holds true for the marine battery. The dash volt meter displays
the battery voltage. If the volt meter shows below 12 volts there could
be a charging system malfunction. This condition needs to be
investigated before the batteries become completely drained.
4-1
4-1
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 4
WIRE COLOR CODES (solid color/stripe)
WIRE COLOR CODES (solid color/stripe)
Color
Function
Color
Battery Cable To Engine
All Grounds
Halon Fire Extinguisher
Water Pressure Pump
Aft Bilge Pump/Manual
Fwd. Bilge Pump/Manual
Overboard Discharge Pump
Aft Auto Bilge Pump
Fwd. Auto Bilge Pump
CO Detector
Blower
Stereo Memory
Refrigerator, Hatch Ram
Windshield Wiper/Run
Windshield Wiper/Park
Horn
Spotlight
Interior Lights
Cockpit Lights
Engine Cranking Circuit
Red
00
Black
16 to 4
Black/White 16
Brown
12
Brown
16
Brown
16
Brown/Black 10
Brown/White 16
Brown/Red 16
Brown/Pink 16
Yellow
12
Yellow/Black 16
Orange
12
Orange
16
Orange/White 16
Orange/Black 16
Orange
10
Blue
14
Blue/White 14
Yellow/Red 14
Gauge
Red
00
Black
16 to 4
Black/White 16
Brown
12
Brown
16
Brown
16
Brown/Black 10
Brown/White 16
Brown/Red 16
Brown/Pink 16
Yellow
12
Yellow/Black 16
Orange
12
Orange
16
Orange/White 16
Orange/Black 16
Orange
10
Blue
14
Blue/White 14
Yellow/Red 14
4-2
4-2
Gauge
Function
Battery Cable To Engine
All Grounds
Halon Fire Extinguisher
Water Pressure Pump
Aft Bilge Pump/Manual
Fwd. Bilge Pump/Manual
Overboard Discharge Pump
Aft Auto Bilge Pump
Fwd. Auto Bilge Pump
CO Detector
Blower
Stereo Memory
Refrigerator, Hatch Ram
Windshield Wiper/Run
Windshield Wiper/Park
Horn
Spotlight
Interior Lights
Cockpit Lights
Engine Cranking Circuit
Systems
Systems
WIRE COLOR CODES (CON’T.)
WIRE COLOR CODES (CON’T.)
Color
Gauge
Function
Color
Gauge
Function
Blue
Blue/White
Gray
Gray/White
Gray/Black
Red/Black
Red/White
Red
10
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
Blue
Blue/White
Gray
Gray/White
Gray/Black
Red/Black
Red/White
Red
10
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
Red
Red
Red
Red
Red
Red
Yellow/Black
Purple
Green
Green
Pink
2/0
2
4
6
8
14
16
16
8
16
16
Cabin Light Main Feed
Transom Courtesy Lights
Bow, Navigation Lights
Mast Light (Fwd. Running)
Mast Light (Anchor Light)
Windlass Up
Windlass Down
Gas Vapor Detector, Stereo
Remote, Breaker To Dash
Feed Leads
Main DC Panel Feed
Positive Feed, Starter, Battery
Positive Feed
Positive Feed, Alt. Charge
Positive Feed, Alt. Charge
Positive Feed, Electronics
Tank Monitor
Hour Meter
Bonding
Tank Level Monitor
Fuel Tank Sender Feed
Red
Red
Red
Red
Red
Red
Yellow/Black
Purple
Green
Green
Pink
2/0
2
4
6
8
14
16
16
8
16
16
Cabin Light Main Feed
Transom Courtesy Lights
Bow, Navigation Lights
Mast Light (Fwd. Running)
Mast Light (Anchor Light)
Windlass Up
Windlass Down
Gas Vapor Detector, Stereo
Remote, Breaker To Dash
Feed Leads
Main DC Panel Feed
Positive Feed, Starter, Battery
Positive Feed
Positive Feed, Alt. Charge
Positive Feed, Alt. Charge
Positive Feed, Electronics
Tank Monitor
Hour Meter
Bonding
Tank Level Monitor
Fuel Tank Sender Feed
4-3
4-3
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 4
The standard wire color, gauge size and function shown is used
throughout the marine industry. The charts are helpful in identifying
wire circuitry during troubleshooting or the adding of marine
accessories. Never replace a wire with a size other than shown in the
chart. This practice could result in fire or component failure.
The standard wire color, gauge size and function shown is used
throughout the marine industry. The charts are helpful in identifying
wire circuitry during troubleshooting or the adding of marine
accessories. Never replace a wire with a size other than shown in the
chart. This practice could result in fire or component failure.
DC Switches
DC Switches
Following is a summary of direct current switches used on Regal boats.
Your boat may not have some of these switches since electrical
components and specifications can change at any time. These switches
may be located at the dash, cockpit or part of a DC control panel.
Following is a summary of direct current switches used on Regal boats.
Your boat may not have some of these switches since electrical
components and specifications can change at any time. These switches
may be located at the dash, cockpit or part of a DC control panel.
Blower
Blower
This switch controls the blower in the bilge. The blower must be
activated (turned to the “on” position at least 4 minutes prior to starting
the engine. The blower should be used below cruising speeds.
This switch controls the blower in the bilge. The blower must be
activated (turned to the “on” position at least 4 minutes prior to starting
the engine. The blower should be used below cruising speeds.
!
WARNING
GASOLINE VAPORS CAN EXPLODE. BEFORE STARTING
ENGINE, OPERATE BLOWER 4 MINUTES AND CHECK
ENGINE COMPARTMENT FOR GASOLINE LEAKS OR
VAPORS. RUN BLOWER BELOW CRUSING SPEED.
!
WARNING
GASOLINE VAPORS CAN EXPLODE. BEFORE STARTING
ENGINE, OPERATE BLOWER 4 MINUTES AND CHECK
ENGINE COMPARTMENT FOR GASOLINE LEAKS OR
VAPORS. RUN BLOWER BELOW CRUSING SPEED.
Navigation/Anchor
Navigation/Anchor
This switch controls the running and stern lights. It is a two position
switch. Activate the top section and the running lights (navigation and
stern lights) are activated. Activate the bottom portion and the stern
light (360 degree light) is activated. Remember the navigation lights,
sometimes called running lights must be used between sunset and
This switch controls the running and stern lights. It is a two position
switch. Activate the top section and the running lights (navigation and
stern lights) are activated. Activate the bottom portion and the stern
light (360 degree light) is activated. Remember the navigation lights,
sometimes called running lights must be used between sunset and
4-4
4-4
Systems
Systems
sunrise. Should you anchor or stop the vessel at night the 360 degree
light is required to be lit.
sunrise. Should you anchor or stop the vessel at night the 360 degree
light is required to be lit.
Cockpit Lights
Cockpit Lights
This switch controls the courtesy lights in the cockpit area. Using these
lights is especially useful when boarding or exiting the vessel at night.
This switch controls the courtesy lights in the cockpit area. Using these
lights is especially useful when boarding or exiting the vessel at night.
Horn
Horn
This switch controls the audible horn signal. Be sure to test the horn
before each outing and learn the horn and bridge signals.
This switch controls the audible horn signal. Be sure to test the horn
before each outing and learn the horn and bridge signals.
Bilge Pump
Bilge Pump
This switch controls the bilge pump located in the engine compartment.
It works manually or automatically. When the switch is manually
activated the bilge pump sends the accumulated bilge water overboard.
There is a outlet on the aft hull where you can visually monitor the
exiting water. When the water stops deactivate the bilge pump switch.
In the automatic mode, the swich uses a float switch. When bilge water
reaches a predetermined level, the float switch activates the bilge
pump.There is a built-in lighted icon on the dash bilge pump switch
that lights when the automatic mode is activated. The operator should
monitor this icon periodically while operating the vessel. If the light
activates stop the vessel and investigate the problem. Check the bilge
pump before each outing and remove any foreign objects caught in
the float switch or pump grating.
This switch controls the bilge pump located in the engine compartment.
It works manually or automatically. When the switch is manually
activated the bilge pump sends the accumulated bilge water overboard.
There is a outlet on the aft hull where you can visually monitor the
exiting water. When the water stops deactivate the bilge pump switch.
In the automatic mode, the swich uses a float switch. When bilge water
reaches a predetermined level, the float switch activates the bilge
pump.There is a built-in lighted icon on the dash bilge pump switch
that lights when the automatic mode is activated. The operator should
monitor this icon periodically while operating the vessel. If the light
activates stop the vessel and investigate the problem. Check the bilge
pump before each outing and remove any foreign objects caught in
the float switch or pump grating.
Fresh Water
Fresh Water
This switch controls the fresh water pump used on selected models.
Make sure this switch is turned to the “off ” position before deboarding
since the pump could be damaged if the system developed a leak,
etc.
This switch controls the fresh water pump used on selected models.
Make sure this switch is turned to the “off ” position before deboarding
since the pump could be damaged if the system developed a leak,
etc.
4-5
4-5
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 4
Docking Lights
Docking Lights
This switch controls the hull docking lights. They are very useful for
night maneuvering and docking.
This switch controls the hull docking lights. They are very useful for
night maneuvering and docking.
Engine Hatch
Engine Hatch
This switch controls the engine hatch used on selected models. It
supplies power to a hydraulic ram which opens the hatch. Be sure all
persons and objects are clear of the engine hatch area and before
activating the switch. Keep an “eye” on the engine hatch while it is
opening or closing.
This switch controls the engine hatch used on selected models. It
supplies power to a hydraulic ram which opens the hatch. Be sure all
persons and objects are clear of the engine hatch area and before
activating the switch. Keep an “eye” on the engine hatch while it is
opening or closing.
Accessory (Acc)
Accessory (Acc)
This switch controls any after market accessories installed on the boat.
Make sure any added equipment is matched to the breaker protecting
the circuit.
This switch controls any after market accessories installed on the boat.
Make sure any added equipment is matched to the breaker protecting
the circuit.
Windlass
Windlass
This switch controls the optional anchor windlass.
This switch controls the optional anchor windlass.
DC Circuit Protection
DC Circuit Protection
As part of the direct current circuitry the engine features a breaker
with a reset button. This breaker protects the engine wiring from
overloads. Refer to the engine owner’s manual for the breaker location
and operation.
In addition, there are dash breakers protecting the individual switches.
If they “pop” due to an overload, they can be reset by pressing the
breaker reset. TheDC breaker sizes are listed. Replace a breaker with
the identical capacity only! Where fuses are used replace with the same
amperage and type.
Following is a DC breaker and or fuse listing for your boat.
4-6
As part of the direct current circuitry the engine features a breaker
with a reset button. This breaker protects the engine wiring from
overloads. Refer to the engine owner’s manual for the breaker location
and operation.
In addition, there are dash breakers protecting the individual switches.
If they “pop” due to an overload, they can be reset by pressing the
breaker reset. TheDC breaker sizes are listed. Replace a breaker with
the identical capacity only! Where fuses are used replace with the same
amperage and type.
Following is a DC breaker and or fuse listing for your boat.
4-6
Systems
DC BREAKER & FUSE LISTING
Systems
DC BREAKER & FUSE LISTING
Function
Breaker/Fuse
Size In Amps
Fuse Or Breaker
Function
Breaker/Fuse
Size In Amps
Fuse Or Breaker
Accessory Plug
10
Either
Accessory Plug
10
Either
Water Pressure Pump 15
Either
Water Pressure Pump 15
Either
Waste Pump
20
Either
Waste Pump
20
Either
Refrigerator
10
Either
Refrigerator
10
Either
Cabin Lights
10
Either
Cabin Lights
10
Either
Cockpit Lights
5
Either
Cockpit Lights
5
Either
Stereo
10
Fuse
Stereo
10
Fuse
Stereo Memory
2
Fuse
Stereo Memory
2
Fuse
CO Monitor
3
1
Either
Fuse
CO Monitor
3
1
Either
Fuse
Bilge Pump
3
Either
Bilge Pump
3
Either
Blower
5
Breaker
Blower
5
Breaker
Horn
10
Breaker
Horn
10
Breaker
Ignition
20
Breaker
Ignition
20
Breaker
Nav/Anchor Lights
10
Breaker
Nav/Anchor Lights
10
Breaker
* NOTE: Parts of the above denote optional equipment
* NOTE: Parts of the above denote optional equipment
4-7
4-7
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 4
Battery Switch
Battery Switch
There are two styles of battery switches used. One type displays on
and off positions with a selection knob. With this style switch the
operator simply turns the knob to the “off ” position when exiting the
boat. Make sure the knob is fully detended when selecting the on or
off functions. The automatic bilge pump still operates with the battery
switch off. The location of this switch varies but normally it is mounted
in the aft cockpit engine compartment.
The other style battery switch used displays 4 functions; off, 1, all and
2. They stand for off position, battery l, both batteries and battery 2.
This switch is designed to start the engine from either battery if one is
low or both batteries. Simply turn the knob to the desired position
before cranking over the engine. This switch features “make before
break” technology which allows the operator to turn the knob between
1, 2, or all positions with the engine running. It is recommended that
you alternate between battery 1 and 2 positions each outing. Both
batteries will stay charged this way. If you operate the switch in the all
position and a malfunction occurs it is possible to drain both batteries.
This battery switch is normally located in a weather protected
compartment in the cockpit. See the illustration.
There are two styles of battery switches used. One type displays on
and off positions with a selection knob. With this style switch the
operator simply turns the knob to the “off ” position when exiting the
boat. Make sure the knob is fully detended when selecting the on or
off functions. The automatic bilge pump still operates with the battery
switch off. The location of this switch varies but normally it is mounted
in the aft cockpit engine compartment.
The other style battery switch used displays 4 functions; off, 1, all and
2. They stand for off position, battery l, both batteries and battery 2.
This switch is designed to start the engine from either battery if one is
low or both batteries. Simply turn the knob to the desired position
before cranking over the engine. This switch features “make before
break” technology which allows the operator to turn the knob between
1, 2, or all positions with the engine running. It is recommended that
you alternate between battery 1 and 2 positions each outing. Both
batteries will stay charged this way. If you operate the switch in the all
position and a malfunction occurs it is possible to drain both batteries.
This battery switch is normally located in a weather protected
compartment in the cockpit. See the illustration.
Battery Switch Box
Battery Switch Box
Inside the battery switch box are several electrical items. One of the
items just to the right of the battery switch is a breaker normally 30
amps with a red reset button. This breaker protects the main red
power lead running up to the dash.
A stereo memory fuse is located in the small panel at the bottom of
the box. Should the batteries be disconnected for a short period of
time the stereo memory of selected stations and other functions
remains intact.
The aft bilge pump fuse protects the bilge pump normally located in
the engine compartment area.
Inside the battery switch box are several electrical items. One of the
items just to the right of the battery switch is a breaker normally 30
amps with a red reset button. This breaker protects the main red
power lead running up to the dash.
A stereo memory fuse is located in the small panel at the bottom of
the box. Should the batteries be disconnected for a short period of
time the stereo memory of selected stations and other functions
remains intact.
The aft bilge pump fuse protects the bilge pump normally located in
the engine compartment area.
4-8
4-8
Systems
TYPICAL BATTERY SWITCH BOX
Systems
TYPICAL BATTERY SWITCH BOX
BREAKER
BREAKER
BATTERY
SWITCH
BATTERY
SWITCH
STEREO MEMORY FUSE
AFT BILGE PUMP FUSE
NOTICE
STEREO MEMORY FUSE
AFT BILGE PUMP FUSE
NOTICE
AVOID DAMAGE TO THE ALTERNATOR
AND OR CHARGING SYSTEM COMPONENTS.
NEVER TURN THE BATTERY SWITCH TO THE “OFF”
POSITION WITH THE ENGINE RUNNING
4-9
AVOID DAMAGE TO THE ALTERNATOR
AND OR CHARGING SYSTEM COMPONENTS.
NEVER TURN THE BATTERY SWITCH TO THE “OFF”
POSITION WITH THE ENGINE RUNNING
4-9
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 4
FUEL
FUEL
The fuel system consists of a fuel tank, fuel fill fittings marked “gas”
or “diesel”, fuel hoses, fuel vents, anti-siphon valve, fuel filter, fuel
gauge and sender. Each one of these components plays an important
role in providing an uninterrupted flow of fuel while operating your
boat. Refer to the technical drawing section for system specifics.
The fuel system consists of a fuel tank, fuel fill fittings marked “gas”
or “diesel”, fuel hoses, fuel vents, anti-siphon valve, fuel filter, fuel
gauge and sender. Each one of these components plays an important
role in providing an uninterrupted flow of fuel while operating your
boat. Refer to the technical drawing section for system specifics.
Fuel Tank
Fuel Tank
Your boat uses an aluminum or polyester fuel tank. These tanks are
tested several times along with the fuel system components for safety
requirements and dependibility in house and inspected independently
by National Marine Manufacturers Association personnel.
Your boat uses an aluminum or polyester fuel tank. These tanks are
tested several times along with the fuel system components for safety
requirements and dependibility in house and inspected independently
by National Marine Manufacturers Association personnel.
Fuel Fills
Fuel Fills
The fuel fills are labeled “gas” or “diesel” and are
normally located on the aft deck. When fueling the
boat keep the fill nozzle in contact with the fuel fill
pipe since it decreases static electricity. Always use
the recommended fuel octane rating as specified in
your engine owners manual. Extinguish all flame
producing agents before fueling! Read the section regarding fueling in
chapter 5.
The fuel fills are labeled “gas” or “diesel” and are
normally located on the aft deck. When fueling the
boat keep the fill nozzle in contact with the fuel fill
pipe since it decreases static electricity. Always use
the recommended fuel octane rating as specified in
your engine owners manual. Extinguish all flame
producing agents before fueling! Read the section regarding fueling in
chapter 5.
!
WARNING
USE OF ALCOHOL ENHANCED FUEL, OR ANY FUEL
OTHER THAN GASOLINE,
CAN LEAD TO DETERIORATION OF THE FUEL
SYSTEM COMPONENTS.
CAN RESULT IN FIRE AND POSSIBLE EXPLOSION
4-10
!
WARNING
USE OF ALCOHOL ENHANCED FUEL, OR ANY FUEL
OTHER THAN GASOLINE,
CAN LEAD TO DETERIORATION OF THE FUEL
SYSTEM COMPONENTS.
CAN RESULT IN FIRE AND POSSIBLE EXPLOSION
4-10
Systems
Systems
Fuel Vents
Fuel Vents
Fuel tanks are vented overboard for the fumes to escape. While the
tank is filled, air is displaced by the incoming fuel is relieved through
the fuel vent. When the fuel tank is near or full slow down or stop the
nozzle flow to keep the fuel from splashing out the vent.
There are two types of fuel vents. One style is located near the fuel fill
fitting on the aft deck and is designed to minimize any fuel spillage.
The other type of fuel fill used is a combo type. The fuel fill and the
vent occupy the same cavity under a protected cover. If fuel overflows
through the vent the design forces it back into the fuel fill and tank.
Fuel tanks are vented overboard for the fumes to escape. While the
tank is filled, air is displaced by the incoming fuel is relieved through
the fuel vent. When the fuel tank is near or full slow down or stop the
nozzle flow to keep the fuel from splashing out the vent.
There are two types of fuel vents. One style is located near the fuel fill
fitting on the aft deck and is designed to minimize any fuel spillage.
The other type of fuel fill used is a combo type. The fuel fill and the
vent occupy the same cavity under a protected cover. If fuel overflows
through the vent the design forces it back into the fuel fill and tank.
SEPARATE GAS
VENT
FILL
SEPARATE GAS
VENT
FILL
COMBO FUEL VENT FIILL
COMBO FUEL VENT FIILL
A seasond skipper will hear when the tank is near the top to avoid
any overboard spills which could harm the environment.
A seasond skipper will hear when the tank is near the top to avoid
any overboard spills which could harm the environment.
Anti-Siphon Valve
Anti-Siphon Valve
The fuel feed line is equipped with an anti-siphon valve at the fuel feed
line tank connector. The valve is pulled off its seat by fuel pump pressure
as the engine is cranking or running. It forms a one- way fuel roadway.
It prevents fuel from siphoning out of the tank in the event of a fuel
line rupture or disconneted fuel feed hose. As you can see they are
important safety items.
4-11
The fuel feed line is equipped with an anti-siphon valve at the fuel feed
line tank connector. The valve is pulled off its seat by fuel pump pressure
as the engine is cranking or running. It forms a one- way fuel roadway.
It prevents fuel from siphoning out of the tank in the event of a fuel
line rupture or disconneted fuel feed hose. As you can see they are
important safety items.
4-11
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 4
Do not remove the anti-siphon valve or its components from the fuel
tank. Clean or replace a clogged or stuck anti-siphon valve. Contact
your closest Regal dealer or marine professional for more information
Do not remove the anti-siphon valve or its components from the fuel
tank. Clean or replace a clogged or stuck anti-siphon valve. Contact
your closest Regal dealer or marine professional for more information
Fuel Gauge & Sender
Fuel Gauge & Sender
The dash fuel gauge is only an indication of the on board fuel supply.
They are not exact reading instruments. Therefore, use the one third
rule discussed earlier for monitoring your fuel supply. There are not many
filling stations on the open waterways!
The gas sender located in the fuel tank uses a float system which sends
a signal to the dash fuel gauge as to the fuel tank level.
The dash fuel gauge is only an indication of the on board fuel supply.
They are not exact reading instruments. Therefore, use the one third
rule discussed earlier for monitoring your fuel supply. There are not many
filling stations on the open waterways!
The gas sender located in the fuel tank uses a float system which sends
a signal to the dash fuel gauge as to the fuel tank level.
Fuel Filters
Fuel Filters
Fuel filters are installed on marine engines. They are of the spin on
type similar to your cars oil filter. Their main purpose is to trap dirt
particles and water in fuel. It is a good idea to keep an extra fuel filter
on board along with a filter wrench, pan and clean rags for emergencies.
Dispose of all fuel residued materials in an environmentally safe
fashion.Consult your engine owner’s manual for more information.
Fuel filters are installed on marine engines. They are of the spin on
type similar to your cars oil filter. Their main purpose is to trap dirt
particles and water in fuel. It is a good idea to keep an extra fuel filter
on board along with a filter wrench, pan and clean rags for emergencies.
Dispose of all fuel residued materials in an environmentally safe
fashion.Consult your engine owner’s manual for more information.
Diesel Fuel System
Diesel Fuel System
Diesel boats use special fuel filters. Most of these filters have a thumb
screw to drain settled particles via the bottom of the filter. Refer to
the engine manufacturers owners manual for further information.
Diesel boats use special fuel filters. Most of these filters have a thumb
screw to drain settled particles via the bottom of the filter. Refer to
the engine manufacturers owners manual for further information.
!
CAUTION
!
ALGAE CAN GROW IN DIESEL FUEL
PERIODICALLY ADD A CONDITIONER
TO THE DIESEL FUEL SYSTEM
4-12
CAUTION
ALGAE CAN GROW IN DIESEL FUEL
PERIODICALLY ADD A CONDITIONER
TO THE DIESEL FUEL SYSTEM
4-12
Systems
Systems
WATER
WATER
Water System Description
Water System Description
Selected models are equipped with a fresh water
supply system. It consists of a water tank, fill and
vent, sink, and a hand pump or a faucet supplied
by a water pressure switch.
One type of fresh water system uses a water tank
with a dockside water fill. There is a hand pump
on the faucet that supplies water when primed.
The other type is called the pressure water system.
It uses the same deck water fill and relies on a 12
DECK WATER FILL
volt pump located between the water tank and
the faucet to supply water. To activate the system
there is a dash switch marked “water pressure”.
When activated the switch sends power to the
pressure pump which supplies fresh water.
When the water supply line is full a pressure valve
switch releases.
We recommend turning the dash pressure switch “off ” when the vessel
is left for extended periods. For initial filling of the water system and
winterizing, refer to the operation and maintenance sections.
Selected models are equipped with a fresh water
supply system. It consists of a water tank, fill and
vent, sink, and a hand pump or a faucet supplied
by a water pressure switch.
One type of fresh water system uses a water tank
with a dockside water fill. There is a hand pump
on the faucet that supplies water when primed.
The other type is called the pressure water system.
It uses the same deck water fill and relies on a 12
DECK WATER FILL
volt pump located between the water tank and
the faucet to supply water. To activate the system
there is a dash switch marked “water pressure”.
When activated the switch sends power to the
pressure pump which supplies fresh water.
When the water supply line is full a pressure valve
switch releases.
We recommend turning the dash pressure switch “off ” when the vessel
is left for extended periods. For initial filling of the water system and
winterizing, refer to the operation and maintenance sections.
WASTE
WASTE
Waste System Description
Waste System Description
The waste system normally consists of a self-contained sanitation device
known as a chemical toilet. It features an upper fresh water tank and a
lower deodorized tank. These two components can be separated for
waste disposal, cleaning and refilling. The lower tank contains a capacity
The waste system normally consists of a self-contained sanitation device
known as a chemical toilet. It features an upper fresh water tank and a
lower deodorized tank. These two components can be separated for
waste disposal, cleaning and refilling. The lower tank contains a capacity
4-13
4-13
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 4
gauge. Before each outing, check the waste level since it is illegal to
dump waste within and extending out 3 miles from United States
territorial waters. Be sure to use the proper chemicals and paper in
the unit that are biodegradable and environmentally friendly.
Chemical toilet supplies are available at most marine oultle stores
and marinas. Some chemical heads feature an optional waste fitting
that permits a pump out station hook-up for removing waste. This
procedure saves manually dumping the tank. The optional pump out
fitting is located on the side of the deck and is labeled “waste”. Refer
to the owner’s information pouch and this manual for additional
information.
gauge. Before each outing, check the waste level since it is illegal to
dump waste within and extending out 3 miles from United States
territorial waters. Be sure to use the proper chemicals and paper in
the unit that are biodegradable and environmentally friendly.
Chemical toilet supplies are available at most marine oultle stores
and marinas. Some chemical heads feature an optional waste fitting
that permits a pump out station hook-up for removing waste. This
procedure saves manually dumping the tank. The optional pump out
fitting is located on the side of the deck and is labeled “waste”. Refer
to the owner’s information pouch and this manual for additional
information.
TYPICAL CHEMICAL TOILET
TYPICAL CHEMICAL TOILET
FLUSHING BELLOWS
FLUSHING BELLOWS
FRESH WATER TANK
FRESH WATER TANK
DEODORIZED WASTE TANK
HOLD DOWN
BRACKET
4-14
DEODORIZED WASTE TANK
HOLD DOWN
BRACKET
LIFT & PULL FORWARD
TO REMOVE HEAD UNIT
4-14
LIFT & PULL FORWARD
TO REMOVE HEAD UNIT
Vessel Operation
Vessel Operation
This chapter explores the many faucets of running
your vessel from casting off to docking and handling
emergencies. We cover the basics but suggest you read
other information on the chapter topics. Also, become
familiar with your engine owner’s manual since many
of the items discussed are found there in more detail.
This chapter explores the many faucets of running
your vessel from casting off to docking and handling
emergencies. We cover the basics but suggest you read
other information on the chapter topics. Also, become
familiar with your engine owner’s manual since many
of the items discussed are found there in more detail.
GETTING UNDERWAY
GETTING UNDERWAY
Pre-Departure Questionnaire
Pre-Departure Questionnaire
Have all fluid levels been topped off ?
Have all fluid levels been topped off ?
Is the fuel tank full?
Is the fuel tank full?
Is all safety equipment accounted for and easily accessible?
Is all safety equipment accounted for and easily accessible?
Are navigation lights and horn in good working condition?
Are navigation lights and horn in good working condition?
Is the bilge free of water and does the bilge pump operate?
Is the bilge free of water and does the bilge pump operate?
Is the engine, outdrive, and propeller in good working condition?
Is the engine, outdrive, and propeller in good working condition?
Is the drain plug in place (Dry stored vessels)?
Is the drain plug in place (Dry stored vessels)?
Have all passengers been briefed on emergency procedures and
seated for departure? Is the boat load balanced?
5-1
Have all passengers been briefed on emergency procedures and
seated for departure? Is the boat load balanced?
5-1
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 5
Is the operator sober, alert and ready to skipper the vessel?
Is the operator sober, alert and ready to skipper the vessel?
Have all passengers been fitted for life jackets?
Have all passengers been fitted for life jackets?
Has a float plan been filed and left with a component person?
Has a float plan been filed and left with a component person?
Has the bilge been sniffed and the fuel system leak checked?
Has the bilge been sniffed and the fuel system leak checked?
Are the seacocks open (if applicable)?
Are the seacocks open (if applicable)?
Is all communication equipment in good operating condition?
Is all communication equipment in good operating condition?
Has a second person been briefed on operational procedures
should the skipper become disabled?
Has a second person been briefed on operational procedures
should the skipper become disabled?
Are all gauges and electrical switches functioning properly?
Are all gauges and electrical switches functioning properly?
Has weather information been gathered and analyzed?
Has weather information been gathered and analyzed?
Underway Questionaire
Underway Questionaire
After casting off have all dock lines and fenders been stowed?
After casting off have all dock lines and fenders been stowed?
Are all passengers seated and all transom doors closed?
Are all passengers seated and all transom doors closed?
As skipper are you monitoring the dash gauges for changes?
As skipper are you monitoring the dash gauges for changes?
As skipper are you on the lookout for changing weather?
As skipper are you on the lookout for changing weather?
As skipper are you checking for abnormal vibration or steering?
As skipper are you checking for abnormal vibration or steering?
Is the remote control safety lanyard (if equipped) tightly secured
to your belt or clothing?
Is the remote control safety lanyard (if equipped) tightly secured
to your belt or clothing?
5-2
5-2
Vessel Operation
Vessel Operation
Disembarking Questionaire
Disembarking Questionaire
Have you removed the keys from the ignition and
secured them?
Have you removed the keys from the ignition and
secured them?
Have all systems been checked for leaks?
Have all systems been checked for leaks?
Has the battery switch been turned to the “off ” position?
Has the battery switch been turned to the “off ” position?
Are all hatches and portholes secured and seacocks closed?
Are all hatches and portholes secured and seacocks closed?
Has the fuel tank been filled enough to prevent condensation?
Has the fuel tank been filled enough to prevent condensation?
Is the vessel properly tied and covered with equipment stored?
Is the vessel properly tied and covered with equipment stored?
FUELING
!
FUELING
DANGER
!
AVOID PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH!
GASOLINE IS A HIGHLY FLAMMABLE
AND EXPLOSIVE MATERIAL.
PRACTICE “NO SMOKING” AND EXTINGUISH ALL
FLAMMABLE MATERIALS WITHIN 75 FEET
OF THE FUEL DOCK.
!
WARNING
AVOID PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH!
GASOLINE IS A HIGHLY FLAMMABLE
AND EXPLOSIVE MATERIAL.
PRACTICE “NO SMOKING” AND EXTINGUISH ALL
FLAMMABLE MATERIALS WITHIN 75 FEET
OF THE FUEL DOCK.
!
AVOID SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH
FROM EXPLOSION OR FIRE
RESULTING FROM LEAKING FUEL.
INSPECT ENTIRE FUEL SYSTEM
AT LEAST ONCE A YEAR.
DANGER
WARNING
AVOID SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH
FROM EXPLOSION OR FIRE
RESULTING FROM LEAKING FUEL.
INSPECT ENTIRE FUEL SYSTEM
AT LEAST ONCE A YEAR.
5-3
5-3
CHAPTER 5
!
CHAPTER 5
CAUTION
SINCE GASOLINE IS AVAILABLE IN VARIOUS OCTANE
LEVELS, REFER TO THE ENGINE MANUFACTURER’S
OWNER’S MANUAL FOR THE CORRECT ONE FOR
YOUR ENGINE. USING IMPROPER OCTANE FUEL
CAN CAUSE ENGINE DAMAGE AND VOID THE
WARRANTY.
!
CAUTION
SINCE GASOLINE IS AVAILABLE IN VARIOUS OCTANE
LEVELS, REFER TO THE ENGINE MANUFACTURER’S
OWNER’S MANUAL FOR THE CORRECT ONE FOR
YOUR ENGINE. USING IMPROPER OCTANE FUEL
CAN CAUSE ENGINE DAMAGE AND VOID THE
WARRANTY.
Before Fueling
Before Fueling
Make sure a working fire extinguisher is at close hand.
Make sure a working fire extinguisher is at close hand.
Stop engines and any device that can cause a spark.
Stop engines and any device that can cause a spark.
Disembark all passengers and crew not needed for fueling.
Disembark all passengers and crew not needed for fueling.
Fuel if possible during the daylight hours.
Fuel if possible during the daylight hours.
Check to ensure nobody is smoking in the boat or near the fueling
dock.
Check to ensure nobody is smoking in the boat or near the fueling
dock.
Close all portholes, hatches and doors to keep vapors from blowing
aboard and settling in the bilge.
Close all portholes, hatches and doors to keep vapors from blowing
aboard and settling in the bilge.
Tie up your boat securely at the fuel dock.
Tie up your boat securely at the fuel dock.
Identify the fuel fill. Unfortunately, people have mistakenly filled
the water or waste with fuel.
Identify the fuel fill. Unfortunately, people have mistakenly filled
the water or waste with fuel.
Visually inspect all fuel system components before each filling.
Visually inspect all fuel system components before each filling.
Avoid using fuels with alcohol additives. They can attack fuel
system hoses and cause deterioration.
Avoid using fuels with alcohol additives. They can attack fuel
system hoses and cause deterioration.
5-4
5-4
Vessel Operation
During Fueling
Vessel Operation
During Fueling
Keep the fuel nozzle in contact with the fuel fill to guard against
static sparks. The fuel fill pipe is grounded through the fuel
system wiring to protect against static electricity.
Keep the fuel nozzle in contact with the fuel fill to guard against
static sparks. The fuel fill pipe is grounded through the fuel
system wiring to protect against static electricity.
Avoid overfilling the fuel tank. Leave room for expansion. Also, if
fuel exits the fuel vent indicating the tank is full, this situation is
dangerous and unfriendly to the environment.
Avoid overfilling the fuel tank. Leave room for expansion. Also, if
fuel exits the fuel vent indicating the tank is full, this situation is
dangerous and unfriendly to the environment.
Avoid spilling any fuel. Clean up any fuel accidently spilled with a
clean rag and dispose of it onshore.
Avoid spilling any fuel. Clean up any fuel accidently spilled with a
clean rag and dispose of it onshore.
After Fueling
After Fueling
Close all fuel fill openings tightly. Use a fuel key if needed.
Close all fuel fill openings tightly. Use a fuel key if needed.
Open all portholes, hatches and doors.
Open all portholes, hatches and doors.
Energize the blower for a minimum of 4 minutes
Energize the blower for a minimum of 4 minutes
Sniff in the lower bilge and engine compartment for gas fumes. If
fumes are detected continue to ventilate until the odor is gone.
Look for any traces of fuel droplets or spillage. Do not start the
engines, smoke or run any electrical components until the
fumes can no longer be detected.
!
WARNING
Sniff in the lower bilge and engine compartment for gas fumes. If
fumes are detected continue to ventilate until the odor is gone.
Look for any traces of fuel droplets or spillage. Do not start the
engines, smoke or run any electrical components until the
fumes can no longer be detected.
!
AVOID SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH!
THE OPERATOR OF THE CRAFT MUST HAVE
COMPLETE CONTROL OF THE HELM STEERING
STATION WHILE THE VESSEL IS MOVING.
NEVER LEAVE THE HELM STATION UNATTENDED
WHILE THE VESSEL IS MOVING.
WARNING
AVOID SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH!
THE OPERATOR OF THE CRAFT MUST HAVE
COMPLETE CONTROL OF THE HELM STEERING
STATION WHILE THE VESSEL IS MOVING.
NEVER LEAVE THE HELM STATION UNATTENDED
WHILE THE VESSEL IS MOVING.
5-5
5-5
CHAPTER 5
STARTING & STOPPING
CHAPTER 5
STARTING & STOPPING
The following general information covers starting and
stopping your engine. Read and understand all previous
infor mation on remote controls, fueling and
operational procedures. Pay particular attention to all
labels. Refer to the engine owner’s manual for in depth
propulsion system information.
The following general information covers starting and
stopping your engine. Read and understand all previous
infor mation on remote controls, fueling and
operational procedures. Pay particular attention to all
labels. Refer to the engine owner’s manual for in depth
propulsion system information.
Starting Guidelines
Starting Guidelines
Review all pre-departure information. Before starting your engine make
sure all canvas is removed and stored. Start engine only in a well
ventilated location to avoid CO build-up. Turn the battery switch to
the number 1 or 2 battery position.
Position the remote control handle in the neutral position. Advance
the neutral throttle advance position as instructed in the engine owner’s
manual. Connect the safety lanyard to a belt or secure to clothing such
as a pants belt loop. Keep passengers seated and away from controls.
Review all pre-departure information. Before starting your engine make
sure all canvas is removed and stored. Start engine only in a well
ventilated location to avoid CO build-up. Turn the battery switch to
the number 1 or 2 battery position.
Position the remote control handle in the neutral position. Advance
the neutral throttle advance position as instructed in the engine owner’s
manual. Connect the safety lanyard to a belt or secure to clothing such
as a pants belt loop. Keep passengers seated and away from controls.
!
DANGER
AVOID PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH!
WHEN ENGINE IS RUNNING TRANSOM DOOR MUST
BE CLOSED AND LOCKED. SWIM PLATFORM
AND LADDER MUST NOT BE IN USE.
!
DANGER
AVOID PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH!
WHEN ENGINE IS RUNNING TRANSOM DOOR MUST
BE CLOSED AND LOCKED. SWIM PLATFORM
AND LADDER MUST NOT BE IN USE.
WARNING
GASOLINE VAPORS CAN EXPLODE. BEFORE STARTING
ENGINE, OPERATE BLOWER 4 MINUTES AND CHECK
ENGINE COMPARTMENT FOR GASOLINE LEAKS OR
VAPORS. RUN BLOWER BELOW CRUSING SPEED.
5-6
!
!
WARNING
GASOLINE VAPORS CAN EXPLODE. BEFORE STARTING
ENGINE, OPERATE BLOWER 4 MINUTES AND CHECK
ENGINE COMPARTMENT FOR GASOLINE LEAKS OR
VAPORS. RUN BLOWER BELOW CRUSING SPEED.
5-6
Vessel Operation
Vessel Operation
Turn the ignition key to the momentarly start position. You will hear
the starter cranking over the engine. When the engine starts release the
key switch. It will automatically align itself in the run position (ignition).
If the engine does not start, refrain from cranking the engine over 1012 seconds. Allow the starter and battery a chance to recover. Advance
the remote control in the neutral throttle position as recommended in
the engine manual. Do not race the remote control in the neutral
position.
Turn the ignition key to the momentarly start position. You will hear
the starter cranking over the engine. When the engine starts release the
key switch. It will automatically align itself in the run position (ignition).
If the engine does not start, refrain from cranking the engine over 1012 seconds. Allow the starter and battery a chance to recover. Advance
the remote control in the neutral throttle position as recommended in
the engine manual. Do not race the remote control in the neutral
position.
!
CAUTION
!
TO AVOID ENGINE DAMAGE!
CHECK THE OIL GAUGE IMMEDIATELY AFTER
STARTING. IF LOW OR NO READING SHUT DOWN
ENGINE IMMEDIATELY AND
INVESTIGATE THE PROBLEM.
CAUTION
TO AVOID ENGINE DAMAGE!
CHECK THE OIL GAUGE IMMEDIATELY AFTER
STARTING. IF LOW OR NO READING SHUT DOWN
ENGINE IMMEDIATELY AND
INVESTIGATE THE PROBLEM.
Shifting Guidelines
Shifting Guidelines
Before shifting into reverse or forward make sure the
coast is clear. When shifting to either gear from
neutral make sure the throttle is in the idle position.
Do not pause but engage the shifter quickly into the
desired gear. Allow your vessel to lose all headway
before shifting into reverse or forward gear. Practice
shifting! You will become more familiar with the procedure and selfconfidence will build especially in tight docking situations. Most
importantly, stay alert!
Before shifting into reverse or forward make sure the
coast is clear. When shifting to either gear from
neutral make sure the throttle is in the idle position.
Do not pause but engage the shifter quickly into the
desired gear. Allow your vessel to lose all headway
before shifting into reverse or forward gear. Practice
shifting! You will become more familiar with the procedure and selfconfidence will build especially in tight docking situations. Most
importantly, stay alert!
5-7
5-7
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 5
Stopping
Stopping
Before stopping the engine make sure it is in neutral and idle speed.
After an outing let the engine cool down at idle speeds for a few minutes
before turning the ignition off. Glance at the gauges one last time to
monitor their readings. Do not pull on the safety lanyard verses the
ignition switch to stop the engine. Never turn off the engine while in
forward or reverse gear since water could enter the engine through the
exhaust system and cause extensive damage. The same holds true for
running the boat in reverse. Above all, use common sense.
Before stopping the engine make sure it is in neutral and idle speed.
After an outing let the engine cool down at idle speeds for a few minutes
before turning the ignition off. Glance at the gauges one last time to
monitor their readings. Do not pull on the safety lanyard verses the
ignition switch to stop the engine. Never turn off the engine while in
forward or reverse gear since water could enter the engine through the
exhaust system and cause extensive damage. The same holds true for
running the boat in reverse. Above all, use common sense.
STEERING
STEERING
Your Regal uses a rotary or rack style steering system. These systems
transfer helm mechanical motion to the engine. There is a hydraulic
steering cylinder which with the assistance of a steering pump sends
fluid force to the stern drive steering arm changing the course of the
boat, depending on the direction the steering wheel is turned.
Since the steering system is the primary link for engine control, it must
be periodically inspected and maintained. The hardware at both the
helm and engine must be checked regularly for tightness.
Check the steering system for full steering port and starboard before
disembarking. Refer to the steering manufacturer’s literature in the
owner’s pouch and the maintenance chapter for more information.
Your Regal uses a rotary or rack style steering system. These systems
transfer helm mechanical motion to the engine. There is a hydraulic
steering cylinder which with the assistance of a steering pump sends
fluid force to the stern drive steering arm changing the course of the
boat, depending on the direction the steering wheel is turned.
Since the steering system is the primary link for engine control, it must
be periodically inspected and maintained. The hardware at both the
helm and engine must be checked regularly for tightness.
Check the steering system for full steering port and starboard before
disembarking. Refer to the steering manufacturer’s literature in the
owner’s pouch and the maintenance chapter for more information.
!
WARNING
AVOID PERSONAL INJURY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE!
LOOSENING OR LOSS OF ONE OR MORE FASTENERS
MAY CAUSE FAILURE OF THE STEERING SYSTEM
OR DAMAGE TO THE STEERING CABLE,
RESULTING IN LOSS OF STEERING CONTROL.
PERIODICALLY INSPECT THE STEERING SYSTEM.
5-8
!
WARNING
AVOID PERSONAL INJURY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE!
LOOSENING OR LOSS OF ONE OR MORE FASTENERS
MAY CAUSE FAILURE OF THE STEERING SYSTEM
OR DAMAGE TO THE STEERING CABLE,
RESULTING IN LOSS OF STEERING CONTROL.
PERIODICALLY INSPECT THE STEERING SYSTEM.
5-8
Vessel Operation
Vessel Operation
5-9
5-9
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 5
FENDERS
FENDERS
Fender Usage
Fender Usage
Fenders are normally made of a rubberized plastic and are usually
filled with air. Most have a fitting like a basketball so they can be inflated
or deflated. Fenders are available in a wide range of sizes and shapes
to fit both small and large vessels. Fenders are normally designated in
inches. They are used between piers, docks, sea walls and the boat.
They protect the topsides of the boat from rubbing against rough
objects. Most fenders have eyes of attachment which allow a line to be
inserted vertically or horizontally. This will permit the fender to be
tied off to fit a variety of marina, dock and tidal situations. Be sure the
fender is correct for the vessel size. It is a good idea to carry extra
fenders but half a dozen is normally an acceptable number. Remember
to store fenders on board so they can be easily accessed. Some people
incorrectly call fenders “bumpers”.
Fenders are normally made of a rubberized plastic and are usually
filled with air. Most have a fitting like a basketball so they can be inflated
or deflated. Fenders are available in a wide range of sizes and shapes
to fit both small and large vessels. Fenders are normally designated in
inches. They are used between piers, docks, sea walls and the boat.
They protect the topsides of the boat from rubbing against rough
objects. Most fenders have eyes of attachment which allow a line to be
inserted vertically or horizontally. This will permit the fender to be
tied off to fit a variety of marina, dock and tidal situations. Be sure the
fender is correct for the vessel size. It is a good idea to carry extra
fenders but half a dozen is normally an acceptable number. Remember
to store fenders on board so they can be easily accessed. Some people
incorrectly call fenders “bumpers”.
Fender Types
Fender Types
There is a variety of fender styles and types, each
selected for specified uses. When choosing fenders,
contact a marine dealer or supply house. Explain how
you moor and use your vessel so they can recommend
the best fender type for you. We suggest the type
with a fill plug so you can inflate them with a hand
pump like the ones used for bicycles.
5-10
There is a variety of fender styles and types, each
selected for specified uses. When choosing fenders,
contact a marine dealer or supply house. Explain how
you moor and use your vessel so they can recommend
the best fender type for you. We suggest the type
with a fill plug so you can inflate them with a hand
pump like the ones used for bicycles.
5-10
Vessel Operation
DOCK LINE BASICS
Vessel Operation
DOCK LINE BASICS
Most skippers use dock line terminology fairly
loose but there is more to the basics than just
bow or stern lines. There are several lines that
can be secured to the bow and stern and
depending on their direction and use, can be
called other names. Remember that “forward”
and “aft” refer to the direction that a spring line
runs from the vessel, and not where it is secured
on board.
Most skippers use dock line terminology fairly
loose but there is more to the basics than just
bow or stern lines. There are several lines that
can be secured to the bow and stern and
depending on their direction and use, can be
called other names. Remember that “forward”
and “aft” refer to the direction that a spring line
runs from the vessel, and not where it is secured
on board.
Bow & Stern Lines
Bow & Stern Lines
There is only one true bow line. It is secured to the forward cleat and
run forward along the dock to prevent the vessel from moving to the
stern. The stern line leads from a rear cleat to a piling or cleat on the
dock astern of the vessel. This line keeps the boat from moving ahead.
For small vessels these are the only lines needed for normal wind and
current conditions. If located in a tidal environment, keep slack in the
lines.
There is only one true bow line. It is secured to the forward cleat and
run forward along the dock to prevent the vessel from moving to the
stern. The stern line leads from a rear cleat to a piling or cleat on the
dock astern of the vessel. This line keeps the boat from moving ahead.
For small vessels these are the only lines needed for normal wind and
current conditions. If located in a tidal environment, keep slack in the
lines.
Breast Lines
Breast Lines
These lines are attached to the bow and stern that lead to nearly right
angles from the center of the vessel to the dock. They help keep larger
vessels from moving away from the dock, or are pulled in to help people
board the vessel. Bigger vessels may use bow or quarter breast lines.
These lines are attached to the bow and stern that lead to nearly right
angles from the center of the vessel to the dock. They help keep larger
vessels from moving away from the dock, or are pulled in to help people
board the vessel. Bigger vessels may use bow or quarter breast lines.
Spring Lines
Spring Lines
Most small boats use two spring lines although it is possible to have
four. They are called the after bow spring and forward quarter spring.
Most small boats use two spring lines although it is possible to have
four. They are called the after bow spring and forward quarter spring.
5-11
5-11
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 5
Bow springs are secured at the vessels’ bow area. Forward spring lines
lead forward from the boat to the dock and control movement
sternward. After springs stem aft from the vessel, and stop movement
ahead. Spring lines are used to prevent movement in a berth, ahead or
astern. They are really useful in controlling the effects of a real active
tidal surge. Spring lines are useful where fenders need to be kept in
place against piles.
Bow springs are secured at the vessels’ bow area. Forward spring lines
lead forward from the boat to the dock and control movement
sternward. After springs stem aft from the vessel, and stop movement
ahead. Spring lines are used to prevent movement in a berth, ahead or
astern. They are really useful in controlling the effects of a real active
tidal surge. Spring lines are useful where fenders need to be kept in
place against piles.
TYPICAL PIER MOORING
1.
2.
=FENDER
3.
TYPICAL PIER MOORING
4.
1.
1. Bow line
2. After bow spring
3.Forward quarter spring
4. Stern line
2.
=FENDER
TYPICAL PILING MOORING
3.
4.
1. Bow line
2. After bow spring
3.Forward quarter spring
4. Stern line
TYPICAL PILING MOORING
Boat Mooring
Boat Mooring
Most boats can be secured to a dock using four lines.The after bow
spring is crossed with the forward quarter spring and secured to
individual dock cleats or pilings. This ensures longer springs and can
be snugged up tighter for more efficient tidal control. Remember, if
you only have one piling available, position the vessel so this point is
opposite admidships. Run both spring lines to it. These lines will be
shorter but still useful.
5-12
Most boats can be secured to a dock using four lines.The after bow
spring is crossed with the forward quarter spring and secured to
individual dock cleats or pilings. This ensures longer springs and can
be snugged up tighter for more efficient tidal control. Remember, if
you only have one piling available, position the vessel so this point is
opposite admidships. Run both spring lines to it. These lines will be
shorter but still useful.
5-12
Vessel Operation
Vessel Operation
The bow and stern lines should be relatively at a 45 degree angle with
the dock. The stern line can be attached to the near-shore quarter
cleat, but will work more efficiently to the offshore quarter cleat. The
longer line will allow the boat flow with the tide with less time checking
the vessel.
The bow and stern lines should be relatively at a 45 degree angle with
the dock. The stern line can be attached to the near-shore quarter
cleat, but will work more efficiently to the offshore quarter cleat. The
longer line will allow the boat flow with the tide with less time checking
the vessel.
Dock Line Sizing
Dock Line Sizing
Most dock lines today are made of nylon, either of twisted rope or
braided core and cover. The most often used material is nylon because
of its stretching abilities absorbing shock loads. It is chafe resistant for
extended life and is easier on bare hands.
The line’s size varies with the vessel. Normally, a vessel in the 20’ to
40’ boats will use 1/2” diameter nylon lines. Larger yachts use 5/8”
and 3/4” diameter nylon lines. Smaller boats can use 3/8” nylon lines.
Dock lines need to have the strength to hold the vessel and have enough
density to resist chafing. They shouldn’t be too heavy that they lose
their shock-absorbing capabilities. Use the right size line for the vessel
since a line to large for the boat will pull hard against the vessel since
it won’t be forced to stretch. If the line is too small for the vessel,
there is no margin for wear and chafe when under strain
Most dock lines today are made of nylon, either of twisted rope or
braided core and cover. The most often used material is nylon because
of its stretching abilities absorbing shock loads. It is chafe resistant for
extended life and is easier on bare hands.
The line’s size varies with the vessel. Normally, a vessel in the 20’ to
40’ boats will use 1/2” diameter nylon lines. Larger yachts use 5/8”
and 3/4” diameter nylon lines. Smaller boats can use 3/8” nylon lines.
Dock lines need to have the strength to hold the vessel and have enough
density to resist chafing. They shouldn’t be too heavy that they lose
their shock-absorbing capabilities. Use the right size line for the vessel
since a line to large for the boat will pull hard against the vessel since
it won’t be forced to stretch. If the line is too small for the vessel,
there is no margin for wear and chafe when under strain
Securing Lines
Securing Lines
When mooring your boat, make sure the dock lines are secured at
both ends. Depending on your situation you may need to loop the eye
splice of the dock line around a piling. Sometimes the mooring line
will lead down sharply from the piling to the deck cleat. Loop the eye
splice around the piling twice to keep it from being pulled up off the
pile. Pull the line through the looped eye if the mooring line is too
small to go around the piling twice or too small to fit over once.
If you must drop a line over a piling that already holds another boat’s
line, run the eye of the line up through the first eye from below, then
loop it over the pile. This will allow either line to be removed without
When mooring your boat, make sure the dock lines are secured at
both ends. Depending on your situation you may need to loop the eye
splice of the dock line around a piling. Sometimes the mooring line
will lead down sharply from the piling to the deck cleat. Loop the eye
splice around the piling twice to keep it from being pulled up off the
pile. Pull the line through the looped eye if the mooring line is too
small to go around the piling twice or too small to fit over once.
If you must drop a line over a piling that already holds another boat’s
line, run the eye of the line up through the first eye from below, then
loop it over the pile. This will allow either line to be removed without
5-13
5-13
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 5
disturbing the other. If another line is dropped over yours, simply
reverse the process. Secure a little slack in the other dock line, then
slip your eye up through its loop and over the top of the pile. Your
line can be dropped through the other eye.
When debarking from a dock, it is easier to release the line from a
cleat or piling, from on board the boat, as soon as you leave the dock.
Loop a long line around the cleat or pier and leading both ends on
board you can release the line easily. Slip one end around the cleat or
pile, the pull it back on board. Release the line without the eye splice,
so it will run freely from around the pile without hanging up on the
splice.
disturbing the other. If another line is dropped over yours, simply
reverse the process. Secure a little slack in the other dock line, then
slip your eye up through its loop and over the top of the pile. Your
line can be dropped through the other eye.
When debarking from a dock, it is easier to release the line from a
cleat or piling, from on board the boat, as soon as you leave the dock.
Loop a long line around the cleat or pier and leading both ends on
board you can release the line easily. Slip one end around the cleat or
pile, the pull it back on board. Release the line without the eye splice,
so it will run freely from around the pile without hanging up on the
splice.
STEPS TO STERN DRIVE DOCKING
STEPS TO STERN DRIVE DOCKING
Inboard/Outboard powered boats are fairly easy to back up and
maneuver with a little knowledge and docking practice. One of the
most important aspects of the process is to keep your calm in the
wake of a busy marina. Basically, the reversing propeller is turned in
the direction you want to go by using the wheel.
Some boats tend to be influenced by the wind. When backing down
in a crosswind, allow room to maneuver and watch the bow. Try not
to overreact or get excited, but use your knowledge and experience. If
the wind begins to swing the bow, you need to stop backing, turn the
wheel to port and go forward to straighten the boat. Use a quick burst
of power but not too much to knock your crew off balance.
Inboard/Outboard powered boats are fairly easy to back up and
maneuver with a little knowledge and docking practice. One of the
most important aspects of the process is to keep your calm in the
wake of a busy marina. Basically, the reversing propeller is turned in
the direction you want to go by using the wheel.
Some boats tend to be influenced by the wind. When backing down
in a crosswind, allow room to maneuver and watch the bow. Try not
to overreact or get excited, but use your knowledge and experience. If
the wind begins to swing the bow, you need to stop backing, turn the
wheel to port and go forward to straighten the boat. Use a quick burst
of power but not too much to knock your crew off balance.
A. Stop the boat by shifting in reverse. Put the wheel over to the port and
begin backing in. Slow down your speed by momentarily shifting into
reverse.
A. Stop the boat by shifting in reverse. Put the wheel over to the port and
begin backing in. Slow down your speed by momentarily shifting into
reverse.
* Control in reverse idle position, Outdrive to port.
5-14
* Control in reverse idle position, Outdrive to port.
5-14
Vessel Operation
B. Continue backing up the boat with the wheel hard to port. Keep an
eye on the bow, and begin to straighten the wheel as the boat enters the
slip.
Vessel Operation
B. Continue backing up the boat with the wheel hard to port. Keep an
eye on the bow, and begin to straighten the wheel as the boat enters the
slip.
* Control in reverse idle position, Outdrive to port.
* Control in reverse idle position, Outdrive to port.
C. Center the wheel to align the boat parallel with the dock.
If the stern is too far from the dock, shift to neutral,
then put the wheel hard over to port and then go forward
a second or two.
C. Center the wheel to align the boat parallel with the dock.
If the stern is too far from the dock, shift to neutral,
then put the wheel hard over to port and then go forward
a second or two.
* Control in neutral idle position. Drive centered.
* Control in neutral idle position. Drive centered.
D. When the boat is completely into the dock, stop stern movement
by shifting into forward. Put the wheel to port to kick the stern over
close to the dock if necessary. Shift into neutral and tie up the boat.
D. When the boat is completely into the dock, stop stern movement
by shifting into forward. Put the wheel to port to kick the stern over
close to the dock if necessary. Shift into neutral and tie up the boat.
* Control in forward idle position. Drive to port.
* Control in forward idle position. Drive to port.
5-15
5-15
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 5
STERN DRIVE MANEUVERING
STERN DRIVE MANEUVERING
Inboard/outboard, I/O or sometimes called stern drive boats do not
have rudders. The boat uses a steering system that directs the propeller
thrust, by turning the stern drive unit where the propeller is mounted.
Normally maneuvering the I/O boat is easier than a similar single screw
vessel.
Directing propeller energy (thrust) makes slower speed maneuvering
easier. The propeller discharge current is turned from one side to the
other which results in turning forces. Rudder boats need water to flow
by the rudder to be efficient. Stern drive units are designed to have
reduced shaft angle, so the propeller does not produce as much unequal
blade thrust and resistance as does a propeller on a single screw boat.
Large horsepower stern drive boats do produce more thrust and steering
torque but Regal boats have the advantage of power steering. Below is
some basic information on how single stern drive boats handle in
normal conditions.
Inboard/outboard, I/O or sometimes called stern drive boats do not
have rudders. The boat uses a steering system that directs the propeller
thrust, by turning the stern drive unit where the propeller is mounted.
Normally maneuvering the I/O boat is easier than a similar single screw
vessel.
Directing propeller energy (thrust) makes slower speed maneuvering
easier. The propeller discharge current is turned from one side to the
other which results in turning forces. Rudder boats need water to flow
by the rudder to be efficient. Stern drive units are designed to have
reduced shaft angle, so the propeller does not produce as much unequal
blade thrust and resistance as does a propeller on a single screw boat.
Large horsepower stern drive boats do produce more thrust and steering
torque but Regal boats have the advantage of power steering. Below is
some basic information on how single stern drive boats handle in
normal conditions.
Gathering Headway
Gathering Headway
When a stern drive is not moving forward or reverse in the water and
the propeller is not turning, (shift in neutral) the boat will not react to
the helm steering wheel.
As soon as the vessel is shifted into forward gear the propellers action
creates a discharge motion and generates energy in the form of thrust.
If the stern drive is centered, the discharge motion is directed straight
back causing the vessel to advance forward.
You may notice that if you advance the throttle quickly in initial takeoff (make sure you have a firm grip on the wheel), the boat has a
tendency to pull the stern of the vessel to starboard. There is a trim
tab (also serves as a sacrificial anode) located on the vertical drive
housing just to the top of the propeller blade. This trim tab helps
compensate for the low speed steering torque. Once the boat increases
headway and the propeller is operating in a faster water flow this torque
5-16
When a stern drive is not moving forward or reverse in the water and
the propeller is not turning, (shift in neutral) the boat will not react to
the helm steering wheel.
As soon as the vessel is shifted into forward gear the propellers action
creates a discharge motion and generates energy in the form of thrust.
If the stern drive is centered, the discharge motion is directed straight
back causing the vessel to advance forward.
You may notice that if you advance the throttle quickly in initial takeoff (make sure you have a firm grip on the wheel), the boat has a
tendency to pull the stern of the vessel to starboard. There is a trim
tab (also serves as a sacrificial anode) located on the vertical drive
housing just to the top of the propeller blade. This trim tab helps
compensate for the low speed steering torque. Once the boat increases
headway and the propeller is operating in a faster water flow this torque
5-16
Vessel Operation
Vessel Operation
effect decreases.
Sometimes the trim tab may need adjustment on stern drive models.
Contact your Regal dealer for further information or consult your
engine manufacturer’s handbook.
effect decreases.
Sometimes the trim tab may need adjustment on stern drive models.
Contact your Regal dealer for further information or consult your
engine manufacturer’s handbook.
Turning
Turning
Once the boat has gathered headway, with the boat planing at the
correct bow angle and the stern drive unit and helm straight the boat
tends to stay on a uniform course heading. To assure the boat trim
angle is correct use the trim gauge as a guide while activating the trim
button on the remote control panel.
When the helm wheel is turned to the right or starboard, the stern
drive unit is turned in the same direction. The propeller’s discharge
force is directed to starboard forcing the boats stern to port. Water
flowing past the hull strikes the stern drive gear housing in its starboard
side, creating additional turning torque. The stern starts a move to
port, forcing the bow to starboard.
If the helm is turned to the left or port the stern drive turns to port,
the stern of the boat goes starboard as the bow turns to port.
As the vessel operator gains experience, he will better gauge each
maneuver and speed situation. In this way he will understand the
handling characteristics of his boat. He needs to keep the safety of his
passengers in the highest priority.
Once the boat has gathered headway, with the boat planing at the
correct bow angle and the stern drive unit and helm straight the boat
tends to stay on a uniform course heading. To assure the boat trim
angle is correct use the trim gauge as a guide while activating the trim
button on the remote control panel.
When the helm wheel is turned to the right or starboard, the stern
drive unit is turned in the same direction. The propeller’s discharge
force is directed to starboard forcing the boats stern to port. Water
flowing past the hull strikes the stern drive gear housing in its starboard
side, creating additional turning torque. The stern starts a move to
port, forcing the bow to starboard.
If the helm is turned to the left or port the stern drive turns to port,
the stern of the boat goes starboard as the bow turns to port.
As the vessel operator gains experience, he will better gauge each
maneuver and speed situation. In this way he will understand the
handling characteristics of his boat. He needs to keep the safety of his
passengers in the highest priority.
Backing Down
Backing Down
Inboard/Outboard (I/O) boats do not have rudders. The boat uses a
steering system that directs the propeller thrust, by turning the stern
drive unit where the propeller is mounted. Normally maneuvering the
I/O boat is easier than a similar single screw vessel.
If your boat has the steering wheel and stern drive straight with the
control in reverse, the stern will be pushed a bit to port by the reversing
propeller thrust. This tendency to back to port can be eliminated by
turning the stern drive to starboard.
5-17
Inboard/Outboard (I/O) boats do not have rudders. The boat uses a
steering system that directs the propeller thrust, by turning the stern
drive unit where the propeller is mounted. Normally maneuvering the
I/O boat is easier than a similar single screw vessel.
If your boat has the steering wheel and stern drive straight with the
control in reverse, the stern will be pushed a bit to port by the reversing
propeller thrust. This tendency to back to port can be eliminated by
turning the stern drive to starboard.
5-17
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 5
When the vessel begins to gather speed to stern, the water passing by
the lower gearcase housing will continue to increase steering torque. If
the helm wheel is turned to starboard, and will direct the propeller
thrust to port, tracking the stern to starboard.
Wind and current will affect how a vessel backs. Stern drive boats tend
to be light displacements and when backing down in a strong crosswind,
the bow will tend to fall toward the windward. This may cause steering
problems.
Once increased headway is gathered in reverse gear, the force of the
lower hull moving through the water is
enough to track straight. When backing, the
stern will lead as it heads to port or
starboard, before the vessel actually starts
to turn.
When the control is put in forward gear
position, the stern is pushed to starboard;
the amount of push depends on the hull
design and the amount of throttle advance.
See illustration.
When the vessel begins to gather speed to stern, the water passing by
the lower gearcase housing will continue to increase steering torque. If
the helm wheel is turned to starboard, and will direct the propeller
thrust to port, tracking the stern to starboard.
Wind and current will affect how a vessel backs. Stern drive boats tend
to be light displacements and when backing down in a strong crosswind,
the bow will tend to fall toward the windward. This may cause steering
problems.
Once increased headway is gathered in reverse gear, the force of the
lower hull moving through the water is
enough to track straight. When backing, the
stern will lead as it heads to port or
starboard, before the vessel actually starts
to turn.
When the control is put in forward gear
position, the stern is pushed to starboard;
the amount of push depends on the hull
design and the amount of throttle advance.
See illustration.
Stopping
Stopping
Remember that your boat does not have any brakes. It uses reverse
thrust from the propeller to stop. If the vessel has headway, with the
helm and propeller in reverse. The propeller thrust is directed
backwards, past the lower gearcase of the stern drive.
Depending on how far the throttle is advanced, the discharged thrust
may not be strong enough to reverse the water flowing by the gearcase.
As the power is increased, the propeller thrust becomes strong enough
to stop the flow of water past the lower unit, and, as the throttle is
advanced it reverses its flow more completely.
When water is flowing past the gearcase, steering torque is increased,
but when the thrust stops the water flow, the boat will not respond to
the helm. This is a short lived event and is overcome quickly when the
water again flows past the gearcase. Furthermore, added to the energy
Remember that your boat does not have any brakes. It uses reverse
thrust from the propeller to stop. If the vessel has headway, with the
helm and propeller in reverse. The propeller thrust is directed
backwards, past the lower gearcase of the stern drive.
Depending on how far the throttle is advanced, the discharged thrust
may not be strong enough to reverse the water flowing by the gearcase.
As the power is increased, the propeller thrust becomes strong enough
to stop the flow of water past the lower unit, and, as the throttle is
advanced it reverses its flow more completely.
When water is flowing past the gearcase, steering torque is increased,
but when the thrust stops the water flow, the boat will not respond to
the helm. This is a short lived event and is overcome quickly when the
water again flows past the gearcase. Furthermore, added to the energy
5-18
5-18
Vessel Operation
Vessel Operation
of the water hitting the lower gearcase, the propeller thrust is directed
by turning the stern drive, whic can add to the steering torque.
The prop tends to throw the stern to port.
This is why experienced skippers
undertake a portside landing when wind
and current conditions permit. They allow
the prop to move the stern to port toward
the dock.
With a forward motion when the helm
wheel is turned hard to one side, the vessel
pivots around a point about 1/3 its length
abaft to stern. See illustration.
of the water hitting the lower gearcase, the propeller thrust is directed
by turning the stern drive, whic can add to the steering torque.
The prop tends to throw the stern to port.
This is why experienced skippers
undertake a portside landing when wind
and current conditions permit. They allow
the prop to move the stern to port toward
the dock.
With a forward motion when the helm
wheel is turned hard to one side, the vessel
pivots around a point about 1/3 its length
abaft to stern. See illustration.
TRIM ANGLE
TRIM ANGLE
Stern drive boats have the ability to angle in or out their drve unit in
relationship to the transom. This is accomplished by hydraulic shocks
located on the outdrve along with an electrical sender unit that reads
the drive angle and sends information to the dash trim gauge that
shows a reading.
Stern drive boats have the ability to angle in or out their drve unit in
relationship to the transom. This is accomplished by hydraulic shocks
located on the outdrve along with an electrical sender unit that reads
the drive angle and sends information to the dash trim gauge that
shows a reading.
Purpose Of Power Trim
Purpose Of Power Trim
The purpose of the power trim/tilt is to enable the operator to
change the angle of the drive while at the helm. Changing the angle
of the drive or “trimming” provides the following benefits:
The purpose of the power trim/tilt is to enable the operator to
change the angle of the drive while at the helm. Changing the angle
of the drive or “trimming” provides the following benefits:
l. Improves acceleration onto a plane.
2. Maintains boat on plane at reduced throttle settings.
3. Increases fuel economy.
4. Provides smoother ride in choppy water.
5. Increases top speed.
l. Improves acceleration onto a plane.
2. Maintains boat on plane at reduced throttle settings.
3. Increases fuel economy.
4. Provides smoother ride in choppy water.
5. Increases top speed.
5-19
5-19
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 5
In short, it is a way of fine-tuning the ride of your boat and will enable
you to get the most efficient and comfortable ride possible, whatever
the conditions.
In short, it is a way of fine-tuning the ride of your boat and will enable
you to get the most efficient and comfortable ride possible, whatever
the conditions.
Use Of Power Trim
Use Of Power Trim
The power trim is normally used prior to accelerating onto a plane,
after reaching the desired RPM or boat speed and when there is a
change in water or boating conditions. Position passengers and
equipment in the boat so that the weight is balanced correctly fore and
aft as well as side to side. Trimming will not compensate for an
imbalanced load.
To operate the trim, push the switch until the desired bow position is
reached. The trim may be operated at any boat speed or at rest. Avoid
operating the trim system when running in reverse. Observe the trim/
tilt gauge which indicates the boat’s bow position achieved by the trim
angle of the vertical drive unit. “Bow-Up” corresponds to the upper
portion of the trim range on the gauge while “Bow Down” corresponds
to the lower portion of the trim range on the gauge.
To determine the proper trim angle, experiment a little until you are
familiar with the changes in your boat. The vessel will be properly
trimmed when the trim angle profides the best boat performance for
the particular operating conditions. A trim position that provides a
balanced steering load is desirable.
To familiarize yourself with the power trim, make test runs at slower
speeds and at various trim positions to see the effect of trimming.
Note the time it takes for the boat to plane. Watch the tachometer and
speedometer readings as well as the ride action of the boat.
The power trim is normally used prior to accelerating onto a plane,
after reaching the desired RPM or boat speed and when there is a
change in water or boating conditions. Position passengers and
equipment in the boat so that the weight is balanced correctly fore and
aft as well as side to side. Trimming will not compensate for an
imbalanced load.
To operate the trim, push the switch until the desired bow position is
reached. The trim may be operated at any boat speed or at rest. Avoid
operating the trim system when running in reverse. Observe the trim/
tilt gauge which indicates the boat’s bow position achieved by the trim
angle of the vertical drive unit. “Bow-Up” corresponds to the upper
portion of the trim range on the gauge while “Bow Down” corresponds
to the lower portion of the trim range on the gauge.
To determine the proper trim angle, experiment a little until you are
familiar with the changes in your boat. The vessel will be properly
trimmed when the trim angle profides the best boat performance for
the particular operating conditions. A trim position that provides a
balanced steering load is desirable.
To familiarize yourself with the power trim, make test runs at slower
speeds and at various trim positions to see the effect of trimming.
Note the time it takes for the boat to plane. Watch the tachometer and
speedometer readings as well as the ride action of the boat.
5-20
5-20
Vessel Operation
Operation In “Bow Up” Position
UP
DN
TRIM
Operation In “Bow Up” Position
The “bow up” or out position is normally used for
crusing, running with a choppy wave condition,
or running at full speed. Excessive “bow up” trim
will cause propeller ventilation resulting in propeller
slippage. Use caution when operating in rough
water or crossing another boat’s wake. Excessive
“bow up” trim may result in the boat’s bow rising
rapidly, creating a hazardous condition.
Operation In “Bow Down” Position
UP
DN
TRIM
Vessel Operation
UP
DN
TRIM
The “bow up” or out position is normally used for
crusing, running with a choppy wave condition,
or running at full speed. Excessive “bow up” trim
will cause propeller ventilation resulting in propeller
slippage. Use caution when operating in rough
water or crossing another boat’s wake. Excessive
“bow up” trim may result in the boat’s bow rising
rapidly, creating a hazardous condition.
Operation In “Bow Down” Position
The “Bow Down” or in position is normally used
for acceleration onto a plane, operating at slow
planning speeds, and running against a choppy wave
condition. It is also used when pulling water skiers,
tubers, kneeboarders, etc. In this position the boat’’s
bow will want to go deeper into the water. If the
boat is operated at high speed and/or against high
waves, the bow of the boat will plow into the water.
UP
DN
TRIM
The “Bow Down” or in position is normally used
for acceleration onto a plane, operating at slow
planning speeds, and running against a choppy wave
condition. It is also used when pulling water skiers,
tubers, kneeboarders, etc. In this position the boat’’s
bow will want to go deeper into the water. If the
boat is operated at high speed and/or against high
waves, the bow of the boat will plow into the water.
Operation In “Level” Position
Operation In “Level” Position
In normal running conditions, distribute passengers
and gear so boat is level. At or below crusing
speeds, trim the vessel for optimum performance.
DN
UP
The trim gauge will show somewhere in the center
TRIM
of the gauge. This position will also enhance
running visibility and overall stability. Again, each
outing provides different wave, load and running
conditions. Be prepared to make trim changes as needed.
In normal running conditions, distribute passengers
and gear so boat is level. At or below crusing
speeds, trim the vessel for optimum performance.
DN
UP
The trim gauge will show somewhere in the center
TRIM
of the gauge. This position will also enhance
running visibility and overall stability. Again, each
outing provides different wave, load and running
conditions. Be prepared to make trim changes as needed.
5-21
5-21
CHAPTER 5
!
CHAPTER 5
CAUTION
!
CAUTION
THE BOAT TRIM SHOULD BE ADJUSTED TO PROVIDE
BALANCED STEERING AS SOON AS POSSIBLE EACH
TIME YOU GET UNDERWAY. SOME BOAT/ENGINE/
PROPELLER COMBINATIONS MAY CREATE BOAT
INSTABILITY AND/ OR HIGH STEERING TORQUE WHEN
OPERATED AT OR NEAR THE LIMITS OF THE “BOW UP”
OR “BOW DOWN” POSITIONS. BOAT STABILITY AND
STEERING TORQUE CAN ALSO VARY DUE TO
CHANGING WATER CONDITIONS. IF YOU EXPERIENCE
BOAT INSTABILITY AND/OR HIGH STEERING TORQUE,
SEE YOUR AUTHORIZED REGAL DEALER
THE BOAT TRIM SHOULD BE ADJUSTED TO PROVIDE
BALANCED STEERING AS SOON AS POSSIBLE EACH
TIME YOU GET UNDERWAY. SOME BOAT/ENGINE/
PROPELLER COMBINATIONS MAY CREATE BOAT
INSTABILITY AND/ OR HIGH STEERING TORQUE WHEN
OPERATED AT OR NEAR THE LIMITS OF THE “BOW UP”
OR “BOW DOWN” POSITIONS. BOAT STABILITY AND
STEERING TORQUE CAN ALSO VARY DUE TO
CHANGING WATER CONDITIONS. IF YOU EXPERIENCE
BOAT INSTABILITY AND/OR HIGH STEERING TORQUE,
SEE YOUR AUTHORIZED REGAL DEALER
Shallow Water Operation
Shallow Water Operation
Operating your vessel in shallow water presents
various hazards. You are more apt to hit a
submerged object such as a rock, sand bar, stump
SHALLOW
WATER
coral, or other unmarked objects.
Pay close attention to your charts for descriptions
of any shallow areas along with marked submerged
objects. Always post a lookout when operating in
shallow water. Trim your outdrive up as needed to provide adequate
draft. Set the alarm on your depth sounder and travel at a speed that
keeps the boat level in these shallow areas.
If your boat strikes a submerged object stop immediately and check
for hull, outdrive and propeller damage.
Operating your vessel in shallow water presents
various hazards. You are more apt to hit a
submerged object such as a rock, sand bar, stump
SHALLOW
WATER
coral, or other unmarked objects.
Pay close attention to your charts for descriptions
of any shallow areas along with marked submerged
objects. Always post a lookout when operating in
shallow water. Trim your outdrive up as needed to provide adequate
draft. Set the alarm on your depth sounder and travel at a speed that
keeps the boat level in these shallow areas.
If your boat strikes a submerged object stop immediately and check
for hull, outdrive and propeller damage.
5-22
5-22
DANGER
DANGER
Vessel Operation
Vessel Operation
TRIMMED “TO FAR IN” POSITION
TRIMMED “TO FAR IN” POSITION
UP
DN
TRIM
TRIM
TRIMMED “TOO FAR OUT” POSITION
TRIMMED “TOO FAR OUT” POSITION
UP
DN
TRIM
WELL TRIMMED “LEVEL” POSITION
WELL TRIMMED “LEVEL” POSITION
DN
UP
TRIM
!
UP
DN
TRIM
DN
UP
DN
UP
TRIM
CAUTION
!
DO NOT RUN ENGINE ABOVE 1000 RPM
WITH THE STERN DRIVE TRIMMED FOR SHALLOW
WATER MANUVERING SINCE THE STERN DRIVE IS
OUT BEYOND THE GIMBAL RING
SIDE SUPPORT BRACKETS.
OPERATING IN ABOVE MANNER COULD PRODUCE A
DANGEROUS STEERING CONDITION OR COULD
DAMAGE THE STERN DRIVE COMPONENTS.
5-23
CAUTION
DO NOT RUN ENGINE ABOVE 1000 RPM
WITH THE STERN DRIVE TRIMMED FOR SHALLOW
WATER MANUVERING SINCE THE STERN DRIVE IS
OUT BEYOND THE GIMBAL RING
SIDE SUPPORT BRACKETS.
OPERATING IN ABOVE MANNER COULD PRODUCE A
DANGEROUS STEERING CONDITION OR COULD
DAMAGE THE STERN DRIVE COMPONENTS.
5-23
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 5
ANCHORING
ANCHORING
Selecting the correct anchor is an important decision.
The anchor style in part depends on the usage and
boat type. Regal boats designate an anchor type and
or model. Some models incorporate chain, line with
an optional windlass. Contact an authorized Regal
dealer for more information.
Anchoring is easier with another person on board.
First be certain that the line for the anchor is properly attached, to
avoid losing the anchor and anchor line overboard.
For most anchors to perform more efficiently, you should attach 3 to 6
feet of chain. The chain will stand up to the abrasion of sand, rock, or
mud on the bottom much better than a nylon line. It should be
galvanized to reduce corrosion. Next, attach a length of nylon line to
the other end of the chain.
The nylon will stretch under a heavy strain cushioning the impact of
waves or wind on both the boat and the anchor.
To anchor, select a well protected area, preferably with a flat bottom.
Contrary to modern belief, you do not throw the anchor over while
the boat is making headway, or moving forward. In fact, the bow of
the boat should be bought slowly backward, while easing the anchor
slowly over the side of the boat until it hits the bottom. To “snub the
line” means to stop its outward “pay” or movement. Usually the length
of anchor line used should be 5 to 10 times the depth of the water.
After you have anchored, check your position with landmarks if
possible. You need to continue to monitor these landmarks to make
sure you are not drifting. Since anchoring can also be an emergency
procedure, the anchor and line should be readily accessible.
For increased holding power in windy conditions, two anchors are
sometimes set. If your primary anchor drags, you can run out your
secondary anchor without picking up the primary one. The important
thing is to lay them out at an angle. When setting two anchors, make
sure they are fastened to separate rodes or cleats. This is done in case
Selecting the correct anchor is an important decision.
The anchor style in part depends on the usage and
boat type. Regal boats designate an anchor type and
or model. Some models incorporate chain, line with
an optional windlass. Contact an authorized Regal
dealer for more information.
Anchoring is easier with another person on board.
First be certain that the line for the anchor is properly attached, to
avoid losing the anchor and anchor line overboard.
For most anchors to perform more efficiently, you should attach 3 to 6
feet of chain. The chain will stand up to the abrasion of sand, rock, or
mud on the bottom much better than a nylon line. It should be
galvanized to reduce corrosion. Next, attach a length of nylon line to
the other end of the chain.
The nylon will stretch under a heavy strain cushioning the impact of
waves or wind on both the boat and the anchor.
To anchor, select a well protected area, preferably with a flat bottom.
Contrary to modern belief, you do not throw the anchor over while
the boat is making headway, or moving forward. In fact, the bow of
the boat should be bought slowly backward, while easing the anchor
slowly over the side of the boat until it hits the bottom. To “snub the
line” means to stop its outward “pay” or movement. Usually the length
of anchor line used should be 5 to 10 times the depth of the water.
After you have anchored, check your position with landmarks if
possible. You need to continue to monitor these landmarks to make
sure you are not drifting. Since anchoring can also be an emergency
procedure, the anchor and line should be readily accessible.
For increased holding power in windy conditions, two anchors are
sometimes set. If your primary anchor drags, you can run out your
secondary anchor without picking up the primary one. The important
thing is to lay them out at an angle. When setting two anchors, make
sure they are fastened to separate rodes or cleats. This is done in case
5-24
5-24
Vessel Operation
Vessel Operation
you need to adjust one later so the line is accessible.
If two anchors are used ahead of a boat, make sure to set the rodes
at an angle than in a straight line to reduce the chances of tangeling
as the boat moves in wind and current. See the above illustration.
you need to adjust one later so the line is accessible.
If two anchors are used ahead of a boat, make sure to set the rodes
at an angle than in a straight line to reduce the chances of tangeling
as the boat moves in wind and current. See the above illustration.
TOWING
TOWING
In case you find yourself aground or in need of a tow, or should you
want to tow another vessel, keep in mind that you never use deck
hardware or cleats to secure lines for towing!
Deck hardware is intended for mooring and anchoring, and is not
designed to withstand the strain and pull of towing. Rather than tie the
line to your cleats on deck, it is suggested that you tie a bridle by passing
a line completely around the hull of your boat to avoid structural
damage.
When towing, always stand clear of a taut line, as any type of line
breaking under stress can be extremely dangerous. The perferred line
for towing is double-braided nylon, as it has sufficient elasticity to
cushion shock loads. Move slowly and cautiously.
5-25
In case you find yourself aground or in need of a tow, or should you
want to tow another vessel, keep in mind that you never use deck
hardware or cleats to secure lines for towing!
Deck hardware is intended for mooring and anchoring, and is not
designed to withstand the strain and pull of towing. Rather than tie the
line to your cleats on deck, it is suggested that you tie a bridle by passing
a line completely around the hull of your boat to avoid structural
damage.
When towing, always stand clear of a taut line, as any type of line
breaking under stress can be extremely dangerous. The perferred line
for towing is double-braided nylon, as it has sufficient elasticity to
cushion shock loads. Move slowly and cautiously.
5-25
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 5
ADMIRALTY LAW
ADMIRALTY LAW
The Admiralty law sometimes referred to as the salvage law was
founded primarily on English law fundamentals and basically says
that a vessel distressed, in danger of flounder, if rendered assistance
from a towing company or private agency, can be forced to relinquish
a portion of the vessels’ worth for the assistance received.
The Admiralty law sometimes referred to as the salvage law was
founded primarily on English law fundamentals and basically says
that a vessel distressed, in danger of flounder, if rendered assistance
from a towing company or private agency, can be forced to relinquish
a portion of the vessels’ worth for the assistance received.
NOTICE
NOTICE
IN THE EVENT YOUR VESSEL IS IN DISTRESS,
PRIOR TO ALLOWING ANY TOWING COMPANY OR
PRIVATE AGENCY THE RIGHT TO PASS A LINE TO
YOUR VESSEL, BE SURE TO ESTABLISH THAT YOU
DO NOT AGREE TO ANY SALVAGE RIGHTS.
ESTABLISH WITH THE CAPTAIN OR OPERATOR
THAT YOU WISH TO BE ASSISTED IN A CONTRACT
BASIS AND ESTABLISH A PRICE.
OF COURSE IN CERTAIN SITUATIONS, YOU MAY
NOT HAVE THIS OPTION.
IN THE EVENT YOUR VESSEL IS IN DISTRESS,
PRIOR TO ALLOWING ANY TOWING COMPANY OR
PRIVATE AGENCY THE RIGHT TO PASS A LINE TO
YOUR VESSEL, BE SURE TO ESTABLISH THAT YOU
DO NOT AGREE TO ANY SALVAGE RIGHTS.
ESTABLISH WITH THE CAPTAIN OR OPERATOR
THAT YOU WISH TO BE ASSISTED IN A CONTRACT
BASIS AND ESTABLISH A PRICE.
OF COURSE IN CERTAIN SITUATIONS, YOU MAY
NOT HAVE THIS OPTION.
USE YOUR BEST JUDGEMENT!
USE YOUR BEST JUDGEMENT!
5-26
5-26
Vessel Operation
!
Vessel Operation
DANGER
AVOID DEATH OR SERIOUS BODILY INJURY!
DO NOT USE DECK HARDWARE INCLUDING
CLEATS FOR TOWING.
!
DANGER
AVOID DEATH OR SERIOUS BODILY INJURY!
DO NOT USE DECK HARDWARE INCLUDING
CLEATS FOR TOWING.
Knots
Knots
Knots are useful in docking, towing and other emergency situations.
Learning to tie knots requires practice. As they say “ Practice makes
perfect”. Some of the knots used in boating are the square, bowline,
anchor bend, clove hitch, figure eight and half hitch. There are several
periodicals available that explain various knots and how to tie them
effectively. An experienced skipper will know the basic nautical knots
and will use them when on the water. Take the time to know the basic
knots.
Knots are useful in docking, towing and other emergency situations.
Learning to tie knots requires practice. As they say “ Practice makes
perfect”. Some of the knots used in boating are the square, bowline,
anchor bend, clove hitch, figure eight and half hitch. There are several
periodicals available that explain various knots and how to tie them
effectively. An experienced skipper will know the basic nautical knots
and will use them when on the water. Take the time to know the basic
knots.
Figure 8 Knot
Tied To Cleat
Figure 8 Knot
Tied To Cleat
A useful knot to learn for general docking is the figure eight with one
end reversed. By turning the free end of the line back under, the knot
can be released without disturbing the boat. After abit of practice one
person can secure a vessel easily to a dock or pier in a variety of weather
conditions. This knot normally is used to tie the bow and stern. Then
the vessel can further be fastened by tying the spring lines(s) in the
figure eight knot. Wrap it around the cleat 2 or 3 times.
5-27
A useful knot to learn for general docking is the figure eight with one
end reversed. By turning the free end of the line back under, the knot
can be released without disturbing the boat. After abit of practice one
person can secure a vessel easily to a dock or pier in a variety of weather
conditions. This knot normally is used to tie the bow and stern. Then
the vessel can further be fastened by tying the spring lines(s) in the
figure eight knot. Wrap it around the cleat 2 or 3 times.
5-27
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 5
EMERGENCIES
EMERGENCIES
Always be ready to help others on the water if possible, but do not
take any unnecessary risks. Use equipment to save a life, but do not
risk a life to save equipment. Consult earlier information in this manual
concerning accidents, etc. Also, read other literature concerning on
the water emergencies. Be alert and prepared!
Always be ready to help others on the water if possible, but do not
take any unnecessary risks. Use equipment to save a life, but do not
risk a life to save equipment. Consult earlier information in this manual
concerning accidents, etc. Also, read other literature concerning on
the water emergencies. Be alert and prepared!
Fire
Fire
Fire aboard a vessel can spread quickly and can cause tremendous alarm
among everyone. Most fires can be prevented by keeping the bilge free
from oil and debris. Keep all equipment stowed and maintained in
working order. Carry a backup fire extinguisher onboard. If something
becomes a possible fire hazard, remove that possibility at once.
Never use water on gasoline, oil or electrical fires. When you dump
water on an electrical fire a you can be shocked since water conducts
electricity.
Follow these instructions if a fire breaks out:
Fire aboard a vessel can spread quickly and can cause tremendous alarm
among everyone. Most fires can be prevented by keeping the bilge free
from oil and debris. Keep all equipment stowed and maintained in
working order. Carry a backup fire extinguisher onboard. If something
becomes a possible fire hazard, remove that possibility at once.
Never use water on gasoline, oil or electrical fires. When you dump
water on an electrical fire a you can be shocked since water conducts
electricity.
Follow these instructions if a fire breaks out:
♦ Fit everyone aboard with a life jacket. Turn off the ignition.
♦ Fit everyone aboard with a life jacket. Turn off the ignition.
♦ Try to keep the fire downwind. If the fire is to the stern, head the
bow toward the wind. If forward, put the stern to the wind.
♦ Try to keep the fire downwind. If the fire is to the stern, head the
bow toward the wind. If forward, put the stern to the wind.
♦ If the engine should catch fire, shut off the fuel supply Usually
there is a fuel tank access that you can crimp the fuel feed line.
♦ If the engine should catch fire, shut off the fuel supply Usually
there is a fuel tank access that you can crimp the fuel feed line.
♦ Use a hand fire extinguisher. Make sure to point it at the base of the
flames. Use short bursts and sweep the extinguisher side to side.
Remember : (4 lb. extinguisher discharges in 20 seconds)
♦ Use a hand fire extinguisher. Make sure to point it at the base of the
flames. Use short bursts and sweep the extinguisher side to side.
Remember : (4 lb. extinguisher discharges in 20 seconds)
These actions help prevent the fire from spreading to other parts of
the boat. You can extinguish fires quickly if you act swiftly. Have a
plan of action in motion in case a fire breaks out.
5-28
These actions help prevent the fire from spreading to other parts of
the boat. You can extinguish fires quickly if you act swiftly. Have a
plan of action in motion in case a fire breaks out.
5-28
Vessel Operation
Vessel Operation
FIRST AID
FIRST AID
Knowing first aid can save lives. A first aid kit and the ability to use it
are important ingredients for the safety of a skippers’ passengers, crew
and vessel. Having confidence and competence in handling medical
emergencies on board is a must for the skipper. Invest your time in a
first aid course available at the American Red Cross.
Knowing first aid can save lives. A first aid kit and the ability to use it
are important ingredients for the safety of a skippers’ passengers, crew
and vessel. Having confidence and competence in handling medical
emergencies on board is a must for the skipper. Invest your time in a
first aid course available at the American Red Cross.
CPR (Basic Life Support)
CPR (Basic Life Support)
If someone is seriously injured have someone call for help while the
injured person is being attended.
If someone is seriously injured have someone call for help while the
injured person is being attended.
Check for possible danger signs; loss of breathing, unconsciousness,
severe bleeding and heartbeat. If you determine the individual is not
breathing or unconscious place the victim on their back on a hard
surface and do the following:
Check for possible danger signs; loss of breathing, unconsciousness,
severe bleeding and heartbeat. If you determine the individual is not
breathing or unconscious place the victim on their back on a hard
surface and do the following:
1. If unconscious, open the airway. Neck lift, head lift or chin head lift.
1. If unconscious, open the airway. Neck lift, head lift or chin head lift.
2. If not breathing, begin artificial breathing. Pinch the nose. Give 4
quick breaths. If airway is blocked, try back blows, abdominal or
chest thrusts and finger probe until airway is open.
2. If not breathing, begin artificial breathing. Pinch the nose. Give 4
quick breaths. If airway is blocked, try back blows, abdominal or
chest thrusts and finger probe until airway is open.
3. Check for pulse. begin artificial circulation. Depress sternum 2”.
15 compressions rate 80 per minute. 2 quick breaths. Continue
uninterrupted until advanced medical support is available.
3. Check for pulse. begin artificial circulation. Depress sternum 2”.
15 compressions rate 80 per minute. 2 quick breaths. Continue
uninterrupted until advanced medical support is available.
Follow up immediately with medical authorities!
Follow up immediately with medical authorities!
5-29
5-29
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 5
HYPOTHERMIA
HYPOTHERMIA
Hypothermia is a condition where the body temperature decreases
because the body can’t generate enough heat to maintain its normal
temperature. It can be serious and usually occurs where victims have
been immersed in water (under 68 degrees) for periods of time. If you
encounter a possible hypothermia victim call for help on the radio and
get the person out of the water.
Symptoms are:
Hypothermia is a condition where the body temperature decreases
because the body can’t generate enough heat to maintain its normal
temperature. It can be serious and usually occurs where victims have
been immersed in water (under 68 degrees) for periods of time. If you
encounter a possible hypothermia victim call for help on the radio and
get the person out of the water.
Symptoms are:
1. Shivering that if condition is advanced may stop.
1. Shivering that if condition is advanced may stop.
2. Confusion, clumsiness or slurred speech.
2. Confusion, clumsiness or slurred speech.
3. Rigid muscles.
3. Rigid muscles.
4. Semiconscious to unconscious.
4. Semiconscious to unconscious.
Treat hypothermia by the following:
Treat hypothermia by the following:
Remove wet clothing.
Monitor the victim’s pulse and breathing.
Monitor the victim’s pulse and breathing.
Rapidly apply heat to the body core by using blankets, naked
bodies or warm water.
Do not give the person any food or drink.
Do not give the person any food or drink.
Do not warm the arms and legs. Warming of these extremities
can be fatal.
Do not warm the arms and legs. Warming of these extremities
can be fatal.
Follow up immediately with medical authorities!
5-30
Remove wet clothing.
Rapidly apply heat to the body core by using blankets, naked
bodies or warm water.
Follow up immediately with medical authorities!
5-30
Vessel Operation
Vessel Operation
ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS
ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS
There are numerous vessels operating on our waterways on a daily
basis. Each boat has as impact on our environment. Boat operation
habits, marine sanitation, and maintenance all play a role in a delicate
battle to keep the ecosystem clean. Each of us has a role in doing our
part as a environmentally conscious skipper to conserve our waterways.
The National Marine Manufacturer’s Asscociation lists their top ten
of Eco-Boating Practices as follows:
There are numerous vessels operating on our waterways on a daily
basis. Each boat has as impact on our environment. Boat operation
habits, marine sanitation, and maintenance all play a role in a delicate
battle to keep the ecosystem clean. Each of us has a role in doing our
part as a environmentally conscious skipper to conserve our waterways.
The National Marine Manufacturer’s Asscociation lists their top ten
of Eco-Boating Practices as follows:
1. Observe all regulatory agency policies regarding marine toilets.
1. Observe all regulatory agency policies regarding marine toilets.
2. If equipped with a holding tank, use marina pump-out facilities.
2. If equipped with a holding tank, use marina pump-out facilities.
3. If used, make sure bottom paints are legal and ecosystem friendly.
3. If used, make sure bottom paints are legal and ecosystem friendly.
4. Use only biodegradable cleaning agents.
4. Use only biodegradable cleaning agents.
5. Dispose of all garbage and liter on shore properly, not on the water.
5. Dispose of all garbage and liter on shore properly, not on the water.
6. Don’t top off fuel tanks. Leave expansion room. Clean up spills.
6. Don’t top off fuel tanks. Leave expansion room. Clean up spills.
7. Watch your wake and propeller wash.
7. Watch your wake and propeller wash.
8. Make sure your engines are well tuned and maintained.
8. Make sure your engines are well tuned and maintained.
9. Control your bilge water.
9. Control your bilge water.
10. When fishing, practice the “catch and release” principle.
10. When fishing, practice the “catch and release” principle.
Follow these basics practices when on the waterways. Treat the
environment in a way that you would like to be treated.
Follow these basics practices when on the waterways. Treat the
environment in a way that you would like to be treated.
5-31
5-31
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 5
CALIFORNIA AIR RESOURCE
BOARD (CARB) LABEL
CALIFORNIA AIR RESOURCE
BOARD (CARB) LABEL
Your Regal boat may have a star shaped label affixed to the bow, port
hullside. It is located at the front of the state registration numbers.
This label is part of the California Air Resource Board (Carb) SD/I
rule. If your boat is operated in the state of California and/or bordering
waters, this label MUST remain intact. The label shows that the engine
installed as original equipment meets a currently approved California
state regulatory emission level. See the example below which shows
the current California ultra low 3 star label.
Your Regal boat may have a star shaped label affixed to the bow, port
hullside. It is located at the front of the state registration numbers.
This label is part of the California Air Resource Board (Carb) SD/I
rule. If your boat is operated in the state of California and/or bordering
waters, this label MUST remain intact. The label shows that the engine
installed as original equipment meets a currently approved California
state regulatory emission level. See the example below which shows
the current California ultra low 3 star label.
CARB LABEL
CARB LABEL
5-32
5-32
Vessel Operation
Vessel Operation
CALIFORNIA PROP 65
CALIFORNIA PROP 65
Proposition 65 relates to the state of California and is an additional
requirement added to their Safe Drinking & Toxic Enforcement Act
of 1986. Prop 65 basically summarized states that:
“No person in the course of doing business shall knowingly discharge
or release a chemical known to the state to cause cancer or
reproductive toxicity into water or onto land where such chemical
passes or probably will pass into any source of drinking water ....”
and it goes on to say “ no person in the course of doing business shall
knowingly and intentionally expose any individual to a chemical known
to the state to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity without first giving
clear and reasonable warning to such individual .....”
For more information, contact the California Office of Environmental
Health Hazard Assessment at 916-445-6900 or http://
www.oehha.ca.gov/prop65.html.
Proposition 65 relates to the state of California and is an additional
requirement added to their Safe Drinking & Toxic Enforcement Act
of 1986. Prop 65 basically summarized states that:
“No person in the course of doing business shall knowingly discharge
or release a chemical known to the state to cause cancer or
reproductive toxicity into water or onto land where such chemical
passes or probably will pass into any source of drinking water ....”
and it goes on to say “ no person in the course of doing business shall
knowingly and intentionally expose any individual to a chemical known
to the state to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity without first giving
clear and reasonable warning to such individual .....”
For more information, contact the California Office of Environmental
Health Hazard Assessment at 916-445-6900 or http://
www.oehha.ca.gov/prop65.html.
!
WARNING
!
WARNING
A wide variety of components used on this vessel contain or emit chemicals
known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects and other
reproductive harm.
A wide variety of components used on this vessel contain or emit chemicals
known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects and other
reproductive harm.
EXAMPLES INCLUDE:
* Engine and generator exhaust
* Engine and generator fuel, and other liquids such as coolants and oil, especially
used motor oil
* Cooking fuels
*Cleaners, paints, substances used for vessel repair
* Waste materials that result from wear of vessel components
* Lead from battery terminals and from other sources such as ballast or fishing
sinkers
EXAMPLES INCLUDE:
* Engine and generator exhaust
* Engine and generator fuel, and other liquids such as coolants and oil, especially
used motor oil
* Cooking fuels
*Cleaners, paints, substances used for vessel repair
* Waste materials that result from wear of vessel components
* Lead from battery terminals and from other sources such as ballast or fishing
sinkers
TO AVOID HARM:
* Keep away from engine, generator, and cooking fuel exhaust fumes
* Wash areas thoroughly with soap & water after handling the substances above
TO AVOID HARM:
* Keep away from engine, generator, and cooking fuel exhaust fumes
* Wash areas thoroughly with soap & water after handling the substances above
5-33
5-33
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 5
MARPOL TREATY
MARPOL TREATY
The USCG now enforces the International Convention for the
Prevention of Pollution from ships, referred to commonly as the
MARPOL TREATY (marine pollution). This international treaty
prohibits the overboard dumping of all oil, garbage, ship-generated
plastic and chemicals. There is a placard on vessels over 26’ that
explains the garbage and plastic dumping laws in detail. Normally
this placard is found near a waste receptacle in the cabin or cockpit.
The USCG now enforces the International Convention for the
Prevention of Pollution from ships, referred to commonly as the
MARPOL TREATY (marine pollution). This international treaty
prohibits the overboard dumping of all oil, garbage, ship-generated
plastic and chemicals. There is a placard on vessels over 26’ that
explains the garbage and plastic dumping laws in detail. Normally
this placard is found near a waste receptacle in the cabin or cockpit.
FUEL SPILLAGE
FUEL SPILLAGE
The federal water pollution control act prohibits the discharge of oil
or oil waste (such as from the sump bilge pump) into or upon the
navigable waters of the United States or the waters of the contiguous
zone. Violators are subject to substantial civil fines and criminal
sanctions.
A placard is normally found inside the engine hatch area or in the
sump warning of overboard discharge of oil or oily waste.
The federal water pollution control act prohibits the discharge of oil
or oil waste (such as from the sump bilge pump) into or upon the
navigable waters of the United States or the waters of the contiguous
zone. Violators are subject to substantial civil fines and criminal
sanctions.
A placard is normally found inside the engine hatch area or in the
sump warning of overboard discharge of oil or oily waste.
5-34
5-34
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
This chapter assists the operator in understanding many of the
standard equipment items on the vessel. Some of the equipment
described may not be installed on your boat or the pictorials may not
exactly resemble equipment on your boat. Remember, Regal is
constantly improving its product line and therefore may make changes
in parts and specifications without notice. For detailed information
on equipment, please refer to the owner’s pouch.
This chapter assists the operator in understanding many of the
standard equipment items on the vessel. Some of the equipment
described may not be installed on your boat or the pictorials may not
exactly resemble equipment on your boat. Remember, Regal is
constantly improving its product line and therefore may make changes
in parts and specifications without notice. For detailed information
on equipment, please refer to the owner’s pouch.
BASIC EQUIPMENT
BASIC EQUIPMENT
Drain Plug
Drain Plug
!
CAUTION
TO PREVENT VESSEL FROM SINKING,
INSTALL DRAIN PLUG!
Your boat is equipped with a
garboard style drain plug. Make sure
it is installed tightly before launching.
Tighten with a wrench. Do not use your
fingers alone to tighten it. After your
outing while the boat is angled on
the ramp remove the drain plug to
eliminate any bilge water
accumulation. If the water stream is diminished, check for foreign
objects stuck in the drain hole. Pull the drain plug if dry storing the
boat for extended periods especially in colder climates.
6-1
TIGHTEN-CLOCKWISE
!
CAUTION
TO PREVENT VESSEL FROM SINKING,
INSTALL DRAIN PLUG!
Your boat is equipped with a
garboard style drain plug. Make sure
it is installed tightly before launching.
Tighten with a wrench. Do not use your
fingers alone to tighten it. After your
outing while the boat is angled on
the ramp remove the drain plug to
eliminate any bilge water
accumulation. If the water stream is diminished, check for foreign
objects stuck in the drain hole. Pull the drain plug if dry storing the
boat for extended periods especially in colder climates.
6-1
TIGHTEN-CLOCKWISE
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
Bilge Pump/Automatic Float Switch
Bilge Pump/Automatic Float Switch
Before each outing be sure to check operation of the bilge pump and
automatic switch. Periodically check for bilge debris around the grates
of both components. Refer to the bilge pump switch description in
Chapter 4 where system details are described and the illustration
below.
Before each outing be sure to check operation of the bilge pump and
automatic switch. Periodically check for bilge debris around the grates
of both components. Refer to the bilge pump switch description in
Chapter 4 where system details are described and the illustration
below.
AUTOMATIC SWITCH
AUTOMATIC SWITCH
BILGE PUMP
BILGE PUMP
CHECK GRATING
FOR DEBRIS
CHECK GRATING
FOR DEBRIS
Chemical Toilet
Chemical Toilet
Before each outing make sure the chemical toilet is filled with the proper
chemicals, paper is available, and the unit is empty. Refer to the systems
chapter for more information or the owner’s information pouch.
Before each outing make sure the chemical toilet is filled with the proper
chemicals, paper is available, and the unit is empty. Refer to the systems
chapter for more information or the owner’s information pouch.
Fresh Water System
Fresh Water System
All water systems need to be initially filled to operate. The following
steps apply to pressure water systems only.
All water systems need to be initially filled to operate. The following
steps apply to pressure water systems only.
1. Unscrew the “water fill” deck fitting. Fill the fresh water tank with
approximately 10 gallons of fresh water. Make sure the water source
is safe, clean water.
1. Unscrew the “water fill” deck fitting. Fill the fresh water tank with
approximately 10 gallons of fresh water. Make sure the water source
is safe, clean water.
6-2
6-2
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
2. Find the pressure water breaker switch. Turn the switch to the
“on” position. The pressure water tank will fill the entire system
with fresh water.
2. Find the pressure water breaker switch. Turn the switch to the
“on” position. The pressure water tank will fill the entire system
with fresh water.
3. Open the faucet to allow any air to escape. Close the faucet when
there is a steady stream of water without air. You will hear the
pressure switch shut off the pump indicating the system is full.
3. Open the faucet to allow any air to escape. Close the faucet when
there is a steady stream of water without air. You will hear the
pressure switch shut off the pump indicating the system is full.
4. If your vessel is equipped with a cold water transom shower repeat
step #3. If installed, the transom shower is on the port or starboard
aft deck.
4. If your vessel is equipped with a cold water transom shower repeat
step #3. If installed, the transom shower is on the port or starboard
aft deck.
5. After these intitial procedures, fill the system near full with fresh
water. When water exits the vent the system is full.
5. After these intitial procedures, fill the system near full with fresh
water. When water exits the vent the system is full.
6. Check for system leaks as evidenced by the pressure water pump
recycling even though no water is being used from the faucet.
6. Check for system leaks as evidenced by the pressure water pump
recycling even though no water is being used from the faucet.
!
CAUTION
!
AVOID PRESSURE PUMP BURN OUT!
DO NOT ACTIVATE THE FRESH WATER
SYSTEM WITH THE WATER TANK EMPTY.
CAUTION
AVOID PRESSURE PUMP BURN OUT!
DO NOT ACTIVATE THE FRESH WATER
SYSTEM WITH THE WATER TANK EMPTY.
Compass
Compass
The compass is set by the manufacturer to ensure its accuracy. If in
doubt it can be zeroed in by using a non-magnetic screwdriver and
turning the compensator screws as recommended. Refer to the compass
manual in the owner’s information pouch. Also, a compass can be
checked while underway for varience and deviation by comparing your
heading with a nautical chart. Compass error is part of the calculation.
The compass is set by the manufacturer to ensure its accuracy. If in
doubt it can be zeroed in by using a non-magnetic screwdriver and
turning the compensator screws as recommended. Refer to the compass
manual in the owner’s information pouch. Also, a compass can be
checked while underway for varience and deviation by comparing your
heading with a nautical chart. Compass error is part of the calculation.
6-3
6-3
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
Bucket Seat Operation
Bucket Seat Operation
The bucket seat features a handle mechanism that operates multiple
seat functions. The separate handles prevent the seat from roatating
and sliding fore and aft during operation of the vessel. This provides
the operator with a safety margin. Do not alter the seat slide system.
To adjust the seat slider follow the instructions and refer the the
illustration.
The bucket seat features a handle mechanism that operates multiple
seat functions. The separate handles prevent the seat from roatating
and sliding fore and aft during operation of the vessel. This provides
the operator with a safety margin. Do not alter the seat slide system.
To adjust the seat slider follow the instructions and refer the the
illustration.
1. To adjust fore and aft seat positions, pull up on handle “A”, slide seat
to desired location and release the handle. The slide will lock in postion.
1. To adjust fore and aft seat positions, pull up on handle “A”, slide seat
to desired location and release the handle. The slide will lock in postion.
2. To rotate seat and adjust the drag control feature for rotation, pull
handle “B” up to the horizontal position and release. The handle will
maintain the horizontal position. The seat is now able to be rotated
360 degrees. To increase the drag on rotation, turn handle “C” clockwise
to desired resistance. To decrease drag, turn handle “C”
counterclockwise.
2. To rotate seat and adjust the drag control feature for rotation, pull
handle “B” up to the horizontal position and release. The handle will
maintain the horizontal position. The seat is now able to be rotated
360 degrees. To increase the drag on rotation, turn handle “C” clockwise
to desired resistance. To decrease drag, turn handle “C”
counterclockwise.
3. To positive lock the rotational feature, push handle “B” down and
the positive quick lock feature looks for the next available locking spline.
Always use positive lock feature when boat is underway.
3. To positive lock the rotational feature, push handle “B” down and
the positive quick lock feature looks for the next available locking spline.
Always use positive lock feature when boat is underway.
!
CAUTION
!
TO PREVENT BODILY INJURY!
PERIODICALLY CHECK AND TIGHTEN
THE MOUNTING BOLTS
BETWEEN THE SEAT SLIDER
AND THE BUCKET SEAT BOTTOM
ALSO, CHECK THE FLOOR INSERT BOLTS.
6-4
CAUTION
TO PREVENT BODILY INJURY!
PERIODICALLY CHECK AND TIGHTEN
THE MOUNTING BOLTS
BETWEEN THE SEAT SLIDER
AND THE BUCKET SEAT BOTTOM
ALSO, CHECK THE FLOOR INSERT BOLTS.
6-4
Equipment Operation
BUCKET SEAT
Equipment Operation
BUCKET SEAT
HANDLE A
HANDLE A
HANDLE B
HANDLE B
HANDLE C
SEAT SLIDER
HANDLE C
SEAT SLIDER
PEDESTAL
PEDESTAL
FLOOR INSERT
FLOOR INSERT
6-5
6-5
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
Swim Platform/Ladder
Swim Platform/Ladder
On integrated or optional swim
platforms you should make periodic
inspections of the swim ladder and
hardware that supports the platform
to insure that all connections and
TYPICAL LABEL SHOWN
fittings are tight and in good condition
before using it to support weight.
Never dive off the swim platform. Make sure you don’t exceed the weight
label attached to the swim platform or in the owner’s packet.
On integrated or optional swim
platforms you should make periodic
inspections of the swim ladder and
hardware that supports the platform
to insure that all connections and
TYPICAL LABEL SHOWN
fittings are tight and in good condition
before using it to support weight.
Never dive off the swim platform. Make sure you don’t exceed the weight
label attached to the swim platform or in the owner’s packet.
!
WARNING
AVOID SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH!
DO NOT OPERATE THE BOAT
WITH PEOPLE ON TOP OR HOLDING ON TO
THE SWIM PLATFORM STRUCTURE OR HARDWARE.
!
AVOID SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH!
DO NOT OPERATE THE BOAT
WITH PEOPLE ON TOP OR HOLDING ON TO
THE SWIM PLATFORM STRUCTURE OR HARDWARE.
Use the swim ladder for entering and exiting the
water. Make sure you use the appropriate hand rails
and ladder rungs. Be sure all body parts are clear
of the ladder when folding the ladder up or down
and repositioning it on the swim platform. Keep
body parts clear of hinged top. Be sure to read
and adhere to any written warnings posted on the
dash or swim platform regarding ladder load limits.
Turn the engine off and remove the ignition keys
while people are swimming near the boat, using
the swim platform or the boarding ladder. Also,
insist people use the ladder not the outdrive
ventilation plate for entering and exiting the vessel
Again safety first!
6-6
WARNING
Use the swim ladder for entering and exiting the
water. Make sure you use the appropriate hand rails
and ladder rungs. Be sure all body parts are clear
of the ladder when folding the ladder up or down
and repositioning it on the swim platform. Keep
body parts clear of hinged top. Be sure to read
and adhere to any written warnings posted on the
dash or swim platform regarding ladder load limits.
Turn the engine off and remove the ignition keys
while people are swimming near the boat, using
the swim platform or the boarding ladder. Also,
insist people use the ladder not the outdrive
ventilation plate for entering and exiting the vessel
Again safety first!
6-6
Equipment Operation
Center Windshield Latch
Center Windshield Latch
The center windshield should be closed and
locked at all times the boat is moving. Make
sure the 2 locking latches are firmly seated in a
horizonal position against the windshield
framework. When the boat is not moving it is
acceptable to open the center windshield and
secure it with the magnetic holders.
!
Equipment Operation
WARNING
The center windshield should be closed and
locked at all times the boat is moving. Make
sure the 2 locking latches are firmly seated in a
horizonal position against the windshield
framework. When the boat is not moving it is
acceptable to open the center windshield and
secure it with the magnetic holders.
!
AVOID BODILY INJURY!
CLOSE AND SECURE CENTER WINDSHIELD AT ALL
TIMES THE BOAT IS MOVING!
WARNING
AVOID BODILY INJURY!
CLOSE AND SECURE CENTER WINDSHIELD AT ALL
TIMES THE BOAT IS MOVING!
Gas Grill
Gas Grill
If equipped there are several items to be aware of when operating tne
propane gas grill. Be sure the grill is always secured in the deck mount
and assumes an overboard position. Never alter the position of the
deck mount! Always watch the grill when cooking. Make sure to let
the grill cool before stowing it! Do not store propane bottles on the
boat. Disconnect the bottle from the grill by unscrewing it. Store the
propane bottles in a cool dry environment.
If equipped there are several items to be aware of when operating tne
propane gas grill. Be sure the grill is always secured in the deck mount
and assumes an overboard position. Never alter the position of the
deck mount! Always watch the grill when cooking. Make sure to let
the grill cool before stowing it! Do not store propane bottles on the
boat. Disconnect the bottle from the grill by unscrewing it. Store the
propane bottles in a cool dry environment.
Cabin Door
Cabin Door
On 2250 models, keep the cabin door closed while underway by using
the key lock. When opened, make sure the door is secured to the
holder.
On 2250 models, keep the cabin door closed while underway by using
the key lock. When opened, make sure the door is secured to the
holder.
6-7
6-7
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
Berth Set-Up
Berth Set-Up
On the 2250, the berth cushions can be set up to make a berth. Start
by inserting the cushion support bar in the two support brackets. Make
sure the bar is seated. Next, remove the port and starboard backrests.
Install them as shown in the illustration. Finally, place the filler cushion
between the two backrest cushions to fill the gap. Reverse the process
to disassemble the berth.
On the 2250, the berth cushions can be set up to make a berth. Start
by inserting the cushion support bar in the two support brackets. Make
sure the bar is seated. Next, remove the port and starboard backrests.
Install them as shown in the illustration. Finally, place the filler cushion
between the two backrest cushions to fill the gap. Reverse the process
to disassemble the berth.
TYPICAL BERTH
2250
TYPICAL BERTH
2250
PORT FWD. BACKREST
PORT FWD. BACKREST
STBD. FWD. BACKREST
STBD. FWD. BACKREST
FILLER CUSHION
FILLER CUSHION
CUSHION SUPPORT BAR
CUSHION SUPPORT BAR
Cockpit Table
Cockpit Table
To use the optional teak table, simply insert the tube in the floor
receiver and position the table securely to the top of the tube. Rock
the table back and forth to make sure it is seated. Use 2 coats of teak
oil as needed to keep the table surface well oiled. Wipe with a clean
rag. Wait 30 minutes between teak oil coatings.
To use the optional teak table, simply insert the tube in the floor
receiver and position the table securely to the top of the tube. Rock
the table back and forth to make sure it is seated. Use 2 coats of teak
oil as needed to keep the table surface well oiled. Wipe with a clean
rag. Wait 30 minutes between teak oil coatings.
6-8
6-8
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
Typical Stereo
Typical Stereo
The stereo system features an AM-FM stereo CD player with matched
speaker sets. A 10 amp automotive style fuse is located at the rear of
the stereo unit. See chapter 7.
The Kenwood stereo features 50 watts x 4 power, CD player, and
uses marine speakers. The CD player accepts all types of CD’s except
the 3” size.
Basic stereo features are covered in this manual. For more detailed
information, refer to the stereo manufacturer’s manual in the owner’s
pouch.
The stereo system features an AM-FM stereo CD player with matched
speaker sets. A 10 amp automotive style fuse is located at the rear of
the stereo unit. See chapter 7.
The Kenwood stereo features 50 watts x 4 power, CD player, and
uses marine speakers. The CD player accepts all types of CD’s except
the 3” size.
Basic stereo features are covered in this manual. For more detailed
information, refer to the stereo manufacturer’s manual in the owner’s
pouch.
BASIC FUNCTIONS
BASIC FUNCTIONS
6-9
6-9
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
Power
Power
To energize the stereo, first turn on the stereo breaker located on the
main DC panel. This is turn supplies 12 volts to the stereo unit.
Next, press the SRC button.
To deactivate the unit, press the SRC button and hold it down for 1
second.
To energize the stereo, first turn on the stereo breaker located on the
main DC panel. This is turn supplies 12 volts to the stereo unit.
Next, press the SRC button.
To deactivate the unit, press the SRC button and hold it down for 1
second.
Selecting the Source
Selecting the Source
Press the SCR button. The display will show Tune for AM-FM, CD,
and Disc for external disc (CD changer if equipped).
Press the SCR button. The display will show Tune for AM-FM, CD,
and Disc for external disc (CD changer if equipped).
Volume
Volume
Press the up button to increase the volume.
Press the down button to decrease the volume.
To rapidly turn down the volume, press the ATT button.
Each time the button is pressed the Attenuator turn on and off.
When its on, the ATT indicator blinks.
Press the up button to increase the volume.
Press the down button to decrease the volume.
To rapidly turn down the volume, press the ATT button.
Each time the button is pressed the Attenuator turn on and off.
When its on, the ATT indicator blinks.
Loudness
Loudness
This compensates for low and high tones during low volume.
Press the loud button for at least 1 second.
Each time the button is pressed for at least 1 second the loudness
turns on and off.
When it’s on, loud indicator is on.
This compensates for low and high tones during low volume.
Press the loud button for at least 1 second.
Each time the button is pressed for at least 1 second the loudness
turns on and off.
When it’s on, loud indicator is on.
6-10
6-10
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
System Q
System Q
When playing different types of music this feature lets you recall the
best sounding preset.
Select the source to set by pressing the SRC button.
Select the sound type by pressing the Q button. Each time the button
is pressed the sound setting changes.
When playing different types of music this feature lets you recall the
best sounding preset.
Select the source to set by pressing the SRC button.
Select the sound type by pressing the Q button. Each time the button
is pressed the sound setting changes.
Sound Setting
Display
Sound Setting
Display
Flat
Rock
Top 40
Pop
Jazz
Easy
Scan of Flat-Easy
SQ-1
SQ-2
SQ-3
SQ-4
SQ-5
SQ-6
SCAn
Flat
Rock
Top 40
Pop
Jazz
Easy
Scan of Flat-Easy
SQ-1
SQ-2
SQ-3
SQ-4
SQ-5
SQ-6
SCAn
Each setting value is changed with the speaker setting.
First, select the speaker type with the speaker setting.
When the system Q setting is changed, the Bass, Middle, and Treble
set in audio control replace the system Q values.
Each setting value is changed with the speaker setting.
First, select the speaker type with the speaker setting.
When the system Q setting is changed, the Bass, Middle, and Treble
set in audio control replace the system Q values.
Audio Control
Audio Control
Select the source for adjustment by pressing the SRC button.
Enter the audio control mode by pressing the AUD button for at least
1 second.
Select the audio item for adjustment by pressing the AM or FM button. Each time the button is pressed the items that can be adjusted
switch as shown below:
Select the source for adjustment by pressing the SRC button.
Enter the audio control mode by pressing the AUD button for at least
1 second.
Select the audio item for adjustment by pressing the AM or FM button. Each time the button is pressed the items that can be adjusted
switch as shown below:
6-11
6-11
CHAPTER 6
Adjustment Item
Display
Base level
Mid level
Treble level
Balance
Fader
Bas
Mid
Tre
Bl
Fd
CHAPTER 6
Range
-8 to +8
-8 to +8
-8 to +8
Left 15-Right 15
Rear 15-Front 15
Adjustment Item
Display
Base level
Mid level
Treble level
Balance
Fader
Bas
Mid
Tre
Bl
Fd
Range
-8 to +8
-8 to +8
-8 to +8
Left 15-Right 15
Rear 15-Front 15
Exit the audio control mode by pressing AUD.
Exit the audio control mode by pressing AUD.
Clock Adjustment
Clock Adjustment
Select the clock display by pressing the CLK button.
Enter the clock adjustment mode by pressing the CLK button for at
least 2 seconds. The clock display will blink.
Adjust the hours by pressing the AM or FM buttons.
Adjust the minutes by pressing the << or >> button.
Exit the clock adjustment mode by pressing CLK.
Select the clock display by pressing the CLK button.
Enter the clock adjustment mode by pressing the CLK button for at
least 2 seconds. The clock display will blink.
Adjust the hours by pressing the AM or FM buttons.
Adjust the minutes by pressing the << or >> button.
Exit the clock adjustment mode by pressing CLK.
TUNING FUNCTIONS
6-12
TUNING FUNCTIONS
6-12
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
Tuning Mode
Tuning Mode
To select the tuning mode press the AUTO button. Each time the
button is pressed the tuning mode switches as shown below.
To select the tuning mode press the AUTO button. Each time the
button is pressed the tuning mode switches as shown below.
Tuning Mode Display
Tuning Mode Display
Auto Seek
Auto1
indicator
Preset station Auto 2
seek
indicator
Manual
Operation
Automatic station search
Auto Seek
Operation
Search in order of preset
memory stations
Auto1
indicator
Preset station Auto 2
seek
indicator
Automatic station search
Search in order of preset
memory stations
Manual tuning knob
Manual
Manual tuning knob
Tuning/Selecting A Station
Tuning/Selecting A Station
Select tuner source by pressing the SRC button. Select the tune display.
Select the band by pressing the AM or FM button.
Each time the FM button is pressed it switches between the FM1,
FM2 and FM3 bands.
Tune up or down the band by pressing the << or >> button.
Select tuner source by pressing the SRC button. Select the tune display.
Select the band by pressing the AM or FM button.
Each time the FM button is pressed it switches between the FM1,
FM2 and FM3 bands.
Tune up or down the band by pressing the << or >> button.
6-13
6-13
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
Station Preset Memory
Station Preset Memory
Select the band by pressing the AM or FM button.
Select the frequency to put in the memory by pressing the << or >>
button.
Put the frequency in the memory by pressing the #1 to #6 buttons
for at least 2 seconds. The preset number display blinks 1 time.
Note: On both AM and FM bands 1 station can be put in each of the
1 through 6 slots.
Select the band by pressing the AM or FM button.
Select the frequency to put in the memory by pressing the << or >>
button.
Put the frequency in the memory by pressing the #1 to #6 buttons
for at least 2 seconds. The preset number display blinks 1 time.
Note: On both AM and FM bands 1 station can be put in each of the
1 through 6 slots.
Auto Memory Entry
Auto Memory Entry
This feature allows stations with high reception to be put in memory.
Select the band for auto memory entry by pressing the AM or FM
button.
Open auto memory entry by pressing the AME button for at least 2
seconds.
Note: The auto memory closes when 6 receivable stations are put in
memory.
This feature allows stations with high reception to be put in memory.
Select the band for auto memory entry by pressing the AM or FM
button.
Open auto memory entry by pressing the AME button for at least 2
seconds.
Note: The auto memory closes when 6 receivable stations are put in
memory.
Preset Tuning
Preset Tuning
This feature allows for calling up stations in the memory.
Select the band by pressing the AM or FM button.
Call up the station by pressing the #1 to #6 button.
This feature allows for calling up stations in the memory.
Select the band by pressing the AM or FM button.
Call up the station by pressing the #1 to #6 button.
6-14
6-14
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
CD General Hints & Recommendations
CD General Hints & Recommendations
Following are some general principles regarding the use and care of
CD’s:
Following are some general principles regarding the use and care of
CD’s:
1. Keep from touching the recording surface of the CD. Hold it by
the edges.
1. Keep from touching the recording surface of the CD. Hold it by
the edges.
2. Remember CD-R and CD-RW are easier to damage than musical
CD’s. The music CD’s are covered with a clear coat to protect them.
Do not stick tape on the CD since it can clog up the internal components.
2. Remember CD-R and CD-RW are easier to damage than musical
CD’s. The music CD’s are covered with a clear coat to protect them.
Do not stick tape on the CD since it can clog up the internal components.
3. If a new CD has a burr on the inner circle take a pen and run it
around the circled area to smooth any rough edges.
3. If a new CD has a burr on the inner circle take a pen and run it
around the circled area to smooth any rough edges.
4. Always clean a CD from the center outward; not in a circular motion.
4. Always clean a CD from the center outward; not in a circular motion.
5. Do not use CD’s with coloring on the recording surface,
or without the disc mark.
5. Do not use CD’s with coloring on the recording surface,
or without the disc mark.
6. Do not store CD discs in direct sunlight.
6. Do not store CD discs in direct sunlight.
7. Invest in a CD storage unit to help keep dirt off the CD surface.
7. Invest in a CD storage unit to help keep dirt off the CD surface.
6-15
6-15
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
CD FUNCTIONS
CD FUNCTIONS
Playing A CD
Insert a CD by pressing the SRC button. Select the CD display. The
in indicator should be on.
Playing A CD
Insert a CD by pressing the SRC button. Select the CD display. The
in indicator should be on.
Ejecting A CD
Press the eject button.
Ejecting A CD
Press the eject button.
Fast Forwarding & Reversing
To fast forward hold down the >> button. Release the button at this
point to play the CD.
To reverse hold down on the << button. Release the button at this
point to play the CD.
Fast Forwarding & Reversing
To fast forward hold down the >> button. Release the button at this
point to play the CD.
To reverse hold down on the << button. Release the button at this
point to play the CD.
6-16
6-16
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
Track/File Search
This feature lets you search for a song on the disc or in the MP3/
WMA folder.
Track/File Search
This feature lets you search for a song on the disc or in the MP3/
WMA folder.
Press the << or >> button.
Press the << or >> button.
Direct Track/File Search
This feature does a track/file search by entering the track/file number.
Direct Track/File Search
This feature does a track/file search by entering the track/file number.
1. Enter the track/file number.
Press the number buttons on the remote.
1. Enter the track/file number.
Press the number buttons on the remote.
2. Do track/file search.
Press the << or >> button.
2. Do track/file search.
Press the << or >> button.
To cancel the operation, press the > II button.
To cancel the operation, press the > II button.
Random Play
This feature lets you play all the CD songs in a random order by
pressing the RDM button.
Each time the button is pressed random play turns on & off. When it
is on the RDM indicator is on and the track # blinks.
Random Play
This feature lets you play all the CD songs in a random order by
pressing the RDM button.
Each time the button is pressed random play turns on & off. When it
is on the RDM indicator is on and the track # blinks.
6-17
6-17
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
Sirius Satellite Radio
Sirius Satellite Radio
Sirius satellite radio features over 120 channels of music entertainment
completely commercial-free along with sports and news channels.
Sirius emphasizes the music and entertainment you want. Channels
use the most updated digital filtering available for the clearest sound.
Sirius uses three satellites flying over the United States for coast to
coast coverage with high elevation angles. The result is a clearer line
of sight and less signal blocking.
The system consists of the Kenwood stereo receiver (sometimes called
the head unit), Kenwood Sirius radio tuner and antenna.With these
components and an active account (6 month initial free subscription) your
Sirius system can be activated. Following are the activation steps to
be taken by the customer:
Sirius satellite radio features over 120 channels of music entertainment
completely commercial-free along with sports and news channels.
Sirius emphasizes the music and entertainment you want. Channels
use the most updated digital filtering available for the clearest sound.
Sirius uses three satellites flying over the United States for coast to
coast coverage with high elevation angles. The result is a clearer line
of sight and less signal blocking.
The system consists of the Kenwood stereo receiver (sometimes called
the head unit), Kenwood Sirius radio tuner and antenna.With these
components and an active account (6 month initial free subscription) your
Sirius system can be activated. Following are the activation steps to
be taken by the customer:
A. Unit must be completely installed and the antenna must have a
clear view of the sky.
A. Unit must be completely installed and the antenna must have a
clear view of the sky.
B. Turn on the radio and go to satellite mode.
B. Turn on the radio and go to satellite mode.
C. Confir m reception by tuning to SIRIUS WEATHER &
EMERGENCY//CHANNEL 184. If you are not receiving Channel
184, please refer to the radio manufacturer owner’s manual.
C. Confirm reception by tuning to SIRIUS WEATHER &
EMERGENCY//CHANNEL 184. If you are not receiving Channel
184, please refer to the radio manufacturer owner’s manual.
D. Call SIRIUS sales support 1-866-580-7234 or customer care at
1-888-539-7474
D. Call SIRIUS sales support 1-866-580-7234 or customer care at
1-888-539-7474
E. Please have your name, address, phone number and the SIRIUS
ID#ESN available for the agent.
E. Please have your name, address, phone number and the SIRIUS
ID#ESN available for the agent.
6-18
6-18
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
Performance Package
Performance Package
This optional upgrade includes 2 extra speakers and the amplifier to
drive the system. The amplifier is located at the port bow storage.
The 30 amp fuse for the amplifier is located at the firewall next to the
battery switch. Should the fuse blow troubleshoot the system before
replacing the fuse. Use the same type and fuse capacity.
This optional upgrade includes 2 extra speakers and the amplifier to
drive the system. The amplifier is located at the port bow storage.
The 30 amp fuse for the amplifier is located at the firewall next to the
battery switch. Should the fuse blow troubleshoot the system before
replacing the fuse. Use the same type and fuse capacity.
Ipod Adapter
Ipod Adapter
A further option available through Regal is a Kenwood ipod
conversion box. With a complete option package onboard your vessel
and the addition of an iPod (purchased separately at your favorite
music store), songs can be downloaded and played through the system
above with all electrical connections compete per manufacturer’s
specifications and various licensing fees.
A further option available through Regal is a Kenwood ipod
conversion box. With a complete option package onboard your vessel
and the addition of an iPod (purchased separately at your favorite
music store), songs can be downloaded and played through the system
above with all electrical connections compete per manufacturer’s
specifications and various licensing fees.
6-19
6-19
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
Electronics
Electronics
Your vessel may be equipped with an optional VHF marine radio. It
features ship to ship, ship to shore, weather station and U. S. Coast
Guard channels. Before each outing check to make sure it is operating
properly along with receiving weather data. Make sure someone on
the outing beside yourself knows how to use the radio. For more
specific information, refer to the owner’s pouch.
Your vessel may be equipped with an optional VHF marine radio. It
features ship to ship, ship to shore, weather station and U. S. Coast
Guard channels. Before each outing check to make sure it is operating
properly along with receiving weather data. Make sure someone on
the outing beside yourself knows how to use the radio. For more
specific information, refer to the owner’s pouch.
LAYOUT OF CONTROLS AND CONNECTORS
LAYOUT OF CONTROLS AND CONNECTORS
6-20
6-20
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
TYPICAL VHF CONTROL FUNCTIONS
TYPICAL VHF CONTROL FUNCTIONS
1. Volume Control (On/Off)
Turns the radio on/off and controls the volume of the output to the
speaker.
1. Volume Control (On/Off)
Turns the radio on/off and controls the volume of the output to the
speaker.
2. Up & Down Keys
These keys are used to move the channel numbers up or down. The
channel number can be increased or decreased by one with each key
press, or will continue to increase or decrease the number as the key
is held.
2. Up & Down Keys
These keys are used to move the channel numbers up or down. The
channel number can be increased or decreased by one with each key
press, or will continue to increase or decrease the number as the key
is held.
3. Squelch control
Provides an adjustable input signal threshold to eliminate RF
background noise during no signal conditions. Basically, it sets the
signal-to-noise level to where there is a clear signal.
3. Squelch control
Provides an adjustable input signal threshold to eliminate RF
background noise during no signal conditions. Basically, it sets the
signal-to-noise level to where there is a clear signal.
4. 16 Plus key
4. 16 Plus key
Used for immediate use of channel 16. This channel is a factory preset. The 16 plus key on the microphone has the same functions as the
16 plus key on the radio.
Used for immediate use of channel 16. This channel is a factory preset. The 16 plus key on the microphone has the same functions as the
16 plus key on the radio.
5. WX/INT key
5. WX/INT key
When pressed once, the radio becomes a weather channel receiver. A
“WX” will be displayed on the LCD along with the weather channel
number (0-9). When pressed and held for 2 seconds, this key toggles
the transmitter output power between 1 watt and 25 watts.
When pressed once, the radio becomes a weather channel receiver. A
“WX” will be displayed on the LCD along with the weather channel
number (0-9). When pressed and held for 2 seconds, this key toggles
the transmitter output power between 1 watt and 25 watts.
6-21
6-21
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
6. MON/1/25 key
6. MON/1/25 key
When pressed once, the radio enters the MONITOR mode and
“MON” is displayed on the LCD. In this mode the radio will scan
(monitor) 16 plus priority channel, a selected working channeland a
weather channel for the weather alert tone. When pressed and held
for 2 seconds this key toggles the transmitter output power between
1 watt (1 watt is displayed and 25 watts ( “1 watt” disappears).
When pressed once, the radio enters the MONITOR mode and
“MON” is displayed on the LCD. In this mode the radio will scan
(monitor) 16 plus priority channel, a selected working channeland a
weather channel for the weather alert tone. When pressed and held
for 2 seconds this key toggles the transmitter output power between
1 watt (1 watt is displayed and 25 watts ( “1 watt” disappears).
7. Scan key
Used to enter all scans and memory scan modes
7. Scan key
Used to enter all scans and memory scan modes
8. PTT (Push-To-Talk) Switch
When pressed, puts the radio into the transmit mode and “TX” will
displayed on the LCD.
8. PTT (Push-To-Talk) Switch
When pressed, puts the radio into the transmit mode and “TX” will
displayed on the LCD.
9. Up and down keys
The up and down keys are used to move the channel markers up or
down. The channel number can be increased or decreased by 1with
each key press, or will continue to increase or decrease the number as
the key is held.
9. Up and down keys
The up and down keys are used to move the channel markers up or
down. The channel number can be increased or decreased by 1with
each key press, or will continue to increase or decrease the number as
the key is held.
10. 16 PLUS key
Used to select channel 16 immediately. This channel has been preset
to channel 16 prior to shipment. The 16 plus key on the microphonehas
the same functionas the 16 PLUS key on the radio.
10. 16 PLUS key
Used to select channel 16 immediately. This channel has been preset
to channel 16 prior to shipment. The 16 plus key on the microphonehas
the same functionas the 16 PLUS key on the radio.
All of the above keys except PPT will procuce an audible “beep”
when pressed.
All of the above keys except PPT will procuce an audible “beep”
when pressed.
6-22
6-22
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
1. SCAN
Will flash by itself when All-Scan mode is to be initiated or will flash
in unison with “MEM” when memory scan is to be initiated.
1. SCAN
Will flash by itself when All-Scan mode is to be initiated or will flash
in unison with “MEM” when memory scan is to be initiated.
2. 1 W (High/Low Power)
Will be displayed when the transmitter circuits are providing 1 watt
of power to the antenna. When the transmitter is supplying 25 watts
to the antenna, the “1 W” indication will be extinguished.
2. 1 W (High/Low Power)
Will be displayed when the transmitter circuits are providing 1 watt
of power to the antenna. When the transmitter is supplying 25 watts
to the antenna, the “1 W” indication will be extinguished.
3. ALT (Weather Alert)
Will blink when a weather alert tone has been detected.
3. ALT (Weather Alert)
Will blink when a weather alert tone has been detected.
4. WX (Weather)
Will be displayed when the channel selected to be monitored is a
weather channel.
4. WX (Weather)
Will be displayed when the channel selected to be monitored is a
weather channel.
6-23
6-23
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
5. MON (Monitor)
Will be displayed when the MON/INT key is pressed. This indicates
the radio is in the monitor mode.
5. MON (Monitor)
Will be displayed when the MON/INT key is pressed. This indicates
the radio is in the monitor mode.
6. INT (International/USA) Will be displayed when international
channels are programmed for use. “INT” is not displayed when US
channels are programmed for use.
6. INT (International/USA) Will be displayed when international
channels are programmed for use. “INT” is not displayed when US
channels are programmed for use.
7. TX (Transmit)
Will be displayed on the LCD when the Push-to-Talk (PTT) switch is
depressed indicating the transmitting circuits are providing a signal
to the antenna.
7. TX (Transmit)
Will be displayed on the LCD when the Push-to-Talk (PTT) switch is
depressed indicating the transmitting circuits are providing a signal
to the antenna.
8. MEM (Memory)
Will be displayed when the SCAN key is pressed and held for two
seconds, or when the radio is programmed to the MEMORY SCAN
mode.
8. MEM (Memory)
Will be displayed when the SCAN key is pressed and held for two
seconds, or when the radio is programmed to the MEMORY SCAN
mode.
9. LCD segments
Will display channel number in use.
9. LCD segments
Will display channel number in use.
6-24
6-24
Equipment Operation
NOTICE
Equipment Operation
NOTICE
WHEN THE POWER IS ON, THE SYNTHESIZER
AUTOMATICALLY PROGRAMS FOR THE USA
CHANNEL FREQUENCIES AND SELECTS THE
CALLING CHANNEL 16.
REFER TO 16 PLUS OPERATION
TO CHANGE THIS CHANNEL.
WHEN THE POWER IS ON, THE SYNTHESIZER
AUTOMATICALLY PROGRAMS FOR THE USA
CHANNEL FREQUENCIES AND SELECTS THE
CALLING CHANNEL 16.
REFER TO 16 PLUS OPERATION
TO CHANGE THIS CHANNEL.
Turning On the Volume
1) Rotate the ON/OFF/VOLUME control clockwise to turn the
radio on.
Turning On the Volume
1) Rotate the ON/OFF/VOLUME control clockwise to turn the
radio on.
Setting the Volume
1) Rotate the Squelch control slowly counterclockwise. Background
noise will be heard.
2) Rotate the Volume control for the desired volume level.
Setting the Volume
1) Rotate the Squelch control slowly counterclockwise. Background
noise will be heard.
2) Rotate the Volume control for the desired volume level.
Setting the Squelch
1) Rotate the squelch control slowly clockwise until the background
noise ceases.
Setting the Squelch
1) Rotate the squelch control slowly clockwise until the background
noise ceases.
Setting the Power Output
1) Presss the “MON/1/25 “ key for two seconds to toggle between 1
watt output and 25 watt output. The choice of power output is
dependent upon the distance of transmission and transmitting
conditions. In some US harbors and on certain channels, the radio
autimatically selects the 1 watt power output when the channel is
selected.
Setting the Power Output
1) Presss the “MON/1/25 “ key for two seconds to toggle between 1
watt output and 25 watt output. The choice of power output is
dependent upon the distance of transmission and transmitting
conditions. In some US harbors and on certain channels, the radio
autimatically selects the 1 watt power output when the channel is
selected.
Selecting the Channel
1) To select the appropriate channnel, press the up or down channel
select keys.
Selecting the Channel
1) To select the appropriate channnel, press the up or down channel
select keys.
6-25
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CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
To Transmit
1) Select the desired mode (USA or INT) by pressing and holding the
WX/INT key for 2 seconds. When “INT” is displayed International
mode is selected. When extinguished, USA mode is active. Then press
the PUSH-TO-TALK switch and speak into the microphone using a
clear normal voice.
2) When the power is initially turned on, press the PUSH-TO-TALK
switch, the radio will be ready for transmission on CH16 or a user
selected priority channel (16 PLUS)
To Transmit
1) Select the desired mode (USA or INT) by pressing and holding the
WX/INT key for 2 seconds. When “INT” is displayed International
mode is selected. When extinguished, USA mode is active. Then press
the PUSH-TO-TALK switch and speak into the microphone using a
clear normal voice.
2) When the power is initially turned on, press the PUSH-TO-TALK
switch, the radio will be ready for transmission on CH16 or a user
selected priority channel (16 PLUS)
As a safety feature, the Ray 48 is designed to inhibit transmission if
the Push-To-Talk is pressed continuously for over five minutes. If
this occurs, audible beeps will sound and “TO” (Time Out) blinks on
the LCD until the Push-To-Talk switch is released. After releasing
the Push-To-Talk switch, the radio is ready fro reception.
As a safety feature, the Ray 48 is designed to inhibit transmission if
the Push-To-Talk is pressed continuously for over five minutes. If
this occurs, audible beeps will sound and “TO” (Time Out) blinks on
the LCD until the Push-To-Talk switch is released. After releasing
the Push-To-Talk switch, the radio is ready fro reception.
NOTICE
NOTICE
INITIAL COMMUNICATION CONTACTS ARE
USUALLY MADE OVER CHANNEL 16 AS ALL SHIPS
AND SHORE STATIONS MONITOR THIS CHANNEL.
THEN A SHIFT TO A WORKING CHANNEL
WILL BE NECESSARY.
INITIAL COMMUNICATION CONTACTS ARE
USUALLY MADE OVER CHANNEL 16 AS ALL SHIPS
AND SHORE STATIONS MONITOR THIS CHANNEL.
THEN A SHIFT TO A WORKING CHANNEL
WILL BE NECESSARY.
To Select A Weather Channel
1) Press the WX/INT key, then use the up or down key to select the
desired weather channel from 0 to 9. When this mode is selected, the
transmitter is alway inhibited.
To Select A Weather Channel
1) Press the WX/INT key, then use the up or down key to select the
desired weather channel from 0 to 9. When this mode is selected, the
transmitter is alway inhibited.
2) If a weather alert signal is received on your selected WX channel
(when in the monitor mode) there is a five-second audible alarm
generated. To cancel the audible alarm, press any key.
2) If a weather alert signal is received on your selected WX channel
(when in the monitor mode) there is a five-second audible alarm
generated. To cancel the audible alarm, press any key.
6-26
6-26
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
The 16 PLUS (priority) Channel
The 16 Plus channel has been preset to channel 16 prior to shipment
from the factory, but the 16 Plus channel can be changed to another
number, the the exception of all weather channels.
The 16 PLUS (priority) Channel
The 16 Plus channel has been preset to channel 16 prior to shipment
from the factory, but the 16 Plus channel can be changed to another
number, the the exception of all weather channels.
1) Press the up or down key to select the desired channel. Then press
and hold the 16 Plus key for three seconds. An audible beep tone will
confirm that the selected channel is stored in memory as the 16 Plus
channel.
2) To reselect channel 16 as the 16 PLUS channel, repeat step 1 for
channel 16.
1) Press the up or down key to select the desired channel. Then press
and hold the 16 Plus key for three seconds. An audible beep tone will
confirm that the selected channel is stored in memory as the 16 Plus
channel.
2) To reselect channel 16 as the 16 PLUS channel, repeat step 1 for
channel 16.
Channel Memory
The Ray 48 can store into memory all U.S. or International channels.
The stored channels will be scanned during Memory Scan Mode.
Channel Memory
The Ray 48 can store into memory all U.S. or International channels.
The stored channels will be scanned during Memory Scan Mode.
1) Channel memory. To put a channel onto memory, select the channel
to be stored with the up or down arrows. Push and hold the SCAN
key for approximately two seconds until a beep is heard and “MEM”
is displayed on the LCD. This procedure can be repeated for all U.S or
International channels.
2) Memory clear. To clear a channel from memory, select the channel
to be cleared with the up or down arrows. Push and hold the “SCAN”
key for approximately two seconds until a “beep” is heard and “MEM”
disappears from the LCD.
1) Channel memory. To put a channel onto memory, select the channel
to be stored with the up or down arrows. Push and hold the SCAN
key for approximately two seconds until a beep is heard and “MEM”
is displayed on the LCD. This procedure can be repeated for all U.S or
International channels.
2) Memory clear. To clear a channel from memory, select the channel
to be cleared with the up or down arrows. Push and hold the “SCAN”
key for approximately two seconds until a “beep” is heard and “MEM”
disappears from the LCD.
Scan Modes
1) All-Scan Mode
If no channels are stored in memory, when the SCAN key is pressed
once, “SCAN” will begin to flash on the LCD. In three seconds, if no
other keys are pressed, the radio will begin scanning all channels
( except weather channels) as long as no signal is received. If a signal
is received, the scan will stop and monitor the receiving channel.If
the signal is lost for 5 seconds, the radio will resume scanning.
Scan Modes
1) All-Scan Mode
If no channels are stored in memory, when the SCAN key is pressed
once, “SCAN” will begin to flash on the LCD. In three seconds, if no
other keys are pressed, the radio will begin scanning all channels
( except weather channels) as long as no signal is received. If a signal
is received, the scan will stop and monitor the receiving channel.If
the signal is lost for 5 seconds, the radio will resume scanning.
6-27
6-27
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
If the scan has stopped on a received signal, you may resume scanning
by pressing the SCAN key. To cancel the scan mode, press the SCAN
key once while the radio is scanning.
2) Memory Scan Mode
If one or more channels are stored in memory, when the SCAN key is
pressed “SCAN” and “MEM” will begin flashing simultaneously on
the LCD. If no other key is pressed, the radio will begin scanning all
channels in memory in three seconds. As with All-Scan, if a signal is
received, the scan will stop on the receiving channel until the signal
is lost for five seconds or the SCAN key is pressed. To cancel memory
scan, press the SCAN key while the radio is scanning.
If you have one or more channels in memory and want to initiate AllScan, perform the following:
Press the SCAN key. “SCAN” and “MEM” will flash on the LCD.
Press the SCAN key again within three seconds and “MEM” will
disappear from the LCD leaving only “SCAN” flashing. All-Scan will
begin in three seconds if no other key is pressed.
If the scan has stopped on a received signal, you may resume scanning
by pressing the SCAN key. To cancel the scan mode, press the SCAN
key once while the radio is scanning.
2) Memory Scan Mode
If one or more channels are stored in memory, when the SCAN key is
pressed “SCAN” and “MEM” will begin flashing simultaneously on
the LCD. If no other key is pressed, the radio will begin scanning all
channels in memory in three seconds. As with All-Scan, if a signal is
received, the scan will stop on the receiving channel until the signal
is lost for five seconds or the SCAN key is pressed. To cancel memory
scan, press the SCAN key while the radio is scanning.
If you have one or more channels in memory and want to initiate AllScan, perform the following:
Press the SCAN key. “SCAN” and “MEM” will flash on the LCD.
Press the SCAN key again within three seconds and “MEM” will
disappear from the LCD leaving only “SCAN” flashing. All-Scan will
begin in three seconds if no other key is pressed.
Master Reset
To preform a master reset, press and hold the 16 PLUS key while
turning the unit on. This feature clears all channels from memory and
programs the 16 PLUS feature back to channel 16.
Master Reset
To preform a master reset, press and hold the 16 PLUS key while
turning the unit on. This feature clears all channels from memory and
programs the 16 PLUS feature back to channel 16.
Monitor Mode
Before entering the Monitor Mode you must first select the WX
channel you wish to monitor for the weather alert tone. Next, you
must select a working channel to be monitored for traffic.
1) Press WT/INT, then scroll to the desired weather channel with
the arrow keys.
2) Press the 16 PLUS key to exit the weather band and return to
normal mode.
3) Use the arrow keys to select the desired working channel.
4) Press the MON/1/25 key to begin monitor mode. Press the MON/
1/25 key again to cancel Monitor Mode.
Monitor Mode
Before entering the Monitor Mode you must first select the WX
channel you wish to monitor for the weather alert tone. Next, you
must select a working channel to be monitored for traffic.
1) Press WT/INT, then scroll to the desired weather channel with
the arrow keys.
2) Press the 16 PLUS key to exit the weather band and return to
normal mode.
3) Use the arrow keys to select the desired working channel.
4) Press the MON/1/25 key to begin monitor mode. Press the MON/
1/25 key again to cancel Monitor Mode.
6-28
6-28
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
As an example, let’s say we have selected channel 68 as our working
channel. WX2 as our weather channel and the 16 PLUS key is
programmed for channel 16. When MON/1/25 is pressed, the radio
begins to scan Priority Channel 16, the working channel 68 and
weather channel WX2.
As an example, let’s say we have selected channel 68 as our working
channel. WX2 as our weather channel and the 16 PLUS key is
programmed for channel 16. When MON/1/25 is pressed, the radio
begins to scan Priority Channel 16, the working channel 68 and
weather channel WX2.
Working Channel
If a signal is received on CH68, the scan will stop on CH68, but
continue to monitor 16 PLUS and the selected weather channel every
5 seconds.
Working Channel
If a signal is received on CH68, the scan will stop on CH68, but
continue to monitor 16 PLUS and the selected weather channel every
5 seconds.
16 PLUS (priority) Channel
If while scanning, a signal is received on the designated 16 PLUS
channel, the scanning will stop on 16 PLUS as long as the signal is
being received. If the signal ceases for more than five seconds, the
scanning will continue.
16 PLUS (priority) Channel
If while scanning, a signal is received on the designated 16 PLUS
channel, the scanning will stop on 16 PLUS as long as the signal is
being received. If the signal ceases for more than five seconds, the
scanning will continue.
Weather Channel
Until a weather alert tone signal is received on WX2, the scan will
stop on WX2 briefly, but will not give any audio output. When a
weather alert tone is received, the monitor will stop and an audible
alarm will sound, When the audio alert ends in five seconds, the
emergency weather broadcast will be heard. To silence the alarm,
push any key.
Weather Channel
Until a weather alert tone signal is received on WX2, the scan will
stop on WX2 briefly, but will not give any audio output. When a
weather alert tone is received, the monitor will stop and an audible
alarm will sound, When the audio alert ends in five seconds, the
emergency weather broadcast will be heard. To silence the alarm,
push any key.
!
CAUTION
!
OPERATION ON CHANNELS NOT DESIGNATED FOR
USE BY YOUR CLASSIFICATION OF VESSEL OR ON
INTERNATIONAL CHANNELS
WITHIN THE US TERRITORIAL WATERS
IS A VIOLATION OF FCC RULES & REGULATIONS
AND MAY RESULT IN SEVERE PENALTIES.
6-29
CAUTION
OPERATION ON CHANNELS NOT DESIGNATED FOR
USE BY YOUR CLASSIFICATION OF VESSEL OR ON
INTERNATIONAL CHANNELS
WITHIN THE US TERRITORIAL WATERS
IS A VIOLATION OF FCC RULES & REGULATIONS
AND MAY RESULT IN SEVERE PENALTIES.
6-29
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
SELECTED MARINE CHANNELS & THEIR USAGE
SELECTED MARINE CHANNELS & THEIR USAGE
Channel Number
Channel Usage
Channel Number
Channel Usage
0 1A
Port Operations & Commercial
Found Only in New Orleans/Lower Mississippi Area
01A
Port Operations & Commercial
Found Only in New Orleans/Lower Mississippi Area
02 through 04
Port Operations
02 through 04
Port Operations
05
Port Operations
Found Only in Houston, New Orleans & Seattle
05
Port Operations
Found Only in Houston, New Orleans & Seattle
06
Intership Safety
06
Intership Safety
07A
Commercial
07A
Commercial
08
Commercial (Intership Only)
08
Commercial (Intership Only)
09
Boat Calling, Commercial & Non- commercial
09
Boat Calling, Commercial & Non- commercial
10
Commercial
10
Commercial
11
Commercial. VTS in select areas.
11
Commercial. VTS in select areas.
12
Port Operations. VTS in select areas.
12
Port Operations. VTS in select areas.
13
Intership Navigation Safety (Bridge to Bridge). Ships
greater than 20 meters in length maintain listening watch
13
Intership Navigation Safety (Bridge to Bridge). Ships
greater than 20 meters in length maintain listening watch
14
Port Operations. VTS in select areas.
14
Port Operations. VTS in select areas.
15
Environmental (Receive Only) Used by class C EPIRBS
15
Environmental (Receive Only) Used by class C EPIRBS
16
International Distress, Safety & Calling.
16
International Distress, Safety & Calling.
17
State Control
17
State Control
18A
Commercial
18A
Commercial
19A
Commercial
19A
Commercial
20A
Port Operations
20A
Port Operations
21A
U.S. Coast Guard Only
21A
U.S. Coast Guard Only
22A
Coast Guard Liaison & Maritime Safety Information
Broadcasts as announced on channel 16
22A
Coast Guard Liaison & Maritime Safety Information
Broadcasts as announced on channel 16
23A
U.S. Coast Guard Only
23A
U.S. Coast Guard Only
24- 28
Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
24- 28
Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
60- 62
Port Operations
60- 62
Port Operations
6-30
6-30
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
Channel Number
Channel Usage
Channel Number
Channel Usage
63A
Port Operations & Commercial.
VTS. Available in New Orleans/ Lower Mississippi
63A
Port Operations & Commercial.
VTS. Available in New Orleans/ Lower Mississippi
64, 65A, 66A
Port Operations
64, 65A, 66A
Port Operations
67
Commercial. Used for bridge- to- bridge in lower
Mississippi River. Intership Only
67
Commercial. Used for bridge- to- bridge in lower
Mississippi River. Intership Only
68,69
Non- Commercial
68,69
Non- Commercial
70
Digital Select Calling (Voice Traffic Not Allowed)
70
Digital Select Calling (Voice Traffic Not Allowed)
71
Non- Commercial
71
Non- Commercial
72
Non- Commercial (Intership Only)
72
Non- Commercial (Intership Only)
73 , 7 4
Port Operations
73 , 7 4
Port Operations
75,76
Ch 16 Guard Band. RX Only
75,76
Ch 16 Guard Band. RX Only
77
Port Operations. (Intership Only)
77
Port Operations. (Intership Only)
78A
Non- Commercial
78A
Non- Commercial
79A
80A
Commercial. Non- Commercial in Great Lakes.
79A
80A
Commercial. Non- Commercial in Great Lakes.
81A
U.S. Government Only. Environmental Protection
Operations
81A
U.S. Government Only. Environmental Protection
Operations
82A
83A
U.S. Government Only.
82A
83A
U.S. Government Only.
84- 87
Public Correspondence. (Marine Operator)
84- 87
Public Correspondence. (Marine Operator)
88A
Commercial. (Intership Only)
88A
Commercial. (Intership Only)
6-31
6-31
CHAPTER 6
!
CHAPTER 6
CAUTION
!
THE TRANSMITTER OF YOUR VHF IS DISABLED
WHEN CHANNEL 15, 75, 76, OR WX0-WX9
IS DISPLAYED.
6-32
CAUTION
THE TRANSMITTER OF YOUR VHF IS DISABLED
WHEN CHANNEL 15, 75, 76, OR WX0-WX9
IS DISPLAYED.
6-32
Equipment Operation
Channel Discription & Usage Guide
Equipment Operation
Channel Discription & Usage Guide
6-33
6-33
CHAPTER 6
6-34
CHAPTER 6
6-34
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
6-35
6-35
CHAPTER 6
6-36
CHAPTER 6
6-36
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
6-37
6-37
CHAPTER 6
6-38
CHAPTER 6
6-38
Equipment Operation
Depth Finder/Sounder
DEPTH GAUGE W/ FUNCTIONS
Equipment Operation
Depth Finder/Sounder
In theory the depth gauge
picks up a bottom signal
sent through a transducer to
the helm gauge unit which
is converted to readings in
feet, meters, or fathoms and
displayed on the gauge. The
unit features shallow or
deep water alarms, both of
the audio and visual type,
and keel offset.
DEPTH GAUGE W/ FUNCTIONS
In theory the depth gauge
picks up a bottom signal
sent through a transducer to
the helm gauge unit which
is converted to readings in
feet, meters, or fathoms and
displayed on the gauge. The
unit features shallow or
deep water alarms, both of
the audio and visual type,
and keel offset.
General Description
General Description
The optional depth finder will display depths of 2-199 feet, 1-92
meters, or 1-54 fathoms. To accommodate greater depths to be
displayed in the “ft” feet mode the depth sounder will automatically
change to “F” fathoms mode and continue to display depths to around
54 fathoms.
When the depth decreases below 200 feet the display will return to
the “ft” mode. Limits on depth will vary depending on transducers
and bottom conditions.
If the reading is less than 19.9 feet, meters, or fathoms, 1/10th
increments will be displayed. If the reading is more than 19.9 feet, all
readings will be in whole numbers.
The depth finder features an audible and LCD displayed depth alarm
with adjustable shallow and deep limits and a depth below keel offset
feature. These settings once made are stored in memory and will remain
even if the battery is not connected.
The optional depth finder will display depths of 2-199 feet, 1-92
meters, or 1-54 fathoms. To accommodate greater depths to be
displayed in the “ft” feet mode the depth sounder will automatically
change to “F” fathoms mode and continue to display depths to around
54 fathoms.
When the depth decreases below 200 feet the display will return to
the “ft” mode. Limits on depth will vary depending on transducers
and bottom conditions.
If the reading is less than 19.9 feet, meters, or fathoms, 1/10th
increments will be displayed. If the reading is more than 19.9 feet, all
readings will be in whole numbers.
The depth finder features an audible and LCD displayed depth alarm
with adjustable shallow and deep limits and a depth below keel offset
feature. These settings once made are stored in memory and will remain
even if the battery is not connected.
6-39
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CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
Operation
Operation
Power On. When the helm is powered up by the key switch 12 volt
DC energy is available at the depth gauge along with the remainder
of the instrument cluster. You do not need to press the “ON/OFF
MODE” keypad.
The LCD will illuminate showing the depth and the type of units
selected; feet (FT), meters (M), or fathoms (F). To deactivate the
depth sounder, hold the “ON/OFF MODE” keypad for 4 seconds.
If you press the “ON/OFF MODE keypad again the unit will be
reactivated.
Power On. When the helm is powered up by the key switch 12 volt
DC energy is available at the depth gauge along with the remainder
of the instrument cluster. You do not need to press the “ON/OFF
MODE” keypad.
The LCD will illuminate showing the depth and the type of units
selected; feet (FT), meters (M), or fathoms (F). To deactivate the
depth sounder, hold the “ON/OFF MODE” keypad for 4 seconds.
If you press the “ON/OFF MODE keypad again the unit will be
reactivated.
Depth Alarm. Shallow mode: If you press the “ON/OFF” MODE”
keypad again the “SH” shallow depth alarm setting is displayed. This
is the shallowest water that will energize the alarm. Press and hold
the up or down arrow keypads to adjust the reading to the desired
depth.
Depth Alarm. Shallow mode: If you press the “ON/OFF” MODE”
keypad again the “SH” shallow depth alarm setting is displayed. This
is the shallowest water that will energize the alarm. Press and hold
the up or down arrow keypads to adjust the reading to the desired
depth.
Depth Alarm. Deep Mode: By pressing the “ON/OFF MODE” keypad displays again the “DP” deep depth alarm setting. This is the
deepest water that will energize the alarm.
Press and hold the “UP” or “DOWN” keypads to adjust the reading
to the desired depth. When the shallow depth setting is read by the
depth finder, the “SH” will flash on the LCD and the audible alarm
will sound in a rapid sequence. When the deep depth setting is read
by the depth finder the “DP” will flash on the LCD and the audible
alarm will sound at 2 beeps per second.
Depth Alarm. Deep Mode: By pressing the “ON/OFF MODE” keypad displays again the “DP” deep depth alarm setting. This is the
deepest water that will energize the alarm.
Press and hold the “UP” or “DOWN” keypads to adjust the reading
to the desired depth. When the shallow depth setting is read by the
depth finder, the “SH” will flash on the LCD and the audible alarm
will sound in a rapid sequence. When the deep depth setting is read
by the depth finder the “DP” will flash on the LCD and the audible
alarm will sound at 2 beeps per second.
Note: To fully deactivate the alarm, reset it to zero. Pressing the
“ON/OFF MODE” keypad temporarily deactivates the alarm. To
reactivate the alarm press the “ON/OFF MODE” keypad until the
depth reading appears.
Note: To fully deactivate the alarm, reset it to zero. Pressing the
“ON/OFF MODE” keypad temporarily deactivates the alarm. To
reactivate the alarm press the “ON/OFF MODE” keypad until the
depth reading appears.
6-40
6-40
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
Keel Offset. By pressing the “ON/OFF MODE” keypad again displays the “KL” keel offset setting. It can be set so the depth finder
shows the depth below the transducer or the depth under the keel.
Press the “UP” or “DOWN” arrow keypads to adjust the reading to
the desired depth no further than 19.9 feet.
An example would be if the keel bottom is 3 feet below the transducer and you desire the depth sounder to read the depth below the
keel, the display should be adjusted to read 3.0 FT.
Keel Offset. By pressing the “ON/OFF MODE” keypad again displays the “KL” keel offset setting. It can be set so the depth finder
shows the depth below the transducer or the depth under the keel.
Press the “UP” or “DOWN” arrow keypads to adjust the reading to
the desired depth no further than 19.9 feet.
An example would be if the keel bottom is 3 feet below the transducer and you desire the depth sounder to read the depth below the
keel, the display should be adjusted to read 3.0 FT.
Note: Once the keel offset is programmed, the shallow and deep
alarms will be energized by the depth under the keel.
Note: Once the keel offset is programmed, the shallow and deep
alarms will be energized by the depth under the keel.
Units. Pressing the “ON/OFF MODE” keypad again displays “UN”
on the LCD indicating the units mode.
Press either the up or down arrow keypads to set the units desired to
(FT) feet, (M) meters, or (F) fathoms. Once these units are set, they
will remain the same for all modes. By pressing the “ON/OFF
MODE” keypad again returns the depth finder to normal operation.
Units. Pressing the “ON/OFF MODE” keypad again displays “UN”
on the LCD indicating the units mode.
Press either the up or down arrow keypads to set the units desired to
(FT) feet, (M) meters, or (F) fathoms. Once these units are set, they
will remain the same for all modes. By pressing the “ON/OFF
MODE” keypad again returns the depth finder to normal operation.
6-41
6-41
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
Canvas
Canvas
Standard canvas includes a
bimini top with boot, bows
and hardware. Also, side and
aft curtains are available. A
tonneau cover protects the
bow seating area.
To install a typical bimini top,
unzip the top boot and remove
it from the bimini top. Store it
for future use. Unroll the
canvas and install the front
canvas snaps in place. Pull
one of the canvas straps aft
until tight and install the clip
to the eyelet. Install the other
Standard canvas includes a
bimini top with boot, bows
and hardware. Also, side and
aft curtains are available. A
tonneau cover protects the
bow seating area.
To install a typical bimini top,
unzip the top boot and remove
it from the bimini top. Store it
for future use. Unroll the
canvas and install the front
canvas snaps in place. Pull
one of the canvas straps aft
until tight and install the clip
to the eyelet. Install the other
canvas strap to the other side.
Zip the optional windscreen to the bimini top. Then attach the
windscreen to the windshield snaps. It may be necessary to unzip a
portion of it to access the snaps.
Install the port and starboard side
curtains. They should be marked for
easy identification. If not, a visual
inspection will indicate their side.
Install the aft curtain to the bimini
top rear section and zip it in place. It
is a good idea to work out of the boat
LANYARD PIN
by fastening one side of the aft
curtain and working your way out of
the boat. Remember to take down the canvas above idle speeds. Inspect
each canvas piece for dryness especially the clear window glass
material. Roll all canvas parts before stowing them.
Install the tonneau (bow) cover to snaps and lower center windshield.
Install tonneau cover pole in canvas receiver and tighten thrumb screw.
Ensure all lanyard pins are fully inserted and tightened completely.
6-42
canvas strap to the other side.
Zip the optional windscreen to the bimini top. Then attach the
windscreen to the windshield snaps. It may be necessary to unzip a
portion of it to access the snaps.
Install the port and starboard side
curtains. They should be marked for
easy identification. If not, a visual
inspection will indicate their side.
Install the aft curtain to the bimini
top rear section and zip it in place. It
is a good idea to work out of the boat
LANYARD PIN
by fastening one side of the aft
curtain and working your way out of
the boat. Remember to take down the canvas above idle speeds. Inspect
each canvas piece for dryness especially the clear window glass
material. Roll all canvas parts before stowing them.
Install the tonneau (bow) cover to snaps and lower center windshield.
Install tonneau cover pole in canvas receiver and tighten thrumb screw.
Ensure all lanyard pins are fully inserted and tightened completely.
6-42
Equipment Operation
TYPICAL COCKPIT COVER
Equipment Operation
TYPICAL COCKPIT COVER
Cockpit Cover
Cockpit Cover
The cockpit cover shown above installs over the windshield and snaps
to the deck. To install the cockpit cover, note that on the bow end of
the cover there is a seam on the inside which separates the port and
starboard sides. Align this seam with the center snap below the
windshield. Complete snapping the canvas to the outside and then
down each gunnel to admidships.Your boat may have several cockpit
poles. Their purpose is to keep the canvas tight. Notice on the
underside of the cover there are areas of reinforced canvas material.
These are for the cockpit cover poles. This pole(s) is adjustable by
opening it to the desired length and tightening the thumb screw. You
may find it helpful to mark the poles so you can install the poles in
the same spot each time. Continue to snap the cockpit cover to the
deck snaps. When you reach the rear corner leave enough room to
allow a safe exit.
The cockpit cover shown above installs over the windshield and snaps
to the deck. To install the cockpit cover, note that on the bow end of
the cover there is a seam on the inside which separates the port and
starboard sides. Align this seam with the center snap below the
windshield. Complete snapping the canvas to the outside and then
down each gunnel to admidships.Your boat may have several cockpit
poles. Their purpose is to keep the canvas tight. Notice on the
underside of the cover there are areas of reinforced canvas material.
These are for the cockpit cover poles. This pole(s) is adjustable by
opening it to the desired length and tightening the thumb screw. You
may find it helpful to mark the poles so you can install the poles in
the same spot each time. Continue to snap the cockpit cover to the
deck snaps. When you reach the rear corner leave enough room to
allow a safe exit.
6-43
6-43
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
WINDSCREEN
BIMINI TOP
TYPICAL CANVAS-FRONT VIEW
TYPICAL CANVAS-FRONT VIEW
AFT CURTAIN
BIMINI TOP
AFT CURTAIN
SIDE CURTAIN
BIMINI TOP
TYPICAL CANVAS-SIDE VIEW
6-44
WINDSCREEN
BIMINI TOP
SIDE CURTAIN
TYPICAL CANVAS-SIDE VIEW
6-44
Equipment Operation
!
CAUTION
!
PREVENT POSSIBLE INJURY AND/OR PROPERTY
DAMAGE!
THE COCKPIT COVER IS DESIGNED TO PROTECT
THE BOAT FROM THE ELEMENTS.
DO NOT TRAVEL WITH THE COCKPIT
COVER INSTALLED
AS IS NOT DESIGNED FOR HIGHWAY USE!
!
Equipment Operation
CAUTION
PREVENT POSSIBLE INJURY AND/OR PROPERTY
DAMAGE!
THE COCKPIT COVER IS DESIGNED TO PROTECT
THE BOAT FROM THE ELEMENTS.
DO NOT TRAVEL WITH THE COCKPIT
COVER INSTALLED
AS IS NOT DESIGNED FOR HIGHWAY USE!
!
PREVENT BODILY INJURY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE.
DO NOT TOW BOAT WITH CANVAS UP.
TOW BOAT WITH CANVAS DOWN
AND STORED IN THE COCKPIT.
FOR WATER CRUISE USE,
PLACE THE BIMINI OR CONVERTIBLE TOP
IN THE CRUISE POSITION.
6-45
CAUTION
CAUTION
PREVENT BODILY INJURY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE.
DO NOT TOW BOAT WITH CANVAS UP.
TOW BOAT WITH CANVAS DOWN
AND STORED IN THE COCKPIT.
FOR WATER CRUISE USE,
PLACE THE BIMINI OR CONVERTIBLE TOP
IN THE CRUISE POSITION.
6-45
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 6
Volvo Neutra-Salt System
Volvo Neutra-Salt System
Neutra-Salt Engine Flushing System is available as a Volvo option
on gasoline engines only. Its purpose is to flush salt deposits that
develop in the engine’s cooling system. It is intended for engines that
operate in brackish or salt water areas only. The system is not intended
for fresh water use.
Neutra-Salt Engine Flushing System is available as a Volvo option
on gasoline engines only. Its purpose is to flush salt deposits that
develop in the engine’s cooling system. It is intended for engines that
operate in brackish or salt water areas only. The system is not intended
for fresh water use.
!
CAUTION
!
CAUTION
THE NEUTRA-SALT SOLUTION WILL FREEZE. IF
FREEZING CONDITIONS ARE POSSIBLE, DRAIN
THE ENTIRE SYSTEM.
THE NEUTRA-SALT SOLUTION WILL FREEZE. IF
FREEZING CONDITIONS ARE POSSIBLE, DRAIN
THE ENTIRE SYSTEM.
The Neutra-Salt solution leaves a corrosion inhibiting coating on all
metal engine parts. The solution travels through the engine via a
solenoid (after a rocker switch is activated) and a set of connecting
hoses. The manufacturer recommends using the system at the end of
the boating outing. Extra solution (Volvo # 41103103 available in
quarts and gallons)should be available from your Regal dealer.
The Neutra-Salt solution leaves a corrosion inhibiting coating on all
metal engine parts. The solution travels through the engine via a
solenoid (after a rocker switch is activated) and a set of connecting
hoses. The manufacturer recommends using the system at the end of
the boating outing. Extra solution (Volvo # 41103103 available in
quarts and gallons)should be available from your Regal dealer.
FILL & TEST SYSTEM
FILL & TEST SYSTEM
1. Pour the quart bottle of Neutra-Salt concentrate into the reservior.
Wear protective eye-wear & gloves since the concentrate may cause
an eye irritation. In case of contact, flush eyes throughly with water
for 15 minutes.
2. Mark the fluid level on the reservoir. To prevent hearing loss, avoid
prolonged exposure to the audible alarm on the engine, particularly
in confined spaces. The alarm can reach 120 decibles.
3. Re-connect the power supply.
4. Connect water supply (flushette) so that the engine can be run.
5. Start the engine. Run at idle.
6-46
1. Pour the quart bottle of Neutra-Salt concentrate into the reservior.
Wear protective eye-wear & gloves since the concentrate may cause
an eye irritation. In case of contact, flush eyes throughly with water
for 15 minutes.
2. Mark the fluid level on the reservoir. To prevent hearing loss, avoid
prolonged exposure to the audible alarm on the engine, particularly
in confined spaces. The alarm can reach 120 decibles.
3. Re-connect the power supply.
4. Connect water supply (flushette) so that the engine can be run.
5. Start the engine. Run at idle.
6-46
Equipment Operation
Equipment Operation
6. Hold the rocker switch on for 45 seconds. Turn the engine off and
then release the switch.
7. Check the reservoir; the fluid level should have dropped 1/4”.
6. Hold the rocker switch on for 45 seconds. Turn the engine off and
then release the switch.
7. Check the reservoir; the fluid level should have dropped 1/4”.
If the reservoir does not drop 1/4” it may be necessary to repeat
steps 1-6. Run the engine at 1500-2000 rpm”s to help begin the fluid
flow. For normal operation, run engine at idle.
If the reservoir does not drop 1/4” it may be necessary to repeat
steps 1-6. Run the engine at 1500-2000 rpm”s to help begin the fluid
flow. For normal operation, run engine at idle.
8. If the fluid is still not flowing from the reservoir, check as follows.
a. Hoses for knicks and leaking clamps.
b. Check the vent hole in the reservoir cap for blockage.
c. Check that the solenoid opens when the switch is on and key is on
run.
d. Check the fuse.
e. Check the solenoid connection.
f. Check for a secure ground connection.
8. If the fluid is still not flowing from the reservoir, check as follows.
a. Hoses for knicks and leaking clamps.
b. Check the vent hole in the reservoir cap for blockage.
c. Check that the solenoid opens when the switch is on and key is on
run.
d. Check the fuse.
e. Check the solenoid connection.
f. Check for a secure ground connection.
6-47
6-47
CHAPTER 6
6-48
CHAPTER 6
Notes
6-48
Notes
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
COSMETIC CARE
COSMETIC CARE
This section covers the care and maintenance of
your Regal boat. Many cosmetic care topics
including exterior hardware, upholstery, fiberglass
and canvas are described. Also, major equipment
and systems are covered. As always, refer to the
owner’s information pouch and the manufacturer’s
owner’s manual for detailed procedures.
This section covers the care and maintenance of
your Regal boat. Many cosmetic care topics
including exterior hardware, upholstery, fiberglass
and canvas are described. Also, major equipment
and systems are covered. As always, refer to the
owner’s information pouch and the manufacturer’s
owner’s manual for detailed procedures.
Upholstery
Upholstery
Cockpit and interior vinyl require periodic cleaning to maintain a neat
appearance and to prevent the build up of dirt and contaminants that
may stain and reduce the vinyl life if they are not removed. The frequency of cleaning depends on the amount of use and conditions to
which the vinyl is subjected.
Most common stains can be cleaned using warm, soapy water and
clear rinses. Scrubbing with a soft bristle brush will help loosen soiled
material from embossed surfaces and under welting. If the stains are
not removed with the above method use a mild cleaner such as Fantastic. This cleaner should be used only as needed and not the normal
means.
With more stubborn stains, rubbing alcohol or mineral spirits may be
tried cautiously. Widespread solvent use can severely damage or discolor vinyl. Try to remove stains immediately before they have a chance
to penetrate the surface of the vinyl.
Cockpit and interior vinyl require periodic cleaning to maintain a neat
appearance and to prevent the build up of dirt and contaminants that
may stain and reduce the vinyl life if they are not removed. The frequency of cleaning depends on the amount of use and conditions to
which the vinyl is subjected.
Most common stains can be cleaned using warm, soapy water and
clear rinses. Scrubbing with a soft bristle brush will help loosen soiled
material from embossed surfaces and under welting. If the stains are
not removed with the above method use a mild cleaner such as Fantastic. This cleaner should be used only as needed and not the normal
means.
With more stubborn stains, rubbing alcohol or mineral spirits may be
tried cautiously. Widespread solvent use can severely damage or discolor vinyl. Try to remove stains immediately before they have a chance
to penetrate the surface of the vinyl.
7-1
7-1
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
Powdered abrasives, steel wool, or industrial strength cleaners are not
recommended for cleaning our vinyl. Lacquer solvents will cause immediate damage. Dilute chlorine bleach before using. Do not wax the
vinyl as it may cause cracking. Always wear protective gloves and make
sure there is sufficient ventilation when cleaning vinyl. Wear eye protection.
Remember that suntan oil will damage vinyl. Use suntan lotion instead
of suntan oil. Exposure to the sun is a natural enemy of vinyl upholstery. For maximum life, keep the vessel covered with a cockpit cover
when not in use.
Powdered abrasives, steel wool, or industrial strength cleaners are not
recommended for cleaning our vinyl. Lacquer solvents will cause immediate damage. Dilute chlorine bleach before using. Do not wax the
vinyl as it may cause cracking. Always wear protective gloves and make
sure there is sufficient ventilation when cleaning vinyl. Wear eye protection.
Remember that suntan oil will damage vinyl. Use suntan lotion instead
of suntan oil. Exposure to the sun is a natural enemy of vinyl upholstery. For maximum life, keep the vessel covered with a cockpit cover
when not in use.
Carpet
Carpet
Use approved cleaners on carpet. Always try on a test area first. Many
spots and spills can be removed using a cleaner combined with a clean,
white terry towel. Try not to soak an area excessively and do not use
solvents because most interior carpet is rubber backed and glued in
place. Solvents and abrasives will break down the backing and fibers.
Use approved cleaners on carpet. Always try on a test area first. Many
spots and spills can be removed using a cleaner combined with a clean,
white terry towel. Try not to soak an area excessively and do not use
solvents because most interior carpet is rubber backed and glued in
place. Solvents and abrasives will break down the backing and fibers.
Plastics
Plastics
Use plastic cleaners and polishes recommended for marine use only.
Use proper applicators. Read all instructions carefully. Test the product
in a small area first. Use a soft rag and always rinse the surface with
water. Ammonia based cleaners and abrasives will damage plastic parts.
Use plastic cleaners and polishes recommended for marine use only.
Use proper applicators. Read all instructions carefully. Test the product
in a small area first. Use a soft rag and always rinse the surface with
water. Ammonia based cleaners and abrasives will damage plastic parts.
NOTICE
NOTICE
NEVER CLEAN PLASTIC SURFACES WITH A DRY
CLOTH OR GLASS CLEANING SOLUTIONS
CONTAINING AMMONIA. NEVER USE SOLVENTS
OR WIPE WITH ABRASIVES.
7-2
NEVER CLEAN PLASTIC SURFACES WITH A DRY
CLOTH OR GLASS CLEANING SOLUTIONS
CONTAINING AMMONIA. NEVER USE SOLVENTS
OR WIPE WITH ABRASIVES.
7-2
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Interior Fabrics
Interior Fabrics
Clean flat good interior fabrics with dry cleaning fluid style cleaners
approved for use with soft fabrics. Allow adequate ventilation and
follow the label instructions carefully. Use a soft cleanser with feldspar
to clean stubborn marks or stains on wallpaper. Normal interior vinyl
such as the headliner and head need a mild soap and water solution.
Rinse immediately with clean water and wipe dry. Always test an area
with a cleaner before applying it to a larger area.
Clean flat good interior fabrics with dry cleaning fluid style cleaners
approved for use with soft fabrics. Allow adequate ventilation and
follow the label instructions carefully. Use a soft cleanser with feldspar
to clean stubborn marks or stains on wallpaper. Normal interior vinyl
such as the headliner and head need a mild soap and water solution.
Rinse immediately with clean water and wipe dry. Always test an area
with a cleaner before applying it to a larger area.
Fiberglass & Gelcoat
Fiberglass & Gelcoat
!
WARNING
!
WARNING
AVOID BODILY INJURY!
WAXED GELCOAT SURFACES CAN BE VERY
SLIPPERY. DO NOT WAX NORMALLY USED
AREAS OF THE DECK, LINER, OR GUNWHALES.
DO NOT WAX ANY TEXTURED OR
NON-SKID SURFACES SUCH AS FLOORS, WALKWAYS, STEPS, LADDERS OR SWIM PLATFORMS.
USE EXTREME CAUTION WHEN WALKING ON
GELCOAT. USE HAND AND BOW RAILS.
ALWAYS WEAR NON-SLIP FOOTWEAR.
AVOID BODILY INJURY!
WAXED GELCOAT SURFACES CAN BE VERY
SLIPPERY. DO NOT WAX NORMALLY USED
AREAS OF THE DECK, LINER, OR GUNWHALES.
DO NOT WAX ANY TEXTURED OR
NON-SKID SURFACES SUCH AS FLOORS, WALKWAYS, STEPS, LADDERS OR SWIM PLATFORMS.
USE EXTREME CAUTION WHEN WALKING ON
GELCOAT. USE HAND AND BOW RAILS.
ALWAYS WEAR NON-SLIP FOOTWEAR.
Routine maintenance is the only practical way to keep the surface of
your boat looking shiny and new. Most objects left outdoors will gradually deteriorate from exposure to the sun, water, dust and pollution.
Such outdoor exposure can cause your boat’s gelcoated surface to
change or fade. Darker colors tend to fade more rapidly than lighter
colors because they absorb more of the sun’s rays (ultraviolet and
infrared).
Basic maintenance includes monthly washing of the boat’s surface to
remove normal accumulation of soil and stain.
7-3
Routine maintenance is the only practical way to keep the surface of
your boat looking shiny and new. Most objects left outdoors will gradually deteriorate from exposure to the sun, water, dust and pollution.
Such outdoor exposure can cause your boat’s gelcoated surface to
change or fade. Darker colors tend to fade more rapidly than lighter
colors because they absorb more of the sun’s rays (ultraviolet and
infrared).
Basic maintenance includes monthly washing of the boat’s surface to
remove normal accumulation of soil and stain.
7-3
CHAPTER 7
Use a mild detergent such as dishwashing powder or liquid. Do not
use automatic dishwasher detergent. Avoid any kind of alkaline cleaners such as tri-sodium phosphate (TSP), abrasives, bleaches and ammonia. For best results use cleaners that are recommended for fiberglass. To help maintain the luster of gelcoat, follow the waxing recommendations and schedules as indicated below. Never wax non-skid
surfaces of the vessel. See the warning on page 3 of this chapter.
CHAPTER 7
Use a mild detergent such as dishwashing powder or liquid. Do not
use automatic dishwasher detergent. Avoid any kind of alkaline cleaners such as tri-sodium phosphate (TSP), abrasives, bleaches and ammonia. For best results use cleaners that are recommended for fiberglass. To help maintain the luster of gelcoat, follow the waxing recommendations and schedules as indicated below. Never wax non-skid
surfaces of the vessel. See the warning on page 3 of this chapter.
NOTICE
NOTICE
WIRE BRUSHES, SCOURING PADS, OR OTHER
ABRASIVE TYPE MATERIALS AND SOLUTIONS
SHOULD NEVER BE USED ON THE HULL
OR DECK OF YOUR BOAT.
THEY CREATE SMALL SCRATCH MARKS
THAT WILL COLLECT MARINE GROWTH
AND OTHER FOREIGN MATERIALS.
WIRE BRUSHES, SCOURING PADS, OR OTHER
ABRASIVE TYPE MATERIALS AND SOLUTIONS
SHOULD NEVER BE USED ON THE HULL
OR DECK OF YOUR BOAT.
THEY CREATE SMALL SCRATCH MARKS
THAT WILL COLLECT MARINE GROWTH
AND OTHER FOREIGN MATERIALS.
It is recommended that you wax the gelcoat surface twice yearly to
prevent loss of gloss and to protect the finish. Use only waxes for
fiberglass and follow the label instructions. Apply a 3' x 3' section at a
time using clean applicator cloths or a buffing bonnet. When a haze
develops, use a power buffer at low speeds (1200-2000 rpm) to remove the haze. Keep the buffer moving to avoid heat build-up. The
power buffer is very efficient at removing contaminants from gelcoat.
Never wax gelcoat in the direct sun.
When the washing and waxing as recommended does not restore the
shine it may be necessary to use a fine rubbing compound. Do not
apply rubbing compound in direct sunlight. A power buffer at low
speed does an excellent job to remove impurities from the gel coat
that cause dulling. Use light pressure and keep the buffer moving. Rewax after compounding to buff the surface.
“Hairline cracks” or “spider webbing” could develop in the gelcoat
surface of a hull or deck. This can be caused by impact or other
factors. Small air pockets or gouges may also occur through normal
7-4
It is recommended that you wax the gelcoat surface twice yearly to
prevent loss of gloss and to protect the finish. Use only waxes for
fiberglass and follow the label instructions. Apply a 3' x 3' section at a
time using clean applicator cloths or a buffing bonnet. When a haze
develops, use a power buffer at low speeds (1200-2000 rpm) to remove the haze. Keep the buffer moving to avoid heat build-up. The
power buffer is very efficient at removing contaminants from gelcoat.
Never wax gelcoat in the direct sun.
When the washing and waxing as recommended does not restore the
shine it may be necessary to use a fine rubbing compound. Do not
apply rubbing compound in direct sunlight. A power buffer at low
speed does an excellent job to remove impurities from the gel coat
that cause dulling. Use light pressure and keep the buffer moving. Rewax after compounding to buff the surface.
“Hairline cracks” or “spider webbing” could develop in the gelcoat
surface of a hull or deck. This can be caused by impact or other
factors. Small air pockets or gouges may also occur through normal
7-4
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
wear. These do not affect the strength of the hull or deck and can be
repaired by yourself, a marine professional or a Regal dealer.
The affected area should be chipped or sanded away and a thin layer
of color matched gelcoat applied. This layer is then sanded smooth
and buffed to its original luster.
Use a stiff britle brush and non abrasive compound to clean non-skid.
Most minor scratches, nicks, and dents can be removed by compounding the surface. Marine type compounds can be found at most auto
body supply stores. Specify a number 25 which is a coarser compound
up to a number 55 being less coarse. Various glazes and polishes are
available as needed. Ask your marine professional or Regal dealer for
more information. Fiberglass hulls are strong but they can be damaged. A fiberglass hull has virtually no internal stresses. Thus when a
part is broken or punctured, the rest of the hull retains its original
shape. A severe blow will either be absorbed or result in a definite
localized break. A break of this nature should be checked and repaired by a marine professional or a Regal dealer.
wear. These do not affect the strength of the hull or deck and can be
repaired by yourself, a marine professional or a Regal dealer.
The affected area should be chipped or sanded away and a thin layer
of color matched gelcoat applied. This layer is then sanded smooth
and buffed to its original luster.
Use a stiff britle brush and non abrasive compound to clean non-skid.
Most minor scratches, nicks, and dents can be removed by compounding the surface. Marine type compounds can be found at most auto
body supply stores. Specify a number 25 which is a coarser compound
up to a number 55 being less coarse. Various glazes and polishes are
available as needed. Ask your marine professional or Regal dealer for
more information. Fiberglass hulls are strong but they can be damaged. A fiberglass hull has virtually no internal stresses. Thus when a
part is broken or punctured, the rest of the hull retains its original
shape. A severe blow will either be absorbed or result in a definite
localized break. A break of this nature should be checked and repaired by a marine professional or a Regal dealer.
Minor Repairs
Minor Repairs
You will need the following materials for minor repairs:
You will need the following materials for minor repairs:
• Gelcoat
• Clear Liquid Catalyst
• Putty Knife
• Razor Blade
• Fine Sandpaper (400,600,1000)
• Wax Paper (to cover repair area)
• Gelcoat
• Clear Liquid Catalyst
• Putty Knife
• Razor Blade
• Fine Sandpaper (400,600,1000)
• Wax Paper (to cover repair area)
!
WARNING
!
AVOID BODILY INJURY!
GELCOAT & FIBERGLASS RESIN ARE FLAMMABLE
WORK IN A WELL VENTILATED AREA FREE FROM
OPEN FLAMES. DO NOT SMOKE!
7-5
WARNING
AVOID BODILY INJURY!
GELCOAT & FIBERGLASS RESIN ARE FLAMMABLE
WORK IN A WELL VENTILATED AREA FREE FROM
OPEN FLAMES. DO NOT SMOKE!
7-5
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
For minor repairs refer to the following procedure:
For minor repairs refer to the following procedure:
1. Clean the area to be repaired and get rid of any wax or grease
residues.
1. Clean the area to be repaired and get rid of any wax or grease
residues.
2. Clean out scratches, chips, and nicks.
2. Clean out scratches, chips, and nicks.
3. Sand area to be repaired so gelcoat will bond.
3. Sand area to be repaired so gelcoat will bond.
4. In a separate container, measure only the amount of gelcoat you
will need. Mix a ratio of 2% ratio of catalyst to the amount ofgelcoat
being used ( a spoonful of gelcoat will require only a drop or two of
catalyst). Do not pour any unused portions of the gelcoat/catalyst
mixture back into either original container.
4. In a separate container, measure only the amount of gelcoat you
will need. Mix a ratio of 2% ratio of catalyst to the amount ofgelcoat
being used ( a spoonful of gelcoat will require only a drop or two of
catalyst). Do not pour any unused portions of the gelcoat/catalyst
mixture back into either original container.
5. Apply gelcoat to area leaving a slight lift above the surface.
5. Apply gelcoat to area leaving a slight lift above the surface.
6. Cover the area with wax paper. It will help the mixture to set up
faster.
6. Cover the area with wax paper. It will help the mixture to set up
faster.
7. Remove wax paper and shave off any extra gelcoat with a razor
blade.
7. Remove wax paper and shave off any extra gelcoat with a razor
blade.
8. After the area is shaved smooth, start with the 400, 600, and finally
the1000 grit sand papers.
8. After the area is shaved smooth, start with the 400, 600, and finally
the1000 grit sand papers.
9. Buff the area with compound, polish and a finish wax. You may
notice a difference between the repaired area and the original fin ish
due to the natural weathering prcess.
9. Buff the area with compound, polish and a finish wax. You may
notice a difference between the repaired area and the original fin ish
due to the natural weathering prcess.
Canvas
Canvas
Boat canvas is in most cases subjected to more severe punishment
than practically any other type of material. Moisture, dirt and chemicals from industrial fallout, heat, ultraviolet rays and salt water are all
factors which accelerate the deterioration of your boat canvas.
7-6
Boat canvas is in most cases subjected to more severe punishment
than practically any other type of material. Moisture, dirt and chemicals from industrial fallout, heat, ultraviolet rays and salt water are all
factors which accelerate the deterioration of your boat canvas.
7-6
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
These elements can cause serious damage if left unchecked.
The boat top and other canvas supplied on your Regal boat are manufactured from top quality materials to provide you with years of trouble
free service. The following information on the care, cleaning and proper
storage of the fabrics and fasteners that make up your marine canvas
is being provided to help you maintain the appearance and ease of
operation.
Sunbrella is used on most Regal tops, aft curtains, camper enclosures,
bow tonneau and cockpit covers. Sunbrella is a woven fabric made
from 100% solution dyed acrylic fiber. It is color fast and will withstand long term exposure to the sun (ultraviolet rays) without excessive fading.
Sunbrella is a woven fabric. Even though it is treated with water repellency some “misting” through the fabric is typical. With new canvas,
the greatest potential for leakage is through the sewn seams. Because
Sunbrella and the long term thread used is synthetic, the holes created
by sewing will not swell up and seal when exposed to water as cotton
does. Usually the movement of the fabric in use will move the fibers
enough to seal the holes. You may apply Apseal or Uniseal to the
seams to speed up this process.
When the canvas is new, the fit will normally be tight. It is designed
this way because Sunbrella stretches as it ages, The initial tight fit allows for a suitable fit for the life of the canvas. The Sunbrella fit will
vary slightly in the heat, cold, and humid environments.
These elements can cause serious damage if left unchecked.
The boat top and other canvas supplied on your Regal boat are manufactured from top quality materials to provide you with years of trouble
free service. The following information on the care, cleaning and proper
storage of the fabrics and fasteners that make up your marine canvas
is being provided to help you maintain the appearance and ease of
operation.
Sunbrella is used on most Regal tops, aft curtains, camper enclosures,
bow tonneau and cockpit covers. Sunbrella is a woven fabric made
from 100% solution dyed acrylic fiber. It is color fast and will withstand long term exposure to the sun (ultraviolet rays) without excessive fading.
Sunbrella is a woven fabric. Even though it is treated with water repellency some “misting” through the fabric is typical. With new canvas,
the greatest potential for leakage is through the sewn seams. Because
Sunbrella and the long term thread used is synthetic, the holes created
by sewing will not swell up and seal when exposed to water as cotton
does. Usually the movement of the fabric in use will move the fibers
enough to seal the holes. You may apply Apseal or Uniseal to the
seams to speed up this process.
When the canvas is new, the fit will normally be tight. It is designed
this way because Sunbrella stretches as it ages, The initial tight fit allows for a suitable fit for the life of the canvas. The Sunbrella fit will
vary slightly in the heat, cold, and humid environments.
Sunbrella Cleaning Instructions
Sunbrella Cleaning Instructions
Sunbrella should be cleaned regularly before substances such as dirt,
roof particles, etc., are allowed to accumulate on and become embedded in the fabric. The fabric can be cleaned without being removed
from the boat. Simply brush off any loose dirt, hose down, and clean
with a mild solution of natural soap in lukewarm water. Rinse throughly
to remove soap. DO NOT USE DETERGENTS! Allow to air dry.
For heavily soiled fabric, remove the top from the frame.
Sunbrella should be cleaned regularly before substances such as dirt,
roof particles, etc., are allowed to accumulate on and become embedded in the fabric. The fabric can be cleaned without being removed
from the boat. Simply brush off any loose dirt, hose down, and clean
with a mild solution of natural soap in lukewarm water. Rinse throughly
to remove soap. DO NOT USE DETERGENTS! Allow to air dry.
For heavily soiled fabric, remove the top from the frame.
7-7
7-7
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
Soak the fabric in a solution that has been mixed to the following
proportions.: 1/2 cup of Clorox bleach and 1/4 cup of Ivory or Lux
soap (liquid or soap) per each gallon of lukewarm water. Allow the
fabric to soak until the bleach has killed the mildew and the stains can
be brushed out with a common kitchen scrub brush. Rinse the fabric
throughly in cold water to remove all the soap. This may require several
rinsings. Incomplete rinsing can cause deterioration of sewing threads
and prohibit the fabric from being properly retreated. Allow the fabric
to dry completely. DO NOT STEAM PRESS OR DRY IN AN
ELECTRIC OR GAS DRYER! Excessive heat can damage and
shrink the fabric since it is heat sensitive.
This method of cleaning may remove part of the water and stain
repellence that was applied to the fabric during its manufacture. It is
recommended to retreat with such water repellency products as Apseal
and Uniseal. We do not recommend any wax based treatments such as
Thompson’s Water Seal or any of the silicone products such as SC-15
or Aqua-Tite. Wax based products prevent the fabric from breathing,
and encourage mildew growth while the silicone products interact with
the original fluorocarbon finish and seem to cause a rapid loss of
water repellency. Scotchguard has not been found to be very effective
for restoring water repellence to Sunbrella. It seems to work well in
the short run, but doesn’t maintain it’s performance very long.
Soak the fabric in a solution that has been mixed to the following
proportions.: 1/2 cup of Clorox bleach and 1/4 cup of Ivory or Lux
soap (liquid or soap) per each gallon of lukewarm water. Allow the
fabric to soak until the bleach has killed the mildew and the stains can
be brushed out with a common kitchen scrub brush. Rinse the fabric
throughly in cold water to remove all the soap. This may require several
rinsings. Incomplete rinsing can cause deterioration of sewing threads
and prohibit the fabric from being properly retreated. Allow the fabric
to dry completely. DO NOT STEAM PRESS OR DRY IN AN
ELECTRIC OR GAS DRYER! Excessive heat can damage and
shrink the fabric since it is heat sensitive.
This method of cleaning may remove part of the water and stain
repellence that was applied to the fabric during its manufacture. It is
recommended to retreat with such water repellency products as Apseal
and Uniseal. We do not recommend any wax based treatments such as
Thompson’s Water Seal or any of the silicone products such as SC-15
or Aqua-Tite. Wax based products prevent the fabric from breathing,
and encourage mildew growth while the silicone products interact with
the original fluorocarbon finish and seem to cause a rapid loss of
water repellency. Scotchguard has not been found to be very effective
for restoring water repellence to Sunbrella. It seems to work well in
the short run, but doesn’t maintain it’s performance very long.
Clear Vinyl, Zipper & Snap Care
Clear Vinyl, Zipper & Snap Care
Never store canvas wet or in an unventilated, moist area. Always roll
the canvas instead of folding. This is of particular importance on side
curtains or any other part with the clear vinyl “glass”. Roll the top
carefully around the bows and cover with the storage boot provided.
The clear vinyl “glass” used in side curtains, aft curtains, visors, and
camper enclosures is very susceptible to heat and cold. Keep vinyl
curtains from touching metal tubing to minimize burning the vinyl.
If the boat is stored with top, side curtains and aft curtain in place,
heat build up inside the boat may discolor the vinyl.
To clean the clear “vinyl” glass, use a solution of Ivory or Lux soap,
Never store canvas wet or in an unventilated, moist area. Always roll
the canvas instead of folding. This is of particular importance on side
curtains or any other part with the clear vinyl “glass”. Roll the top
carefully around the bows and cover with the storage boot provided.
The clear vinyl “glass” used in side curtains, aft curtains, visors, and
camper enclosures is very susceptible to heat and cold. Keep vinyl
curtains from touching metal tubing to minimize burning the vinyl.
If the boat is stored with top, side curtains and aft curtain in place,
heat build up inside the boat may discolor the vinyl.
To clean the clear “vinyl” glass, use a solution of Ivory or Lux soap,
7-8
7-8
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
liquid or flakes, and lukewarm water. Allow to air dry. Never use any
type of abrasive cleaner as it will scratch the “vinyl” glass. There are
many cleaners and scratch removers on the market specifically for
clear vinyl. Handle the clear curtains carefully. They are soft and prone
to scratching.
Canvas parts are designed with zippers. When zippers are new they
can be a little difficult to use. Zip carefully without forcing the zipper
or the material. They will loosen with use. A zipper lubricant may be
used to help new zippers as well as maintaining used ones. The most
vulnerable part of the zipper is the starts. Use care when starting the
zipper.
Canvas snap fasteners should be unsnapped as close to the button as
possible. Never remove canvas by pulling roughly on the edge of the
material. This can damage the canvas as well as the fasteners. Use
petroleum jelly on snaps to keep them from developing corrosion
especially in harsh environments.
liquid or flakes, and lukewarm water. Allow to air dry. Never use any
type of abrasive cleaner as it will scratch the “vinyl” glass. There are
many cleaners and scratch removers on the market specifically for
clear vinyl. Handle the clear curtains carefully. They are soft and prone
to scratching.
Canvas parts are designed with zippers. When zippers are new they
can be a little difficult to use. Zip carefully without forcing the zipper
or the material. They will loosen with use. A zipper lubricant may be
used to help new zippers as well as maintaining used ones. The most
vulnerable part of the zipper is the starts. Use care when starting the
zipper.
Canvas snap fasteners should be unsnapped as close to the button as
possible. Never remove canvas by pulling roughly on the edge of the
material. This can damage the canvas as well as the fasteners. Use
petroleum jelly on snaps to keep them from developing corrosion
especially in harsh environments.
Metal
Metal
Keep all stainless steel and other metal parts rinsed and wiped dry. To
maintain their finish annually polish the stainless steel and other bright
works at least annually. Use commercially available metal products and
read the labels carefully before use. Refer to the flyer in the owners
information pouch. Most marinas and boating retail outlets carry metal
care products.
Keep all stainless steel and other metal parts rinsed and wiped dry. To
maintain their finish annually polish the stainless steel and other bright
works at least annually. Use commercially available metal products and
read the labels carefully before use. Refer to the flyer in the owners
information pouch. Most marinas and boating retail outlets carry metal
care products.
Hull Bottom
Hull Bottom
Never use wire brushes or highly abrasive scouring pads on your hull
bottom. It could damage the gel coat surface or the bottom paint.
The bottom of your boat needs to be clean since the build up of
natural coatings from water or marine life can potentially create drag
and affect your boat’s performance. Contact a marine professional or
Regal dealer for more information.
Never use wire brushes or highly abrasive scouring pads on your hull
bottom. It could damage the gel coat surface or the bottom paint.
The bottom of your boat needs to be clean since the build up of
natural coatings from water or marine life can potentially create drag
and affect your boat’s performance. Contact a marine professional or
Regal dealer for more information.
7-9
7-9
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
FREQUENT STAINS/CLEAN-UP STEPS 1
Coffee, Tea, Chocolate...................................
Permanent Marker*........................................
Household Dirt...............................................
Grease...............................................................
Ketchup, Tomato Products............................
Latex Paint.......................................................
Oil Base Paint..................................................
Mustard.............................................................
Suntan Oil........................................................
Asphalt/Road Tar...........................................
Crayon..............................................................
Engine Oil........................................................
Spray Paint.......................................................
Chewing Gum.................................................
Shoe Polish*.....................................................
Ballpoint Pen*..................................................
Lipstick.............................................................
Eyeshadow........................................................
Mildew*............................................................
Wet Leaves *....................................................
B
E
A
D
A
A
D
A
A
D
D
B
B
D
D
E
A
E
C
C
2
3
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
C
A
B
B
B
B
B
B
C
A
A
A
FREQUENT STAINS/CLEAN-UP STEPS 1
Coffee, Tea, Chocolate...................................
Permanent Marker*........................................
Household Dirt...............................................
Grease...............................................................
Ketchup, Tomato Products............................
Latex Paint.......................................................
Oil Base Paint..................................................
Mustard.............................................................
Suntan Oil........................................................
Asphalt/Road Tar...........................................
Crayon..............................................................
Engine Oil........................................................
Spray Paint.......................................................
Chewing Gum.................................................
Shoe Polish*.....................................................
Ballpoint Pen*..................................................
Lipstick.............................................................
Eyeshadow........................................................
Mildew*............................................................
Wet Leaves *....................................................
B
E
A
D
A
A
D
A
A
D
D
B
B
D
D
E
A
E
C
C
2
3
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
C
A
B
B
B
B
B
B
C
A
A
A
A= Soft brush; warm soapy water/rinse/ dry
A= Soft brush; warm soapy water/rinse/ dry
B= Fantastik cleaner
B= Fantastik cleaner
C= One tablespoon ammonia, 1/4 cup of hydrogen peroxide, 3/4
cup of warm water/ rinse/dry
C= One tablespoon ammonia, 1/4 cup of hydrogen peroxide, 3/4
cup of warm water/ rinse/dry
D= Scrape off residue ( use ice to lift gum)
D= Scrape off residue ( use ice to lift gum)
E= Denatured alcohol/rinse/dry
E= Denatured alcohol/rinse/dry
* These products contain dyes which leave permanent stains.
* These products contain dyes which leave permanent stains.
7-10
7-10
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
MAINTENANCE
MAINTENANCE
Propellers
Propellers
Out-of-balance or nicked props will effect performance or cause
vibration. Damaged props should be replaced, but those that are
chipped or bent can usually be reconditioned by a marine dealer or a
propeller repair facility. When cruising, consider carrying a spare set
of props onboard because many marinas do not carry a full inventory
of replacement propellers. Refer to the manufacturer’s engine manual
for appropriate stern drive and inboard propeller replacement.
Be sure to make a note of the propeller diameter and pitch while the
vessel is in dry dock. They are pressed into the prop for easy reading.
In an emergency an aluminum propeller blade can be straightened by
laying the propeller blade on a 2 x 4 and hammering the bent portion
of the blade until straight. This procedure will assist the operator in
reaching port so he can have the propeller repitched.
It is advantageous to carry the needed tools to change propeller(s).
Use the following procedure to remove single stern drive propellers.
This method provides a safety margin from sharp propeller blades
especially those with stainless steel propellers. The 2 x 4 when laid
across the ventilation plate allows safe removal of propeller. With
MerCruiser alpha drives make sure the washer tabs are bent up before
trying to remove the prop nut. With Volvo SX drives, remove the
propshaft cotter key and splined washer first to access the nut.
Out-of-balance or nicked props will effect performance or cause
vibration. Damaged props should be replaced, but those that are
chipped or bent can usually be reconditioned by a marine dealer or a
propeller repair facility. When cruising, consider carrying a spare set
of props onboard because many marinas do not carry a full inventory
of replacement propellers. Refer to the manufacturer’s engine manual
for appropriate stern drive and inboard propeller replacement.
Be sure to make a note of the propeller diameter and pitch while the
vessel is in dry dock. They are pressed into the prop for easy reading.
In an emergency an aluminum propeller blade can be straightened by
laying the propeller blade on a 2 x 4 and hammering the bent portion
of the blade until straight. This procedure will assist the operator in
reaching port so he can have the propeller repitched.
It is advantageous to carry the needed tools to change propeller(s).
Use the following procedure to remove single stern drive propellers.
This method provides a safety margin from sharp propeller blades
especially those with stainless steel propellers. The 2 x 4 when laid
across the ventilation plate allows safe removal of propeller. With
MerCruiser alpha drives make sure the washer tabs are bent up before
trying to remove the prop nut. With Volvo SX drives, remove the
propshaft cotter key and splined washer first to access the nut.
TYPICAL PROPELLER CHANGINGMERCRUISER ALPHA
TYPICAL PROPELLER CHANGINGMERCRUISER ALPHA
2X4 WOOD
ZINC ANODE
2X4 WOOD
ZINC ANODE
COUNTERCLOCKWISE
TO LOOSEN
COUNTERCLOCKWISE
TO LOOSEN
CLOCKWISE
TO TIGHTEN
CLOCKWISE
TO TIGHTEN
PROPELLER SHAFT NUT
PROPELLER SHAFT NUT
7-11
7-11
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
VOLVO SINGLE PROPELLER SX INSTALLATION
VOLVO SINGLE PROPELLER SX INSTALLATION
1. Coat the propeller shaft with marine grease.
2. Place the thrust bushing on prop shaft with inner taper toward
gearcase to match taper on propeller shaft (A & B).
3. Slide propeller on shaft completely (C).
4. Place thrust washer (D) on propeller shaft splines.
5. Shift the remote control into reverse with the key switch in the off
position.
6. Install & tighten the propeller nut (E)to 70-80 ft. lbs.
7. Install keeper (F) on prop nut until aligned with cotter key hole.
8. Install cotter key (H) and bend tabs over. See illustration below.
1. Coat the propeller shaft with marine grease.
2. Place the thrust bushing on prop shaft with inner taper toward
gearcase to match taper on propeller shaft (A & B).
3. Slide propeller on shaft completely (C).
4. Place thrust washer (D) on propeller shaft splines.
5. Shift the remote control into reverse with the key switch in the off
position.
6. Install & tighten the propeller nut (E)to 70-80 ft. lbs.
7. Install keeper (F) on prop nut until aligned with cotter key hole.
8. Install cotter key (H) and bend tabs over. See illustration below.
7-12
Keeper
Keeper
Cotter Key
Cotter Key
7-12
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
MERCRUISER ALPHA & BRAVO ONE
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
MERCRUISER ALPHA & BRAVO ONE
MERCRUISER BRAVO THREE
MERCRUISER BRAVO THREE
7-13
7-13
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
Steering
Steering
Regals feature rack or rotary style steering systems that features a cable
with assistance through the engine power steering pump. As you turn
the wheel the force is applied through the system to a hydraulic cylinder
atached at the engine rear and attached through the engine power
steering pump hoses.
With the engine running, check the engine power steering pump levels
before each outing. Add the appropriate power steering fluid.
Periodically inspect the entire steering system for tightness and signs
of wear and leaks including the steering wheel. Lubricate the steering
shaft at the engine. Refer to the manufacturer’s engine manual in the
owner’s pouch for additional information along with the maintenance
chart in this chapter.
Regals feature rack or rotary style steering systems that features a cable
with assistance through the engine power steering pump. As you turn
the wheel the force is applied through the system to a hydraulic cylinder
atached at the engine rear and attached through the engine power
steering pump hoses.
With the engine running, check the engine power steering pump levels
before each outing. Add the appropriate power steering fluid.
Periodically inspect the entire steering system for tightness and signs
of wear and leaks including the steering wheel. Lubricate the steering
shaft at the engine. Refer to the manufacturer’s engine manual in the
owner’s pouch for additional information along with the maintenance
chart in this chapter.
!
CAUTION
AVOID PERSONAL INJURY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE!
ABRUPT TURNS ABOVE 30 MPH MAY RESULT
IN LOSS OF CONTROL.
STEERING RESPONSE AT HIGH SPEEDS
CAN BE VERY SUDDEN.
ABRUBT TURNS MAY CAUSE YOU
TO CROSS YOUR OWN WAKE.
JUMPING A WAKE, SUDDEN TURNS, AND INCREASES
OR DECREASES IN SPEEDS MAY BE DANGEROUS.
THE OPERATOR MUST MAKE SURE THAT ALL
PASSENGERS ARE SEATED SECURELY
BEFORE MAKING SPEED CHANGES.
!
CAUTION
AVOID PERSONAL INJURY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE!
ABRUPT TURNS ABOVE 30 MPH MAY RESULT
IN LOSS OF CONTROL.
STEERING RESPONSE AT HIGH SPEEDS
CAN BE VERY SUDDEN.
ABRUBT TURNS MAY CAUSE YOU
TO CROSS YOUR OWN WAKE.
JUMPING A WAKE, SUDDEN TURNS, AND INCREASES
OR DECREASES IN SPEEDS MAY BE DANGEROUS.
THE OPERATOR MUST MAKE SURE THAT ALL
PASSENGERS ARE SEATED SECURELY
BEFORE MAKING SPEED CHANGES.
Battery
Battery
Frequently check your battery terminals for corrosion build-up. If
you find a greenish, powdery substance, remove the cable connections
7-14
Frequently check your battery terminals for corrosion build-up. If
you find a greenish, powdery substance, remove the cable connections
7-14
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
!
WARNING
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
!
WARNING
TO PREVENT BODILY INJURY!
WEAR GOGGLES, RUBBER GLOVES
AND A PROTECTIVE APRON
WHEN WORKING WITH A BATTERY.
BATTERY ELECTROLYTE CAUSES SEVERE EYE
DAMAGE AND SKIN BURNS.
IN CASE OF SPILLAGE, WASH AREA WITH
A SOLUTION OF BAKING SODA AND WATER.
TO PREVENT BODILY INJURY!
WEAR GOGGLES, RUBBER GLOVES
AND A PROTECTIVE APRON
WHEN WORKING WITH A BATTERY.
BATTERY ELECTROLYTE CAUSES SEVERE EYE
DAMAGE AND SKIN BURNS.
IN CASE OF SPILLAGE, WASH AREA WITH
A SOLUTION OF BAKING SODA AND WATER.
clean both the both the terminals and the connectors with a wire
brush. When the cleaning is finished reconnect the battery cables and
coat the terminal with an approved grease or petroleum jelly to help
prevent further corrosion.Check the electrolyte level at least every 30
days, more often in hot weather. The level should be maintained
between the top of the battery plates and the bottom of the fill cap
opening. Add distilled water as needed after charging the batteries or
periodically as needed. Do not overfill because sulfuric acid could run
over and cause burns or an explosion.
clean both the both the terminals and the connectors with a wire
brush. When the cleaning is finished reconnect the battery cables and
coat the terminal with an approved grease or petroleum jelly to help
prevent further corrosion.Check the electrolyte level at least every 30
days, more often in hot weather. The level should be maintained
between the top of the battery plates and the bottom of the fill cap
opening. Add distilled water as needed after charging the batteries or
periodically as needed. Do not overfill because sulfuric acid could run
over and cause burns or an explosion.
!
WARNING
!
TO PREVENT BODILY INJURY!
BATTERIES CONTAIN SUFURIC ACID (POISON)
WHICH ALSO CAN CAUSE BURNS.
AVOID CONTACT WITH THE SKIN, EYES & CLOTHING.
IF CONTACTED, FLUSH WITH WATER AT LEAST 15
MINUTES. IF SWALLOWED, DRINK LARGE AMOUNTS
OF WATER OR MILK. FOLLOW UP WITH MILK OF
MAGNESIA, BEATEN EGG OR VEGETABLE OIL. GET
MEDICAL ATTENTION IMMEDIATELY!
7-15
WARNING
TO PREVENT BODILY INJURY!
BATTERIES CONTAIN SUFURIC ACID (POISON)
WHICH ALSO CAN CAUSE BURNS.
AVOID CONTACT WITH THE SKIN, EYES & CLOTHING.
IF CONTACTED, FLUSH WITH WATER AT LEAST 15
MINUTES. IF SWALLOWED, DRINK LARGE AMOUNTS
OF WATER OR MILK. FOLLOW UP WITH MILK OF
MAGNESIA, BEATEN EGG OR VEGETABLE OIL. GET
MEDICAL ATTENTION IMMEDIATELY!
7-15
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
Batteries should be charged outside the boat. Do not smoke or bring
flames near a battey that is being or has recently been charged. The
hydrogen gas generated by battery charging is highly explosive.
Set batteries on a block of wood rather than concrete since this
procedure will help the batteries from losing their charge.
Do not allow a metal object or loose wires to spark across battery
posts while working close to the battery. Contact across terminals will
cause a short circuit and electrical burns or personal injury may result.
Tighten all battery connectors securely. Check their tightness by pulling
on the connectors. They should not move from their tightened
position. Be sure to reinstall the positive boot over the battery terminal
after tightening the battery post connection.While using the boat, use
the volt meters to monitor the charge level of each battery bank.
Monitor the charge with the engines turned off (static condition).
The engine alternators recharge the batteries. A fully charged battery
will indicate between 12.3 and 12.6 volts on the voltmeter. Readings
below this could indicate a dead battery cell or a charging system
malfunction which should be checked by a marine professional.
Batteries should be charged outside the boat. Do not smoke or bring
flames near a battey that is being or has recently been charged. The
hydrogen gas generated by battery charging is highly explosive.
Set batteries on a block of wood rather than concrete since this
procedure will help the batteries from losing their charge.
Do not allow a metal object or loose wires to spark across battery
posts while working close to the battery. Contact across terminals will
cause a short circuit and electrical burns or personal injury may result.
Tighten all battery connectors securely. Check their tightness by pulling
on the connectors. They should not move from their tightened
position. Be sure to reinstall the positive boot over the battery terminal
after tightening the battery post connection.While using the boat, use
the volt meters to monitor the charge level of each battery bank.
Monitor the charge with the engines turned off (static condition).
The engine alternators recharge the batteries. A fully charged battery
will indicate between 12.3 and 12.6 volts on the voltmeter. Readings
below this could indicate a dead battery cell or a charging system
malfunction which should be checked by a marine professional.
Remote Control
Remote Control
The remote controls at the dash control box and the
cable attachment at the engine should be tight and
shift without binding.
Shift and throttle controls at both the engine and
helm areas must be checked on a periodic basis. At
the engine end, make sure all control cable hardware
is tight and control cable brackets are secure. An
application of silicone spray on the cable ends
periodically will keep control cables working freely
and fights corrosion. At the helm end check to make
sure the control box hardware is tightly secured. Contact your Regal
dealer for further assistance.
The remote controls at the dash control box and the
cable attachment at the engine should be tight and
shift without binding.
Shift and throttle controls at both the engine and
helm areas must be checked on a periodic basis. At
the engine end, make sure all control cable hardware
is tight and control cable brackets are secure. An
application of silicone spray on the cable ends
periodically will keep control cables working freely
and fights corrosion. At the helm end check to make
sure the control box hardware is tightly secured. Contact your Regal
dealer for further assistance.
7-16
7-16
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Seating
Seating
The bucket seat slider needs periodic inspection and
maintenance. Loosen the swivel knob located on the
slider and pull the slider off the pedestal. Inspect all
fasteners and metal for fatigue. Lubricate the points
shown in the illustration with a marine type lithium
grease. Use a paint brush to apply the grease. Also,
use silicon spray for areas that can not be accessed
with the grease. Reassemble the slider to the pedestal with the delrin
cup positioned correctly.
The bucket seat slider needs periodic inspection and
maintenance. Loosen the swivel knob located on the
slider and pull the slider off the pedestal. Inspect all
fasteners and metal for fatigue. Lubricate the points
shown in the illustration with a marine type lithium
grease. Use a paint brush to apply the grease. Also,
use silicon spray for areas that can not be accessed
with the grease. Reassemble the slider to the pedestal with the delrin
cup positioned correctly.
BUCKET SEAT SLIDER MAINTENANCE
BUCKET SEAT SLIDER MAINTENANCE
LUBRICATE SLIDER PLATE
LUBRICATE
HANDLES &
BOLT
HANDLE
LUBRICATE SLIDER PLATE
LUBRICATE
HANDLES &
BOLT
HANDLE
HANDLE
HANDLE
HANDLE
BOLT
LUBRICATE ALL
SPLINES
HANDLE
BOLT
CHECK FASTENERS
FOR TIGHTNESS
7-17
LUBRICATE ALL
SPLINES
CHECK FASTENERS
FOR TIGHTNESS
7-17
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
Bilge Pump
Bilge Pump
The bilge pump is usually installed in the engine compartment just
below the engine front. Check for foreign materials stuck in the
strainer area or discharge hose.
Check all clamps and electrical connections for tightness. A quick check
of the bilge pump automatic float switch is afforded by lifting up on
the float and listening for the pump operating. Look around the float
area for foreign debris and remove as necessary.
The bilge pump is usually installed in the engine compartment just
below the engine front. Check for foreign materials stuck in the
strainer area or discharge hose.
Check all clamps and electrical connections for tightness. A quick check
of the bilge pump automatic float switch is afforded by lifting up on
the float and listening for the pump operating. Look around the float
area for foreign debris and remove as necessary.
Fuel Tank & Fittings
Fuel Tank & Fittings
Periodically (at least once a year) inspect the fuel tank components for
loose clamps at the vent, fill and feed locations. Examine each hose
for signs of deterioration and leakage. Check the fuel sender for loose
bolts, nuts, and leaks at all areas of contact. Also, inspect the fuel tank
for signs of leakage or abrasion. Tighten all components as needed.
Periodically (at least once a year) inspect the fuel tank components for
loose clamps at the vent, fill and feed locations. Examine each hose
for signs of deterioration and leakage. Check the fuel sender for loose
bolts, nuts, and leaks at all areas of contact. Also, inspect the fuel tank
for signs of leakage or abrasion. Tighten all components as needed.
TYPICAL FUEL TANK
TYPICAL FUEL TANK
ANTI-SIPHON VALVE
ANTI-SIPHON VALVE
HOSE CLAMPS
HOSE CLAMPS
FUEL SENDER
FUEL SENDER
FUEL FEED
FUEL FEED
FUEL FILL
FUEL VENT
7-18
FUEL FILL
FUEL VENT
7-18
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Do not remove the spring and ball assembly in theanti-siphon valve.
It can be cleaned with compressed air. Should the component be faulty
(normally a fuel surge problem at mid to high speed ranges) replace it.
Check the fuel fill pipe hose connection at the deck. Normally, there is
an access plate which can be removed for inspection. Make sure the
black ground wire is tightly secured. For further information, contact
your closest Regal dealer or marine professional.
Do not remove the spring and ball assembly in theanti-siphon valve.
It can be cleaned with compressed air. Should the component be faulty
(normally a fuel surge problem at mid to high speed ranges) replace it.
Check the fuel fill pipe hose connection at the deck. Normally, there is
an access plate which can be removed for inspection. Make sure the
black ground wire is tightly secured. For further information, contact
your closest Regal dealer or marine professional.
Chemical Toilet/ Pump Out Fittings
Chemical Toilet/ Pump Out Fittings
This self-contained unit requires periodic rinsing with soap and water.
Keep the unit flushed out as needed.
Vessels with the optional pump out fitting need to run fresh water
through the hose to keep debris from clinging to the hose inside
surfaces after each pump out.
This self-contained unit requires periodic rinsing with soap and water.
Keep the unit flushed out as needed.
Vessels with the optional pump out fitting need to run fresh water
through the hose to keep debris from clinging to the hose inside
surfaces after each pump out.
Fresh Water System
Fresh Water System
Inspect the fresh water
system hoses and fittings
periodically. A sign of a
water leak is the pressure
water pump running
FEED HOSE
inter mittently with the
FILTER
faucet off. There is a fresh
water filter located on the
pressure water pump. Clean
the element of debris and
deposits as needed.
Reassemble and perform a
system leak check.For
information purposes ther
e is a pressure pump cut-out switch mounted on the water pump. It
controls the water system line pressure. When the system reaches
normal pressure the switch cuts out until a water demand resumes.
7-19
Inspect the fresh water
system hoses and fittings
periodically. A sign of a
water leak is the pressure
water pump r unning
FEED HOSE
inter mittently with the
FILTER
faucet off. There is a fresh
water filter located on the
pressure water pump. Clean
the element of debris and
deposits as needed.
Reassemble and perform a
system leak check.For
information purposes ther
e is a pressure pump cut-out switch mounted on the water pump. It
controls the water system line pressure. When the system reaches
normal pressure the switch cuts out until a water demand resumes.
7-19
TYPICAL
WATER
PUMP
TYPICAL
WATER
PUMP
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
Fuses
Fuses
The dash features individual fuses for onboard equipment. Should an
overload develop, that individual fuse will “blow”. After determining
the system fault, replace the fuse with the exact size. The fuse panel is
located at the helm area. Carry extra fuses for emergencies. Fuses can
be purchased from a marine store or you Regal dealer.
The dash features individual fuses for onboard equipment. Should an
overload develop, that individual fuse will “blow”. After determining
the system fault, replace the fuse with the exact size. The fuse panel is
located at the helm area. Carry extra fuses for emergencies. Fuses can
be purchased from a marine store or you Regal dealer.
TYPICAL FUSE PANEL
TYPICAL FUSE PANEL
FUSE BLOCK
FUSE BLOCK
There is an access under the dash to many of the wires. On the 2250
there is an access plate at the cabin forward bulkhead. Periodically
check the mounting blocks on all wiring components to make sure all
connections are tight. Refer to the illustration for more information.
There is an access under the dash to many of the wires. On the 2250
there is an access plate at the cabin forward bulkhead. Periodically
check the mounting blocks on all wiring components to make sure all
connections are tight. Refer to the illustration for more information.
7-20
7-20
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Stereo
Stereo
The stereo requires little maintenance. Protect the unit from water,
dirt and ultra-violet damage.When washing the interior do not discharge
water directly at the stereo unit. As with any CD unit clean your CD’s
to keep them from skipping. This process also aids in keeping dust
out of the unit. For further information, refer to your stereo owner’s
manual located in the pouch.
The stereo requires little maintenance. Protect the unit from water,
dirt and ultra-violet damage.When washing the interior do not discharge
water directly at the stereo unit. As with any CD unit clean your CD’s
to keep them from skipping. This process also aids in keeping dust
out of the unit. For further information, refer to your stereo owner’s
manual located in the pouch.
Blower
Blower
Check the blower hoses to ensure they are fastened in the bilge properly
and there are no holes in them. The hose connected to the blower
needs to be 3/4 down in the bilge to evacuate fumes properly. Check
all blower hoses to ensure there are no pockets anywhere that can
catch rain water. All hoses should follow a sloped up to down pattern.
All vents need to be checked for debris.
Make sure the blower motor is securely fastened and all hose clamps
and or tie wraps are tight. Also, check the electrical connectors for
tightness.
Check the blower hoses to ensure they are fastened in the bilge properly
and there are no holes in them. The hose connected to the blower
needs to be 3/4 down in the bilge to evacuate fumes properly. Check
all blower hoses to ensure there are no pockets anywhere that can
catch rain water. All hoses should follow a sloped up to down pattern.
All vents need to be checked for debris.
Make sure the blower motor is securely fastened and all hose clamps
and or tie wraps are tight. Also, check the electrical connectors for
tightness.
7-21
7-21
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
VOLVO MAINTENANCE GUIDE
FUNCTION
Each Tri p
AD JUST
CHECK
LUBE
FILL
REPLACE
VOLVO MAINTENANCE GUIDE
TIGHTEN
FUNCTION
Each Tri p
AD JUST
CHECK
LUBE
FILL
Anodes
*
Anodes
*
Leaks,
Cooling
System
*
Leaks,
Cooling
System
*
Stop Switch
*
Stop Switch
*
Leaks,
Fuel System
*
Leaks,
Fuel System
*
O il, Engine
*
*
O il, Engine
*
*
O il, Drive
*
*
O il, Drive
*
*
Safety
Equipment
*
Safety
Equipment
*
Shift System
*
Shift System
*
Fluid, Power
Steering
*
Fluid, Power
Steering
*
Steering Cable
*
Steering Cable
*
*
Mont hly
REPLACE
TIGHTEN
*
Mont hly
Battery
*
Exhaust Sys
*
*
Ev ery 50 Operat ing Hours
Battery
*
Exhaust Sys
*
*
Ev ery 50 Operat ing Hours
Battery
Connections
*
*
Battery
Connections
*
*
All Belts
*
*
All Belts
*
*
Exhaust
System
Hoses,Clamps
*
*
Exhaust
System
Hoses,Clamps
*
*
Fasteners
*
*
Fasteners
*
*
Fuel System
*
Fuel System
*
Water Pump
Impeller
*
Water Pump
Impeller
*
7-22
Every 2
years
7-22
Every 2
years
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
VOLVO MAINTENANCE GUIDE CONT.
FUN CTIO N
Per Season
ADJUST
CHECK
Bellows &
Clamps
Drive
*
Exhaust
Maniflold,
Risers
*
LUBE
FILL
REPLACE
VOLVO MAINTENANCE GUIDE CONT.
TIGHTEN
Every 2
Years
Carb, Fuel
Filter
Every 2
Years
Leaks, Fuel
System
ADJUST
CHECK
Bellows &
Clamps
Drive
*
Exhaust
Maniflold,
Risers
*
LUBE
REPLACE
Every 2
Years
Leaks, Fuel
System
*
O il, Engine
*
O il, Engine
*
O il, Drive
*
O il, Drive
*
O il Filter,
Engine
*
O il Filter,
Engine
*
Propeller &
Shaft
*
Remote
Control
Cable
*
*
*
Spark Plugs
Spark Plugs
Wires, Boots
Steering
System
Cable
Throttle
Cable
*
Serpentine
where
applicable
*
Carb Adj.
Engine
Alignment
*
Remote
Control
Cable
*
*
*
Spark Plugs
Wires, Boots
*
*
Steering
System
Cable
*
Throttle
Cable
*
Serpentine
where
applicable
*
*
Carb Adj.
Engine
Alignment
*
Gimbal
Bearing
Universal
Joints &
Splines
Propeller &
Shaft
Spark Plugs
*
*
Universal
Joints &
Splines
*
7-23
*
*
*
Gimbal
Bearing
*
TIGHTEN
*
Water Pump
Impeller
*
FILL
Every 2
Years
Carb, Fuel
Filter
*
Water Pump
Impeller
FUN CTIO N
Per Season
*
*
7-23
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
MERCRUISER MAINTENANCE GUIDE
EACH
TRIP
WEEKLY
EVERY
2
MTHS.
EVERY
YEAR
(100 HRS)
EVERY 3
YRS.
(300 HRS)
EVERY
2 YRS.
MERCRUISER MAINTENANCE GUIDE
EVERY
5 YRS.
EACH
TRIP
Oil, Engine
*
Oil, Engine
*
Oil, Drive
*
Oil, Drive
*
Oil, Trim
Pump
*
Oil, Trim
Pump
*
Fluid,
Power
Steering
*
Fluid,
Power
Steering
*
Salt Usage,
Flush
Cooling
*
Salt Usage,
Flush
Cooling
*
WEEKLY
Water
Pick- Ups
*
Water
Pick- Ups
*
Anodes
*
Anodes
*
Fuel Pump
Site Tube
*
Fuel Pump
Site Tube
*
Battery
Connection
*
Battery
Connection
*
EVERY
2
MTHS.
Propeller
Shaft/Nut
*
Propeller
Shaft/Nut
*
Engine,
Corrosion
Guard
*
Engine,
Corrosion
Guard
*
EVERY
YEAR
(100 HRS)
Touch- Up
Paint
*
Touch- Up
Paint
*
Engine Oil
& Filter
*
Engine Oil
& Filter
*
Drive
Oil,Change
*
Drive
Oil,Change
*
Fuel Filter,
Replace
*
Fuel Filter,
Replace
*
Steering &
Remote
Control
*
Steering &
Remote
Control
*
7-24
7-24
EVERY 3
YRS.
(300 HRS)
EVERY
2 YRS.
EVERY
5 YRS.
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
MERCRUISER MAINTENANCE GUIDE CONT.
MERCRUISER MAINTENANCE GUIDE CONT.
EACH
TRIP
WEEKLY
EVERY 2
MTHS.
EVERY
YEAR
(100 HRS)
EVERY 3
YRS.
(300 HRS)
EVERY 2
YRS.
EVERY 5
YRS.
EACH
TRIP
WEEKLY
EVERY 2
MTHS.
EVERY
YEAR
(100 HRS)
U- Joints,
Splines &
Bellows
*
U- Joints,
Splines &
Bellows
*
Lube Gimbal
Bearing &
Engine Coupler
*
Lube Gimbal
Bearing &
Engine Coupler
*
Test
MerCathode
Bravo's
*
Test
MerCathode
Bravo's
*
Engine Mounts,
Retorque
*
Engine Mounts,
Retorque
*
Check ignition
parts, timing
*
Check ignition
parts, timing
*
PCV Valve,
Replace
*
PCV Valve,
Replace
*
Flame Arrestor,
Clean
*
Flame Arrestor,
Clean
*
Belts, Inspect
*
Belts, Inspect
*
Leaks &
Tightness,
Exhaust Sys.
*
Leaks &
Tightness,
Exhaust Sys.
*
Disassemble
Seawater Pump
*
Disassemble
Seawater Pump
*
Leaks &
Tightness,
Cooling System
*
Leaks &
Tightness,
Cooling System
*
Clean seawater
section, cooling
system
*
Clean seawater
section, cooling
system
*
Replace
Coolant
Lube U- joints
Replace
Coolant
*
*
Lube U- joints
7-25
EVERY 3
YRS.
(300 HRS)
EVERY 2
YRS.
EVERY 5
YRS.
*
*
7-25
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
Engine
Engine
Each engine and sterndrive package is unique and quite complex. A
select portion of the maintenance items are covered in this chapter
including lubrication specifications and general periodic maintenance.
Because of the advanced ignition and fuel injection systems used on
marine engines it is best to contact your Regal dealer for more of the
detailed service procedures.
Each engine and sterndrive package is unique and quite complex. A
select portion of the maintenance items are covered in this chapter
including lubrication specifications and general periodic maintenance.
Because of the advanced ignition and fuel injection systems used on
marine engines it is best to contact your Regal dealer for more of the
detailed service procedures.
!
CAUTION
!
AVOID ENGINE DAMAGE!
FOLLOW ALL ENGINE BREAK-IN PROCEDURES
AS RECOMMENDED BY THE ENGINE MANUFACTURER. FAILURE TO FOLLOW THE BREAK-IN
PROCEDURE MAY VOID THE ENGINE AND
STERNDRIVE WARRANTY.
!
AVOID ENGINE DAMAGE!
FOLLOW ALL ENGINE BREAK-IN PROCEDURES
AS RECOMMENDED BY THE ENGINE MANUFACTURER. FAILURE TO FOLLOW THE BREAK-IN
PROCEDURE MAY VOID THE ENGINE AND
STERNDRIVE WARRANTY.
CAUTION
!
AVOID ENGINE DAMAGE!
DO NOT RUN ENGINE AT A CONSTANT RPM
FOR PROLONGED PERIODS OF TIME DURING
BREAK-IN PERIOD. CHECK ENGINE OIL OFTEN.
!
CAUTION
AVOID ENGINE DAMAGE!
DO NOT RUN ENGINE AT A CONSTANT RPM
FOR PROLONGED PERIODS OF TIME DURING
BREAK-IN PERIOD. CHECK ENGINE OIL OFTEN.
CAUTION
!
AVOID ENGINE DAMAGE!
DO NOT RUN ENGINE OUT OF WATER UNLESS
YOU HAVE AN OPTIONAL FLUSHETTE. FOLLOW
MANUFACTURER’S ATTACHING & RUNNING
INSTRUCTIONS.
7-26
CAUTION
CAUTION
AVOID ENGINE DAMAGE!
DO NOT RUN ENGINE OUT OF WATER UNLESS
YOU HAVE AN OPTIONAL FLUSHETTE. FOLLOW
MANUFACTURER’S ATTACHING & RUNNING
INSTRUCTIONS.
7-26
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Recommended Lubricant Specifications
Recommended Lubricant Specifications
Volvo Engine
Volvo Engine
Checking the Engine Oil
Checking the Engine Oil
VOLVO ENGINE OIL
CHART
Lowest
Anticipated
Temperature
32 Degrees
F & Above
O Degrees
To 32
Degrees F
Below 0
Degrees F
Volvo 3.0 uses approximately
4 quarts with oil filter.
Recommended Volvo 4.3 uses approximately
SAE Viscosity 4.5 quarts with oil filter.
Oils
Volvo 5.0, 5.7 uses approximately
SAE 30*
6 quarts with oil filter.
SAE 20W50
SAE 15W50 Volvo 8.1 uses approximately
9 quarts with oil filter.
VOLVO ENGINE OIL
CHART
Lowest
Anticipated
Temperature
32 Degrees
F & Above
SAE 20W20
O Degrees
To 32
Degrees F
SAE 10W
Below 0
Degrees F
Volvo 3.0 uses approximately
4 quarts with oil filter.
Recommended Volvo 4.3 uses approximately
SAE Viscosity 4.5 quarts with oil filter.
Oils
Volvo 5.0, 5.7 uses approximately
SAE 30*
6 quarts with oil filter.
SAE 20W50
SAE 15W50 Volvo 8.1 uses approximately
9 quarts with oil filter.
SAE 20W20
SAE 10W
* SAE 30 Volvo Penta DuraPlus synthetic motor oil for API Service
CE/SG (Volvo # 3851230-7). If the recommended oil is not available,
use pure synthetic multi-viscosity oil.
* SAE 30 Volvo Penta DuraPlus synthetic motor oil for API Service
CE/SG (Volvo # 3851230-7). If the recommended oil is not available,
use pure synthetic multi-viscosity oil.
1. Remove the dipstick. The oil level must lie between the 2 marks on
the dipstick. Add the recommended oil to maintain the proper level.
1. Remove the dipstick. The oil level must lie between the 2 marks on
the dipstick. Add the recommended oil to maintain the proper level.
2. Recheck the engine oil dipstick level.
2. Recheck the engine oil dipstick level.
Note: All fluid recommendations are based on this manuals printing date. Regal is
not responsible for the accuracy of the information since it can change at any time.
For more detailed information and procedures check your engine operators manual
or call a Regal dealer servicing the product line.
7-27
Note: All fluid recommendations are based on this manuals printing date. Regal is
not responsible for the accuracy of the information since it can change at any time.
For more detailed information and procedures check your engine operators manual
or call a Regal dealer servicing the product line.
7-27
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
NOTICE
NOTICE
PREVENT ENGINE DAMAGE!
DO NOT ALLOW THE CRANKCASE OIL LEVEL TO
RECEDE BELOW THE ADD MARK, AND DO NOT FILL
ABOVE THE FULL MARK. OVERFILLING RESULTS IN
REDUCED ENGINE LIFE, HIGH OPERATING
TEMPERATURES, FOAMING & LOSS OF POWER.
PREVENT ENGINE DAMAGE!
DO NOT ALLOW THE CRANKCASE OIL LEVEL TO
RECEDE BELOW THE ADD MARK, AND DO NOT FILL
ABOVE THE FULL MARK. OVERFILLING RESULTS IN
REDUCED ENGINE LIFE, HIGH OPERATING
TEMPERATURES, FOAMING & LOSS OF POWER.
Checking the Power Trim/Tilt Fluid Level
Checking the Power Trim/Tilt Fluid Level
1. At least once annually preferably at
the start of the boating season check
Fill Cap the system flluid level. Begin with the
stern drive trimmed in (down) as far as
possible.
1. At least once annually preferably at
the start of the boating season check
Fill Cap the system flluid level. Begin with the
stern drive trimmed in (down) as far as
possible.
2. Remove the fill cap on the power
trim pump reservoir.
2. Remove the fill cap on the power
trim pump reservoir.
3. Check the flluid level. It should be between the minimum and
maximum marks on the reservoir.
3. Check the flluid level. It should be between the minimum and
maximum marks on the reservoir.
4. If needed add Volvo Penta DuraPlus Power Trim/Tilt and Steering
Fluid.
4. If needed add Volvo Penta DuraPlus Power Trim/Tilt and Steering
Fluid.
5. Replace the fill cap and tighten cap securely.
5. Replace the fill cap and tighten cap securely.
7-28
7-28
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Checking Power Steering Fluid
Checking Power Steering Fluid
1. Check the power steering fluid before each boating outing. Remove
the steering reservoir and check the fluid level. If the engine has not
been running use the “COLD” mark. Use the “HOT” mark for engines
that have been running at normal operating temperature as indicated
by the temperature gauge.
1. Check the power steering fluid before each boating outing. Remove
the steering reservoir and check the fluid level. If the engine has not
been running use the “COLD” mark. Use the “HOT” mark for engines
that have been running at normal operating temperature as indicated
by the temperature gauge.
2. The flluid shoud be between the minimum and maximum marks on
the dipstick. If needed, fill to the proper level with Volvo Penta Dura
Plus Power Trim/Tilt & Steering Fluid. DO NOT OVERFILL THE
STEERING PUMP RESERVOIR.
2. The flluid shoud be between the minimum and maximum marks on
the dipstick. If needed, fill to the proper level with Volvo Penta Dura
Plus Power Trim/Tilt & Steering Fluid. DO NOT OVERFILL THE
STEERING PUMP RESERVOIR.
!
CAUTION
!
PREVENT STEERING OPERATION IMPAIRMENT
OR COMPONENT DAMAGE!
NEVER FILL THE POWER STEERING SYSTEM
WITH AN UNKNOWN OIL.
CAUTION
PREVENT STEERING OPERATION IMPAIRMENT
OR COMPONENT DAMAGE!
NEVER FILL THE POWER STEERING SYSTEM
WITH AN UNKNOWN OIL.
3. Replace the fill cap and tighten securely.
3. Replace the fill cap and tighten securely.
NOTICE
NOTICE
HELPFUL HINT:
TO FILL THE TRIM, CRANKCASE & POWER STEERING
LEVELS WITHOUT SPILLING FLUID
PURCHASE A FUNNEL AT AN AUTOMOTIVE
STORE WITH A LONGER NECK THAT WILL FIT THE
RESERVOIR OPENINGS.
7-29
HELPFUL HINT:
TO FILL THE TRIM, CRANKCASE & POWER STEERING
LEVELS WITHOUT SPILLING FLUID
PURCHASE A FUNNEL AT AN AUTOMOTIVE
STORE WITH A LONGER NECK THAT WILL FIT THE
RESERVOIR OPENINGS.
7-29
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
Volvo Sterndrive
Volvo Sterndrive
Checking Volvo Sterndrive Oil
Checking Volvo Sterndrive Oil
Pulling Dipstick
!
Pulling Dipstick
Drive Housing Top
Drive Housing Top
Dipstick Shown At Full Level
Dipstick Shown At Full Level
CAUTION
!
CAUTION
FULLY THREAD OIL DIPSTICK INTO THE OIL
LEVEL HOLE IN THE DRIVE UNIT TO PROPERLY
CHECK THE OIL LEVEL. AN IMPROPER OIL LEVEL
MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS STERNDRIVE COMPONENT DAMAGE.
FULLY THREAD OIL DIPSTICK INTO THE OIL
LEVEL HOLE IN THE DRIVE UNIT TO PROPERLY
CHECK THE OIL LEVEL. AN IMPROPER OIL LEVEL
MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS STERNDRIVE COMPONENT DAMAGE.
It is recommended to check the drive oil level on a weekly schedule.
Fully thread the dipstick into the hole. At this point, remove the dipstick
and make sure the oil level is at the top of the mark as shown above.
If the oil level is low, add enough oil to bring the level to the top of
the mark on the dipstick. DO NOT OVERFILL. Tighten up the
dipstick with a slotted screwdriver.
If the oil color is milky in appearance there probably is water in the
unit normally caused by a leaking seal.
No metal flakes should be present in the oil. If the abov e conditions
exist contact a Regal dealer.
7-30
It is recommended to check the drive oil level on a weekly schedule.
Fully thread the dipstick into the hole. At this point, remove the dipstick
and make sure the oil level is at the top of the mark as shown above.
If the oil level is low, add enough oil to bring the level to the top of
the mark on the dipstick. DO NOT OVERFILL. Tighten up the
dipstick with a slotted screwdriver.
If the oil color is milky in appearance there probably is water in the
unit normally caused by a leaking seal.
No metal flakes should be present in the oil. If the abov e conditions
exist contact a Regal dealer.
7-30
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
MerCruiser Engine
MerCruiser Engine
Checking Engine Crankcase Oil
Checking Engine Crankcase Oil
1. Check the engine oil by first allowing the engine to warm up abit.
Stop the engine and allow about 5 minutes for the oil to drain to the
oil pan to obtain an accurate reading.
1. Check the engine oil by first allowing the engine to warm up abit.
Stop the engine and allow about 5 minutes for the oil to drain to the
oil pan to obtain an accurate reading.
2. Remove the dipstick. Wipe it clean and reinstall it into the dipstick
tube. Wait 1 minute to allow any trapped air to vent. ( Install dipstick
with oil indication marks facing the flywheel end of the engine. Add
Mercury/Quicksilver Synthetic Blend MerCruiser Engine Oil 25W-40
to bring the level up to the full or OK points on the oil dipstick. DO
NOT OVERFILL.
2. Remove the dipstick. Wipe it clean and reinstall it into the dipstick
tube. Wait 1 minute to allow any trapped air to vent. ( Install dipstick
with oil indication marks facing the flywheel end of the engine. Add
Mercury/Quicksilver Synthetic Blend MerCruiser Engine Oil 25W-40
to bring the level up to the full or OK points on the oil dipstick. DO
NOT OVERFILL.
3. Remove the dipstick and look at the oil level. Level must be between
full or OK range and add. Reinstall dipstick into the tube.
3. Remove the dipstick and look at the oil level. Level must be between
full or OK range and add. Reinstall dipstick into the tube.
NOTICE
NOTICE
ADDING 1 QUART OF ENGINE OIL WILL RAISE
THE OIL LEVEL FROM THE ADD MARK
TO THE TOP OF THE OK RANGE
ADDING 1 QUART OF ENGINE OIL WILL RAISE
THE OIL LEVEL FROM THE ADD MARK
TO THE TOP OF THE OK RANGE
4. When checking or filling the engine crankcase oil ensure that the
vessel is level in the water or on a trailer.
4. When checking or filling the engine crankcase oil ensure that the
vessel is level in the water or on a trailer.
For changing the engine oil & filter see the MerCruiser maintenance
schedule and operation manual or contact your Regal dealer.
For changing the engine oil & filter see the MerCruiser maintenance
schedule and operation manual or contact your Regal dealer.
Note: Above are basic recommendations. Regal is not responsible for the accuracy
of the information since it can change at any time. For more detailed information
and procedures check your engine operators manual or call a Regal dealer servicing
the product line.
7-31
Note: Above are basic recommendations. Regal is not responsible for the accuracy
of the information since it can change at any time. For more detailed information
and procedures check your engine operators manual or call a Regal dealer servicing
the product line.
7-31
CHAPTER 7
Checking Sterndrive Oil
Checking Sterndrive Oil
CAUTION
!
CHAPTER 7
CAUTION
!
ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD!
DISCHARGE OF OIL OR OIL WASTE
INTO THE ENVIRONMENT IS RESTRICTED BY
LAW. DO NOT SPILL OIL OR OIL WASTE INTO THE
ENVIRONMENT WHEN USING OR SERVICING
YOUR VESSEL. DISPOSE OF OIL OR OIL WASTE
AS DEFINED BY LOCAL & STATE AUTHORITIES.
ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD!
DISCHARGE OF OIL OR OIL WASTE
INTO THE ENVIRONMENT IS RESTRICTED BY
LAW. DO NOT SPILL OIL OR OIL WASTE INTO THE
ENVIRONMENT WHEN USING OR SERVICING
YOUR VESSEL. DISPOSE OF OIL OR OIL WASTE
AS DEFINED BY LOCAL & STATE AUTHORITIES.
1. Drive oil level must be checked with the engine cold before starting.
1. Drive oil level must be checked with the engine cold before starting.
2. Check the gear oil level in the reservoir located on the engine. Keep
the gear oil level at the recommended ranges as marked on the reservoir.
If any water is visible at the bottom of the reservoir or there are any
metal chips in the drive oil do not run the engine since component
damage can result. Contact your Regal dealer for more information.
2. Check the gear oil level in the reservoir located on the engine. Keep
the gear oil level at the recommended ranges as marked on the reservoir.
If any water is visible at the bottom of the reservoir or there are any
metal chips in the drive oil do not run the engine since component
damage can result. Contact your Regal dealer for more information.
Filling the Sterndrive
Filling the Sterndrive
1. If more than 2 ounces of High
Performance Gear Lubricant is required to fill
A the monior reservoir a seal may be leaking.
Contact your Regal dealer.
1. If more than 2 ounces of High
Performance Gear Lubricant is required to fill
A the monior reservoir a seal may be leaking.
Contact your Regal dealer.
2. If drive lubricant is free from water and
metal chips proceed to fill the reservoir.
Remove the gear lube monitor cap. Fill the
reservoir with High Performance Gear
Lubricant (Merc part # 92-802854A1).
2. If drive lubricant is free from water and
metal chips proceed to fill the reservoir.
Remove the gear lube monitor cap. Fill the
reservoir with High Performance Gear
Lubricant (Merc part # 92-802854A1).
A=Drive Reservoir
7-32
A=Drive Reservoir
7-32
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
3. Fill the reservoir so that the drive oil level is in the operating range.
Do not overfill. For changing the drive oil refer to the MerCruiser
operation manual or contact a Regal dealer for more information.
3. Fill the reservoir so that the drive oil level is in the operating range.
Do not overfill. For changing the drive oil refer to the MerCruiser
operation manual or contact a Regal dealer for more information.
Checking Power Steering Fluid
Checking Power Steering Fluid
1. Stop the engine and center the sterndrive unit.
1. Stop the engine and center the sterndrive unit.
2. Remove the combo fill cap/dipstick and observe the level.
2. Remove the combo fill cap/dipstick and observe the level.
a. Proper fluid level with engine at normal operating
temperature should be within the warm range.
a. Proper fluid level with engine at normal operating
temperature should be within the warm range.
b. Proper fluid level with engine cold should be within the cold
range.
b. Proper fluid level with engine cold should be within the cold
range.
3. Fill to line with Quicksilver Power Trim & Steering Fluid (Merc #
92-802880A1) or Dextron III automatic transmission fluid. If you can
not see any fluid in the power steering reservoir contact your Regal
dealer since a leak must of developed in the system.
3. Fill to line with Quicksilver Power Trim & Steering Fluid (Merc #
92-802880A1) or Dextron III automatic transmission fluid. If you can
not see any fluid in the power steering reservoir contact your Regal
dealer since a leak must of developed in the system.
a=Power Steering Pump
b=Engine Cold Range
c=Engine Warm Range
7-33
a=Power Steering Pump
b=Engine Cold Range
c=Engine Warm Range
7-33
CHAPTER 7
Checking Power Trim Fluid
!
CHAPTER 7
Checking Power Trim Fluid
CAUTION
!
ALWAYS CHECK THE OIL LEVEL
WITH THE STERNDRIVE
IN THE “FULL” DOWN OR “IN” POSITION.
CAUTION
ALWAYS CHECK THE OIL LEVEL
WITH THE STERNDRIVE
IN THE “FULL” DOWN OR “IN” POSITION.
1. Place the stern drive unit in the full down position.
1. Place the stern drive unit in the full down position.
2. Observe the oil level. Level must be between the “MIN” or “MAX”
lines on the reservoir.
2. Observe the oil level. Level must be between the “MIN” or “MAX”
lines on the reservoir.
3. Fill as necessary with Power Trim & Steering Fluid (Merc part # 92802880Al).
3. Fill as necessary with Power Trim & Steering Fluid (Merc part # 92802880Al).
Refilling The Reservoir
Refilling The Reservoir
1. Remove the fill cap from the reservoir. Fill cap is vented.
1. Remove the fill cap from the reservoir. Fill cap is vented.
2. Add lubricant to bring level to the within the “MIN” and “MAX”
lines on the reservoir. Use Power Trim & Steering Fluid (92- 802880A1).
2. Add lubricant to bring level to the within the “MIN” and “MAX”
lines on the reservoir. Use Power Trim & Steering Fluid (92- 802880A1).
3. Install the cap.
3. Install the cap.
Changing Power Trim Fluid
Changing Power Trim Fluid
1. Power steering fluid does not require changing unless it becomes
comtaminated with water or debris. Contact a Regal dealer to change
the fluid.
1. Power steering fluid does not require changing unless it becomes
comtaminated with water or debris. Contact a Regal dealer to change
the fluid.
7-34
7-34
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Checking Engine Coolant
!
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Checking Engine Coolant
WARNING
!
WARNING
AVOID BODILY INJURY!
ALLOW ENGINE TO COOL DOWN BEFORE REMOVING
THE COOLANT PRESSURE CAP. A SUDDEN LOSS OF
PRESSURE COULD CAUSE HOT COOLANT TO BOIL
AND DISCHARGE VIOLENTLY. AFTER THE ENGINE HAS
COOLED, TURN THE CAP 1/4 TURN TO ALLOW
PRESSURE TO ESCAPE SLOWLY, THEN PUSH DOWN &
TURN THE CAP COMPLETELY OFF.
AVOID BODILY INJURY!
ALLOW ENGINE TO COOL DOWN BEFORE REMOVING
THE COOLANT PRESSURE CAP. A SUDDEN LOSS OF
PRESSURE COULD CAUSE HOT COOLANT TO BOIL
AND DISCHARGE VIOLENTLY. AFTER THE ENGINE HAS
COOLED, TURN THE CAP 1/4 TURN TO ALLOW
PRESSURE TO ESCAPE SLOWLY, THEN PUSH DOWN &
TURN THE CAP COMPLETELY OFF.
1. Remove the cap from the heat exchanger and observe the level of
the fluid.
1. Remove the cap from the heat exchanger and observe the level of
the fluid.
2. The coolant level in the heat exchanger should be at the bottom of
the filler neck. A low coolant level means you should contact your
Regal dealer.
2. The coolant level in the heat exchanger should be at the bottom of
the filler neck. A low coolant level means you should contact your
Regal dealer.
3.Install the cap onto the heat exchanger.
3.Install the cap onto the heat exchanger.
4. When reinstalling the pressure cap, be sure to tighten it until it seats
on the filler neck.
4. When reinstalling the pressure cap, be sure to tighten it until it seats
on the filler neck.
5. With the engine at normal operating temperature, check the coolant
level in the coolant recovery canister.
5. With the engine at normal operating temperature, check the coolant
level in the coolant recovery canister.
a=Coolant Cap
a=Coolant Cap
7-35
7-35
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
6. The coolant level should be between the “ADD” and “FULL” marks.
6. The coolant level should be between the “ADD” and “FULL” marks.
7. Add Extended Life Antifreeze/Coolant (Mercury part # 92877770K1).
7. Add Extended Life Antifreeze/Coolant (Mercury part # 92877770K1).
!
CAUTION
!
AVOID ENGINE DAMAGE!
DO NOT USE ALCOHOL OR METHANOL BASED
ANTIFREEZE OR PLAIN WATER IN THE COOLANT
SECTION OF THE CLOSED COOLING SYSTEM
AT ANY TIME.
AVOID ENGINE DAMAGE!
DO NOT USE ALCOHOL OR METHANOL BASED
ANTIFREEZE OR PLAIN WATER IN THE COOLANT
SECTION OF THE CLOSED COOLING SYSTEM
AT ANY TIME.
NOTICE
NOTICE
ADD COOLANT ONLY WHEN THE ENGINE IS AT A
NORMAL OPERATING TEMPERATURE.
Filling Engine Coolant
CAUTION
ADD COOLANT ONLY WHEN THE ENGINE IS AT A
NORMAL OPERATING TEMPERATURE.
Filling Engine Coolant
1. Remove the fill cap from the coolant
recovery canister.
1. Remove the fill cap from the coolant
recovery canister.
2. Fill to the “FULL” line with Extended
Life Antifreeze/Coolant Mercury part #
92-877770K1.
2. Fill to the “FULL” line with Extended
Life Antifreeze/Coolant Mercury part #
92-877770K1.
3. Reinstall the cap onto the coolant
recovery canister.
3. Reinstall the cap onto the coolant
recovery canister.
Changing Engine Coolant
Changing Engine Coolant
Call your Regal dealer to change coolant in the entire system.
Call your Regal dealer to change coolant in the entire system.
7-36
7-36
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Cosmetic Care & Maintenance
Electrolysis Protection
Electrolysis Protection
Sacrificial zinc anodes usually found on the outdrive housing, trim
cylinders or propshaft to protect softer metals exposed to the water.
Electrolysis attacks the least noble metals first. Because zinc is a less
noble metal, it will decompose before other metals. Check these zinc
anodes periodically and have them replaced when they are 50% gone.
Zinc is also used to protect metal that is exposed to saltwater. The
salt causes a galvanic action that decomposes metals.
Sacrificial zinc anodes usually found on the outdrive housing, trim
cylinders or propshaft to protect softer metals exposed to the water.
Electrolysis attacks the least noble metals first. Because zinc is a less
noble metal, it will decompose before other metals. Check these zinc
anodes periodically and have them replaced when they are 50% gone.
Zinc is also used to protect metal that is exposed to saltwater. The
salt causes a galvanic action that decomposes metals.
VOLVO SHOWN
VOLVO SHOWN
SACRIFICIAL ANODE
SACRIFICIAL ANODE
Zinc anodes in saltwater need to be checked more frequently. If the
anodes seem to be requiring frequent replacement there may be a
boat emitting a shore power leak into the water taxing the anodes.
This is especially possible around a marina environment. If this is the
case contact the marina personnel since the current in the water can
be measured by a device. Refer to the engine manufacturer’s manual
for exact location and detailed information regarding anodes. Outdrive
damage due to neglecting anode inspection service is not covered under
the warranty.
7-37
Zinc anodes in saltwater need to be checked more frequently. If the
anodes seem to be requiring frequent replacement there may be a
boat emitting a shore power leak into the water taxing the anodes.
This is especially possible around a marina environment. If this is the
case contact the marina personnel since the current in the water can
be measured by a device. Refer to the engine manufacturer’s manual
for exact location and detailed information regarding anodes. Outdrive
damage due to neglecting anode inspection service is not covered under
the warranty.
7-37
7-38
DA TE
DA TE
HOURS OF
OPERA TION
HOURS OF
OPERA TION
7-38
SERVICE/REPA IRS PERFORMED
SERVICE/MA IN TEN A N CE LOG
SERVICE/REPA IRS PERFORMED
SERVICE/MA IN TEN A N CE LOG
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 7
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
DIAGNOSTIC CHARTS
DIAGNOSTIC CHARTS
The following diagnostic charts will assist you in identifying minor
electrical, fuel, and mechanical problems. Some of the items listed
require technical training and tools. Additional assistance is available
in the engine manufacturer’s manual. Also, you can contact your closest
Regal dealer or marine professional for more information. Most defects
can be found by doing a logical sequence of elimination.
The following diagnostic charts will assist you in identifying minor
electrical, fuel, and mechanical problems. Some of the items listed
require technical training and tools. Additional assistance is available
in the engine manufacturer’s manual. Also, you can contact your closest
Regal dealer or marine professional for more information. Most defects
can be found by doing a logical sequence of elimination.
!
CAUTION
!
TO AVOID BODILY INJURY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE!
USE ONLY APPROVED MARINE
REPLACEMENT PARTS.
!
WARNING
CAUTION
TO AVOID BODILY INJURY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE!
USE ONLY APPROVED MARINE
REPLACEMENT PARTS.
!
WARNING
TO AVOID BODILY INJURY AND DEATH!
BEFORE PERFORMING ANY MAINTENANCE WORK
TURN OFF THE BATTERY SWITCH AND REMOVE
THE KEYS FROM THE IGNITION SWITCH.
TO AVOID BODILY INJURY AND DEATH!
BEFORE PERFORMING ANY MAINTENANCE WORK
TURN OFF THE BATTERY SWITCH AND REMOVE
THE KEYS FROM THE IGNITION SWITCH.
8-1
8-1
CHAPTER 8
CHAPTER 8
REMOTE CONTROL DIAGNOSTIC CHART
PROBLEM
Remote control
stiff/inopera tiv e
Throttle only control
inopera tiv e (neutra l)
POSSIBLE CA USE
REMOTE CONTROL DIAGNOSTIC CHART
POSSIBLE FIX
Corroded ca ble
Clea n/lubrica te ca ble
Kink ed ca ble
PROBLEM
Remote control
stiff/inopera tiv e
No rea ding on ga uge or
ga uge rea ds wrong
Ga uge rea ds erra tic
8-2
POSSIBLE FIX
Corroded ca ble
Clea n/lubrica te ca ble
Repla ce ca ble
Kink ed ca ble
Repla ce ca ble
Brok en ca ble
Repla ce ca ble
Brok en ca ble
Repla ce ca ble
Remote control box
ja mmed
Repa ir/Repla ce box
Remote control box
ja mmed
Repa ir/Repla ce box
Worn throttle ca ble
Repla ce ca ble
Worn throttle ca ble
Repla ce ca ble
Binding Ca ble
Follow ca ble routing;
look for pinched ca ble
Binding Ca ble
Follow ca ble routing;
look for pinched ca ble
Brok en ca ble
Repla ce ca ble
Brok en ca ble
Repla ce ca ble
Control box worn or in
need of lubrica tion
Refer to infor ma tion
supplied by control mfg.
Control box worn or in
need of lubrica tion
Refer to infor ma tion
supplied by control mfg.
Throttle only control
inopera tiv e (neutra l)
IN STRUMEN T D IA GN OSTIC CHA RT
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CA USE
POSSIBLE CA USE
IN STRUMEN T D IA GN OSTIC CHA RT
POSSIBLE FIX
Fa ulty ga uge
Repla ce ga uge
Wiring to ga uge fa ulty
Inspect/repa ir wiring
Fa ulty sender
Repla ce sender
Loose ground or hot
wire
Repa ir or repla ce wire
a nd or connection
PROBLEM
No rea ding on ga uge or
ga uge rea ds wrong
Ga uge rea ds erra tic
8-2
POSSIBLE CA USE
POSSIBLE FIX
Fa ulty ga uge
Repla ce ga uge
Wiring to ga uge fa ulty
Inspect/repa ir wiring
Fa ulty sender
Repla ce sender
Loose ground or hot
wire
Repa ir or repla ce wire
a nd or connection
Troubleshooting
PERFORMA N CE D IA GN OSTIC CHA RT
PROBLEM
E xcessiv e v ibra tion
Poor perfor ma nce
POSSIBLE CA USE
Troubleshooting
PERFORMA N CE D IA GN OSTIC CHA RT
POSSIBLE FIX
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CA USE
POSSIBLE FIX
Ma teria l obstr ucting
propeller
Remov e ma teria l by
rev ersing engine
Ma teria l obstr ucting
propeller
Remov e ma teria l by
rev ersing engine
Bent propeller sha ft
Ca ll Rega l dea ler
Bent propeller sha ft
Ca ll Rega l dea ler
Bent propeller bla de
Repa ir/repla ce propeller
Bent propeller bla de
Repa ir/repla ce propeller
Propeller hub slipping
Repla ce propeller
Propeller hub slipping
Repla ce propeller
E ngine trim incorrect
Adjust trim
E ngine trim incorrect
Adjust trim
Unev en loa d
distribution
Adjust boa t loa d
Unev en loa d
distribution
Adjust boa t loa d
E ngine problem
Ca ll Rega l dea ler
E ngine problem
Ca ll Rega l dea ler
E xcessiv e v ibra tion
Poor perfor ma nce
FUEL SY STEM D IA GN OSTIC CHA R T
FUEL SY STEM D IA GN OSTIC CHA R T
PROBLEM
PROBLEM
E ngine won't sta rt or
not r unning right
POSSIBLE CA USE
POSSIBLE FIX
POSSIBLE CA USE
POSSIBLE FIX
Fuel ta nk v ent
obstr ucted
Clea n v ent hose or a nd
fitting. Check for k ink s.
Fuel ta nk v ent
obstr ucted
Clea n v ent hose or a nd
fitting. Check for k ink s.
Fuel line block ed
Check for k ink ed hose
Fuel line block ed
Check for k ink ed hose
La ck of fuel
Clea n filter. Check for
clog ged a nti-siphon
v a lv e
La ck of fuel
Clea n filter. Check for
clog ged a nti-siphon
v a lv e
Wa ter in fuel
E limina te wa ter
E ngine won't sta rt or
not r unning right
Wa ter in fuel
E limina te wa ter
Clog ged fuel filter
Repla ce filter element
Clog ged fuel filter
Repla ce filter element
No fuel rea ching engine
Check fuel pump output.
Clea n filters. Check fuel
ta nk ga uge lev el.
No fuel rea ching engine
Check fuel pump output.
Clea n filters. Check fuel
ta nk ga uge lev el.
8-3
8-3
CHAPTER 8
CHAPTER 8
FRESH WATER DIAGNOSTIC CHART
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE
CA USE
FRESH WATER DIAGNOSTIC CHART
POSSIBLE FIX
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE
CA USE
POSSIBLE FIX
Ai r i n sy st e m
Wa ter ta nk empty
Fill ta nk . With
pump on bleed a ir
from lines until
wa ter flows out
fa ucet w/o a ir.
Fresh wa ter pump
cycles on a nd off
Lea k in wa ter
sy st e m
Loca te wa ter lea k &
repa ir
Brea k er blown
Reset brea k er
Brea k er blown
Reset brea k er
Wa ter ta nk empty
Refill wa ter ta nk
Wa ter ta nk empty
Refill wa ter ta nk
Switch turned off
Turn switch on
Switch turned off
Turn switch on
Block ed/pinched
line or wa ter filter
Clea r obstr uction or
stra ighten line;
Clea n wa ter filter
Block ed/pinched
line or wa ter filter
Clea r obstr uction or
stra ighten line;
Clea n wa ter filter
Loosr or
disconnected wire
Check connections;
Tighten a s needed
Loosr or
disconnected wire
Check connections;
Tighten a s needed
Low wa ter pressure
Defectiv e fresh
wa ter pump
Repla ce pump
Low wa ter pressure
Defectiv e fresh
wa ter pump
Repla ce pump
Wea k pressure a t
tra nsom shower
Line pinched
Reloca te line
Wea k pressure a t
tra nsom shower
Line pinched
Reloca te line
Wa ter to pump. No
output
Fa ulty pump or
pump pressure
sw i t c h
Repla ce wa ter pump
or pressure switch
Wa ter to pump. No
output
Fa ulty pump or
pump pressure
sw i t c h
Repla ce wa ter pump
or pressure switch
No wa ter a t sink
fa ucets
8-4
Ai r i n sy st e m
Wa ter ta nk empty
Fill ta nk . With
pump on bleed a ir
from lines until
wa ter flows out
fa ucet w/o a ir.
Fresh wa ter pump
cycles on a nd off
Lea k in wa ter
sy st e m
Loca te wa ter lea k &
repa ir
No wa ter a t sink
fa ucets
8-4
Troubleshooting
WASTE SYSTEM DIAGNOSTIC CHART
PROBLEM
Chemical head not
flushing with push
v a lv e
Chemical head emits
odor
Marine head not
flushing
Marine head not
emptying
Marine head tank
emits odor
POSSIBLE CAUSE
WASTE SYSTEM DIAGNOSTIC CHART
POSSIBLE FIX
PROBLEM
Out of fresh water
Fill with fresh water
Chemical head not
flushing with push
v a lv e
Lower tank full
Empty toilet
No chemical in lower
tank
Add chemical
Seacock closed
Open seacock
Breaker in "off"
postition
Turn breaker "on"
Blocked holding tank
line
Unclog line
Chemical head emits
odor
Marine head not
flushing
Marine head not
emptying
POSSIBLE CAUSE
Fill with fresh water
Lower tank full
Empty toilet
No chemical in lower
tank
Add chemical
Seacock closed
Open seacock
Breaker in "off"
postition
Turn breaker "on"
Blocked holding tank
line
Unclog line
Holding tank full
Worn or tore pump
diaphragm
Repair/replace
diaphragm
Marine head tank
emits odor
Open seacock
Macerator option r uns
Seacock "off"
but doesn't exit waste
Defective pump, faulty Replace pump, wire,
wire, tripped breaker or reset breaker
Key switch at monitor Turn "on" key switch
panel not activated
8-5
Macerator option
won't r un
POSSIBLE FIX
Out of fresh water
Pump-out holding
tank
Macerator option r uns
Seacock "off"
but doesn't exit waste
Macerator option
won't r un
Troubleshooting
Holding tank full
Pump-out holding
tank
Worn or tore pump
diaphragm
Repair/replace
diaphragm
Open seacock
Defective pump, faulty Replace pump, wire,
wire, tripped breaker or reset breaker
Key switch at monitor Turn "on" key switch
panel not activated
8-5
CHAPTER 8
CHAPTER 8
D C ELECTRICA L D IA GN OSTIC CHA RT
PROBLEM
No 1 2 v olt power
Ba ttery not cha rging;
(E ngine r unning)
Ba ttery will not hold
cha rge
1 2 v olt equipment not
work ing
8-6
POSSIBLE CA USE
Ba ttery switch in " off"
position
D C ELECTRICA L D IA GN OSTIC CHA RT
POSSIBLE FIX
PROBLEM
Turn selector switch to
" on" position
No 1 2 v olt power
POSSIBLE CA USE
Ba ttery switch in " off"
position
POSSIBLE FIX
Turn selector switch to
" on" position
Wea k or dea d ba ttery
Cha rge or repla ce
ba ttery
Wea k or dea d ba ttery
Cha rge or repla ce
ba ttery
Loose belt
Tighten belt
Loose belt
Tighten belt
Fa ulty a lterna tor
Repa ir/Repla ce
a lterna tor
Fa ulty a lterna tor
Repa ir/Repla ce
a lterna tor
Fa ulty v olt meter
Repla ce v olt meter
Fa ulty v olt meter
Repla ce v olt meter
Fa ulty/O ld ba ttery
Repla ce ba ttery
Fa ulty/O ld ba ttery
Repla ce ba ttery
Ba ttery not cha rging;
(E ngine r unning)
Ba ttery will not hold
cha rge
E quipment switch " off" Switch to " on" position
E quipment switch " off" Switch to " on" position
Circuit brea k er blown
Push reset on circuit
brea k er
Circuit brea k er blown
Push reset on circuit
brea k er
Wea k or dea d ba ttery
Repla ce ba ttery
Wea k or dea d ba ttery
Repla ce ba ttery
Corroded connection
E limina te corrosion
Corroded connection
E limina te corrosion
Loose wire
Tighten connection
Loose wire
Tighten connection
Interna l equipment
short
Repla ce equipment
Interna l equipment
short
Repla ce equipment
1 2 v olt equipment not
work ing
8-6
Storage & Winterization
Storage & Winterization
Storage procedures are outlined in this chapter. These are general
guidelines to follow before longer periods of storage such as over the
winter in colder climates. Be sure to familarize yourself with all relevant
information in the owner’s pouch. Special winterization procedures
are necessary for the boat equipment and systems. Use the enclosed
checklists to help you identify areas of concern and maintenance. These
lists cover land stored boats either inside or outside. Call a Regal dealer
or marine professional for further information.
Storage procedures are outlined in this chapter. These are general
guidelines to follow before longer periods of storage such as over the
winter in colder climates. Be sure to familarize yourself with all relevant
information in the owner’s pouch. Special winterization procedures
are necessary for the boat equipment and systems. Use the enclosed
checklists to help you identify areas of concern and maintenance. These
lists cover land stored boats either inside or outside. Call a Regal dealer
or marine professional for further information.
!
WARNING
!
EXPLOSION, FIRE AND POLLUTION HAZARD!
DO NOT FILL FUEL TANK TO RATED CAPACITY
LEAVE ROOM FOR EXPANSION.
!
EXPLOSION, FIRE AND POLLUTION HAZARD!
DO NOT FILL FUEL TANK TO RATED CAPACITY
LEAVE ROOM FOR EXPANSION.
CAUTION
!
REMOVE BATTERY(IES) WHEN VESSEL IS IN LONG
PERIODS OF STORAGE.
!
WARNING
CAUTION
REMOVE BATTERY(IES) WHEN VESSEL IS IN LONG
PERIODS OF STORAGE.
!
TO PREVENT ENGINE DAMAGE!
USE ONLY ETHYLENE GLYCOL BASE ANTIFREEZE.
DO NOT USE ALCOHOL BASE PRODUCTS.
9-1
CAUTION
CAUTION
TO PREVENT ENGINE DAMAGE!
USE ONLY ETHYLENE GLYCOL BASE ANTIFREEZE.
DO NOT USE ALCOHOL BASE PRODUCTS.
9-1
CHAPTER 9
CHAPTER 9
DECOMISSIONING CHECKLIST
DECOMISSIONING CHECKLIST
ENGINE
ENGINE
Run engine. Pour a fuel stabilizer/conditioner in the fuel tank.
Allow timefor it to circulate through the fuel system.
Run engine. Pour a fuel stabilizer/conditioner in the fuel tank.
Allow timefor it to circulate through the fuel system.
Change all engine fluids as referenced in the engine
manufacturer’s owners manual.
Change all engine fluids as referenced in the engine
manufacturer’s owners manual.
Drain cooling and exhaust system or have a marine professional
“pickle” the engine with anti-freeze and rust preventative.
Drain cooling and exhaust system or have a marine professional
“pickle” the engine with anti-freeze and rust preventative.
Spray all exterior parts with a rust preventative.
Spray all exterior parts with a rust preventative.
STERN DRIVE
STERN DRIVE
Remove drive. Perform maintenance as referenced in the
manufacturer’s owners manual.
Remove drive. Perform maintenance as referenced in the
manufacturer’s owners manual.
Remove propeller. Refurbish as needed.
Remove propeller. Refurbish as needed.
Touch up paint on stern drive upper and lower gear housings
as required.
Touch up paint on stern drive upper and lower gear housings
as required.
Apply coat of wax to stern drive.
Apply coat of wax to stern drive.
BOAT
BOAT
Check hull bottom for any fiberglass damage. Repair as needed
Check hull bottom for any fiberglass damage. Repair as needed
Apply a coat of wax to hull and deck surfaces.
Apply a coat of wax to hull and deck surfaces.
9-2
Pour a pint of 50/50 antifreeze into bilge pump.
9-2
Pour a pint of 50/50 antifreeze into bilge pump.
Storage & Winterization
Storage & Winterization
Remove battery (ies). Charge as needed.
Remove battery (ies). Charge as needed.
Remove all loose gear from boat such as life jackets, etc. Inspect
and store in cool, dry environment.
Remove all loose gear from boat such as life jackets, etc. Inspect
and store in cool, dry environment.
Remove drain plug. Clean drain plug hole of debris as needed.
Enclose drain plug in plastic bag and tie to steering wheel.
Remove drain plug. Clean drain plug hole of debris as needed.
Enclose drain plug in plastic bag and tie to steering wheel.
Make sure bow is higher than stern to permit proper drainage.
Make sure bow is higher than stern to permit proper drainage.
Clean all upholstery and store so it breathes.
Clean all upholstery and store so it breathes.
Conduct a visual inspection to ensure boat is balanced properly
on the trailer, cradle or blocks.
Conduct a visual inspection to ensure boat is balanced properly
on the trailer, cradle or blocks.
Cover boat with tarp. Tie down for wind protection if outside.
Prop tarp up as needed to provide proper ventilation. Be sure
not to cover up the fuel vents.
Cover boat with tarp. Tie down for wind protection if outside.
Prop tarp up as needed to provide proper ventilation. Be sure
not to cover up the fuel vents.
Drain the fresh water system per instructions in this chapter.
Drain the fresh water system per instructions in this chapter.
TRAILER
TRAILER
Repack all wheel bearings per manufacturer’s specifications.
Repack all wheel bearings per manufacturer’s specifications.
Check all trailer parts for excessive wear. Replace/refurbish as
needed.
Check all trailer parts for excessive wear. Replace/refurbish as
needed.
Use touch up paint on trailer as needed.
Use touch up paint on trailer as needed.
Lubricate all moving parts as needed.
Lubricate all moving parts as needed.
Block the trailer up to remove some of the strain on the wheels.
Block the trailer up to remove some of the strain on the wheels.
If outside, install a coupler lock to prevent theft.
If outside, install a coupler lock to prevent theft.
9-3
9-3
CHAPTER 9
CHAPTER 9
FRESH WATER SYSTEM
FRESH WATER SYSTEM
1. Turn on the fresh water pump switch.
1. Turn on the fresh water pump switch.
2. Open all faucets including transom shower (if equipped) and allow
tank to empty.
2. Open all faucets including transom shower (if equipped) and allow
tank to empty.
3. Drain the water tank. Shut off fresh water pump switch.
3. Drain the water tank. Shut off fresh water pump switch.
4. Mix non-toxic antifreeze with water in accordance with the
manufacturer’s recommendations. (Available at marina & RV stores)
4. Mix non-toxic antifreeze with water in accordance with the
manufacturer’s recommendations. (Available at marina & RV stores)
5. Pour solution into the fresh water tank.
5. Pour solution into the fresh water tank.
6. Turn on fresh water pump switch.
6. Turn on fresh water pump switch.
7. Open water faucet and purge until a steady stream of non-toxic
antifreeze flows from the faucet. If equipped, do the same to the
transom shower. Turn the fresh water switch off..
7. Open water faucet and purge until a steady stream of non-toxic
antifreeze flows from the faucet. If equipped, do the same to the
transom shower. Turn the fresh water switch off..
WASTE SYSTEM
WASTE SYSTEM
1. With chemical heads, make sure to dump both upper and lower
tanks. Rinse well with fresh water.
1. With chemical heads, make sure to dump both upper and lower
tanks. Rinse well with fresh water.
2. With marine head, pump out holding tank. Add non-toxic antifreeze
to toilet and holding tank. Pump from toilet to holding tank to
eliminate any water in lines.
2. With marine head, pump out holding tank. Add non-toxic antifreeze
to toilet and holding tank. Pump from toilet to holding tank to
eliminate any water in lines.
NOTICE
NOTICE
AVOID VESSEL AND ENGINE DAMAGE!
CONTACT MARINE PROFESSIONAL FOR
WINTERIZATION INSTRUCTIONS. DAMAGE NOT
COVERED BY WARRANTY.
AVOID VESSEL AND ENGINE DAMAGE!
CONTACT MARINE PROFESSIONAL FOR
WINTERIZATION INSTRUCTIONS. DAMAGE NOT
COVERED BY WARRANTY.
9-4
9-4
Storage & Winterization
Storage & Winterization
RECOMISSIONING CHECKLIST
RECOMISSIONING CHECKLIST
ENGINE/STERN DRIVE
ENGINE/STERN DRIVE
Check all components per engine manufacturer’s owners
manual especially fluid levels.
Check all components per engine manufacturer’s owners
manual especially fluid levels.
Run engine on “ear muffs” before launching. Check for fuel,
exhaust, oil, and water leaks.
Run engine on “ear muffs” before launching. Check for fuel,
exhaust, oil, and water leaks.
BOAT
BOAT
Install drain plug.
Install drain plug.
Install battery and tighten all terminals.
Install battery and tighten all terminals.
Check all equipment, switches, alarms, gauges and breakers
for proper operation.
Check all equipment, switches, alarms, gauges and breakers
for proper operation.
Add necessary chemicals and water to chemical head.
Add necessary chemicals and water to chemical head.
Add water to fresh water tank. Turn on faucet to purge tank.
Refill water tank.
Add water to fresh water tank. Turn on faucet to purge tank.
Refill water tank.
Make sure all safety gear is on board and in excellent working
condition.
Make sure all safety gear is on board and in excellent working
condition.
After launching, check controls and gauges for proper
operation.
After launching, check controls and gauges for proper
operation.
TRAILER
TRAILER
Make sure all equipment is in excellent working condition.
9-5
Make sure all equipment is in excellent working condition.
9-5
CHAPTER 9
9-6
Notes
CHAPTER 9
9-6
Notes
Trailering
Trailering
This chapter covers trailering basics including equipment, maintenance,
and techniques of trailer usage. Check with state and local agencies
for detailed information on required equipment, safety issues, and
licensing.
This chapter covers trailering basics including equipment, maintenance,
and techniques of trailer usage. Check with state and local agencies
for detailed information on required equipment, safety issues, and
licensing.
BEFORE TRAILERING
BEFORE TRAILERING
Before trailering your boat, be sure to check the air pressure of your
tires for the recommended inflation rating. Also, be certain that your
tow vehicle is in good working order.
Stow all gear to be carried properly, especially heavy items such as
batteries or anchors. Be sure these items are secured. Don’t overload
and try to carry too much on your trailer.
Give consideration to the weight distribution of your trailer. If the
rear end of your vehicle sags, chances are the load is positioned too far
forward on your trailer.
This can make it especially difficult todrive safely, as the hitch may be
in danger of striking the road. Also, this situation can be caused by
worn rear shock absorbers. One option is to install a set of air shocks
which will assist in supporting the load. As a rule of thumb 5 to 7
percent of the total trailer load should be on the trailer tongue.
Check all lights to ensure thay are in good working order. You may
find it helpful at ask someone to check your turn signals, brake lights,
and towing lights while you remain in the vehicle and check them.
Be certain that the trailer winch cable is securely attached to the boat’s
bow eye and the cable lock is engaged. Make sure the bow of the boat
is snug against the bow stop at the winch stand. It is a good idea to tie
10-1
Before trailering your boat, be sure to check the air pressure of your
tires for the recommended inflation rating. Also, be certain that your
tow vehicle is in good working order.
Stow all gear to be carried properly, especially heavy items such as
batteries or anchors. Be sure these items are secured. Don’t overload
and try to carry too much on your trailer.
Give consideration to the weight distribution of your trailer. If the
rear end of your vehicle sags, chances are the load is positioned too far
forward on your trailer.
This can make it especially difficult todrive safely, as the hitch may be
in danger of striking the road. Also, this situation can be caused by
worn rear shock absorbers. One option is to install a set of air shocks
which will assist in supporting the load. As a rule of thumb 5 to 7
percent of the total trailer load should be on the trailer tongue.
Check all lights to ensure thay are in good working order. You may
find it helpful at ask someone to check your turn signals, brake lights,
and towing lights while you remain in the vehicle and check them.
Be certain that the trailer winch cable is securely attached to the boat’s
bow eye and the cable lock is engaged. Make sure the bow of the boat
is snug against the bow stop at the winch stand. It is a good idea to tie
10-1
10-2
10-2
TAIL LIGHT
BUNK PAD
TAIL LIGHT
BUNK PAD
SAFETY CHAINS
FENDER ROLLER
PARKING JACK
TYPICAL TRAILER SHOWN
AXLE
COUPLER
TRAILER TERMINOLOGY
FRAME
SAFETY CHAINS
FENDER ROLLER
PARKING JACK
COUPLER
TYPICAL TRAILER SHOWN
AXLE
FRAME
TRAILER TERMINOLOGY
CHAPTER 10
CHAPTER 10
Trailering
Trailering
HUB
HUB
BEARING
BEARING
LUG NUT
WHEEL
LEAF SPRING
LUG NUT
WHEEL
LEAF SPRING
TYPICAL WHEEL PARTS DESCRIPTION
TYPICAL WHEEL PARTS DESCRIPTION
BOW CHAIN
BOW CHAIN
WINCH/CABLE
WINCH STAND
WINCH/CABLE
WINCH STAND
TONGUE JACK
TONGUE JACK
MASTER
CYLINDER
MASTER
CYLINDER
BRAKE
ACTUATOR
COUPLER
BRAKE
ACTUATOR
COUPLER
TYPICAL TONGUE SECTION
TYPICAL TONGUE SECTION
10-3
10-3
CHAPTER 10
CHAPTER 10
another line or secure an extra cable to the winch stand and boat bow
eye as a backup system.
Be certain that your trailer is of rated capacity for the size and weight
of your boat, including the weight for all fuel, water and gear. Your
authorized Regal dealer can advise you on the proper trailer capacity
and tongue weight ( the weight exerted on the rear of your vehicle).
Never use a bumper mounted trailer hitch. Always use a bolted or
welded frame-mounted hitch, class 2 or 3. Consult your Regal dealer
for more information.
Should your trailer be equipped with surge brakes, that is brakes on
the trailer that cut in with a very slight delay when your brakes are
applied, be sure to follow recommended service and maintenance
instructions. Be sure that the trailer master cylinder is filled with the
recommended fluid before trailering your boat. Inspect the trailer brake
lines for any leakage. Also, if you notice brake fluid on the inside of
the tires, you may have a wheel cylinder leaking. Consult a professional.
Never place your hands between the trailer hitch coupling and the
hitch ball on your towing vehicle while hooking up. Be sure the tongue
jack is in the full up position before departure. Be certain safety chains
are criss-crossed and secured; do not allow them to drag on the road.
Check the trailer lug nuts for the proper torque. Use a foot pound
wrench and torque in a star sequence to the correct poundage as
recommended by the trailer manufacturer. Torque the lug nuts at half
the poundage on all nuts. Then set the torque wrench to the full
poundage and fasten to the last foot poundage figure.
Check the trailer tires often for voids, excessive wear or out of round
tire conditions. If the trailer seems to vibrate you may have a bad tire
or one that is unbalanced. These wheels can be rebalanced at most
automotive or tire shops. Never pull a boat on a patched tire. Buy a
spare tire and wheel. Mount it on the trailer speedy installation should
a blow out occur.
Check the trailer harness often for signs of fraying. Check the harness
connector for corrosion. Make sure the trailer harness when connected
to the trailer has enough slack for turning
another line or secure an extra cable to the winch stand and boat bow
eye as a backup system.
Be certain that your trailer is of rated capacity for the size and weight
of your boat, including the weight for all fuel, water and gear. Your
authorized Regal dealer can advise you on the proper trailer capacity
and tongue weight ( the weight exerted on the rear of your vehicle).
Never use a bumper mounted trailer hitch. Always use a bolted or
welded frame-mounted hitch, class 2 or 3. Consult your Regal dealer
for more information.
Should your trailer be equipped with surge brakes, that is brakes on
the trailer that cut in with a very slight delay when your brakes are
applied, be sure to follow recommended service and maintenance
instructions. Be sure that the trailer master cylinder is filled with the
recommended fluid before trailering your boat. Inspect the trailer brake
lines for any leakage. Also, if you notice brake fluid on the inside of
the tires, you may have a wheel cylinder leaking. Consult a professional.
Never place your hands between the trailer hitch coupling and the
hitch ball on your towing vehicle while hooking up. Be sure the tongue
jack is in the full up position before departure. Be certain safety chains
are criss-crossed and secured; do not allow them to drag on the road.
Check the trailer lug nuts for the proper torque. Use a foot pound
wrench and torque in a star sequence to the correct poundage as
recommended by the trailer manufacturer. Torque the lug nuts at half
the poundage on all nuts. Then set the torque wrench to the full
poundage and fasten to the last foot poundage figure.
Check the trailer tires often for voids, excessive wear or out of round
tire conditions. If the trailer seems to vibrate you may have a bad tire
or one that is unbalanced. These wheels can be rebalanced at most
automotive or tire shops. Never pull a boat on a patched tire. Buy a
spare tire and wheel. Mount it on the trailer speedy installation should
a blow out occur.
Check the trailer harness often for signs of fraying. Check the harness
connector for corrosion. Make sure the trailer harness when connected
to the trailer has enough slack for turning
10-4
10-4
Trailering
Trailering
Check the wheel bearings for wear periodically by a
professional. On most trialers, there is a zerk fitting on the wheel hub
to add the proper lubricant to the wheel bearing with a grease gun
that can be purchased at a supply house of marine store.
Finally, make sure everything is secured in the boat. Tilt the outdrive
up to clear the road and any bumps that might occur while in transit.
Check the wheel bearings for wear periodically by a
professional. On most trialers, there is a zerk fitting on the wheel hub
to add the proper lubricant to the wheel bearing with a grease gun
that can be purchased at a supply house of marine store.
Finally, make sure everything is secured in the boat. Tilt the outdrive
up to clear the road and any bumps that might occur while in transit.
DRIVING
DRIVING
Practice maneuvering the vehicle and trailer in a large, empty parking
lot or open space. If you practice slowly and cautiously, you will soon
develop a feel for maneuvering the trailer properly.
Test your vehicle and trailer brakes before departure along with the
lights. Also, be sure you pack a tool kit with extra bulbs, fuses and
fluids.
Drive as smoothly as possible, anticipating your stops and giving
yourself plenty of room for turning and stopping. Avoid any quick
turns or sudden jerks of the steering wheel.
Remember to maintain safe speed limits. It takes longer to stop your
loaded boat. Allow enough more room to the front in bad weather.
Keep an eye on your rig through the rear view and side mirrors. If
your rear view mirror is obstructed, purchase a set of side mirrors that
extend out over the side of the vehicle for increased visibility. It is a
good idea to install a set of round mirrors to the side mirrors as they
help identify blind spots.
Plan to stop periodically on your way to check the trailer hitch for
tightness, harness connector, tires, wheel bearings. Also, check to make
sure the load is balanced.
Practice maneuvering the vehicle and trailer in a large, empty parking
lot or open space. If you practice slowly and cautiously, you will soon
develop a feel for maneuvering the trailer properly.
Test your vehicle and trailer brakes before departure along with the
lights. Also, be sure you pack a tool kit with extra bulbs, fuses and
fluids.
Drive as smoothly as possible, anticipating your stops and giving
yourself plenty of room for turning and stopping. Avoid any quick
turns or sudden jerks of the steering wheel.
Remember to maintain safe speed limits. It takes longer to stop your
loaded boat. Allow enough more room to the front in bad weather.
Keep an eye on your rig through the rear view and side mirrors. If
your rear view mirror is obstructed, purchase a set of side mirrors that
extend out over the side of the vehicle for increased visibility. It is a
good idea to install a set of round mirrors to the side mirrors as they
help identify blind spots.
Plan to stop periodically on your way to check the trailer hitch for
tightness, harness connector, tires, wheel bearings. Also, check to make
sure the load is balanced.
10-5
10-5
CHAPTER 10
CHAPTER 10
LAUNCHING
LAUNCHING
Serious accidents can occur at the launching ramp. Therefore, it is
imperative you be alert and attentive during launching and docking
activities. Study the ramp area and surrounding water for any potential
hazards, such as a short ramp or one with a drop off at the end. If you
are uncertain of the conditions, ask someone else who has just used
the ramp if there are any peculiarities to the area.
Attach 2 lines, one each at the bow and stern, to control your boat
once it is off the trailer. If you need additional fenders to keep the
sides of the boat from banging against walls, put those on as well
Unhook the winch line to the bow. Unplug the trailer harness connector
so the trailer lights won’t blow out when they come in contact with
the water.
When backing in, have someone assist, giving the palms up stop signal
when the boat is in deep enough water to float off, or when the rear
wheels of your vehicle approach the water’s edge.
After your boat is floating freely, position it clear of the trailer before
pulling out of the water. If there is no one to help you, secure one of
the lines you’ve attached from the boat to the dock and use the other
line to pull the boat off trailer. You should have someone assist you.
Serious accidents can occur at the launching ramp. Therefore, it is
imperative you be alert and attentive during launching and docking
activities. Study the ramp area and surrounding water for any potential
hazards, such as a short ramp or one with a drop off at the end. If you
are uncertain of the conditions, ask someone else who has just used
the ramp if there are any peculiarities to the area.
Attach 2 lines, one each at the bow and stern, to control your boat
once it is off the trailer. If you need additional fenders to keep the
sides of the boat from banging against walls, put those on as well
Unhook the winch line to the bow. Unplug the trailer harness connector
so the trailer lights won’t blow out when they come in contact with
the water.
When backing in, have someone assist, giving the palms up stop signal
when the boat is in deep enough water to float off, or when the rear
wheels of your vehicle approach the water’s edge.
After your boat is floating freely, position it clear of the trailer before
pulling out of the water. If there is no one to help you, secure one of
the lines you’ve attached from the boat to the dock and use the other
line to pull the boat off trailer. You should have someone assist you.
!
CAUTION
!
AVOID LOSING VEHICLE TRACTION!
DO NOT ALLOW REAR WHEELS TO ENCOUNTER
SANDOR SLIPPERY CONCRETE CONDITIONS.
!
10-6
AVOID LOSING VEHICLE TRACTION!
DO NOT ALLOW REAR WHEELS TO ENCOUNTER
SANDOR SLIPPERY CONCRETE CONDITIONS.
WARNING
AVOID BODILY INJURY!
RAMPS ARE VERY SLIPPERY. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO
WALK OR STAND ON AN ANGLED BOAT RAMP.
CAUTION
!
WARNING
AVOID BODILY INJURY!
RAMPS ARE VERY SLIPPERY. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO
WALK OR STAND ON AN ANGLED BOAT RAMP.
10-6
Trailering
BACKING A TRAILER
1
BACKING A TRAILER
2
LAUNCHING
RAMP
3
Trailering
1
2
LAUNCHING
RAMP
4
A trailer backs in a direction opposite to an automobile. In 1, driver
swings the rig near the launching ramp. In 2, the driver cuts the vehicle
toward the driveway. In 3, the driver cuts the vehicle wheels to the left
and then backs into the ramp as the trailer moves to the right. In 4, the
driver straightens the vehicle wheels to follow the trailer as it backs
down the ramp.
NOTICE
ALLOW TRAILER WHEEL BEARINGS AND LIGHTS
TO COOL BEFORE SUBMERGING.
10-7
3
4
A trailer backs in a direction opposite to an automobile. In 1, driver
swings the rig near the launching ramp. In 2, the driver cuts the vehicle
toward the driveway. In 3, the driver cuts the vehicle wheels to the left
and then backs into the ramp as the trailer moves to the right. In 4, the
driver straightens the vehicle wheels to follow the trailer as it backs
down the ramp.
NOTICE
ALLOW TRAILER WHEEL BEARINGS AND LIGHTS
TO COOL BEFORE SUBMERGING.
10-7
CHAPTER 10
CHAPTER 10
LOADING BOAT
LOADING BOAT
The most important thing to remember when getting your boat out of
the water is that often the ramp will be crowded. As you approach the
ramp, make a visual inspection of the traffic, both at the ramp and all
around you. This is an important time to use caution, courtesy, and
common sense. While you may feel it’s your next turn, another boater
may not be as courteous. Don’t insist on your rightful place in line; it
could lead to disastrous consequences in the confines of a crowded
boat ramp. If there is any perceived danger, stand off until you can
safely approach the ramp.
Back your trailer down to the water’s edge. At this point it is a good
idea to let a sufficient amount of line out of the winch to reach the
bow eye. Make sure you disconnect the trailer harness to keep the
bulbs from blowing out due them being subjected to the cold water.
On roller or bunk style trailers back up until the aft roller is just at the
water level. This allows you to hook up the winch cable and to start
cranking the boat on to the trailer properly. This method gives you a
good starting point and helps keep the boat centerd on the trailer as it
is reloaded. It may be necessary to further back the trailer into the
water to allow cranking up the boat.
Once the boat is positioned correctly on the trailer have someone hook
up the winch cable hook to the bow eye. Also, this will help keep the
boat bow against the trailer roller. Shut down the engine and run the
outdrive up to to the top of the trailer position.
With the bow snug against the roller, start to crank the boat up onto
the trailer. Make sure the hull bottom or keel stays in the center of
each roller as it is being cranked on the trailer. On bunk style trailers,
watch the bunks to make sure the boat is centered as they usually do
not touch any rollers other than the aft one because the boat weight is
being supported more by the bunks as it is cranked onto the trailer.
Stop cranking the winch when the boat bow contacts the bow roller.
Be sure the winch is in the locked position. Stand back and make sure
the boat is centered on the trailer.
The most important thing to remember when getting your boat out of
the water is that often the ramp will be crowded. As you approach the
ramp, make a visual inspection of the traffic, both at the ramp and all
around you. This is an important time to use caution, courtesy, and
common sense. While you may feel it’s your next turn, another boater
may not be as courteous. Don’t insist on your rightful place in line; it
could lead to disastrous consequences in the confines of a crowded
boat ramp. If there is any perceived danger, stand off until you can
safely approach the ramp.
Back your trailer down to the water’s edge. At this point it is a good
idea to let a sufficient amount of line out of the winch to reach the
bow eye. Make sure you disconnect the trailer harness to keep the
bulbs from blowing out due them being subjected to the cold water.
On roller or bunk style trailers back up until the aft roller is just at the
water level. This allows you to hook up the winch cable and to start
cranking the boat on to the trailer properly. This method gives you a
good starting point and helps keep the boat centerd on the trailer as it
is reloaded. It may be necessary to further back the trailer into the
water to allow cranking up the boat.
Once the boat is positioned correctly on the trailer have someone hook
up the winch cable hook to the bow eye. Also, this will help keep the
boat bow against the trailer roller. Shut down the engine and run the
outdrive up to to the top of the trailer position.
With the bow snug against the roller, start to crank the boat up onto
the trailer. Make sure the hull bottom or keel stays in the center of
each roller as it is being cranked on the trailer. On bunk style trailers,
watch the bunks to make sure the boat is centered as they usually do
not touch any rollers other than the aft one because the boat weight is
being supported more by the bunks as it is cranked onto the trailer.
Stop cranking the winch when the boat bow contacts the bow roller.
Be sure the winch is in the locked position. Stand back and make sure
the boat is centered on the trailer.
10-8
10-8
Trailering
Trailering
After pulling your boat away from the ramp, be sure to go through all
the checks involved before departure. Reinstall the harness connector
and check the lights, brakes, safety chain, winch, hitch, wheel bearing
and tie downs. Make sure the boat is covered properly and all loose
gear is stowed.
Remove the hull drain plug to exit any excess water in the bilge. Make
sure you reinstall the hull drain plug and securely tighten it.
After pulling your boat away from the ramp, be sure to go through all
the checks involved before departure. Reinstall the harness connector
and check the lights, brakes, safety chain, winch, hitch, wheel bearing
and tie downs. Make sure the boat is covered properly and all loose
gear is stowed.
Remove the hull drain plug to exit any excess water in the bilge. Make
sure you reinstall the hull drain plug and securely tighten it.
!
WARNING
!
AVOID PERSONAL INJURY!
DO NOT LET ANYONE STAND NEAR THE WINCH OR
CABLE AS THE CABLE COULD BREAK.
!
CAUTION
AVOID PERSONAL INJURY!
DO NOT LET ANYONE STAND NEAR THE WINCH OR
CABLE AS THE CABLE COULD BREAK.
!
HULL BOTTOM DAMAGE COULD RESULT
FROM THE BOAT NOT BEING POSITIONED
ON THE ROLLERS BUT RESTING
ON THE TRAILER FRAME.
AVOID BACKING TRAILER TOO FAR INTO THE WATER!
10-9
WARNING
CAUTION
HULL BOTTOM DAMAGE COULD RESULT
FROM THE BOAT NOT BEING POSITIONED
ON THE ROLLERS BUT RESTING
ON THE TRAILER FRAME.
AVOID BACKING TRAILER TOO FAR INTO THE WATER!
10-9
CHAPTER 10
10-10
Notes
CHAPTER 10
10-10
Notes
Glossary & Index
Glossary & Index
Below is a brief list of nautical terms useful in everyday boating
experiences and communications. For more detailed glossaries of
nautical terminology, we recommend you check your local library or a
marine store for boating books.
Below is a brief list of nautical terms useful in everyday boating
experiences and communications. For more detailed glossaries of
nautical terminology, we recommend you check your local library or a
marine store for boating books.
GLOSSARY
GLOSSARY
Abeam: at right angles to the fore and aft line and off the boat
Abeam: at right angles to the fore and aft line and off the boat
Aboard: on or in the boat
Aboard: on or in the boat
Above: the part of the boat on a bavin vessel which is above the interor
of the boat
Above: the part of the boat on a bavin vessel which is above the interor
of the boat
Aft,After:: aft is the boat section toward the stern or back of the boat
Aft,After:: aft is the boat section toward the stern or back of the boat
Admidships: toward the center of the boat from either side to side or
rear to front
Admidships: toward the center of the boat from either side to side or
rear to front
Beam: the width of a boat at its widest part
Beam: the width of a boat at its widest part
Bilge: the lower interior of the hull of the boat
Bilge: the lower interior of the hull of the boat
Bitter end: the end of a line also the end of an anchor line
Bitter end: the end of a line also the end of an anchor line
Bow: the front, or forward part of the boat
Bow: the front, or forward part of the boat
Bulkhead: the vertical partition or wall of a boat
Bulkhead: the vertical partition or wall of a boat
11-1
11-1
CHAPTER 11
CHAPTER 11
Cast off: to let go or release
Cast off: to let go or release
Chine: the line fore and aft formed by the intersection of the side and
bottom of the boat
Chine: the line fore and aft formed by the intersection of the side and
bottom of the boat
Chock: deck fitting used to secure or guide anchor or tie lines
Chock: deck fitting used to secure or guide anchor or tie lines
Cleat: deck fitting with protruding arms around which lines are secured
Cleat: deck fitting with protruding arms around which lines are secured
Cockpit: the seating space used to accomodate passengers
Cockpit: the seating space used to accomodate passengers
Cuddy: a small cabin in the fore part of the boat
Cuddy: a small cabin in the fore part of the boat
Deck: the open flooring surface on which crew and passengers walk
Deck: the open flooring surface on which crew and passengers walk
Draft the depth from the waterline of the boat to the lowest part of
the boat, which indicates how much water is required to float the boat
Draft the depth from the waterline of the boat to the lowest part of
the boat, which indicates how much water is required to float the boat
Fathom: a measurement of depth; one fathom equals six feet
Fathom: a measurement of depth; one fathom equals six feet
Fender: a cushion hung from the side of a boat to prevent it from
rubbing against a dock or against other boats
Fender: a cushion hung from the side of a boat to prevent it from
rubbing against a dock or against other boats
Fend off: to push off to avoid sharp contact with dock or other vessel
Fend off: to push off to avoid sharp contact with dock or other vessel
Fore: the part of the boat toward the bow or front
Fore: the part of the boat toward the bow or front
Freeboard: the height of the top side from the waterline to the deck
at its shortest point. (The distance from the sheer or gunwale to the
water)
Freeboard: the height of the top side from the waterline to the deck
at its shortest point. (The distance from the sheer or gunwale to the
water)
Galley: cooking area
Galley: cooking area
Gunwale: rail or upper edge of the side of the boat
Gunwale: rail or upper edge of the side of the boat
Hatch: an opening in the deck to provide access below
11-2
Hatch: an opening in the deck to provide access below
11-2
Glossary & Index
Glossary & Index
Head: toilet
Head: toilet
Hull: the part of the hull from the deck down
Hull: the part of the hull from the deck down
Keel: the lowest point of a boat; the backbone of the vessel
Keel: the lowest point of a boat; the backbone of the vessel
Knots: a measurement of speed indicating nautical miles per hour
Knots: a measurement of speed indicating nautical miles per hour
Lee: the side opposite that from which the windHUB
is blowing: the side
sheltered from the wind
BEARING
Lee: the side opposite that from which the windHUB
is blowing: the side
sheltered from the wind
BEARING
NUT
Leeward: the direction toward which the wind isLUG
blowing
WHEEL
PFD: personal floatation device; required for each
person
aboard
LEAF
SPRING
NUT
Leeward: the direction toward which the wind isLUG
blowing
WHEEL
PFD: personal floatation device; required for each
person
aboard
LEAF
SPRING
Port: the left side of the boat when facing forward (an easy way to
remember the difference between “port” and “starboard” is that both
“port” and “left” have four letters)
Port: the left side of the boat when facing forward (an easy way to
remember the difference between “port” and “starboard” is that both
“port” and “left” have four letters)
Shank: the main body of an anchor
Shank: the main body of an anchor
Sheer: the curve of the boat’s deck from fore to aft when seen from
the side
Sheer: the curve of the boat’s deck from fore to aft when seen from
the side
Starboard: the right side of the boat when facing forward
Starboard: the right side of the boat when facing forward
Stern: the aft end of the boat
Stern: the aft end of the boat
Stern drive: an inboard/outboard (IO) unit
Stern drive: an inboard/outboard (IO) unit
Stringer: strengthening integral unit fastened from fore to aft inside
the hull and fiberglass encapsulated for added strength: much like the
skeleton system of our body
Stringer: strengthening integral unit fastened from fore to aft inside
the hull and fiberglass encapsulated for added strength: much like the
skeleton system of our body
Top off: to fill up a tank
Top off: to fill up a tank
Transom: the vertical part of the stern
Transom: the vertical part of the stern
11-3
11-3
CHAPTER 11
CHAPTER 11
Trim: the boat’s balance when properly loaded
Trim: the boat’s balance when properly loaded
Wake: the path of a boat left astern in the water
Wake: the path of a boat left astern in the water
Windward: the direction from which the wind blows; opposite of
leeward
Windward: the direction from which the wind blows; opposite of
leeward
11-4
11-4
Glossary & Index
INDEX
A
Accidents
Accident Reporting
Admirality Law
Aids To Navigation
Alcohol
Anchor Light
Anchoring
Audible Alarms
Audible Producing Devices
Automatic Fire Extinguisher
B
Battery
Battery Switch
Berth Set-Up
Bilge Pump
Blower
Breast Lines
Bucket Seat Operation
4-1
7-16
4-8
6-7
4-5
6-2
7-21
4-4
5-6
5-11
6-8
C
Canvas
INDEX
A
D
1-27
1-28
5-26
2-6
1-25
1-16
5-24
3-11
1-15
3-10
7-25
6-10
7-6
Carbon Monoxide
1-21
Carbon Monoxide Detector
7-23
Capacity Plate
Int-14
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
5-28
Carpet
7-2
Cosmetics
7-1
Collision
2-2
Compass
6-3
Controls
3-5
Corrosion
7-25
Dealer Responsibilities
Depth Sounder
Direct Current (DC)
Distress Signals
Diver’s Flag
Docking
Dock Lines
Drain Plug
Int-15R
3-9
4-1
1-12
1-13
6-4
1-29
5-14
5-11
6-1
E
EPIRB
Electrical
Electrolysis Protection
Engine
Equipment Operation
Exhaust
Explosion
1-20
4-1
7-25
3-1
7-11
9-2
7-26
6-1
1-21
4-10
Fuel
Fuses
Accidents
Accident Reporting
Admirality Law
Aids To Navigation
Alcohol
Anchor Light
Anchoring
Audible Alarms
Audible Producing Devices
Automatic Fire Extinguisher
5-10
7-3
7-21
1-10I
5-27
5-28
Int-11
4-5
4-7
4-13
6-2
7-21
4-10
4-9
11-5
D
1-27
1-28
5-26
2-6
1-25
1-16
5-24
3-11
1-15
3-10
7-25
B
Battery
Battery Switch
Berth Set-Up
Bilge Pump
Blower
Breast Lines
Bucket Seat Operation
F
Fenders
Fiberglass Maintenance
Filters
Fire Extinguishers
Fires
First Aid
Float Plan
Fresh Water System
Glossary & Index
4-1
7-16
4-8
6-7
4-5
6-2
7-21
4-4
5-6
5-11
6-8
C
Canvas
6-10
7-6
Carbon Monoxide
1-21
Carbon Monoxide Detector
7-23
Capacity Plate
Int-14
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
5-28
Carpet
7-2
Cosmetics
7-1
Collision
2-2
Compass
6-3
Controls
3-5
Corrosion
7-25
Dealer Responsibilities
Depth Sounder
Direct Current (DC)
Distress Signals
Diver’s Flag
Docking
Dock Lines
Drain Plug
Int-15R
3-9
4-1
1-12
1-13
6-4
1-29
5-14
5-11
6-1
E
EPIRB
Electrical
Electrolysis Protection
Engine
Equipment Operation
Exhaust
Explosion
1-20
4-1
7-25
3-1
7-11
9-2
7-26
6-1
1-21
4-10
F
Fenders
Fiberglass Maintenance
Filters
Fire Extinguishers
Fires
First Aid
Float Plan
Fresh Water System
Fuel
Fuses
5-10
7-3
7-21
1-10I
5-27
5-28
Int-11
4-5
4-7
4-13
6-2
7-21
4-10
4-9
11-5
CHAPTER 11
CHAPTER 11
INDEX
G
INDEX
G
Garbage Placard
Gas Grill
Gathering Headway
Gauges (Instrumentation)
Gear Shift
Gelcoat Maintenance
General Boating Safety
1-18
6-6
5-16
3-7
3-13
7-3
1-3
Getting Underway
Grounding
5-1
7-23
H
HIN
Head
Horn
Hour Meter
Hull Bottom
Int-9
4-13
6-2
7-21
1-19
4-5
3-7
7-9
I
Ignition Switch
Instruments (Gauges)
Interior Fabrics
International Distress Signals
Interrupt Switch
3-11
3-5
7-3
1-14
3-15
K
Knots
5-2
L
Lights
11-6
1-15
1-19
2-9
Loading
Lanyard
5-20
Int-14
3-15
Launch & Cruise Checklist
Int-12
M
Maneuvering
Maintenance Schedule
Maintaining PFD’S
Marpol Treaty
Masthead Light
Mayday
MerCruiser
Metal (Cleaning)
Minimum Required Equipment
Mooring
5-16
6-2
1-9
5-33
1-16
1-19
1-15
7-15
7-9
1-19
5-12
N
Navigation Aids
Navigation Lights
Navigation Rules
Neutral Safety Switch
New Boat Delivery Checklist
1-18
6-6
5-16
3-7
3-13
7-3
1-3
Getting Underway
Grounding
5-1
7-23
H
HIN
Head
Horn
Hour Meter
Hull Bottom
2-6
1-16
2-1
3-13
Int-17
O
Oil Pressure Gauge
Oil Spills
Overloading
Owner’s Information Packet
Owner’s Registration
Owner Responsibilities
Garbage Placard
Gas Grill
Gathering Headway
Gauges (Instrumentation)
Gear Shift
Gelcoat Maintenance
General Boating Safety
3-7
1-17
Int-14
Int-8
Int-15
Int-15
Int-9
4-13
6-2
7-21
1-19
4-5
3-7
7-9
I
Ignition Switch
Instruments (Gauges)
Interior Fabrics
International Distress Signals
Interrupt Switch
3-11
3-5
7-3
1-14
3-15
K
Knots
5-2
L
Lights
11-6
1-15
1-19
2-9
Loading
Lanyard
5-20
Int-14
3-15
Launch & Cruise Checklist
Int-12
M
Maneuvering
Maintenance Schedule
Maintaining PFD’S
Marpol Treaty
Masthead Light
Mayday
MerCruiser
Metal (Cleaning)
Minimum Required Equipment
Mooring
5-16
6-2
1-9
5-33
1-16
1-19
1-15
7-15
7-9
1-19
5-12
N
Navigation Aids
Navigation Lights
Navigation Rules
Neutral Safety Switch
New Boat Delivery Checklist
2-6
1-16
2-1
3-13
Int-17
O
Oil Pressure Gauge
Oil Spills
Overloading
Owner’s Information Packet
Owner’s Registration
Owner Responsibilities
3-7
1-17
Int-14
Int-8
Int-15
Int-15
Glossary & Index
P
Personal Flotation Devices
Plastics
Power Trim
Precautionary Safety Labels
Pre-departure questionaire
Propellers
Propulsion
Pump Out Fittings
P
1-7
1-19
7-2
5-19
1-1
5-1
3-3
7-11
8-3
3-3
7-21
R
Recomissioning
Registration Information
Remote Control
Right-Of-Way
Rules Of The Road
9-5
Int-19
3-13
7-18
8-2
2-2
2-1
S
Safety
Sanitizing Water System
Seating
Shallow Water Operation
Ski Tow
Specifications
Speedometer
Spring Line
Starting & Stopping
Stern Line
Steering
Glossary & Index
Stereo
Stern Drive
Stern Light
Sunbrella canvas cleaning
Swim Ladder
Swim Platform
Switches (DC)
T
Tachometer
Throttle Control
1-1
Int-14
6-2
7-19
5-22
1-31
Tech
3-9
5-11
5-6
5-11
5-8
5-22
7-16
7-26
7-23
3-3
3-13
5-7
5-14
5-16
5-19
7-11
7-25
7-26
9-2
9-5
1-16
7-7
6-5
1-31
4-4
Temperature Gauge
Towing
Turning
Trailering
Trim Angle
Trim Gauge
Troubleshooting
3-7
3-13
8-2
3-8
5-25
5-17
10-1
5-19
3-9
8-1
U
Upholstery
7-1
11-7
Personal Flotation Devices
Plastics
Power Trim
Precautionary Safety Labels
Pre-departure questionaire
Propellers
Propulsion
Pump Out Fittings
1-7
1-19
7-2
5-19
1-1
5-1
3-3
7-11
8-3
3-3
7-21
R
Recomissioning
Registration Information
Remote Control
Right-Of-Way
Rules Of The Road
9-5
Int-19
3-13
7-18
8-2
2-2
2-1
S
Safety
Sanitizing Water System
Seating
Shallow Water Operation
Ski Tow
Specifications
Speedometer
Spring Line
Starting & Stopping
Stern Line
Steering
Stereo
Stern Drive
Stern Light
Sunbrella canvas cleaning
Swim Ladder
Swim Platform
Switches (DC)
T
Tachometer
Throttle Control
1-1
Int-14
6-2
7-19
5-22
1-31
Tech
3-9
5-11
5-6
5-11
5-8
5-22
7-16
7-26
7-23
3-3
3-13
5-7
5-14
5-16
5-19
7-11
7-25
7-26
9-2
9-5
1-16
7-7
6-5
1-31
4-4
Temperature Gauge
Towing
Turning
Trailering
Trim Angle
Trim Gauge
Troubleshooting
3-7
3-13
8-2
3-8
5-25
5-17
10-1
5-19
3-9
8-1
U
Upholstery
7-1
11-7
CHAPTER 11
V
Ventilation
Visibility
Visual Distress Signals
Volt Meter
Volvo
V
1-21
3-2
4-4
5-6
7-24
2-9
5-23
1-12
3-8
7-13
7-25
W
Wake
Warning Labels
Warranty
Waste
Water Skiing
Weather
Winterizing
11-8
Ventilation
Visibility
Visual Distress Signals
Volt Meter
Volvo
1-21
3-2
4-4
5-6
7-24
2-9
5-23
1-12
3-8
7-13
7-25
W
1-33
1-1
Int-18
4-13
7-21
8-5
1-29
1-34
9-1
Z
Zinc Anodes
CHAPTER 11
Wake
Warning Labels
Warranty
Waste
Water Skiing
Weather
Winterizing
1-33
1-1
Int-18
4-13
7-21
8-5
1-29
1-34
9-1
Z
7-25
Zinc Anodes
11-8
7-25
Technical Information
Technical Information
2200 & 2250
2200 & 2250
NOTICE
NOTICE
The following technical information and drawings
are accurate up to the printing date listed at the
beginning of this manual. Note that all product
specifications, models, standard and optional
equipment, systems, along with the technical
information is subject to change without notice.
For more information contact your nearest authorized Regal dealer.
For the location of your nearest authorized dealer call 407-851-4360
or you can contact Regal through the internet: www.regalboats.com
Your Regal dealer has received special factory training on the entire
product line and his services should be employed to solve more technical
problems.
12-1
The following technical information and drawings
are accurate up to the printing date listed at the
beginning of this manual. Note that all product
specifications, models, standard and optional
equipment, systems, along with the technical
information is subject to change without notice.
For more information contact your nearest authorized Regal dealer.
For the location of your nearest authorized dealer call 407-851-4360
or you can contact Regal through the internet: www.regalboats.com
Your Regal dealer has received special factory training on the entire
product line and his services should be employed to solve more technical
problems.
12-1
2 2 0 0 /2 2 5 0 GENERAL S PECIFICATIO NS
2 2 0 0 /2 2 5 0 GENERAL S PECIFICATIO NS
GEN ERAL
SPECIFICATIO N S
U.S.A.
METRIC
GEN ERAL
SPECIFICATIO N S
U.S.A.
METRIC
LEN GTH O VERALL
22' 2"
6.7 M
LEN GTH O VERALL
22' 2"
6.7 M
CEN TERLIN E
LEN GTH
22' 2"
6.7 M
CEN TERLIN E
LEN GTH
22' 2"
6.7 M
BEAM
8' 6"
2.5 M
BEAM
8' 6"
2.5 M
DEADRISE
20 DEGREES
DEADRISE
20 DEGREES
2200=3700 LBS.
1678K G
2200=3700 LBS.
1678K G
2250=4060 LBS.
1841 K G
2250=4060 LBS.
1841 K G
BRIDGE CLEARAN CE
TO P UP
53"
1.3 M
BRIDGE CLEARAN CE
TO P UP
53"
1.3 M
CO CK PIT DEPTH
32"
0.9 M
CO CK PIT DEPTH
32"
0.9 M
DRAFT- DRIVE
DO WN
29"
0.9 M
DRAFT- DRIVE
DO WN
29"
0.9 M
FUEL CAPACITY
55 GALS.
208 L
FUEL CAPACITY
55 GALS.
208 L
MAXIMUM
CAPACITY/
PERSO N S & GEAR
10 PERSO N S
1500 LBS
MAXIMUM
CAPACITY/
PERSO N S & GEAR
10 PERSO N S
1500 LBS
SLEEPIN G CAPACITY
2250
2 PERSO N S
SLEEPIN G CAPACITY
2250
2 PERSO N S
APPRO XIMATE DRY
WEIGHT W/ 5.0L
12-2
APPRO XIMATE DRY
WEIGHT W/ 5.0L
12-2
Technical Information
Technical Information
TYPICAL LABELS & LOCATIONS
CARBON MONIXIDE IS A TASTELESS, ODORLESS AND
INVISIBLE GAS THAT CAN CAUSE DISCOMFORT, SEVERE
AND EVEN DEATH. EXERCISE CAUTION WHILE OPERATING
GENERATOR OR ENGINES IN CONFINED SPACES OR AT
DOCKSIDE. DO NOT ALLOW HULL EXHAUST OUTLETS TO
BECOME BLOCKED OR EXHAUST FUMES CAN BECOME
TRAPPED IN AND AROUND THE CONFINES OF YOUR BOAT,
DURING IDLE AND SLOW CRUISE CONDITIONS, BILGE
BLOWERS SHOULD BE USED.
WARNING
!
DANGER
!
INTERRUPT SWITCH MUST BE ATTACHED TO
OPERATOR WHILE ENGINE IS RUNNING.
QUALIFIED OPERATOR MUST BE IN CONTROL
AT ALL TIMES. READ OWNER'S MANUAL BEFORE USE
NOTE: 2200 SHOWN
WARNING
WARNING
!
STOP ENGINE BEFORE BOARDING
INTERRUPT SWITCH MUST BE ATTACHED TO
OPERATOR WHILE ENGINE IS RUNNING.
QUALIFIED OPERATOR MUST BE IN CONTROL
AT ALL TIMES. READ OWNER'S MANUAL BEFORE USE
NOTE: 2200 SHOWN
WARNING
WARNING
GASOLINE VAPORS CAN EXPLODE. BEFORE STARTING
ENGINE, OPERATE BLOWER 4 MINUTES AND CHECK
ENGINE COMPARTMENT FOR GASOLINE LEAKS OR
VAPORS. RUN BLOWER MOTOR BELOW CRUSING SPEED.
!
WARNING
CARBON MONIXIDE IS A TASTELESS, ODORLESS AND
INVISIBLE GAS THAT CAN CAUSE DISCOMFORT, SEVERE
AND EVEN DEATH. EXERCISE CAUTION WHILE OPERATING
GENERATOR OR ENGINES IN CONFINED SPACES OR AT
DOCKSIDE. DO NOT ALLOW HULL EXHAUST OUTLETS TO
BECOME BLOCKED OR EXHAUST FUMES CAN BECOME
TRAPPED IN AND AROUND THE CONFINES OF YOUR BOAT,
DURING IDLE AND SLOW CRUISE CONDITIONS, BILGE
BLOWERS SHOULD BE USED.
WARNING
!
DANGER
!
!
GASOLINE VAPORS CAN EXPLODE. BEFORE STARTING
ENGINE, OPERATE BLOWER 4 MINUTES AND CHECK
ENGINE COMPARTMENT FOR GASOLINE LEAKS OR
VAPORS. RUN BLOWER MOTOR BELOW CRUSING SPEED.
!
TYPICAL LABELS & LOCATIONS
WARNING
!
LEAKING FUEL IS A FIRE AND
EXPLOSION HAZARD. INSPECT
SYSTEM REGULARLY. EXAMINE
FUEL SYSTEM FOR LEAKS OR
CORROSION AT LEAST ANNUALLY
12-3
!
WARNING
STOP ENGINE BEFORE BOARDING
WARNING
LEAKING FUEL IS A FIRE AND
EXPLOSION HAZARD. INSPECT
SYSTEM REGULARLY. EXAMINE
FUEL SYSTEM FOR LEAKS OR
CORROSION AT LEAST ANNUALLY
12-3
ANTI-SIPHON
VALVE
FUEL FEED
HOSE
FUEL VENT
HOSE
BLOWER
12-4
2200 & 2250
FUEL SYSTEM
2200 & 2250
FUEL SYSTEM
FUEL
TANK
FUEL
TANK
FUEL FILL
HOSE
FUEL/ VENT
DECK
FILL
ANTI-SIPHON
VALVE
FUEL FEED
HOSE
FUEL VENT
HOSE
BLOWER
12-4
FUEL FILL
HOSE
FUEL/ VENT
DECK
FILL
Technical Information
2200 & 2250
FRESH WATER & WASTE SYSTEM
Technical Information
2200 & 2250
FRESH WATER & WASTE SYSTEM
2250 CHEMICAL
HEAD
2250 CHEMICAL
HEAD
DECK PUMPOUT FITTING
(OPTIONAL)
DECK PUMPOUT FITTING
(OPTIONAL)
WET BAR
FAUCET
WET BAR
FAUCET
WATER PUMP
WATER PUMP
WATER TANK
WATER TANK
WATER FILL/
VENT
WATER FILL/
VENT
TRANSOM SHOWER
(OPTIONAL)
12-5
TRANSOM SHOWER
(OPTIONAL)
12-5
Technical Information
BATTERY POS
ENG STARTER POS
ENG STARTER
BATTERY
REVISION DESCRIPTION
DR. BY:
APP. BY:
REV. DATE:
REGAL MARINE INDUSTRIES
2300 JETPORT DRIVE
ORLANDO FLORIDA 32809-7895
TELEPHONE (407) 851-4360
ROUTE TO ENG
GROUND STUD
DRAWING TITLE:
2200-2250 BATTERY CABLE ROUTING
GROUND BLOCK
DATE:
DR. BY:
LATEST REV LET:
SCALE:
APP. BY:
DWG. NO.:
07-15-02
BATTELEC
12-6
Technical Information
FRONT SIDE VIEW
50
OFF
30
ON
#956947
VAC-FORM BATTERY SWITCH BOX
7.5
10
STEREO
MEMORY
PLUG
AFT
BILGE PUMP
DR. BY:
REVISION DESCRIPTION
DOOR HINGE
APP. BY:
REV. DATE:
REGAL MARINE INDUSTRIES
2300 JETPORT DRIVE
ORLANDO FLORIDA 32809-7895
TELEPHONE (407) 851-4360
DRAWING TITLE:
2200-2250 BATTERY SWITCH BOX
DATE:
DR. BY:
LATEST REV LET:
SCALE:
APP. BY:
DWG. NO.:
NTS
X
X
12-8
Technical Information
REAR VIEW
OPTIONAL AMP.
#1571
1/2" BLACK
HOLE PLUG
#155752
KLIXON
BREAKERS
30 AMP
#
KLIXON
BREAKERS
50 AMP
#6 RED
#10 RED
#14 RED
BATT
#14 RED
#147140
BATTERY SWITCH
#956947
AUTO FUSE PANEL
10
7.5
COM
AFT
BILGE PUMP
#1571
HOLE PLUG
STEREO
MEMORY
REVISION DESCRIPTION
DR. BY:
APP. BY:
REV. DATE:
REGAL MARINE INDUSTRIES
2300 JETPORT DRIVE
ORLANDO FLORIDA 32809-7895
TELEPHONE (407) 851-4360
SHEET 2 OF 2
DRAWING TITLE:
2200/2250 (DK/DJ) BATTERY SWITCH BOX
12-9
DATE:
LATEST REV LET:
SCALE:
DR. BY:
APP. BY:
DWG. NO.:
NTS
Technical Information
BILL OF MATERIALS
ITEM QTY.
01
1 500 GPH
02
1
03
1
04
1 132" X 3/4"
05
1
06
1 3"
PART #
48317
48324
1479
1462
W/ENGINE
1400
MATERIAL
BILGE PUMP
SURE BAIL BILGE SWITCH
SMALL BATTERY TRAY
BILGE HOSE
TRIM PUMP
BLOWER
SIZE
01
02
03
04
05
DR. BY:
REVISION DESCRIPTION
APP. BY:
REV. DATE:
REGAL MARINE INDUSTRIES
2300 JETPORT DRIVE
ORLANDO FLORIDA 32809-7895
TELEPHONE (407) 851-4360
06
DRAWING TITLE:
2200-2250 DK/DJ SUMP LAYOUT
DATE:
DR. BY:
LATEST REV LET:
SCALE:
APP. BY:
DWG. NO.:
07-15-02
MDK23A
12-10
Technical Information
TRAILER CONNECTOR PLUG INSERTS
INTO BOAT BOW RECEPTACLE
16 GAUGE BLACK
16 GAUGE GREEN
1
4
2
3
16 GAUGE YELLOW/BLACK
16 GAUGE GREEN
16 GAUGE YELLOW
16 GAUGE BROWN
16 GAUGE WHITE
TRAILER HARNESS
TYPICAL TRAILER PLUG
12-11
TRAILER
CONNECTOR
PLUG
BOAT BOW
RECEPTACLE
Regal Marine Industries, Inc.
2300 Jetport Drive
Orlando, FL 32809-7895
(407) 851-4360
Internet Address: http://www.RegalBoats.com
EMail Address: Regal@RegalBoats.com
OWNER’S MANUAL
2200-2250