Car Solutions QPI-G7-MAIN-V2.0 Installation guide

HP recommended configurations for online
transaction processing: ProLiant DL980
G7, VMA-series Memory Array (VMA) and
Oracle 11gR2 database
When your OLTP application needs extreme performance
Technical white paper
Table of contents
Executive summary............................................................................................................................... 2
Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 3
Solution criteria ................................................................................................................................... 3
Recommended configurations ................................................................................................................ 7
System/Environment setup .................................................................................................................... 8
Storage configuration details ............................................................................................................. 8
DL980 system setup ........................................................................................................................ 13
Oracle database setup ................................................................................................................... 14
VMA-series Memory Array storage setup .......................................................................................... 15
Test assumptions ............................................................................................................................ 16
Bill of materials.................................................................................................................................. 16
Recommended configuration 1 for 6,000 users ................................................................................. 16
Recommended configuration 2 for 13,000 users ............................................................................... 18
Recommended configuration 3 for 26,000 users ............................................................................... 20
Implementing a proof-of-concept .......................................................................................................... 21
Appendix ......................................................................................................................................... 22
Oracle Advanced Compression ....................................................................................................... 22
For more information .......................................................................................................................... 23
Executive summary
Always a critical part of the IT infrastructure, databases are at the heart of a number of trends in IT:
 Demand for large symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) type scalability in a Linux or Microsoft®
Windows® environment
 Complex workloads that demand better response times and increased I/O operations per second
(IOPS)
 Oracle applications and data are growing in size and complexity. Some applications running on
32-bit platforms may be reaching the limits of the architecture, specifically regarding the amount of
addressable memory.
 Organizations are now able to migrate complex solutions from high-cost proprietary systems to
lower-cost Linux or Windows-based systems.
 Organizations are consolidating applications to fewer servers to simplify critical data center
operations. Consolidation can reduce cost, management complexity, and physical space
requirements in the data center.
 Historically, different computer system components have advanced at different relative rates.
Although disk capacity has improved somewhat, disk performance ranks at the bottom with no
significant improvement compared to million-fold boosts by other system components such as
servers.
Online transaction processing (OLTP) applications such as enterprise resource planning (ERP), supply
chain management (SCM), web-based e-commerce systems and even extract, transform and load
(ETL) applications can benefit from the performance of a scale-up architecture. More importantly, the
HP ProLiant DL980 G7 with HP VMA-series Memory Array solution offers the capacity to consolidate
and manage these applications in a single server. Any database application that requires increase in
performance including lower user response times, and higher throughput and IOPS is a candidate for
these configurations.
Systems such as large e-commerce websites that must respond to spikes in demand from large
numbers of users and a high volume of transactions should also see improvement. With these
applications, large amounts of memory are required to maintain connection context for every
database object opened by a user in addition to storage acceleration for significant I/O
performance.
This white paper describes three recommended configurations to support small, medium and large
OLTP solutions, capitalizing on the power of the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server, HP VMA3210
Memory Array appliance, Linux, and Oracle 11gR2 database. The objective of these configurations
is to meet or exceed the demanding OLTP performance requirements, reduce the time to purchase and
implement the solution as well as to minimize any implementation risks.
The recommended configurations described in this paper include the storage configuration, Oracle
database setup, best practices, and a bill of materials.
The configuration information is based on data collected in HP’s solution performance lab and proof
of concept testing.
Target audience: This white paper is intended for system architects and decision makers who have
responsibility for evaluating, purchasing, recommending and/or implementing database applications
based on Oracle databases. Previous knowledge of Linux, Oracle database software, HP ProLiant
servers, and HP VMA-series Memory Array products would be advantageous but is not required.
This white paper describes testing performed in October 2010 and May 2011.
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Introduction
The recommended configurations are based on an online transaction processing (OLTP) workload.
The set of transactions used in the workload is representative of a web-based application.
These transactions allow users to check product availability, place an order for products, pay for their
order, view the status of their order, and schedule delivery of their order. The most common
transactions are placing and paying for an order; these two transactions occur with similar frequency
and occur approximately ten times as frequently as other transactions. Checking for product
availability and the status of an order are simple, read-only transactions. Placing an order for
products, paying for an order, and scheduling delivery of an order include read and write (Insert,
Select, and Update) operations. Placing an order is the most complex transaction, involving multiple
tables. The recommendations provided are most accurate for applications with transactions similar to
those described above. Also these solutions will perform very well for packaged solutions such as
Oracle E-Business Suite, PeopleSoft, Siebel, and SAP. We strongly recommend that you work with
your local HP Reseller or HP Sales Representative to determine the best solution for you.
The objective of the proposed configurations is to:
1. Provide best-in-class performance – You can experience a dramatic increase in performance,
efficiency and reliability with HP servers powered by the massively scalable and highly reliable
Intel® Xeon® processor E7 family. Built to handle demanding applications, the Intel Xeon
processor E7 family delivers a quantum leap in enterprise computing performance and delivers
performance scalability that takes server consolidation to the next level. You’ll also get the
reliability that you need to run your applications with complete confidence, while maintaining data
integrity and minimizing downtime.
2. Reduce the risk to implement database solutions – These recommended configurations provide a
balance of CPU, memory and I/O capacity specifically optimized for database workloads. As a
result, the likelihood of functional or performance problems in your database deployments is
drastically reduced.
3. Reduce the time to implement database solutions on HP servers – By using the configuration details
described in this document the time to deploy the database and its application can be reduced.
4. Simplify the purchasing process for well-defined HP server configurations – The recommended
configurations may be implemented as is or used as a starting point for a semi-custom
configuration. In either case, the expectation is that IT can make quicker and more informed
decisions to purchase the optimal configuration for the application.
Solution criteria
Table 1 below shows details of the three workloads in terms of the maximum user count, database
size, business transactions/hour, and storage type. These values are the estimated maximum values
for the recommended configurations listed in this document. The maximum values are not listed for all
possible server configurations. A business transaction has to do with a business function, for example,
check status of an order or view an invoice. It is not possible to make a direct comparison between a
sustained business transaction volume and transactions per minute (TPM). Business transactions are
made up of several individual SQL transactions required to satisfy the business request rather than a
total of the individual SQL transactions. Some batch and reporting requirements are essential elements
of most OLTP environments. If your environment has extensive batch processing and/or reporting
requirements, then HP recommends starting with a proof of concept to test your specific workload
before the final configuration is defined. Many other configurations can be created that use
additional hardware and support a greater number of transactions.
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If you need help with a specific Oracle solution or prefer a solution design or sizing based on your
requirements please contact your local HP reseller, HP sales representative, or the HP Oracle Solution
Center in your region.
Table 1. Recommended Configuration metrics and storage type options
Number
HP ProLiant
Server Model
User Count
Database Size
TB
Business
OLTP Transactions
per Hour
Storage
Type
1
DL980 G7 (4p/32c)
6,000
8
35,000,000
Flash
2
DL980 G7 (4p/40c)
13,000
15
70,000,000
Flash
3
DL980 G7 (8p/80c)
26,000
25
150,000,000
Flash
The first configuration using four Intel Xeon E7-2830 processors utilizes direct attached storage (DAS)
with two HP VMA controllers and Memory Arrays. The second configuration using four Intel Xeon
E7-4870 processors utilizes DAS with four HP VMA Memory Arrays and the third configuration uses
eight Intel Xeon E7-4870 processors with eight HP VMA Memory Arrays. Additional information on
these VMA products can be found in the Storage configuration details section.
The tables below list the supported Intel Xeon processors, memory DIMMs, and PCI expansion slots
for the ProLiant DL980 G7 server. This information is included to help determine how the
recommended configurations can be modified to support different workload sizes or user
combinations.
Table 2. Supported E7 Family Processors
Cores
Max Cores in a
DL980 G7
E7-4870 (30MB Cache, 2.4GHz, 130W, 6.4 GT/s QPI)
10
80
E7-2860 (24MB Cache, 2.26GHz, 130W, 6.4 GT/s QPI)
10
80
E7-2850 (24MB Cache, 2.00GHz, 130W, 6.4 GT/s QPI)
10
80
E7-2830 (24M Cache, 2.13 GHz, 105W, 6.4 GT/s QPI)
8
64
E7-4807 (18M Cache, 1.86GHz, 95W, 4.8 GT/s QPI )
6
48
Processor Type Intel Xeon
Note:
The Intel Xeon processor E7 series supports Hyper-Threading (HT). HT is
recommended and was tested in our configurations. However it is good
practice to test HT with your particular application.
4
Table 3. Supported Memory DIMMs
Memory Kits
Rank
HP 4GB 1Rx4 PC3-10600R-9
Single
HP 4GB PC3L-10600R-9 512Mx
Single
HP 8GB 2Rx4 PC3-10600R-9
Dual
HP 8GB 2Rx4 PC3L-10600R-9, 512Mx RoHS
Dual
HP 16GB 2Rx4 PC3L-10600R-9
Dual
HP 16GB 4Rx4 PC3-8500R-7
Quad
PC3L = low voltage memory
Table 4 represents the minimum, middle, and maximum memory combinations possible for the 4, 8,
and 16 GB memory kits available for the DL980 G7 servers. However, for best performance use dual
or quad rank memory DIMMs.
Table 4. Minimum, middle, and maximum memory for 4 and 8 processor configurations
Number of
CPUs
Memory Density
(GB)
Total Memory
Cartridges
Min Memory
(GB)
Mid Memory
(GB)
Max Memory
(GB)
4
4
8
64
128
256
4
8
8
128
256
512
4
16
8
256
512
1024
8
4
16
128
256
512
8
8
16
256
512
1024
8
16
16
512
1024
2048
Note:
Max memory depends on the number of processors configured. Four/eight
processor configurations support up to 1TB/2TB of memory, respectively.
However Red Hat 5.6 only supports up to 1TB. Red Hat 6.x will expand
memory support for Oracle once it is available.
Table 5. VMA supported Expansion Slot Configurations
Expansion Slots
 Standard Main I/O with 5 Gen2 slots: (3) x4 PCI-Express; (2) x8 PCI-Express
 PCIe Option with 6 slots: (1) x4 Gen1 PCI-Express; (1) x4 Gen2 PCI-Express (4) x8 Gen2 PCI-Express
 Low Profile Expansion Option with 5 Gen2 slots; (1) x4 PCI-Express; (4) x8 PCI-Express
5
Note:
The PCI-X and PCIe Combination Option slots are not to be used for HP
VMA-series Memory Arrays.
I/O slots capable of bi-directional x8 PCIe provide the best performance. The DL980 G7 server
comes with the Standard Main I/O board with PCIe slots 7-11. Slots 9 and 11 are x8 Gen2 PCIe
slots. The PCIe expander option provides additional I/O slots 1-6. Slots 2, 3, 5 and 6 are x8 Gen2
PCIe slots. The low profile expansion option provides additional I/O slots 12-16. Slots 12, 13, 15,
and 16 are x8 Gen2 PCIe slots. For configuration three, the DL980 with eight VMA arrays requires
eight PCIe slots. In order to get the best performance for configurations two and three you will need to
also install the low profile expansion option to optimize performance with the PCIe x8 slots. If a VMA
Array is ordered with a DL980 G7, PCIe Option I/O Expansion (588137-B21) is integrated
regardless. If 3 or more (up to 8) VMA Arrays are ordered with the DL980 G7, the low profile PCIe
Option (AM434A) is automatically integrated. Table 6 provides the recommended slot locations
occupied by the VMA pass-thru cards for each configuration.
Table 6. HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server with HP VMA PCIe slot configurations
Configuration
Number of
HP VMA arrays
DL980 PCIe x8
slots needed
Recommended PCIe x8
I/O slot #
Slot Type
1
2
2
2, 5
x8 Gen2 PCIe
2
4
4
2, 5, 9, 11
x8 Gen2 PCIe
3
8
8
2, 3, 5, 9, 11, 12, 13, 15
x8 Gen2 PCIe
If an add-on SAS controller is installed into the DL980 it may be possible the SAS controller could
interfere with the performance of any VMA pass-thru cards installed in PCIe x8 slots 9 and 11 on
the Standard Main I/O. You may want to move any VMA pass-thru cards to alternate PCIe x8 slots
6 and 16.
Note:
It is not supported to use slot 1 for any HP VMA PCIe Pass Thru Cards
due to low I/O performance (PCI-x 100 MHz).
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Recommended configurations
The detailed information for these recommended configurations includes the server, number and type
of processors, memory, internal and external storage. The configurations were evaluated for a given
workload: concurrent users, I/O operations per second, transactions/hour, and database size. The
configurations are based on testing done in HP’s performance integration lab to support the
implementation of online transaction processing servers using HP ProLiant servers running Red Hat
Linux and Oracle 11gR2 Enterprise Edition.
The configurations were determined based on the following utilization criteria:
 CPU utilization of approximately 75% at the target workload
 Buffer cache hit ratio of no less than 98% (indicating that the majority of the active database buffers
are in physical memory)
 Disk I/O activity reflects a read/write ratio of approximately 80/20
HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server configurations examples:
 4 or 8 processors
 256 - 1024 GB of memory (4P upgradeable to 1TB) (8P upgradeable to 2TB)
 8, 15 and 25 TB database sizes
 35 million business trans/hr (6,000 users), 70 million business trans/hr (13,000 users) and 150
million trans/hr (26,000 users)
 Storage – 2, 4 or 8 VMA3210 Memory Arrays
Table 7. HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server configurations
Number
CPUs
CPU Type
Memory
GB
External Storage
Users
Transactions
/hr
Database
size
TB
1
4
Intel Xeon E7-2830
(24M Cache, 2.13 GHz,
105W, 6.4 GT/s QPI)
256
(2) VMA3210
Memory Arrays
6,000
35,000,000
8
2
4
Xeon E7-4870
(30MB Cache, 2.4GHz,
130W, 6.4 GT/s QPI)
512
(4) VMA3210
Memory Arrays
13,000
70,000,000
15
3
8
Xeon E7-4870
(30MB Cache, 2.4GHz,
130W, 6.4 GT/s QPI)
1024
(8) VMA3210
Memory Arrays
26,000
150,000,000
25
Note:
Currently this reference solution is supported with Red Hat Linux 5.6, with
support for Windows Server 2008 R2 shortly after initial release.
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Figure 1. HP ProLiant DL980 G7 with eight internal drives and an optical DVD
System/Environment setup
Storage configuration details
Internal storage
The DL980 G7 OLTP recommended configurations use four internal drives configured with RAID1 for
the OS and 11gR2 software. The server supports up to eight internal drives, so additional drives can
be added for staging data, logs, or other requirements.
Table 8. Internal storage controllers
Database Server
Internal Storage Controller
 HP Smart Array P410i/Zero Memory Controller (RAID 0/1/1+0)
DL980 G7
 Available upgrades: 512MB with BBWC, Battery kit upgrade (for BBWC), 512MB Flash Backed
Write Cache (FBWC), 1G Flash Backed Write Cache, and Smart Array Advanced Pack (SAAP)
External storage
VMA3210 Memory Array
Hewlett Packard’s VMA-series Memory Arrays are external systems offering high capacities of solid
state storage, using hot-swappable flash memory devices. The VMA-series Memory Arrays feature
rackable external solid state storage in capacities ranging from 5TB to 10TB per Single-level Cell
(SLC) array. Multiple arrays can create scalable capacities up to petabytes of solid state storage.
The arrays are designed for customers who need low-latency response times, very high I/O
performance, and large capacity. Solid state memory technology provides these storage products
with no-moving-parts reliability and low power and cooling requirements. These arrays offer a choice
of PCIe-direct attach or Fibre Channel SAN attach. PCIe-direct attach with rackmount servers offers
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lowest latency speeds for single-server applications. Fibre Channel SAN attach with either blade or
rackmount servers allows multiple servers to operate on the same shared data, with practically
unlimited amounts of solid state storage.
The VMA3210 Memory Array is a 3U appliance that provides solid state storage to servers. The
VMA-series Memory Array eliminates the seek-bound limitations of rotating disk storage and delivers
significant application performance benefits over traditional storage systems that utilize hundreds of
hard disk drives (HDDs). VMA-series Memory Arrays have practically unlimited scalability – the very
large capacities that can be created with VMA-series arrays enable users to place entire databases
into solid state memory without needing to architect their solution around limited capacity solid state
drives.
Using a massively parallel architecture with distributed garbage collection implemented in hardware,
each VMA-series Memory Array with Single Layer Cell (SLC) NAND Flash delivers sustained DRAMlike performance that is an order of magnitude faster than a similar size HDD array:
 1.4 GB/s bandwidth
 350K Random Read IOPS
 Delivers up to 240K Sustained Random Write IOPS (4K block with RAID)
 Up to 10TB raw capacity and 6TB Usable flash storage (if configured for best performance)
 Low latency Flash 4 + 1 parity RAID
– Reads: 80 micro seconds
– Writes: 25 micro seconds
– Non-blocking Erases ensures consistent low-latency Reads
 Significant application performance
 90% reduction in cost, power, and cooling for similar performance
 Power-safe writes without batteries
The configuration used to achieve highest performance consists of attaching the VMA directly to the
PCIe slots in the back of the DL980 server using VMA Direct Attach PCIe x8 pass thru cards. This is
the configuration used in the three solutions described in this paper. VMA can also be configured via
Fibre Channel via a 2U HP VMA SAN Gateway that provides LUN management functions. A
maximum of two VMA memory arrays are supported behind one VMA SAN Gateway for Fibre
Channel SAN attach. However, latency will be higher than that achieved with direct attach pass thru
cards. If an active-active highly available solution is required using Oracle Real Application Clusters
(RAC) then you could use a combination of the HP VMA SAN Gateway with the VMAs to provide a
shared storage configuration.
Table 9. DL980 G7 and VMA Storage Performance and Capacity
Attribute
VMA Configuration 1
VMA Configuration 2
VMA Configuration 3
Number of arrays
2
4
8
Potential IOPS
600,000
1,200,000
2,400,000
Bandwidth (GB/s)
2.8
5.6
11.2
Capacity (RAW)
20TB
40TB
80TB
Capacity (Useable)
12TB
24TB
48TB
9
When the active data of large-scale and high performance applications using Oracle databases is
assigned to VMA appliances, dramatic application acceleration and much higher CPU utilization is
achieved. This enables the data center by supporting high performance random I/O without the need
for large DRAM server footprints or thousands of spinning HDDs.
Each VMA3210 is populated with 84 x 128GB solid state memory (SSM) Modules based on Single
Layer Cell (SLC) flash memory devices. VMA Switched Memory technology and VMA’s Flash RAID
provide the system with its industry-leading scalability, data reliability and efficiency:
 Hot swappable flash memory modules with 4+1 RAID and 4 spares
 System power: less than 120W per Useable Terabyte
 Endurance: greater than 8TB Writes per Hour for 5 Years
 Redundant power supplies and cooling are provided in all VMA-series Memory Array systems.
Manageability is built into the system with an on board management controller.
 Built-in management processor with command line interface
 Front panel status icons and internal status LEDs on each memory board
 Appliance with factory-installed VMA controller software.
The optional FC SAN Gateway appliance and vShare software supports a web-based user interface.
Figure 2 shows a single VMA-series Memory Array.
Figure 2. VMA3210 Memory Array
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Figure 3 depicts the direct connectivity to the server.
Figure 3. Depicts the direct connections between the VMA units and the DL980 server
Note:
Factory Integration and racking is supported for DL980 servers ordered
with VMA-series Memory Array and PCIe-direct options.
HP Care Pack Services: Packaged server and storage services for increased
uptime, productivity and ROI.
Additional external storage requirements
A typical data center will have some sort of shared conventional storage for the various applications
based on performance needs and business storage requirements. Most business solutions will have
requirements for multiple environments besides the primary production storage requirements such as
development, test, quality, training, sandbox and backup. Each of these additional environments
typically will require their own storage solution. Many of these non-production environments do not
require the extreme performance of the production solutions and therefore can be hosted on lower
cost, higher capacity storage solutions. The HP P6000/Enterprise Virtual Array (EVA) disk array could
make a great backup solution for the VMA units.
There are at least three options to hosting the storage for these other environment requirements:
 Use the same storage architecture as production
 Use existing conventional storage in the current data center such as a storage area network (SAN)
 Add additional disk array storage
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This reference architecture includes additional conventional storage recommendations for these
multiple non-production environments. However, you can substitute an existing SAN solution or add
additional VMA arrays to satisfy these non-production requirements.
HP P6300 EVA – The HP P6000 Enterprise Virtual Array (EVA) is an enterprise class virtual storage
array family for midsized customers at an affordable price. With built in virtualization, the P6000
EVA is designed to improve capacity utilization and be easy to manage, which lowers the cost of
ownership compared to traditional arrays. These arrays have high performance, scale easily, and are
highly reliable and available. The P6000 EVA is a trusted platform for enterprise application
consolidation with solutions for Microsoft Exchange and SQL Server, Oracle, and SAP. It also is a
great platform for all non-production environments.
The HP P6000 EVA family is the next generation of EVA with two new models: P6300 EVA and
P6500 EVA. The P6000 EVA family supports Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) disk drives with a wide
range of Small Form Factor (SFF) SAS drives, Large Form Factor (LFF) SAS drives, or combinations of
both, to better match customer storage capacity, performance, power, and availability needs. The
P6000 EVA models are available with Fibre Channel host ports only, or Fibre Channel and 1Gb/s
iSCSI host ports, or Fibre Channel and 10Gb/s iSCSI/FCoE host ports. P6000 EVA is also very
energy efficient, with high efficiency power supplies for both the controllers and disk drive enclosures,
with temperature sensing, self-adjusting variable speed fans.
HP P6000 Command View management software now includes Thin Provisioning, which helps reduce
the storage capacity required, to help reduce the number of disks needed, and thus reduce power
and cooling costs. P6000 EVA also offers robust local and remote replication capabilities with HP
P6000 Business Copy and HP P6000 Continuous Access software. P6000 Business Copy now also
supports Dynamic LUN and RAID migration, where in one step the user can change the characteristics
of an existing LUN, such as size, RAID type, or disk type while the host I/O operation is active. This
feature is useful, for example, to move data to more space efficient storage tiers or to move a heavily
accessed LUN to a different disk group to improve performance.
The reference configurations deploy two disk groups within the EVA. For example, the
test/development database volumes are in one disk group and the archive logs, flashback recovery,
and RMAN backup volumes are in the second disk group. HP 6300 Enterprise Virtual Arrays are
configured and managed using the HP Command View EVA Software.
Note:
Always check HP’s Single Point of Connectivity Knowledge (SPOCK)
compatibility and interoperability matrix for a “configuration set” of
Storage Area Network (SAN) components. It is also very important to
examine the notes in each section, because they may further limit or clarify
supported configurations.
See http://www.hp.com/storage/spock (requires an HP Passport account).
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Figure 4 shows a sample drive configuration for the P6300 EVA.
Figure 4. P6300 EVA logical drive configuration for the additional nonproduction environments
DL980 system setup
When setting up the DL980 for an Oracle database there are a few best practices that will provide
improved performance and proper configuration.
 If the DL980 G7 has 1.0TB or more of RAM, the BIOS System Address Mode should be set to
44-bit. By default this is set to 40-bit.
 Spread the same size DIMM memory evenly across all memory cartridge sockets for maximum
performance. For the two 4-socket configurations it is best to populate all memory slots associated
with those four CPUs. For the 8-socket configuration install memory DIMMs across all memory
sockets of the eight CPUs for optimum NUMA performance.
 Use only dual or quad rank DIMMs as they are faster than single rank DIMMs.
 Configure per DL980 best practices to minimize memory latencies.
 If the application has parallelism that will work optimally with Hyper-Threading, leaving it enabled
in the BIOS could result in significance improvement. If not, Hyper-Threading can cause a drop in
overall performance. We saw up to 30% improvement in our testing by turning Hyper-Threading
on. Make sure to test it for your particular workload.
 Use the PCI-Express x8 slots for critical disk I/O.
 If connecting three or more HP VMAs, for optimal performance install the Low Profile PCIe
expansion option.
 Distribute PCIe pass-thru cards evenly across the available I/O bays and I/O hubs.
 Install and configure the NUMA packages.
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 Enable the Hardware Prefetcher. The Hardware Prefetcher proactively collects data from the
memory to the cache in order to reduce response time. If the application is memory intensive, this
enablement may have a negative impact on the performance.
 In the BIOS menu under Power Management Options set the HP Power Profile to Maximum
Performance.
 For environments not running Virtual Machines – Disable Virtualization support in the BIOS as well
as INTEL VT-D.
 By default Drive Write Cache is Disable and should remain disabled using VMA attached storage.
 Do not use slot 1 for any HP VMA PCIe Pass Thru Cards. It is a PCI-x Gen1 slot.
 Set HUGE pages for system global area (SGA) to 2MB. The main advantages of creating an SGA
using huge pages has to do with increased performance from improving the translation lookaside
buffer (TLB) hit ratio and reducing the memory footprint required for mapping the SGA.
Oracle database setup
Location of Oracle 11gR2 binaries
The Oracle database software should be installed separately from the storage used for the database
instance itself. The recommended configurations are designed with the intent that the Oracle binaries
be placed on the same drives as the OS. There is no performance benefit to separating the OS and
Oracle binaries on different drives, though some customers will chose to do so to simplify system
backup and maintenance operations.
Oracle databases location
For the HP VMA storage configuration it is recommended that the Oracle database components, such
as data, indexes, undo, temp and redo, should be managed with Oracle Automatic Storage
Management (ASM) to stripe across the storage arrays. ASM should be used in “external
redundancy” mode, since the VMA arrays themselves will provide the RAID level protection for the
databases.
The HP P6300 EVA is used for additional database storage requirements such as database backups,
flash recovery area, storing archive logs, test, QA, training, sandbox and development environments.
There is fibre channel connectivity between the P6300 EVA and the production and test/dev DL980
servers through a pair of fibre channel switches.
Memory allocation for OS
In an Oracle 11gR2 setup it is recommended to use any extra memory available on the system for the
system global area (SGA). This can improve I/O performance. Leave 10% of the memory available
for the operating system and about 4% for buffer cache.
Patching
Make sure the Linux operating system and Oracle database is patched to current patch releases for
best performance and problem resolution. Please refer to the Oracle database installation guide and
release notes for recommended patch, OS, and database parameter recommendations.
Other best practice recommendations you may want to consider:
 Enable NUMA mode by setting the Oracle database parameter:
– _enable_NUMA_support = true
– If NUMA is enabled, alert.log will trace it as “NUMA system found and support enabled”
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 We recommend disabling automatic memory management:
– SGA_TARGET = 0
– MEMORY_TARGET = 0
(Oracle DB 11g)
– MEMORY_MAX_TARGET = 0
(Oracle DB 11g)
 Set automatic memory management for the program global area (PGA):
– PGA_AGGREGATE_TARGET and WORK_AREA_POLICY set to AUTO
VMA-series Memory Array storage setup
VMA arrays can be connected directly to existing hardware or can be combined into a hardware
refresh or new opportunities. The following best practices are recommended when using the DL980
and VMA in an Oracle database environment:
 The first step towards installing the VMA drivers is to ensure that all of the required VMA packages
are installed on the host server prior to the installation and configuration of the VMA driver.
 The VMA arrays are pre-formatted at 65% of the available storage for improved write performance.
 Slots capable of bi-directional x8 PCIe provide the best performance.
 On the server enable asynchronous I/O.
 Flash-based memory arrays are designed for 4KB block access or any multiple of 4KB blocks.
Smaller block sizes (for example, 512 bytes) will significantly reduce performance, particularly for
writes. Therefore, it is import that you verify whether the file system and operating system are 4KB
aligned.
 Use the Parted software tool to create 4 to 16 partitions across each array and leverage ASM to
concatenate the volumes into a common disk group or groups.
– Be sure to set the offset in Parted to 1MB to ensure a 4KB boundary for I/O.
– 512B partitions start at 2048s
– 4096B partitions start at 256s
 Balance the workload evenly across all VMA Arrays.
– Depending on your workload set the allocation unit (AU) to 1MB or 4MB. When using Oracle
Automatic Storage Management (ASM), you have an option to enable software mirroring. Our
recommendation is not to implement Oracle ASM mirroring because the arrays are designed to
meet five 9s of high availability without incurring the I/O overhead of Oracle mirroring or the
50% reduction in usable storage space.
 Recommended to increase the I/O Q-depth to 256 on the DL980 (default is 16).
 It is best to use dual 208V power cords/supplies for most optimal performance.
 For applications that require high availability, the use of Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC) is
fully supported; however, it is not required. For customers that are using Oracle Enterprise Edition,
Oracle Data Guard configured with Fast Failover is the recommended high availability solution.
This solution is a good match for the simplicity of the HP VMA configuration. There are also other
replication products that are fully supported with VMA arrays.
 HP and Oracle both recommend using the Linux kernel’s Huge Pages feature (which necessitates the
disabling of Oracle Automatic Memory Management).
15
Test assumptions
 These configurations are examples; there are many additional server/storage options which could
also meet the workload requirements.
 Testing has not been performed to date on each of these exact configurations. The configurations
are based on best practices, benchmarks, extrapolation based on current test knowledge, and
performance assumptions through discussions with Oracle and HP experts.
 No consideration at this point has been given for spares, recovery storage groups, clusters, etc.;
nevertheless, all of these options can be added to the base configurations.
Note:
One PCIe Pass Thru Card is required with each Memory Array and is used
to connect the array to the external server. The card must be installed in the
target server (for the PCI-direct attach method)
Bill of materials
Recommended configuration 1 for 6,000 users
Figure 5. Oracle Database 11gR2 online transaction processing (OLTP) 6000 user solution
16
Table 10. Bill of materials – Configuration 1 – DL980 G7 4P with (2) VMA3210 Memory Arrays
Qty
Description
Production Database Server Configuration
1
HP ProLiant DL980 G7 CTO system
1
HP DL980 G7 E7-2830 FIO 4-processor Kit
4
HP 1200W CS Platinum Power Supply kit
32
HP 8GB 2Rx4 PC3-10600R-9 kit
1
HP Slim 12.7mm SATA DVD Optical kit
1
PCI Express I/O Exp. Kit
2
HP 8Gb Dual Port PCIe FC HBA
1
Dual Port 10GbE Server Adapter
4
HP 72GB 6G SAS 15k 2.5in DP ENT HDD
Test/Dev Database Server Configuration
1
HP ProLiant DL980 G7 CTO system
1
HP DL980 G7 E7-2830 FIO 4-processor Kit
4
HP 1200W CS Platinum Power Supply kit
16
HP 8GB 2Rx4 PC3-10600R-9 kit
1
HP Slim 12.7mm SATA DVD Optical kit
1
PCI Express I/O Exp. Kit
2
Dual port 8 Gb FC HBA
1
Dual Port 10GbE Server Adapter
4
HP 72GB 6G SAS 15k 2.5in DP ENT HDD
Storage Configuration
2
HP VMA3210 10TB SLC Memory Array with PCIe 20 Gbit/s Interface
2
HP VMA PCIe Pass Thru Card, Dual Port PCIe x8 Interfaces
2
24 port 8Gb/s Fibre Channel Switches
1
HP P6300 Enterprise Virtual Array dual controller with dual embedded switch option with 86
300GB 10K rpm SFF 6Gb/s SAS HDD
Other
2
24 port 10GbE Switches
17
Recommended configuration 2 for 13,000 users
Figure 6. Oracle Database 11gR2 online transaction processing (OLTP) 13,000 user solution
Table 11. Bill of materials – Configuration 2 – DL980 G7 4P with (4) VMA3210 Memory Arrays
Qty
Description
Production Database Server Configuration
18
1
HP ProLiant DL980 G7 CTO system
1
HP DL980 G7 E7-4870 FIO 4-processor Kit
4
HP 1200W CS Platinum Power Supply kit
64
HP 8GB 2Rx4 PC3-10600R-9 kit
1
HP Slim 12.7mm SATA DVD Optical kit
1
PCI Express I/O Exp. Kit
2
HP 8Gb Dual Port PCIe FC HBA
1
Dual Port 10GbE Server Adapter
Qty
4
Description
HP 72GB 6G SAS 15k 2.5in DP ENT HDD
Test/Dev Database Server Configuration
1
HP ProLiant DL980 G7 CTO system
1
HP DL980 G7 E7-2830 FIO 4-processor Kit
4
HP 1200W CS Platinum Power Supply kit
16
HP 8GB 2Rx4 PC3-10600R-9 kit
1
HP Slim 12.7mm SATA DVD Optical kit
1
PCI Express I/O Exp. Kit
2
Dual port 8 Gb FC HBA
1
Dual Port 10GbE Server Adapter
4
HP 72GB 6G SAS 15k 2.5in DP ENT HDD
Storage Configuration
4
HP VMA3210 10TB SLC Memory Array with PCIe 20 Gbit/s Interface
4
HP VMA PCIe Pass Thru Card, Dual Port PCIe x8 Interfaces
2
24 port 8Gb/s Fibre Channel Switches
1
HP P6300 Enterprise Virtual Array dual controller with dual embedded switch option with 170
300GB 10K rpm SFF 6Gb/s SAS HDD
Other
2
24 port 10GbE Switches
19
Recommended configuration 3 for 26,000 users
Figure 7. Oracle Database 11gR2 online transaction processing (OLTP) 26,000 user solution
Table 12. Bill of materials – Configuration 3 – DL980 G7 8P with (8) VMA3210 Memory Arrays
Qty
Description
Production Database Server Configuration
1
HP ProLiant DL980 G7 CTO system
2
HP DL980 G7 E7-4870 FIO 4-processor Kit
1
HP DL980 CPU Installation Assembly
4
HP 1200W CS Platinum Power Supply kit
128
20
HP 8GB 2Rx4 PC3-10600R-9 kit
8
HP DL980 G7 Memory Board
1
HP Slim 12.7mm SATA DVD Optical kit
Qty
Description
1
PCI Express I/O Exp. Kit
1
Low Profile PCI Express I/O Expansion Kit
2
HP 8Gb Dual Port PCIe FC HBA
1
Dual Port 10GbE Server Adapter
4
HP 72GB 6G SAS 15k 2.5in DP ENT HDD
Test/Dev Database Server Configuration
1
HP ProLiant DL980 G7 CTO system
1
HP DL980 G7 E7-2830 FIO 4-processor Kit
4
HP 1200W CS Platinum Power Supply kit
16
HP 8GB 2Rx4 PC3-10600R-9 kit
1
HP Slim 12.7mm SATA DVD Optical kit
1
PCI Express I/O Exp. Kit
2
Dual port 8 Gb FC HBA
1
Dual Port 10GbE Server Adapter
4
HP 72GB 6G SAS 15k 2.5in DP ENT HDD
Storage Configuration
8
HP VMA3210 10TB SLC Memory Array with PCIe 20 Gbit/s Interface
8
HP VMA PCIe Pass Thru Card, Dual Port PCIe x8 Interfaces
2
24 port 8Gb/s Fibre Channel Switches
1
HP P6300 Enterprise Virtual Array dual controller with dual embedded switch option with
250 300GB 10K rpm SFF 6Gb/s SAS HDD
Other
2
24 port 10GbE Switches
Implementing a proof-of-concept
As a matter of best practice for all deployments, HP recommends implementing a proof-of-concept
using a test environment that matches as closely as possible the planned production environment. In
this way, appropriate performance and scalability characterizations can be obtained. For help with a
proof-of-concept, contact an HP Sales representative or your HP partner.
21
Appendix
Oracle Advanced Compression
Many customers are looking for solutions that provide a means for reducing the size of their rapidly
growing databases without negatively affecting their end user performance. Oracle 11gR2 offers
integrated database compression to address this requirement.
We often think of compression as being a trade-off between performance and storage: compression
reduces the amount of storage required, but the overhead of compressing and decompressing makes
things slower. However, while there is always some CPU overhead involved in compression the effect
on table scan I/O can be favorable, since if a table is reduced in size it will require fewer I/O
operations to read it.
Prior to 11g, table compression could only be achieved when the table was created, rebuilt or when
using direct load operations. However, in 11gR2, the Advanced Compression option allows data to
be compressed when manipulated by standard DML (Data Manipulation Language). The data
compression feature in Oracle 11gR2 Enterprise Edition reduces the size of tables and indexes while
providing full row level locking for updates. There are two types of compression.
1. Row compression enables storing fixed-length data types in a variable-length storage format.
2. Page compression is a superset of row compression. It minimizes the storage of redundant data on
the page by storing commonly-occurring byte patterns on the page once, and then referencing
these values for respective columns.
Oracle’s Advanced Compression offers three distinct levels: low, medium, and high. HP and Oracle
recommend using the “low” method for best overall OLTP workload performance when data
compression is desired. Oracle has provided a compression algorithm specifically designed to work
with OLTP type workloads. This recommendation is based upon tests performed by HP and Oracle on
industrial-standard x86 hardware (see the reference at the end of this document). Users may wish to
evaluate other compression options to determine if the “medium” or “high” setting offers superior
performance for their specific workload.
As one would expect, Oracle Advanced Data Compression was very effective at reducing disk
utilization of traditional storage arrays. The result was improved data transfer from storage into the
database instance for processing and reduced I/O wait overhead. Testing conducted by HP’s Oracle
Alliances team showed that Advanced Data Compression scaled linearly across the full range of CPU
cores on HP 8-socket servers. All indications are that data compression will have an even greater
positive impact on performance with the VMA series Memory Array solutions.
22
For more information
For additional Oracle solutions from HP, please visit http://www.hp.com/go/oracle
HP VMA-series Memory Array products at www.hp.com/go/VMA; www.hp.com/go/vma-docs
HP ProLiant servers, http://www.hp.com/go/proliant
HP P6000 Enterprise Virtual Array (EVA), http://www.hp.com/go/eva
HP P6300/P6500 Enterprise Virtual Array Best Practice
http://h20195.www2.hp.com/V2/GetDocument.aspx?docname=4AA3-2641ENW
HP Single Point of Connectivity Knowledge (SPOCK) website
http://h20272.www2.hp.com
Open Source and Linux from HP www.hp.com/go/linux
11gR2 Compression Tests using Oracle Enterprise Linux,
http://hporacle.com/-/documents/view.asp?id=765
requires registration at http://hporacle.com
Oracle Database Compression with HP DL785 and EVA: a scalability study,
http://h20195.www2.hp.com/V2/GetDocument.aspx?docname=4AA1-0234ENW&cc=us&lc=en
A complete list of certified third party storage for HP servers can be found at:
www.hp.com/products1/serverconnectivity/mass_storage_devices.html
For assistance with HP VMA Array support and training please send an email to:
hpsupport@vmem.com
Learn more: www.hp.com/services/servers and www.hp.com/services/storage
If you do not know your HP sales or HP partner representative, please do not hesitate to send your
response via e-mail to one of the regional HP Oracle Solution Teams below.



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Americas
Europe / Middle East / Asia
Asia Pacific / Japan
Mexico
Brasil
Other Latin America / Caribbean
ssa@hp.com
oracle-sizing.emea@hp.com
oracle-sizing.apj@hp.com
oracle-sizing.mexico@hp.com
oracle-sizing.brasil@hp.com
oracle-sizing.lac@hp.com
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© Copyright 2010 - 2011 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is
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warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as
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4AA3-2367ENW, Created December 2010; Updated September 2011, Rev. 4