AT&T Merlin Legend BIS22 Instruction manual

AT&T 555-640-118
Issue 1
March 1996
MERLIN LEGEND®
Communications System
Releases 3.1 and 4.0
System Manager’s Guide
Copyright  1996, AT&T
All Rights Reserved
Printed in U.S.A.
AT&T 555-640-118
Issue 1
March 1996
Notice
Every effort was made to ensure that the information in this book was complete and accurate at the time of printing.
However, information is subject to change.
See Appendix A, “Customer Support Information,” for important information.
Your Responsibility for Your System’s Security
Toll fraud is the unauthorized use of your telecommunications system by an unauthorized party, for example, persons
other than your company’s employees, agents, subcontractors, or persons working on your company’s behalf. Note that
there may be a risk of toll fraud associated with your telecommunications system, and if toll fraud occurs, it can result in
substantial additional charges for your telecommunications services.
You and your System Manager are responsible for the security of your system, such as programming and configuring
your equipment to prevent unauthorized use. The System Manager is also responsible for reading all installation,
instruction, and system administration documents provided with this product in order to fully understand the features
that can introduce risk of toll fraud and the steps that can be taken to reduce that risk. AT&T does not warrant that this
product is immune from or will prevent unauthorized use of common-carrier telecommunication services or facilities
accessed through or connected to it. AT&T will not be responsible for any charges that result from such unauthorized
use. For important information regarding your system and toll fraud, see Appendix A, “Customer Support Information.”
Federal Communications Commission Statement
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of
the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the
equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency
energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case
the user will be required to correct the interference at his own expense. For further FCC information, see Appendix A,
“Customer Support Information.”
Canadian Department of Communications (DOC)
Interference Information
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for radio noise emissions set out in the radio interference
regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications.
Le Présent Appareil Numérique n’émet pas de bruits radioélectriques dépassant les limites applicables aux appareils
numériques de la class A préscrites dans le reglement sur le brouillage radioélectrique édicté par le ministère des
Communications du Canada.
Trademarks
5ESS, Accunet, CONVERSANT, DEFINITY, Megacom, MERLIN, MERLIN LEGEND, Magic on Hold, MultiQuest and
PARTNER are registered trademarks and AT&T Attendant, 4ESS, AUDIX Voice Power, Fax Attendant System, MERLIN
MAIL, ExpressRoute 1000, MERLIN PFC, MLX-10, MLX-10D, MLX-10DP, MLX-16DP, MLX-20L, MLX-28D, and
PassageWay are trademarks of AT&T in the U.S. and other countries.
NetPROTECT is a servicemark of AT&T in the U.S. and other countries.
Supra, StarSet, and Mirage are registered trademarks of Plantronics, Inc.
UNIX is a registered trademark of UNIX System Laboratories, Inc.
Microsoft is a registered trademark and Windows a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
PagePac is a registered trademark and PagePal a trademark of DRACON, a division of Harris Corporation.
Macintosh is a registered trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.
Ordering Information
Ordering Information
Call:
AT&T GBCS Publications Fulfillment Center
Voice 1 800 457-1235
Fax 1 800 457-1764
International Voice 317 361-5353
International Fax 317 361-5355
Write:
AT&T GBCS Publications Fulfillment Center
P.O. Box 4100
Crawfordsville, IN 47933
Order:
Document No. AT&T 555-640-118
Comcode: 107713703
Issue 1, March 1996
For more information about AT&T documents, refer to the section entitled, “Related Documents” in “About This Book.”
Support Telephone Number
In the continental U.S., AT&T provides a toll-free customer helpline 24 hours a day. Call the AT&T Helpline at
1 800 628-2888 or your AT&T authorized dealer if you need assistance when installing, programming, or using your
system. Consultation charges may apply. Outside the continental U.S., contact your local AT&T authorized
representative.
AT&T Corporate Security
Whether or not immediate support is required, all toll fraud incidents involving AT&T products or services should be
reported to AT&T Corporate Security at 1 800 821-8235. In addition to recording the incident, AT&T Corporate Security
is available for consultation on security issues, investigation support, referral to law enforcement agencies, and
educational programs.
AT&T Fraud Intervention
If you suspect you are being victimized by toll fraud and you need technical support or assistance, call GBCS National
Service Assistance Center at 1 800 628-2888.
Warranty
AT&T provides a limited warranty on this product. Refer to “Limited Warranty and Limitation of Liability” in Appendix A,
“Customer Support Information.”
MERLIN LEGEND®
Communications System
Releases 3.1 and 4.0
System Manager’s Guide
System Information Sheet
If you have a problem with your system, you may be able to resolve it quickly and easily by
following the appropriate troubleshooting procedure in this guide. If the problem persists or is
not listed in this guide, call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888 for further assistance.
When you call the Helpline, the AT&T representatives can better help you if you have available
the following system information and troubleshooting information. Also, obtain system planning
Form 2c, System Numbering: Trunk Jacks.
System Information
Company Name
(as it appears on the equipment order)
Account Number
(if known)
Main Listed Telephone Number
(for this location)
AT&T Representative’s Name and Phone Number
Troubleshooting Information
Type of equipment experiencing the problem (for example, MERLIN LEGEND Communications
System, MERLIN MAIL, or a particular system component):
A description of the problem:
Has this problem occurred before?
Have you attempted to troubleshoot the problem?
Contents
New Features and Enhancements
n Release 3.1 Enhancements
n Release 4.0 Enhancements
About This Book
n Intended Audience
n How to Use This Book
n Terms and Conventions Used
n Security
n Related Guides
n How to Comment on This Document
1
Read This First
n Overview
n Your Role as System Manager
n The System Planning Forms
n Upgrading the System
n Environmental Requirements
xxi
xxiii
xxvii
xxvii
xxviii
xxx
xxx
xxxi
1–1
1–3
1–5
1–5
1–6
System Manager’s Guide vii
Contents
2
3
4
About the System
n Background
n System Overview
n Incoming Trunks
n Modes of Operation
n Components
n Features
n Applications
n Programming the System
n System Capacities
n Auxiliary Components
n Data Communications Capabilities
System Components
n Control Unit
n Telephones
n Operator Consoles
n Adapters
n Adjuncts
n Power-Related Hardware
Features and Applications
n Features
n Applications
viii System Manager’s Guide
2–2
2–10
2–12
2–16
2–18
2–22
2–22
2–25
2–25
2–26
2–29
3–1
3–14
3–28
3–32
3–35
3–43
4–1
4–50
Contents
5
6
Putting the System to Work
n Scenario 1: A Small Office
n Scenario 2: A Professional Office
n Scenario 3: A Dual-Location Company
n Optimizing Your System
Managing the System
n Using the Task Descriptions
n Using the Programming Procedures
n Introduction to System Programming
n Programming from the Console
n Programming from a PC with SPM
n Centralized Telephone Programming
n Using Reports
n Setting System Date and/or Time
n Backing Up the System
n Adding an Extension
n Moving an Extension
n Removing an Extension
n Changing Calling Restrictions
n Changing Trunk-to-Trunk Transfer Status
n Adding/Removing a Line
n Adding a DLC Operator Position
n Adding a QCC Operator Position
n Adding Operator Features
n Connecting Auxiliary Equipment
n Changing Calling Group Assignments
n Revising Allowed Lists
n Assigning Allowed Lists to Extensions
n Changing Disallowed Lists
n Assigning Disallowed Lists to Extensions
5–2
5–7
5–21
5–30
6–1
6–3
6–5
6–12
6–18
6–22
6–32
6–36
6–37
6–38
6–41
6–42
6–44
6–46
6–47
6–48
6–52
6–54
6–56
6–59
6–61
6–63
6–64
6–66
System Manager’s Guide ix
Contents
Managing the System (continued)
n Changing Group Coverage Assignments
n Revising Night Service with Group Assignment
n Changing Extension Directory Labels
n Changing Trunk Labels
n Changing Posted Message Labels
n Changing Calling Group Labels
n Changing System Directory Labels
7
8
Learning More
n Guides
n System Guides Information Finder
n Training
Troubleshooting the System
n All Phones Are Dead (No Dial Tone or Lights)
n Some Phones Are Dead (No Dial Tone or Lights)
n Difficulty Making Outside Calls
n Phone Does Not Ring
n DLC Console Not Ringing for Incoming Calls
n QCC Console Not Ringing for Incoming Calls
n Single-Line Phones Ring Back after Completed Call
n Cannot Transfer Call after Answer on an Outside Line
n Night Service Not Working
n Calls Not Going to Voice Mail
n Callers Getting Incorrect Response from Voice Mail
n Calls Not Going to Coverage
n Trouble Hearing Called Party
n Programmed Button Fails
x System Manager’s Guide
6–68
6–69
6–70
6–72
6–73
6–74
6–75
7–1
7–14
7–21
8–2
8–3
8–4
8–7
8–9
8–10
8–12
8–13
8–13
8–15
8–16
8–17
8–18
8–18
Contents
A
Troubleshooting the System (continued)
n Reminder Messages Received with the Wrong Time
n Recall/Switchhook Does Not Work
n Calling Group Members Not Receiving Calls
n Other or Unresolved Problems
8–20
Customer Support Information
n Support Telephone Number
n Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
A–1
Electromagnetic Interference Information
A–1
Canadian Department of Communications (DOC)
Interference Information
A–2
FCC Notification and Repair Information
A–2
Installation and Operational Procedures
A–4
DOC Notification and Repair Information
A–5
Renseignements sur la notification du ministère des
Communications du Canada et la réparation
A–6
Security of Your System: Preventing Toll Fraud
A–9
Toll Fraud Prevention
A–10
Other Security Hints
A–16
Limited Warranty and Limitation of Liability
A–20
Remote Administration and Maintenance
A–21
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
B
About Telecommunications
n Telephone Station Equipment
n Transmission Facilities
n Switching Equipment
n Signaling
8–19
8–21
8–22
B–2
B–3
B–5
B–8
System Manager’s Guide xi
Contents
C
System Capacities
D
System Planning Forms
E
Removing/Reinstalling the
Control Unit Housing
n Removing the Control Unit Housing
n Installing the Control Unit Housing
E–2
Glossary
GL-1
Index
IN-1
xii System Manager’s Guide
E–1
Figures
2
About the System
2–1.
2–2.
2–3.
2–4.
2–5.
2–6.
2–7.
2–8.
2–9.
2–10.
3
2–3
2–4
2–7
2–8
2–11
2–15
2–20
2–21
2–24
2–28
System Components
3–1.
3–2.
3–3.
3–4.
3–5.
3–6.
3–7.
3–8.
3–9.
5
The Local Loop
The Telephone Network
The Evolution of Switches
The Switching Office Hierarchy
System Overview
Incoming Trunks
System Components
408 GS/LS-MLX Module
System Applications
Auxiliary System Components
Release 4.0 Processor Module
Power Supply Module
Line/Trunk and Extension Modules
MLX-28D Telephone
MLX-20L Telephone
MLX-16DP Telephone
MLX-10D Telephone
MLX-10 Telephone
Direct Station Selector
3–3
3–4
3–13
3–16
3–17
3–18
3–19
3–20
3–21
Putting the System to Work
5–1.
5–2.
5–3.
5–4.
5–5.
Medical Office Floor Plan
Law Firm Floor Plan
Law Firm Equipment
Law Firm Call Coverage
Dual-Location Company Floor Plans
5–4
5–8
5–15
5–19
5–22
System Manager’s Guide xiii
Figures
6
Managing the System
6–1.
6–2.
6–3.
6–4.
6–5.
6–6.
6–7.
6–8.
6–9.
E
Information Screen
Menu Selection Screen
Data Entry Screen
System Programming Menu Screens
Screen Keys
Station Busy Screen
MLX-20L Telephone with Direct Station Selector (DSS)
Console Buttons and Main Menu
Console Overlay
6–6
6–6
6–7
6–8
6–9
6–10
6–13
6–14
6–15
Removing/Reinstalling the
Control Unit Housing
E–1.
E–2.
E–3.
Removing the Control Unit Housing
Installing the Top Cover
Installing the Front Cover
xiv System Manager’s Guide
E–1
E–3
E–4
Tables
2
About the System
2–1.
3
2–17
System Components
3–1.
3–2.
3–3.
3–4.
3–5.
4
Modes of Operation
Line/Trunk and Extension Modules
Analog Multiline Telephones
Single-Line Telephones
Maximum Number of System Operator Positions
Adjunct Summary
3–6
3–23
3–23
3–28
3–41
Features and Applications
4–1.
4–2.
4–3.
4–4.
4–5.
4–6.
4–7.
4–8.
4–9.
4–10.
4–11.
4–12.
4–13.
Feature Finder: Basic Calling and Answering
Feature Finder: Covering Calls and
Having Calls Covered
Feature Finder: Calling Privileges and Restrictions
Feature Finder: Customizing Phones
Feature Finder: Messaging
Feature Finder: Timekeeping
Feature Finder: System Manager's
Functions and Features
Feature Finder: Special Operator and
Supervisor Features
Selective Coverage Features
Call Coverage and Call Forwarding
Facility Restriction Levels
Application Capacities and Modes of Operation
Voice Messaging Systems
4–5
4–11
4–14
4–16
4–18
4–20
4–21
4–26
4–32
4–34
4–41
4–51
4–55
System Manager’s Guide xv
Tables
5
Putting the System to Work
5–1.
5–2.
5–3.
5–4.
5–5.
5–6.
5–7.
5–8.
5–9.
6
5–2
5–9
5–10
5–11
5–12
5–16
5–20
5–24
5–26
Managing the System
6–1.
6–2.
6–3.
6–4.
6–5.
6–6.
6–7.
6–8.
6–9.
7
Medical Office Needs
Executive Staff Needs
Secretarial Staff Needs
Administrative/Support Staff Needs
Other Needs
Law Firm Call Coverage
Law Firm Calling Restrictions
Work Group Needs
Individual Needs
Typefaces Used in Summary Programming
Procedures
System Programming Menu Options
Screen Keys
Idle States
Exiting System Programming
Features That Can Be Copied: All Telephones
Features That Can Be Copied: Direct-Line Consoles
Only
Maximum Number of Operator Positions
Maximum Number of Operator Positions
6–4
6–8
6–9
6–11
6–18
6–28
6–30
6–49
6–52
Learning More
7–1.
7–2.
7–3.
System Reference Guides Overview
Information Finder: Features
Information Finder: Programming
xvi System Manager’s Guide
7–3
7–14
7–17
Tables
C
System Capacities
C–1. Hardware and Software Capacities
D
C–2
System Planning Forms
D–1. System Planning Forms
D–1
System Manager’s Guide xvii
Tables
xviii System Manager’s Guide
Safety
The exclamation point in an equilateral triangle is
intended to alert the user to the presence of
important operating and maintenance (servicing)
instructions in the literature accompanying the
product.
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
When installing telephone equipment, always follow basic safety precautions to
reduce the risk of fire, electrical shock, and injury to persons, including:
■
Read and understand all instructions.
■
Follow all warnings and instructions marked on or packed with the
product.
■
Never install telephone wiring during a lightning storm.
■
Never install a telephone jack in a wet location unless the jack is
specifically designed for wet locations.
■
Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the
telephone wiring has been disconnected at the network interface.
■
Use caution when installing or modifying telephone lines.
■
Use only AT&T-manufactured MERLIN LEGEND Communications System
circuit modules, carrier assemblies, and power units in the MERLIN
LEGEND Communications System control unit.
■
Use only AT&T-recommended/approved MERLIN LEGEND
Communications System accessories.
■
If equipment connected to the analog extension modules (008, 408, 408
GS/LS) or to the MLX telephone modules (008 MLX, 408 GS/LS-MLX) is
to be used for in-range out-of-building (IROB) applications, IROB
protectors are required.
■
Do not install this product near water, for example, in a wet basement
location.
■
Do not overload wall outlets, as this can result in the risk of fire or
electrical shock.
■
The MERLIN LEGEND Communications System is equipped with a 3-wire
grounding-type plug with a third (grounding) pin. This plug will fit only
into a grounding-type power outlet. This is a safety feature. If you are
unable to insert the plug into the outlet, contact an electrician to replace
the obsolete outlet. Do not defeat the safety purpose of the grounding
plug.
■
The MERLIN LEGEND Communications System requires a
supplementary ground.
System Manager's Guide xix
Safety
■
Do not attach the power supply cord to building surfaces. Do not allow
anything to rest on the power cord. Do not locate this product where the
cord will be abused by persons walking on it.
■
Slots and openings in the module housings are provided for ventilation.
To protect this equipment from overheating, do not block these openings.
■
Never push objects of any kind into this product through module
openings or expansion slots, as they may touch dangerous voltage
points or short out parts, which could result in a risk of fire or electrical
shock. Never spill liquid of any kind on this product.
■
Unplug the product from the wall outlet before cleaning. Use a damp
cloth for cleaning. Do not use cleaners or aerosol cleaners.
■
Auxiliary equipment includes answering machines, alerts, modems, and
fax machines. To connect one of these devices, you must first have a
Multi-Function Module (MFM).
■
Do not operate telephones if chemical gas leakage is suspected in the
area. Use telephones located in some other safe area to report the
trouble.
!
WARNING:
■
For your personal safety, DO NOT install an MFM yourself.
■
ONLY an authorized technician or dealer representative shall install, set
options, or repair an MFM.
■
To eliminate the risk of personal injury due to electrical shock, DO NOT
attempt to install or remove an MFM from your MLX telephone. Opening
or removing the module cover of your telephone may expose you to
dangerous voltages.
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
xx System Manager's Guide
New Features and Enhancements
Release 3.1 Enhancements
Release 3.1 includes all Release 3.0 functionality plus the enhancements listed
below.
■
Call Restriction checking for star codes
Beginning with Release 3.1, the system manager can now add star (*)
codes to Allowed and Disallowed Lists to help prevent toll fraud. Star
codes, typically dialed before an outgoing call, enable telephone users to
obtain special services provided by the central office (CO). For example,
in many areas, a telephone user can dial *67 before a telephone number
to disable central office-supplied caller identification at the receiving
party's telephone. (You must contract with your telephone service
provider to have these codes activated.)
When users dial star codes, the MERLIN LEGEND system's Calling
Restrictions determine whether the codes are allowed. If allowed, the
system's Calling Restrictions are reset, and the remaining digits that the
users dial are checked against the Calling Restrictions.
■
Trunk-to-Trunk Transfer on a per-station basis
This enhancement to the trunk-to-trunk feature enables the system
manager to allow or disallow trunk-to-trunk transfer on a per-station basis.
Beginning with Release 3.1, the default setting for all stations is
restricted.
System Manager's Guide xxi
Release 3.1 Enhancements
■
Programmable Second Dial Tone Timer
Beginning with Release 3.1, the system manager can now assign a
second dial tone timer to lines and trunks to help prevent toll fraud (for
example, when star codes are used). After receiving certain digits dialed
by a user, the CO may provide a second dial tone, prompting the user to
enter more digits. If this second dial tone is delayed, and the user dials
digits before the CO provides the second dial tone, there is a risk of toll
fraud or the call being misrouted. The second dial tone timer enables the
system manger to make sure that the CO is ready to receive more digits
from the caller.
■
A Disallowed List containing numbers frequently associated with toll
fraud
Beginning with Release 3.1, Disallowed List #7 now contains default
entries, which are numbers frequently associated with toll fraud. By
default, Disallowed List #7 is automatically assigned to both generic and
integrated VMI ports used by voice messaging systems. The system
manager must manually assign this list to other ports.
■
Pool Dial-Out Code restriction for all extensions by default
Beginning with Release 3.1, the default setting for the Pool Dial-Out Code
restriction has changed to restricted. No extension or remote access user
with a barrier code has access to pools until the restriction is removed by
the system manager.
■
Outward restrictions for VMI ports by default
Beginning with Release 3.1, ports assigned for use by voice messaging
systems (generic or integrated VMI ports) are now assigned outward
restrictions by default. If a voice messaging system should be allowed to
call out (for example, to send calls to a user's home office), the system
manager must remove these restrictions.
!
Security Alert:
Before removing restrictions, it is strongly recommended that you
read Appendix A: “Customer Support Information.”
■
New default Facility Restriction Level (FRL) for VMI ports
Beginning with Release 3.1, the default FRL for VMI ports has changed to
0, restriction all outcalling.
■
New default FRL for the Default Local Route Table
Beginning with Release 3.1, the default FRL has changed to 2 for the
Default Local Route Table. Now, system managers can easily change an
extension default of 3 to 2 or lower in order to restrict calling. No
adjustment to the route FRL is required.
xxii System Manager's Guide
Release 4.0 Enhancements
■
New maintenance procedure for testing outgoing trunk problems
A password is now required for technicians to perform trunk tests.
!
Security Alert:
The enhancements in Release 3.1 help increase the security of the
MERLIN LEGEND System. To fully utilize these security
enhancements, be sure to read and understand the information in
these upgrade notes.
Release 4.0 Enhancements
Release 4.0 includes all Release 3.1 functionality plus the enhancements listed
below:
■
Support for up to 200 stations
Release 4.0 has an expanded dial plan that supports up to 200 tip/ring
devices.
■
New 016 tip/ring module
This new module supports the 200 station dial plan by providing sixteen
ports for tip/ring devices. Applications that use a tip/ring interface can
connect to this board. All sixteen ports can ring simultaneously. Four
touch-tone receivers (TTRs) are included on the module as well. The
module's ringing frequency (default 20 Hz) can be changed through
programming to 25 Hz for those locations that require it.
■
Support for National ISDN BRI Service
This service provides a low-cost alternative to loop-start and ground-start
trunks for voice and digital data connectivity to the Central Office. Each
of the two B (bearer)- channels on a BRI line can carry one voice or one
data call at any given time. The data speeds on a B-channel are up to
14.4 kbps for analog data and up to 64 kbps for digital data, which is
necessary for video conferencing and other video applications. Release
4.0 supports the IOC Package “S” (basic call handling) service
configuration and Multi-Line Hunt service configuration on designated
CO switches.
■
New 800 NI-BRI module
This new module connects NI-1 BRI trunks to the MERLIN LEGEND
system for high-speed data and video transmission.
System Manager's Guide xxiii
Release 4.0 Enhancements
■
Support for 2B Data applications
Release 4.0 has certified group and desktop video applications that use
two B-channels to make video/data calls from endpoints (stations) that
are enabled to use 2B Data. The endpoints that support these
applications connect to an MLX-port on the MERLIN LEGEND system. 2B
Data applications can make use of the NI-1 BRI, PRI, or T1 Switched 56
network interfaces to make outside connections using one or two data
channels at a time.
■
Support for T1 digital data transmission
Release 4.0 expands its T1 functionality by providing access to digital
data over the public switched 56 kbps network in addition to data TieTrunk services. Users who have T1 facilities for voice services can now
use them for video calls at data rates of 56 kbps per channel (112 kbps
for video calls using two channels). The Release 4.0 T1 offering also
includes point-to-point connectivity over T1 Tie-trunks, allowing
customers to connect two MERLIN LEGEND Communications Systems or
a MERLIN LEGEND Communications System with a DEFINITY
Communications System. The two communications systems can be colocated or off-premises.
■
Delayed Call Forwarding
Each user can program a Forwarding Delay setting for the Forward,
Remote Call Forwarding, or Follow Me features. The forwarding delay is
the number of times that a call rings at the forwarding extension before
the call is sent to the receiver. During the delay period, the user can
screen calls by checking the displayed calling number (if it is available).
The delay can be set at 0 to 9 rings. The factory setting for Forwarding
Delay is 0 rings (no delay).
■
Voice Announce on the QCC
The QCC operator can enable the fifth Call Button to announce a call on
another user’s speakerphone if the destination telephone has a Voice
Announce capable SA button available. A QCC cannot receive Voice
Announce calls; they are received as ringing calls. The factory-set status
for the fifth Call Button is to have Voice Announce disabled.
■
Time-based option for overflow on Calling Group
Release 4.0 has added a time limit for calls in queue in addition to the
previous number limit. If the Overflow Threshold Time is set to a valid
number between 1–900 seconds, calls that remain in the Calling Group
Queue for the set time are sent to the Overflow Receiver. If the Overflow
Threshold Time is set to 0, Overflow by time is turned off. The factory-set
time limit is 0 seconds (Overflow by time off).
■
Downloadable Firmware for 016 T/R board and the NI-BRI board.
The PCMCIA technology introduced in Release 3.0 continues to support
these two new boards in Release 4.0 for installation and upgrade. A
Release 3.0 or later processor is required for PCMCIA technology.
xxiv System Manager's Guide
Release 4.0 Enhancements
■
Single-Line Telephone Enhancements
Disable Transfer. Through centralized telephone programming, the
system manager can disable the ability to transfer calls by removing
all but one SA or ICOM button from the telephone.
No Transfer Return. When a handset bounce in its cradle, the
MERLIN LEGEND system interprets that as a switchhook flash and
attempts to transfer a call. When the transfer attempt period expires,
the user's telephone rings. Release 4.0 eliminates this unintended
ringing by disconnecting the call in situations where a switchhook
flash is followed by an on-hook state when dial tone is present.
Forward Disconnect. All ports on 012 and 016 modules now send
forward disconnect to all devices connected to them when forward
disconnect is received from the CO. This enhancement prevents the
trunk/line form being kept active when one end disconnects from the
call. If an answering machine is connected to the port, it will not
record silence, or busy tones, or other useless messages. This is a
non-administrable operation.
■ 7-digit password for SPM
Release 4.0 has increased system security by requiring a 7-digit password
when using SPM to perform remote administration or when performing the Trunk
Test procedure. This password is to be used in addition to the Remote Access
barrier codes.
System Manager's Guide xxv
Release 4.0 Enhancements
xxvi System Manager's Guide
About This Book
The MERLIN LEGEND Communications System is an advanced digital switching
system that integrates voice and data communications features. Voice features
include traditional telephone features, such as Transfer and Hold, and
advanced features, such as Group Coverage and Park. Data features allow
both voice and data to be transmitted over the same system wiring.
Intended Audience
This book is specifically designed to help you fulfill your role as system manager
of the MERLIN LEGEND Communications System Release 4.0. To use this
guide, you need have little or no knowledge of the system and no particular
experience or expertise.
How to Use This Book
This book provides background information about all aspects of the system,
including system components and features, as well as specific information and
procedures for managing the system.
The first two chapters are especially important as an introduction to the system
and your role as system manager. Therefore, you should read Chapter 1, “Read
This First,” and Chapter 2, “About the System,” if you’re not already familiar with
these topics.
For more detailed information about features, system programming, and system
components, refer to the following system documents:
■
Feature Reference
About This Book xxvii
Terms and Conventions Used
■
System Programming
■
Equipment and Operations Reference
“Related Documents,” later in this chapter, provides a complete list of system
documentation together with ordering information.
In the U.S.A. only, AT&T provides a toll-free customer Helpline 24 hours a day.
Call the Helpline (1 800 628-2888), or your AT&T representative, if you need
assistance when installing, programming, or using your system.
Terms and Conventions Used
The terms described here are used in preference to other, equally acceptable
terms for describing communications systems.
Lines, Trunks, and Facilities
Facility is a general term that designates a communications path between a
telephone system and the telephone company central office. Technically, a
trunk connects a switch to a switch, for example, the MERLIN LEGEND
Communications System to the central office. Technically, a line is a loop-start
facility or a communications path that does not connect switches, for example,
an intercom line or a Centrex line. However, in actual usage, the terms line and
trunk are often applied interchangeably. In this guide, we use lines/trunks and
line/trunk to refer to facilities in general. Specifically, we refer to digital facilities.
We also use specific terms such as personal line, ground-start trunk, DID trunk,
and so on. When you talk to your local telephone company central office, ask
about the terms they use for the specific facilities they connect to your system.
Some older terms have been replaced with newer terms. The following list
shows the old term on the left and the new term on the right.
trunk module
trunk jack
station
station jack
analog data station
7500B data station
analog voice and analog data station
digital voice and analog data station
analog data-only station
7500B data-only station
MLX voice and 7500B data station
xxviii About This Book
line/trunk module
line/trunk jack
extension
extension jack
modem data station
ISDN terminal adapter data station
analog voice and modem data
MLX voice and modem data
modem data-only station
ISDN terminal adapter data-only station
MLX voice and ISDN terminal adapter
data station
Terms and Conventions Used
Typographical Conventions
Certain type fonts and styles act as visual cues to help you rapidly understand
the information presented:
Example
It is very important that you follow these
steps. You must attach the wristband
before touching the connection.
Purpose
Italics indicate emphasis.
The part of the headset that fits over one
or both ears is called a headpiece.
Italics also set off special terms.
If you press the Feature button on an
MLX display telephone, the display lists
telephone features you can select. A
programmed Auto Dial button gives you
instant access to an inside or outside
number.
The names of fixed-feature, factoryimprinted buttons appear in bold. The
names of programmed buttons are
printed as regular text.
Choose Ext Prog from the display
screen.
Plain constant-width type indicates text
that appears on the telephone display or
PC screen.
To activate Call Waiting, dial *11.
Constant-width type in italics indicates
characters you dial at the telephone or
type at the PC.
Product Safety Labels
Throughout these documents, hazardous situations are indicated by an
exclamation point inside a triangle and the word caution or warning.
!
WARNING:
Warning indicates the presence of a hazard that could cause death or
severe personal injury if the hazard is not avoided.
!
CAUTION:
Caution indicates the presence of a hazard that could cause minor
personal injury or property damage if the hazard is not avoided.
About This Book xxix
Security
Security
Certain features of the system can be protected by passwords to prevent
unauthorized users from abusing the system. You should assign passwords
wherever you can and limit knowledge of such passwords to three or fewer
people.
Nondisplaying authorization codes and telephone numbers provide another
layer of security. For more information, see Appendix A, “Customer Support
Information.”
Throughout this document, toll fraud security hazards are indicated by an
exclamation point inside a triangle and the words Security Alert.
!
Security Alert:
Security Alert indicates the presence of toll fraud security hazard. Toll
fraud is the unauthorized use of your telecommunications system by an
unauthorized party (e.g., persons other than your company’s employees,
agents, subcontractors, or persons working on your company’s behalf).
Be sure to read “Your Responsibility for Your System’s Security” on the
inside front cover of this book and “Security of Your System: Preventing
Toll Fraud” in Appendix A, “Customer Support Information.”
Related Documents
In addition to this book, the documents listed below are part of the
documentation set. Within the continental United States, these documents can
be ordered from the AT&T GBCS Publications Fulfillment Center by calling 1 800
457-1235.
Document No.
555-640-110
555-640-111
555-640-112
555-640-113
555-640-116
555-640-118
xxx About This Book
Title
System Documents
Feature Reference
System Programming
System Planning
System Planning Forms
Pocket Reference
System Manager’s Guide
How to Comment on This Book
Document No.
555-640-122
555-630-150
555-630-153
555-640-124
555-630-151
555-640-120
555-640-126
555-640-138
555-640-134
555-640-132
555-640-136
555-640-130
555-640-129
555-025-600
555-640-140
Title
Telephone User Support
MLX-10D, MLX-10DP, MLX-16DP, MLX-28D, and
MLX-20L Display Telephones User’s Guide
MLX-10D Display Telephone Tray Cards (5 cards)
MLX-28D and MLX-20L Telephone Tray Cards (5 cards)
MLX-10 Nondisplay Telephone User’s Guide
MLX-10 Nondisplay Telephone Tray Cards (6 cards)
Analog Multiline Telephones User’s Guide
Single-Line Telephones User’s Guide
MDC 9000 and MDW 9000 Telephones User’s Guide
System Operator Support
MLX Direct-Line Consoles Operator’s Guide
Analog Direct-Line Consoles Operator’s Guide
MLX Queued Call Console Operator’s Guide
Miscellaneous User Support
Calling Group Supervisor’s Guide
Data/Video Reference
GBCS Products Security Handbook
Documentation for Qualified Technicians
Installation, Programming, & Maintenance (IP&M) Binder
Includes: Installation, System Programming & Maintenance
(SPM), and Maintenance & Troubleshooting
How to Comment on This Book
We welcome your comments, both good and bad. Please use the feedback
form on the next page to let us know how we can continue to serve you. If the
feedback form is missing, write directly to:
Documentation Manager
AT&T
211 Mount Airy Road, Room 2W226
Basking Ridge, NJ 07920
About This Book xxxi
How to Comment on This Book
xxxii About This Book
FEEDBACK FORM
MERLIN LEGEND Communications System Releases 3.1 and 4.0
Title: System Manager’s Guide
Order No.: 555-640-118 Date: March 1996, Issue 1
1.
Please rate the effectiveness of this book in the following areas:
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2.
Please check ways you feel we could improve this book:
¨ Improve the overview
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¨ Make it less technical
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THIS FORM MAY BE PHOTOCOPIED
Read This First
1
Contents
Overview
■
■
Using This Guide
Related Guides
1–1
1–2
1–3
Your Role as System Manager
1–3
System Manager Responsibilities
1–4
■
The System Planning Forms
1–5
Upgrading the System
1–5
Environmental Requirements
1–6
Read This First 1–i
Read This First
1
This chapter includes important background information to help you understand
the system manager function and how to use this guide.
After a brief overview, this chapter provides the following information:
■
A description of system manager responsibilities
■
A description of the planning forms that are the record of how your
system is set up
■
Information about upgrading the system
■
A description of environmental requirements for correct and safe system
operation
Overview
Although the MERLIN LEGEND Communications System is technologically
sophisticated and offers state-of-the-art services, it is designed for ease of use
and management.
Once AT&T personnel install and program the system, it should require only a
little of your time. If you need to make changes to the system as business needs
change, or if there is a problem with the system, you can use the system
reference books and get assistance from AT&T personnel, as appropriate.
When you do need to perform simple system management tasks, there are
several easy-to-use tools available to help you. For example, to program
changes in the system, you can use a specially designated system telephone
that has a display or you can use a personal computer (PC).
Read This First 1–1
Overview
Whether using a system telephone or a PC to program system changes,
you simply make selections from menus; you don’t have to remember any
special commands or codes.
If you need detailed information or step-by-step instructions, the system guides
clearly describe your choices.
Although the number of system reference guides may seem overwhelming at
first, this book contains clear instructions on how to use those guideshow to
quickly and easily find a solution or needed information when a problem or new
business need arises.
There are also several features that can help you manage the system, for
example, reports that provide information about how the system is set up, a
record of all incoming and outgoing calls, and an error log that describes any
system errors that occur. These reports can be viewed on screen or printed out.
If you run into a problem at any time while you’re using or managing the system,
there are experienced AT&T personnel who can provide information and
instructions, including your local AT&T representative as well as the AT&T
national technical support organization at the AT&T Helpline (1 800 628-2888).
Using This Guide
This guide is specifically designed to help you fulfill your function as system
manager.
To use this guide, you need little or no knowledge of the system and no
particular technical experience or expertise. Also, wherever possible, the guide
provides quick reference tables and illustrations, so that you don’t have to wade
through dense text to get the information you need.
This guide is loosely divided into two parts:
■
The first four chapters provide information to help you understand the
system, including its hardware components and features.
■
The last four chapters specifically deal with managing the system,
including how to perform the most common system management tasks,
and how to “troubleshoot” system problems, that is, what you can do on
your own before you call AT&T for help.
We recommend that you scan the first four chapters now so that you have a
general idea of how the system works. Then, if and when you need a stronger
understanding about a particular aspect of the system or a common system
management task, you can read that chapter or section more carefully.
1–2 Read This First
Your Role as System Manager
Related Guides
There are two categories of guides available for the system:
■
User Guides and Operator Guides. Each of these guides describes the
use and features of a specific telephone or operator console.
■
System Reference Guides. These guides provide detailed information
about system features and capabilities:
— Feature Reference contains information about features and
applications.
— System Programming includes detailed step-by-step procedures to
program the system.
— Equipment and Operations Reference contains information about
system equipment.
NOTE:
An additional guide, System Planning, contains information about completing
the planning forms and is used mainly by AT&T personnel.
The Feature Reference and System Programming are essential when you
perform the common system management tasks described in Chapter 6,
“Managing the System,” or when you otherwise modify the system as your
company needs change and expand.
Each of these guides is described in Chapter 7, “Learning More,” which will
help you quickly find what you need in each guide.
Your Role as System Manager
As system manager, you coordinate the system to ensure the best possible
benefit and performance for your company. Primarily, this involves acting as a
contact for people using the system and for AT&T personnel, as well as making
changes to the system as the needs of your company change or expand.
When the system is installed, experienced AT&T personnel complete all of the
programming required to get the system up and running. But if and when you
need to make changes to the system, you don’t have to be an engineer, a
programmer, or a telecommunications specialist. It is more important that you
understand the needs of your company and the system’s users.
If you like, you can use a personal computer (PC) to do the programming.
Otherwise, you can use a system telephone, with a display, for most
programming tasks. In both cases, menus guide you through the process. You
don’t need to remember any special commands or codes.
Read This First 1–3
Your Role as System Manager
If you want more detailed instructions, you can use the step-by-step procedures
in the system’s manuals. The instructions are designed so that you can follow
them easily. To quickly find the information or procedure you need, read
Chapter 7, “Learning More,” for descriptions of the system reference guides and
how to use them. As a last resort, call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
System Manager Responsibilities
Depending on the size and complexity of a system, more than one person may
perform the system manager function. AT&T personnel carry out more complex
tasks or help you through them.
Specifically, the responsibilities of the system manager may include the
following tasks:
■
Pre-installation
— Ensuring appropriate selection of equipment and features by
surveying your company’s employees and providing the information to
your AT&T representative
— Helping develop a floor plan that illustrates where to install equipment
— Participating in system training that your AT&T representative
provides for you and telephone users
■
Post-installation
— Functioning as the in-house contact both for your system’s users and
for AT&T personnel
— Planning for and sometimes implementing system modifications that
may become necessary as your company changes and grows
— Maintaining records of changes made to the system
— Preparing an updated in-house directory of telephone extension
numbers
— Training new users
— Screening repair and/or operational problems or questions and
reporting them, if necessary, to the AT&T Helpline (1 800 628-2888)
— Maintaining the security of the system and overseeing features that
help prevent fraud
1–4 Read This First
The System Planning Forms
The System Planning Forms
When a MERLIN LEGEND Communications System is installed and set up,
AT&T personnel program it to function according to the options the customer
selects and the features the customer needs. To make the programming
process run smoothly, the AT&T personnel fill out and refer to planning forms
that record all of the system’s settings and features, those that affect the whole
system and those that affect individual extensions. AT&T representatives use a
book called System Planning as a guide when filling out forms at the time of an
installation or upgrade.
After the system is installed and programmed, copies of these completed
planning forms are available for you, as system manager, to use for reference
and to update as you make changes to the system. The forms are a complete
record of how your system is set up, so keep them in a safe place.
A list of the forms and a description of each form’s purpose is in Appendix D.
One of the forms, the Employee Communications Survey, is included in
Appendix D. Use this form if you need to conduct a survey of your users’ needs;
for example, to plan system modifications as your company’s needs expand.
If you have not received the completed planning forms for your system, contact
your AT&T representative. If you need a blank set of forms, call the AT&T
Customer Information Center at 1 800 432-6600.
Upgrading the System
There are two types of system upgrades:
■
Feature Upgrade. To upgrade your system to the latest “release” or
version as soon as it becomes available. With little or no changes in your
existing equipment or wiring, your system can be easily adapted and
expanded as your company’s business needs change and grow.
■
Maintenance Upgrade. To fix problems in the system.
In Release 3.0 and later, an upgrade basically involves inserting a memory card
(similar to a computer diskette) into a slot on the system’s processor or “brain”
(part of the system’s control unit). For a feature upgrade, you need a new
memory card; for a maintenance upgrade, AT&T provides the memory card at
no cost to you.
Read This First 1–5
Environmental Requirements
The memory cards are color-coded and have different titles to indicate their
contents and function:
■
Feature Upgrade Memory Card. Orange label with black bars; entitled
Forced Installation. To upgrade your system to the latest release.
■
Maintenance Upgrade Memory Card. Orange label; entitled Upgrade
Card. To fix problems in the system.
NOTE:
A third type of memory card has a white label and is entitled Translation Card.
This memory card is used to back up and restore your system programming as
described in “Backing Up the System” in Chapter 6, “Managing the System.”
For more information about upgrading your system, contact your AT&T
representative.
Environmental Requirements
The control unit requires a regulated environment that is temperature-controlled,
clean, and not exposed to direct sunlight. In addition, proper power and
grounding are essential for correct and safe system operation, and to protect
the system against lightning, power surges, and other problems.
If the control unit and other system components were installed by qualified
AT&T technicians, these requirements were met during installation.
After installation, you can help with the correct operation of the system by
making sure the following rules are observed:
■
The electrical outlet for the control unit must not be controlled by a
switch. Plugging the control unit into an outlet that can be turned on and
off by a switch invites accidental disconnection of the system.
■
The AC outlet must be properly grounded by using an AC receptacle for
a 3-prong plug.
■
Do not install the control unit outdoors.
■
Do not place the control unit near extreme heat (furnaces, heaters, attics,
or direct sunlight).
■
Do not expose the control unit to devices that generate electrical
interference (such as arc welders, or the motors of air conditioners and
ventilators, compressors, and so on).
■
Each auxiliary power unit requires one outlet.
■
Do not expose the control unit to moisture, corrosive gases, dust,
chemicals, spray paint, or similar material.
1–6 Read This First
Environmental Requirements
■
Do not place anything that could block ventilation on top of or around the
carriers.
■
Do not install the control unit under any device that may drip fluid, such
as an air conditioner.
■
For maintenance purposes, the control unit should be mounted in an
accessible location. There should be sufficient room and lighting
available to remove the cover(s) and replace modules without moving
furniture, boxes, or other objects.
For more information, refer to the Equipment and Operations Reference or
contact your AT&T representative.
Read This First 1–7
Environmental Requirements
1–8 Read This First
About the System
2
Contents
Background
■
■
Telephone Equipment
Switching Equipment
The Evolution of Switches
Switching Methods
2–2
2–5
2–6
2–6
2–9
System Overview
2–10
Incoming Trunks
2–12
Modes of Operation
2–16
Components
2–18
■
Line/Trunk and Extension Modules
2–21
Features
2–22
Applications
2–22
Programming the System
2–25
System Capacities
2–25
Auxiliary Components
2–26
Data Communications Capabilities
2–29
About the System 2–i
About the System
2
This chapter provides a general overview that introduces all of the major
aspects of the system and its operation, including:
■
Trunks
■
Modes of operation
■
System components
■
Features
■
Applications
■
Programming the system
■
System capacities
■
Auxiliary components
■
Data communications capabilities
More information about specific system topics is included throughout the guide.
The Equipment and Operations Reference, the Feature Reference, and System
Programming provide detailed information.
Many of the principles of telephone communications have not changed since
Alexander Graham Bell made the first phone call in 1876. Because learning
about these concepts will help you to understand how the system works, this
chapter begins with some background on telephone communications. For a
more detailed history and description, see Appendix B, “About
Telecommunications.”
If you are already familiar with the concepts described in this chapter, you can
skip the chapter.
About the System 2–1
Background
Background
Alexander Graham Bell and his assistant, Thomas A. Watson, demonstrated the
first working model of a telephone on March 10, 1876. Bell made the call from a
transmitter in one room to a receiver a few rooms away.
The first telephone installations were set up like that first call, as direct
connections between one telephone and another. When more and more
telephones were installed, it quickly became impractical to have every phone
connected directly to every other phone. Thus, the concept of switching
developed, that is, all telephones connected physically to all other telephones,
but each telephone could make the electrical cross-connection between itself
and another phone so that the caller was connected to the called party.
Again, as more and more telephones and lines were installed, it became
impractical to have each telephone perform this switching function, so all lines
from all phones were brought into a common place, called a central office (CO)
or exchange (see Figure 2–1) where human operators switched calls at
switchboards. This two-way connection between the telephone and the CO was
(and still is) called the local loop. Eventually, more and more COs were created
and interconnected, until the current global telephone network evolved (see
Figure 2–2).
As geographic areas expanded and the global telephone network evolved, and
as technological advances became available, switches also evolved and are
now fully automatic and controlled by computers.
There are now also private switches that, rather than being located at the
telephone company’s CO, are located on a company’s premises. These
systems, called private branch exchanges (PBXs), made sense because most
of a business’ calls are between telephones on-site within the company.
The MERLIN LEGEND Communications System includes such a switch, located
on a company’s premises, that offers access to even more powerful telephone
network applications and services. It can operate as a PBX (Hybrid/PBX mode)
or can be set up to operate in one of two other modes that define how the
system works. The system can also use state-of-the-art telephone equipment.
The next sections briefly describe the evolution of telephone equipment and
switching. For more information, see Appendix B, “About Telecommunications.”
2–2 About the System
Background
Telephone Company
Central Office
(CO)
Customer
Premises
Figure 2–1. The Local Loop
About the System 2–3
Background
CO
Long Distance
(Toll) Network
Customer
Premises
CO
Customer
Premises
Figure 2–2. The Telephone Network
2–4 About the System
Background
Telephone Equipment
The first working model of a telephone consisted of a microphone (called a
transmitter) and a small loudspeaker-like device (called a receiver) connected
by a pair of wires and a battery.
A telephone is powered by direct current (dc) which, in early phones, was
supplied by a battery inside the phone. Beginning in 1894, COs used a
common battery to power all the telephones connected to the exchange.
The receiver for early telephones hung on a hook that activated a switch to
control the flow of direct current to the telephone. This hook was called a
switchhook, a term that is still used today. When a telephone handset is sitting
on its cradle (on-hook), it draws no current from the CO. When a person
removes the handset from the cradle (off-hook), current flows and signals the
CO that the caller is requesting service.
Similarly, the CO signals the called party by sending current to his or her phone,
causing it to ring. When the called party lifts the handset from its cradle, the
current flows, indicating to the CO that the party has answered.
Bell realized that a caller needed a way to signal the other person to pick up the
phone. After experiments with various bells and buzzers, in 1878 Bell’s assistant
Watson developed a bell ringer operated by a hand crank.
When human operators handled switching, the caller used the telephone’s hand
crank to ring the operator, and then told the operator the name of the person he
or she wanted to reach. If the called party was available, the operator
connected the two parties by using a cord that had plugs at each end. Each
plug had parts called a tip and a ring that functioned as conductors to complete
the electrical circuit. The operator connected the two parties by plugging in one
end of the cord into the caller’s connector (called a jack) on the switchboard,
and the other end of the cord into the called party’s jack.
Once automatic switches were in place, telephone companies assigned
numbers to telephone service subscribers, and a dialing mechanism was built
into the telephone. The caller identified the called party to the switch by dialing
the called party’s number.
Telephone users originally dialed numbers by using a mechanical device called
a rotary dialer. A spring wound up when turned in one direction and, on its
return to normal position, caused interruptions in the flow of current, thus
creating dial pulses recognized by the switch. The subsequent development of
the touch-tone dialer provided a further innovation: the creation of unique tones
produced by simply pressing buttons on the dialpad.
About the System 2–5
Background
Although there are still some rotary-dial telephones in use, most modern
telephones have touch-tone dialing, which is faster and, with the advent of
services available from touch-tone phones, more versatile.
The terms tip and ring, however, still describe any telephone equipment that
involves only one line, for example, a single-line telephone (such as those in
most homes), an answering machine, or a fax machine. These are referred to as
tip/ring (T/R) devices.
You can use several different types of telephones with the MERLIN LEGEND
Communications System, including single-line telephones, analog multiline
telephones, and MLX digital telephones. The terms analog and digital refer to
the type of signal the telephone produces:
■
Analog Signal. A signal that represents a range of frequencies, that is,
continuously variable physical qualities such as amplitude; for example,
the human voice.
■
Digital Signal. Information transmitted in a coded form (from a computer)
represented by discrete signal elements; for example off and on or zero
and one.
Switching Equipment
As described earlier, the telephone network is composed of a number of
centralized switching locations, called central offices (COs), where a telephone
circuit is connected, or switched, to another circuit. That is, the caller’s line is
connected to the called party’s line so the two can hold a conversation.
Telephone operators, who supplied the first manual switching, were slow and
costly but afforded some special functionality: calls could be forwarded,
messages taken, and calls interrupted. Electromechanical switching automated
that manual labor and made telephone service universally affordable, but the
technology was inflexible and did little more than switch calls. Now, with
electronic, computer-controlled switches, both flexibility and functionality are
affordable to everyone.
The Evolution of Switches
The method, type, capabilities, and capacities of switches have evolved as
geographic areas expanded and technological advances became available.
The following list describes each of these progressive innovations. Figure 2−3
illustrates this evolution of switching equipment.
■
Private-Line Service. In the first telephone installations, communication
was directly from one telephone to another, as in Bell’s demonstration.
Thus, one telephone could communicate with only one other telephone.
2–6 About the System
Background
■
Party-Line Service. Several telephones were connected to one line so
that a number of people could communicate in the same conversation.
But there was no way to reach a telephone on any other line.
■
Station Switching. All telephones were connected to all other
telephones. The telephone itself performed the switching and made the
connection. This was workable for a small number of telephones, but
quickly became impractical as hundreds of telephones were installed.
■
Centralized Switching. As the number of telephones grew, all the lines
from all the telephones came to a common central office (CO) or
exchange, so that the lines could be electrically cross-connected.
Human operators made the connections.
Telephone
Station
☎
☎
☎
☎
☎
☎
☎
Party-Line
Service
Private-Line
Service
Telephone
Station
Switch
☎
☎
Central Office
☎
Station Switching
☎
☎
☎
☎
☎
☎
☎
Centralized Switching
Figure 2–3. The Evolution of Switches
About the System 2–7
Background
Eventually, as more and more COs were created, a hierarchy of special
switching offices (SOs) connected the COs locally and then between cities and
countries for long-distance (toll) switching. The dedicated lines between COs
were called trunks.
The following list provides an overview of the hierarchy of switching offices.
Figure 2−4 illustrates the hierarchy.
■
Level 1: Trunking Between COs. The first level in the hierarchy consists
of local COs with direct trunk connections between them. This is referred
to as the local network. The customer premises served by each CO can
be a residence with a single phone line or a business with a customer
premises switch like the MERLIN LEGEND Communications System.
■
Level 2: Switching Between Tandem (Intermediary) SOs. When the
traffic between two COs exceeds the amount that direct trunking can
efficiently and cost-effectively serve, the COs are each connected to a
third switching office (SOs) that functions as an Intermediary. This is
referred to as the tandem network.
■
Level 3 and Above: Switching Between All SOs. To ensure that there is
a communications path from each SO to any other SO, ever-increasing
levels of SOs combine larger and larger geographical areas. This is
referred to as the toll network and comprises national and international
service.
Key:
= Level 5
= Level 4
Toll
Network
= Level 3
= Level 2
= Level 1 (CO)
= MERLIN
LEGEND
Communications
System
Tandem
Network
Local
Network
☎☎ ☎☎ ☎☎ ☎
Figure 2–4. The Switching Office Hierarchy
2–8 About the System
☎= Customer
Telephone
Background
Today, a local area within which there is a single uniform set of charges for
telephone service is called a local exchange area. A number of COs may serve
a local exchange area, and a call between any two points within an exchange
area is a local call. A toll call is a call made to a point outside the local
exchange area and includes service through the switching office hierarchy.
Switching Methods
For the first few decades of telephone service, human operators manually
switched calls and made the actual connections of circuits. They made the
connections at switchboards by using cords that had plugs at each end.
Approximately 120 lines terminated at answering jacks on an operator’s
switchboard. In turn, each operator had 18 cords for making connections.
When a telephone service subscriber made a call, a lamp lit at his or her jack,
telling the operator that the person on that line desired service. The operator
connected to the subscriber’s jack and the calling party would then give the
name (and later, the telephone number) of the party he or she was calling. Then
the operator completed the call (that is, completed the circuit) by connecting
the cord to one of perhaps 10,000 subscriber jacks within reach. When the call
was over and the parties had hung up, the lamp associated with each
connecting cord would go out and the operator knew that the call was complete
and the cord could be removed.
The first automatic switch was invented in 1892 by Almon B. Strowger, an
undertaker who realized that his competitor was getting all the undertaking
business in the town, referred by the town telephone operator—who was also
the competing undertaker’s wife! The Strowger switch was an
electromechanical device controlled by the caller’s telephone (station
switching).
Strowger’s switch was adapted for use in the Bell System in 1919. It was noisy
and not very flexible at offering new services but, because it was more costeffective than human operators, it was directly responsible for making telephone
service affordable and universal.
In 1938, the Bell System developed and installed the next innovation in
electromechanical switching, and it is still in use in some areas today. It had
fewer switches, a sophisticated control mechanism, and lower maintenance.
However, like its predecessor, it was not flexible because it couldn’t be
programmed.
About the System 2–9
System Overview
It was, therefore, a natural progression that led to the idea of using a computer,
with its inherent programmable flexibility, to control the switching operation. This
new generation of switching technology was called an electronic switching
system (ESS). With ever-increasing innovations in technology (beginning with
the AT&T No.1 ESS first installed in 1965), the AT&T 5ESS digital switching
system handles 100,000 lines and 650,000 telephone calls per hour. The newer
digital switching systems also interface easily with high-speed digital trunks.
As mentioned earlier, the MERLIN LEGEND Communications System is a switch
located on a company’s premises, providing access to powerful features and
advanced telephone network applications and services.
System Overview
The MERLIN LEGEND Communications System can handle voice and data
simultaneously over the same lines, and voice features can enhance the use of
data communications. The system accommodates businesses with needs
ranging from a few telephones to over 100 telephones. Its modular design
allows easy expansion.
Many of the terms and concepts introduced in the beginning of this chapter are
used in the system. As illustrated in Figure 2–5, the system allows the
connection of incoming trunks from the telephone company’s central office
(CO), connected through the system’s control unit to telephones and other
system equipment, for example, a PC or fax machine.
There are various types of trunks that provide different functionality. Likewise, a
variety of telephones and other equipment can be connected to the system.
Depending on the trunks and the telephones and other equipment selected, a
wide array of features and add-on products (applications) can function
according to the needs of your company.
The rest of this chapter provides an overview of each primary system aspect:
■
Incoming trunks
■
Modes of operation
■
System components
■
Line/trunk and extension modules
■
Features
■
Applications
■
Programming the system
■
System capacities
■
Auxiliary components
■
Data communications capabilities
2–10 About the System
System Overview
Telephone Company
Central Office
(CO)
Telephone
Company
Incoming Trunks
MERLIN
LEGEND
Communications
System
Control Unit
Telephones
and Other
Equipment
MERLIN
LEGEND
Applications
Auxiliary
Components
Figure 2–5. System Overview
About the System 2–11
Incoming Trunks
Incoming Trunks
Trunks are the telephone company’s facilities, provided by the central office
(CO) to carry voice or data communications (see Figure 2–6). There are a
variety of trunks, each with different capabilities. These types have evolved over
the years as technology has advanced and customer needs have expanded.
The decision concerning the type of trunks chosen for your company’s system
depends primarily on your company’s needs. Other factors include cost (due to
differing capabilities, the use of some trunks is more expensive than others),
and availability (some of the advanced trunks are not available everywhere).
Your company chooses trunks before the system is installed. An AT&T
representative works with you or your company’s representative to identify
needs and, therefore, the appropriate type and number of trunks. When the
AT&T representative places the order for the system equipment, she or he also
contacts the local telephone company and arranges for the trunks.
Depending on the trunk type and what the CO can provide, a variety of services
are available, for example, incoming and outgoing WATS (INWATS and
OUTWATS).
The types of trunks are:
■
Loop-Start Trunks (Incoming and Outgoing Calls). Provide incoming
and outgoing calls and are intended primarily for single-line telephones
and older PBXs. They are the simplest (often the least expensive) and
most common facilities in the nationwide telephone network. Although
they are not appropriate for some situations, they are necessary for
others (for example, some caller identification services).
■
Ground-Start Trunks (Incoming and Outgoing Calls). Provides a signal
at the beginning and end of incoming and outgoing calls to determine the
availability of a trunk before the CO routes an incoming call on it. Also,
when either the caller or the called party hangs up, the entire circuit is
disconnected and dropped. These trunks were introduced to solve the
problems that PBXs encounter on loop-start trunks (namely, glare and
unreliable disconnect), as described in the Introduction booklet.
■
Tie Trunks. Private lines that directly connect two communications
systems. Using a tie trunk, a user on one system can call an extension on
another system by dialing an access code and the extension number or
simply the extension number.
2–12 About the System
Incoming Trunks
In more complex tie trunk configurations, a person can tie into another
system and use a trunk that does not exist on his or her own system. For
example, in a company with locations in New York, Chicago, and Los
Angeles (with tie trunks between New York and Chicago, and Chicago
and Los Angeles), users in New York can access a Los Angeles trunk
and make a local call as if they were in Los Angeles themselves.
■
Direct Inward Dialing (DID) Trunks (Incoming Calls Only). Provide fast
access to specific individuals; incoming DID calls can be routed directly
to an extension or calling group without system operator assistance.
■
Digital Facilities. MERLIN LEGEND supports two different types of
digital facilities: Digital Signal 1 (DS1) and, in Release 4.0 and later,
National Integrated Services Digital Network 1 Basic Rate Interface
(abbreviated NI-1 BRI) facilities. T1, PRI, and BRI are the system’s
interfaces to these Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) facilities,
which provide end-to-end digital connectivity and switched connections
to other networks. All three interfaces allow high-speed data transfer.
National Integrated Services Digital Network 1 Basic Rate
Interface (Incoming and Outgoing Calls). One NI-1 BRI facility carries
the equivalent of three “lines.” Two are called B-channels and provide
voice and data communications services. A third D-channel controls
signaling and maintains operations on the B-channels.
Digital Signal 1 Facility Programmed for Either T1 or Primary Rate
Interface Operation (Incoming and Outgoing Calls). One Digital
Signal 1 (DS1) facility provides the equivalent of 24 lines. In Release
4.0 and later, the DS1 facility can be programmed to operate in one of
three ways:
¨ T1 Voice Operation. A “line” is called a channel and can be
programmed through the system, without the services of a
telephone company installer, to emulate a ground-start, loop-start,
tie, or DID trunk. This type of T1 operation also gives you access to
special services, like Megacom 800 service for incoming, toll-free
service for voice calls. Only this type of T1 operation is available in
releases prior to Release 4.0.
NOTE:
While you can quickly and easily change the type of line that a
channel imitates, you must coordinate the change with the CO so
that both ends of the connection are set up for the same type of
line/trunk.
About the System 2–13
Incoming Trunks
¨ T1 Data Operation. Available in Release 4.0 and later, T1 data
operation allows high-speed data communications over the public
switched network; this is called T1 Switched 56 service. It also
provides data tie “lines” to connect one MERLIN LEGEND
Communications System to another or to a DEFINITY system. A
T1 data-operation “line” is a B-channel.
¨ Primary Rate Interface (PRI) Operation. The 24 “lines” include 23
B-channels. Each B-channel can dynamically provide voice and
data services; one D-channel carries signaling information for the
B-channels.
NOTE:
Facility is a general term that designates a communications path between a
telephone system and the telephone company central office. Technically, a
trunk connects a switch to a switch, for example, the MERLIN LEGEND
Communications System to the central office. Technically, a line is a loop-start
facility or a communications path that does not connect switches, for example,
an intercom line or a Centrex line. However, in actual usage, the terms line and
trunk are often applied interchangeably. In this guide, we use lines/trunks and
line/trunk to refer to facilities in general. Specifically, we refer to digital facilities.
We also use specific terms such as personal line, ground-start trunk, DID trunk,
and so on. When you talk to your local telephone company central office, ask
them what terms they use for the specific facilities they connect to your system.
2–14 About the System
Incoming Trunks
Telephone
Company
Incoming Trunks
Telephone Company
Central Office
(CO)
Loop-Start Trunk
Ground-Start Trunk
Digital Facility
MERLIN
LEGEND
Communications
System
Control Unit
Telephones
and Other
Equipment
MERLIN
LEGEND
Applications
Auxiliary
Components
Figure 2–6. Incoming Trunks
About the System 2–15
Modes of Operation
Modes of Operation
The system’s mode of operation determines the following:
■
The types of outside trunks that can be connected to the system
■
How users access outside trunks
■
The types of system operator consoles that your business can use
■
The features and applications that your business can use and how they
work
■
How the system is registered with the Federal Communications
Commission (FCC)
The choice of system mode depends on your company’s needs. Your AT&T
representative and you or your company’s representative decide on the system
mode when you plan and purchase your system. AT&T personnel then set the
mode when they install the system.
!
CAUTION:
Because the operating mode significantly affects how the system works,
you should know in which mode your system has been configured. You
can either check the Planning Forms (Form 1, Page 2, ”System Mode”) or
contact your AT&T representative.
The system operates in one of three modes:
■
Key Mode. The simplest way to provide people with more than one line
from a telephone. Easy to use. Recommended for smaller systems.
■
Hybrid/PBX Mode. Especially useful where toll fraud/security are a
concern. Provides cost-effective call routing, especially useful for
special-purpose network services. Recommended for medium to larger
systems.
■
Behind Switch Mode. Used when the system is connected to a system
such as DEFINITY. May be appropriate for users who are part of a large
organization, for example, a department within a company.
While Key mode is appropriate for smaller systems and has the capacity
limitations of any key system, the MERLIN LEGEND Communications System,
unlike other key systems, is flexible and allows you to expand to a PBX system
when your business outgrows Key mode.
Table 2–1 describes the primary differences among the modes.
“Line Buttons on Multiline Telephones” in Chapter 3 describes Shared Access
(SA) buttons and Intercom (ICOM) buttons.
2–16 About the System
Modes of Operation
Table 2–1. Modes of Operation
Key Mode
Hybrid/PBX Mode
Behind Switch Mode
Description
Telephones have
multiple buttons (or
keys) labeled with
telephone numbers.
Every button
corresponds directly to
an outside line.
Different buttons
(ICOM buttons) are
used for inside calls.
Outside trunks are
grouped in pools for
shared use; the
system automatically
selects an available
outside trunk. People
use the same button
to make both inside
and outside calls.
Used when the system
(called the local system) is
connected to a larger PBX
or Centrex system (called
the host system). One
outside line (a prime line)
is assigned to each
telephone. The host
system provides the
interface to outside lines
and some features.
Types of Trunks
Ground-start
Loop-start
Tie
DS1 (T1 only)
BRI
Ground-start
Loop-start
Tie
DS1 (PRI and T1)
DID
BRI
Ground-start
Loop-start
Tie
Good
Not recommended
Good
Good
Good
Good up to 80
Types of Buttons
A line button for each
outside line. Up to 10
ICOM buttons for
inside calls.
Up to 10 SA buttons.
Pool button to access
a specific pool.
(Optional) A personal
line button for
dedicated use of a
specific outside trunk.
For multiline phones:
multiple prime line
buttons. Up to 10 ICOM
buttons.
User Access to
Outside
Lines/Trunks
Choosing a specific
line button
Dialing a code (usually
9) from an SA button
Types of Operator
Console(s)
DLCs only
DLC, QCC, or a
combination of both
DLCs only
Recommended
Use
Smaller systems
(fewer than 50
extensions)
Medium to larger
systems (more than 50
extensions)
For users who are part of
a large organization, for
example, a department
within a company or
companies who subscribe
to Centrex services for
most features
Number of
Extensions:
Fewer than 50
More than 50
Dialing the host system’s
dial-out code (usually 9)
from a prime line button
Continued on next page
About the System 2–17
Components
Table 2–1, Continued
Comments
Key Mode
Hybrid/PBX Mode
Behind Switch Mode
All users need multiline
phones.
Line assignments can
be customized by
phone or groups of
phones, for example,
you can assign tie
trunks only to the
telephones where
they’re needed.
Provides the most
efficient use of outside
trunks. The Automatic
Route Selection (ARS)
feature can be
programmed for the
cost-effective use of
pools and the greatest
protection against toll
fraud. Provides greater
functionality for singleline phones than other
modes. Fewer line
buttons required for
users.
Users can have access to
most features of both the
local system and the host
system. Single-line
phones can be used.
Components
The system consists of the following components:
■
Control Unit. The circuitry that manages the switching activities of the
telephone company's trunks and your system. It consists of carriers into
which modules (circuit packs) are inserted. The module types include a
processor module (the “brain” of the system), a power supply module,
and a variety of line/trunk or extension modules with jacks for connecting
the incoming trunks and the extension lines. The following section
explains line/trunk and extension modules in more detail.
A plastic cabinet (the cover) protects the control unit.
■
Telephones. Single-line, cordless, cordless/wireless, and analog
multiline telephones, as well as digital MLX telephones that offer a variety
of features and advanced capabilities. Most MLX telephones have
displays that show call information, list features for using the telephone,
and provide menu-driven programming instructions. MLX telephones
include the following: MLX-10, MLX-10D, MLX-10DP, MLX-16DP,
MLX-20L, and MLX-28D.
2–18 About the System
Components
■
System Operator Consoles. Telephones programmed to handle a
variety of operator functions. Types of consoles include:
— Analog or MLX Direct-Line Console (DLC). Outside lines are
assigned to individual buttons, and the console can have several calls
ringing at the same time. Only certain MLX telephones and analog
multiline telephones can be used as DLCs.
— MLX Queued Call Console (QCC). Available only in Hybrid/PBX
mode. Incoming calls wait in a queue for the operator and reach the
QCC on a first-in, first-out basis, according to the call priority level
assigned through system programming. Only one call rings at a time.
The MLX-20L telephone is the only telephone that can be assigned
through system programming to function as a QCC. The buttons on
the QCC are factory-set with fixed features.
The type of console used depends on the company’s needs and the
system’s mode of operation, as described earlier in this chapter.
NOTE:
One or two Direct Station Selector (DSS) adjuncts can be added to an
MLX console to provide 150 or 300 additional extension buttons. The
analog System Display Console has 40 built-in DSS buttons and provides
access to three pages of extensions, for a total of 120.
■
Auxiliary Components. Adapters for connecting extra equipment and
the adjuncts that add features to the system or extensions. Some
adjuncts are: loudspeaker paging systems, headsets, fax machines, and
modems. Other add-on components are optional accessories, for
example, surge protectors that protect the equipment from lightning and
power surges.
Figure 2–7 illustrates some of the components of the system. “Auxiliary
Components,” later in this chapter and Chapter 3, “System Components,”
include additional information. The Equipment and Operations Reference
provides details about each component.
For more information or to order any of the components, contact your AT&T
representative.
About the System 2–19
Components
Telephone Company
Central Office
(CO)
Telephone
Company
Incoming Trunks
MERLIN
LEGEND
Communications
System
Control Unit
Telephones
and Other
Equipment
MERLIN
LEGEND
MLX
Telephone
Applications
Auxiliary
Components
Figure 2–7. System Components
2–20 About the System
Fax
Machine
MLX
Telephone
with MFM
SingleLine
Phone
Answering
Machine
Analog
MLX
Multiline Telephone
Telephone
Components
Line/Trunk and Extension Modules
The line/trunk and extension modules inserted into the control unit have jacks for
connecting CO trunks and system telephone wires to the control unit.
A system with a basic carrier has five slots for modules. Up to two expansion
carriers can be added, each one adding six slots for modules.
The system supports 17 different types of modules that vary in the types of
lines/trunks that they support and the types of telephones or other equipment
that can be connected to them.
408 GS/LS
4 GS or LS Outside Lines/
8 Analog Telephones (ATL)
The names of the modules identify their capacities and capabilities. The first
digit tells you the number of line/trunk jacks a module supports, while the last
two digits describe the number of extension jacks it supports. Following the
number may be letters that indicate the type of trunk it supports, that is, LS for
loop-start and GS for ground-start; if the number indicates line/trunk support
and no letters follow, the module supports loop-start trunks. For example, the
408 GS/LS-MLX module provides four line/trunk jacks and eight MLX extension
jacks, and supports ground-start and loop-start trunks (see Figure 2–8).
PFT Jack
Line/Trunk
Jacks
Digital (MLX)
Extension
Jacks
408
GS/LS-MLX
Figure 2–8. 408 GS/LS-MLX Module
About the System 2–21
Features
Features
The versatility and power of the system are due, in large part, to the variety of
feature settings and services it can provide.
Features include traditional items (Transfer and Call Waiting), as well as
advanced features (Coverage and Park).
Some functions can be performed in several ways. For example, the system
offers a variety of ways to provide call coverage. You therefore choose and set
up features according to your specific business needs.
Chapter 4, “Features and Applications,” provides additional information about
features. The Feature Reference provides detailed information, including
interactions of features.
Applications
Numerous add-on products (applications) are available to enhance the system,
including:
■
Voice messaging systems answer incoming calls, provide callers with a
menu of choices, such as people or departments, and then transfer the
call as prompted by the caller using a touch-tone phone. Voice
messaging systems may or may not include voice mail services,
described below.
■
Voice mail services enable system users, for example, to send voice
messages to other users, forward voice messages with comments, and
return a call.
■
Fax messaging services automate the sending, receiving, call-handling,
and storage of faxes, in much the same way voice messaging systems
handle voice messaging.
2–22 About the System
Applications
■
Call accounting applications manage telephone usage by tracking and
sorting telephone costs and producing reports on costs.
■
A call management application answers and distributes calls to members
of a specified group, for example, ticketing agents.
■
Passage Way Direct Connect Solution provides an interface between an
extension and a PC with Microsoft Windows, as well as providing
useful utilities and allowing the integration of Windows applications with
telephone activities.
■
Group and personal videoconferencing and data exchange applications
allow multimedia interaction among people who work together but are
geographically distant.
In addition, the system provides support for special services, such as Centrex,
Basic Rate Interface (BRI), and Primary Rate Interface (PRI).
Figure 2−9 illustrates some of these applications.
Businesses can purchase some applications separately; others are integrated
to have a common interface. Most have settings that you can easily customize
to suit your company’s needs. Some require additional hardware.
Chapter 4, “Features and Applications,” includes an overview of available
applications. Of course, the documentation provided with the product is the
most authoritative. Once you have reviewed this material and found an
application that seems to fit your needs, contact your AT&T representative to
order the product or discuss it further.
About the System 2–23
Applications
Telephone Company
Central Office
(CO)
Telephone
Company
Incoming Trunks
MERLIN
LEGEND
Communications
System
Control Unit
Telephones
and Other
Equipment
MERLIN
LEGEND
MLX
Telephone
Fax
Machine
MLX
Telephone
with MFM
SingleLine
Phone
Answering
Machine
Analog
MLX
Multiline
Telephone Telephone
Applications
Call
Accounting
System
Auxiliary
Components
Figure 2–9. Applications
2–24 About the System
Voice
Messaging
System
PassageWay
Direct Connect
Solution
Programming the System
Programming the System
System installation includes programming features, settings, and options
selected by you or a representative from your company.
Depending on the feature, either you, as system manager, or a person at his or
her extension can make changes to features:
■
System Programming. Used to program systemwide or group features.
An AT&T technician can also do system programming. You use one of
the following:
— An MLX-20L telephone, referred to as the programming console
— A PC with System Programming and Maintenance (SPM) software,
reaching the system in one of three ways: a direct connection
between the PC and the system’s control unit, an on-site or local
modem connection to the modem in the control unit, or an off-site
remote modem connection
■
Extension Programming. Can be performed in two ways:
— Centralized Telephone Programming. You program at the
programming console.
— Telephone Programming. Either you or the user programs at a
specific telephone.
When programming at an MLX telephone or PC, you work with features and
options from screen menus. You simply select an item from the menu and enter
settings as desired.
System Capacities
The system can support up to 80 line/trunk jacks, 72 of which can actually be
B-channels supplied on 100D modules or 800 NI-BRI modules (Release 4.0 and
later systems).
The maximum number of extensions depends on the type of equipment
included in the system. In theory, you can connect as many as 255 extensions,
but this, in fact, is not practical. In Release 4.0 and later, a higher-capacity
tip/ring (T/R) extension module, the 016, allows the system to support as many
as 200 T/R devices such as single-line telephones, modems, and fax machines.
The number of extensions you can connect depends on the equipment you are
using in your system.
If you have any questions about your system’s capacity, contact your AT&T
representative.
About the System 2–25
Auxiliary Components
Appendix C describes hardware and software capacities, that is, the minimums
and maximums for certain features.
Auxiliary Components
There are many other components that people use with the system, including
adapters, adjuncts, and accessories. You probably have many of these in your
system already. If you’re interested in adding any of these components to your
system, contact your AT&T representative.
The following is a list of the types of auxiliary system components, including
some examples of each:
■
Adjuncts. An auxiliary piece of equipment that adds features to the
system, for example, a fax machine or a modem. There are three types of
adjuncts:
— System Adjuncts. Connect directly to the control unit, for example, a
Station Message Detail Recording Printer (SMDR) to print call records,
a PC with System Programming and Maintenance (SPM) software to
be used for the programming and maintenance of the system,
loudspeaker paging systems, and Magic on Hold to provide
background music for callers on hold.
— Telephone Adjuncts. Connect to telephones. For example, Direct
Station Selectors (DSSs) can enhance the capabilities of operator and
programming consoles, as well as a variety of headsets,
speakerphones, and specialty handsets (for users who are hard of
hearing or in noisy environments).
— Other Adjuncts. Connect directly to the control unit but are not
necessarily used systemwide, for example, a fax machine at its own
extension. (Many adjuncts, such as fax machines and modems, can
either connect directly to the control unit from their own extensions, or
they can connect to a telephone at an extension.)
2–26 About the System
Auxiliary Components
■
Adapters. Enable the connection of other equipment or certain telephone
company facilities. There are two kinds of adapters, classified according
to function:
— System Adapters. Connect adjuncts (for example, a loudspeaker
paging system) directly to the control unit and serve the whole
system.
— Telephone Adapters. Connect adjuncts to telephones. For example,
a Multi-Function Module (MFM) connects an adjunct, such as an
answering machine, modem, fax machine, or special strobe, to an
MLX telephone.
■
Accessories. Different kinds of accessories can be added to the system
to provide more power or additional protection from power surges. There
are three types of accessories:
— Power Accessories. For example, an Uninterruptible Power Supply
(UPS) for the system or telephone power units to provide additional
power to individual telephones that require them for adjuncts.
— Protection Accessories. For example, for grounding and protecting
special telephone connections (like a telephone located in a different
building) from lightning strikes and power surges.
— Miscellaneous Accessories. A power-failure transfer (PFT) telephone
used to make and receive calls in the event of a commercial power
failure or an Off-Premises Range Extender (OPRE) used for a singleline telephone located in a different building from the control unit and
more than 1000 feet away.
Figure 2–10 illustrates some of these components. For information about these
accessories, see Chapter 3, “System Components,” and the Equipment and
Operations Reference.
About the System 2–27
Auxiliary Components
Telephone Company
Central Office
(CO)
Telephone
Company
Incoming Trunks
MERLIN
LEGEND
Communications
System
Control Unit
Telephones
and Other
Equipment
MERLIN
LEGEND
MLX
Telephone
Fax
Machine
MLX
Telephone
with MFM
SingleLine
Phone
Answering
Machine
Analog
MLX
Multiline Telephone
Telephone
Applications
Call
Accounting
System
Voice
Messaging
System
Auxiliary
Components
PassageWay
Direct Connect
Solution
POWER
OUT
657
E
GROUND
IN
657
E
GAIN
ON
1 2
3 4
OPRE
HO L D
EXPRESSROUTE
Data
Headset
Digital Adapter
1000
Computer Music-on-Hold Bell, Chime, Uninterruptible “Attention”
and Universal
or
Strobe, etc.
Power
Paging
Data Module Magic-on Hold
Supply
System
Building A
Figure 2–10. Auxiliary System Components
2–28 About the System
SingleLine Phone
Building B
Data Communications Capabilities
Data Communications Capabilities
One of the important capabilities of the system is that it can carry both voice
and data communications simultaneously over the same lines. In addition,
system features used for voice communications, such as Automatic Route
Selection, calling restrictions, and speed dialing can also enhance the use of
data equipment.
NOTE:
For the most up-to-date information about data and video communications,
consult the Data/Video Reference.
Thus, the system allows you to use telephone lines for communicating not only
voices but data and video too. For example, a computer in New York can send
data files to a computer in San Diego. At your own company, your PC can
communicate with a gateway computer on a local area network (LAN) and gain
access to the network; or, you can call your office computer from your home
computer and send files back and forth between your home and office.
In addition, the system supports advanced network services that integrate voice
and data, such as group and personal videoconferencing.
A special type of extension, called a data station, is used for data
communications. It may include a telephone and always includes two types of
equipment:
■
Data Terminal Equipment (DTE). For example, a PC, data terminal,
printer, optical scanner, or video system.
■
Data Communications Equipment (DCE). For example, an internal or
external modem or an external ExpressRoute 1000 ISDN terminal
adapter.
The DTE connects to the system via the DCE, which has capabilities similar to a
telephone. The DCE places the data call, maintains its connection, and
terminates the data call.
Sometimes a telephone is also part of a data station. The telephone can be
either an MLX or an analog multiline telephone that operates independently of
the data communications equipment (DCE). You can attach a modem to either
an analog or MLX telephone adapter.
A video station is a type of data station that allows group or desktop
videoconferencing.
About the System 2–29
Data Communications Capabilities
For high-speed data communications over Integrated Services Digital Network
Basic Rate Interface (NI-1 BRI, Release 4.0 and later) or Digital Signal 1 (DS1)
Primary Rate Interface (PRI) or T1 Switched 56 (Release 4.0 and later) facilities,
you can attach an ExpressRoute 1000 ISDN Terminal Adapter or another ISDN
(Integrated Digital Services Network) terminal adapter to an MLX telephone.
Group videoconferencing may require an ExpressRoute 1000, or an ISDN
terminal adapter compatible with them, which may be provided with the
videoconferencing application. A modem or ISDN terminal adapter can operate
(with its data terminal, of course) from its own extension, with no telephone at
the extension.
Desktop videoconferencing, data transfer, and screen-sharing applications
work with Release 4.0 and later systems.They use any combination of PRI, NI-1
BRI, and T1 Switched 56 data lines/trunks. Such systems can stand alone, and
some may also have an MLX telephone attached. Desktop videoconferencing
systems can use one MLX B-channel or two (for acceptable video quality). If the
system uses both MLX B-channels, you cannot use the phone connected to the
same MLX port as the videoconferencing application while the desktop
videoconferencing system is making or receiving calls. The use of two
B-channels is called 2B data.
2–30 About the System
System Components
3
Contents
Control Unit
■
■
■
■
Carriers
Processor Module
PCMCIA Memory Card
Power Supply Module
Line/Trunk and Extension Modules
Modules Supporting Extensions
Extension Jacks
Touch-Tone Receivers
016, 012, and 008 OPT Modules
Modules Supporting Lines/Trunks
Power-Failure Transfer Telephones
100D Module
800 NI-BRI Module
Summary
3–1
3–2
3–2
3–3
3–4
3–5
3–8
3–8
3–9
3–9
3–9
3–9
3–10
3–12
3–12
System Components 3–i
Contents
Telephones
■
■
■
■
■
MLX Telephones
MLX-28D
MLX-20L
MLX-16DP
MLX-10D
MLX-10DP
MLX-10
Direct Station Selector
Analog Multiline Telephones
Single-Line Telephones
Line Buttons on Multiline Telephones
Key Mode Line Buttons
Line Buttons in Hybrid/PBX Mode
Line Buttons and Special Considerations in Behind Switch
Mode
Operator Consoles
■
■
Queued Call Consoles
QCC Buttons
Direct-Line Consoles
Adapters
■
■
System Adapters
Telephone Adapters
Multi-Function Module
General-Purpose Adapter
Adjuncts
■
System Adjuncts
Station Message Detail Recording Printer
System Programming and Maintenance PC
Loudspeaker Paging Systems
Dial Dictation
Fax Machines
Delay Announcements
Door Phone
3–ii System Components
3–14
3–14
3–16
3–17
3–18
3–19
3–19
3–20
3–21
3–22
3–23
3–24
3–24
3–25
3–27
3–28
3–29
3–29
3–31
3–32
3–32
3–33
3–33
3–34
3–35
3–35
3–35
3–36
3–36
3–36
3–36
3–37
3–37
Contents
Adjuncts continued
■
■
■
Telephone Adjuncts
Modems
Headsets
Headpieces
Manual Operation (Analog Multiline Telephones Only)
One-Touch Operation (MLX and Analog Multiline
Telephones)
Specialty Handsets
Message-Waiting Indicator
Additional Telephone Adjuncts
Data Communications Adjuncts
ExpressRoute 1000 ISDN Terminal Adapter
Summary
Power-Related Hardware
■
■
■
■
Power Accessories
System Auxiliary Power
Battery Backup Power
Telephone Power Units
Protection Accessories
In-Range Out-of-Building Protection
Off-Premises Range Extender
146A and 147A Surge Protectors
Electromagnetic Interference Filters
System Alarms
Trouble Alarm
Power Failure Alarm
Power Failure DID Busy-Out
Power-Failure Transfer Telephone
3–37
3–37
3–38
3–38
3–38
3–38
3–38
3–39
3–39
3–39
3–40
3–40
3–43
3–43
3–43
3–44
3–44
3–44
3–44
3–45
3–45
3–45
3–45
3–45
3–45
3–46
3–46
System Components 3–iii
System Components
3
This chapter describes the system’s basic hardware. It includes descriptions of
the control unit, MLX telephones, analog multiline telephones, single-line
telephones, system operator consoles, adjuncts and adapters for the system
and telephones, and power-related accessories.
NOTE:
This chapter describes hardware that is currently available on the system. The
system also supports hardware that is no longer available for sale or lease. To
find out more about the hardware supported on the system, see the Equipment
and Operations Reference.
Control Unit
The control unit connects the telephone company’s outside trunks to the
system’s telephones and adjuncts. It is the heart of the system, managing the
traffic within the system (inside calls) and making telephone company facilities
and outside services available to your company. It includes the following
components:
■
Carriers (up to three)
■
Processor module (one per system)
■
Power supply module (one per carrier)
■
Line/trunk and extension modules (up to 17 total in three carriers)
■
Cover that protects the unit
System Components 3–1
Control Unit
Carriers
The carriers in the system are the containers that hold the modules on which the
circuit boards and connections for lines/trunks and extensions (called jacks or
ports) are. There can be up to three carriers: one basic carrier and two
expansion carriers.
The carriers hold the modules in slots. For the purposes of system programming
and installation, 2-digit numbers indicate the slots, starting with 00 for the
processor module.
Inside the back of each carrier is a component called the backplane, which
holds the circuitry that makes it possible for the modules to “talk” to each other
and for the processor module to handle the traffic among the modules.
Every system has a basic carrier that holds the following modules in its slots:
■
Power supply module (not numbered)
■
Processor module (slot 00)
■
Up to five line/trunk and extension modules (slots 01–05)
If you need more trunks and/or extensions than can fit in the basic carrier, you
can connect up to two expansion carriers to the basic carrier. Like the basic
carrier, each expansion carrier’s leftmost slot holds a power supply module; the
remaining six slots hold line/trunk and extension modules. (The processor
module in the basic carrier serves the expansion carriers too.) The six slots for
line/trunk and extension modules in the expansion carriers are numbered as
follows:
■
First expansion carrier: slots 06−11
■
Second expansion carrier: slots 12−17
Processor Module
The processor module is the “brains” of the system, a miniature computer that
controls system features and diagnostics, as well as the traffic among the
modules (see Figure 3−1). The processor module provides three jacks, one for
Station Message Detail Recording (labeled SMDR), one for system
programming and maintenance using a PC (labeled ADMIN), and one for
software maintenance by AT&T technicians only (this one is plugged shut).
The Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA)
interface slot on the processor module is the place in which you insert a
PCMCIA memory card. A memory card is very similar to a floppy diskette used
in a PC, but it is about the size of a credit card. There are different types of
memory cards used with the system, each with a different label; see the next
section for more information.
3–2 System Components
Processor
Control Unit
Module Label
Error/Status Code Display
PCMCIA
Interface Slot
Debugging Port (plugged to prevent access)
Alarm Status Light
SMDR Port
ADMIN Port
Figure 3–1. Release 4.0 Processor Module
The processor module has a single-character display for numbers and symbols
that help AT&T technicians to understand any problems with the system
software and to maintain the system. The module also has a red light that
indicates hardware failures.
A super capacitor in the processor module provides backup power for the
system’s clock and its memory in case of power failure or system shutdown. The
super capacitor retains data for 4 to 5 days.
PCMCIA Memory Card
The processor includes 4 MB of on-board memory that can be erased and
written over multiple times. A PCMCIA memory card can be used to install or
upgrade the system software into this memory. A memory card can also be
used to back up and restore system programming.
There are different types of memory cards, each about the size of a credit card.
Their labels indicate contents and function. Described below are three types of
PCMCIA memory cards that you may come in contact with. For more
information, see System Programming or contact your AT&T representative.
System Components 3–3
Control Unit
■
Feature Upgrade Memory Card. Orange label with black bars; entitled
Forced Installation. To upgrade your system to the latest release.
■
Maintenance Upgrade Memory Card. Orange label; entitled Upgrade
Card. To fix problems in the system.
■
Translation Memory Card. White label; entitled Translation Card. To
back up and restore your system programming as an alternative to using
System Programming and Maintenance (SPM). These procedures are
faster when you use the PCMCIA card.
Power Supply Module
The power supply module (Figure 3−2) provides power to the carrier, to each
telephone, and to most adjuncts (some adjuncts, such as fax machines, come
with their own power supplies and don’t rely on the system). Each carrier
requires its own power supply module, installed in the carrier’s leftmost slot.
In some systems, you need extra power supplies to support your system
components as described in “Power-Related Hardware,” later in this chapter.
POWER
CAUTION
ON
OFF
TURN OFF
POWER BEFORE
INSERTING OR
REMOVING
MODULES
Power Indicator (Green Light)
Auxillary Power Input Jack
On/Off Switch
Power Connection
Grounding Screw
Figure 3–2. Power Supply Module
3–4 System Components
Control Unit
Line/Trunk and Extension Modules
Line/trunk and extension modules have jacks for connecting telephone
company lines/trunks and extension wires to the control unit. The system
supports 17 types of line/trunk and extension modules. For maximum flexibility,
some modules support only lines/trunks, some only extensions, and some a
combination of the two.
Each module has a label that contains its name. As noted in Chapter 2, “About
the System,” the names of the modules identify their capacities and capabilities.
The first digit indicates the number of line/trunk jacks a module supports, while
the last two digits describe the number of extension jacks it supports. Following
the number may be letters that indicate the type of trunk or trunks it supports; for
example, LS for loop-start and GS for ground-start. A line/trunk module name
with no letter following it supports loop-start trunks. The following are examples
of module names:
■
The 408 GS/LS MLX module provides four trunk jacks supporting groundstart and/or loop-start trunks and eight MLX extension jacks.
■
The 016 module (Release 4.0 and later only) provides 16 extension jacks
that, in this case, supply tip/ring (T/R) connections for single-line
telephones, modems, voice messaging systems that serve the system as
a whole, and other components.
This section provides a table that describes the equipment you can connect to
each module, then includes some specific information about the modules that
connect extensions and the modules that connect lines/trunks, and a final
summary.
System Components 3–5
Control Unit
Table 3–1. Line/Trunk and Extension Modules
Module
Line/
Trunk
008
none
Capacity: 8 analog extension jacks
Supports: Analog multiline telephones; Call Management System (CMS)
008 MLX
none
Capacity: 8 digital extension jacks, each with 1 or 2 extensions (each
extension is assigned an individual extension number)
Supports: MLX extensions, including:
— MLX voice only
— MLX voice with Voice Announce to Busy
— MLX voice and ISDN terminal adapter
— MLX voice and Multi-Function Module (MFM) with T/R adjunct
— ISDN terminal adapter only
008 OPT*
none
Capacity: 8 T/R extensions on 2-way voice transmission path with support
for telephones with message-waiting lights, 2 TTRs
Supports: On-premises or off-premises single-line telephones
012
none
Capacity: 12 T/R extensions on 2-way voice transmission path with
support for telephones with message-waiting lights, 2 TTRs
Supports: Single-line telephones; AT&T Attendant; MERLIN MAIL Voice
Messaging System; CONVERSANT; T/R adjuncts (such as answering or
fax machine); analog data devices (such as modems)
016†
none
Capacity: 16 T/R extensions on 2-way voice transmission path with
support for telephones with message-waiting lights, 4 TTRs
Supports: Single-line telephones; AT&T Attendant; MERLIN MAIL Voice
Messaging System; CONVERSANT; T/R adjuncts (such as answering or
fax machine); analog data devices (such as modems).
100D
T1 or PRI
Capacity: 24 channels/B-channels (“virtual” lines/trunks) for voice and
analog data or for digital data only (T1); or 23 for voice and data and 1
channel used for signaling (PRI).
Supports: See section “100D Module” for details. T1 emulates 24
lines/trunks: loop-start, ground-start, tie, and Direct Inward Dial (DID;
Hybrid/PBX mode only); can also supply AT&T subscriber services. In
Release 4.0 and later, T1 can also provide high-speed data
communications and digitally emulated tie trunks for data
communications. PRI supports AT&T subscriber services and allows highspeed digital data communications and includes special features.
*
†
Description
The system software recognizes the OPT module as a 012 module. Even though the OPT
module only has 8 jacks, it uses 12 ports of capacity, thereby decreasing overall
extension capacity by 4 extensions for every OPT module.
This module is not compatible with releases prior to Release 4.0.
Continued on next page
3–6 System Components
Control Unit
Table 3–1, Continued
Module
Line/
Trunk
Description
800
NI-BRI*
BRI
Capacity: 8 BRIs, each with 2 B-channels (“virtual” lines) for voice and
data and 1 channel used for signaling.
Supports: See section “800 NI-BRI” module for details. Voice, data,
video, and other services at 64 kbps over standard ISDN lines/trunks.
400†
LS and TTR Capacity: 4 lines/trunks, 4 TTRs, 1 power-failure transfer (PFT) telephone
Supports: A PFT telephone
400EM
Tie trunk
Capacity: 4 tie trunks
400 GS/LS
LS or GS
and TTR
Capacity: 4 lines/trunks, 4 TTRs, 1 PFT telephone
Supports: A PFT telephone with ground-start (GS) button
408†
LS
Capacity: 4 lines/trunks, 8 extensions, 1 PFT telephone
Supports: Analog multiline telephones; CMS; a PFT telephone
408 GS/LS
LS or GS
Capacity: 4 lines/trunks, 8 extensions, 1 PFT telephone
Supports: Analog multiline telephones; CMS; PFT telephone (GS button
needed)
408 GS/LS- LS or GS
MLX‡
Capacity: 4 lines/trunks, 1 PFT telephone, 8 digital extension jacks for
MLX extensions, including:
— MLX voice only
— MLX voice with Voice Announce to Busy
— MLX voice and ISDN terminal adapter
— MLX voice and MFM with T/R adjunct
— ISDN terminal adapter only
800†
LS
Capacity: 8 lines, 2 PFT telephones
Supports: 2 PFT telephones
800 DID
DID and
TTR
Capacity: 8 lines/trunks, 2 TTRs
800 GS/LS
LS or GS
and TTR
Capacity: 8 lines/trunks, 2 PFT telephones
Supports: 2 PFT telephones with ground-start (GS) button
800
GS/LS-ID§
LS or GS
Capacity: 8 lines/trunks, 2 PFT ports; 2 TTRs
Supports: Caller ID (ground-start trunks only) that, if you subscribe to
caller identification from the local phone company, displays the numbers
of incoming callers (from supported areas) on MLX display phones.
*
†
‡
§
This module is not compatible with releases prior to Release 4.0.
Although these MERLIN II modules are supported, the following are recommended for
the system: 400 GS/LS, 408 GS/LS, 408 GS/LS-MLX, 800 GS/LS, and 800 GS/LS-ID.
This module is not compatible with releases prior to Release 2.0.
This module is not compatible with releases prior to Release 3.0.
System Components 3–7
Control Unit
Modules Supporting Extensions
Table 3−1 describes the type of equipment that each module supports. This
section highlights some important points about extension modules.
NOTE:
Extension jacks connect to individual telephones and to adjuncts that are
attached to extensions. Some adjuncts and applications serve the whole system
and connect directly to line/trunk jacks.
Extension Jacks
While the jacks that support MLX extensions and the jacks that support analog
extensions may look the same, there is a major difference: an MLX extension
jack actually supports two extension numbers at each location served by the
jack.
When you use an adapter called a Multi-Function Module in an MLX telephone,
you can connect a T/R device (for example, a modem, a fax machine, or an
answering machine) to that telephone. Even though a single extension jack on
the module serves both the phone and T/R device, each device has its own
extension number and operates independently. In contrast, if you want to use
both an analog multiline telephone and a modem or other adjunct at the same
location in the system and give each one its own extension number, you must
use two physical extension jacks on the module.
The Voice Announce to Busy feature, which allows a telephone user to hear a
voice page (also called a voice-announced call ) while on another call, has the
same requirements as an adjunct that operates independently from the phone:
one extension jack (and no adjunct) for an MLX phone; two extension jacks for
an analog multiline telephone. Single-line telephones and cordless or wireless
telephones (which are analog multiline telephones) cannot receive voice pages.
NOTE:
There is a distinction between an extension jack (sometimes referred to as a
logical ID or port) and an extension number. In system programming, you
sometimes need to use port/jack/logical ID numbers rather than extension
numbers or system line/trunk numbers. Port/jack/logical IDs are numbered,
starting at 1, from the bottom of a module, and are fixed: they cannot be
changed. The extension and line/trunk numbers that people in the system dial
are flexible and can be programmed.
3–8 System Components
Control Unit
Touch-Tone Receivers
In addition to jacks for connecting lines/trunks and extensions, various modules
also include components called touch-tone receivers (TTRs). These TTRs allow
the system to process touch tones entered by outside callers for special
purposes, such as automated attendants that answer calls from people with
touch-tone phones, voice mail systems, and remote access callers who call into
the system and use its services. When your AT&T representative helps plan
your system, he or she makes sure that your modules have enough touch-tone
receivers to support your needs. When you add an application or adjunct to
your system, you sometimes have to make more TTRs available as well. For
information about adding TTRs, see the Equipment and Operations Reference.
016, 012, and 008 OPT Modules
Extension modules that support single-line telephones or off-premises
telephones (OPT) must have ring generators so that the phones get electrical
current for their ringers. All 016 extension modules, which are compatible only
with Release 4.0 and later systems, include built-in ring generators. Since late in
1993, 012 and 008 modules have come with ring generators built in. Earlier
modules required AT&T technicians to install ring generators. If your 008 or 012
module has a ring generator, either added or built-in, you should see a label on
the front of the module telling you that the ring generator is included.
Also, 016, 012, and 008 modules allow the connection of T/R devices directly to
the control unit, without the need for a telephone and adapter at an extension.
You can use them to hook up fax machines or PCs with modems, for example.
For more information, see “Adjuncts,” later in this chapter.
Modules Supporting Lines/Trunks
Table 3−1 summarizes the modules that support lines/trunks. This section
describes a few module features and modules that need additional explanation.
NOTE:
Modes of operation affect features and hardware. For example, Direct Inward
Dialing is only supported in Hybrid/PBX mode, so if your system uses a different
mode of operation, you don’t need a DID module. For more information about
modes, see Chapter 2, “About the System.”
Power-Failure Transfer Telephones
When your system was planned, the AT&T representative(s) made sure that you
had a module to support one or more power-failure transfer (PFT) telephones.
These telephones, which are connected to a special line/trunk jack, allow you to
make and receive calls during a commercial power failure. They do not affect
the capacity of the modules.
System Components 3–9
Control Unit
100D Module
The 100D module has only one line/trunk (called a Digital Signal Level 1 or DS1
facility) but actually supports 23 or 24 “virtual” lines/trunks. These are called
channels or B-channels, depending upon the type of service you choose. As
described in Chapter 2, “About the System,” you can program the DS1 facility to
provide either T1 or Primary Rate Interface (PRI) service on the 100D module,
supplying a combination of the AT&T Switched Network (ASN) services listed
below (your company must subscribe to these). Only domestic, not
international, services are provided.
■
Megacom WATS. Supports domestic long-distance outgoing voice calls.
■
Megacom 800. Supports domestic toll-free incoming voice calls. T1 and
PRI support Megacom 800 with or without Dialed Number Identification
Service (DNIS). DNIS is a service provided by ASN. It routes incoming
800 or 900 calls according to customer-selected parameters, such as
area code, state, or time of call. For example, a customer can specify that
calls received from a particular area code be routed to a specific
individual or group responsible for accounts in the area.
■
Software Defined Network (SDN). An ASN service that supports voice
calls and circuit-switched data calls. SDN enables your business to use
portions of the ASN in concert with dedicated private line networks.
However, the system does not support the uniform dialing plan that is
necessary for complete integration with SDN.
■
MultiQuest. Supports domestic toll incoming voice calls (900 number).
T1 and PRI support MultiQuest with or without DNIS.
NOTE:
The 100D module is not available in Behind Switch mode.
PRI and T1 differ in some important ways:
■
Primary Rate Interface (PRI). PRI supports Shared Access for Switched
Services (SASS) and Call-by-Call Service Selection. SASS allows both
Megacom and Megacom 800 services to use the same facilities,
eliminating the need to have dedicated, separate incoming and outgoing
B-channel groups. Call-by-Call Service Selection selects the optimal
service for each outgoing call. Call-by-Call Service Selection provides
more than one service over each B-channel, including Accunet digital
data communications at speeds up to 64 kilobits per second.
3–10 System Components
Control Unit
PRI supports Station Identification/Automatic Number Identification when
your company subscribes to it.
PRI also allows your system to connect to an AT&T DEFINITY telephone
system.
In addition, PRI supports Group IV (G4) fax machines, as well as desktop
and group videoconferencing.
■
T1 Service. This service is cost-effective and convenient for many
businesses. Prior to Release 4.0, it provided voice operation only. In
Release 4.0 and later systems, T1 service provides voice operation or
high-speed data operation. A T1 channel must be programmed either for
voice or data operation and cannot be used for both.
Voice Operation. T1 voice channels can be configured to emulate
different types of trunks for voice (analog) use, according to
business needs. T1 can emulate loop-start, ground-start, Direct
Inward Dial (DID, Hybrid/PBX mode only), and tie trunks. In some
areas, T1 service is less expensive than leasing the equivalent
number of standard telephone company trunks.
You can connect the system’s control unit to another system’s
control unit using an emulated T1 tie trunk programmed for T1type voice operation. This arrangement provides voice
communications or analog data communications using modems.
T1 voice operation also supports Megacom WATS and Megacom
800 on a shared line/trunk.
Data Operation. Available in Release 4.0 and later systems, T1
Switched 56 data operation allows switched data communications
at 56 kilobits per second. This supports Accunet Switched 56
Service, as well as other data communications services. The same
high-speed connectivity can link a MERLIN LEGEND
Communications System to another or to link a MERLIN LEGEND
Communications System to a DEFINITY system. Whether used for
digital tie-trunk emulation or not, a T1 data-operation B-channel
provides data communication only, not voice communications.
System Components 3–11
Control Unit
800 NI-BRI Module
For Release 4.0 and later systems, this module supplies eight line/trunk jacks for
connecting central office facilities that use the standard National ISDN 1
(Integrated Services Digital Network 1) protocol and the BRI (Basic Rate
Interface) access arrangement (this combination is abbreviated NI-1 BRI).
These digital facilities are available from COs in many areas.
Each facility actually includes three “virtual” lines: two B-channels for carrying
voice and data and one D-channel for handling signaling and maintenance.
NOTE:
The 800 NI-BRI module is not available in Behind Switch mode.
Summary
Figure 3–3 shows each module; Table 3–1 lists the number of available jacks for
each module and presents a brief description of the equipment you can
connect to it.
NOTE:
Modules labeled “GS/LS” can accept ground-start trunks, loop-start trunks, or a
combination of both types of trunks.
3–12 System Components
PFT Jack
PFT Jack
Line/
Trunk
Jacks
Line/Trunk
Jacks
Line/Trunk
Jacks
Line/
Trunk
Jacks
Line/Trunk
Jacks
PFT Jack
Line/
Trunk
Jacks
Line/
Trunk
Jacks
Line/
Trunk
Jacks
Line/
Trunk
Jacks
TieTrunk
Jacks
PFT Jack
4-pair
Jacks
(DS1)
Line/
Trunk
Jacks
Line/
Trunk
Jacks
PFT Jack
PFT Jack
800 GS/LS
8 GS/LS Outside Lines
800
8 Outside Lines
800 DID
8 Direct Inward Dialing Trunks
400 GHS/LS/TTR
4 GS or LS Outside Lines
Touch Tone Receivers
400
4 Outside Lines
Touch Tone Receivers
400EM
4 E&M Tie Trunks
800 GS/LS-ID
8 GS/LS-ID Outside Lines
800 NI-BRI
8 Central Office Basic Rate Interfaces
Control Unit
Line/Trunk
Jacks
PFT Jack
PFT Jack
TieTrunk
Jacks
800 DID
Off-Premises
Telephone
(OPT) Jacks
408 GS/LS
4 GS or LS Outside Lines/
8 Analog Telephones (ATL)
PFT Jack
PFT Jack
PFT Jack
Line/
Trunk
Jacks
Line/
Trunk
Jacks
Line/
Trunk
Jacks
Analog
Extension
Jacks
Analog
Extension
Jacks
Digital
Extension
Jacks
Basic
Telephone
Jacks
Off-Premises
Telephone
(OPT) Jacks
Basic
Telephone
Jacks
Analog
Extension
Jacks
008 OPT
800
GS/LS
800
408 GS/LS
4 GS or LS Outside Lines/
8 Analog Telephones (ATL)
400
GS/LS/TTR
016 with RING GEN.
16 Basic Telephone Sets
008
8 Analog Telephones (ATL)
400
408
4 Outside Lines/ 8 Voice Terminals
400EM
008 MLX
8 MLX (Dighital) Telephones
100D
012
12 Basic Telephone Sets
800
GS/LS-ID
008 OPT
8 Off-Premisis (Basic) Telephones (+4)
800
NI-BRI
008
Digital
Extension
Jacks
008 MLX
012
016
408
408
GS/LS
408
GS/LS-MLX
Figure 3–3. Line/Trunk and Extension Modules
System Components 3–13
Telephones
Telephones
You can use MLX (digital) telephones as well as several different analog and
single-line telephones with the system. This section describes these telephones.
NOTE:
Telephones that are located far from the control unit or that have other
equipment (adjuncts) attached (for example, an answering machine or a fax
machine) may need additional power. A special power unit, described in
“Power-Related Hardware,” later in this chapter, supplies this need.
MLX Telephones
MLX telephones are available in black or white with factory-set buttons in
English, French, or Spanish. (The MLX-10DP telephone is available with Englishlanguage buttons only.) In addition, all models have the following features in
common:
■
Line buttons (that can be programmed with features) with red and green
lights
■
Fixed-feature buttons (including Feature, HFAI, Mute, and Speaker)
■
Red Message light
■
Built-in speakerphone
■
Multi-function volume control for speakerphone, handset, and ringer
■
Telephone card tray for easy reference to frequently used features
■
Two-position adjustable desk stand
■
Four-pair modular line cord
■
Optional Multi-Function Module (MFM) to connect tip/ring (T/R)
equipment and alerting devices
3–14 System Components
Telephones
MLX display telephones in particular offer enhanced services to telephone
users and to you in your role as system manager. MLX display telephones have
the following unique features:
■
Menu-driven telephone programming
■
The ability to select and use features from the display
■
Support for Primary Rate Interface (PRI) calling number identification
services and the Caller ID feature
■
Information in English, French, or Spanish. (You can program the system
to provide all displays to MLX telephones in one of these languages;
users at each MLX telephone can program their own telephones to
display in English, French, or Spanish, independently of the system
language.)
The communications system supports the following MLX telephones:
■
MLX-28D
■
MLX-20L
■
MLX-16DP
■
MLX-10D
■
MLX-10DP
■
MLX-10
A list of features specific to each MLX telephone follows.
System Components 3–15
Telephones
MLX-28D
The MLX-28D telephone (Figure 3−4) provides the following features:
■
Optional Direct-Line Console (DLC) operation
■
Display (2 lines by 24 characters)
■
28 line buttons that can be programmed with features
■
4 fixed display buttons, 4 unlabeled display buttons for screen selection,
and 8 fixed-feature buttons
■
Support of one or two Direct Station Selectors (DSSs) or PassageWay
Direct Connect Solution
MLX-28D telephones cannot be wall-mounted.
Handset
Display Screen
MLX-28D
Unlabeled Display Buttons (4)
Home
Menu
Inspct
Fixed-Display Buttons (4)
More
Button Labeling Cards
Line Buttons (28)
v
v Volume
1
Feature
Transfer
GHI
HFAI
Conf
PQRS
Mute
Drop
Speaker
Hold
4
7
ABC
DEF
JKL
MNO
5
6
TUV
WXYZ
2
8
3
Message
9
Message Light
Dialpad
OPER
*
0
#
Volume Control
Fixed-Feature Buttons (8)
User Cards and Tray
Figure 3–4. MLX-28D Telephone
3–16 System Components
Telephones
MLX-20L
The MLX-20L telephone (Figure 3−5) provides the following features:
■
System programming and optional DLC or QCC operation
■
Display (7 lines by 24 characters)
■
20 line buttons that can be programmed with features
■
14 fixed and unlabeled display buttons and 8 fixed-feature buttons
■
Support of one or two DSSs or PassageWay Direct Connect Solution
MLX-20L telephones cannot be wall-mounted.
NOTE:
When used as a QCC, some restrictions apply. The line buttons are not
programmable, and the console cannot have an MFM. Later in this chapter is
more information about QCCs.
Unlabeled Display
Buttons (10)
Fixed-Display
Buttons (4)
Display Screen
MLX-20L
Home
More
Menu
Inspct
Button Labeling Cards
Handset
Line Buttons (20)
v
v Volume
Feature
Transfer
Message
1
GHI
4
HFAI
Conf
Mute
Drop
Speaker
Hold
PQRS
7
ABC
DEF
JKL
MNO
5
6
TUV
WXYZ
2
8
3
9
Message Light
Dialpad
OPER
*
0
#
Volume Control
Fixed-Feature Buttons (8)
User Cards and Tray
Figure 3–5. MLX-20L Telephone
System Components 3–17
Telephones
MLX-16DP
The MLX-16DP telephone (Figure 3−6) provides the following features:
■
Display (2 lines by 24 characters)
■
16 line buttons that can be programmed with features
■
4 fixed display buttons, 4 unlabeled display buttons for screen selection,
and 8 fixed-feature buttons
■
Support of PassageWay Direct Connect Solution, version 2.1 or later
MLX-16DP telephones cannot be wall-mounted.
NOTES:
1. The MLX-16DP telephone cannot be an operator console.
2. The system recognizes the MLX-16DP as an MLX-28D. For this reason, when
programming the telephone, be careful not to assign lines or features to
buttons that do not actually exist on the telephone. Programming instructions
come with the equipment.
Handset
Display Screen
MLX-16DP
Unlabeled Display Buttons (4)
Home
Menu
Inspct
Fixed-Display Buttons (4)
More
Button Labeling Card
Line Buttons (16)
Message
HFAI
Mute
Speaker
v
v Volume
Feature
Transfer
ABC
DEF
GHI
JKL
MNO
5
6
PQRS
TUV
WXYZ
1
4
2
Conf
Drop
Hold
7
*
8
OPER
0
Message Light
3
Dialpad
9
#
Volume Control
Fixed-Feature Buttons (8)
User Cards and Tray
Figure 3–6. MLX-16DP Telephone
3–18 System Components
Telephones
MLX-10D
The MLX-10D telephone (Figure 3−7) provides the following features:
■
Display (2 lines by 24 characters)
■
10 line buttons that can be programmed with features
■
8 fixed display buttons and 8 fixed-feature buttons
MLX-10D telephones can be wall-mounted, but doing so makes the display
hard to read.
Handset
Display Screen
MLX-10D
Unlabeled Display Buttons (4)
Home
Menu
Inspct
Fixed-Display Buttons (4)
More
Button Labeling Card
Line Buttons (10)
Message
Feature
HFAI
Mute
Speaker
v
v Volume
Transfer
ABC
DEF
GHI
JKL
MNO
5
6
PQRS
TUV
WXYZ
1
4
2
Conf
Drop
Hold
7
*
8
OPER
0
Message Light
3
Dialpad
9
#
Volume Control
Fixed-Feature Buttons (8)
User Cards and Tray
Figure 3–7. MLX-10D Telephone
MLX-10DP
The MLX-10DP telephone is the same as the MLX-10D telephone (see Figure
3−8), except that the MLX-10DP has an adjunct jack in the back of it for
connecting the PassageWay Direct Connect Solution application.
System Components 3–19
Telephones
MLX-10
The MLX-10 telephone (Figure 3−8) provides the following features:
■
10 line buttons that can be programmed with features
■
8 fixed-feature buttons
MLX-10 telephones can be wall-mounted.
Handset
MLX-10
Button Labeling Card
Line Buttons (10)
Message
v
v Volume
Feature
Transfer
ABC
DEF
GHI
JKL
MNO
5
6
PQRS
TUV
WXYZ
1
2
4
HFAI
Conf
Mute
Drop
Speaker
Hold
7
*
8
OPER
0
Message Light
3
9
Dialpad
#
Volume Control
Fixed-Feature Buttons (8)
User Cards and Tray
Figure 3–8. MLX-10 Telephone
3–20 System Components
Telephones
Direct Station Selector
The Direct Station Selector (DSS), shown in Figure 3–9, is an adjunct that you
can connect to an MLX-20L or an MLX-28D telephone programmed as an
operator console (it cannot connect to any other telephone). DSSs enhance the
capabilities of both DLCs and QCCs and, when connected to an MLX-20L
telephone, help with programming. The DSS has 50 multifunction buttons, all of
which have lights.
DSS Buttons
DSS
00
10
20
30
40
01
11
21
31
41
02
12
22
32
42
03
13
23
33
43
04
14
24
34
44
05
15
25
35
45
06
16
26
36
46
07
17
27
37
47
08
18
28
38
48
09
19
29
39
49
Page
Buttons
Message
Status
Button
Figure 3–9. Direct Station Selector
The system operator can use DSS buttons for one-touch dialing and Transfer.
Buttons can be programmed with the following numbers:
■
Extension numbers
■
Line/trunk numbers
■
Pool dial-out codes (Hybrid/PBX only)
■
Calling group extension numbers
System Components 3–21
Telephones
■
Paging group extension numbers
■
Park zone access codes
■
Automatic Route Selection (ARS) access codes
■
Remote Access dial code
■
Listed Directory Number (the extension for the QCC queue)
Ten fixed-feature buttons with green lights are at the bottom of the DSS. The first
three (from left to right) on the top row are Page buttons, which you use to select
the range of extension numbers represented by the DSS buttons. Each DSS
button can represent up to 3 extension numbers, and each set of 50 extension
numbers is called a page. The DSS can have up to 3 pages of numbers, for a
total of 150 extensions handled by one DSS. If the console has two DSSs, only
the Page buttons on the first DSS are used.
Page buttons act like the Shift key on a PC or typewriter. Each of the 3 Page
buttons activates a set of 50 numbers. For example, the Page 1 button may
access extensions 1–50, the Page 2 button may access extensions 51–100, and
the Page 3 button may access extensions 101–150.
If two DSSs are connected together, the total extension capacity of the console
increases to 300. Each Page button then handles a range of 100 extensions
across both DSSs. If your system has more than 150 extensions and you want
access to all system extensions through DSSs, you must have two DSSs.
NOTE:
Extensions may have to be renumbered in order to have all extension numbers
appear on the DSS.
A fourth button (lower leftmost) is the Message Status button, which changes
the mode to and from message status operation. The remaining six buttons in
the bottom two rows are not used.
NOTE:
DSSs ship without auxiliary power supplies; if two DSSs are connected to a
console, you must order auxiliary power (329A unit) separately.
Analog Multiline Telephones
In addition to MLX telephones, the system supports the currently available
analog multiline telephones listed in Table 3–2.
The displays on analog multiline telephones provide call-handling information;
they do not support menu-driven telephone programming, selection of features
from the display, or operation in languages other than English.
3–22 System Components
Telephones
Table 3–2. Analog Multiline Telephones
Model
Description
BIS-10
10-button telephone with built-in speakerphone
BIS-22
22-button telephone with built-in speakerphone
BIS-22D
22-button telephone with 16-character display and built-in
speakerphone
BIS-34D
34-button telephone with 16-character display and built-in
speakerphone
MDC 9000 Cordless
Cordless multiline
MDW 9000
Cordless and wireless multiline
MERLIN II System Display34-button telephone with a built-in DSS (the only telephone
Console
model that is uniquely used as an operator console) for
Direct-Line Console operation
MERLIN PFC
Telephone
Analog multiline phone, fax machine, and copier; requires
two analog multiline extension jacks
Single-Line Telephones
Table 3–3 lists the recommended single-line telephones. Other available singleline telephones are also supported but are not recommended for Release 3.0 or
later systems. Contact your AT&T representative for more information.
Table 3–3. Single-Line Telephones
Model
Description
2500 YMGL
Basic desk telephone
2500 MMGL
Basic desk telephone with selectable positive disconnect
8101
Basic desk telephone with jack to support adjuncts
8110
Basic desk telephone with jack to support adjuncts, built-in
speakerphone, and programmable dialing buttons
3129-WTWA
Touch-tone outdoor telephone with cast aluminum housing, armored
handset cord with bell ringers
3129-WRWA
Rotary dial outdoor telephone with same features as 3129-WTWA
3129-WAWA
Auto dial outdoor telephone with cast aluminum housing, armored
handset cord with bell ringers
3129-WNWA
Non-dial, automatic ringing on dedicated circuit outdoor telephone
with cast aluminum housing, armored handset cord with bell ringers
System Components 3–23
Telephones
Line Buttons on Multiline Telephones
Different models of telephones, of course, have different imprinted buttons. The
descriptions above summarized these buttons. Line buttons on multiline
telephones fall into two categories:
■
Buttons that are system-programmed to access an inside or outside line
or pool of outside lines
■
Blank line buttons that can be programmed—by the system manager
only, or by either the system manager or the user—with system features
Buttons are different on Queued Call Consoles (QCCs), and you can read more
about them later in this chapter. Direct-Line Consoles are similar to other MLX
display telephones, but there are differences that are also described later in this
chapter.
The system automatically assigns line buttons to each multiline telephone. You
can add, remove, or change this assignment through centralized telephone
programming, but every multiline telephone will automatically have two ICOM
(intercom) or three SA (System Access) buttons assigned. Whether your system
has ICOM buttons or SA buttons depends on the system’s operating mode.
(Chapter 2, “About the System,” explains modes.)
NOTE:
The system automatically assigns two ICOM or SA buttons to single-line
telephones. Even though the telephone allows only one line, the extra assigned
button permits the use of features that require two line buttons (for example,
Transfer). In Release 4.0 and later systems only, the system manager can
remove one line button assigned to a single-line telephone. This disables
Transfer, Park, Account Codes, Pickup, Call Waiting, Conference, Extension
Status, and Privacy.
Key Mode Line Buttons
When the system operates in Key mode, you can program two different kinds of
line buttons for making and receiving calls:
■
Line Buttons (or Keys). These buttons are associated with specific
outside lines for making or receiving calls to telephone numbers other
than system extensions (“outside” the system). Line buttons allow you to
see activity on other telephones, join conversations, and make and
receive calls.
■
ICOM Buttons. These buttons allow you to make and receive inside calls
to or from system extension numbers (“inside” the system).
3–24 System Components
Telephones
ICOM buttons fall into several categories:
■
ICOM Ring. Use this button to make inside calls and to receive inside
and outside calls transferred from another extension. When you use an
ICOM Ring button to make an inside call, the telephone at the destination
extension rings once per ring cycle to indicate an inside call.
■
ICOM Voice. Use this button to make inside calls and to receive inside
and outside calls transferred from another extension. When you use
ICOM Voice to make an inside call, the user at the destination extension
hears the caller’s voice on the speakerphone after a beep that replaces
ringing. (If you are using an ICOM Voice button to make a voiceannounced call and the user at the destination extension has a single-line
telephone or a telephone that does not have a speakerphone, or has
disabled voice announcements, the telephone rings just as if the call was
made on an ICOM Ring button.)
■
ICOM Originate Only. Use this button to make inside calls. You cannot
receive inside or outside calls on ICOM Originate Only buttons. This
type of button ensures that you always have a button available to make or
transfer a call, establish a conference call, answer a call-waiting call, or
pick up parked calls. You can program this button for either voice or ring
operation.
You can assign any combination of up to 10 ICOM Voice, ICOM Ring, and
ICOM Originate Only buttons to each telephone on line buttons 1 through 10.
The number of line buttons that you can assign to a telephone is limited only by
the number of lines/trunks in the system and the number of buttons available on
the telephone.
Line Buttons in Hybrid/PBX Mode
Because outside trunks are pooled in Hybrid/PBX mode, outside numbers are
not associated with individual telephones. SA buttons on multiline telephones
allow you to access a pool of lines and make different kinds of calls from the
same button. Other types of buttons may connect the user to pools of specialpurpose lines or to personal lines that are not pooled.
You can assign the following types of buttons to multiline telephones:
■
SA Ring. Use this button to make and receive inside and outside calls.
When you use an SA Ring button to make an inside call, the telephone at
the destination extension rings once per cycle to indicate an inside call.
System Components 3–25
Telephones
■
SA Voice. Use this button to make and receive inside and outside calls.
When you use an SA Voice button to make an inside call, the user at the
destination extension hears your voice on the speakerphone after a
single beep, rather than ringing. (If you are using an SA Voice button to
make a voice-announced call and the user at the destination extension
has a telephone that does not have a speakerphone or has disabled
voice announcements, the telephone rings just as if the call was made on
an SA Ring button.)
■
SA Originate Only. Use this button to make inside and outside calls. You
cannot receive calls on SA Originate Only buttons. The purpose of this
type of button is to ensure that you always have a button available to
make or transfer a call, establish a conference call, answer a call-waiting
call, or pick up parked calls. For inside calls, you can program the button
for either voice or ring operation.
■
Shared SA (SSA). Use this button to allow two or more users to answer
each other’s calls, join conversations, or make or receive inside or
outside calls on each other’s SA Ring or SA Voice buttons. In a Shared
System Access arrangement, one extension is the principal (or primary)
extension. This extension is the telephone from which SA Ring, SA
Voice, and/or SA Originate Only buttons are assigned as Shared SA
buttons.
Shared SA buttons are often used by assistants and their supervisors, as
well as people who work closely together, such as in a customer service
department. For inside calls, you can program the button for either voice
or ring operation.
■
Pool. Use this button to make outside calls on a specific trunk pool. To
make an outside call, press the appropriate Pool button; no dial-out code
is necessary.
■
Personal Line. Use this button to dedicate the use of a specific outside
trunk to one or more telephones in the system. You can use the personal
line button to make and receive only outside calls. To make a call, press
the appropriate personal line button; no dial-out code is necessary.
You can assign a combination of up to 28 SA Voice, SA Ring, SA Originate
Only, and Shared SA buttons to any telephone (but not to a QCC) with 28 or
more line buttons, using buttons 1 through 28. Buttons 1 through 10 can be SA
buttons, and one must be an SA button. Any of the remaining 27 buttons can be
assigned as Shared SA buttons, but no Shared SA buttons are required. The
number of personal line buttons that you can assign to a telephone is limited
only by the number of trunks in the system and the number of buttons available
on the telephone.
3–26 System Components
Telephones
Line Buttons and Special Considerations in
Behind Switch Mode
When you program the system for Behind Switch mode, the system assigns a
single prime line, an ICOM Ring button, and an ICOM Voice button to each
multiline telephone. When you lift the telephone handset, the prime line is
selected automatically (even when it is busy) unless you have first selected a
different button. The prime line connects only to the host system and from the
host to an outside trunk. (For more information about local and host systems in
Behind Switch Mode, see “Modes of Operation” in Chapter 2.)
To call another person connected to the host system, you dial the host system
extension number assigned to that person. To access an outside trunk, you dial
the host system’s dial-out code (usually a 9 ), and the host system selects an
available outside trunk.
In Behind Switch mode, ICOM buttons allow you to call other people connected
to the system but not necessarily to the host. When you press an ICOM button,
you reach an inside talk path and receive dial tone from the MERLIN LEGEND
Communications System (not from the host). You can then reach co-workers
without tying up a prime line.
You can use the following types of buttons to make and receive inside calls in
Behind Switch mode:
■
ICOM Ring. Use this button to make inside calls and to receive inside
calls and outside calls transferred from another extension. When you use
an ICOM Ring button to make an inside call, the telephone at the
destination extension rings with one burst to indicate an inside call.
■
ICOM Voice. Use this button to make inside calls and to receive inside
calls and outside calls transferred from another extension. When you use
an ICOM Voice button to make an inside call, the person at the
destination extension hears your voice on the speakerphone after a
single beep, rather than ringing. (If you are using an ICOM Voice button
to make a voice-announced call and the user at the destination extension
has a telephone that does not have a speakerphone or has disabled
voice announcements, the telephone rings just as if the call was made on
an ICOM Ring button.)
■
ICOM Originate Only. Use this button to make inside calls only. Neither
inside nor outside calls can be received on an ICOM Originate Only
button. This button ensures that you always have a button available to
make or transfer a call, establish a conference call, answer a call-waiting
call, or pick up a parked call. You can program the button for either voice
or ring operation.
System Components 3–27
Operator Consoles
You can assign a combination of up to 10 ICOM Voice, ICOM Ring, and ICOM
Originate Only buttons to each multiline telephone, on buttons 1 through 10.
The number of prime line buttons that can be assigned is limited only by the
number of trunks provided by the host and the number of buttons available on
the telephone.
In Behind Switch mode, you have access to the special features of both the
on-site communications system and the host system. When both systems have
common features, you must decide which system to use for those features.
When you press a fixed-feature Conference, Drop, or Transfer button, the
respective host features are activated, not those of the communications system.
However, an unused line button on a telephone can be programmed for the
communications system’s own Conference, Drop, or Transfer feature. Each
system must be programmed to meet your needs, and you must give users the
appropriate access instructions.
The way that buttons are programmed in Behind Switch mode has many effects
on system feature use and host feature use. For details or advice when planning
a modification for this mode of operation, consult your AT&T representative.
Also, see Chapter 4, “Features and Applications,” for additional information.
Operator Consoles
Operator consoles are telephones that you program for call handling and other
system operator duties. With one exception (the MERLIN II System Display
Console with built-in DSS), the telephones themselves are no different from the
ones already described. In most cases, the telephone’s programming and the
extension jack it connects to on the control unit are what makes the telephone
an operator console. An operator console can be a Queued Call Console (QCC)
or Direct-Line Console (DLC). QCCs are available only in Hybrid/PBX mode.
A system operating in Hybrid/PBX mode can include both QCCs and DLCs.
Table 3–4 shows the maximum number of both types of system operator
positions.
Table 3–4. Maximum Number of System Operator Positions
Position Types
Type of Telephone
QCC
DLC
MLX-20L
MLX-20L
MLX-28D
BIS-34D, BIS-22, or BIS-22D
analog multiline telephones
MERLIN II Display Console
3–28 System Components
Maximum Positions
4
8
Operator Consoles
NOTE:
The system cannot have more than eight operator positions of any combination
(QCCs and/or DLCs); if you use a combination of consoles, no more than four
can be QCCs.
Queued Call Consoles
The Queued Call Console (QCC) is available only in Hybrid/PBX mode. In a
QCC configuration, the system holds waiting calls in a queue and directs them
to a QCC as a position becomes available. Only one call rings at a time.
The MLX-20L telephone is the only telephone that you can assign as a QCC.
Unlike other users, the QCC system operator cannot use feature codes to
activate features; however, the operator can choose features from the display
and use the fixed features that have been assigned to the console buttons.
The display also tells the operator about incoming and outgoing calls: extension
numbers and names (if programmed), trunk identifiers, reasons for call return
and redirection, and the number of unanswered calls waiting for the operator’s
attention.
QCC Buttons
The system automatically sets the buttons on the QCC with fixed features, and
they are not programmable by the system operator or through centralized
telephone programming. The QCC has the following fixed-feature buttons:
■
Call. Five buttons used to answer incoming calls and make inside and
outside calls.
NOTE:
In Release 4.0 and later systems, the system manager can enable the
Voice Announce to Busy feature on the fifth Call button (the factory
setting is disabled). Then the QCC operator can use this button to voice
announce a call to a user who can receive voice-announced calls. This
setting applies to all QCCs in the system.
■
Start. Initiates the call-directing process by putting a caller on hold at the
Source button and providing an inside dial tone to the system operator.
■
Source. Reconnects the system operator to the original caller before the
call is connected to (released to) its destination.
System Components 3–29
Operator Consoles
■
Release. Releases the system operator from a call and/or completes the
call-directing process, making the operator available for another call.
■
Destination. Reconnects the system operator to the destination before a
new call is released to its destination.
■
Cancel. Cancels call directing and reconnects the system operator with
the caller (source).
■
Join. Connects the system operator with the caller (source) and the
person being called (destination) in a three-way conference. All three
parties are connected on one Call button.
■
Headset Mute (Headset/Handset Mute). Activates and deactivates the
headset or handset microphone.
■
Headset Status. Activates and deactivates the headset operation of the
console.
■
Headset Auto Ans (Headset Auto Answer). Activates and deactivates
the Headset Auto Answer feature when headset operation is enabled by
pressing the Headset Status button.
■
Send/Remove Message. Turns on the telephone Message light to
indicate a message waiting and turns off the Message light when all
system operator messages are delivered.
■
Position Busy (Also Called Backup On). Temporarily takes the system
operator console out of service.
■
Night Service. Activates and deactivates Night Service.
■
Alarm. Provides visible indication of a system alarm. When a system
alarm occurs, the red light next to the button goes on. The system
operator can use the Inspct button to determine the number of alarms.
■
Pool Status. Provides the system operator with the status of all trunk
pools (a maximum of 11). The information includes the number of trunks
and the number of busy trunks in each pool.
■
Forced Release. Disconnects the system operator from an active call
and makes the system operator available to receive another call.
You can attach one or two DSSs to a QCC. The system operator can use the
DSS buttons during call handling, for example, to direct a call, make an inside
call, park a call, or see the availability of an extension.
During system programming, you assign certain features and settings to QCC
operator extensions. These help determine the types of calls that ring at the
extension, which calls get priority, who provides backup when the operator must
be away from the phone, and more. See Chapter 4, “Features and
Applications,” and the Feature Reference for details.
3–30 System Components
Operator Consoles
Keep these facts in mind if you need to work with QCCs:
■
You must connect a QCC to an extension jack on a 008 MLX or 408
GS/LS-MLX module.
■
Each 008 or 408 GS/LS-MLX module can carry a maximum of two QCCs.
■
You must connect the first QCC to the first MLX extension jack in the
system.
■
You can connect QCCs only to the first and fifth extension jacks on each
module.
■
You can connect up to four QCCs for the system.
Direct-Line Consoles
A Direct-Line Console (DLC) operates like other multiline telephones. In all three
modes of operation (Key, Hybrid/PBX, and Behind Switch), you assign (or the
system automatically assigns) outside lines to individual buttons on the console.
You can assign the lines that have been assigned to a DLC to buttons on other
consoles or other telephones. Incoming calls can ring on any of the line buttons,
and several calls can ring at the same time. The operator directs calls to other
users by using the Transfer button.
A DLC can use system operator features as well as the telephone features
available for non-operator multiline telephones to increase call-handling
efficiency. The special system operator features that you can assign to buttons
on the console are Alarm, Night Service, Reminder Service for sending reminder
beeps to other telephones, and Send/Remove Message. (For more information
about these features, see Chapter 4, “Features and Applications,” or see the
Feature Reference.)
You can use the following telephones as DLCs:
■
MLX DLC
— MLX-20L telephone
— MLX-28D telephone
■
Analog DLC
— MERLIN II System Display Console with built-in DSS (the only
telephone model that is uniquely used as an operator console)
— BIS-34D telephone
— BIS-22D telephone
System Components 3–31
Adapters
You can add one or two DSSs to the MLX-20L or MLX-28D telephone to provide
150 (3 pages for each of 50 buttons) or 300 (3 pages for each of 50 buttons for
each of 2 DSSs) of additional extension buttons. You cannot attach a DSS to an
analog DLC; however, the MERLIN II System Display Console provides a built-in
DSS, and Auto Dial buttons can be programmed on BIS phones for rapid
access to extensions.
Keep these facts in mind if you need to work with DLCs:
■
You can connect an analog DLC to an analog extension jack on either a
008 or a 408 analog multiline telephone module; an MLX DLC connects
to a digital extension jack on a 008 MLX or a 408 GS/LS-MLX module.
■
When you assign both DLCs and QCCs in Hybrid/PBX mode, the
maximum combined number of system operator positions is eight; no
more than four can be QCCs. You can assign a maximum of two DLCs
per MLX or analog module.
■
Only multiline telephones that are connected to the first and fifth
extension jacks on MLX or analog modules can be assigned as DLCs.
This includes DLCs assigned as calling group supervisors and Call
Management System (CMS) supervisors. CMS must be connected to two
extension jacks programmed to support analog DLCs.
■
You can use an MLX-20L telephone set up as a DLC for system
programming if you connect it to the first or fifth extension jack on the first
MLX module and then designate that jack for system programming.
Adapters
This section describes the adapters that connect adjuncts to the system and to
telephones. System adapters connect directly to the control unit; telephone
adapters connect adjuncts to telephones.
System Adapters
Four system adapters connect directly to the control unit: a channel service unit
(CSU), the Loop-Start Trunk Adapter, the PagePal paging access adapter,
and the Universal Paging Access Module (UPAM).
A channel service unit (CSU) is the interface between the 100D module and the
Digital Signal 1 (DS1) T1 facility provided by the telephone company.
The Loop-Start Trunk Adapter, UPAM, and PagePal connect loudspeaker
paging systems. The PagePac Plus loudspeaker paging systems require no
system adapter.
3–32 System Components
Adapters
Installation and operation of these adapters, as well as planning for them, is
handled by AT&T.
Telephone Adapters
The adapters described below connect adjuncts to telephones.
Multi-Function Module
The Multi-Function Module (MFM) enables you to connect tip/ring (T/R) or
supplemental alert adjuncts to an MLX telephone. The MFM is a circuit board
that mounts inside the telephone. Adjuncts plug into a modular jack on the
MFM. The MFM is the only T/R adapter used with MLX telephones. You cannot
install an MFM in an MLX-20L telephone that is set up for QCC operation.
!
WARNING:
Only a qualified technician can install or repair an MFM. To eliminate the
risk of electrical shock, do not disassemble the MLX telephone.
T/R adjuncts operate independently of the MLX telephone. If the telephone is in
use, the adjunct can send and receive voice or data calls. An MFM
accommodates the following T/R adjuncts:
■
Answering machines
■
Fax machines
■
Modems
■
Credit card verification terminals
■
Cordless telephones
■
Single-line touch-tone telephones
■
Supplemental alerts (bells, chimes, horns, and strobes)
The MFM is shipped with a power supply that supports one MFM and one DSS.
When you connect two DSSs to a telephone, ask your AT&T representative
about getting a different power supply. With either type of power unit, the total
cord length cannot exceed 50 feet (15 m) from the telephone.
The MFM supports only touch-tone dialing and does not detect pulse dialing.
You cannot transfer or conference calls from a device connected to an MFM or
use the Hold or Pickup features.
System Components 3–33
Adapters
NOTE:
The MFM uses one of the two channels when it is active. A channel carries a
voice or data call between the system and the extension. This means you
cannot use Voice Announce and Speakerphone Paging when an adjunct (such
as a fax machine) and an MLX telephone are in use at the same time. When
Voice Announce is in use, a person calling an MFM extension gets a busy
signal; a person attempting to call out from an adjunct extension with an MFM
does not get a dial tone. Also, an adjunct connected by an MFM cannot provide
a switchhook flash.
A qualified service technician sets up your MFMs to work with either an adjunct
or a supplemental alert.
General-Purpose Adapter
A General-Purpose Adapter (GPA) enables you to connect a tip/ring (T/R)
device—such as a single-line telephone, modem, or answering machine—to an
analog multiline telephone. The device must be touch-tone, not rotary, and you
must make calls from the analog multiline telephone, because the GPA has no
pulse or touch-tone detectors.
The switch on the back of the GPA lets you choose one of the following
services:
■
Basic. Use this setting to dial and answer calls on an analog multiline
telephone or to attach a T/R device such as a single-line telephone or a
fax machine. Incoming calls ring only on the analog multiline telephone.
■
Join. Use this setting to add a recording device or a single-line
telephone to a call that is in progress on the analog multiline telephone.
You cannot originate or answer calls on this setting.
■
Automatic. You can use this setting in two ways:
— For devices that answer calls, for example, an answering machine or
a modem (you need a programmed Auto Answer All button to allow
the device to answer calls automatically).
— For voice and data, which enables you to make and receive calls on
the telephone when the modem attached to the GPA is busy. You
cannot make or receive a data call while on a voice call.
NOTE:
When using a GPA set to Automatic, you must lift the handset before
using any feature that automatically turns on the speakerphone. These
features include Authorization Codes, Auto Dial, Last Number Dial,
and Saved Number Dial.
A GPA is not recommended for use with a fax machine. See “Fax
Machines,” later in this chapter.
3–34 System Components
Adjuncts
Adjuncts
This section describes the adjuncts that you can use with the system. System
adjuncts connect directly to the control unit and serve the whole system.
Telephone adjuncts attach to telephones and serve particular extensions.
System Adjuncts
The system adjuncts described in this section connect directly to the control
unit and serve the whole system.
NOTE:
Modems can be connected directly to a 012 or 016 (Release 4.0 or later)
module on the control unit or to an extension. See “Telephone Adjuncts,” later in
this chapter, for more information.
Station Message Detail Recording Printer
You can connect a Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR) printer to the
SMDR jack on the processor module. You need this printer so that you can use
system programming to get copies of reports about the system.
SMDR captures detailed usage information about incoming and outgoing voice
and data calls and sends the information to a printer. Two SMDR report formats
are available: the factory-set Basic format and the Integrated Services Digital
Network (ISDN) format. Use the ISDN format if you subscribe to the AT&T INF02
Automatic Number Identification (ANI) or have an 800 GS/LS-ID module and
caller identification service from the central office (CO). If you select the ISDN
format during system programming, the number identification information prints
in the CALLED NUMBER field of the call report. The remainder of the fields are
identical to the Basic format.
An SMDR record consists of the following fields:
■
CALL TYPE (Basic or ISDN)
■
DATE
■
TIME
■
CALLED NUMBER
■
DUR (duration)
■
LINE (facility number)
■
STN (extension)
■
ACCOUNT (account code or authorization code if no account code is
entered)
System Components 3–35
Adjuncts
The printer should be a 1200-bpi serial printer set at no parity and one stop bit.
For more information, contact your AT&T representative.
Also, a Call Accounting Terminal application is available for tracking and
printing reports on telephone charges. See “Applications” in Chapter 4.
System Programming and Maintenance PC
You can use a PC with MS-DOS version 3.3 (or higher) and System
Programming and Maintenance (SPM) software to program and maintain the
system. The PC connects to the ADMIN jack on the processor module. For
additional information, see System Programming or contact your AT&T
representative.
Loudspeaker Paging Systems
Loudspeaker paging systems use a ground-start/loop-start (GS/LS) line jack. Up
to three loudspeaker paging systems can be attached to the control unit. You
can program up to three line ports as paging ports. If you connect a paging
system other than PagePac Plus, you must also install a Universal Paging
Access Module (UPAM) or Loop-Start Trunk Adapter.
NOTE:
If a loop-start line jack is used for paging, you cannot use it for outside calls
unless you install a PagePac Port Saver.
PagePac Plus Loudspeaker Paging System from AT&T does not require an
adapter. It comes equipped with 8 built-in zones, expandable to as many as 48
zones with 16-zone zone expansion modules. PagePac Plus also provides a
music source for paging and Music On Hold without a music coupler.
Dial Dictation
You can use a dictation unit as either a system or extension adjunct. Some
dictation units connect directly to the control unit via a T/R jack on the 012, 016
(Release 4.0 and later) module or 008 OPT module, or to a telephone using an
MFM or a GPA. Other dictation units connect to a Universal Paging Access
Module (UPAM) that connects to a loop-start port programmed for dial dictation
(similar to loudspeaker paging).
Fax Machines
You can connect a fax machine to the control unit via a T/R jack on the 012 or
016 (Release 4.0 and later) T/R module or to an MFM. Using a fax machine with
a GPA is not recommended because the fax machine cannot dial through the
GPA. You can use a fax machine as an MLX telephone adjunct if you use it with
an MFM.
3–36 System Components
Adjuncts
A fax machine originates and receives fax calls independently of any
associated telephone. You can dial calls from the fax machine’s dialpad or from
an associated single-line telephone.
If the system does not have DID trunks, you should program fax extensions to
personal lines. When the system has DID service, it can direct incoming calls
automatically to individual fax extensions or to machines in calling groups.
Most industry-standard fax machines work with the system.
Delay Announcements
You can use a delay announcement recording to cover incoming calls that may
wait for an available calling group member (Chapter 4, “Features and
Applications,” includes more information about calling groups). To make
announcements, use an industry-standard announcement device, which
connects either to an extension jack on a 012, 016 (Release 4.0 and later), or
008 OPT module or to an MFM.
Door Phone
The AT&T Door Phone enables you to speak directlyover the telephonewith
people outside your locked business door. When a visitor presses the button on
the Door Phone Speaker, it rings a predesignated extension or activates an alert
device. You can then speak to the person by using the predesignated phone.
Use system programming to designate which phone will ring. The Door Phone
controller unit connects to a 408 or 800 line/trunk jack.
You can attach an answering machine to greet off-hours visitors or let them
leave a message. You can also attach an electromechanical door lock so you
can unlock the door by dialing a special code from the telephone.
Telephone Adjuncts
The telephone adjuncts described in this section connect to a telephone either
directly or through an adapter.
Modems
A modem can connect at an extension or directly to a 012 or 016 (Release 4.0
and later) module on the control unit.
A modem connected to an MLX telephone requires a Multi-Function Module
(MFM); a modem connected to an analog multiline telephone requires a GPA
(General-Purpose Adapter).
You can connect most industry-standard modems to the system.
System Components 3–37
Adjuncts
Headsets
Headsets allow for hands-free telephone use and consist of several
components, depending upon whether manual or one-touch operation is used.
Any AT&T headpiece works in either of these two modes of operation. For more
information about installing and using headsets, see the user or operator guide
for the telephone where the headset will be connected.
Headpieces
Six different headpieces are available as headset components. Each is light,
comfortable, and uses a transparent voice tube to eliminate any cumbersome
large microphone.
■
Mirage. Receiver fits over either ear. Not for noisy environments.
■
StarSet. Eartip fits in ear canal.
■
Supra Monaural. Adjustable headband and soft ear cushion.
■
Supra Monaural Noise-Canceling (NC). Same as above with noisecanceling microphone that reduces background noise by up to 75
percent.
■
Supra Binaural. Sound in both ears. Features windscreen and reduces
background noise transmission by up to 75 percent.
■
Supra Binaural Noise-Canceling (NC). Same as above with noisecanceling microphone on flexible boom; features windscreen and
reduces background noise transmission by up to 75 percent.
Manual Operation (Analog Multiline Telephones Only)
Manual operation is appropriate when a headset is used occasionally. You must
pick up the handset to answer a call and replace it to hang up.
One-Touch Operation (MLX and Analog Multiline Telephones)
One-touch operation allows you to simply touch a button to answer a call and
touch another button to hang up.
Specialty Handsets
Model K6S handsets for users who are hard of hearing are available for use with
MLX telephones.
In addition, beginning with Release 2.1, four specialty handsets are available.
They are compatible with earlier releases.
■
Noise-Canceling Handset. Reduces background noise in an office
environment; provides 10 dB (nominal) reduction.
■
High Noise-Canceling Handset. Reduces background noise in a
factory- or warehouse-type environment; provides 20 dB (nominal)
reduction.
3–38 System Components
Adjuncts
■
Amplified Speech Handset. Amplifies the voice of the other party;
provides 0 dB to 10 dB (nominal) voice gain.
■
Push-to-Talk Handset. Activates the mouthpiece only when you push
the button on the handset.
Message-Waiting Indicator
You can connect the Z34A message-waiting indicator to single-line telephones
that do not have Message lights.
Additional Telephone Adjuncts
You can also connect answering machines and credit card verification terminals
to telephones.
Data Communications Adjuncts
You can use a variety of data communications equipment (DCEs) with the
system. This equipment connects to analog, T/R (tip/ring), or MLX extension
jacks and to analog or digital lines/trunks. Data terminal equipment (DTE), such
as a PC or videoconferencing system, connects to the DCE. Generally, dialing is
performed at the DTE keyboard, although some configurations use a telephone
or data module for dialing. When a telephone is included in your data setup, you
usually use an MFM or GPA as well.
NOTE:
For the most up-to-date information about data and video communications,
consult the Data/Video Reference.
The system works with a variety of modems for data communications use within
the system over analog system lines, or over analog lines/trunks, such as
standard loop-start or ground-start lines/trunks. A modem can connect an MLX
telephone (with an MFM installed) The modem serves a data terminal (such as a
PC or printer) and connects to the system through an MLX extension jack. A
GPA allows connection of a modem to an analog extension jack and analog
multiline telephone. A modem can also connect to a T/R extension jack on an
008, 012, or 016 (Release 4.0 and later) module for use with data terminals that
do not share an extension with a telephone.
The DCE described below is a terminal adapter. An ISDN terminal adapter is
designed for digital communications within the system or over NI-1 BRI
(National Integrated Services Digital Network Basic Rate Interface), PRI (Primary
Rate Interface), or T1 Switched 56 facilities. A terminal adapter serves the same
purpose as modems do but facilitate high-speed digital communications.
Terminal adapters always connect to the system through MLX extension jacks.
System Components 3–39
Adjuncts
You can set up a terminal adapter to handle a variety of data terminal
equipment (DTE), including group videoconferencing systems and Group IV
(G4) fax machines. The ExpressRoute 1000 terminal adapter has dialing
capabilities. It does not allow the use of two B-channels for 112 or 128 kbps
data transfer (2B data).
Desktop videoconferencing and data-sharing applications have 2B data
capability built in, and some also allow the extension to include an MLX
telephone connected directly to the desktop video application. In this
configuration, the desktop video system can use both B-channels for 2B data
video calls, as long as the MLX telephone is not making or receiving a call. To
use 2B data, the MLX port must be programmed for this capability (see System
Programming for more information). The desktop video application can make or
receive a call using only one B-channel when the MLX telephone is on a call.
One B-channel is not adequate for video, but some desktop video applications
can switch to two channels once the MLX telephone is not on a call.
NOTE:
An extension jack programmed as a QCC position cannot be programmed for
2B data. Extensions for MFMs (or data communications equipment not
supporting 2B data) should not be programmed for 2B data.
For more details about data connections, see Data/Video Reference or contact
your AT&T representative. For more information about videoconferencing
equipment, see Chapter 5, “Putting the System to Work.”
NOTE:
You cannot connect a modem or terminal adapter to a QCC.
ExpressRoute 1000 ISDN Terminal Adapter
An Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) terminal adapter connects a data
terminal to the system, so that a user can make and receive calls at an ISDN
terminal adapter data station. The ISDN terminal adapter maintains a digital
data format that allows transmission to another ISDN terminal adapter data
station in the system or over one of the high-speed digital facilities supported by
the system.
The ExpressRoute 1000 ISDN Terminal Adapter (or a compatible ISDN terminal
adapter) connects high-speed data terminal or video equipment to the system
for data transfer with an NI-1 BRI, PRI, or T1 Switched 56 facility. The
ExpressRoute 1000 ISDN Terminal Adapter supports speeds up to 64 kilobits
per second.
Summary
Table 3-5 contains a summary of the adjuncts.
3–40 System Components
Adjuncts
Table 3–5. Adjunct Summary
Equipment Type
Line/Extension/Adapter Type
Alerts (AC):
Any audible or visual alert that operates on 20–30 Hz
ringing signals; associated with a specific extension
(supplemental alert).
Can be connected to:
008 OPT, 016 (Release 4.0 and later), or
012 T/R extension jack
MFM and MLX extension jack
GPA and analog extension jack
Can be connected to:
LS trunk jack
Requires UPAM to provide 48 VDC.
MFM and MLX extension jack
SAA and analog extension jack
Alerts (DC):
Audible or visual alert operating on 48-VDC ringing
signals; associated with specific extension (supplemental alert) or works on programmed trunk jack
(external alert).
Answer/Record Machine:
Can be connected to:
Industry-standard machine; low ringer equivalence
008 OPT, 016 (Release 4.0 and later), or
(< 0.15 or < 1.0 total REN for T/R port). It has ability to
012 T/R extension jack
recognize 600-ms disconnect signal or other means
MFM and MLX extension jack
of automatic disconnect (such as voice reset
GPA and analog extension jack
disconnect timer, fixed recording time).
Cannot be connected to a QCC.
Credit Card Verification Terminal:
Can be connected to:
Must have touch-tone dialing capability when
008 OPT, 016 (Release 4.0 and later), or
connected by MFM; rotary or touch-tone dialing can
012 T/R extension jack
be used on T/R port.
MFM and MLX extension jack
With MFM, device originates and
receives calls independently of phone.
GPA and analog extension jack
Dial Dictation:
A device that requires contact closure can be used
on LS/GS line jack only with UPAM.
Direct Station Selector (DSS):
A maximum of 2 DSSs per operator console; 329A
power supply required for console with 2 DSSs.
Cannot be connected to a QCC.
Can be connected to:
LS or GS/LS trunk jack
008 OPT, 016 (Release 4.0 and later), or
012 T/R extension jack
MFM and MLX extension jack
GPA and analog extension jack
Cannot be connected to a QCC.
Requires UPAM to provide 48 VDC.
Connects to DSS jack on MLX operator
console only
Door Phone:
Use system programming to designate phone to ring.
Connects to loop-start line/trunk jack.
ExpressRoute 1000 ISDN Terminal Adapter:
Acts as DCE for high-speed data communications.
Can be connected to MLX extension jack
Cannot be connected to a QCC.
Continued on next page
System Components 3–41
Adjuncts
Table 3–5, Continued
Equipment Type
Line/Extension/Adapter Type
Fax:
Must have touch-tone dialing if connected by MFM;
rotary or touch-tone dialing can be used on T/R port.
Industry-standard analog interface.
Can be connected to:
008 OPT, 016 (Release 4.0 and later), or
012 T/R extension jack
MFM and MLX extension jack
With MFM, device originates and
receives calls independently of phone.
Cannot be connected to a QCC.
Group Calling Delay Announcement:
Can be connected to:
Industry-standard announcement device; must
008 OPT, 016 (Release 4.0 and later), or
provide automatic disconnect. Each calling group can
012 T/R extension jack
have its own announcement (maximum 32). A device
MFM and MLX extension jack
can provide delay announcement for more than one
With MFM, device originates and
group.
receives calls independently of phone.
GPA and analog extension jack
Cannot be connected to a QCC.
Hands-Free Unit
Connects to analog multiline phones.
Headsets and Adapters
Connect to MLX/analog multiline phones.
Loudspeaker Paging:
Connects to LS or GS/LS trunk jack
External paging system using DTMF signaling.
Bidirectional paging supported; only one
Customer paging systems require an interface unit: for line jack is needed for multizone paging.
3-wire input, BOGEN UPAM-K (58500) can be used.
Message-waiting indicator
Connects to single-line phones.
Modem
Can be connected to:
008 OPT, 016 (Release 4.0 and later), or
012 T/R extension jack
MFM and MLX extension jack,
GPA and analog extension jack
Music On Hold:*
Connects to LS or GS/LS trunk jack
Any FCC-registered 8-ohm music source or recorded
Music coupler required.
announcement device.
SMDR Printer:
Connects to SMDR jack on processor
Must be located within 50 ft. (15 m) of control unit or
module.
use Asynchronous Data Unit (ADU); should be 1200bpi serial printer set at no parity and one stop bit.
*
If you use equipment that rebroadcasts music or other copyrighted materials, you may
be required to obtain a copyright license from and pay license fees to a third party such
as American Society of Composers, Artists, and Producers (ASCAP) or Broadcast Music
Incorporated (BMI). Or you can purchase a Magic on Hold system, which does not
require you to obtain such a license, from AT&T.
3–42 System Components
Power-Related Hardware
Power-Related Hardware
Your AT&T representative can plan for added power-related hardware to
provide your system with additional power and protection from power surges,
although most systems do not need extra surge protection. Other accessories
apply to system-specific conditions.
Power Accessories
In a power failure, battery backup units can keep the system running for several
hours. When you connect adjuncts and adapters to telephones, the power
requirements for the telephones and the system increase. Sometimes it is
necessary to add a power accessory, described in this section, to an individual
telephone or to the system to accommodate these additional needs.
System Auxiliary Power
When your system is installed, when you change the system operating mode, or
when you expand your system, an AT&T technician calculates the unit load on
your system and determines your overall power needs. A unit load is a measure
of power used to determine the electrical load that the following components
have on each carrier’s power supply:
■
Telephones and adjuncts
■
800 DID modules
Only the telephones and adjuncts that connect to the analog and MLX extension
jacks on the control unit require unit load calculation, not equipment that has its
own power supply (for example, a fax machine, an MFM, or an answering
machine). If, after a system is changed, additional power is required for the
control unit, your AT&T representative will see that an auxiliary power unit is
installed.
NOTE:
Some system power supplies limit the number of 100D modules and 800 NI-BRI
modules (Release 4.0 and later systems only) installed in a carrier. A newer
power supply, the 391A3, eliminates the restriction. Consult your AT&T
representative for details.
System Components 3–43
Power-Related Hardware
Battery Backup Power
An Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) unit can provide battery backup for
power to the system. Basic UPS provides power for 15 minutes; however, you
can add reserve UPS units to basic UPS. Each reserve unit extends backup
power for an additional hour.
Telephone Power Units
The KS22911-L1 and 329A power units provide additional power to MLX or
analog multiline telephones that have adjuncts, adapters, or two DSSs attached
(MLX telephones only), or to telephones located far from the control unit.
These power units are installed between the telephone and the wall jack.
Adding local power to a few telephones can reduce system load.
Protection Accessories
This section describes accessories that are needed for grounding and
protecting special telephone connections from power surges, electromagnetic
interference, and electrostatic discharge.
In-Range Out-of-Building Protection
Your AT&T representative orders an In-Range Out-of-Building (IROB) protection
unit when equipment is connected to the following jacks and is located in a
different building but within 1000 feet (305 m) of the control unit:
■
Analog multiline telephone extension jacks on 008, 408, and 408 GS/LS
modules
■
MLX telephone extension jacks on 008 MLX or 408 GS/LS-MLX modules
These units protect the equipment and the control unit from lightning strikes and
power surges. Each piece of equipment requires two units, one for the control
unit end of the wire run, the other for the equipment end.
!
CAUTION:
The IROB protectors must be installed by a qualified service technician or
installer.
3–44 System Components
Power-Related Hardware
Off-Premises Range Extender
An Off-Premises Range Extender (OPRE) is used for off-premises extensions up
to 5.2 miles from the control unit.
146A and 147A Surge Protectors
If you live in an area prone to heavy lightning and/or power surges, the control
unit may require surge protectors. The control unit’s power supply has built-in
protection, so extra protectors are not usually necessary. It is the responsibility
of the local telephone company to provide primary protection on the outside
lines where they connect to the control unit and to ensure that these protectors
are properly grounded. If the telephone company line protector is properly
grounded and bonded to the AC power ground, most lightning damage is
prevented.
When your system is installed, your AT&T representative sees that you have the
necessary protection. If electrical conditions change, contact your
representative and ask for advice.
Electromagnetic Interference Filters
Your AT&T representative will recommend these filters for certain environments
where electric motors, radio transmitters, or other radio-frequency generating
equipment may interfere with telephone reception.
System Alarms
An alarm condition detected by the system can cause the control unit to
activate an alarm device on a loop-start port. When the contacts close, a signal
is passed on to a Universal Paging Access Module (UPAM) and then to an
external alert. Alerting devices can be a strobe, horn, bell, or chime.
Trouble Alarm
Your system operator consoles have programmed Alarm buttons to let you know
if there is a problem with the system. An external bell or light can be attached to
a console to supplement the button. If this is not enough notice of a system
problem, an AT&T technician can use a loop-start line jack and a UPAM to
attach a bell or strobe light to the system.
Power Failure Alarm
Your AT&T technician can use a ground-start or loop-start power-failure transfer
(PFT) telephone jack to attach an alerting device that will go off during a power
failure. You can connect a PFT telephone to this jack when the jack is
connected for a power failure alarm.
System Components 3–45
Power-Related Hardware
Power Failure DID Busy-Out
Your AT&T technician may program the PFT jack on a ground-start or module to
automatically short the busy-out wire pair associated with a group of DID trunks
when a power failure occurs. This signals the local telephone company that the
DID trunks are out of service.
Power-Failure Transfer Telephone
A power-failure transfer (PFT) telephone is a single-line telephone connected to
a PFT jack on a 400, 400/GS/LS, 408, 408 GS/LS, 408 GS/LS-MLX, 800, 800
GS/LS, or 800 GS/LS-ID module. In the event of a power failure, the system
shuts off and the PFT telephone automatically connects to an associated
outside line for making and receiving calls.
When your system was planned, your AT&T representative made sure that it had
a module to support one or more PFT telephones in case of an emergency. For
more information, contact your AT&T representative.
NOTES:
1. The PFT jack does not operate unless a power outage occurs or the power
supply units are turned off.
2. The PFT telephone can be any basic single-line telephone; a single-line
telephone that is connected to an MFM cannot be a PFT telephone.
3. If rotary lines/trunks are in the system, you must use rotary telephones
(500MMs recommended) as PFT telephones.
3–46 System Components
Features and Applications
4
Contents
Features
■
■
4–1
Feature Finders
Basic Calling and Answering
Covering Calls and Having Calls Covered
Calling Privileges and Restrictions
Customizing Phones
Messaging
Timekeeping
System Manager’s Functions and Features
Special Operator and Supervisor Features
Feature Descriptions
Covering Calls
Sharing Lines
Forward and Follow Me
Pickup
Coverage
Direct Voice Mail
Summary
Calling Restrictions
Outward and Toll Restrictions
Allowed/Disallowed Lists
Night Service with Outward Restriction
Pool Dial-Out Code Restriction
Facility Restriction Levels (FRLs)
Authorization Codes
Security
Dialing Features
4–2
4–4
4–10
4–13
4–15
4–17
4–20
4–20
4–25
4–28
4–28
4–29
4–30
4–30
4–31
4–32
4–33
4–35
4–38
4–38
4–39
4–40
4–40
4–42
4–43
4–44
Features and Applications 4–i
Contents
Features continued
Group Features
Calling Groups
Other Groups
Data Communications
Remote Access
Account Codes
Automatic Route Selection (ARS)
System Management Features
Applications
■
■
Summary of Applications
Voice Messaging Systems
4–ii Features and Applications
4–45
4–45
4–46
4–46
4–47
4–48
4–48
4–49
4–50
4–51
4–54
Features and Applications
4
This chapter offers descriptions of system features and applications that are
available to help enhance your system. System features make it possible to
customize the system to overall business needs, to the requirements of groups
within your organization, and to the day-to-day job functions of individuals.
Applications provide special functions for specific business needs and work
hand in hand with system features.
The goal of this chapter is to help you assess system features and applications
and decide which are best for your organization’s needs as they change.
Although features and applications are set up for you at installation, when you
add a new user to the system, for example, you may want to consult this chapter
for an overview of the feature- and application-related decisions you need to
make.
This section provides an overview of the features only. For detailed information,
especially about important considerations and feature interactions, refer to the
Feature Reference.
Features
While there is some overlap, features can be divided roughly into five
categories:
■
User Features. Used at extensions by individuals, including Direct-Line
Console (DLC) operators or calling supervisors, to make work easier.
User features include Saved Number Dial, Personal Speed Dial, and
Personal Directory.
Features and Applications 4–1
Features
■
Operator Features. Used by system operators exclusively or primarily for
rapid call handling and for monitoring extensions. Operator features are
planned by the system manager.
■
General Systemwide Features. Features and settings that apply to all or
most users, for example, One-Touch Hold. These features are set at
installation but may need to be changed by you later on.
■
Group Features. Some user features are planned and/or programmed
by the system manager for groups of users. Groups may be set up to
answer calls that are not directed to an individual, to have their calls
covered, to receive speakerphone pages, or to pick up one another’s
calls. Groups must be set up to associate extensions with operators for
Night Service operation.
■
System Management Features. Features that help you manage the
system by, for example, giving you reports on system usage and
programming. System managers also plan and implement some features
that affect overall system security or efficiency, such as calling
restrictions or Automatic Route Selection (ARS).
This section contains:
■
Feature Finders. Quick reference tables that enable you to look up a
feature name according to what it does.
■
Feature Descriptions. Although a complete list of features (in
alphabetical order) with detailed descriptions is contained in the Feature
Reference, this section expands on the Feature Finders and presents
brief descriptions according to the business needs they fulfill.
For example, there are several different coverage methods available. The
section entitled “Coverage” describes and compares each method and
suggest when you might want to use each. In the next chapter, you’ll see
how features are put into action in sample business scenarios.
Feature Finders
The Feature Finders in this section describe features according to activity.
Some system management features and all operator-only features are listed in
their own Feature Finders. For each feature, the type of feature is noted as well:
user, operator, group, general, or system management.
The third column, labeled PROG, classifies the feature according to whether it is
programmable by regular users (extension programming, abbreviated EXT),
only by the system manager using centralized telephone programming
(abbreviated CNT), or only by the system manager using system programming
(abbreviated SYS). If a feature is labeled SYS, you should consult System
Programming for full programming instructions.
4–2 Features and Applications
Features
NOTE:
Any feature that can be programmed using extension programming can also be
programmed by centralized telephone programming. However, some features
can only be programmed using centralized telephone programming; these are
the features with the CNT label.
The following list summarizes the Feature Finders:
■
Basic Calling and Answering
— Answering calls
— Conferencing and joining calls
— Dialing and calling
— Paging
— Putting a call on hold
— Transferring calls
— Using the system from an outside phone
■
Covering Calls and Having Calls Covered
— Covering others’ calls
— Controlling coverage by others
■
Timekeeping
■
Calling Privileges and Restrictions
— Preventing people from making calls
— Allowing calls
■
Customizing Phones
■
Messaging
— Leaving messages
— Receiving messages
— Setting up messaging
■
System Management Functions
— Group activities
— Lines, line buttons, fixed-feature buttons
— Maintenance
— Numbering lines and extensions
— Operators
— Reports
— Security
■
Special Operator and Supervisor Features
Features and Applications 4–3
Features
Basic Calling and Answering
This Feature Finder (Table 4–1) covers features that users and Direct-Line
Console (DLC) operators may need for basic calling and answering. Operatoronly features are listed in the Operator Feature Finder. Note, however, that many
of the features here are used by operators, especially DLC operators, as well as
regular telephone users.
4–4 Features and Applications
Basic Calling and Answering
Type
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
Answering calls
See the phone number of an outside caller
before answering.
General
SYS
Answer a call ringing at an extension other than
your own.
Answer a call ringing on a line that is not on your
phone.
Answer calls for another person or for a group.
See “Covering Calls and Having Calls Covered.”
User
EXT
Pickup
User
EXT
Pickup
SYS
EXT
Coverage
Forward and Follow Me
Features and Applications 4–5
User
Operator
Group
Take calls for another person after the calls ring User
at his or her extension, giving the other person a Operator
chance to answer first.
Answer calls as part of a group that responds to Group
a certain type of call.
Answer a call waiting for you when all your lines User
are in use.
Answer calls that come to your extension while
User
you are at another extension.
EXT
MLX display only;
company needs 800
GS/LS-ID module and
caller identification
service from local phone
company; or company
must subscribe to AT&T
ANI service.
EXT
Coverage
Forward and Follow Me (Release 4.0
and later only)
Calling Group
Extension Status
Call Waiting
EXT
Forward and Follow Me
SYS
Not for QCC
Caller ID
Automatic Number Identification
(ANI)
Features
Table 4–1. Feature Finder: Basic Calling and Answering
Type
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
Answering calls (continued)
Answer with no hands, using a Hand-Free Unit.
User
EXT
For analog multiline
phones without speakers
MLX or analog multiline
Answer calls using a headset.
User
EXT
Answer calls using a modem or fax machine
(only necessary on analog multiline phones).
User
EXT
Analog multiline, not for
QCC
Conference inside and outside parties where the General
inside parties do not share a line.
SYS
Prevent others from joining your calls.
Join a caller and the extension he or she wants.
EXT
SYS
In Release 4.0 and later,
system manager can
disable Conference on
single-line phones.
Not for QCC
Not for QCC. In Release
4.0 and later, system
manager can disable
Transfer on single-line
phones.
Auto Answer Intercom
Headset Hang Up (CNT, MLX)
Headset Status (CNT, MLX)
Headset Auto Answer (EXT, MLX)
Headset/Handset Mute (EXT, MLX)
Auto Answer All (CNT, analog)
Auto Answer All
Conferencing and joining calls
User
General
Conference
Privacy
Transfer
Dialing and calling
Dial an inside or outside number with one touch. User
EXT
Call anyone in a group at your company.
Group
Set up account codes so that calls can be billed General
or tracked to a specific client or project.
SYS
SYS
Not for single-line or
QCC
Auto Dial
Calling Group
Account Code Entry/Forced Account
Code Entry
Features
4–6 Features and Applications
Basic Calling and Answering
Type
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
Dialing and calling (continued)
For billing to a project or client, use an account
code before or during a call.
Enter a 3-digit code to call a number that people
in your company call often.
Enter a 2-digit code to dial a party you call
often.
Dial by selecting a name from the display for a
number that you call often
Dial by selecting a name from the display for a
number that people in your company call often.
Call a co-worker who has left a message on
your display, with one touch.
Make a call outside normal office hours.
Call a number you dialed before.
User
EXT
General
SYS
User
EXT
User
Account Code Entry/Forced Account
Code Entry
System Speed Dial
Features and Applications 4–7
Personal Speed Dial
EXT
Phones with 10 or fewer
buttons only
MLX-20L only
General
SYS
MLX display phones
System Directory
User
Display phones only
Return Call
User
User
CNT
EXT
SYS
EXT
Call a busy extension and reach it when it is
available.
User
EXT
Change the Extension Directory to reflect new or
changed extensions.
Change a user’s Personal Directory listings.
Change the System Directory so that people
can call often-used numbers quickly.
Transfer a caller to a voice mailbox, if available,
without calling the extension.
General
SYS
User
General
EXT
SYS
User
EXT
All but QCC
All but QCC. Do not use
Camp-On if your system
has voice mail.
Display phones only
Display phones only
Personal Directory
Night Service
Last Number Dial
Saved Number Dial
Callback
Camp-On
Labeling
Labeling
Labeling
Direct Voice Mail
Features
Basic Calling and Answering
Type
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
Dialing and calling (continued)
Call a co-worker’s voice mailbox, if available,
after a busy signal or without calling extension.
Make a call from someone else’s extension
using your own calling privileges.
Make a call using a special long-distance
service.
User
EXT
Direct Voice Mail
User
EXT
Authorization Codes
User
SYS
Primary Rate Interface (PRI)
T1 Switched 56 Service
Automatic Route Selection
Page over your company’s loudspeaker system.
Page a group of co-workers who have
speakerphones.
User
Group
SYS
SYS
Page all the people at your company who have
speakerphones.
Prevent voice-announced paging calls from
coming in over your speakerphone, or allow
them.
User
SYS
User
SYS
EXT
General
General
General
None Not for single-line
SYS Single-line only
SYS Different on QCC
Paging
Only MLX (except QCC)
and BIS phones take
speakerphone pages.
See item above.
Only MLX (except QCC
in releases prior to 4.0)
and BIS phones take
speakerphone pages.
Loudspeaker Paging
Speakerphone Paging
Group Paging
Speakerphone Paging
Voice Announce to Busy
Putting a call on hold
Put a call on hold.
Put a call on hold automatically.
Hold
Recall/Timed Flash
One-Touch Hold
Features
4–8 Features and Applications
Basic Calling and Answering
Type
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
Putting a call on hold (continued)
Put a call on hold so that anyone can pick it up
after you page them.
General
User
EXT
Different on QCC. In
Release 4.0 and later,
system manager can
disable Park on singleline phones.
Hold
Park
Transfer a call to an inside or outside number.
General
SYS
Transfer
Transfer a call with one touch.
General
SYS
Different on QCC. In
Release 4.0 and later,
system manager can
disable Transfer on
single-line phones.
Not for single-line
phones.
Transferring calls
One-Touch Transfer
Using the system from an outside phone
Set up barrier codes (passwords) for remote
User
access callers.
Gain access to the system and use it as if you
User
were on an inside extension.
At a phone outside the system, receive calls that User
come your system extension.
SYS
Remote Access
SYS
Remote Access
SYS
Remote Call Forward
Features
Basic Calling and Answering
Features and Applications 4–9
Features
Covering Calls and Having Calls Covered
The Feature Finder in Table 4–2 covers features that users and Direct-Line
Console (DLC) operators may need when they are covering calls for others or
have their calls handled by others. When there is no voice mail system,
operators cover calls more than anyone else, and many of these features apply
to them. Operator-only features are described in a later section.
As explained later in this chapter, you don’t have to use the features below for
covering calls. Shared lines (personal, prime, or SA) offer another method
where people working closely together can join or cover one another’s calls.
Even though many of these features can be programmed by users at their own
telephones, it is important that coverage be planned centrally, so that groups
and operators can be assigned to provide coverage as needed. (Users cannot
assign operators and groups to cover calls.)
4–10 Features and Applications
Covering Calls and Having Calls Covered
Type
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
Covering others’ calls
In a calling group, cover calls for another group. Group
SYS
Not for QCC
In a calling group, answer calls ringing for
others in your group.
As an individual, cover calls for a group.
Cover all of a co-worker’s calls.
Cover a co-worker’s calls when they do not
answer.
Group
EXT
Not for QCC
Group
User
User
SYS
SYS
SYS
EXT
User
CNT
EXT
Set calls you’re covering to ring immediately or
after a delay (to let someone else answer first).
Not for QCC
CNT used for single-line
phones or devices
connected to MFMs and
the Forward and
Follow Me delay setting
Group Calling
Group Coverage
Group Calling
Pickup groups
Group Coverage
Primary Coverage
Secondary Coverage
Forward and Follow Me (Release 4.0
and later only)
Coverage
Ringing Options
Forward and Follow Me (Release 4.0
and later only)
Features
Table 4–2. Feature Finder: Covering Calls and Having Calls Covered
Features and Applications 4–11
Type
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
Controlling coverage by others
Have your calls covered only occasionally.
User
EXT
Have your calls covered by a voice mail system. General
Have all your calls covered by a co-worker.
Have your calls ring immediately at your
User
extension or only after a delay.
SYS
SYS
EXT
CNT
Have a co-worker cover your calls only when
you don’t answer them right away.
User
SYS
When you are the principal user of a SA button
and others have Shared SA buttons
corresponding to it, have your calls ring at their
SSA buttons and not at your SA button.
User
EXT
CNT used for single-line
phones or devices
connected to MFMs
Not for single-line
Forward and Follow Me
Coverage On/Off
Coverage VMS
Primary Coverage
Coverage
Ringing Options
Secondary Coverage
Group Coverage
Forward and Follow Me (Release 4.0
and later only)
Send Ring
Features
4–12 Features and Applications
Covering Calls and Having Calls Covered
Features
Calling Privileges and Restrictions
Calling privileges and restrictions are planned and programmed centrally for the
extensions in your company, as well as for remote access users. When you add
a new extension or make other changes in your system, you may need to add or
change calling restrictions. You should also consider security issues when you
decide whether to allow the system to forward calls to an outside number or
when you plan for voice mail systems. See “Security” in this chapter and
Appendix A, “Customer Support Information,” for more information about
security planning and procedures.
Although the features described in Table 4–3 affect individual users, controlling
calling privileges is a system management function.
Do Not Disturb and Privacy are not calling restrictions, but are included here
because they prevent calls to individual extensions.
NOTES:
1. If your system operates in Behind Switch mode with a Centrex service
providing features, Centrex (and not system) calling restrictions must be
used.
2. The Authorization Codes feature enables users to apply the calling
restrictions of their own extensions when they need to make calls from more
restricted phones. For more information, see “Authorization Codes,” later in
this chapter, or the Feature Reference.
3. In Release 4.0 and later systems, the system manager can remove one of
the line buttons (SA or ICOM) assigned to an extension where there is a
single-line telephone. This feature is designed to accommodate hotels and
other institutions, where organizations do not want calls transferred from
guest extensions. Removing one of the buttons prevents Privacy from being
used at the extension.
4. In Release 3.1 and later systems, default settings for calling restrictions help
system managers guard against toll fraud. For more information, see the
topics “Calling Restrictions,” and “Security,” later in this chapter.
Features and Applications 4–13
Table 4–3. Feature Finder: Calling Privileges and Restrictions
Type
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
Preventing people from making calls
Prevent calls from coming to your extension
Prevent an extension from making outside calls.
Prevent an extension from making toll calls.
User
Sys Mgr
Sys Mgr
EXT
SYS
SYS
Not for operators
Prevent other callers who share the same line
from joining your calls.
Prevent an extension from reaching certain
numbers or area codes.
Control calls made during off-hours.
Set passwords for remote access and control
calls made by remote access users.
Control calls made on specific outside lines.
User
EXT
Do Not Disturb
Toll or Outward Restrictions
Toll or Outward Restrictions
Automatic Route Selection (ARS)
Privacy
Sys Mgr
SYS
Allowed/Disallowed Lists
Sys Mgr
Sys Mgr
SYS
SYS
Sys Mgr
SYS
Toll or Outward Restrictions
Automatic Route Selection (ARS)
General
SYS
Authorization Codes
Sys Mgr
SYS
Allow certain or all calls outside normal business Sys Mgr
hours.
Allow trunk-to-trunk transfer at one or more
Sys Mgr
extensions.
Use a password to make off-hours calls.
User
CNT
Night Service with Password
See System
Programming.
Allowing calls
Allow people to use their own calling privileges
at others’ extensions.
When calling restrictions are applied, allow calls
to certain numbers or area codes.
SYS
CNT
ARS for Hybrid/PBX only
Allowed/Disallowed Lists
Speed Dial (System)
ARS Facility Restriction Levels
Authorization Codes
Night Service
Allow Trunk-to-Trunk Transfers
(Release 3.1 and later systems)
Night Service
Features
4–14 Features and Applications
Calling Privileges and Restrictions
Features
Customizing Phones
The Feature Finder in Table 4–4 describes features that people in your company
can use to make their telephones work better for them.
A person with an MLX telephone can choose from eight types of rings to
distinguish their own phone’s ringing from those around them. Other ringing
options determine whether lines ring immediately when a call comes in, after a
delay, or not at all. These ring timing options are applied automatically with
some coverage features (see “Covering Calls,” later in this chapter) but can be
changed by the user or system manager.
A person at an MLX display telephone can change the language used on the
display; the system manager can change the language used on all MLX display
telephones in the system.
Features and Applications 4–15
Customizing phones
Type
PROG Considerations
Give your phone its own distinctive ring.
User
Change the way your phone rings when you are User
already on a call.
Delay or remove the ring from an outside, SA, or User
ICOM button.
EXT
EXT
Change the language used (English, French, or
Spanish) systemwide; this also changes the
clock, which is 12-hour for English and 24-hour
for French or Spanish.
Change the language used (English, French, or
Spanish) at your extension; this also changes
the clock, which is 12-hour for English and 24hour for French or Spanish.
Change the language used (English, French, or
Spanish) used in System Programming and
Maintenance (SPM) software.
Change the language used (English, French, or
Spanish) in Station Message Detail Recording
(SMDR) and programming reports.
Sys Mgr
EXT
CNT
Feature Name
Personalized Ringing
Abbreviated Ring
SYS
CNT for single-line
phones and devices
connected to MFMs
MLX display phones only
Language
User
EXT
MLX display phones only
Language
Sys Mgr
SYS
Labeling
Sys Mgr
SYS
Labeling
Ringing Options
Features
4–16 Features and Applications
Table 4–4. Feature Finder: Customizing Phones
Features
Messaging
The system includes a number of messaging features (see Table 4–5) that allow
people at your company to let others know when they’ve called and even leave
special messages for co-workers at display telephones.
To leave a message for people who have display telephones, use Leave
Message or Posted Messages. Leave Message simply displays a message
saying that your extension has called; it can be used with or without actually
ringing the extension. Posted Messages supply more specific information.
Twenty different Posted Messages are available for display when a co-worker
calls your extension. The system manager can program the text for all but the
first one according to the needs of people in the company (the first message,
DO NOT DISTURB, cannot be changed; Posted Messages posts the message
only and does not turn on the Do Not Disturb feature).
To leave a message for a person without a display telephone, contact the
operator. Or, if your system includes voice mail, use the Direct Voice Mail
feature to leave a message without calling your co-worker.
Features and Applications 4–17
Messaging
Type
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
Leaving messages
Call and let a co-worker with a display phone
know that you have called.
Let a co-worker with a display phone know that
you wish to speak with him or her, without
calling.
User
EXT
Not for QCC
Leave Message
User
EXT
Leave Message
Signal/Notify
Direct Voice Mail
Let a co-worker with a multiline phone know that
you wish to speak with him or her, without
calling.
Leave a voice mail message for someone or
allow a caller to do so.
Post a specific message (such as, OUT TO
LUNCH) for co-workers with display phones.
Cancel a message left for a co-worker who has
a display phone.
User
EXT
Signal/Notify not for
single-line phones or
QCC; Leave Message
not for QCC
Signal and Notify not for
single-line phones or
QCC
User
EXT
User
EXT
Not for single-line
Posted Messages
User
EXT
Not for QCC
Leave Message
User
EXT
Display phones only
Return Call
User
User
User
EXT
EXT
EXT
Display phones only
Next Message
Message LED Off
Delete Message
Signal/Notify
Direct Voice Mail
Direct Voice Mail
Receiving messages
Return a call from a co-worker who has left a
message.
Read messages.
Turn off Message light.
Delete messages.
Display phones only
Features
4–18 Features and Applications
Table 4–5. Feature Finder: Messaging
Messaging
Type
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
Setting up messaging
General
SYS
Labeling
General
SYS
Labeling
General
Group
SYS
SYS
Group Calling
Group Calling
Group
SYS
Group Calling
General
SYS
Labeling
Group
SYS
Group Calling
Features
Change the posted messages that users can
choose from.
Change the extension information that appears
on display telephones that have messages.
Set up a voice messaging system to take calls.
Set up extensions to receive messages from a
machine when it has deliveries for them.
Set up calling groups to receive messages from
co-workers.
Change the extension information that appears
on display telephones with inside calls and
messages.
Set up an extension to receive messages for a
calling group.
Features and Applications 4–19
Features
Timekeeping
People at your company can set alarms or reminder calls to let them know when
it is time for some event (see Table 4–6). They also can use a timer to keep
track of phone conversations or other activities.
Table 4–6. Feature Finder: Timekeeping
Timekeeping
Type
PROG Considerations Feature
Set your own phone to ring at a
certain time as a reminder.
User
EXT
Set the alarm clock on your
telephone.
User
EXT
Display phones
only
Alarm Clock and
Timer
Set the time at your telephone.
User
EXT
Display phones
only
Alarm Clock and
Timer
Set the timer for calls or other
activities.
User
EXT
Display phones
only
Alarm Clock and
Timer
Set the systemwide time.
General
SYS
Reminder Service
See System
Programming
System Manager’s Functions and Features
Listed in the Feature Finder in Table 4–7 are those features that you program as
part of your system manager function, along with some system manager
activities not included in other Feature Finders. Some features and functions
affect the system as a whole, and others affect only certain lines/trunks or
extensions.
In addition to the features listed here, system manager features are listed in the
other Feature Finders according to the activities they affect. Additionally,
features listed as General, SYS, or CNT in the Feature Finders are also the
system manager’s responsibility. Fortunately, these features are set up for you
at installation. Most do not require much attention after installation.
This Feature Finder includes setting up groups, changing line button
assignments, and modifying the way some fixed-feature buttons work
systemwide. In addition, it outlines some features you can choose to help
operators, as well as listing reporting functions.
4–20 Features and Applications
System Manager’s Functions and Features
Type
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
Group activities
Set up a group that shares an extension number
for receiving calls.
Set up a group that shares and extension
number to cover calls for others.
Set up a group of extension whose calls will all
be covered by the same person or persons.
Set up a group to pick up each others’ calls.
Set up a group that shares an extension number
for receiving speakerphone calls.
Set up a group of fax machines to take calls.
Set up groups associated with operators who
will turn Night Service on and off for the group.
Set up a voice messaging system to take calls.
Group
SYS
Group Calling
Group
SYS
Group
SYS
Group Calling
Coverage
Coverage Group
Group
Group
SYS
SYS
Pickup
Paging
Group
Group
SYS
SYS
Group Calling
Night Service
Group
SYS
Group Calling
User
SYS
User
SYS
User
SYS
Sys Mgr
SYS
Lines, line buttons, fixed-feature buttons
Features and Applications 4–21
Modify the line buttons (SA or ICOM) available
on a user’s telephone: change, add, or delete.
Remove one of two assigned line buttons (SA or
ICOM) so that Transfer cannot be used. Also
disables Conference, Call Waiting, Park, group
Pickup, and Privacy.
Specify the line that is selected when a user lifts
the handset or presses the Speaker button.
Take an outside line out of service.
Not for single-line except
in Release 4.0 and later
Single-line phones,
Release 4.0 and later.
Intended primarily for
hotels and motels.
System Access/Intercom Buttons
System Access/Intercom Buttons
Automatic Line Selection and
Ringing/Idle Line Preference
Automatic Maintenance Busy
Features
Table 4–7. Feature Finder: System Manager’s Functions and Features
Type
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
Extension Copy
Line Copy
Personal Lines
Lines, line buttons, fixed-feature buttons
(continued)
User
CNT
User
SYS
See System
Programming.
Hybrid/PBX only
User
General
EXT
SYS
SYS
System manager only for Ringing Options
single-line or MFM
Coverage
Behind Switch mode only Recall/Timed Flash
Back up and restore system programming.
Sys Mgr
SYS
See System
Programming.
Control what a caller hears while waiting (for
example, during transfer or while on hold).
Set up special phones for calls during a
commercial power failure.
Prevent DLC operators from accidentally
disconnecting callers.
Fix the hold timer when callers on hold are being
disconnected.
Find out about the Alarm button on operator
consoles or set up a special light or bell to
signal a system problem.
For noisy places: turn off microphone at a phone
so that a user hears voice pages but must lift
the handset to respond.
General
SYS
Music on Hold
General
SYS
Power Failure Transfer (PFT)
Operator
SYS
General
SYS
General
User
Copy line assignments, buttons, and features
from one extension to another.
Assign lines that can be answered without
operator involvement.
Adjust the ringing at an extension, including one
with a single-line phone or MFM.
Allow Drop, Transfer, and Conference buttons
to access either host or system features.
Maintenance
DLC operators only
Hold
Direct-Line Consoles
Hold
SYS
Operator consoles
Alarm
SYS
MLX only; not for QCC
Microphone Disable
Features
4–22 Features and Applications
System Manager’s Functions and Features
Type
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
Maintenance (continued)
Fix problems with the switchhook, Recall, or
Flash button.
General
SYS
Recall/Timed Flash
General
SYS
System Renumbering
User
General
Group
Operator
SYS
System Renumbering
Allow a QCC operator to join callers and
Operator
extension more rapidly.
Set up the QCC Call 5 button for use as a voice- Operator
announce call button.
SYS
QCC operators only
Queued Call Console
SYS
Queued Call Console
Voice Announce to Busy
Make sure that the most important calls ring first Operator
at a QCC.
Prevent DLC operators from accidentally
Operator
disconnecting callers.
SYS
QCC operators only.
Release 4.0 and later
systems only.
QCC operators only
SYS
DLC operators only
Numbering lines and extensions (See also SYS
items in “Basic Calling and Answering”)
Change the overall system numbering plan; for
example, change to 2-, 3-, or a variable number
of digits for extension numbers.
Change extension numbers for extensions,
adjuncts, trunks, telephones, ranges of
extension on a Direct Station Selector (DSS),
Automatic Route Selection (ARS), calling
groups, Idle Line Access, Listed Directory
Number, paging groups, park zones, pools, or
Remote Access.
Operators
Features and Applications 4–23
Queued Call Console
Hold
Direct-Line Consoles
Features
System Manager’s Functions and Features
Type
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
Operators (continued)
Find out about the Alarm button on operator
consoles or set up a special light or bell to
signal a system problem.
Operator
SYS
Alarm
Sys Mgr
SYS
Station Message Detail Recording
(SMDR)
Sys Mgr
SYS
Station Message Detail Recording
(SMDR)
User
SYS
Remote Access
Sys Mgr
Sys Mgr
SYS
SYS
Remote Access
Remote Access
User
SYS
See guide for VMS.
Night Service
User
SYS
See guide for VMS.
Night Service
Sys Mgr
SYS
See guide for VMS.
Night Service
Sys Mgr
Sys Mgr
SYS
SYS
Reports
Get a report on incoming and outgoing calls,
including account codes and/or authorization
codes if programmed.
Get a report about the way the system is
programmed.
Security
Assign barrier codes (passwords) to remote
access users.
Change remote access barrier codes often.
Delete unused remote access barrier codes
immediately.
Assign passwords as necessary for voice
messaging systems (VMSs) and Night Service
with Outward Restriction.
Change voice messaging and Night Service
passwords frequently.
Delete unused voice messaging and Night
Service passwords immediately.
Review SMDR reports often.
See that the system programming is backed up
frequently, automatically or manually, and make
sure it is backed up before and after changes.
Station Message Detail Recording
See System
Programming.
Features
4–24 Features and Applications
System Manager’s Functions and Features
Features
Special Operator and Supervisor Features
The Feature Finder in Table 4–8 lists features that are only available to
operators. Many of the features listed in other categories are also used by
operators, but are not exclusively designed for them. In the PROG column, the
notation AUTO means that Queued Call Console (QCC) operator telephones are
automatically programmed with a button for the feature.
Because of the fixed buttons that are programmed automatically on QCCs,
these operators handle calls differently from other users in the system.
Features and Applications 4–25
Special Operator and Supervisor Features
Set others’ phones to ring at a certain time as a
reminder.
Turn an extension’s Message light on or off to
indicate that you have a message for the party.
Prevent calls from coming to your extension
when your phone is too busy to take any more
calls or you must be away from your phone.
Put a call on hold automatically.
Put a call on hold at one of several reserved
extensions, so that anyone can pick it up after
you page them.
Interrupt a call at a busy extension or one with
Do Not Disturb on.
Type
PROG Considerations
Operator
EXT
Operator
Operator
EXT
AUTO
AUTO QCC operators only
Position Busy
Operator
Operator
SYS
SYS
Hold
Park
Operator
CNT
EXT
Call an inside or outside number with one touch. Operator
Supervise a group of people answering calls.
Operator
Find out about the Calls-In-Queue Alarm
button that signals either too many calls waiting
in line or calls waiting too long (Release 4.0 and
later only) for your or your group’s attention.
Operator
DLC operators only
Feature Name
DLC operators only
QCC and MLX DLC
operators can choose
the feature from the
display
AUTO MLX phones or System
Display Consoles only
EXT DLC operators only
SYS
AUTO
Reminder Service
Send/Remove Message
Barge-In
Direct Station Selector
Direct Station Selector
Group Calling
Extension Status
Group Calling
Auto Dial
Features
4–26 Features and Applications
Table 4–8. Feature Finder: Special Operator and Supervisor Features
Type
Find out about the Alarm button that signals a
system problem.
Activate/deactivate Night Service for a Night
Service group outside normal business hours.
Set up the way calls are distributed to calling
group members.
Monitor others’ calls.
Operator
Set up a device to answer calls when a group is
unavailable to take them.
Log a calling group member in or out.
Operator
Group
Operator
Log a delay announcement device for a group
in or out.
Operator
Group
Operator
Operator
Group
Operator
Group
PROG Considerations
Feature Name
SYS
AUTO
SYS
AUTO
SYS
Alarm
SYS
AUTO
Direct Station Selector
Group Calling
Extension Status
Group Calling
Night Service
Group Calling
SYS
SYS
DLC operators only
SYS
DLC operators only
Group Calling
Extension Status
Group Calling
Features
Special Operator and Supervisor Features
Features and Applications 4–27
Features
Feature Descriptions
This section provides more detail about certain groups of related features, so
that you can gain additional insight when it is necessary to match features with
changing business needs. Here, the focus is on the differences among your
choices, and not all system features are described. In addition, features that
affect security receive special attention. The Feature Reference includes
complete information about all the features, including their interactions, modes
of operation, and the ways that features work on different system equipment.
Covering Calls
The system provides numerous methods for covering calls, allowing one or
more users to handle incoming calls for others. In many systems, operators
direct calls to groups and individuals. In others, automated attendants perform
all or most of this function. When a person is not available, voice mail is often
used, and the system allows voice mail too. There are also a number of ways
that two or more people can work together to personally handle one another’s
calls, and that is primarily what we describe here.
There are several factors you should keep in mind when you plan for covering
calls:
■
How heavy is the call volume of the people involved? Will the covering
person(s) be able to handle the volume, and will there be a backup
alternative when they can’t?
■
When will calls be covered? Will they be covered all of the time, some of
the time, or only when the covered person doesn’t answer immediately?
■
Are programmed line buttons required for the method you’ve chosen? Do
the phones at the extensions have these buttons available for
programming?
■
Is a voice mail system providing coverage? Do users need programmed
buttons to turn this coverage on and off?
The system includes a group of capabilities called coverage features, which are
described below under the section entitled “Coverage.” However, there are
several other features that also help people cover calls for one another, and
these are described first.
4–28 Features and Applications
Features
Sharing Lines
The simplest way to cover someone else’s calls is to share a line with him or her.
This method is most appropriate in Hybrid/PBX and Behind Switch systems.
Listed below are the types of lines that can be shared:
■
Prime Lines (Behind Switch Only). In this type of arrangement, a person
who is covering for someone else has a line button that corresponds to
the covered person’s prime line. You can adjust the ring timing (Ringing
Options feature) so that a call rings immediately at the covering phone, or
after a delay. If transferred calls come in on prime lines, they are
covered; otherwise, they are not. People who share prime lines can join
one another’s calls, but you cannot use the system to assure privacy of
conversations. Instead, check with your Centrex provider or host system
manager.
■
Personal Lines (Key and Hybrid/PBX). If most or all of a person’s calls
come in on a line assigned only to his or her extension, someone else
can also have a button for that personal line and cover calls. You can
adjust the ring timing (Ringing Options feature) so that a call rings
immediately at the covering phone or after a delay. Calls that come in on
SA or ICOM buttons, whether transferred outside calls or inside calls, are
not covered. People who share personal lines can join one another’s
calls, and they can use the Privacy feature to assure that others don’t
listen in.
■
Shared System Access Buttons (Hybrid/PBX only). Shared SA buttons
(called SSA buttons) offer a simple method for covering calls. The
extension being covered (called the principal extension) has an SA
button that also appears as an SSA button on up to 16 other extensions.
(A covering phone can have up to 27 SSA buttons, but only one for a
given principal extension.) Ring timing options are automatically set so
that a call rings twice at the principal extension before ringing at any SSA
buttons, but the Send Ring feature allows the principal user to change the
ringing on SSA buttons so that calls arrive there immediately.
People who share System Access buttons cannot answer the same call,
but they can join one another’s calls in progress; they can use the
Privacy feature to assure that others don’t listen in. When Privacy is
required, a button should be programmed, because turning on the
feature prevents all other users of the SSA or SA button from joining
calls. Furthermore, the lighted button provides a reminder when Privacy
is on.
Features and Applications 4–29
Features
Forward and Follow Me
Forward, Follow Me, and Remote Call Forward allow a user to temporarily send
calls to another inside extension or to an outside number (Remote Call Forward,
for example, to someone’s “home office”). If the user turns the feature on or off
at his or her own phone, it’s called Forward; if the person turns it on or off from
the destination extension, it’s called Follow Me.
In Release 4.0 and later systems, forwarding features are useful for covering
calls regularly, rather than only temporarily. Forward, Follow Me, and Remote
Call Forward can be set up to ring first at the forwarding extension before they
are sent to the forwarded-to extension. If a call is not answered at the forwarding
extension, it then rings at the extension to which forwarding has been
programmed. The system manager programs a forwarding delay so that a calls
rings from zero to nine times before being forwarded. Other features, such as
Ringing Options, as well as line/trunk availability, affect the number of rings. For
additional information about using this feature for covering calls, see “Direct
Voice Mail,” below.
When people use this feature often, they can program a button for it.
Pickup
Pickup allows users to answer calls that come in for others in a group they are
part of (called a pickup group). It also allows individuals to quickly pick up calls
ringing at another extension or at lines that are not on their phones (called
Individual Pickup, for a line or an extension).
Generally, Pickup is used with Paging and Park. A call comes in. The person
who answers then pages the person who should receive the call, telling that
co-worker where the call is parked. The user who ultimately takes the call uses
Pickup to answer it.
You should be aware of pickup groups as an option for users who work closely
together and can hear one another’s phones (when you answer a group pickup
call, you can’t determine whose call you are picking up). Operators can be
members of pickup groups.
Coverage features (see below) can be used with Pickup. If someone is a
member of a pickup group, his or her calls can always be picked up by another
group member, whether or not the person at the covered extension has turned
on coverage. If coverage is off, Individual Pickup cannot be used to pick up a
call.
4–30 Features and Applications
Features
Coverage
One of the system’s unique capabilities is the variety of automatic coverage
possibilities. The features we describe as coverage allow a call ringing at one
extension (a sender) to also ring at another extension (a receiver). Here are the
types of senders we refer to:
■
An individual at an extension (Individual Coverage)
■
A group called a coverage group (Group Coverage)
A variety of different receivers can be assigned to take calls for an individual or
a coverage group:
■
Another individual
■
A calling group
■
A voice mail system
■
An operator
Unless the receiver is a Queued Call Console (QCC) operator or a calling
group, his or her phone is assigned Cover buttons; each should be labeled with
the name of the group or individual they are covering for (for example, Cover
Sales or Cover Juan). Covered calls come in on these buttons, so the receiver
knows whose call he or she is answering.
Depending upon the needs of the business, a sender can have immediate
coverage (called Primary Coverage) or delayed coverage (called Secondary
Coverage), where the call rings at the sender’s phone and only goes to the
receiver’s phone when the sender doesn’t answer.
The ringing for covered calls depends upon whether Primary (immediate) or
Secondary (delayed) Coverage is provided. System programming determines
settings for these timers, and calls that are covered by calling groups or
operators may be further delayed as they for someone to answer.
Coverage senders can use programmed buttons on their phones to turn voice
mail coverage on or off, coverage of inside calls on or off, or all Individual
Coverage on or off. Table 4–9 summarizes these options.
Features and Applications 4–31
Features
Table 4–9. Selective Coverage Features
Selective
Coverage Feature Description
Coverage Off
Coverage Inside
Coverage VMS
Turns off only Individual
Coverage; if sender is in a
coverage group, group coverage
remains in effect.
Prevents/allows coverage of
inside calls. For example, with
Coverage Inside off, only outside
calls are covered.
Prevents or allows voice mail
coverage of outside calls. With
Coverage VMS off, only inside
calls are covered by voice mail.
Comments
User must have a programmed
Coverage Off button.
User must dial the feature code or
select the feature from the display of
a display telephone. Cannot be
programmed on a button.
User must have a programmed
Coverage VMS button; can use this
in combination with Coverage Inside
to turn all Individual Coverage off.
Depending on the type of call and how the sender’s phone is set up, some calls
are not eligible for coverage. Furthermore, there are interactions among the
various forms of coverage. Nevertheless, coverage features are flexible enough
to ensure that a caller does receive attention, and that someone whose calls are
being covered can quickly tailor the system to his or her needs. For more
information about these topics, refer to the Feature Reference.
Direct Voice Mail
When Direct Inward Dialing (DID) or Automated Attendant are used, people get
calls directly, bypassing the operator. In these cases, the best call-covering
solution is to have calls go directly to voice mail rather than to the operator. The
caller then has the option to leave a message or press 0 for the operator. If,
after talking to the operator, the user wants to leave a message, the operator
can transfer the call back to the called party’s voice mail using the Direct Voice
Mail feature. This feature offers several advantages:
■
It reduces the burden on the operator.
■
It allows the caller to make the choice whether to leave a message or
speak to an operator.
■
It allows the caller to leave a message without waiting for the operator to
answer.
The Direct Voice Mail feature also allows a caller to leave a message in a voice
mailbox without calling the person’s extension first.
4–32 Features and Applications
Features
There are several different configurations that can be set up, depending on the
number of users who require this kind of coverage and their needs. For
example, if calls must go to an operator and not directly to voice mail, you can
use one of the following configurations:
■
If fewer than eight users need this kind of coverage, use delayed Primary
Coverage or Secondary Coverage to the operator, who can then send the
call to voice mail using the Direct Voice Mail feature. (The operator can
cover a maximum of eight extensions.)
■
In Release 4.0 and later systems, the Forward/Follow Me feature provides
this type of coverage, with no system limits on the number of users who
can take advantage of the feature. The user or system manager
programs forwarding to the operator’s extension, adding a delay of zero
to nine rings before the call goes to the operator. This way, the person at
the extension can pick up the call while it is still ringing at his or her
extension. If the person does not pick up, the call is forwarded to the
operator, who can then send it to voice mail using the Direct Voice Mail
feature.
■
Alternatively, if fewer than 30 users need this kind of coverage, set up a
“phantom” or special calling group for each extension. Each special
calling group is covered by voice mail. When a call comes in, the
operator uses the Direct Voice Mail feature to send the covered call to
voice mail. to which the operator can send the caller, by using the Direct
Voice Mail feature, to leave a voice mail message. (Each extension is a
calling group covered by the operator; their corresponding phantom
extensions are covered by voice mail.)
■
If more than 30 users need this kind of coverage, set up phantom
extensions to which the operator can send the caller, or which the caller
can dial directly after hours or if the operator is unavailable. (Phantom
extensions use Shared System Access buttons on the real extensions so
that calls ring at the real extensions.)
If calls must be covered by a personal secretary who is not the operator, use
Primary Coverage such that the call would ring at the user’s extension first, then
at the secretary’s phone, at which point, the secretary can use Direct Voice Mail
to transfer the call back to the user’s voice mail.
For more information about how you can use the Direct Voice Mail feature, see
the Feature Reference.
Summary
Table 4–10 illustrates the various ways that calls can be covered.
Features and Applications 4–33
Features
Table 4–10. Features for Covering Calls
Feature
Covered by
Description
Example
Follow Me
Any individual
A person forwards his/her calls,
turning the feature on at the
destination phone.
A supervisor is helping someone at
another desk and remembers that
he or she wants to receive calls
there.
Forward
Any individual
A person forwards his or her
calls to an inside extension,
turning the feature on at his or
her own phone. (This feature
can be activated through
remote access as well.)
A manager is in a meeting and
wants to receive calls in the
meeting room.
In Release 4.0 or later systems,
Forward/Follow Me and Remote
Call Forward provide a Delayed
Call Forwarding option that
allows calls to ring at the
forwarding extension. This way
of covering calls need not be
temporary.
In a Release 4.0 or later system, a
manager answers some calls
before they are forwarded to his or
her extension. When the manager
can’t answer, the calls ring at his or
her secretary’s extension after a
delay.
Remote Call
Forward
Outside phone A person temporarily forwards
A person is working at home and
his or her calls to an outside
wants to receive calls there.
extension, turning the feature on
at the destination phone or at
the originating phone.
Group
Coverage
A calling group, Coverage for a group of people.
QCC operator, This type of coverage cannot be
or individual
turned completely off at the
extension. Coverage of outside
calls always remains in effect.
Calls to a government information
agency are not directed to
individuals, and can be answered,
for example, this way: “Hello, this is
the IRS Help Line.”
Individual
Coverage
A calling group, Coverage for one person. This
QCC operator, type of coverage gives the
or individual
sender maximum control over
coverage.
An executive’s calls must be
answered with her name, so her
assistant covers for her, answering,
“Hello, this is May’s office.”
Shared
Personal
Line
One or more
individuals
All of the account representatives
have their own personal lines for
answering customer calls. When
they need a technical
representative’s expertise during a
phone conversation, it’s easy for
the technician to join in.
Allows people who share a
personal line to cover calls for
each other. Privacy is available
to prevent joining of calls. (Ring
Timing Options can facilitate
this.) Does not allow covering of
calls on ICOM or SA buttons.
Continued on next page
4–34 Features and Applications
Features
Table 4–10, Continued
Feature
Covered by
Description
Example
Pickup
A pickup group Allows someone to answer calls
or
ringing at another extension or
any individual on a line not assigned to his or
her telephone. If Group Pickup
is used, the individual does not
need to know the extension
number where the call is ringing.
If general Pickup is used for a
line or extension, the user must
know the line or extension
number. A button can be
programmed to pick up calls at
a specific extension.
A bookkeeping department works
closely together and their calls can
usually be handled by anyone in
the group. In accounts receivable,
clerks sitting next to one another
have individual Pickup buttons to
answer calls at a neighbor’s
extension.
Shared SA
Buttons
One or more
individuals
Hybrid/PBX only. Allows people
who share an SA button (SSA
buttons) to answer calls for the
principal user of the button (SA
button). Users can join each
other’s calls, but Privacy is
available to prevent this. The
principal user can control
ringing at SSA buttons.
A supervisor answers questions
with the participation of her group.
When she is not able to take a call,
they cover for her. This feature is
especially useful because the
people in this group do not have
many line buttons available for
programming.
Shared
Prime Line
One or more
individuals
Behind Switch mode only.
Allows people who share a
prime line to cover calls for each
other. Privacy is not available to
prevent joining of calls (Ring
Timing Options can be adjusted
to avoid confusion.) Does not
allow covering of calls on ICOM
buttons.
See the example above. In this
company, each representative has
his or her own prime line and
transfers are handled by the
Centrex system.
Calling Restrictions
If you and your AT&T representative planned for calling restrictions as part of
the initial setup of the system, the settings required for these calling restrictions
are already in place. However, you may wish to change these settings or set
restrictions and privileges for new users or new lines/trunks. There are several
methods you can use to limit outgoing toll calls:
■
Toll and Outward Restrictions. Limit toll and outside calls by individual
extensions or remote access users, or on pools or trunks.
■
Allowed/Disallowed Lists. Allow some calls when calling restrictions are
in effect or disallow certain calls when restrictions are not applied.
Features and Applications 4–35
Features
■
Night Service Exclusion List and/or Emergency List. Allow some calls
when Night Service with the Outward Restriction option is used.
■
Pool Dial-Out Code Restriction (Hybrid/PBX Only). Restrict specific
pools. This can be used to reserve certain pools for specific purposes,
for example, for data communications.
■
Facility Restriction Levels (Hybrid/PBX Only). Automatic Route
Selection (ARS) allows Facility Restriction Levels (FRLs) to be applied to
both outside trunks and extensions for the most reliable control of toll
calling.
IMPORTANT:
1. In Release 3.1 and later systems, a system programming feature allows you
to help guard against toll fraud when star codes are dialed under certain
circumstances. Star codes, typically dialed before an outgoing call, provide
special services from the CO. For example, in many areas a telephone user
can dial *67 before a telephone number to disable central office-supplied
caller identification at the receiving party’s telephone (to allow or disallow star
codes preceding a call, see Chapter 6, “Managing the System”). Some
central offices supply a second dial tone following the dialed star (*) code, to
signal customers that they must dial additional digits. If this second dial tone
is not immediate, a hacker can enter digits that are not detected by the CO
but are detected by the system’s calling restrictions. If your business uses
central office star codes and the CO issues a second dial tone after a pause,
see System Programming for information about including a timed delay that
will cause the system to prevent the call when digits are entered during the
pause.
2. In Behind Switch mode, calling restrictions must be supplied by the host
system, not by the MERLIN LEGEND Communications System.
3. In Release 3.1 and later systems, the system provides certain default calling
restrictions that make it easier for system managers to guard against toll
fraud. These are described below with the specific features they affect.
This section describes each of these features. Some of these features are
combined with security measures to prevent system abuse by remote access
users or hackers. In addition, users can be assigned authorization codes, which
they can enter when they are away from their extensions. When a person enters
an authorization code while visiting another system extension, the calling
restrictions assigned to his or her own extension are applied to the call. For
more information, see “Authorization Codes,” later in this section.
!
SECURITY ALERT:
For more information see the section, “Security,” later in this chapter. Also
consult “Security of Your System: Preventing Toll Fraud,” in Appendix A,
“Customer Support Information.”
4–36 Features and Applications
Features
When you change your system, be aware of the following special considerations
that apply to toll calling:
■
The Remote Access feature allows employees to dial into the system by
dialing the number of a trunk designated for remote access. After a
remote access caller reaches the system, you should make sure that he
or she must dial a password (called a barrier code). After gaining access
to the system, the user can, among other things, select a regular or
special-purpose outside line (for example, a WATS line) or a pool or an
ARS line to make outgoing calls. You can apply calling restrictions to
outside lines used to access the system remotely; you can also apply
restrictions to barrier codes just as though they were system extensions.
■
Some voice messaging systems (described later in this chapter) permit
outcalling. That is, these systems can be programmed to call an outside
number to deliver messages or faxes. This feature can be used for toll
abuse, so consider calling restrictions for lines used by such systems.
■
Remote Call Forwarding can be allowed or disallowed for your system. If
allowed, a user can have calls forwarded to an outside number. (This is
not permitted at extensions or on lines where calling restrictions have
been applied.)
■
When restrictions are applied to extensions, rather than to lines/trunks, a
person can ask a co-worker or operator with fewer restrictions to make a
toll call on his or her behalf.
■
Authorization codes are intended to allow people with less restricted
extensions to use extensions where there are more restrictions. If you use
authorization codes to enforce restrictions, people may discover that, at
some extensions, they can make calls without using authorization codes
and gain more privileges than their own extensions allow.
The sections below list the types of restrictions, including the following
information:
■
Whether the restriction is applied to an extension, line, remote access
barrier code (acting as an “extension” for a remote access user), or a
combination
■
What other restriction features it works in conjunction with, as well as
mode restrictions
■
A brief description, including recommended use
Since there is some interaction among these features and with other system
features, refer to the Feature Reference for more detailed information.
Features and Applications 4–37
Features
Outward and Toll Restrictions
Apply to: Lines/trunks, especially those used for remote access or for
outcalling by a voice messaging system (see “Voice Messaging
Systems,” later in this chapter), excluding tie and emulated tie trunks
programmed as Tie-PBX for Hybrid/PBX mode extensions.
Use with: Allowed Lists to permit restricted users to make some calls. (Tagged
System Speed Dial codes or their corresponding tagged Directory
listings can also be used to make certain calls.) Can be used with
any other calling restrictions.
An extension, line/trunk, or remote access user’s barrier code can be
programmed to prevent either all outside calls or to prevent outside toll calls
only. In Release 3.1 and later systems, ports assigned for use by voice
messaging systems (generic or integrated VMI ports) are assigned outward
restrictions by default. If a voice messaging system is allowed to call out (for
example, to send calls to a user’s home office), the system manager should
remove these restrictions.
NOTE:
In Release 3.1 and later systems in Hybrid/PBX mode, remote access users are
automatically restricted from making outside calls using the system. See
“Facility Restriction Levels (FRLs)” below for more information.
Allowed/Disallowed Lists
Apply to: Extensions and remote access barrier codes
Use Allowed Lists to permit restricted users to make some calls. (Tagged
System Speed Dial codes or their corresponding marked Directory listings can
also be used to make certain calls.) Use Disallowed Lists to provide some
protection from toll abuse when no other restrictions are applied.
Allowed/Disallowed Lists can be used with any other calling restrictions. This
feature provides flexibility by allowing users whose phones are restricted to call
specific numbers related to their business activities, as well as emergency
numbers.
4–38 Features and Applications
Features
Beginning with Release 3.1, star codes can be included in Allowed and
Disallowed Lists (in Releases 3.0 and earlier, the system treats star codes no
differently from other dialed digits, and you cannot include a star code in an
Allowed/Disallowed List; this can affect calling restrictions and ARS routing).
Furthermore, they are ignored by the Automatic Route Selection feature when
routing calls. Star codes, typically dialed before an outgoing call, provide
special services from the CO. For example, in many areas a telephone user can
dial *67 before a telephone number to disable central office-supplied caller
identification at the receiving party’s telephone. To allow or disallow use of this
star code preceding a call, you include *67 in an Allowed or Disallowed List. For
each star code, a separate list entry is required. For more information about
star codes in Allowed/Disallowed Lists, see Chapter 6, “Managing the System.”
Beginning with Release 3.1, a default Disallowed List (number 7) is provided
with the system. This Disallowed List is automatically assigned to both generic
and integrated VMI ports used by voice messaging systems. It includes the
following entries, which are often used for toll fraud:
■
0, to prevent international calls
■
10, to prevent access to long-distance service providers
■
1809, to prevent unauthorized international calls routed through the
Dominican Republic
■
1700, to prevent unauthorized toll calls with a “700” area code
■
1900, to prevent unauthorized toll calls with a “900” area code
■
976, to prevent local toll calls to numbers with “976” local access codes
■
1www976, where “w” stands for a wildcard entry, to prevent longdistance calls to numbers with “976” local access codes
■
11, to prevent the use of star codes at single-line telephones
■
*, to prevent the use of star codes at multiline telephones
Night Service with Outward Restriction
Apply to: Whole system
Use with: Night Service Emergency List. Includes emergency numbers that can
be dialed regardless of restrictions. No password is required.
Night Service Exclusion List. Exempts certain extensions from the
password requirement. Normal calling restrictions, however, are still
in effect.
When the Password option of the Night Service feature is programmed,
outgoing calls can be restricted by requiring the user to enter a password. The
operator who turns Night Service on and off must also enter a password.
Features and Applications 4–39
Features
Pool Dial-Out Code Restriction
Apply to: Extensions and remote access barrier codes, in Hybrid/PBX mode
only
Use with: Any other restrictions
This restriction prevents an extension from dialing specific pool dial-out codes.
This restricts outgoing calls from specific pools and can be used to reserve
pools for specific purposes, for example, data communications. Beginning with
Release 3.1, the default setting for this restriction is on; no extension or remote
access user with a barrier code has access to pools until the restriction is
removed.
Facility Restriction Levels (FRLs)
Apply to: Extensions in conjunction with lines/trunks, in Hybrid/PBX mode only
Use with: Any other restrictions. Use Disallowed Lists if an FRL is unrestricted,
and use Allowed Lists if an FRL is highly restricted, particularly for
emergency numbers. Not necessary for remote access trunks (used
to reach the system) if barrier codes are used. Can be used on all tie
trunks.
Automatic Route Selection (ARS) is a Hybrid/PBX mode feature where the
system is programmed with dialing plans (called routes) that specify certain
lines/trunks or network services for outgoing calls, and can choose the most
economical facility for a given call at a given time of day. Facility Restriction
Levels (FRLs) are assigned to specific routes in an ARS table. There are seven
different FRLs that can be assigned to routes, ranging from 0 to 6, where 0 is
the least restricted and 6 is the most restricted.
In conjunction with FRLs assigned to routes, FRLs from 0 to 6 are also assigned
to extensions and are used to determine whether callers have permission to use
the routes. For an extension, 0 is the most restricted and 6 is the least restricted.
To use a route, the telephone must have an FRL equal to or greater than the
route’s FRL. In other words, an extension with an FRL of 0 has the fewest ARS
privileges (routes with levels 1 through 6 cannot be used), and an extension
with an FRL of 6 has the most privileges (any route may be used). Table 4–11
shows some examples.
In Release 3.1 and later systems, default FRLs help system managers guard
against toll fraud. These restrictions are automatically applied to routes, voice
messaging ports, and to the barrier codes of remote access users, as follows:
4–40 Features and Applications
Features
■
Routes. The default FRL is 2 for default local routes, so system managers
can easily change an extension default of 3 to 2 or lower in order to
restrict calling. No adjustment to the route FRL is required.
■
Voice Messaging Ports. The default FRL is 0, restricting all outcalling.
■
Barrier Codes. The default FRL is 0, restricting all but inside calls.
Table 4–11. Facility Restriction Levels
Extension FRL
Route FRL
Allowed
0
0
only
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!
SECURITY ALERT:
The MERLIN LEGEND Communications System ships with ARS activated
with all extensions set to Facility Restriction Level 3, allowing all
international calling. To prevent toll fraud, ARS Facility Restriction Levels
(FRLs) should be established using:
■
FRL 0 for restriction to inside calls only
■
FRL 2 for restriction to local calls only
■
FRL 3 for restriction to domestic long distance (excluding area
code 809 for the Dominican Republic as this is part of the North
American Numbering Plan, unless 809 is required)
■
FRL 4 for international calling
Each extension should be assigned the appropriate FRL to match its
calling requirement. All voice mail port extensions and barrier codes
not used for outcalling should be assigned to FRL 0 (the default
setting in Release 3.1 and later).
Features and Applications 4–41
Features
Authorization Codes
Authorization codes are passwords that allow users to apply the calling
restrictions of their own extensions when they want to make a call using a more
restricted extension.
Using system programming, you can assign one authorization code of 2 to 11
characters for each extension. While each authorization code must be unique,
more than one user can use an authorization code simultaneously, for example,
to set up a conference call. For optimal security, you should use the longest
possible barrier codes (11 characters).
The following issues should be considered when you assign or modify
authorization codes:
■
The assignment of authorization codes depends on your company’s
culture and how system calling restrictions are assigned. For example,
you may choose to assign authorization codes only to top-level
executives who have a high level of calling privileges or to users who
move around the company throughout the day rather than sitting at their
own desks.
Or, if there are a number of phones with little or no outside calling
privileges, for example, in common areas used by the public, you may
choose to assign authorization codes to all users so they can use those
phones if they need to.
■
Authorization codes interact with other system features. For example, if
the user’s own extension is assigned Forced Account Code Entry, the
user must enter an account code after entering the authorization code.
■
Authorization codes can be used for call control and call accounting
through the Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR) printout. However,
if the user enters both an authorization code and an account code, the
account code takes precedence and is stored in the SMDR record.
For more information about authorization codes, see the Feature Reference.
!
SECURITY ALERT:
Authorization codes are not designed to function as a security measure
against toll fraud. For information on system security, see the next section,
“Security,” and “Security of Your System: Preventing Toll Fraud,” in
Appendix A, “Customer Support Information.”
4–42 Features and Applications
Features
Security
Most security issues were covered in the section above, “Calling Restrictions,”
which describes the various ways you can help guard against toll fraud. There
are four additional features you can use to enhance security and make phone
use easier for people in your company:
■
Barrier Codes. Barrier codes are unique passwords assigned to remote
access users, and are designed to prevent unauthorized individuals from
using the system. As noted above, you can also apply calling restrictions
to barrier codes. Change barrier codes frequently and immediately
deactivate any unused barrier codes. In Release 3.1 and later systems
(Hybrid/PBX only), remote access barrier codes are restricted, by default,
from making outside calls.
IMPORTANT:
Read the “Security Alert” at the end of this chapter before using this
feature.
■
Disabling Trunk-to-Trunk Transfer. In Release 3.1 and later systems,
extensions are, by default, not allowed to make trunk-to-trunk transfers,
that is, to transfer an outside caller to another outside line/trunk. This
enhancement helps secure against toll fraud. To change the trunk-totrunk transfer privileges of an extension, see Chapter 6, “Managing the
System.”
■
Star-Code Dialing Pause. In Release 3.1 and later systems, a system
programming feature allows you to help guard against toll fraud when
star codes are dialed under certain circumstances. Star codes, typically
dialed before an outgoing call, provide special services from the CO. For
example, in many areas a telephone user can dial *67 before a telephone
number to disable central office-supplied caller identification at the
receiving party’s telephone (to allow or disallow star codes preceding a
call, see Chapter 6, “Managing the System”). Some central offices supply
a second dial tone following the dialed star (*) code, to signal customers
that they must dial additional digits. If this second dial tone is not
immediate, a hacker can enter digits that are not detected by the CO but
are detected by the system’s calling restrictions. If your business uses
central office star codes and the CO issues a second dial tone after a
pause, see System Programming for information about including a timed
delay that will cause the system to prevent the call when digits are
entered during the pause.
■
Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR). This system management
feature keeps track of incoming and outgoing calls and prints out reports
on a printer attached to your control unit. It also prints programming
reports that can alert you to tampering with the system. Inspect these
reports frequently. (Call Accounting System applications also provide a
utility for detecting toll fraud. See Table 4–12 later in this chapter.)
Features and Applications 4–43
Features
Toll fraud is a growing criminal industry, and there are individuals who have
made a science of defrauding businesses of millions of dollars. You should
strongly caution users against the following practices that can compromise the
security of the system:
■
Writing down barrier codes or passwords and keeping them in a wallet or
purse
■
Making remote access calls or other password-protected calls from
public telephones in such a way that they can be viewed by others, who
may even use telescopes or binoculars to see the digits as they are
dialed
■
Sharing barrier codes or passwords with others or saying them out loud
in public locations
■
Programming passwords or barrier codes on telephone buttons inside or
outside the system
For more information about security, see “Remote Access” and “Voice
Messaging Systems,” later in this chapter.
Dialing Features
Dialing features are straightforward, providing a variety of methods for fast
dialing of frequently used numbers. Review the dialing features by looking at
“Dialing and Calling” in Table 4–1, earlier in this chapter. The analog multiline
and cordless/wireless telephone user’s and operator’s guides include forms for
recording dial codes (not passwords or barrier codes) that people use often.
MLX telephones come with tray cards for this purpose.
When considering dialing features for an extension, keep the following factors in
mind:
■
Operators often need Direct Station Selectors (DSSs) for easy access to
extensions. Auto Dial is also an option when the operator does not cover
a large number of extensions.
■
Auto Dial buttons require programmed line buttons but are useful for
people who have those buttons available and make many calls to a few
numbers. They are also useful for entering account codes and other
dialed codes and may be appropriate for people who frequently enter the
same codes.
■
MLX display telephone users can take advantage of Directory features for
calling frequently used numbers.
4–44 Features and Applications
Features
■
Speed dial codes are helpful to people who have nondisplay telephones,
single-line telephones, and telephones with few line buttons. They are
also useful for entering account codes at MLX display telephones, where
the user can choose the Account Code feature from the display, or at
telephones with a programmed button for the Account Code feature.
■
A Last Number Dial button performs like the redial button available on
most home telephones and should be considered for most multiline
telephones in the system. Saved Number Dial is similar, but works as a
temporary Auto Dial button. Once a number is saved on it, it remains until
the feature is used again.
Group Features
Group features allow a programmed group of extensions to have a single
extension number. For many purposes, these groups are treated as a single
extension. Below, we discuss the uses of these groups.
Calling Groups
A calling group is created to receive calls when several people answer the
same type of calls and it is not important which person answers a call.
Examples are airline agents, customer service representatives, and
telemarketers who receive direct response calls from customers placing orders.
Calling groups of this type are usually monitored by a special type of operator, a
calling supervisor. When too many calls are waiting for a calling group, calls are
sent to an overflow receiver. In Release 4.0 and later systems, waiting calls can
be sent to the overflow receiver based how long callers have been waiting or
how many callers are waiting.
The system has numerous features and settings to support calling groups:
■
Hunt type determines whether calls go in a circular pattern to the first
available group member or whether all calls go to one group member
and only reach others when the first person is unavailable.
■
Extensions and supervisor positions can be programmed to log group
members in or out (automatically or manually) for the purpose of
receiving calls or stopping calls to the extension.
■
A Calls-In-Queue Alarm button on a phone alerts the user when too many
calls are waiting for the group.
■
A delay announcement device can be programmed to play a recording
that describes a delay to waiting callers. (Music On Hold can also
entertain waiting callers.)
■
Other extensions or an operator can provide coverage when all the group
members are unavailable and too many callers are waiting.
■
An extension can be assigned to receive messages for a calling group.
Features and Applications 4–45
Features
Calling groups can be used to designate extensions used by voice messaging
systems or fax machines, so that these devices can receive calls directed to a
single extension number.
Other Groups
Other groups are assigned to enhance the use of specific system features:
■
Pickup groups can be assigned when people need to answer one
another’s calls (see “Pickup,” earlier in this chapter).
■
Paging groups are used for extensions that have speakerphones and are
located in the same work areas or departments. All members of a group
can be paged at once. (Note that the Loudspeaker Paging feature is
different; a loudspeaker paging system can support zones for
broadcasting to different areas of a company.)
■
Coverage groups are described above, in the section “Covering Calls.”
Data Communications
You won’t find a great deal about data communications in the Feature Finders
earlier in this chapter. Although the system allows data communications, it does
so with features that also support other functions. Full descriptions of data
communications are included in the Feature Reference and Data/Video
Reference.
NOTE:
For the most up-to-date information about data and video communications,
consult the Data/Video Reference.
Some data communications setups (called data stations ) include a modem
connected to an MLX telephone that is equipped with a Multi-Function Module
(MFM). MLX extensions make good data stations because they require only one
extension jack for both the phone and the modem (the modem may be inside or
external to a data terminal or PC). Alternatively, a modem may be attached
directly to an analog extension jack or to a General-Purpose Adapter (GPA) and
analog multiline telephone; to operate independently, the phone and GPA must
each have an analog extension jack. A modem can also be attached directly to
a tip/ring (T/R) jack on a 012 module, 016 (Release 4.0 and later systems), or
008 OPT module.
Group and personal desktop videoconferencing and Group IV (G4) fax
machines are supported through Basic Rate Interface (BRI), T1 Switched 56
lines, or Primary Rate Interface (PRI) for high-speed digital communications.
These arrangements also allow high-speed data transmissions through an MLX
extension that accesses a channel corresponding to a line/trunk. An ISDN
terminal adapter or built-in DCE takes the place of a modem for transmitting and
receiving data.
4–46 Features and Applications
Features
Depending upon the equipment you are using, there are many interactions
between data stations and system features. Not all features are available at all
data stations. These features should be disabled at most data stations:
■
Voice Announce to Busy
■
Call Waiting
■
Automatic Callback
Automatic Callback can be used at data stations that include a desktop
videoconferencing and data-sharing system (see Chapter 5, “Optimizing the
System,” for more information about this system). Privacy should be turned on at
data stations connected to analog extension jacks, 012 modules, or 016
modules (Release 4.0 and later).
An Auto Answer All button must be programmed at an analog multiline
telephone that is connected by a GPA to a modem. If you use Auto Dial, Last
Number Dial, Saved Number Dial, or Authorization Codes at an analog voice
and modem data station with a GPA set to Auto operation (for automatic
answering of data calls), the user must first lift the handset and then activate the
feature. If a feature turns on the speakerphone at the telephone, the GPA does
not work properly.
Remote Access
The Remote Access feature allows someone outside the system to call in and
use the system as if he or she were on the system. You can and should see that
a barrier code is programmed for each remote access user, who will enter that
code as a password for access to the system. Your AT&T representative will
help you plan these barrier codes as needed and will help you designate an
outside trunk for use by people calling in for remote access to the system.
Remote access requires that you have a certain number of touch-tone receivers
(TTRs) to interpret the digits entered by remote access users, who must use
touch-tone telephones. These TTRs are supplied on the control unit modules.
The number required depends upon the call volume you anticipate. Discuss this
with your AT&T representative.
Calling restrictions can and should be associated with each barrier code, so
that remote access users cannot make unauthorized calls. In a Hybrid/PBX
system, an Automatic Route Selection (ARS) Facility Restriction Level (FRL) can
ensure that remote access users are restricted just like other system users.
NOTE:
In Release 3.1 and later systems, the default FRL assignment for a barrier code
is 0, restricting all outside calls.
Features and Applications 4–47
Features
Take these additional measures to enhance system security:
■
Change remote access barrier codes frequently. This helps prevent toll
fraud when someone has revealed their barrier codes to others.
■
Delete unused barrier codes immediately.
■
Always use the longest possible barrier codes.
System Programming includes instructions for adding, deleting, and changing
barrier codes.
Account Codes
If your company requires that telephone costs be associated with specific
projects, departments, or clients, you should take advantage of the Account
Code Entry and Forced Account Code Entry features of the system. Call
Accounting Systems, described in “Applications,” later in this chapter, are
applications that enhance these functions. See System Programming for
information about programming account codes, and distribute these account
codes to people who need them. Dialing features (see “Dialing Features” earlier
in this chapter) may be used to help automate Account Code Entry.
■
Account Code Entry. This feature enables users to enter account codes
for outside calls, both incoming and outgoing. These codes appear on
Station Message Detailed Recording (SMDR) reports and are used for
billing or cost accounting to identify outgoing calls with a project, client,
or department. You can enter an account code before or during a call, or
not at all. You can also change, correct, or cancel an account code while
the call is in progress.
■
Forced Account Code Entry. Forced Account Code Entry is similar, but
affects only outgoing calls and requires a user to enter an account code
before placing an outside call. You can change or correct an account
code while a call is in progress, but you cannot cancel it.
NOTE:
Account codes override authorization codes for the purposes of SMDR
reporting. If an authorization code is used without an account code, the
authorization code is reported. When Forced Account Code Entry is
assigned to an extension, the user must enter the authorization code
before making the call.
Automatic Route Selection (ARS)
This feature is available for Hybrid/PBX systems only and assures cost-efficient
use of the various lines/trunks and facilities in the system. ARS makes decisions,
based on programmed routing tables and calling restrictions, that choose the
most cost-effective facility for each outgoing call. It also provides enhanced
calling restrictions, as described in “Calling Restrictions,” earlier in this chapter.
4–48 Features and Applications
Features
ARS is complex to program but well worth the effort. If your system was installed
with ARS, consult the following system planning form(s) for information about
how calls are routed for this feature: Form 3e, Automatic Route Selection
worksheet; Form 3f, Automatic Route Selection Tables; and Form 3g, Automatic
Route Selection Default and Special Numbers Tables. When you add a
line/trunk to your system, this routing may need changes. Consult the Feature
Reference, System Programming, and your AT&T representative for help.
When you add or change extensions in your system, you may also need to
change Facility Restriction Levels (FRLs), the calling restriction feature of ARS.
This is not difficult, as long as you refer to the FRLs already programmed for
facilities on the system. Consult the system planning forms noted above, as well
as the Feature Reference and System Programming.
System Management Features
The system includes features for which the system manager is responsible and
features that help the system manager do his or her job. Features for which the
system manager is responsible are detailed in the Feature Finders earlier in this
chapter and in the feature descriptions above. Use the Feature Reference as
your source for further details about all these features.
Features that help you in your work are listed below.
■
Reports. Review the Station Message Detailing Recording (SMDR)
feature for information about the calling and programming reports you
can get from the system. When your system is installed, your AT&T
representative should see that an SMDR printer is attached to the control
unit for printing these reports. A list of the available reports and how to
access and print them is included in Chapter 6, “Managing the System.”
■
Programming. Programming is not really a feature, but you use it to
facilitate most aspects of your job when a change to the installed system
is necessary. Centralized telephone programming allows you to program
extensions with headsets, program Barge-In for operators, and change
line button assignments at extensions. You can also use centralized
telephone programming to program features and buttons at individual
extensions, rather than having users do this themselves. You can copy
line button assignments and features from one extension to another.
To program the system, you need an MLX-20L telephone preferably with
a DSS. System programming comprises much of your work of this type,
and is outlined, along with centralized telephone programming, in System
Programming.
Chapter 6, “Managing the System,” provides useful information about the
programming and tasks required for common administrative duties. The section
below describes applications that can help you manage the system.
Features and Applications 4–49
Applications
Applications
The system allows you to take advantage of various types of call handling and
system management add-on software and/or hardware products (applications),
including voice mail and messaging; call accounting and reporting; and call
management, call distribution, and reporting.
In addition, Centrex services are supported by (not supplied by) the system;
Centrex is supplied by the local telephone company. The system also allows the
use of the Primary Rate Interface (PRI) platform for accessing services you can
subscribe to from AT&T.
This section provides an overview of the applications and services that you can
connect to the system. If you’re considering adding any of these products to
your system, see the following system reference guides for more information:
■
Equipment and Operations Reference for information about some
considerations you will need to take into account, for example, the
hardware and software required. Also included in that document is an
overview of the system programming required to set up applications.
■
System Planning for planning instructions
■
System Programming for detailed system programming instructions
■
The documentation for specific products and services provides the most
detail. None of the system guides present full information about the
operation and installation of specific applications. (Applications, are,
however, installed by AT&T.) Consult your AT&T representative after you
review the system guides.
IMPORTANT:
There are important differences in how applications function in the system’s
different modes of operation (Key, Hybrid/PBX, or Behind Switch). Also, there
may be interactions between an application and certain system features. For
more information, see the Feature Reference or contact your AT&T
representative.
As you review information about the available applications, ask yourself and
your AT&T representative the following questions:
■
What adjunct hardware and software are required for the application?
Does a UNIX system, DOS, or Windows environment match my
expertise or that of others who will use the application?
■
How will the application work with the features and settings already
programmed for the system?
■
Are additional line/trunk and/or extension modules necessary to
accommodate the application?
4–50 Features and Applications
Applications
This section summarizes applications in general, then presents some specifics
regarding voice messaging applications.
Summary of Applications
Table 4–12 provides a summary of the applications, including a brief
description of each, and the modes of operation in which you can use the
application. Most of these applications can be customized to suit your specific
needs.
Some of the applications are available as stand-alone products; some can only
be provided with an Integrated Solutions package. Integrated Solution II (IS II)
and Integrated Solution III (IS III) are actually platforms for applications. You
choose the platform and select from the applications that work with it.
NOTE:
In Table 4–12, H/PBX stands for “Hybrid/PBX” and BS stands for “Behind
Switch.”
Table 4–12. Application Descriptions and Modes of Operation
Application
Stand-Alone Programming
System Programming and
Maintenance (SPM)
PassageWay Direct Connect
Solution
Stand-Alone Call Accounting
and Management
Applications
Call Accounting System
(CAS) Plus V3
Call Accounting System
(CAS) for Windows
Key H/PBX
BS
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Description
DOS-based PC software that enables system
programming from a PC instead of an
MLX-20L telephone. See System Programming
for a complete description.
Windows-based. Provides an interface between
a PC and the system for programming the MLX
telephone at the extension, auto dialing from the
PC, and call logging. Can integrate with
Windows applications.
DOS-based. Tracks and sorts telephone
charges, offering a wide range of customizable
reports. Also includes messaging features and a
special utility for detecting toll fraud.
Windows-based. Offers the features of CAS Plus
V3 (without the toll-fraud detection utility), and
supports both local and remote business sites.
Continued on next page
Features and Applications 4–51
Applications
Table 4–12, Continued
Application
Key H/PBX
4
4
4
4
MERLIN Identifier
4
4
Stand-Alone Call Answering
and Voice Mail Packages
MERLIN MAIL Voice
Messaging System (VMS)
4
4
AT&T Attendant
4
4
Integrated Packages
IS II
AUDIX Voice Power
Integrated Voice Power
Automated Attendant
CAS IS II
SPM IS II
4
4
4
4
Call Accounting Terminal
(CAT)
Call Management System
(CMS)
BS
4
Description
Dedicated terminal and printer for tracking and
sorting telephone charges and printing reports.
Provides enhancements over SMDR reporting.
Answers calls and distributes them to agent
extensions in calling groups. Designed for
businesses with large groups of people who
perform a common function. Provides enhanced
reporting and call handling functions beyond
that which the system allows.
Identifies callers on four lines and displays
information at phones. Can be integrated with a
database and PC for input and display of
additional information about callers. With all its
options in place, is ideal for direct marketing
use. Requires caller identification service from
local telephone company.
Includes multiple automated attendants for
answering calls, as well as voice mail
messaging for outside and inside callers.
Answers incoming calls and plays a menu of
recorded prompts, then routes calls as
prompted by callers. Can route calls to
answering or fax machines. Does not work with
MERLIN MAIL or AUDIX Voice Power (see IS
applications below).
4
4
UNIX System-based voice processing and call
analysis software applications. Provides a single
interface to the applications and allows easy
integration of general system programming with
programming for applications. CAS and SPM
are described above. IVP Automated Attendant
answers and directs calls. See “Voice
Messaging Systems” below for more about
AUDIX Voice Power.
Continued on next page
4–52 Features and Applications
Applications
Table 4–12, Continued
Application
IS III
AUDIX Voice Power with
FAX Attendant System
Integrated Administration
IS CAS
SPM IS III
Key H/PBX
BS
Description
UNIX System-based voice processing and call
analysis software applications. Provides a single
interface to the applications. Integrated
Administration allows programming of AVP/Fax
Attendant and system features without
programming each system separately. IS CAS
provides the features of CAS Plus V3 above.
SPM is described above. Fax Attendant
manages calls to fax machines and provides for
information retrieval from fax machines. See
“Voice Messaging Systems” following this table.
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
CONVERSANT
4
4
4
Other Applications
MERLIN PFC
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Automated Document
Delivery System (ADDS)
Telephone Company Services
PRI
Group IV (G4) fax
Videoconferencing
NI-1 BRI*
Group IV (G4) fax
Videoconferencing
T1 Switched 56*
Group IV (G4) fax
Videoconferencing
Accunet Switched 56
Centrex
*
Provides attendant and call management
services and also operates as a platform,
allowing the integration of voice mail and
interactive applications.
Offers a phone, fax machine, and copier in one
unit. Operates as a BIS-34D telephone with the
added devices built in.
Computer-based system to store documents in
a database and fax them on request.
Used to connect the system to an ISDN network
facility providing voice and digital data services.
Used to connect the system to an ISDN network
facility providing voice and digital data services.
Used to connect the system to an ISDN network
facility providing digital data services.
4
Provides telephone features from the CO that
were formerly available only from a PBX.
Release 4.0 and later systems only
Features and Applications 4–53
Applications
Voice Messaging Systems
A voice messaging system (VMS) provides call-answering services and may
provide voice mail services. When choosing or planning a VMS, keep the
following considerations in mind:
■
Each of the following VMS applications connects to a special tip/ring
(T/R) jack, called a voice messaging interface (VMI). If you plan to add
voice messaging to your system, ask your AT&T representative to help
you plan for VMI ports for your system. (You may already have enough on
existing modules.)
■
Voice messaging systems also require that you have a certain number of
touch-tone receivers to interpret the digits entered by callers using touchtone telephones. These are supplied on the control unit modules. The
number required depends upon the call volume you anticipate. Discuss
this with your AT&T representative.
■
You may want to use password access to voice mailboxes, to protect
business and personal privacy.
■
If you plan to use an outcalling feature (see Table 4–13 for an
explanation), you should consider using calling restrictions to prevent this
feature from being abused by people who may use it to make fraudulent
toll calls.
NOTE:
In Release 3.1 and later systems, all VMI ports are by default restricted
from outcalling in Hybrid/PBX systems, using an extension FRL of 0. VMI
ports are automatically assigned a special Disallowed List that restricts
many types of calls made by fraudulent callers. In addition, these ports
are outward-restricted. For more information, see “Calling Restrictions,”
earlier in this chapter.
■
The system provides two specific features that work with voice mail
systems: Direct Voice Mail and Coverage VMS. Direct Voice Mail allows
transfer of a caller to a voice mail box, without ringing the mailbox owner
at his or her extension. Voice mail can be designated to cover calls in the
same fashion that a calling group can; Coverage VMS allows a user to
turn this feature on or off and requires a programmed button. Consider
how you will take advantage of these in your company.
IMPORTANT:
Before planning your voice messaging system, see the Security Alert at
the end of this chapter. Also consult “Security of Your System: Preventing
Toll Fraud,” in Appendix A, “Customer Support Information.”
Table 4–13 describes the services available by product.
4–54 Features and Applications
Applications
Table 4–13. Voice Messaging Systems
Service or
Application Description
Automated
Attendant
Answers calls with recorded greeting and
menu of choices; transfers calls as
prompted by callers.*
Call Answer
For a busy or unanswered extension, caller
is connected to called party’s mailbox.
Enhances an automated attendant.
Voice Mail
Outside callers can leave messages.
System users can send messages to other
users, forward messages with comments,
and return a call.
Broadcast
messages
Enables you to send a voice mail message
to all system users.
Information
Option
Plays a recorded message and then
disconnects the caller.
Prompted
information
Allows a caller to enter a code and hear
information about specific subjects.
Message
Drop
Plays a message and then allows caller to
leave a message (no transfer).
Outcalling
Automatically calls a user at an outside
number (may be a beeper) to signal a new
message so user can call to retrieve it.
Multi-level
menus
You can record multiple levels of menus and
announcements, including different ones for
day and night.
Immediate
or delayed
answer
Calls can be handled immediately or after a
set number of rings, allowing them to be
answered by an operator.
Dial by
name
Users can call other users by dialing the
called party’s last name instead of number.
*
†
‡
AVP/Fax
MERLIN AT&T
AVP Attendant
MAIL Attendant (IS II) (IS III)
4†
4‡
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
If the caller does not have a touch-tone phone, the system transfers the call to the
system operator.
Interacts with the Night Service feature to provide specialized after-hours service, for
example, answering calls on lines not usually answered during business hours, or
directing calls to a specific night extension, for example, Building Security. Also, a
special night announcement can greet callers after hours. Supports multiple languages.
AT&T Attendant can be set up to answer every incoming call or only calls on certain
lines/trunks.
Continued on next page
Features and Applications 4–55
Applications
Table 4–13, Continued
Service or
Application Description
Alternate
Personal
Greetings
Allows a user to record a second greeting in
addition to the primary call-answer greeting.
Class of
service
Allows you to assign one of 16 predefined
parameters to a user, so that you can
define, for example, mailbox size, type of
coverage, and activation of outcalling.
General
mailbox
Provides two special mailboxes with reserve
extension; callers using rotary-dial phones
or needing help can be transferred to leave
messages in a general mailbox.
Fax Call
Coverage
For a busy or unanswered extension, a fax
is stored for later printing. Allows users
without fax machines to receive faxes for
later printing.
Fax
Messaging
For confidentiality, allows faxes to be stored
in a user’s fax mailbox for later printing.
Fax Mail
Allows people to send and receive faxes, as
well as program fax outcalling.
Route to fax
Recognizes fax signals and routes calls to
an individual fax or a group of fax machines.
Fax
Broadcast
Allows high-speed, economical fax
transmission to up to 1000 fax numbers.
Route to
answering
machines
For a busy or unattended extension, routes
calls to an answering machine.
Fax
Response
Allows callers to give information about their
fax machines, then receive faxed
information that they request through
prompts from the system.
4–56 Features and Applications
AVP/Fax
MERLIN AT&T
AVP Attendant
MAIL Attendant (IS II) (IS III)
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Applications
!
SECURITY ALERT:
Your Voice Messaging System permits callers to leave verbal messages
for system users or gain access to the backup position in an emergency
as well as create and distribute voice messages among system users.
The Voice Messaging System, through proper programming, can help you
reduce the risk of unauthorized persons gaining access to the network.
However, phone numbers and passwords can be compromised when
overheard in a public location, are lost through theft of a wallet or purse
containing access information, or through carelessness (writing codes on
a piece of paper and improperly discarding them). Additionally, hackers
may use a computer to dial a password and then publish the information
to other hackers. Substantial charges can accumulate quickly. It is your
responsibility to take appropriate steps to implement the features
properly, evaluate and program the various restriction levels, protect and
carefully distribute access codes.
Under applicable tariffs, you will be responsible for payment of toll
charges. AT&T cannot be responsible for such charges and will not make
any allowance or give any credit resulting from unauthorized access.
To reduce the risk of unauthorized access through your Voice Messaging
System, please observe the following procedures:
■
Employees who have voice mailboxes should be required to use the
passwords to protect their mailboxes.
Have them use random sequence passwords.
Impress upon them the importance of keeping their passwords a
secret.
Encourage them to change their passwords regularly.
■
The administrator should remove any unneeded voice mailboxes from
the system immediately.
■
AT&T Voice Messaging Systems have the ability to limit transfers to
subscribers only. You are strongly urged to limit transfers in this
manner.
■
Use the system programming capability to do the following:
Block direct access to outgoing lines and force the use of account
codes/barrier codes.
Disallow trunk-to-trunk transfer unless required (in Release 3.1 and
later systems, trunk-to-transfer is disallowed by default and can
only be permitted through system programming).
Features and Applications 4–57
Applications
Assign toll restriction levels to all voice messaging ports. In Release
3.1 and later systems, voice messaging ports are automatically
outward-restricted, assigned an FRL of 0 (Hybrid/PBX mode only),
and assigned a Disallowed List that restricts calls to many numbers
often dialed by toll-fraud abusers.
If you do not need to use the outcalling feature, completely restrict
the outward calling capability of the voice messaging ports (this is
the default in Release 3.1 and later systems). For AUDIX Voice
Power and MERLIN MAIL, use the “transfer to subscribers only”
feature to restrict outside calls.
■
Monitor SMDR reports or Call Accounting System reports for outgoing
calls that might be originated by voice messaging ports.
A 012 or 016 port (Release 4.0 and later) that is programmed as a generic
VMI port can transfer an outside call to an outside number. A single-line
telephone, connected to an integrated VMI port can complete trunk-totrunk transfers. In Release 3.1 and later systems, trunk-to-trunk transfer is
automatically disallowed for all extensions, unless it has been enabled (on
a per-extension basis) through system programming.
Calling restrictions (for example, Disallowed Lists, Toll Restriction, Facility
Restriction Levels) should be programmed, as appropriate, to minimize
toll fraud abuse, especially if a single-line telephone is connected to an
integrated VMI port. Refer to the “Calling Restrictions” section in the
Feature Reference for additional information about programming calling
restrictions.
4–58 Features and Applications
Putting the System to Work
5
Contents
Scenario 1: A Small Office
■
■
Staff Needs
System Description
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
■
■
Staff Needs
Executive Staff
Secretarial Staff
Administrative/Support Staff
Other Needs
System Description
Equipment
Call Coverage
Calling Restrictions
Scenario 3: A Dual-Location Company
■
■
■
■
General Needs
Connectivity
Cost-Effective Calling
Toll Fraud and Calling Restrictions
Work Group Needs
Individual Needs
System Description
General
Work Groups
Individuals
5–2
5–2
5–5
5–7
5–9
5–9
5–10
5–11
5–12
5–12
5–14
5–16
5–20
5–21
5–23
5–23
5–23
5–24
5–24
5–26
5–26
5–27
5–28
5–30
Putting the System to Work 5–i
Contents
Optimizing Your System
■
■
■
■
■
Desktop Videoconferencing
Group Videoconferencing
CONVERSANT
PassageWay Direct Connect Solution
Caller ID
5–ii Putting the System to Work
5–30
5–31
5–31
5–32
5–32
5–33
Putting the System to Work
5
This chapter provides a variety of sample business scenarios to help you
understand both your existing system and other configurations you may want to
consider in the future. The following examples are discussed:
■
Scenario 1: A Small Office (Key Mode). A private medical practice.
■
Scenario 2: A Large Professional Office (Hybrid/PBX Mode). A law firm
with some special needs and concerns, including covering calls and
restricting outgoing calls.
■
Scenario 3: A Dual-Location Company (Hybrid/PBX Mode). A duallocation direct marketing company with a group of telephone order
agents, faxed and electronically mailed orders, a field sales force, and a
group of customer service representatives. The company also requires
voice and data connections between the locations.
Each scenario includes some general background (a description of the
company’s staff, particular needs and concerns, and a floor plan) and then
descriptions of some of the major aspects of the system as set up to meet the
company’s needs, for example, equipment, methods of call coverage, and
calling restrictions.
To better understand your current system, review the scenario that is most like
your own; or, when you’re planning system expansion, review one or more of the
other scenarios that involve system aspects you’re planning for.
For more information about the system equipment used in the scenarios, see
Chapter 3, “System Components,” in this guide, or see the Equipment and
Operations Reference. For more information about system features and
applications, see Chapter 4, “Features and Applications,” or the Feature
Reference. For the most up-to-date information about data and video
communications, consult the Data/Video Reference.
Putting the System to Work 5–1
Scenario 1: A Small Office
Scenario 1: A Small Office
This scenario describes a private medical practice. The staff includes one
physician, a nurse, an office manager, a billing clerk, the operator/receptionist,
and an appointments/payments clerk.
All incoming calls come through the operator/receptionist, who transfers them to
the appropriate person. A special concern is restricting outgoing calls for
phones in common areas, for example, the waiting room and physical therapy
room.
The office manager also functions as the system manager.
Staff Needs
This section describes the needs of the staff members and provides a floor plan
of the office.
Table 5−1 describes the staff member needs. Figure 5−1 illustrates the layout of
the office.
Table 5–1. Medical Office Needs
Staff Member/Extension Needs
Physician
Personal line in her office; if she is not available, the
appointments/payments clerk should take these calls.
Minimal interruptions when with patients. At these times, the
operator/receptionist or nurse should take messages; the
physician must be notified of urgent calls.
Ability to beep the nurses’ station when she needs
assistance
Ability to make unrestricted calls from own phone, staff lounge,
and meeting room
Nurse
Quick dialing of primary local pharmacy numbers
Continued on next page
5–2 Putting the System to Work
Scenario 1: A Small Office
Table 5–1, Continued
Staff Member/Extension Needs
Office Manager
(System Manager)
Ability to generate reports on system use
As system manager, needs programming privileges and a
programming console
PC with modem
Fax machine
Billing Clerk
Quick dialing of insurance company numbers
Operator/Receptionist
Console with four incoming lines; if one line is busy, calls
automatically go to the next line.
Ability to notify the doctor of a waiting call without actually
calling her
Ability to switch calls to answering service after hours;
however, any staff members working after hours need to
be able to receive calls.
Ability to switch calls to office manager when no other staff
member is available
Ability to page staff members when not at their phones;
page should exclude certain rooms to avoid disturbing
patient care
If staff member is not at his or her desk to receive a
transferred call, it returns to the operator/receptionist so
she can page the person or take a message.
Ability to identify who’s calling so the patient’s record
can quickly be retrieved from the computer database
Waiting Room
Outgoing calls restricted to local calls and 800 numbers
(for use by pharmaceutical company representatives)
Lab
Quick access to other labs
Staff Lounge
Outgoing calls restricted for toll calls
All Staff
Ability to dial frequently used numbers quickly
Putting the System to Work 5–3
Scenario 1: A Small Office
FUTURE EXPANSION –
EMERGENCY ROOM
EXAM
ROOM
#2
EXAM
ROOM
#3
SUPPLIES
DOCTOR’S SUITE
DOCTOR’S
OFFICE
STAFF
LOUNGE
LAB
APPTS.
&
PAYMENT
CLERK
RECEPT.
WAITING
ROOM
Figure 5–1. Medical Office Floor Plan
5–4 Putting the System to Work
PHYSICAL
THERAPY
NURSES’ STATION
EXAM
ROOM
#1
MEETING
ROOM
R
E
S
T
R
O
O
M
S
OFFICE
MANAGER
BILLING
CLERK
Scenario 1: A Small Office
System Description
The system is set up for Key mode operation and uses the following equipment
and features to answer the needs of the staff:
■
Incoming Lines. Four lines associated with the office’s Listed Directory
Number, plus a personal line for the physician and a dedicated line for
the office manager’s fax machine.
■
Equipment. The following MLX telephones:
— MLX-20L telephones for the doctor’s office and for the office/system
manager
NOTE:
The office manager’s telephone is the system programming console.
— MLX-28D telephone for the operator/receptionist console
— MLX-10DP telephones (wall-mounted) for all other staff members and
locations
The system also includes Caller ID and the PassageWay Direct Connect
Solution application so the receptionist can quickly identify the caller and
access the patient’s record on the PC.
To provide battery backup power to the system in the event of a
commercial power failure, an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) is
installed.
■
Restrictions on Outgoing Calls. Calling Restrictions and Allowed List
features. All phones are unrestricted except the following:
— Staff lounge: Toll-restricted
— Waiting room: Toll-restricted with Allowed List for 800 numbers
— Examination rooms: Toll-restricted with marked System Directory
numbers (available from any phone) to call certain pharmacies
■
Transferring Calls. Operator/receptionist can transfer calls using the
Transfer feature with One-Touch Transfer and a Transfer Return Time set
to 4 (calls return to the operator/receptionist if the staff member does not
answer the phone by the fourth ring).
■
Coverage. Only certain extensions receive coverage. During office
hours, the operator/receptionist handles all calls except those to the fax
machine and to the physician’s personal line. Occasionally people use
Forward or Follow Me features when they are working at another
extension or Remote Call Forwarding when they are out of the office.
Putting the System to Work 5–5
Scenario 1: A Small Office
— For physician: Coverage after 3 rings by appointments/payments
clerk; this feature is intended to handle personal line calls. (On all
other lines, the operator speaks to the caller and then transfers the
call to the doctor only at certain times of the day; otherwise, the
operator takes messages.)
— For operator/receptionist when no other staff can be at the operator
console: Immediate coverage by the office manager, with Coverage
On/Off button at the console.
— For fax machine: No coverage
■
After-Hours Coverage. Night Service feature with Group Assignment to
ring in the doctor’s office, nurses’ station, and office manager’s office.
The telephone company sends calls that come into the Listed Directory
Number to the outside answering company; people who work late receive
Night Service calls on the second line, the number of which is
unpublished.
■
Paging. Loudspeaker Paging feature with multizone paging to two zones:
— Zone 1: Nurses’ station, lab, physical therapy
— Zone 2: Office manager’s office and staff lounge
■
Quick Dialing. System Directory for the nurse at the nurses’ station to call
pharmacies, for lab staff to call other labs, and for the billing clerk to call
insurance companies. Personal Speed Dial for MLX-10DP telephone
users. Programmed Auto Dial buttons for the physician. Personal
Directories for MLX-20L telephone users (office manager and the
operator/receptionist). Direct Station Selector (DSS) for
operator/receptionist to reach extensions.
■
Phone Use Reports for Office Manager. Call Accounting Terminal
application.
■
Signaling the Doctor or Nurses’ Station. Use of the Signaling feature
for doctor to beep the nurses’ station for assistance. Use of the Notify
feature for operator/receptionist to activate the light next to a
programmed button on the phone in the doctor’s office.
■
Other Messaging. The physician uses the Do Not Disturb feature and the
Do Not Disturb posted message to prevent interruptions from others in
the system. (Only the operator can use Barge-In to contact the doctor in
an emergency.) Since all phones are MLX display phones, the people in
the office take advantage of the Posted Messages feature when they are
out to lunch or otherwise unavailable. (The nurse often posts a message
created for his or her use when with a patient.)
5–6 Putting the System to Work
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
This scenario describes a law firm. The communications needs of the company
fall into these categories:
■
Executive Staff. Five partners and four associate partners.
■
Secretarial Staff. Five executive secretaries, a general secretary, two
associates’ secretaries, and an operator/receptionist.
■
Administrative/Support Staff. Eight paralegals, an office manager, a
word processing pool, and a bookkeeping department. The office
manager functions as system manager.
■
All Staff. All staff members share some common requirements, as do the
phones in public areas.
The firm plans with these general considerations in mind:
■
A variety of call coverage needs
■
A need to track call costs for client billback
■
Extensive use of on-line databases and the Internet for research, keeping
up to date with professional organizations and publications, and
electronic mailing of large legal documents
■
Use of Group IV (G4) fax machines for receiving and sending legal
documents
■
Use by partners, associates, and clients of a PictureTel group
videoconferencing system installed in one of the firm’s conference rooms
■
Security requirements and restrictions on outgoing calls, especially for
common areas; for example, the conference room, client meeting rooms,
and staff lounge
Because of the extensive data communications needs in this office, many lines
are required; furthermore, pools are needed to access certain special line/trunk
groups. The operator directs all incoming calls except those to devices such as
fax machines and those that arrive on DID and personal lines. For these
reasons, a Hybrid/PBX system is required.
Figure 5–2 illustrates the office layout. Following the figure are sections that
describe the firm’s requirements in more detail and how the system’s equipment
and features meet these special needs and concerns.
Putting the System to Work 5–7
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
Library
Word
Processing
Pool
Main Entrance
Figure 5–2. Law Firm Floor Plan
5–8 Putting the System to Work
en
pm
Operator/
Receptionist
Reception
Area
Junior
Partner
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Paralegals
(8)
Equipment
Senior
Partner
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Main
Conference
Room
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As
s
oc
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at
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oc
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Associate
As
s
Junior
Partner
Staff
Lounge
at
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Junior
Partner
Bookkeeping
and Accounting
oc
i
Managing
Partner
Meeting
Room
As
s
Conference
Room
Records/Filing
Supplies
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
Staff Needs
This section describes the needs of the office staff, including the executive staff,
secretarial staff, and the administrative/support staff, as well as other
miscellaneous needs.
Executive Staff
Table 5–2 describes the needs of the executive staff.
Table 5–2. Executive Staff Needs
Staff Member
Needs
Partners
Partners’ calls do not ring at their phones.
Partners never answer their own phone calls; executive
secretaries answer all their calls. If a secretary is not
available, calls must be recorded in the partner’s voice
mailbox with password access to messages.
A personal line
No calling restrictions
Ability to use own calling privileges at another extension
Ability to bill clients for phone time
Access to the phone system from an outside phone
Ability to forward calls to their cellular phones
Associates
Calls go directly to each associate. If an associate is not
available, one of the associates’ secretaries answers. If
no secretary is available, calls must be recorded in the
associate’s voice mailbox with password access to
messages.
Each has a PC with modem.
Ability to bill clients for phone time
Access to the phone system from an outside phone
Ability to forward calls to their cellular phones
Putting the System to Work 5–9
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
Secretarial Staff
Table 5–3 describes the needs of the secretarial staff.
Table 5–3. Secretarial Staff Needs
Staff Member
Needs
Partners’ Executive
Secretaries
Answer all of their bosses’ calls. Calls come directly
and through the operator. If an executive secretary
is not available, one of the other executive
secretaries answers that partner’s call. If no
secretary is available to take a partner’s call, calls
must be recorded in the partner’s voice mailbox
with password access to messages.
If the secretary is not available, the secretary’s own
telephone messages must be recorded with
password access to the messages.
Some calling restrictions
A shared Group IV fax machine
Each secretary has a PC; the local area network
(LAN) server provides access to data modules.
They share a recording device for recording
depositions.
Need to identify inside callers
On behalf of partners, need to broadcast faxes and
voice mail messages for staff
Associates’ Secretary
and General Secretary
Answers associates’ calls when associates are not
available.
If associates’ secretary is not available, general
secretary answers associates’ calls.
If the secretary is not available, calls must be
recorded in the secretary’s voice mailbox with
password access to messages.
Some calling restrictions
A shared Group IV fax machine
Each secretary has a PC; they use data modules
provided by connection to the LAN.
5–10 Putting the System to Work
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
Administrative/Support Staff
Table 5–4 describes the needs of the administrative/support staff.
Table 5–4. Administrative/Support Staff Needs
Staff Member
Needs
Paralegals
If a paralegal is not available, another in the group
picks up the call. If none are available, calls must be
recorded in the paralegal’s voice mailbox with
password access to messages.
Each has a PC; they access data modules connected
to the LAN server.
Some calling restrictions
Ability to bill clients for phone time
Access to the phone system from an outside phone
Two shared Group IV fax machines
Office Manager
(System Manager)
If the office manager is not available, calls go to the
general secretary.
PC with fax/modem for purchasing purposes
Ability to track and generate reports on calling usage
for client billback
Equipment to manage the system
Bookkeeping
If a bookkeeper is not available, another in the group
Department Members picks up the call. If none are available, calls must be
recorded in the bookkeeper’s voice mailbox with
password access to messages.
Calling restrictions
Word Processing
Pool Members
If a pool member is not available, another in the group
picks up the call. If none are available, calls must be
recorded in the staff member’s voice mailbox with
password access to messages.
Calling restrictions
Operator/Receptionist Takes calls to Listed Directory Number and remote
access calls.
Ability to interrupt a call at a busy extension or one
with Do Not Disturb on
Ability to identify inside callers
Loudspeaker paging (except partners’ offices,
conference room, and client meeting rooms)
Fax machine for general use
Putting the System to Work 5–11
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
Other Needs
Table 5–5 describes some of the miscellaneous needs of the office.
Table 5–5. Other Needs
Extension
Needs
All staff members
After hours, staff members must be able to hear phones
ring and be able to answer. They need to be able to
transfer after-hours calls to voice mail.
Messaging among all staff members
Least expensive routes for calls
Ability to quickly dial most frequently used phone numbers
Phones in common
areas
Restrictions on outgoing calls
Fax machines, data Need exclusive use of their own lines
modules, and
modems
System Description
This section provides an overview of the system features and equipment used
to meet the needs of this office. Following this overview, equipment, covering
calls, and restrictions on outgoing calls are described in more detail.
■
Lines/Trunks. One 408 GS/LS module to handle the loudspeaker paging
system and provide a power-failure transfer (PFT) telephone. Three 800
NI-BRI (Release 4.0 and later only) modules supply outside line/trunks to
the system. Two modules are fully equipped, with eight NI-1 BRI (National
Integrated Services Digital Network 1 Basic Rate Interface) facilities on
each module, supplying a total of 32 virtual “lines” (B-channels). The third
800 NI-BRI module currently connects three facilities that provide six
additional B-channels. (For more information about NI-1 BRI access
arrangement and the 800 NI-BRI module, see Chapter 3, “System
Components.”)
■
Extension Modules. One 016 basic telephone module (Release 4.0 and
later only) to handle the modems, single-line telephones, analog fax
machines, and applications. Six 008 MLX modules serve MLX extensions.
NOTE:
The 016 basic telephone module (Release 4.0 and later only) supports a
maximum bit rate of 14.4 kbps. Therefore, the office’s analog equipment
(fax machines and modems) is restricted to speeds no higher than this.
5–12 Putting the System to Work
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
■
Equipment. MLX telephones for each staff member, excluding four parttime or temporary workstations in bookkeeping and word processing
areas (these use single-line telephones), modems, ExpressRoute 1000
ISDN Terminal Adapters for videoconferencing and high-speed data
communications, Group IV (G4) and analog fax machines, a recording
machine for depositions, headset for operator/receptionist, Integrated
Solutions applications package for office/system manager, PictureTel
4000 group videoconferencing system.
■
Covering Calls. Coverage (Individual and Group) feature with
appropriate use of Cover buttons and ringing options, SA and SSA
buttons, and voice messaging system with automated attendant and
voice mail, as well as Fax Attendant application and fax mail. Outside
regular business hours, Night Service feature with Group Assignment and
Outward Restriction; unanswered calls go to the voice messaging
system. Individuals use Forward/Follow Me features occasionally.
■
Cost-Effective Calling. Automatic Route Selection (ARS) for costeffective line/trunk selection for outgoing calls.
■
Restrictions on Outgoing Calls. Automatic Route Selection (ARS) with
Facility Restriction Levels (FRLs); Allowed/Disallowed Lists; remote
access barrier codes; authorization codes are mandatory for anyone
using extensions other than their own; pool dial-out code restriction to
reserve data-only lines.
■
Tracking Calls and Costs for Client Billback. Call Accounting System
and use of the Account Code Entry feature for tracking calls by customer
account for billing purposes.
NOTE:
Partners use the Authorization Codes feature (see the section, “Calling
Restrictions,” later in this chapter) so that they can make calls from
extensions other than their own and still use their own calling privileges.
However, these calls cannot be tracked for client billback using the
Account Code Entry feature. When both Account Codes and
Authorization Codes features are used, only the authorization code is
printed on reports.
■
Paging. Loudspeaker paging for certain work areas; secretaries use
programmed speakerphone paging buttons to inform their bosses about
calls waiting for them.
■
Dialing Features. System Directory or System Speed Dial codes for all
users and devices; Personal Directories for operator, partners, and office
manager; Auto Dial buttons for MLX-28D users; Personal Speed Dial
codes for MLX-10DP telephones, modems, and fax machines.
Putting the System to Work 5–13
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
■
Other System Features and Applications. Direct Voice Mail feature,
password-protected voice and fax mail services (AUDIX Voice Power and
Fax Attendant, Integrated Solutions); Integrated Administration; Remote
Access (with barrier codes) for partners to access the system from offsite; PassageWay Direct Connect Solution for MLX-10DP and MLX-16DP
users. The Remote Call Forward feature for associates to forward calls to
their cellular phones.
Other system equipment includes an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) to
supply backup power in the event of a commercial power failure.
Equipment
This section describes the system equipment used to meet the staff members’
needs. Included are the types of telephones and adjuncts.
The system includes the following telephones for staff members, as well as in
common areas:
■
MLX-20L telephones for all partners for maximum functionality and for the
Queued Call Console (QCC) operator console for operator/receptionist
■
MLX-28D telephones for executive secretaries to provide display screen,
maximum number of buttons (to include SSA button for each of the
partners’ lines), and maximum functionality
■
MLX-16DP telephones for associates’ secretaries
■
MLX-10DP telephones for associates, paralegals, as well as some
bookkeeping and word processing pool members; used in some cases
with the custom PassageWay Direct Connect Solution applications
■
Single-line telephones for reception, word processing, and bookkeeping
areas
The following adjuncts are included in the system:
■
Group IV and analog (slower speed) fax machines
■
ExpressRoute 1000 ISDN Terminal Adapters for high-speed data
communications by fax, PC, or videoconferencing system
■
PictureTel 4000 videoconferencing system for use by partners and
associates in meeting with key clients
■
Modems and fax/modem for office/system manager
■
Direct Station Selector (DSS) for office/system manager and Queued Call
console (QCC) operator/receptionist
■
Headset for QCC operator/receptionist
■
Recording machine for executive secretaries
5–14 Putting the System to Work
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
■
Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR) and call accounting printers;
paralegals also print out on-line researched information at their printer.
Figure 5−3 illustrates the equipment.
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so
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Staff
Lounge
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Bookkeeping
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e
Meeting
Room
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Conference
Room
Records/Filing
DSS
Senior
Partner
Junior
Partner
en
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Operator/
Receptionist
Reception
Area
FAX
Paralegals
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DSS
FAX
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Equipment
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FAX
Main
Conference
Room
Word
Processing
Pool (4)
Library
Supplies
Main Entrance
MLX
TELEPHONE
SINGLE-LINE
TELEPHONE
COMPUTER
OR DATA TERMINAL
OPERATOR
POSITION
ADJUNCT
VIDEOCONFERENCING
EQUIPMENT
Figure 5–3. Law Firm Equipment
Putting the System to Work 5–15
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
Call Coverage
Table 5–6 describes the staff members’ call coverage needs and the system
features used to handle those needs.
Table 5–6. Law Firm Call Coverage
Staff Member
Needs
System Feature/Application
Partners
Never answer phone calls; all calls
answered by their executive secretaries.
System Access (SA) button(s)
programmed for Send Ring
If no executive secretary is available,
calls can go to voice mail, if desired.
Group Coverage to voice
messaging system (Call
Answer service)
Answer their bosses’ calls when their
bosses are not available.
If a secretary is not available, one of the
other executive secretaries takes the
calls.
Shared System Access (SSA)
button for each partner’s SA
button, ringing immediately.
Each secretary has Delay Ring
on an SSA button that is
usually answered by another
secretary.
If no executive secretary is available,
coverage by voice mail.
Coverage to voice messaging
system application (Call
Answer Service)
Partners’
Executive
Secretaries
Each partner has a separate fax number, Fax Attendant and fax mail
but their faxes all go to a single machine.
Associates
Data modules
No coverage. If data module is
not available, calling party gets
busy signal.
If an associate is not available, calls
answered by associates’ secretaries’
after 2 rings.
Each has Individual Coverage,
secondary (delayed).
If no one is available to take calls, voice
mail coverage.
Coverage to voice messaging
system application (Call
Answer Service)
Modems
No coverage; if a modem is not
available, calling modem gets
busy signal.
Continued on next page
5–16 Putting the System to Work
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
Table 5–6, Continued
Staff Member
Needs
Feature/Application
Paralegals
If a paralegal is not available, another
paralegal takes the call.
Delayed Call Forwarding
(Release 4.0 and later systems
only) and Direct Voice Mail.
Calls ring twice at a
paralegal’s phone. If the
person does not answer, the
call rings at an assigned coworker’s extension. The person
receiving the call can transfer
it to voice mail if necessary.
If the forwarded-to receiver is not
available, the forwarding extension turns
off the Forwarding feature and calls
receive voice mail coverage.
Coverage to voice messaging
system application (Call
Answer Service)
Data modules
No coverage. If a data module
is not available, calling party
gets busy signal. Most data
calls are outgoing, not
incoming.
Answer their bosses’ calls when
associates are not available.
If a secretary is not available, the other
secretary answers.
Cover buttons for associates;
associates’ secretary’s Cover
buttons set for 2-ring delay;
general secretary’s cover
buttons are set for 4-ring
delay, to handle calls when
associates’ secretary is not
available.
When no secretary is available,
voice mail coverage.
Coverage to voice messaging
system application (Call
Answer Service)
Each associate has a separate fax
number, but their faxes all go to a
single machine.
Fax Attendant application and
fax mail
If manager is not available, voice mail
answers. Occasionally forwards calls to
general secretary or works at another
desk.
Coverage by voice mail
system and Forward/Follow Me
features
Fax/modem
Fax Attendant stores faxes for
receipt when the fax line is
available
Associates’
Secretaries
and General
Secretary
Office/System
Manager
Continued on next page
Putting the System to Work 5–17
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
Table 5–6, Continued
Staff Member
Needs
Feature/Application
Bookkeeping
Department
Members
If a bookkeeper is not available, another
picks up call.
Pickup (Group). Supervisor
has Personalized Ringing
pattern.
If none are available, messages are
recorded.
Coverage to voice messaging
system application (Call
Answer Service)
Word
Processing
Pool
Operator/
Receptionist
If a pool member is not available, another Group Pickup
picks up the call.
If none are available, messages are
recorded.
Coverage to voice messaging
system application (Call
Answer Service)
Needs backup if call volume through
main numbers is too heavy or operator
is not at his/her desk.
Coverage for new incoming
calls (that is, calls not already
covered) to voice messaging
system (Auto Attendant
Service)
Fax machine is for general use.
Fax Attendant and fax mail
Figure 5–4 illustrates the call coverage patterns. The shaded areas in the figure
indicate those extensions that are included in the voice messaging system
(VMS) voice mail. If staff members need to remotely access their voice
mailboxes to check for messages, they can do so through the voice mail
system, bypassing the operator.
5–18 Putting the System to Work
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
Library
Operator/
Receptionist
Reception
Area
Junior
Partner
en
pm
ui
Paralegals
(8)
Equipment
Senior
Partner
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Main
Conference
Room
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Bookkeeping
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oc
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Partner
Meeting
Room
As
s
Conference
Room
Records/Filing
Word
Processing
Pool
Supplies
Main Entrance
VMS
Figure 5–4. Law Firm Call Coverage
Putting the System to Work 5–19
Scenario 2: A Professional Office
Calling Restrictions
The following system features and applications handle calling restrictions
requirements (see Table 5–7):
■
Automatic Route Selection (ARS) with appropriate Facility Restriction
Levels (FRLs) for each extension, and time-of-day routing (day or night)
using ARS subpatterns
■
Disallowed List for 900 numbers for all staff and phones
■
Authorization codes for partners only
■
Pool dial-out code restrictions to reserve certain lines for paralegal
modems
■
Voice mail and fax mail passwords
Table 5–7. Law Firm Calling Restrictions
Staff Member
Calling Requirements
Partners
Day and night: long-distance and local calling
Remote access to system.
Partners’ Executive
Secretaries
Day: long-distance and local calling
Night: local calling only
Associates
Day and night: long-distance and local calling
Paralegals
Day and night: long-distance and local calling
Associates’ Secretaries Day: long-distance and local calling
and General Secretary Night: local calling only
Office/System Manager Day: long-distance and local calling
Night: local calling only
Bookkeeping
Department Members
Day: non-toll local calling
Night: non-toll local calling only
Word Processing Pool
Day: non-toll local calling
Night: non-toll local calling only
Operator/ Receptionist
Day: long-distance and local calling
Night: local calling only
Reception Area Phone
Day and night: local calling only
All
Day and night: no calls allowed to 976 or 900
numbers
5–20 Putting the System to Work
Scenario 3: A Dual-Location Company
!
SECURITY ALERT:
The MERLIN LEGEND Communications System ships with ARS activated
with all extensions set to Facility Restriction Level 3, allowing all
international calling. To prevent toll fraud, ARS Facility Restriction Levels
(FRLs) should be established using:
■
FRL 0 for restriction to inside calls only
■
FRL 2 for restriction to local calls only
■
FRL 3 for restriction to domestic long distance (excluding area
code 809 for the Dominican Republic as this is part of the North
American Numbering Plan, unless 809 is required)
■
FRL 4 for international calling
Each extension should be assigned the appropriate FRL to match its
calling requirement. All voice mail port extensions not used for outcalling
should be assigned to FRL 0.
Scenario 3: A Dual-Location Company
This scenario describes a medium-sized mail-order company with supervised
groups of order-takers and customer service representatives; the company also
sells to large corporate customers through a field sales force. The various
departments and staff are in two different cities, and the company uses two
different MERLIN LEGEND Communication Systems, both in Hybrid/PBX mode.
In this company, the system manager allocates more time to system operations
than in the two previous scenarios; she also acts as Manager of Information
Systems for the company’s computer systems.
Company needs and the solutions provided by the system fall into the following
categories:
■
General. Broad concerns that affect the company as a whole and require
basic decisions about the lines/trunks used in the system, as well as
system modes of operation.
■
Work Groups. Groups of people who work together have specific
communications needs.
■
Individuals. Individuals, such as the system manager and off-site
employees, have needs that general planning does not meet.
NOTE:
Previous scenarios described many system features, for example, call
coverage. Therefore, this scenario highlights additional needs and features not
yet discussed. In this scenario, such features as coverage and calling
restrictions are only mentioned briefly.
Figure 5−5 illustrates the locations and staffing.
Putting the System to Work 5–21
Scenario 3: A Dual-Location Company
Headquarters
(East Coast)
President
Chief
Financial
Officer
VP Sales/ VP Product Chief Operating
Marketing
Design
Officer
Equipment
Main Entrance
Operator/
Receptionist
Division
Sales Administration
Manager
and Support (5)
Division Mgr. Sect'y
Conference
Room
Operator/
Receptionist
Main Entrance
ie
lT
ta
i
g
Di
k
un
Tr
Conference
Room with
Group
VideoConferencing
QC
Manager
Plant (12)
Secretary
Drafting
(2)
Engineering
(2)
Plant
Manager
Warehouse (6)
Order
Processing
(8)
Shipping/Receiving (2)
West Coast
Division
Figure 5–5. Dual-Location Company Floor Plans
5–22 Putting the System to Work
ries
reta
Sec
Personnel MIS/ Supplies
and
Manager System
Manager Storage
Equipment
Order-Takers (12)
and Customer
Service (6)
Accounting
(8)
Scenario 3: A Dual-Location Company
General Needs
The company has several broad areas of concern:
■
Connectivity
■
Cost-effective calling
■
Toll fraud and calling restrictions
In addition, the company would like to provide these features to all or most
telephone users:
■
Easy dialing of frequently called numbers
■
Covering of calls
■
Answering of calls after hours
Connectivity
The two sites need to communicate easily by voice and also must transmit data
rapidly back and forth.
Many staff members in both locations require connectivity to the company’s
customer, inventory, and order processing databases. The company uses two
local area networks (LANs) that share data communications equipment (DCE)
connected to LAN server computers. The LANs are linked by gateway
computers. Volume is high, and communications must be speedy in order to
serve both direct marketing and corporate customers.
Customers place orders to high-speed Group IV (G4) fax machines and also
use slower analog fax equipment. In addition, some customers transmit orders
electronically over the Internet, and off-site employees frequently find electronic
mail convenient.
Executive and professional staffers use the Internet to communicate with
customers and associates outside the company, review developments in their
industry, and keep up with professional organizations in their fields.
In addition, executives use group videoconferencing to meet without the need
for travel. Personal desktop videoconferencing and data-sharing are essential to
ensure that product design and factory operations mesh smoothly and that
manufacturing problems are resolved rapidly.
Cost-Effective Calling
The company uses incoming and outgoing 800 and WATS services for
customer interaction. In addition, customers need to call in directly when they
require help, without going through an operator. They often use an automated
response system to check their order status or place a small order.
Putting the System to Work 5–23
Scenario 3: A Dual-Location Company
To simplify cost accounting and make outcalling more cost-effective, field
representatives access the west coast system remotely, then use the system to
dial out to customers or make tie-trunk calls to headquarters.
Toll Fraud and Calling Restrictions
The company must keep tight control of telecommunications costs and prevent
toll fraud by hackers attempting to access their system remotely and then dial
out from it. When a new product is released, the company brings in temporary
order-taking agents, and this also presents a toll-fraud risk.
Work Group Needs
Several groups of people work together and interact with customers and coworkers in similar ways. Some of them also have individual needs.
Table 5–8 outlines the needs of work groups.
Table 5–8. Work Group Needs
Work Group
Needs
Order-Takers and
Customer
Service
Personnel
Ability for small-order customers to access an automatic ordering
system in which they use their touch-tone phones to enter account
numbers, product codes, and so on, without having to wait for an
agent. They have the option of speaking to an agent.
Ability for calls from high-volume customers to be directed to the
agents as a group, bypassing the operator, so that any available
agent can answer a call. If no agents are available, the caller must
hear an announcement stating that an agent will soon take the call;
while the caller is on hold, he or she should hear music.
Hands-free operation of their telephones so they can enter order
information, review customer history, or check on orders in progress
while talking to a customer.
Stringent calling restrictions for all agents except those allowed to
use WATS services.
Ability for callers to fax or email orders
Order-Takers’ and
Customer
Service
Supervisor
Ability to monitor and control the order agents’ calls (for example, to
know who is available). When a caller has waited a certain length of
time (Release 4.0 and later systems only), the call should go to an
overflow receiver. The supervisor makes sure that enough agents
are available and that callers are not waiting too long, either for
agents or overflow receiver(s).
Continued on next page
5–24 Putting the System to Work
Scenario 3: A Dual-Location Company
Table 5–8, Continued
President and vicepresidents, West
Coast Division
Manager, Plant
Manager, Personnel
Manager
Ability to meet frequently, face to face, without incurring travel costs
Executive
Secretaries
Ability to receive bosses’ calls directly, without those calls going
through an operator/receptionist.
Call-covering by other secretary or voice mail
Vice-President of
Product Design
Product engineers
Quality Assurance
Engineers
Plant Manager
Drafters
Ability to exchange and work together individually on documents
and computer-generated images
Ability to meet as a group without incurring travel costs
Vice-President of
Marketing and
Sales
Sales Support
Staff
Ability to access either system remotely for calling customers and
associates
Field Sales
Representatives
Ability for field representatives to have calls forwarded from the
West coast site to their off-site telephones
Factory and
Warehouse
Personnel
Ability to be summoned by loudspeaker when necessary
Ability to hear an extra alert when a call arrives in some noisier
areas.
Calling restrictions
Barrier code (password) access for remote callers, to help avoid toll
fraud by hackers
Putting the System to Work 5–25
Scenario 3: A Dual-Location Company
Individual Needs
Table 5−9 describes the individual needs of certain staff members.
Table 5–9. Individual Needs
Staff Member(s)
Needs
Executive Managers
Ability to make unrestricted calls from any extension
Screening and coverage of all calls, by secretary during
normal hours and by voice mail after hours.
Ability to work or confer without being disturbed, even by
secretary.
Executive Secretaries
Ability to receive bosses’ calls directly, without those calls
going through an operator/receptionist.
Call-covering by other secretary or voice mail when
unavailable
System Manager/MIS
Manager
Ability to manage two systems using computers
Ability to manage one system remotely
Ability to generate reports about phone usage
Operator/Receptionist
(Headquarters)
Ability to page certain groups or all staff members
Answering of all calls, except those that go directly to agents
or executive secretaries, by an automated operator who
directs calls according to the touch-tones entered by callers;
callers can choose to talk to the operator by pressing 0.
Operator/Receptionist
(West Coast)
Ability to page certain groups or all staff members through
phone speakers or the loudspeaker system
Answering of all calls, except those that go directly to orderprocessing agents or the secretaries
System Description
The system includes equipment, system features, and applications to satisfy
needs in three categories:
■
General
■
Work groups
■
Individuals
5–26 Putting the System to Work
Scenario 3: A Dual-Location Company
General
The company uses the following general equipment to and applications to
provide basic functionality for the business:
■
Lines/Trunks. Both systems use Digital Signal 1 (DS1) T1 service
facilities, connected to the system by 100D modules (two at each
location). Each facility consists of 24 channels. A B-channel functions as
a line/trunk and is programmed for voice (analog service) or data (digital
service). In these systems, T1 channels provide tie-trunk service so that
employees can call extensions on the other system by dialing the
extension number. Data (Release 4.0 only) and voice tie trunks are
assigned to pools. T1 channels are also used for incoming and outgoing
WATS services, personal lines, emulated DID (Direct Inward Dial)
lines/trunks, and analog data transfer by modem or analog fax machine.
Digital data transfer (Release 4.0 and later) supports high-speed Group
IV fax machines, group videoconferencing, desktop videoconferencing,
and data exchange through ISDN terminal adapters.
T1 service offers better protection against toll fraud than does standard
loop-start or ground-start lines/trunks.
In addition, each location has one 408 GS/LS line/trunk and extension
module. Loudspeaker paging, Call Management System (CMS), and
Music on Hold connect to this module.
■
Extension Modules. The headquarters system uses six 008 MLX
extension modules to connect MLX telephones and digital equipment; the
West coast office uses five 008 MLX extension modules for the same
purpose. Each control unit includes a 016 tip/ring extension module
(Release 4.0 and later) for connecting modems, fax/modems, analog fax
machines, and automated answering applications.
■
Common Equipment. LANs equipped with shared modems, fax
modems, and ExpressRoute 1000 ISDN Terminal Adapters serve the
data communications needs of many employees at both sites. They also
share common-area fax machines, both high-speed digital Group IV and
analog devices.
■
General Extension Equipment. Each extension includes an MLX
telephone; single-line telephones are available for use in reception areas.
Most extensions include a PC or terminal connected to a LAN, sharing
LAN data modules and modems.
■
Fax Attendant 2.1.1. This Integrated Systems III (IS III) application
manages incoming and outgoing faxes in both locations, over digital and
emulated ground-start B-channels provided by the T1 service.
■
AUDIX Voice Power 2.1.1. (AVP). This IS III application supplies voice
mail and services at both sites. At headquarters, its Automated Attendant
answers calls to the site’s main numbers.
Putting the System to Work 5–27
Scenario 3: A Dual-Location Company
Other system equipment includes Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPSs) to
supply backup power in the event of a commercial power failure.
People in both locations use these features:
■
Covering Calls. Calls are covered using SSA buttons, call coverage
features (Cover buttons), Call Forwarding, and Group Pickup.
■
Security. Authorization Codes allow executives to call from any extension
using their own privileges. ARS restrictions limit toll-calling privileges for
many extensions.
!
SECURITY ALERT:
For more information about security, see the section, “Security,”
later in this chapter. Also consult “Security of Your System:
Preventing Toll Fraud,” in Appendix A, “Customer Support
Information.”
■
Speed Dialing. Personal and System Speed dial codes and directories
help people quickly reach frequently called numbers. Some staff
members also use Auto Dial buttons.
!
SECURITY ALERT:
Never program passwords and/or authorization codes as Speed
Dial codes.
Both features and equipment fill paging needs. A loudspeaker paging system
connected to the control unit in the West coast office allows the
operator/receptionist to page people working in noisy areas such as the factory.
The system’s Group Paging feature serves the same purpose for people in
offices.
Work Groups
The following work groups use specialized equipment, features, and
applications that serve their needs:
■
Executive Managers. Each location includes a conference room with a
PictureTel group videoconferencing system that allows face-to-face
meetings. The systems use two MLX channels and two T1 B-channels
programmed for data operation; communication is at 112 kilobits per
second. Two dedicated ExpressRoute 1000 ISDN Terminal Adapters at
each site act as the DCEs for the group videoconferencing systems.
5–28 Putting the System to Work
Scenario 3: A Dual-Location Company
■
Agent Groups. The CONVERSANT application is used for automated
ordering, allowing customers to order using their touch-tone phones; if
callers choose, they can talk to an agent by pressing 0. The system has
two Call Management Systems (CMSs) to answer customer order calls or
customer service calls and distribute them to agents. A Delay
Announcement device is attached for both groups, and callers hear
Music On Hold while they wait. For faxed-in orders, fax machines are in a
calling group so they are accessed through one phone number; orders
are received by the next available fax machine in the group.
Calls arrive on emulated Direct Inward Dial (DID) trunks to the separate
calling groups (CONVERSANT, agents, and fax machines) in both
locations, bypassing the operator/receptionist. All agents’ phones have
headsets attached for hands-free operation.
Two agents in each group use ExpressRoute 1000 ISDN Terminal
Adapters, available through the LAN, to respond to orders and customer
service requests through Internet electronic mail.
Supervisors have Direct-Line Consoles (DLCs) and Direct Station
Selectors (DSS) with a button for each agent extension, and with the
Extension Status feature to monitor the status of agents’ extensions. The
Group Calling Overflow Threshold Time setting (Release 4.0 and later
systems only) monitors when a caller is waiting too long. Then the call is
sent to an overflow receiver.
■
Engineering Group. Design and quality engineers, along with drafters
and the Vice-President of Product Design, share a desktop
videoconferencing workstation. There is a system at each location. They
use this desktop videoconferencing application for data-sharing, video
meetings, and cooperative work on documents. Each desktop video
system uses two MLX channels and two T1 B-channels (2B data)
programmed for data operation; communication is at 112 kilobits per
second. No additional data communications equipment (DCE) is
required. The engineers also use the PictureTel group videoconferencing
system described above.
■
Factory and Warehouse Personnel. People in the warehouse and
factory hear loudspeakers from the paging system. When a call comes
into these areas, extra bells alert personnel on the floor.
■
Sales Group. Remote Access passwords (barrier codes) help ensure
that field representatives, not hackers, are able to first access the system
and then call out; passwords are associated with ARS restrictions, and
the system manager changes them often.
Although they do not have on-site offices, each representative does have
a voice mailbox in the voice messaging system (with no corresponding
system extension). They often have calls forwarded to their off-site offices
by using the Remote Call Forwarding feature.
Putting the System to Work 5–29
Optimizing Your System
Individuals
The following equipment, features, and applications meet the needs of
individuals at the company:
■
Executives. Executives use the Do Not Disturb feature to prevent calls
from ringing for meetings and conferences. They also use the
Authorization Code feature for calling from any extension using their own
calling privileges. Executives use MLX-16DP telephones. (See below for
a description of how executive calls are covered.)
■
Executive Secretaries. General calls come in for executives on
emulated DID lines/trunks. Personal calls for executives come in on their
own personal lines, which the operator/receptionist does not answer. The
system’s Shared System Access (SSA) buttons allow the secretaries to
answer these lines. The bosses’ SA lines do not ring. The system’s Notify
feature allows them to visually alert their bosses when a caller is waiting.
When the callers request it, the secretaries can transfer them to voice
mail using the Direct Voice Mail feature. When a secretary is unavailable,
she uses either the voice messaging system (after hours) or another
secretary as backup. Each secretary has SSA buttons for each partner;
calls for a secretary’s own boss ring immediately; calls for another
partner ring after a delay. When calls on SSA buttons are forwarded to
voice mail, they go to the partners’ mailboxes. Secretaries use MLX-20L
telephones so that they can easily dial for their bosses.
■
Operator/Receptionist. At headquarters, callers who wish to speak to an
operator/receptionist, rather than to IS III’s Automated Attendant, can
press 0. Both operator/receptionists use MLX-20L telephones
programmed as Queued Call Consoles (QCCs).
■
System Manager. The system manager manages one remote system
and one on-site system. For the more complex headquarters system
located at the same site where the system manager works, the Call
Management System (CMS) application offers a variety of reporting
options. At the West coast office, an SMDR printer produces reports. For
security reasons, the system manager uses password access to the
remote system. The system manager has an MLX-20L telephone and
uses SPM as part of Integrated Solutions III for the on-site system. For the
remote system, the standalone SPM provides functionality; the system
manager has a dedicated modem to ensure immediate access to the
remote system; her PC is directly connected to the on-site system.
Optimizing Your System
This section describes some features and applications that you read about in
the scenarios. They are highlighted here because they can significantly
enhance your system.
5–30 Putting the System to Work
Optimizing Your System
For more information about any of these products and features, see the Feature
Reference or contact your AT&T representative.
Desktop Videoconferencing
A desktop videoconferencing application is designed for individual video calls,
data transfer, and screen-sharing between two compatible personal computers
that are running compatible software.
The desktop videoconferencing system can use either one MLX B-channel or
two, although one is not adequate for video display. The use of one B-channel is
called 1B data; the use of two data channels is referred to as 2B data.
Acceptable quality and performance results from a 2B data installation.
Depending upon the type of high-speed digital facilities and interface
arrangement connected to your system, 1B data transfer takes place at 56 or 64
kbps, and 2B data transfer takes place at 112 or 128 kbps.
An MLX telephone may be connected to some desktop videoconferencing
systems. The telephone shares the MLX extension. If the MLX telephone is on a
call, the desktop videoconferencing application has only one B-channel
available and is limited to 1B data. On some systems, the second B-channel is
added when the MLX telephone becomes idle. See the Feature Reference for
more information about desktop videoconferencing.
Group Videoconferencing
Group videoconferencing enables groups of people in different geographical
locations to meet face to face. Conferees can exchange information,
documents, ideas, and data while employing a variety of visual aids, including
interactive writing and drawing, prepared text and graphic materials, and
prerecorded audio and video material. You can have all the advantages of
face-to-face meetings while decreasing your travel budget.
Most group videoconferencing applications include an easy-to-use control
console that allows you to conduct the conference as easily as you operate a
telephone. It includes superior camera optics and digital audio signals.
The components of the system can be integrated on a mobile console that rolls
easily into a conference room prior to a scheduled video conference call.
Alternatively, some companies build their systems into a video conference
room.
Putting the System to Work 5–31
Optimizing Your System
CONVERSANT
This voice-response system enables you to run Integrated Voice Response
(IVR) applications. It consists of hardware and software that supports, for
example, automated interactive order-taking. Because it can interface with a
computer, it can facilitate quick and easy transaction processing, data retrieval,
and data entry using a touch-tone telephone.
Using the example of automated phone orders, you can use CONVERSANT to
decrease the need for human order-takers or to handle large call volume without
having callers wait. The caller is prompted to enter appropriate responses by
using the touch-tone keys on the telephone. It enables your customers to have
access to your business and services on a 24-hour, seven-days-per-week
basis.
You can customize several aspects of the system, including: the ways inbound
calls are directed; the ways to handle calls during normal business hours as
opposed to after hours or during holidays; optional seasonal greetings; and
interaction with voice mailboxes.
PassageWay Direct Connect Solution
This collection of software applications provides a Microsoft Windows interface
between a PC and the system through an MLX-28D, MLX-20L, MLX-16DP
telephone.
The applications include:
■
AT&T Call. A cardfile that enables you to maintain information such as
names, addresses, and telephone numbers. You specify the information
you want to store. You can place a call directly from the PC and keep a
log of all calls that are made.
■
AT&T Set. A telephone programming application that enables you to
program telephone features for your MLX telephone from your PC. You
can also create and save multiple button programming files for your
telephone, and exchange these files with other AT&T Set users.
■
Log Viewer. Enables you to view entries that are stored in the
PassageWay call log that contains a record of every call you make using
AT&T Call.
■
AT&T Connect. Management software that provides the basis for the
other PassageWay applications and the diagnostics features to
troubleshoot them. Auto dialing capabilities using the common modem
command set are also provided.
5–32 Putting the System to Work
Optimizing Your System
■
AT&TBuzz. An application that enables you to manage incoming calls on
loop-start telephone lines connected to 800 LS-ID modules and view the
Caller ID calling party number (when available) so you can quickly
access customer records on your PC.
Caller ID
Caller ID enables you to screen incoming calls so that you can identify the
calling party’s number before you answer the call.
Using Caller ID, you can also integrate the calling party information with various
applications that your business uses. For example, you can quickly identify the
caller, then access and display his or her account information from your
computer database while you’re on the call.
Putting the System to Work 5–33
Optimizing Your System
5–34 Putting the System to Work
Managing the System
6
Contents
Using the Task Descriptions
6–1
Using the Programming Procedures
6–3
Using Detailed Procedures
Using Summary Programming Procedures
6–3
6–4
Introduction to System Programming
6–5
■
■
■
■
■
Types of Programming
Programming Screens
Information Screens
Menu Selection Screens
Data Entry Screens
System Programming Menu
Saving Entries and Moving Among Screens
Idle States
Forced Idle Reminder Tones
6–5
6–5
6–6
6–6
6–7
6–7
6–9
6–10
6–12
Programming from the Console
6–12
System Programming Console
Console Buttons
Console Overlay
Console and DSS Lights
Console Lights
DSS Lights
Access to System Programming
Exiting System Programming
6–12
6–13
6–15
6–16
6–16
6–16
6–16
6–17
■
■
■
Managing the System 6–i
Contents
Programming from a PC with SPM
■
■
Types of PC Connections
Access to System Programming
With a Direct Local Connection
With a Local or Remote Modem Connection
Modem Connections
Centralized Telephone Programming
■
■
■
■
Starting Centralized Telephone Programming
Guidelines for Programming Extensions
Copying Feature and SA/ICOM Buttons
Copying Line/Trunk Button Assignments
Using Reports
■
■
Printing SMDR Reports
Printing System Programming Reports
6–18
6–18
6–19
6–19
6–20
6–20
6–22
6–23
6–24
6–27
6–31
6–32
6–35
6–35
Setting System Date and/or Time
6–36
Backing Up the System
6–37
Adding an Extension
6–39
Moving an Extension
6–41
Removing an Extension
6–42
Changing Calling Restrictions
6–44
Changing Trunk-to-Trunk Transfer Status
6–46
Adding/Removing a Line
6–47
Adding a DLC Operator Position
6–48
Adding a QCC Operator Position
6–52
Adding Operator Features
6–54
Connecting Auxiliary Equipment
6–56
Changing Calling Group Assignments
6–60
Revising Allowed Lists
6–61
Assigning Allowed Lists to Extensions
6–63
Changing Disallowed Lists
6–64
Assigning Disallowed Lists to Extensions
6–66
Changing Group Coverage Assignments
6–68
Revising Night Service with Group Assignment
6–69
6–ii Managing the System
Contents
Changing Extension Directory Labels
6–70
Changing Trunk Labels
6–72
Changing Posted Message Labels
6–73
Changing Calling Group Labels
6–74
Changing System Directory Labels
6–75
Managing the System 6–iii
Managing the System
6
This chapter will help you complete the most common system management
tasks. It includes some background on the types of programming and how to
access them, and then provides task descriptions and procedures.
!
CAUTION:
Do not attempt to change either the system numbering plan or the system
operating mode. Changing either of these could cause serious disruption
of the system and would require significant time and effort to remedy.
Also, do not use either the Maintenance or Restart options from the
system programming menus. These items are intended for use by AT&T
technicians only.
Before you perform the system management tasks, review the general
instructions in the next sections, “Using the Task Descriptions” and “Using the
Programming Procedures.”
To help you troubleshoot system problems, label phones with extension
numbers rather than line numbers.
Using the Task Descriptions
Each task description contains the following information:
■
A brief description of the task
■
Guidelines for planning the change
■
A task checklist that includes references to other system reference
guides for additional information, if needed
Managing the System 6–1
Using the Task Descriptions
■
Programming instructions that contain summary programming
procedures for programming from the console and from a PC with SPM
The task descriptions fall loosely into the following categories:
■
System tasks (setting system date and time; backing up the system)
■
Extensions (adding, moving, or removing an extension; changing calling
restrictions)
■
Lines (adding and removing)
■
Operator consoles (adding a DLC or QCC operator position and adding
operator features)
■
Auxiliary equipment connections
■
Group assignments (calling groups, Allowed Lists, Disallowed Lists,
Group Coverage, and Night Service with Group Assignment)
■
Labels (changing displays for Extension Directory, trunks, Posted
Messages, and calling groups)
To perform a task, follow these general steps:
1. Review the entire task description.
2. Obtain the system planning form(s) noted in the task description.
3. Using the planning guidelines in the task description, plan the changes
and record them on the planning form(s). You may want to refer to the
feature description in the Feature Reference or the appropriate section in
System Programming for more information.
NOTE:
You should become familiar with the detailed instructions in System
Programming before you use the summary programming instructions
provided in the task descriptions.
4. Program the changes using either the detailed, step-by-step
programming procedure in System Programming or the summary
programming instructions that follow the task list. You can photocopy the
task list and use it to check off tasks as you complete them.
For more information, refer to the following guides:
■
For information about the planning forms, see System Planning. If you
don’t have this guide, contact your AT&T representative.
■
For information about the features, including important feature
interactions, see the Feature Reference.
■
For more detailed programming information and instructions, see Chapter
3, “Common Administrative Procedures,” in System Programming.
6–2 Managing the System
Using the Programming Procedures
Using the Programming Procedures
This section provides an overview of how to read the procedures and summary
procedures in this chapter. For more detailed information, see Chapter 1,
“Programming Basics,” in System Programming.
All programming procedures begin from the System Programming menu. For
information about how to access this menu from the console or from a PC with
System Programming and Maintenance (SPM), or how to use centralized
telephone programming, see the appropriate sections that follow this chapter.
Using Detailed Procedures
The detailed procedures consist of numbered steps in the format shown in the
following Steps 4 and 5 extracted from an actual procedure.
4
Console/Display Instructions
Select Start.
Extension Program
Press HOME to Exit
Sys Program
5
xxxx
Additional Information
PC
xxxx = extension entered in Step 2
Start _
0
Select the line button to which you want to assign the feature.
Select Button:
Extension Program
Sys Program
xxxx = extension entered in Step 2
xxxx
Page 1
Page 2
Press the line button or function key that
corresponds to your selection.
Û
7
The format includes numbered steps that appear in a gray bar. It contains three
columns, each with a header:
■
Console/Display Instructions. In most cases, the screen shown in this
column contains the results of the previous step. The console key that
corresponds to the option you are to select is highlighted in black (see
Start in the sample Step 4). The function key that corresponds to the
highlighted console option appears in the right column under the PC
header.
Managing the System 6–3
Using the Programming Procedures
■
Additional Information. This column may contain a note, a value entered
in a previous step, branching instructions, general information, or specific
instructions. Variable screen information appears as xs or ns in the
screen and is defined in this column (see sample Steps 4 and 5).
■
PC. Lists the function key that corresponds to the highlighted console
option shown in the first column. An arrow symbol ( ), indicates that the
instructions under “Additional Information” apply to both the console and
the PC and signals you to follow those instructions.
Û
Using Summary Programming Procedures
Some of the task descriptions in this chapter include summary programming
procedures. They summarize the detailed procedures in System Programming.
NOTE:
You should become familiar with the detailed programming procedures in
System Programming before you use the summary programming procedures
provided in the task descriptions.
The summary programming procedures describe steps for both the console
and for the PC. You should use the appropriate procedure. The format is as
follows:
Console Procedure:
More→Labeling→Grp Calling→Dial calling
group ext. no.→Enter→Drop→Enter label→
Enter→Exit→Exit
PC Procedure:
u→1→4→Type calling group ext. no.→
0→A + P
→Type label→6→5→5
The arrows separate each step. Table 6−1 shows the typefaces that indicate
what the step involves.
Table 6–1. Typefaces Used in Summary Programming Procedures
Typeface
Meaning
More
Select this option by pressing this imprinted
button on the console.
Select this menu option using an unlabeled
display button.
Enter this information.
Press this key on the PC.
Press this function key on the PC.
On the PC, while holding down the first key,
press the second key.
Labeling
Dial calling group ext. no.
u
1
A+P
6–4 Managing the System
Introduction to System Programming
Introduction to System Programming
The system offers menu-driven software for performing the tasks described in
this chapter.
This section provides an overview of the types of programming, the
programming screens, and the appropriate idle state that the system must be in
to perform certain tasks.
Types of Programming
The following are the three types of programming available for the system:
■
System Programming. Allows you, as the system manager, to program
features that affect all or most system users. Perform system
programming using one of the following:
— System Programming Console. An MLX-20L telephone connected
to one of the first five jacks on the first MLX module in the control unit.
— PC with System Programming and Maintenance (SPM) Software. A
PC directly connected through its serial port to the lower RS-232 port
on the control unit’s processor module, or a PC dialing into the system
through a modem either locally or remotely. SPM emulates a system
programming console on your PC.
■
Extension Programming. Allows individual telephone users and system
operators (except QCC operators) to change their telephone features to
meet individual needs.
■
Centralized Telephone Programming. Allows you, as the system
manager, to program any feature that can be programmed by individual
telephone users or system operators. Certain features must be
programmed in this manner. You can perform centralized telephone
programming on the system programming console or on a PC with SPM.
This chapter describes system programming and centralized telephone
programming (both on the system programming console and on a PC with
SPM). For information about extension programming, see the appropriate user
and operator guides.
Programming Screens
There are three types of system programming screens:
■
Information Screens. To view what is currently programmed on the
system. You cannot make changes on an information screen.
■
Menu Selection Screens. To select features or options to program.
Managing the System 6–5
Introduction to System Programming
■
Data Entry Screens. To enter values or to identify a specific extension or
line/trunk you want to program.
This section describes each screen type and the System Programming menu; it
also provides information about saving entries and moving among screens.
Information Screens
Information screens display what is currently programmed on your system. You
cannot make changes on an information screen. Figure 6–1 shows a sample
information screen. When you select Sys Program from the main menu screen, the
screen shown in Figure 6–1 appears with system setup information.
System Set-up
Review and Exit
Size: xxxx
Type: xxxx
Operator: xxxx xxxx xxxx
xxxx xxxx xxxx
Exit
Your system information appears in
place of xxxx.
Figure 6–1. Information Screen
Menu Selection Screens
A menu selection screen prompts you to select a listed option. The screen title
is the first line on all screens. The second line contains a system prompt or
instruction. The remaining lines of text vary based on options. Figure 6–2 shows
a sample menu selection screen.
An angle bracket (>) appears in the upper right corner of menu selection
screens that have additional option screens. Press More (or u on the PC) to
see the additional screens. Continue to press More to move through the
screens and eventually return to the original screen.
System Programming:
>
Make a Selection
System
Extensions
SysRenumber Options
Operator
Tables
LinesTrunks
AuxEquip
Exit
NightSrvce
Figure 6–2. Menu Selection Screen
6–6 Managing the System
Screen title and More indicator (>)
Prompt
Options
Introduction to System Programming
Data Entry Screens
A data entry screen prompts you to enter specific data or to make specific
choices. If data is currently programmed for the feature, it appears on the
screen. Many screens also show data entered on a previous screen, such as an
extension or trunk number.
Data entry screens may also contain menu selections. Instead of entering data
from the dialpad, you select options on the screen, such as Yes or No, to enable
or disable a feature. To select this type of option, you press the unlabeled
display button next to the option name or the function key that corresponds to
the option name. Then your selection is either highlighted or inserted in the
screen title. To program or save the highlighted selection, you press the
unlabeled display button next to Enter (0 on the PC).
NOTE:
You can use the Inspect feature to view, verify, or check the entries you save:
press the Inspct fixed display button on the console or press d on the PC.
After you have finished inspecting the entries, you can return to the previous
screen by pressing the unlabeled display button next to Exit or by pressing 5
on the PC. See System Programming for more information about the Inspect
feature.
Figure 6−3 shows a data entry screen with the first (of two) required extension
numbers needed to assign analog voice and data.
Data Voice/Data
>
Enter voice/data pair
Selected Option
Prompt
7108
Extension entered
Delete
Backspace
Exit
Enter
Figure 6–3. Data Entry Screen
System Programming Menu
Figure 6–4 shows the two screens that make up the System Programming menu.
This is the main menu of system features and options. You reach the System
Programming menu by selecting Sys Program from the system’s main menu.
Table 6–2 lists the System Programming menu options and describes each one.
Managing the System 6–7
Introduction to System Programming
System Programming:
>
Make a Selection
System
Extensions
SysRenumber Options
Operator
Tables
LinesTrunks
AuxEquip
Exit
NightSrvce
System Programming:
Make a Selection
Labeling
Language
Data
Print
Cntr-Prg
Exit
Figure 6–4. System Programming Menu Screens
Table 6–2. System Programming Menu Options
Option
Description
System
Set system operating conditions.
SysRenumber
Select the system numbering plan and/or reassign extension
numbers with 1- to 4-digit numbers.
Operator
Assign or remove operator positions and program operator features
(such as Operator Hold Timer or QCC options).
LinesTrunks
Program line/trunk options.
Extensions
Program extensions (for example, with restrictions and lines).
Options
Program systemwide settings (for example, Transfer Return).
Tables
Program features that require entering information in a table (such
as Allowed Lists and Disallowed Lists).
AuxEquip
Program auxiliary equipment connected to the system (for example,
loudspeaker paging and fax machines).
NightSrvce
Program Night Service features.
Labeling
Program the labels shown on telephone displays (for example,
entries in the System Directory and Posted Messages).
Data
Specify extensions that need voice and data capability.
Print
Print system programming reports (for example, system
configuration and extension assignments).
Cntrl Prog
Perform centralized telephone programming (assign features to
specific buttons on telephones).
Language
Select the language of the system for MLX display telephones,
SMDR reports, and print reports.
The system programming hierarchy, included in Appendix B of System
Programming, details the sequence of screens you work with when you select
the system programming options.
6–8 Managing the System
Introduction to System Programming
Saving Entries and Moving Among Screens
At the bottom of each screen, one or more screen keys with functions allow you
to change or save your entry or return to a previous screen. Various
combinations of these keys appear on each programming screen. Figure 6–5
shows the QCC Priority screen with a typical display of screen keys.
QCC Priority x:
Enter line/trunk number
The QCC Queue Priority Level you
entered appears in place of x.
xxx
4
5
Backspace
Exit
Delete
Next
Enter
8
9
0
The line/trunk number you entered
appears in place of xxx.
Figure 6–5. Screen Keys
For quick reference, Table 6–3 shows the PC keys that correspond to the
screen key selections on most screens. These PC keys do not appear on the
console display screen.
Table 6–3. Screen Keys
Display/Key
Function
BackSpace / 4
Change your entry. Select Backspace (4 on the PC) to correct
your entry. Each time you press the key, the screen cursor moves
backward to erase one character at a time.
Enter / 0
Save your entry if the entry is valid. Typically, you select Enter
(0 on the PC) to complete a procedure and save the information.
Occasionally, you must select Exit (5 on the PC) and return to a
previous screen before you use Enter. If the entry is not valid, the
system may beep and/or display an error message and does not
save the entry.
Delete / 8
Delete a current entry. Select Delete (8 on the PC) to delete (or
remove) a current entry.
Next / 9
Program sequentially numbered items. If you are programming a
group of sequentially numbered extensions, lines, or trunks, you
may have the option to select Next (9 on the PC). This saves your
entry and automatically provides the number of the next extension
or trunk in the sequence. Typically, you remain at the same screen
for as long as you select Next. In a few cases, you may return to an
earlier screen in the procedure.
Continued on next page
Managing the System 6–9
Introduction to System Programming
Table 6–3, Continued
Display/Key
Function
Exit / 5
Return to the previous screen. Select Exit (5 on the PC) when
you complete a procedure, to move up one screen in the menu
hierarchy. (Appendix B in System Programming provides a
reference to the entire system programming menu hierarchy.)
Exit a screen without changes. In most cases, you select Exit
(5 on the PC) to exit from a screen without making any changes.
Exceptions are noted as part of a procedure.
Complete a procedure. In a few cases, you return to the System
Programming menu when you select Exit. In most cases, you return
to an intermediate step within the procedure. You can then select
one of the options shown on the screen and continue programming,
or you can continue to use Exit until you return to the System
Programming menu.
Idle States
You can begin some programming procedures only when all or part of the
system is not in use; this is called an idle state. The idle state must remain in
effect until you finish programming.
NOTE:
If a procedure requires an idle state, do it outside normal business hours.
If a procedure requires an idle state and an extension on the system is busy
when you begin, you see a screen like the one shown in Figure 6–6.
Station Busy
DialCode: nnnn
-
Pls Wait
S/P:ss/pp
nnnn = a previously entered extension
ss/pp = the slot and port number of the
busy extension
Exit
Figure 6–6. Station Busy Screen
The screen changes to the appropriate programming screen when the system is
no longer busy.
6–10 Managing the System
Introduction to System Programming
Table 6–4 explains the various idle states, including a description of each state
and the procedures that can be performed only during that idle state.
IMPORTANT:
1. This table includes all the procedures that fall into each idle-state category.
Some of these procedures should only be performed by an AT&T technician
as noted.
2. There is an additional state that is not an idle state but must be considered:
when an extension is in programming mode, the system considers it to be
busy. Thus, to perform a backup, make sure that no telephone is in
programming mode.
Table 6–4. Idle States
Idle State
Description
System Forced The entire system (every line
Idle
and every extension) is idle.
No calls can be made or
received.
Extension
Forced Idle
Procedures
Select system mode (AT&T only).
Identify system operator positions.
Renumber the system (AT&T only).
Renumber modules (AT&T only).
Identify extensions with voice signal pairs
for Voice Announce to Busy.
Identify extensions needing simultaneous
voice and data.
Restore backup file.
Multiline phone users
hear a signal, indicating that
the phone cannot be used;
display phone users see the
message Wait: System Busy;
single-line telephone users
do not hear a dial tone.
Assign call restrictions.
No calls can be made or
Assign pool dial-out restrictions.
received on that phone or
Copy extension assignments.
data terminal.
Assign lines, trunks, or pools to extensions.
Assign labels to a Personal Directory.
Multiline telephone users
hear a signal, indicating that Use centralized telephone programming.
the telephone cannot be
used; display telephone
users see the message Wait:
System Busy; single-line
telephone users do not hear
a dial tone.
Continued on next page
Managing the System 6–11
Programming from the Console
Table 6–4, Continued
Idle State
Description
Line or Trunk
Idle
The line or trunk is idle only at Identify loudspeaker paging extension jack.
the instant of programming.
Assign trunks to pools.
Specify incoming or outgoing DID or tie
trunk type (AT&T only).
Specify tie trunk direction (AT&T only).
Specify tie trunk E&M signal (AT&T only).
Only the 100D module is
Specify board type (AT&T only).
idle.
Specify frame format (AT&T only).
Specify board signaling format (AT&T only).
Specify board suppression format (AT&T
only).
Specify board facility compensation (AT&T
only).
100D Module
Idle
Procedures
Forced Idle Reminder Tones
The forced idle reminder tone is a high-low “doorphone” tone that sounds under
the following circumstances:
■
At the extension, to remind the user that the system or the extension is in
the forced idle state
■
At the programming console or at a PC running SPM, to remind the
system manager that the system (or at least one extension) is in the
forced idle state because of programming activity
Forced idle reminder tones occur every 20 seconds. You can adjust the volume
of these tones with the volume control.
Programming from the Console
This section describes the system programming console and provides the
procedure for entering and exiting system programming from the console.
System Programming Console
The system programming console is an MLX-20L telephone connected to the
system programming jack (the first jack on the first MLX module).
6–12 Managing the System
Programming from the Console
NOTE:
This jack is also factory set as an operator position. You can change the system
programming jack to any one of the first five jacks on the first MLX module. This
allows you to program without interfering with the operator’s call handling.
However, if you change the programming jack to other than the first or fifth jack
on a 008 MLX or 408 GS/LS-MLX module, then you cannot attach a Direct
Station Selector (DSS) to the console.
You can also have one or two DSSs connected to the system programming
console. Each DSS adds 50 extension buttons to the console, which facilitates
assigning features to telephones.
Figure 6–7 shows an MLX-20L telephone with a DSS.
Display Buttons
Handset
DSS Light
Direct
Station Selector
(DSS)
Display Screen
MLX-20L
Home
More
Menu
Inspct
Button
Labeling
Cards (2)
Line Buttons (20)
Feature
Console Light
v
v Volume
Transfer
Conf
Drop
Speaker
Hold
10
20
30
40
01
11
21
31
41
02
12
22
32
42
03
13
23
33
43
04
14
24
34
44
05
15
25
35
45
06
16
26
36
46
07
17
27
37
47
08
18
28
38
48
09
19
29
39
49
Message
1
ABC
2
DEF
3
GHI
JKL
MNO
5
6
PQRS
TUV
WXYZ
4
HFAI
Mute
DSS
00
7
8
OPER
*
0
9
#
Message Light
Volume Control
Dialpad
Fixed Feature Buttons (8)
User Cards and Tray
Figure 6–7. MLX-20L Telephone with Direct Station Selector (DSS)
Console Buttons
You can use the 14 buttons located on either side of the console display screen
for system programming. These buttons are arranged in two columns of seven
buttons, as shown in Figure 6–8.
Managing the System 6–13
Programming from the Console
Home
Menu
MENU MODE: Select Feature
Press HOME to Exit
Directory
More
Inspct
Messages
Posted Msg
Alarm Clock
Timer
Sys Program
Maintenance
Ext Program
Figure 6–8. Display Buttons and Main Menu
There are two types of console buttons:
■
Fixed Display Buttons. The top two buttons in each column have the
same labels and functions regardless of the screen display:
— Home. Return to normal call-handling mode after you finish
programming.
— Menu. Display the main menu shown in Figure 6–8.
— More. Display more items when a menu continues on a subsequent
screen, indicated by an angle bracket (>) on the upper right of the
screen.
— Inspct (Inspect). View a list of lines or extensions on which a feature is
programmed, or view the settings for a feature.
■
Unlabeled Display Buttons. Use the five unlabeled display buttons on
each side of the screen to select commands, options, or items on the
screen. The functions of these buttons vary based on the option you
select.
NOTE:
If you are using SPM for system programming, the simulated MLX-20L console
screen on your PC screen shows the function keys that correspond to the
console screen selections. For example, to save an entry, you select Enter on
the console or press 0 on your PC. For more information about using function
keys, see System Programming, Chapter 2.
6–14 Managing the System
Programming from the Console
Console Overlay
The programmable line buttons are on the main part of the console. There are
actually 20 line buttons on the console, but you can use the console overlay to
program up to 34 lines. Some of the unlabeled line buttons on the lower part of
the console may also be used for programming features. You can also use the
dialpad for entering feature and programming codes.
Figure 6–9 illustrates the system console overlay. For each of the programmable
line buttons, the top numbers represent the lines on a telephone (up to the
maximum of 34), and the bottom numbers represent the lines in the system (up
to the maximum of 80).
Line 1
Line 21
Line 14
Line 34
G 5 / 25
5 25 45 65
10 / 30 H
1O 30 50 70
I 15 /
15 35 55 75
20 / J
20 40 60 80
K 4 / 24
4 24 44 64
9 / 29 L
9 29 49 69
M 14 / 34
14 34 54 74
19 / N
19 39 59 79
O 3 / 23
3 23 43 63
8 / 28 P
8 28 48 68
Q 13 / 33
13 33 53 73
18 / R
18 38 58 78
S 2 / 22
2 22 42 62
7 / 27 T
7 27 47 67
U 12 / 32
12 32 52 72
17 / V
17 37 57 77
Y 11 / 31
11 31 51 71
16 / Z
16 36 56 76
W 1 / 21
1 21 41 61
6 / 26 X
6 26 46 66
Top Sys Prog
Switchhook Flash
Stop/Drop Entry
Pause
Figure 6–9. Console Overlay
Appendix E in System Programming shows the button diagrams for the
telephones used in the communications system. Refer to this appendix when
programming buttons for other telephones.
Managing the System 6–15
Programming from the Console
Console and DSS Lights
The red and green lights (sometimes called LEDs) next to each of the 20 line
buttons show the status of the line features. The lights on the DSS show the
status of features programmed on extensions.
Console Lights
The green and red lights next to each button on the console are on, off, or
flashing depending on whether the line is programmed with a feature. The
flashing green light indicates the ring option. The feature determines whether
the red or green light indicates feature status. The programming procedures
specify which light verifies feature status.
DSS Lights
The lights on the DSS (if one is attached to the console) show the status of
features programmed on the extensions. When you select a feature from a
menu, the red light next to the DSS button is on, off, or flashing, depending on
whether the feature is programmed on the corresponding extension. For
example, when you select Toll Restrict from the Restrictions menu, you see a
red light next to the DSS button for each toll-restricted extension.
Access to System Programming
Follow the steps below to begin system programming from the system
programming console. To use this procedure, note the following:
■
The summary instructions are numbered and shaded in gray.
■
The first column, “Console/Display Instructions,” illustrates the display
screens and indicates the console buttons to press.
■
The last column, “Additional Information,” contains explanatory
information if necessary.
The System Programming menu in Step 4 is described in “System Programming
Menu,” earlier in this chapter. For information about the procedure format, see
“Using the Programming Procedures,” earlier in this chapter.
6–16 Managing the System
Programming from the Console
1
Console/Display Instructions
Additional Information
Display the Menu Mode (main menu) screen.
Press the Menu button.
2
Select System Programming.
MENU MODE: Select Feature
Press HOME to Exit
Directory
Messages
Posted Msg
Sys Program _
Alarm Clock Maintenance
Timer
Ext Program
3
If the programming console is a QCC, Ext
Program does not appear on this screen.
Display the System Programming menu.
System Set-up:
Review and Exit
Size: Large
Type: xxxx
Operator:
xxxx xxxx
xxxx xxxx
xxxx xxxx
_ Exit
On the System Set-up screen,
system information appears in place of
the xs.
Size = Large
Type = Key, Hybrid/PBX, or Behind Switch
Operator = Position extension numbers
Select Exit.
4
Make a selection.
System Programming:
>
Make a selection
System
Extensions
SysRenumber Options
Operator
Tables
LinesTrunks AuxEquip
Exit
NightSrvce
Press the button or function key next to
your selection.
Exiting System Programming
Use the information in Table 6–5 to return to the System Programming menu, the
main menu (Menu Mode screen), or the Home screen.
Managing the System 6–17
Programming from a PC with SPM
Table 6–5. Exiting System Programming
To return to . . .
On the console press:
On the PC press:
Previous menu
(or, in some cases
go to the next item
to program)
Main menu
Exit
5
Menu
e
Normal call
handling
Home
h
Programming from a PC with SPM
The System Programming and Maintenance (SPM) software package offers an
alternate method of programming using a PC. This method frees the system
programming console for other uses and also provides additional functions.
Using a PC with SPM enables you and qualified service personnel to program
the system from off-site locations.
SPM runs on a DOS-based PC as a standalone package, or on a UNIX System
platform with Integrated Solution II or Integrated Solution III (IS II/III).
For more information about setting up and using SPM for programming on a PC
with DOS, see Chapter 2 of System Programming. For information about
accessing SPM from IS II/III, refer to the appropriate book:
■
Integrated Solution System Manager’s Guide
■
Integrated Solution Installation and Maintenance Guide
Types of PC Connections
There are three ways to connect the PC to the control unit:
■
Direct Local Connection. For a direct local connection, you must
connect the PC to the system programming jack (labeled ADMIN). This is
the lower modular RS-232 jack on the processor module. (The upper jack
is reserved for the SMDR printer.)
■
Local Modem Connection. For a local modem connection, you must use
a modem (either connected to or built into the PC) to access the internal
modem in the control unit. Connect the modem to a 012 or 016 (Release
4.0 and later systems only) module in the control unit.
6–18 Managing the System
Programming from a PC with SPM
■
Remote Modem Connection (DOS-Based SPM Only). For a remote
modem connection, you must use a modem (either connected to or built
into the PC) to access the internal modem in the control unit. You must
also use a modem to dial into the system using remote access.
NOTE:
Remote access (modem connection) has priority over local access (direct
connection), unless a backup or restore procedure is in progress through a
direct local connection. If a modem connection is attempted while any other
type of on-site programming is in progress (either at the system console or at a
directly connected PC), the system sends a message to the on-site
programmer. The message indicates that a modem connection is being
established, and the on-site programming session is terminated.
Access to System Programming
Before you can begin system programming from a PC, you need to access the
SPM software. The procedure for reaching SPM depends on whether your PC is
connected to the control unit with a modem (either local or remote) or without a
modem (direct). This section describes both of these procedures.
With a Direct Local Connection
To begin using SPM when your PC is connected directly to the control unit,
follow the steps below. For information about the procedure format, see “Using
the Programming Procedures,” earlier in this chapter.
1
Console/Display Instructions
Additional Information
Set up the appropriate physical connections between the PC and the control
unit.
See Chapter 2 of System Programming.
2
If you installed SPM on the hard disk of the PC, go to Step 5.
3
If the PC does not have a hard disk, insert the SPM diskette into Drive A.
4
Type a: and press R.
5
A:> appears on the screen.
Type spm and press R to display the SPM Welcome screen shown below.
Welcome to SPM
The MERLIN LEGEND
System Programming
& Maintenance Utility
Please press any key
to continue
Version X.XX
x.xx = current version of SPM
Managing the System 6–19
Programming from a PC with SPM
6
1
2
3
4
5
Console/Display Instructions
Additional Information
Press any key to display the SPM Main Menu shown below.
SPM Main
Menu: Select
Sys Program
Backup
Boards
Print Opts
Monitor
Menu
Function
Maintenance
Restore
Pass-Thru
Password
Language
6
7
8
9
0
■
If the SPM Main Menu does not appear or if the information about the screen is
garbled, press any key again.
■
If the COMM PORT (communications port) screen appears instead of the SPM
Main Menu, the SPM software has not been initialized. See Chapter 2 of System
Programming.
7
NOTE:
The function keys shown on either side of the display are included here for quick
reference. On the PC screen, the system programming keys do not look like actual
keys.
To reach the System Programming menu, select Sys Program by pressing 1.
8
Perform the procedures contained in the task descriptions later in this chapter.
With a Local or Remote Modem Connection
The method you use to access SPM by modem depends on whether you are
programming on site (locally) or from a remote location.
■
If you are on site, the modem must be connected to a 012 or an 016
(Release 4.0 and later only) module on the control unit. To establish a
connection to the control unit’s internal modem, dial *10.
■
If you are at a remote location, do one of the following:
— Place a call to the system on a remote access line, enter the barrier
code (if required), and dial the code for the internal modem (*10 ).
— Place a voice call to the system on a regular line and ask the operator
to transfer you to the modem (by dialing *10 ). When you hear the
modem answer tone, switch to data mode.
Modem Connections
You must make a data connection to a modem. The following modem dialing
commands work for most modems. These may not be the commands your
modem uses; refer to the user guide that came with your modem for specific
information.
6–20 Managing the System
Programming from a PC with SPM
■
If the PC is in the same location as the control unit, type *10.
■
If the PC is in a remote location and your system has activated the
Remote Access feature, type the following and press R:
ATDT, the remote access telephone number, and W*10.
For example: ATDT12015551234 W*10 R. Also, a barrier code (4 to
11 digits) may be required between the ATDT and the W*10 entries. For
example: ATDT12015551234 W1234567 W*10.
The password prompt appears on the screen when the connection is
made. (You may have to press R more than once to get the
password prompt.)
■
If the PC is in a remote location and your system has not activated the
Remote Access feature, do the following:
NOTE:
If you enter a telephone number of fewer than 11 digits, you must end it
with a pound sign (#).
— Use the main telephone number to place a voice call to the system.
— Instruct the operator to to transfer the call to the modem by
transferring the call to *10 .
— Put the modem on line by switching it to data mode.
To access SPM through a local or remote modem connection, follow the steps
below. For more information about the procedure format, see “Using the
Programming Procedures,” earlier in this chapter.
1
2
Console/Display Instructions
Additional Information
Set up the appropriate physical connections between the PC and the control
unit as described in Chapter 2 of System Programming.
Type spm and press R to display the SPM Welcome screen shown below.
Welcome to SPM
The MERLIN LEGEND
System Programming
& Maintenance Utility
Please press any key
to continue
Version X.XX
x.xx = current version of SPM
3
Press any key to display a blank screen on which you can enter
modem commands. (You may have to press the key several times.)
4
Make a data connection to the modem of the control unit.
See Chapter 2, “Programming with SPM,” in System Programming. When the
connection is made, the password prompt appears, as shown in Step 5.
Managing the System 6–21
Centralized Telephone Programming
5
Console/Display Instructions
Additional Information
Type the remote access password to display the SPM Main Menu shown in
Step 6.
Enter Password:
6
1
2
3
4
5
7
The password does not display when you type it.
To reach the System Programming menu, select System Programming by
pressing 1.
SPM Main Menu
Menu: Select Function
Sys Prog
Maintenance
Backup
Restore
Boards
Pass-Thru
Print Opts
Password
Monitor
Language
6
7
8
9
0
NOTE:
The function keys shown on either side of the display are included here for quick
reference. On the PC screen these do not look like actual keys.
Perform the procedures contained in the task descriptions later in this chapter.
Centralized Telephone Programming
Centralized telephone programming allows you, as the system manager, to
program the following:
■
Any feature that can be programmed by individual telephone users or by
operators. Certain features can be copied from one extension to another
in the system.
■
Certain features that can be programmed only by using centralized
programming:
— Barge-In
— Headset Hang Up
— Intercom buttons: all types (Key and Behind Switch mode only)
— System Access buttons: all types (Hybrid/PBX only)
6–22 Managing the System
Centralized Telephone Programming
To perform centralized telephone programming, you can use the system
programming console or a PC with SPM software as described earlier in this
chapter.
If you are programming several telephones of the same type (that is, all analog
or all MLX), you can use the Copy Extension feature (described in “Copying
Feature and SA/ICOM Buttons”) to program one extension and then use the
programmed extension as a template for programming additional extensions.
There are special planning forms for the Copy Extension feature.
NOTE:
Some programming can be performed only when the entire system or some part
of it (such as a trunk or an extension) is idle. See “Idle States” earlier in this
chapter.
Starting Centralized Telephone Programming
Reach the Centralized Programming menu from the System Programming menu.
You can then perform centralized telephone programming by selecting features
from the display or by using programming codes.
Follow the procedure below to get to the Centralized Programming menu. For
information about the procedure format, see “Using the Programming
Procedures,” earlier in this chapter.
1
Console/Display Instructions
Additional Information
Go to the second screen of the System Programming menu.
System Programming:
>
Make a Selection
System
Extensions
SysRenumber Options
Operator
Tables
LinesTrunks AuxEquip
Exit
NightSrvce
2
Press More.
PC
u
Select Centralized Programming.
System Programming
Make a selection
Labeling
Data
Print
_ Cntr-Prg
Exit
4
Managing the System 6–23
Centralized Telephone Programming
3
Console/Display Instructions
Select a programming option.
Centralized Programming:
Make a selection
_ Program Ext
_ Copy Ext
Exit
4
Additional Information
Select Program Ext or
Copy Ext.
1
2
Enter
Go to either “Guidelines for Programming Extensions,” “Copying Feature and
SA/ICOM Buttons,” or “Copying Line/Trunk Button Assignments.”
The following sections explain the use of menu selections for programming a
single extension, and for using the feature and SA/ICOM buttons and/or the
line/trunk button assignments of one extension as a template for programming
several extensions of the same type. For information about copying calling
restrictions from one extension to another, see “Copy Call Restrictions” in
Chapter 3 of System Programming.
NOTE:
You should use programming codes for centralized telephone programming;
however, you may also use the List Feature option that is available on the
programming screen for extensions as described in the next section. For
detailed information about the List Feature option, see Chapter 5 in System
Programming.
Guidelines for Programming Extensions
Review the items below before you begin to program extensions.
■
Refer to Appendix C in System Programming to locate the code for the
feature that you want to program, or use the List Feature menu (which
includes the Find Feature option) by selecting ListFeature from the
screen that appears when you are programming a feature (see Step 6 in
the following procedure). For more information about using the List
Feature menu, see Chapter 5 in System Programming.
■
If you enter a feature code incorrectly or enter a feature code that is not
appropriate for the selected button, you may hear a beep or see the
message Programming Error as the green light next to the button
flashes. Press the button again and repeat the procedure.
■
If you program the wrong feature on a button, follow the steps below:
1. Press the button.
2. Select Delete (press 2 on the PC).
3. Press the button again.
6–24 Managing the System
Centralized Telephone Programming
■
If you press a line button that is not active, the screen shown below
appears. Press Home to return to the Home screen.
Blank
Press HOME to Exit
Page 1
Page 2
Sys Program
■
ListFeature
You can use the Extension Information (Ext Info) report option on the
Print menu (accessed from the System Programming menu) to print all of
the programmed features for a specific extension.
NOTE:
If you are programming buttons at an extension with an MLX-16DP telephone,
keep the following in mind:
1. The system recognizes the MLX-16DP as an MLX-28D. If you are
replacing an MLX-28D with an MLX-16DP, remove all line and feature
button assignments from the extension first. This rule also applies when
you are replacing other telephones with an MLX-16DP.
2. The System Programming Extension Information Report incorrectly
reports MLX-16DP telephones as MLX-28D telephones; keep a separate
log of the MLX-16DP telephones on your system.
At the Centralized Programming menu, use the following procedure to program
features onto a single telephone. For information about accessing the
Centralized Programming menu, see “Starting Centralized Telephone
Programming,” earlier in this section.
1
Console/Display Instructions
Select Program Extension.
Additional Information
PC
Centralized Programming:
Make a selection
_ Program Ext
Copy Ext
Exit
Enter
1
Managing the System 6–25
Centralized Telephone Programming
2
Console/Display Instructions
Additional Information
Specify the extension you want to program.
Centralized Programming:
Enter extension
Backspace
Exit
Û
Enter
3
Save your entry.
4
Select Enter.
Select Start.
Extension Program
Press HOME to Exit
Sys Program
5
Dial or type:
Extension number: [nnnn]
Slot and port number: *[sspp]
Logical ID number: #[nnn]
0
xxxx
xxxx = extension entered in Step 2
Start _
0
Select the line button where you want to assign the feature.
Select Button:
Extension Program
xxxx = extension entered in Step 2
xxxx
Page 1
Page 2
Press the line button or function key that
corresponds to your selection.
Û
Sys Program
If you are programming a telephone with more than 20 line buttons, use Page 2 ( 7)
to select the additional buttons. See Appendix E in System Programming for button
diagrams of all telephones.
6–26 Managing the System
Centralized Telephone Programming
6
Console/Display Instructions
Program the feature(s).
****
Press HOME to Exit
Delete
Page 1
Page 2
Sys Program
7
Additional Information
**** = current programming of button selected
in Step 5 (Line xxx, voice, feature, or blank)
Dial or type the programming code:
*[nnn] or select List Feature ( 0 ) to
display a list of features you can select
from.
Û
ListFeature
When the line button is programmed, the system automatically returns to the display
in Step 5. (Note that this is a sample screen for a line button; other screens may have
a different first line.)
Repeat Steps 5 and 6 for each line button you want to program for the
extension, or press the Home button to return to the Centralized Programming
menu.
Copying Feature and SA/ICOM Buttons
You can use the Copy Extension feature to copy an extension’s programmed
buttons (with some exceptions) to one or more extensions. Program the features
individually on an extension to create a template that can then be copied to
other extensions in the system.
Only extensions of the same type can be copied to one another (that is, analog
to analog, and MLX to MLX) because the two telephones have different button
layouts. For a system that has both analog and MLX telephone types, you will
need two templates: one for analog and one for MLX.
A Multi-Function Module’s programming can be copied to or from another MFM.
A Direct Line Console (DLC) can only be copied to another DLC. Single-line
telephones’ and QCCs’ features cannot be copied.
Table 6−6 lists the features that can be copied to another extension. Features
that can be copied for DLC operator extensions are listed in Table 6–7.
Managing the System 6–27
Centralized Telephone Programming
Table 6–6. Features That Can Be Copied: All Telephones
Feature
Analog and MLX
Telephones
Account Code Entry
Authorization Code
Auto Answer All
Auto Answer Intercom
Auto Dial Inside
Auto Dial Outside*
Barge-In
Callback-Selective
Camp-On
Conference†
Coverage Off
Coverage VMS Off
Data Status
Delete Message
Direct Voice Mail
Do Not Disturb
Drop†
Extension Status 2 (ES2)
(Non-operator)
Extension Status 1 (ES1)
(Non-operator)
Feature Button
Forward
Group Calling
Group Page
*
†
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Analog
Telephones
Only
MLX
Telephones
Only
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Number is not copied.
Behind Switch mode only.
Continued on next page
6–28 Managing the System
Centralized Telephone Programming
Table 6–6, Continued
Feature
Headset Auto Answer
Headset Hang Up
Headset Status
Headset/Handset Mute
Last Number Dial*
Leave Message
Message Light Off
Next Message
Park
Pickup: Group
Pickup: General
Pickup: Extension
Pickup: Line
Posted Message
Privacy
Recall
Reminder Service: Set
Reminder Service: Cancel
Return Call
Saved Number Dial*
Scroll
Signaling
SA/ICOM Ring‡
SA/ICOM Voice‡
SA/ICOM Originate Only‡
System Speed Dial
Transfer†
*
†
‡
Analog and MLX
Telephones
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Analog
Telephones
Only
MLX
Telephones
Only
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Number is not copied.
Behind Switch mode only.
Ringing options (No Ring, Delay Ring, and Immediate Ring) are copied with the
button.
Managing the System 6–29
Centralized Telephone Programming
Table 6–7 shows the operator features than can be copied for operator
consoles. QCC features cannot be copied.
Table 6–7. Features That Can Be Copied: Direct Line Consoles Only
Analog
Direct-Line
Console (DLC)
Feature
Alarm
Extension Status Off
Extension Status 1
Extension Status 2
Missed Reminder
Night Service
Operator Park
Send/Remove Message
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
MLX
Direct-Line
Console (DLC)
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
At the Centralized Programming menu, follow the procedure below to copy
feature buttons from one extension to another. For information about accessing
the Centralized Programming menu, see “Starting Centralized Telephone
Programming,” earlier in this section.
1
Console/Display Instructions
Select Copy Extension.
Additional Information
Centralized Programming:
Make a selection
Program Ext
_ Copy Ext
Exit
2
PC
2
Enter
Specify the number of the extension from which you want to copy programming
features.
Extension Program Copy:
Enter extension to copy
from
Backspace
Exit
Enter
6–30 Managing the System
Dial or type [nnnn].
Û
Centralized Telephone Programming
3
4
Console/Display Instructions
Save your entry.
PC
0
Select Enter.
Specify the number of the extension to which you want to copy programmed
features or SA or ICOM buttons.
Copy extension xxxx to:
Enter extension
nnnn
Backspace
Exit
5
Additional Information
Next
Enter
xxxx = extension entered in Step 2
Û
Dial or type [nnnn].
Continue to copy line assignments and programmed features from the copy
extension shown to another extension or go to Step 7.
Select Enter to continue copying
line assignments from the
extension currently displayed on
Line 1 to additional extensions.
Select Next if the extension numbers to be
copied to are sequential. Select Enter
(0) after completing programming.
6
Return to Step 4 to continue programming. The
extension to be copied from will be displayed on
Line 1.
Return to the Centralized Programming menu.
Select Exit.
Save your entry.
5
7
Select Enter.
Return to the Centralized Programming menu.
0
8
Select Exit.
5
Copying Line/Trunk Button Assignments
Use this procedure to copy outside line/trunk button assignments, pool dial-out
code restrictions (Hybrid/PBX only), and Night Service information (for operator
positions only). You can copy from one extension to another or to a block of
extensions with identical requirements. Use system programming for this
procedure.
Managing the System 6–31
Using Reports
If you are copying assignments from an operator position to a block of
extensions that includes both operator and non-operator extensions, the
information is copied only to the operator positions; the non-operator positions
are not affected. Similarly, if you are copying assignments from a non-operator
position to a block of extensions that includes both operator and non-operator
extensions, the information is copied only to the non-operator positions; the
operator positions are not affected. The system does not provide an error tone
to signal that the copy did not work for all of the extensions in the block.
If you are performing this procedure for the first time, see the detailed steps in
“Copy Line/Trunk Assignments” of the “Telephones” section, Chapter 3, System
Programming.
Console Procedure
To copy to a single extension:
Extensions→Line Copy→Single→Dial copy from ext.
no.→Enter→Dial copy to ext. no.→Enter→
Exit→Exit
To copy to a block of extensions:
Extensions→Line Copy→Block→Dial copy from
ext. no.→Enter→Dial ext. no of first telephone in
block→Enter→Dial ext. no of last telephone in
block→Enter→Exit→Exit
PC Procedure
To copy to a single extension:
6→2→1→Type copy from ext. no.→0→
Type copy to ext. no.→0→5→5
To copy to a block of extensions:
6→2→2→Type copy from ext. no.→
0→Type ext. no. of first telephone in block→
0→Type ext. no. of last telephone in block→
0→5→5
Using Reports
The system generates a variety of reports that can help you with your system
management tasks:
■
The Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR) feature provides
information about incoming and outgoing calls. The content of the report
depends on which of two formats (Basic or ISDN) you select and can
include the type of call (voice or data), the date, the time of the call, the
called number, the duration of the call, the number of the trunk used to
make or receive the call, and an account code, if applicable. This report
prints on the SMDR printer.
6–32 Managing the System
Using Reports
■
The system programming reports include reports that describe how
various aspects of the system are programmed (for example, trunk
information, label information, Allowed and Disallowed Lists, and Pickup
Groups), and an Error Log that describes any system errors that may
occur. You reach these reports from the system programming menus.
The following system programming reports are available. With the exception of
Trunk Information, the dash lists under the bullets show the sections of each
report that automatically print when the report option is selected.
■
All
— Each report
— All report options
■
System Set Up
■
System Dial Plan
— Pools
— Telephone Paging Zones
— Direct Group Calling
— Lines/Trunks
— Stations (Extensions)
■
Label Information
— Telephone Personal Directory
— Message Numbers and Posted Messages
■
Trunk Information (trunk option must be specified)
— Tie
— DID
— Loop/Ground
— General
■
T1 Information
■
PRI Information
■
BRI Information
Managing the System 6–33
Using Reports
■
Remote Access
— General Options
— Non-Tie Restrictions
— Tie Restrictions
— Barrier Code Restrictions
■
Operator Information
— Position
— General Options
— DSS Options
— QCC Operators
— Operator Information
■
Allowed Lists
■
Allowed Lists Assigned to Extensions
■
Disallowed Lists
■
Disallowed Lists Assigned to Extensions
■
Automatic Route Selection
■
Tables
■
Extension Directory
■
System Directory
■
Group Page
■
Extension Information
■
Group Coverage
■
Group Calling
■
Night Service
■
Call Pickup Groups
■
Error Logs
■
Authorization Codes
6–34 Managing the System
Using Reports
Printing SMDR Reports
SMDR reports consist of SMDR call records that print sequentially on a serial
printer connected to the SMDR jack on the control unit. If the printer is off, is out
of paper, or has a paper jam, up to 100 SMDR records are stored in the SMDR
queue. The printing of system programming reports take precedence; while
these reports are printing, SMDR records are stored in the queue.
For more information, see “Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR)” in the
Feature Reference.
Printing System Programming Reports
System programming reports can be printed out or viewed on the screen of a
PC with SPM or printed out on a serial printer connected to the SMDR jack on
the processor module in the control unit. You can print individual reports or use
the All option to print the entire set of available reports, including all report
sections and options. See Appendix F of System Programming for samples of
the print reports.
For more information, see “Print Reports” in Chapter 4, System Programming.
NOTES:
1. If you select the All option, the reports take several minutes to print. You
may want to schedule use of the printer during off-peak hours.
2. If you select a report for which there is no information, the report header
still prints.
3. Print reports if you cannot back up your system programming information.
4. If your system must handle more than 100 calls per hour, do not print
reports during regular hours.
5. If you are printing from the console, your printer must be connected to
the SMDR port. If you are programming on a PC with SPM, you have the
following choices:
■
Print reports on the SMDR printer (if available).
■
Print reports on the PC printer.
■
Save reports (on hard disk or floppy).
■
View reports (browse).
Managing the System 6–35
Setting System Date and/or Time
To print system programming reports, use one of the following procedures:
Console Procedure:
To print trunk information:
More→Print→Trunk Info→Select trunk type→Exit
To print extension information:
More→Print→More→Ext Info→Dial extension
number→Enter→Exit
To print all other reports:
More→Print→Select report→Exit
PC Procedure
To print trunk information:
u→3→6→Select trunk type→5
To print extension information:
u→3→u→0→Type extension number→
0→5
To print all other reports:
u→3→Select report→5
To save report on disk:
u→3→Select report→0→select GOTO FLOPPY
from below console simulation screen→0
To view report:
C+8
NOTE:
The Extension Information report incorrectly lists MLX-16DP telephones as MLX28D telephones. If you have MLX-16DP telephones in your system, keep a
separate log of the extension numbers.
Setting System Date and/or Time
Use this procedure to change the system date and/or time. These must be set
correctly. System time affects the functioning of several system features and
applications, including Automatic Backup, Night Service, SMDR reports,
standalone auto attendant systems, voice mail, and Reminder Service.
NOTE:
Be sure to change the system time appropriately when Daylight Savings Time
starts and when it ends.
Planning Guidelines
If you change the system time while the system is in Night Service mode, Night
Service is deactivated and must be manually reactivated.
6–36 Managing the System
Backing Up the System
If you have installed applications such as Call Management System (CMS) or
AUDIX Voice Power, you may need to set the time in the applications software
whenever you reset the system time.
Valid Entries
For date:
Month: 01 to 12
Day: 01 to 31
Year: 00 to 99
For time: 0000 to 2359
Task List: Setting System Date and/or Time
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “Set System Date”
or “Set System Time” in the “Basic System Operating Conditions” section
in Chapter 3 of System Programming, or the summary programming
instructions below.
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
System→Date or Time→Drop→Dial current
date or time→Enter→Exit
PC Procedure:
→Type current date
1→7 or 8→A + P
or time→0→5
Backing Up the System
Use this procedure to make a copy of your customized system data. You should
create a backup once after each system upgrade, service technician visit, or
major system reconfiguration.
The backup does not copy any application data. For information about
application backup, see the documentation for the application.
The backup is performed using the Translation memory card (white label).
For information about the Restore procedure, see Chapter 4, “Advanced
Programming Procedures,” in System Programming.
Managing the System 6–37
Adding an Extension
Planning Guidelines
While the backup is in progress, you cannot access any programming
functions.
If any type of programming is taking place at another extension when you begin
the backup procedure, the backup is canceled and the number of the first busy
extension appears on the screen. Attempt the backup procedure again when
the busy extension becomes idle.
NOTE:
By default, the system is set to perform a backup automatically once a week.
You can change this to daily backups or to manual backups. For more
information, see “Automatic Backup” in the “Memory Card” section in Chapter 3
of System Programming.
Default filenames in manual backups are automatically dated using the MMDD
convention with no slashes.
Task List: Backing Up the System
o If necessary, read “Memory Card” in Chapter 3 of System Programming
for detailed information about this feature, including how to insert the
memory card into the PCMCIA interface slot on the processor module
and descriptions of the backup files.
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “Backup” the
“Memory Card” section of System Programming, Chapter 3, or the
summary programming instructions below.
o When you have finished, leave the Translation memory card in the
PCMCIA interface slot.
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
Insert memory card→System→Back/Restore→
Backup→Select backup file→Dial new backup
filename→Enter→Yes→Exit→Exit→Exit
PC Procedure:
Insert memory card→1→9→2→Type ext.
no.→0→A + P
→Type label→6→5→
5→5
Adding an Extension
Use this procedure to add an extension to the system.
6–38 Managing the System
Adding an Extension
Planning Guidelines
The procedure to add an extension involves several decisions on your part. For
example, you must decide which features to assign to the extension. These
include calling restrictions, Coverage, calling group, Pickup group, paging
group, Night Service, Forced Account Code Entry, and Remote Call Forwarding.
You can read about the features in the Feature Reference.
You also need to make decisions about assigning buttons on multiline
telephones. There are two types of buttons: system-programmed buttons (for
example, SA or ICOM buttons) to access an inside or outside line or pool of
outside lines, and blank line buttons that can be programmed with system
features like Do Not Disturb. For more information about buttons, see “Line
Buttons on Multiline Telephones” in Chapter 3 of this guide and in the Feature
Reference; information about individual features is in the Feature Reference.
For feature buttons, you may choose to simply copy another extension’s
programmed buttons (with some exceptions) to this new extension. Refer to
“Copying Feature and SA/ICOM Buttons” earlier in this chapter.
Before you actually begin performing the tasks listed below, read through the
list and make your decisions now about these and other aspects of the new
extension. Otherwise, you may have to stop in the middle of the procedure to
collect the necessary information.
For additional planning information, see the “Telephones” section in Chapter 3
of System Programming.
Task List: Adding an Extension
o Obtain Form 2a, System Numbering: Extension Jacks. Also obtain any
other relevant forms, including group-assigned feature forms (for
example, Form 7c, Group Coverage) and forms for the individual
extension (for example, Form 4d, MLX Telephone). Appendix D of this
guide includes a list of the planning forms.
o On Form 2a, confirm that there is a spare jack that supports the type of
extension you want to add. In the Jack Type column, A indicates an
analog jack, D indicates a digital (MLX) jack, and B indicates a basic
jack (for single-line telephones, adjuncts, and certain applications).
NOTE:
If there are no spare jacks, you will need to add a module to the control
unit before you can add an extension. Contact your AT&T representative.
o Make decisions about which features and buttons to assign to this
extension as described in the planning guidelines above. Record your
decisions on the appropriate planning forms.
Managing the System 6–39
Adding an Extension
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o If your system uses the Set Up Space numbering plan (see Form 2a),
single-renumber the extension jack following the instructions in “Single
Renumbering” in the “System Renumbering” section of System
Programming, Chapter 3.
NOTE:
This task requires Extension Forced Idle for this extension jack.
o If you are adding a personal line, Loudspeaker Paging, or Pool buttons
(Hybrid/PBX only), assign the outside lines/trunks to the buttons on the
telephone, following the instructions in “Assign Trunks or Pools to
Telephones” in the “Telephones” section of System Programming,
Chapter 3.
Also, you may choose to copy line/trunk button assignments, pool
dial-out code restrictions (Hybrid/PBX only), and Night Service
information (for operator positions only) as described in “Copy Line/Trunk
Assignments” in the Telephones” section of System Programming,
Chapter 3.
NOTE:
This task requires an idle condition: Extension Forced Idle.
o Assign intercom or system access buttons by following the instructions in
“Assign Intercom or System Access Buttons” in the “Telephones” section
of System Programming, Chapter 3.
NOTE:
This task requires an idle condition: Extension Forced Idle. Also, you may
choose to use the Copy Extension procedure described in “Copying
Feature and SA/ICOM Buttons” earlier in this chapter.
o If the telephone is an analog multiline telephone and does not have a
built-in speakerphone (BIS) or Hands-Free Answer on Intercom (HFAI),
identify it as such to the system by following the instructions in “Analog
Multiline Telephone Without Built-in Speakerphone (BIS) or Hands-Free
Answer Intercom (HFAI) Capability” in the “Telephones” section of
System Programming, Chapter 3.
o If the telephone is an analog multiline telephone and requires a
dedicated pair of extension jacks to provide Voice Announce to Busy or
to provide voice and data features, identify it to the system as such by
following the instructions in “Analog Multiline Telephones with Voice
Announce to Busy” in the “Telephones” section of System Programming,
Chapter 3, or the instructions in “Data Features” in Chapter 4 of System
Programming.
6–40 Managing the System
Moving an Extension
o Program the features following the instructions for each feature in
“Optional Telephone Features,” “Optional Group Features,” and “System
Features” in System Programming, Chapter 3, or in Chapter 5,
“Centralized Telephone Programming” of System Programming.
o When you have finished, file the form(s) with the rest of the planning
forms.
Programming Instructions
See the appropriate procedures in System Programming as noted in the task list
above.
Moving an Extension
Use this procedure to move an extension in your system.
Planning Guidelines
There are three ways to move an extension:
■
Call AT&T at 1 800 247-7000. They will arrange for an AT&T technician to
do it for you at your site.
■
If you have remote maintenance and administration as part of your
maintenance contract, call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888. They
will determine if it can be done remotely. If possible, they will do it
remotely for you. If not (for example, if additional ports are required), you
will be instructed to call the 1 800 247-7000 number for service. If you do
not have this coverage in your contract and are interested in adding it,
contact your AT&T representative.
■
Follow the procedure in this section.
If the extension is not wired or is wired but not connected to the system, or if
you’re not sure, you must call AT&T at 1 800 247-7000 to arrange for this to be
checked or completed.
Task List: Moving an Extension
o Obtain Form 2a, System Numbering: Extension Jacks.
o Renumber the extension(s) and record the changes on Form 2a. If you
are switching two extensions (for example, Extension 303 and Extension
306) because two people are trading offices, you would renumber as
follows:
303 --> 7103 (the default; to free up 303)
Managing the System 6–41
Removing an Extension
306 --> 303
7103 (the original 303) --> 306
NOTE:
Renumbering changes the extension number, but the programming of
the extension stays the same. Therefore, for the new Extensions 303 and
306 in the example above, each still has its original programming, even
though it has a new extension number. This programming includes
Extension Directory labels, Personal Speed Dial, button assignments, and
group-assigned features like Coverage, Pickup, paging, and Night
Service. If you need to change the programming for the extension, you
must perform the next task.
o If necessary, program the extension that was moved for the appropriate
features and buttons as described in “Adding an Extension,” earlier in
this chapter. Remember to record everything on the appropriate form(s).
o When you have finished, file the form(s) with the rest of the planning
forms.
Programming Instructions
See “Adding an Extension,” earlier in this chapter.
Removing an Extension
Use this procedure to remove an extension.
Planning Guidelines
When you remove an extension, you need to remove it from any groups and lists
to which it is assigned, for example, Allowed Lists, calling restrictions,
Coverage, calling group, Pickup group, paging group, and/or Night Service.
Task List: Removing an Extension
o Obtain Form 2a, System Numbering: Extension Jacks. Also obtain any
relevant forms, including group-assigned feature forms (for example, 7c,
Group Coverage) and Forms for the individual telephone (for example,
4d, MLX Telephone). Appendix D of this guide includes a list of the
planning forms.
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
6–42 Managing the System
Removing an Extension
o If your system uses the Set Up Space numbering plan (see Form 2a),
single-renumber the extension jack following the instructions in “Single
Renumbering” in the “System Renumbering” section of System
Programming, Chapter 3.
NOTE:
This task requires an idle condition: Extension Forced Idle for this
extension jack.
o If you are removing a personal line, Loudspeaker Paging, or Pool button
assignments (Hybrid/PBX only), follow the instructions in “Assign Trunks
or Pools to Telephones” in the “Telephones” section of System
Programming, Chapter 3.
NOTE:
This task requires an idle condition: Extension Forced Idle for this
extension jack.
o To remove intercom or System Access button assignments, follow the
instructions in “Assign Intercom or System Access Buttons” in the
“Telephones” section of System Programming, Chapter 3.
NOTE:
This task requires an idle condition: Extension Forced Idle for this
extension jack.
o If the telephone does not have a built-in speakerphone (BIS) or HandsFree Answer on Intercom (HFAI), remove it as such from the system by
following the instructions in “Analog Multiline Telephone Without Built-in
Speakerphone (BIS) or Hands-Free Answer Intercom (HFAI) Capability”
in the “Telephones” section of System Programming, Chapter 3.
o If the telephone required a dedicated voice or voice pair of extension
jacks to provide the Voice Announce to Busy feature, or to provide voice
and data features, remove them from the system as such by following the
instructions in “Analog Multiline Telephones with Voice Announce to
Busy” in the “Telephones” section of System Programming, Chapter 3, or
the instructions in “Data Features” in Chapter 4 of System Programming.
o Remove the features, following the instructions for each feature in
“Optional Telephone Features,” “Optional Group Features,” and “System
Features” in System Programming, Chapter 3, or in Chapter 5,
“Centralized Telephone Programming,” of System Programming.
o Remove the extension from any of the group-assigned feature forms or
lists on which it appears, and remove its individual telephone form from
the planning forms package.
o When you have finished, file the form(s) with the rest of the planning
forms.
Managing the System 6–43
Changing Calling Restrictions
Programming Instructions
See the appropriate procedures in System Programming as noted in the task list
above.
Changing Calling Restrictions
Use this procedure to change individual extensions’ calling restrictions to one of
the following:
■
Unrestricted
■
Restricted from making all outgoing calls
■
Restricted from making toll calls
NOTE:
In Release 3.1 and later systems, checking for calling restrictions is reset after
entered star codes pass those restrictions (in some areas, star codes are
provided by the central office to allow the use of special features available from
the local telephone company). In earlier releases, the star code digits were
processed as dialed digits by ARS, Allowed Lists, Disallowed Lists, and calling
restrictions. Therefore, the actual called party number was not properly
processed when a star code was entered. For more information about star
codes, see “Revising Allowed Lists” later in this chapter.
Planning Guidelines
Changing calling restrictions may affect other features, including Allowed Lists,
Auto Dial, Automatic Route Selection (ARS), Callback, Conference, Coverage,
Disallowed Lists, Display, Extension Status, Forward and Follow Me, Night
Service, personal lines, Pools, Speed Dial, and SA/ICOM buttons. For more
information, see the Feature Reference.
NOTES:
1. You can copy restrictions from another extension as described in “Copy Call
Restrictions” in the “Optional Telephone Features” section of Chapter 3 in
System Programming.
2. In Release 3.1 and later systems, ports programmed for voice messaging
systems (VMI ports) are factory-set as outward-restricted. To permit
outcalling from a voice messaging system, you must change this restriction.
Valid Entries
Unrestricted, Outward-restricted, Toll-restricted
6–44 Managing the System
Changing Calling Restrictions
Task List: Changing Calling Restrictions
o Obtain the following forms, as appropriate:
— 6g, Call Restriction Assignments and Lists
— 6e, Allowed Lists
— 6f, Disallowed Lists
— Forms for individual telephones: Forms 4b, 4d, 4e, 4f, 5a, 5b, or 5c
o If necessary, read “Calling Restrictions” in the Feature Reference for
detailed information about this feature.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on the form(s).
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “Call Restrictions” in
the “Optional Telephone Features” section of System Programming,
Chapter 3, or the summary programming instructions below.
o When you have finished, file the form(s) with the rest of the planning
forms.
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
Extensions→Restriction→Dial ext. no.→
Enter→Select restriction→Enter→Exit
PC Procedure:
6→4→Type ext. no.→0→Select restriction
→0→5
Managing the System 6–45
Changing Trunk-to-Trunk Transfer Status
Changing Trunk-to-Trunk
Transfer Status
Beginning with Release 3.1, the system includes an option to allow or disallow
trunk-to-trunk transfer for each extension. Trunk-to-trunk transfer is the
transferring of an outside call to another outside number. When trunk-to-trunk
transfer is allowed, there is a risk of toll fraud.
Use this procedure to enable or disable trunk to trunk transfer at one or more
extensions.
Planning Guidelines
!
SECURITY ALERT:
The default setting for all extensions, including voice messaging (VMI)
ports and remote access barrier codes, disallows trunk-to-trunk transfer. If
you elect to enable this feature at an extension, consider the risk of tollfraud abusers obtaining access to your system and calling out of the
system using this feature. For more information about protecting your
system from fraudulent toll charges, see Appendix A, “Customer Support
Information.”
Valid Entries
Enabled, Disabled
NOTE:
A single-line set can never perform a trunk-to-trunk transfer unless it is plugged
into a port administered as a VMI port.
Task List: Changing Trunk-to-Trunk Transfer
Status
o Obtain the following forms, as appropriate:
— Form 4b, Analog Multiline Telephone
— Form 4d, MLX Telephone
— Form 4e, MFM Adjunct: MLX Telephone
— Form 4f, Tip/Ring Equipment
— Form 5a, Direct-Line Console (DLC): Analog
— Form 5b, Direct-Line Console (DLC): Digital
— Form 5c, MFM Adjunct: DLC
6–46 Managing the System
Adding/Removing a Line
— Form 5d, Queued Call Console (QCC)
— Data Form 1a, Modem Data Station
— Data Form 1b, 7500B Data Station
o If necessary, read “Trunk-to-Trunk Transfers in the Feature Reference for
detailed information about this feature.
o Plan changes and record the new values on the form(s).
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “Trunk-to-Trunk
Transfer” in System Programming, Chapter 3, or the summary
programming instructions below.
o When you have finished, file the form(s) with the rest of the planning
forms.
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
PC Procedure:
Extensions→More→More→TrkTransfer→
Toggle LED On/Off or Dial ext. no.→Enter→
Exit→Exit
6→u→7→Toggle letter R On/Off or Type
ext. no.→0→5→5
Adding/Removing a Line
Use this procedure to add a line to or remove a line from the system.
Planning Guidelines
If you are adding a new line and need to order a module to connect the line,
coordinate the installation and connection dates to ensure that the new module
is installed before the line is connected to the system.
Task List: Adding/Removing a Line
o Obtain Form 2c, System Numbering: Line/Trunk Jacks. Check the form to
confirm that there is a spare jack.
NOTE:
If you are adding a line but there is no spare jack, you need to add a new
module. Contact your AT&T representative.
o Contact your central office (CO) to obtain a new line or to disconnect a
line.
Managing the System 6–47
Adding a DLC Operator Position
o If you are adding a line/trunk, call AT&T 1 800 247-7000 to arrange for an
AT&T technician to connect the line to the system and set it up. If you are
removing a line, it is not necessary to make any such arrangements.
NOTE:
A new module must be installed before a line is connected to it.
o After the line is connected and set up or is disconnected, open the
System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM to
program it as described in the next task.
o Assign the line to or unassign the line from a pool, to/from extensions (if
it’s a personal line), to/from a calling group, or to/from Remote Access, as
appropriate, following the instructions in the “Telephones” section of
Chapter 3 in System Programming.
o Revise the appropriate planning form(s).
o When you have finished, file the form(s) with the rest of the planning
forms.
Programming Instructions
See the appropriate procedures in System Programming as noted in the task list
above.
Adding a DLC Operator Position
Use this procedure to add a DLC operator position to either an MLX or an
analog multiline extension module.
To add a QCC operator position, see the next section, “Adding a QCC Operator
Position.”
Planning Guidelines
DLC operator positions can be assigned to the first and fifth extension jacks on
any MLX or analog multiline module. The first jack on the first extension module
in your system is automatically assigned as the primary operator position.
If your system has Call Management System (CMS), the two CMS connections
must be made to analog jacks. Each CMS requires two DLC operator positions
on the same analog module to connect the equipment and one position to serve
as CMS supervisor.
6–48 Managing the System
Adding a DLC Operator Position
A maximum of eight DLC operator positions can be assigned. Any combination
of operator positions can be assigned as long as there are not more than four
QCC operator positions (Hybrid\PBX) and no more than a total of eight operator
positions (see Table 6−8).
Table 6–8. Maximum Number of Operator Positions
Position Type
Type of Telephone
QCC
MLX-20L
Maximum Positions
4
DLC
MLX-20L
MLX-28D
BIS-34D, BIS-22, or BIS-22D
analog multiline telephone
MERLIN II Display Console
8
Lines and trunks are assigned on individual buttons.
NOTE:
Because this procedure requires an idle system, you may want to perform it
after hours. Also, when you change an extension to or from an operator position,
the system returns the port (extension jack) type of that extension to the factory
setting. You must reprogram lines and any features for that telephone or
console. You may also need to reprogram any attached adjunct equipment and
optional features.
The procedure to add an operator position involves several tasks that require
decisions, for example, assigning features like calling restrictions, Coverage,
calling group, Pickup group, paging group, Night Service, Forced Account
Code Entry, and Remote Call Forwarding. If necessary, read about the
individual features in the Feature Reference for detailed information.
You also need to make decisions about assigning buttons. There are two types
of buttons: system-programmed buttons (for example, SA or ICOM buttons) to
access an inside or outside line or pool of outside lines, and blank line buttons
that can be programmed with system features like Do Not Disturb. “Line Buttons
on Multiline Telephones” in Chapter 3 of this guide includes information about
buttons; information about individual features is in the Feature Reference.
Before you actually begin performing the items in the task list below, read
through the list and make your decisions now about these and other aspects of
the new extension rather than having to stop in the middle of the procedure.
For additional planning information, see the “Telephones” section in Chapter 3
of System Programming.
Managing the System 6–49
Adding a DLC Operator Position
Task List: Adding an Operator Position
o Obtain Form 2a, System Numbering: Extension Jacks, Form 6a, Optional
Operator Features, and one of the following, as appropriate: 5a, DirectLine Console (DLC): Analog; or 5b, Direct-Line Console (DLC): Digital.
o If necessary, read “Direct-Line Console” in the Feature Reference for
detailed information about DLC consoles.
o Check Form 2a for available operator-position jacks; look for the shaded
first and fifth lines on the form.
NOTE:
If there are no available operator-position jacks, contact your AT&T
representative.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on the form(s).
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o If your system uses the Set Up Space numbering plan (see Form 2a),
single-renumber the extension jack, following the instructions in “Single
Renumbering” in the “System Renumbering” section of System
Programming, Chapter 3.
NOTE:
This task requires an idle condition: Extension Forced Idle for this
extension jack.
o Assign the jack, following the instructions for “DLC Operator Positions” in
the “System Operator Positions” section of System Programming,
Chapter 3, or the summary programming instructions below.
NOTE:
This task requires an idle condition: System Idle.
o Assign the lines/trunks, following the instructions for “Assign Trunks or
Pools to Telephones” in the “System Operator Positions” section in
System Programming, Chapter 3.
NOTE:
This task requires an idle condition: Extension Forced Idle for this
extension jack. Also, if you need additional SA or SA Originate Only
buttons, you should remove all lines using system programming, then
assign the buttons using centralized telephone programming. For more
information, see System Programming.
o Using centralized telephone programming, assign Ringing Options as
described in Chapter 5, “Centralized Telephone Programming,” in
System Programming.
6–50 Managing the System
Adding a DLC Operator Position
o If you are adding a personal line, Loudspeaker Paging, or Pool buttons
(Hybrid/PBX only), assign the outside lines/trunks to the buttons on the
telephone following the instructions in “Assign Trunks or Pools to
Telephones” in the “Telephones” section of System Programming,
Chapter 3.
NOTE:
You may choose to copy line/trunk button assignments that other
extensions have, for example, a Loudspeaker Paging button. For more
information, see “Copy Line/Trunk Assignments” in the “Telephones”
section of System Programming, Chapter 3.
o Assign intercom or system access buttons by following the instructions in
“Assign Intercom or System Access Buttons” in the “Telephones” section
of System Programming, Chapter 3. Also, you may choose to use the
Copy Extension procedure described earlier in this chapter in “Copy
Feature and SA/ICOM Buttons.”
NOTE:
This task requires an idle condition: Extension Forced Idle.
o If the extension requires a dedicated voice or voice pair of extension
jacks to provide Voice Announce to Busy or to provide voice and data
features, identify it to the system as such by following the instructions in
“Analog Multiline Telephones with Voice Announce to Busy” in the
“Telephones” section of System Programming, Chapter 3, or the
instructions in “Data Features” in Chapter 4 of System Programming.
o Assign other buttons, for example, Night Service, Send/Remove
Message, Camp-On, headset, Auto Dial, Forward, Pickup, or Group
Pickup, following instructions in Chapter 5, “Centralized Telephone
Programming,” System Programming.
o Program the telephone features following the instructions for each feature
in “Optional Telephone Features,” “Optional Group Features,” and
“System Features” in System Programming, Chapter 3, or in Chapter 5,
“Centralized Telephone Programming,” System Programming.
o When you have finished, file the form(s) with the rest of the planning
forms.
Programming Instructions
See the appropriate procedures in System Programming as noted in the task list
above.
Managing the System 6–51
Adding a QCC Operator Position
Adding a QCC Operator Position
Use this procedure to add a QCC operator position (Hybrid/PBX systems only).
To add a DLC operator position, see the previous section, “Adding a DLC
Operator Position.”
Planning Guidelines
QCC operator positions can be assigned only to the first and fifth extension
jacks of an MLX module. The first jack on the first extension module in your
system is automatically assigned as the primary operator position.
A maximum of four QCC operator positions can be assigned.
When other QCC operator positions are added, the primary QCC operator
position should be the first one added.
Any combination of operator positions can be assigned as long as there are no
more than four QCC operator positions and no more than a total of eight
operator positions (see Table 6−9).
Table 6–9. Maximum Number of Operator Positions
Position Type
Type of Telephone
QCC
MLX-20L
Maximum Positions
4
DLC
MLX-20L
MLX-28D
BIS-34D, BIS-22, or BIS-22D
analog multiline telephone
MERLIN II Display Console
8
QCC button assignments are automatic and factory-set. In Release 4.0 and later
systems, the Call 5 button is factory set so that Voice Announce is disabled.
The button works the same way as any other Call button. If you use system
programming to enable the Voice Announce feature, the Call 5 button is
available for originating voice-announce calls; the operator does not receive
voice-announced calls on this button.
Lines and trunks are assigned on individual buttons.
6–52 Managing the System
Adding a QCC Operator Position
NOTE:
Because this procedure requires an idle system, you may want to perform it
after hours. Also, when you change an extension to an operator position, the
system returns the port (extension jack) type of that extension to the factory
setting. You must reprogram lines and any features for that telephone or
console. You may also need to change any attached adjunct equipment and
optional features.
The procedure to add an extension involves several tasks about which you
need to make decisions, for example, assigning features like calling restrictions,
Coverage, calling group, Pickup group, paging group, Night Service, Forced
Account Code Entry, Remote Call Forwarding. If necessary, read about the
individual features in the Feature Reference for detailed information.
Before you actually begin performing the items in the task list below, read
through the list and make your decisions now about these and other aspects of
the new extension rather than having to stop in the middle of the procedure.
For additional planning information, see the “Telephones” section in Chapter 3
of System Programming.
Task List: Adding a QCC Operator Position
o Obtain Form 2a, System Numbering: Extension Jacks, Form 6a, Optional
Operator Features, and 5d, Queued Call Console (QCC).
o If necessary, read “Queued Call Console” in the Feature Reference for
detailed information about QCC consoles.
o Check Form 2a for available operator-position jacks; look for the shaded
first and fifth lines on the form.
NOTE:
If there are no available operator-position jacks, contact your AT&T
representative.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on the form(s).
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o If your system uses the Set Up Space numbering plan (see Form 2a),
single-renumber the extension jack following the instructions in “Single
Renumbering” in the “System Renumbering” section of System
Programming, Chapter 3, or the summary programming instructions
below.
Managing the System 6–53
Adding Operator Features
NOTE:
This task requires an idle condition: Extension Forced Idle for this
extension jack.
o Assign the jack, following the instructions for “QCC Operator Positions” in
the “System Operator Positions” section of System Programming,
Chapter 3, or the summary programming instructions below.
NOTE:
This task requires an idle condition: System Idle.
o Assign the lines/trunks to ring at the QCC, following the instructions for
“QCC Operator to Receive Calls” in the “Lines and Trunks” section of
System Programming, Chapter 4.
NOTE:
This task requires an idle condition: System Idle.
o Assign the QCC queue priority level values, following the instructions in
“QCC Queue Priority Level” in the “Lines and Trunks” section of Chapter
4 in System Programming.
o Assign optional operator features, as desired, following the instructions in
“Optional Operator Features” in Chapter 3 of System Programming.
o When you have finished, file the form(s) with the rest of the planning
forms.
Programming Instructions
See the appropriate procedures in System Programming as noted in the task list
above.
Adding Operator Features
Use this procedure to add the following operator features (available in
Hybrid/PBX mode only):
■
For DLC and QCC: Operator Hold Timer
■
For DLC only: DLC Operator Automatic Hold
■
For QCC only:
—
Hold Return
—
Automatic Hold or Release
—
Queue over Threshold
—
Elevate Priority
—
Calls-in-Queue Alert
6–54 Managing the System
Adding Operator Features
—
QCC Operator to Receive Call Types
—
Call Type Queue Priority Level
—
Voice Announce to Busy (Release 4.0 and later systems only)
—
Message Center Operation
—
Automatic or Manual Extended Call Completion
—
Return Ring
—
Position-Busy Backup
Planning Guidelines
Some of the options cannot be programmed for individual operator positions
but, rather, apply to all operator positions in the system. These are: Operator
Hold Timer, Hold Return, Automatic Hold or Release, Extended Call Completion,
Return Ring, Queue over Threshold, Elevate Priority, and QCC Operator to
Receive Call Types.
Only one Position-Busy Backup can be programmed per system.
Valid Entries
Operator Hold Timer
10 to 255 seconds
DLC Operator Automatic Hold
Disable, Enable
Hold Return
Remain on hold, Return to QCC queue
Automatic Hold Release
Auto Hold, Auto Release
Queue over Threshold
0 to 99
Elevate Priority
0 (same priority) and 5 to 30 seconds
Calls-in-Queue Alert
Enable, Disable
QCC Operator to Receive Call
Types
QCC Operator Voice Announce
to Busy (Release 4.0 and later
only)
Call Type Queue Priority Level
N/A
1 to 7
Message Center Operation
QCC extension numbers
Extended Call Completion
Automatic, Manual
Return Ring
1 to 15 rings
Position-Busy Backup
Calling group number
Disable, Enable
Managing the System 6–55
Connecting Auxiliary Equipment
Task List: Adding Operator Features
o Obtain Form 6a, Optional Operator Features.
o If necessary, read “Direct Line Console” or “Queued Call Console” in the
Feature Reference for detailed information about the consoles and the
optional operator features.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on Form 6a.
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the appropriate instructions for
“Optional Operator Features” in System Programming, Chapter 3.
o When you have finished, file Form 6a with the rest of the planning forms.
Programming Instructions
See the appropriate procedure in the “Optional Operator Features” section of
Chapter 3, System Programming.
Connecting Auxiliary Equipment
Use the information in this section to do the following:
■
Identify the line/trunk or extension jacks used for auxiliary equipment and
applications, for example, a music source for Music On Hold,
loudspeaker paging equipment, maintenance alarm (that is, an external
alerting device that sounds or flashes when maintenance problems
occur), or a fax machine.
■
Specify the extensions to receive a message-waiting indication (MWI)
when a fax transmission is received, and specify the length of time before
the system registers that a fax has arrived and sends the MWI.
■
Specify the number of rings before a call transferred by the voice
messaging system goes to the backup position for both integrated and
generic voice messaging interface (VMI) ports, rather than going to a
voice mailbox.
6–56 Managing the System
Connecting Auxiliary Equipment
Planning Guidelines
For Music On Hold
If you use equipment that rebroadcasts music or other copyrighted materials,
you may be required to obtain a copyright license from and pay license fees to
a third party [such as the American Society of Composers, Artists, and
Producers (ASCAP) or Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI)]. Magic on Hold
requires no such license and can be purchased from your AT&T representative.
Only one Music On Hold line/trunk jack is allowed per system.
You cannot assign the line/trunk identified for Music On Hold to a line/trunk pool.
If the line/trunk is currently assigned to a pool, you must remove it before you
program this option.
You cannot assign the line/trunk identified for use with Music On Hold to a
button on any telephone or as a Remote Access trunk, and you cannot use the
line/trunk jack identified for Music On Hold for a loudspeaker paging system or
maintenance alarm.
Because this procedure requires an idle system, you may want to perform it
after hours.
Valid Entries
Line/trunk numbers
For Loudspeaker Paging
If you use equipment that rebroadcasts music or other copyrighted materials,
you may be required to obtain a copyright license from and pay license fees to
a third party (such as the ASCAP or BMI). Magic on Hold requires no such
license and can be purchased from your AT&T representative.
A maximum of three single-zone or multizone loudspeaker paging systems can
be connected to the system.
You cannot assign the line/trunk identified for loudspeaker paging equipment
use to a line/trunk pool. If the line/trunk is currently assigned to a pool, you must
remove it before you program this option.
You cannot assign the line/trunk identified for loudspeaker paging equipment
use as a Remote Access line/trunk, and you cannot use its jack for Music On
Hold or maintenance alarm.
Valid Entries
Line/trunk numbers
Managing the System 6–57
Connecting Auxiliary Equipment
For Fax Machines
A maximum of 16 fax machines can use the Fax Message Waiting feature.
Additional fax machines (more than 16) can be installed, but these machines
cannot use this feature.
NOTE:
Fax machines should not be connected to analog multiline telephones with a
General-Purpose Adapter (GPA). In a GPA configuration, features cannot be
assigned to the fax machine independently of the telephone.
You can specify up to four telephones to receive the message-waiting indication
when a fax transmission is received. Note that fax machines can only send and
not receive message-waiting indications.
Valid Entries
For the number of seconds: 0 to 30 seconds
For Maintenance Alarms
You cannot assign the line/trunk identified for the maintenance alarm to a button
on any telephone or as a Remote Access trunk, and you cannot use its
line/trunk jack to connect a loudspeaker paging system or Music On Hold.
Valid Entries
Line/trunk numbers
For Voice Messaging System and Automated Attendant
The number of rings cannot be programmed for individual voice messaging
systems; the single setting applies for all. Use the Group Type procedure in
“Optional Group Features” to assign VMI ports as either integrated or generic.
Valid Entries
Touch-tone duration: 50 to 200 ms, in increments of 25 ms
Interval between digits: 50 to 200 ms, in increments of 25 ms
Number of rings before transfer: 0 to 9
Task List: Connecting Auxiliary Equipment
o Obtain Form 2c, System Numbering: Line/Trunk Jacks, and the
appropriate individual telephone form (4d, 4e, 4f, 5b, or 5c). For a voice
messaging system or auto attendant system, see the forms packaged
with the application.
o If necessary, read “Auxiliary Equipment” in System Programming,
Chapter 4, for additional information.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on the form(s).
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
6–58 Managing the System
Changing Calling Group Assignments
o Program the change(s), following the appropriate instructions for
“Auxiliary Equipment” in System Programming, Chapter 4, or the
appropriate summary programming instructions below.
NOTE:
For Music On Hold and maintenance alarms, System Idle is required; for
loudspeaker paging, Line/Trunk Idle is required.
o When you have finished, file the form(s) with the rest of the planning
forms.
Programming Instructions
For fax machines:
Console Procedure:
PC Procedure:
AuxEquip→Fax→Extension→Dial ext. no.→
Enter→Exit→Msg Waiting→Dial fax machine
ext. no.→Enter→Dial message waiting indicator
ext. no.→Enter→Threshold→Drop→Dial no. of
seconds→Enter→Exit→Exit
9→3→1→Type ext. no.→0→5→
2→Type fax machine ext. no.→0→Type
message waiting indicator ext. no.→0→3→
A+P
→Type no. of seconds 0→5→5
For a voice messaging system and auto attendant:
Console Procedure:
PC Procedure:
AuxEquip→VMS/AA→TransferRtn→Drop→Dial
no. of rings→Enter→TT Duration→Drop→Dial
no. of ms→Enter→TT Interval→Drop→Dial
no. of ms→Enter→Exit→Exit
→Type no. of rings→
9→6→1→A + P
0→2→A + P
→Type no. of ms→0→
3→A + P
→Type no. of ms→0→5→
5
For the other auxiliary equipment noted above:
Console Procedure:
AuxEquip→MusicOnHold or Ldspkr Pg or
MaintAlarms→Dial line/trunk no.→Enter→Exit
PC Procedure:
9→1→Type line/trunk no.→0→5
Changing Calling Group Assignments
Use this procedure to assign or remove an extension from a calling group.
Managing the System 6–59
Changing Calling Group Assignments
Planning Guidelines
An extension can belong to only one calling group. A QCC cannot be a member
of a calling group. The delay announcement device should not be programmed
as a calling group member.
A calling group can be a Night Service group member.
The total number of extensions can be divided into a maximum of 32 calling
groups. A calling group can include a maximum of 20 extensions, but not all 32
calling groups can have this maximum number.
If a linear hunting pattern is indicated on the back of the system planning form
(7d), be sure to assign extensions to the group in the exact order that they are
shown on the form. The system searches for an available member in the order in
which you assign the extensions to the group.
The Extension Status feature must be set to the calling group or CMS mode
before you assign members to the group. For more information, see “Extension
Status” in the Feature Reference and in the “System Features” section of
Chapter 3, System Programming.
Changing calling group assignments may affect other features; for more
information, see the Feature Reference.
NOTE:
To assign an extension to a new calling group, you must remove it from its old
group before programming the new assignment.
Valid Entries
Extension numbers
Task List: Changing Calling Group Assignments
o Obtain Form 7d, Group Calling.
o If necessary, read “Group Calling” in the Feature Reference for detailed
information about this feature.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on Form 7d.
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “Group Calling
Member Assignments” in the “Optional Group Features” section of
System Programming, Chapter 3, or the summary programming
instructions below.
o When you have finished, file Form 7d with the rest of the planning forms.
6–60 Managing the System
Revising Allowed Lists
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
PC Procedure:
Extensions→More→Grp Calling→Members→
Dial calling group ext. no.→Enter→Dial ext.
no.→Enter→Exit→Exit→Exit
6→u→4→9→Type calling group ext.
no.→0→Type ext. no.→0→5→5→5
Revising Allowed Lists
An Allowed List provides some flexibility for extensions with calling restrictions
by allowing specified extensions to dial certain numbers (for example, 911),
regardless of the extension’s calling restrictions. Use this procedure to modify
an Allowed List of telephone numbers that can be dialed.
NOTE:
A Disallowed List takes precedence over an Allowed List.
Planning Guidelines
Revising Allowed Lists may affect other features, including Auto Dial, Automatic
Route Selection (ARS), calling restrictions, Conference, Directories, Forward
and Follow Me, Night Service, personal lines, Remote Access, Speed Dial, and
Toll Type. For more information, see the Feature Reference.
NOTE:
When Allowed Lists are used in conjunction with Remote Access to restrict calls
made through the system from remote locations, the Allowed Lists can be
assigned to either a specific barrier code (password) or to specific types of
remote access trunks (for example, all tie/DID trunks).
In Release 3.1 and later systems, star codes may be included in Allowed and
Disallowed Lists. In these releases, dialed star codes are ignored by ARS for
routing calls. Star codes are provided by the central office (CO) to allow the use
of special features (for example, in many areas *70 turns off a call-waiting
feature provided by the central office). In Release 3.0 and earlier systems, the
star code digits were processed as dialed digits by ARS, Allowed Lists,
Disallowed Lists, and calling restrictions. Therefore, the actual called party
number was not properly processed when a star code was entered.
Release 3.1 and later systems permit system managers to include star codes in
Allowed and Disallowed Lists. If a star code is allowed, the digits following the
star code are checked normally by Allowed/Disallowed Lists, calling restrictions,
and ARS.
The MERLIN LEGEND Communications System Release 3.1 and later observes
these Bellcore standards for star codes:
Managing the System 6–61
Revising Allowed Lists
■
Only two- or three-digit star codes are recognized. Two-digit star codes
must begin with 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9. Three-digit star codes must begin
with a 2 or a 3.
■
The star code or codes must come at the beginning of the string of digits
dialed, not at the end or in the middle.
■
Multiple leading star codes are allowed. For example, *67*705551212 is
recognized correctly, but in 5551212*67*705553131 the stars are
ignored.
Valid Entries
6 digits for each number (an area code plus an exchange, or 6 digits with a
leading 1, where required)
Asterisk (*, Release 3.1 and later systems only) preceding a maximum of one
leading star code per entry
10 numbers for each list (numbered 0 through 9)
8 lists for each system (numbered 0 through 7)
8 lists for each telephone
NOTE:
If you program 0 as the first digit of a list entry, any toll restriction assigned to
the extension is removed for calls that can be placed by a toll operator. Also,
special characters (such as Pause) are not permitted in Allowed List entries.
Task List: Revising Allowed Lists
o Obtain Form 6e, Allowed Lists and, as appropriate, the form(s) for
individual telephones: Forms 4b, 4d, 4e, 4f, 5a, 5b, or 5c.
o If necessary, read “Allowed/Disallowed Lists” in the Feature Reference for
detailed information about this feature.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on the form(s).
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
6–62 Managing the System
Assigning Allowed Lists to Extensions
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “Allowed Lists” in
the “System Features” section of System Programming, Chapter 3, or the
summary programming instructions below.
o When you have finished, file the forms with the rest of the planning forms.
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
Tables→AllowList→Dial list no. and entry
no.→Enter→Drop→Dial no.→Enter→Exit
PC Procedure:
8→1→Type list no. and entry no.→0→
A+P
→Type no.→0→5
Assigning Allowed Lists to Extensions
Use this procedure to assign individual extensions to established Allowed Lists.
Planning Guidelines
More than one Allowed List can be assigned to an extension.
NOTE:
You can copy calling restrictions. See “Copy Call Restrictions” in Chapter 3 of
System Programming.
Valid Entries
0 to 7
Task List: Assigning Allowed Lists to
Telephones
o Obtain Form 6e, Allowed Lists and, as appropriate, the form(s) for
individual telephones: Forms 4b, 4d, 4e, 4f, 5a, 5b, or 5c.
o If necessary, read “Allowed/Disallowed Lists” in the Feature Reference for
detailed information about this feature.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on the form(s).
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “Assign Allowed
Lists to Telephones” in the “System Features” section of System
Programming, Chapter 3, or the summary programming instructions
below.
Managing the System 6–63
Changing Disallowed Lists
o When you have finished, file the forms with the rest of the planning forms.
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
Tables→AllowTo→Dial list no.→Enter→Dial
ext. no.→Enter→Exit→Exit
PC Procedure:
8→2→Type list no.→0→Type ext.
no.→0→5→5
Changing Disallowed Lists
Use this procedure to establish Disallowed Lists that contain telephone
numbers than cannot be dialed from specified telephones (including
unrestricted telephones). A Disallowed List takes precedence over an Allowed
List.
Planning Guidelines
Changing Disallowed Lists may affect other features, including Auto Dial,
Automatic Route Selection (ARS), Conference, Forward and Follow Me, personal
lines, Remote Access, and Toll Type. For more information, see the Feature
Reference.
When Disallowed Lists are used in conjunction with Remote Access to restrict
calls made through the system from remote locations, the Disallowed Lists can
be assigned to either a specific barrier code (password) or to specific types of
remote access trunks (for example, all tie/DID trunks).
In Release 3.1 and later systems, star codes may be included in Allowed and
Disallowed Lists. In these systems, dialed star codes are ignored by ARS for
routing calls. Star codes are provided by the central office (CO) to allow the use
of special features (for example, in many areas *70 turns off a call-waiting
feature provided by the central office). In Release 3.0 and earlier systems, the
star code digits were processed as dialed digits by ARS, Allowed Lists,
Disallowed Lists, and calling restrictions. Therefore, the actual called party
number was not properly processed when a star code was entered.
Release 3.1 and later systems permit system managers to include star codes in
Allowed and Disallowed Lists. If a star code is allowed, the digits following the
star code are checked normally by Allowed/Disallowed Lists, calling restrictions,
and ARS.
The MERLIN LEGEND Communications System Release 3.1 and later observes
these Bellcore standards for star codes:
6–64 Managing the System
Changing Disallowed Lists
■
Only two- or three-digit star codes are recognized. Two-digit star codes
must begin with 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9. Three-digit star codes must begin
with a 2 or a 3.
■
The star code or codes must come at the beginning of the string of digits
dialed, not at the end or in the middle. Multiple leading star codes are
allowed for dialing, although not in Allowed/Disallowed Lists. For
example, *67*705551212 is recognized correctly, but in
5551212*67*705553131 the stars are ignored.
■
To prevent rotary phone users from using all star codes, include a
separate Disallowed List entry, 11. To disallow specific codes, create
separate entries where 11 is substituted for the *, for example, 1167.
Beginning with Release 3.1, a default Disallowed List (number 7) is provided
with the system. This Disallowed List is automatically assigned to both generic
and integrated VMI ports used by voice messaging systems. It includes the
following entries, which are often used for toll fraud:
■
0, to prevent international calls
■
10, to prevent access to long-distance service providers
■
1809, to prevent unauthorized international calls routed through the
Dominican Republic
■
1700, to prevent unauthorized toll calls with a “700” area code
■
1900, to prevent unauthorized toll calls with a “900” area code
■
976, to prevent local toll calls to numbers with “976” local access codes
■
1www976, where “w” stands for a wildcard entry, to prevent longdistance calls to numbers with “976” local access codes
■
11, to prevent the use of star codes at rotary telephones
■
*, to prevent the use of star codes at multiline telephones
Managing the System 6–65
Assigning Disallowed Lists to Extensions
Valid Entries
11 digits for each number (+ wildcard Pause character, entered by pressing the
Hold button)
Asterisk (*) or star or 11 (Release 3.1 and later systems only) a maximum of one
leading star code in each entry
10 numbers for each list (numbered 0 through 9)
8 lists for each system (numbered 0 through 7)
8 lists for each telephone
Task List: Changing Disallowed Lists
o Obtain Form 6f, Disallowed Lists and, as appropriate, the form(s) for
individual telephones: Forms 4b, 4d, 4e, 4f, 5a, 5b, or 5c.
o If necessary, read “Allowed/Disallowed Lists” in the Feature Reference for
detailed information about this feature.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on the form(s).
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “Disallowed Lists” in
the “System Features” section of System Programming, Chapter 3, or the
summary programming instructions below.
o When you have finished, file the form(s) with the rest of the planning
forms.
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
Tables→Disallow→Dial list no. and entry no.→
Enter→Drop→ Dial no.→Enter→Exit
PC Procedure:
8→3→Type list no. and entry no.→0→A
+P
→Type no.→0→5
Assigning Disallowed Lists to
Extensions
Use this procedure to assign established Disallowed Lists to individual
extensions.
6–66 Managing the System
Assigning Disallowed Lists to Extensions
Planning Guidelines
Each restricted extension can be assigned to more than one list.
Valid Entries
0 to 7
NOTE:
You can copy restrictions. See “Copy Call Restrictions” in the “Optional
Telephone Features” section of Chapter 3, System Programming.
Task List: Assigning Disallowed Lists to
Extensions
o Obtain Form 6f, Disallowed Lists and, as appropriate, the form(s) for
individual telephones: Forms 4b, 4d, 4e, 4f, 5a, 5b, or 5c.
o If necessary, read “Allowed/Disallowed Lists” in the Feature Reference for
detailed information about this feature.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on the form(s).
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “Assign Disallowed
Lists to Telephones” in the “System Features” section of System
Programming, Chapter 3, or the summary programming instructions
below.
o When you have finished, file the form(s) with the rest of the planning
forms.
!
SECURITY ALERT:
In Release 3.1 and later systems, Disallowed List number 7 is
automatically assigned to voice messaging system ports. To help guard
against toll fraud, assign this list to other extensions. For more information,
see the section above, “Changing Disallowed Lists.”
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
Tables→DisallowTo→Dial list no.→Enter→Dial
ext. no.→Enter→Exit→Exit
PC Procedure:
8→4→Type list no.→0→Type ext. no.→
0→5→5
Managing the System 6–67
Changing Group Coverage Assignments
Changing Group Coverage
Assignments
Use this procedure to assign or remove an extension from a coverage group.
Planning Guidelines
Changing Group Coverage assignments can affect other features, including
Account Code Entry, Auto Answer All, Auto Answer Intercom, Automatic Line
Selection, Barge-In, Callback, calling restrictions, Call Waiting, Camp-On,
Conference, Direct Station Selector, Do Not Disturb, Forward and Follow Me,
Group Calling, Hold, Park, personal lines, Pickup, pools, Recall, Reminder
Service, Ringing Options, SMDR, System Access/Intercom Buttons, Transfer,
and Voice Announce to Busy. For more information, see the Feature Reference.
NOTE:
This procedure assigns senders. Before you begin, make certain that the
receivers for the coverage groups are assigned through extension or
centralized telephone programming.
A maximum of 30 coverage groups is allowed, each with an unlimited number of
members. Up to eight receivers can be assigned per coverage group.
An extension can be a sender in only one group; it can be a receiver for more
than one coverage group. A calling group can be assigned as a receiver for up
to 30 coverage groups. In Hybrid/PBX mode only, the QCC queue can be a
receiver for up to 30 coverage groups.
If the sender’s extension has one or more personal lines assigned, the sender
can be assigned as the principal user so that calls received on the personal line
follow that user’s coverage pattern, if any.
When you reassign an extension to a new coverage group, the extension is
automatically removed from its old group.
Valid Entries
Extension numbers
Task List: Changing Group Coverage
Assignments
o Obtain Form 7c, Group Coverage.
o If necessary, read “Coverage” in the Feature Reference for detailed
information about this feature.
6–68 Managing the System
Revising Night Service with Group Assignment
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on Form 7c.
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “Group Coverage
Member Assignments” in the “Optional Group Features” section of
System Programming, Chapter 3, or the summary programming
instructions below.
o When you have finished, file Form 7c with the rest of the planning forms.
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
Extensions→More→Group Cover→Dial group
no.→Enter→Dial ext. no.→Enter→Exit→Exit
PC Procedure:
6→u→3→Type group no.→0→Type
ext. no.→0→5→5
Revising Night Service
with Group Assignment
Use this procedure to add or remove extensions and calling groups to a Night
Service group for after-hours coverage.
Planning Guidelines
Revising Night Service with Group Assignment may affect other features. For
more information, see the Feature Reference.
There can be a maximum of eight Night Service groups (no more than one for
each operator position assigned). Any number of extensions can be assigned to
a Night Service group, and an extension can belong to more than one group.
A calling group can also be assigned to a Night Service group.
Task List: Revising Night Service with Group
Assignment
o Obtain Form 9a, Night Service: Group Assignment.
o If necessary, read “Night Service” in the Feature Reference for detailed
information about this feature.
Managing the System 6–69
Changing Extension Directory Labels
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on Form 9a.
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “Night Service
Group Assignment” in the “Labeling” section of System Programming,
Chapter 3, or the summary programming instructions below.
o When you have finished, file Form 9a with the rest of the planning forms.
Programming Instructions
Console Procedures:
To assign a calling group to a Night Service group:
NightSrvce→GroupAssign→Calling Group→Dial
ext. no. of Night Service attendant→Enter→Dial
calling group no.→Enter→Exit→Exit
To assign an extension to a Night Service group:
NightSrvce→GroupAssign→Extensions→Dial ext.
no. of Night Service attendant→Enter→Dial ext. no.
of telephone→Enter→Exit→Exit
PC Procedures:
To assign a calling group to a Night Service group:
0→1→2→Type ext. no. of Night Service
attendant→0→Type calling group no.→0→
5→5
To assign an extension to a Night Service group:
0→1→1→Type ext. no. of Night Service
attendant→0→Type ext. no. of telephone→0→
5→5
Changing Extension Directory Labels
Use this procedure for either of the following purposes:
■
To change the alphanumeric system labels so that display telephone
users can identify the co-worker who is calling or leaving a message
■
To program the Extension Directory feature for MLX telephones
NOTE:
If your system has Integrated Solution III (IS III), use IS III to perform this task.
6–70 Managing the System
Changing Extension Directory Labels
To program on the system programming console:
Use the buttons next to the display and line/feature buttons to specify
alphanumeric characters and punctuation for labels. Use the template provided
with the MLX-20L telephone to see which line buttons correspond to which
alphanumeric characters.
To program with SPM:
Use the PC keyboard for labels. All letters appear on the screen in uppercase.
Planning Guidelines
Changing Extension Directory Labels may affect other features, including
Directories, Group Calling, and Messaging. See the Feature Reference for more
information.
Valid Entries
A label can have a maximum of seven characters.
Labels can contain capital letters, numbers, and eight types of characters:
ampersands (&), dashes (-), spaces, periods (.), commas (,), apostrophes (‘),
stars (*), and pound signs (#).
Task List: Changing Extension Directory Labels
o Obtain Form 2a, System Numbering: Extension Jacks.
o If necessary, read “Labeling” in the Feature Reference for detailed
information about this feature.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on Form 2a.
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “Extension
Directory” in the “Labeling” section of System Programming, Chapter 3,
or the summary programming instructions below.
o When you have finished, file Form 2a with the rest of the planning forms.
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
More→Labeling→Directory→Extension→
Dial ext. no.→Enter→Drop→Enter label→Enter→
Exit→Exit→Exit
PC Procedure:
u→1→1→2→Type ext. no.→0→A +
P
→Type label→6→5→5→5
Managing the System 6–71
Changing Trunk Labels
Changing Trunk Labels
Use this procedure to establish alphanumeric system labels that help display
telephone users identify the line or trunk being used.
To program on the system programming console:
Use the buttons next to the display and line/feature buttons to specify
alphanumeric characters and punctuation for labels. Use the template provided
with the MLX-20L telephone to see which line buttons correspond to which
alphanumeric characters.
To program with SPM:
Use the PC keyboard for labels. All letters appear on the screen in uppercase.
Planning Guidelines
NOTE:
The availability of the caller identification information may be limited by localserving (caller’s) jurisdiction, availability, or central office (CO) equipment.
Valid Entries
Each label can have a maximum of seven characters.
Labels can contain capital letters, numbers, and eight types of characters:
ampersands (&), dashes (-), spaces, periods (.), commas (,), apostrophes (‘),
stars (*), and pound signs (#).
Task List: Changing Trunk Labels
o Obtain Form 2c, System Numbering: Line/Trunk Jacks.
o If necessary, read “Labeling” in the Feature Reference for detailed
information about this feature.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on Form 2c.
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “Lines or Trunks” in
the “Labeling” section of System Programming, Chapter 3, or the
summary programming instructions below.
o When you have finished, file Form 2c with the rest of the planning forms.
6–72 Managing the System
Changing Posted Message Labels
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
More→Labeling→LinesTrunks→Dial ext. no.→
Enter→Drop→Dial label→Enter→Exit→Exit
PC Procedure:
u→1→2→Type line/trunk no.→0→A
+P
→Type label→6→5→5
Changing Posted Message Labels
Use this procedure to add or change existing posted messages that tell callers
with display telephones now why the called extension does not answer.
To program on the system programming console:
Use the buttons next to the display and line/feature buttons to specify
alphanumeric characters and punctuation for labels. Use the template provided
with the MLX-20L telephone to see which line buttons correspond to which
alphanumeric characters.
To program with SPM:
Use the PC keyboard for labels. All letters appear on the screen in uppercase.
Planning Guidelines
Messages 2 through 20 can be changed through programming. Message 1, DO
NOT DISTURB, cannot be changed.
Valid Entries
1 to 20
Each posted message can have a maximum of 16 characters.
Labels can contain capital letters, numbers, and eight types of characters:
ampersands (&), dashes (-), spaces, periods (.), commas (,), apostrophes (‘),
stars (*), and pound signs (#).
Task List: Changing Posted Message Labels
o Obtain Form 10a, Label Form: Posted Messages.
o If necessary, read “Labeling” in the Feature Reference for detailed
information about this feature.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on Form 10a.
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
Managing the System 6–73
Changing Calling Group Labels
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “Posted Message”
in the “Labeling” section of System Programming, Chapter 3, or the
summary programming instructions below.
o When you have finished, file Form 10a with the rest of the planning forms.
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
More→Labeling→PostMessage→Dial message
no.→Enter→Drop→Enter message→Enter→
Exit→Exit
PC Procedure:
u→1→3→Type message no.→0→
A+P
→Type message→6→5→5
Changing Calling Group Labels
Use this procedure to change alphanumeric system labels for display telephone
users to identify calling groups.
To program on the system programming console:
Use the buttons next to the display and line/feature buttons to specify
alphanumeric characters and punctuation for labels. Use the template provided
with the MLX-20L telephone to see which line buttons correspond to which
alphanumeric characters.
To program with SPM:
Use the PC keyboard for labels. All letters appear on the screen in uppercase.
Planning Guidelines
Valid Entries
Each label can have a maximum of seven characters.
Labels can contain capital letters, numbers, and eight types of characters:
ampersands (&), dashes (-), spaces, periods (.), commas (,), apostrophes (‘),
stars (*), and pound signs (#).
Task List: Changing Calling Group Labels
o Obtain Form 7d, Group Calling.
o If necessary, read “Labeling” in the Feature Reference for detailed
information about this feature.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on Form 7d.
6–74 Managing the System
Changing System Directory Labels
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “ Group Calling” in
the “Labeling” section of System Programming, Chapter 3, or the
summary programming instructions below.
o When you have finished, file Form 7d with the rest of the planning forms.
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
More→Labeling→Grp Calling→Dial calling
group ext. no.→Enter→Drop→Enter label→
Enter→Exit→Exit
PC Procedure:
u→1→4→Type calling group ext. no.→
0→A + P
→Type label→6→5→5
Changing System Directory Labels
Use this procedure to change System Speed Dial numbers for all system users.
You can also use this procedure to enter the alphanumeric labels shown on the
System Directory feature of MLX display telephones.
To program on the system programming console:
Use the buttons next to the display and line/feature buttons to specify
alphanumeric characters and punctuation for labels. Use the template provided
with the MLX-20L telephone to see which line buttons correspond to which
alphanumeric characters.
To program with SPM:
Use the PC keyboard for labels. All letters appear on the screen in uppercase.
Planning Guidelines
Valid Entries
Speed dial code assignments are 600 through 729.
There can be a total of 130 numbers, with a maximum of 11 characters per
label.
Labels can contain capital letters, numbers, and eight types of characters:
ampersands (&), dashes (-), spaces, periods (.), commas (,), apostrophes (‘),
stars (*), and pound signs (#).
Managing the System 6–75
Changing System Directory Labels
Task List: Changing System Directory Labels
o Obtain Form 10b, System Speed Dial.
o If necessary, read “Labeling” in the Feature Reference for detailed
information about this feature.
o Plan changes using the planning guidelines above; record the new
values on Form 10b.
o Open the System Programming menu from the console or a PC with SPM.
o Program the change(s), following the instructions for “System Speed Dial
Directory” in the “Labeling” section of System Programming, Chapter 3,
or the summary programming instructions below.
o When you have finished, file Form 10b with the rest of the planning forms.
Programming Instructions
Console Procedure:
PC Procedure:
6–76 Managing the System
More→Labeling→Directory→System→Dial code
no.→Enter→Drop→Enter label→Enter→Backspace→
Dial telephone no.→Enter→Yes or No→Enter→Exit→
Exit→Exit
u→1→1→1→Type dial code no.→0→
A+P
→Type label→6→2→Type telephone no.
→6→1/2→6→5→5→5
Learning More
7
Contents
Guides
■
■
■
Ordering and Availability
System Reference Guides
Common Elements
Feature Reference
Contents and Organization
Entries
Appendixes
Special Tools
Using This Guide
System Programming
Contents and Organization
Appendixes
Special Tools
Using This Guide
Equipment and Operations Reference
Contents and Organization
Appendixes
Using This Guide
User and Operator Guides
Common Elements
Calling Supervisor’s Guide and Data/Video Reference
7–1
7–2
7–2
7–4
7–4
7–5
7–5
7–6
7–7
7–7
7–7
7–8
7–8
7–9
7–9
7–10
7–10
7–11
7–11
7–11
7–12
7–13
System Guides Information Finder
7–14
Training
7–21
Learning More 7–i
Learning More
7
This chapter provides descriptions of the system manuals, a quick reference to
the system reference guides (“System Guides Information Finder”), and a
description of training materials available from AT&T.
When you don’t know where to look for help on a specific feature or activity,
check this chapter first. It will help you to determine which guide contains the
information you need and how to find it in that guide.
Additional materials may have become available since this book was printed. If
you don’t find what you need here, contact your AT&T representative.
Guides
There are two types of guides:
■
System Reference Guides. Designed to help system managers and
AT&T personnel in planning, programming, and managing the system.
These references provide detailed information about system
components, features, and capabilities, as well as procedures for
programming all aspects of the system.
■
User and Operator Guides. Designed for the users of telephones or
system features. Each of these manuals describes the use and features
of specific telephones or operator consoles.
This section provides ordering information and then descriptions of the system
reference guides and of the user and operator guides.
Learning More 7–1
Guides
Ordering and Availability
For information about ordering any of the printed materials, see “Related
Documents” in “About This Book,” at the beginning of this book.
System Reference Guides
There are three system reference guides that you may need to consult as part of
your system manager function:
■
The Feature Reference contains detailed information about features and
summary descriptions of applications.
■
System Programming includes detailed step-by-step procedures to
program the system.
■
The Equipment and Operations Reference contains detailed information
about system equipment.
The Feature Reference and System Programming are essential if you modify the
system or add new users and new features.
The Equipment and Operations Reference provides information about hardware,
modes of operation, and lines and trunks; you may wish to order it when you
require more detail on these subjects or plan major changes in your system.
NOTE:
The Equipment and Operations Reference does not include information about
hardware that was introduced after Release 3.0 of the system. Consult Chapter
3 of this guide, “System Components,” for general descriptions. For more
detailed information about newer hardware components, contact your AT&T
representative. For general information about applications, disregard the
Equipment and Operations Reference and consult the Feature Reference
instead. For ordering information, contact your AT&T representative.
Table 7−1 contains an overview of the system reference guides, including
descriptions of some special tools available in each guide. Following the table,
this section describes some common elements contained in all three of the
guides, then provides specific information about each of the guides, including
contents and organization, special tools, and how to use the guide.
In addition to the descriptions and information in this section, each of the guides
provides information about its contents and how to use the guide to find what
you need or to complete a particular task.
NOTE:
An additional guide, System Planning, contains information about completing
the planning forms. Because it is primarily used by AT&T personnel, it is not
described here.
7–2 Learning More
Guides
Table 7–1. System Reference Guides Overview
Title
Description
Contents Overview
Feature Reference
Provides detailed
descriptions, in alphabetical order, of each system feature and some
system components. Also
includes summary
information about
applications.
No chapters; each feature
description is a separate entry.
Special Tools
Index to features by name
(at the front of the guide)
Index to features by activity
(at the front of the guide)
System Programming
Provides general programming information
and step-by-step procedures for programming
all aspects of the system.
Equipment and Operations
Reference
Provides detailed
information about system
components and system
functioning.
NOTE: Not updated for
Release 4.0 and later
systems.
Chapters 1 through 5
Introduction to programming
and using System Programming and Maintenance
(SPM), administrative procedures corresponding to
Chapter 6 of this guide, other
system programming procedures and centralized
telephone programming
procedures
Special Tools
Chapter 1: a quick reference
to programming menus
Appendixes
Menu hierarchy diagram and
quick reference tables for
programming and for using a
phone and its features
Chapters 1 through 5
System overview, descriptions of hardware components, technical information
about lines/trunks, descriptions of applications, and
hardware and feature
components of data stations
Learning More 7–3
Guides
Common Elements
All three system reference guides include the following informational and
organizational aids, customized for each guide:
■
About This Book. An introduction that includes the purpose and
audience of the guide, typographical conventions, how to use the guide,
and other relevant information, as well as a Feedback Form to submit
your comments on the guide to AT&T.
IMPORTANT:
We urge you to complete the Feedback Form and send in your
comments. The writers at AT&T need your suggestions.
■
Main Table of Contents. A list of the chapters and their primary sections,
a list of figures, and a list of tables. (Use the tabs to get to chapters
quickly.)
■
Chapter Tables of Contents. A detailed list, at the beginning of each
chapter, of the sections in that chapter (the exception is the Feature
Reference).
■
Glossary. A list, in alphabetical order, of terms and abbreviations used in
the guide, along with definitions of each.
■
Index. An alphabetical list with page references at the back of the guide.
■
Appendix A, Customer Support Information. Provides Federal
Communications Commission (FCC) information, Canadian Department
of Communication (DOC) information, and information about the security
of your system.
Feature Reference
The Feature Reference contains detailed information about each feature. The
features are listed alphabetically by name. Some groups of related features
appear under one entry, for example, “Messaging.” The contents and
organization of each entry are described in “Entries,” later in this section.
This guide includes entries describing some system components that are not,
strictly speaking, features. These include:
■
BRI
■
Centrex operation
■
Direct-Line Console (DLC; features that are exclusive to or different at
this operator position)
■
Direct Station Selector (DSS)
■
Display (a full explanation of the display menus on MLX and analog
multiline telephones)
7–4 Learning More
Guides
■
Integrated Administration (a programming component of Integrated
Solutions software applications)
■
Multi-Function Module (MFM; a telephone adapter that affects and is
affected by system features)
■
Personal lines
■
Primary Rate Interface (PRI) and T1 switched 56 service
■
Programming
■
Queued Call Console (QCC)
■
System Renumbering (a programming procedure for changing extension
and/or line numbers)
■
Touch-Tone or Rotary Signaling (information about supporting the two
types of telephone signaling on the system)
Contents and Organization
The Feature Reference does not have chapters. Instead, each feature is a
section of the guide; the name of the feature explained in the section appears at
the bottom of each page.
Entries
Each entry in the guide explains a feature or set of features in great detail.
“At a Glance,” a boxed table at the beginning of each feature description,
summarizes the following aspects of the feature or feature group:
■
Users Affected. Shows what category of users is affected by a feature.
For example, “Auto Dial” lists telephone users and Direct-Line Console
(DLC) operators as those affected by the feature. (From this you can
conclude that Queued Call Console (QCC) operators cannot use Auto
Dial.)
■
Reports Affected. Cites the Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR)
reports in which you can find information relating to the feature.
■
Modes. Lists the system operating mode or modes in which the feature is
used.
■
Telephones. Tells you which telephones can use the feature.
■
Programming Code(s). Lists the programming code(s) used to program
the feature on a button or turn it on or off.
■
Feature Code(s). Lists the feature code(s) you can use to activate the
feature or turn it off.
■
MLX Display Label(s). Lists the name as it appears on the MLX-20L
and/or other MLX telephones.
Learning More 7–5
Guides
■
Feature Code(s). Lists the feature code(s) you can use to activate the
feature or turn it off.
■
System Programming. If applicable, summarizes the system
programming procedure(s) that affect the feature.
■
Maximum(s). If applicable, tells you what maximum numbers apply to
the feature.
■
Factory Setting(s). Shows you the default programming, that is, how the
system sets the feature when no one programs it.
Following each “At a Glance” table is a full description of the feature or feature
group, telling you how it works for each type of user it affects. Following the
description, feature entries include (as applicable) each of these sections:
■
Considerations and Constraints. An explanation of exceptions and
unusual conditions pertaining to the feature. This section can help you
troubleshoot a problem with the feature.
■
Mode Differences. An explanation of variations in the use of the feature
in the different modes supported by the system.
■
Telephone Differences. An explanation of variations in the use of the
feature with different telephones.
■
Feature Interactions. A list of issues and considerations to be aware of
when using another feature in conjunction with the main feature
described. The list is arranged by feature, in alphabetical order.
Appendixes
The Feature Reference appendixes include a variety of useful tables and
reference tools, in addition to the customer service information in Appendix A:
■
An alphabetical list of system features, citing the system planning forms
they are associated with (Appendix B)
■
An alphabetical list of general systemwide features, including their
availability in different operating modes as well as notes on mode
differences and availability in different releases of the system
(Appendix C)
■
Information about general feature use and how operator and user
features are activated or programmed on MLX, analog multiline, and
single-line telephones (Appendix D)
■
A fold-out flowchart showing the system programming hierarchy and
menus. Many system programmers remove this chart and hang it on a
wall for quick reference (Appendix E)
■
A table describing the SMDR reports available for the system, along with
samples of those reports (Appendix F)
7–6 Learning More
Guides
■
Telephone button diagrams for MLX and analog multiline telephone in all
three modes of operation (Appendix G)
■
A description of the special characters used in dialing sequences for
numbers dialed automatically, for example, with the Auto Dial feature.
Tells you what these characters are and how to insert them on MLX,
analog multiline, and single-line telephones. (Appendix H)
■
An overview of the applications you can include with the system
(Appendix I)
Special Tools
In addition to the information described in “Common Elements,” earlier in this
chapter and the information in the appendixes, the first pages of the Feature
Reference include several tools to help you find the information you need:
■
“Index of Feature Names” shows where you can find information about
features and other system components that may have been renamed or
reorganized in this release of the communications system and related
products. It also lists some hardware components that appear in the
Equipment and Operations Reference. This section is helpful both to
people who have used early releases of the system, as well as to those
who are accustomed to other communications systems.
■
The “Index of Features by Activity” lists features according to tasks
typically performed with the system. It describes the task and then tells
you which Feature Reference entry explains it fully.
Using This Guide
Since the entries in the guide are in alphabetical order, you simply look up a
feature by name. If you’re not sure of the feature name, you can use the “Index
to Feature Names” or “Index to Features by Activity” at the front of the guide
and/or use the general index at the back of the guide.
System Programming
This reference guide provides detailed, step-by-step instructions for
programming all aspects of the system. Some of these programming
procedures you may use frequently, for example, the labeling functions to
change the names, phone numbers, and extension numbers that display
features use. Some you may use only occasionally, depending on how your
system is set up. Others are very technical and never require your attention.
Since System Programming does not provide the full descriptions of features
that the Feature Reference does, you may need to refer to both guides when
you are programming a complex feature for the first time.
Learning More 7–7
Guides
Contents and Organization
System Programming is organized into the following chapters:
■
Programming Basics (Chapter 1). Provides an introduction to
programming and idle states, and general information about using the
guide.
■
Programming with SPM (Chapter 2). Provides information about using
SPM (PC-based software) that enables you to program the system from a
PC instead of from a system programming console.
■
Common Administrative Procedures (Chapter 3). Contains procedures
that system managers use often (as summarized in Chapter 6 of this
System Manager’s Guide), including a programming summary, whether
an idle state is required during programming, the system planning forms
required, and the actual step-by-step procedures. This chapter also
includes information about backing up system programming using a
memory card.
NOTE:
After you are familiar with the step-by-step procedures, you can use the
programming summaries to quickly refresh your memory.
■
Programming Procedures (Chapter 4). Provides each system
programming procedure not covered in Chapter 3. The procedures
appear in the same order as they do in the menus themselves. Use this in
conjunction with the Appendix B flowchart or the annotated menus in the
first chapter.
!
CAUTION:
As the text indicates, some procedures are for qualified technicians
only. Do not attempt to perform these yourself.
■
Centralized Telephone Programming (Chapter 5). Contains the
procedures for centralized telephone programming.
Appendixes
System Programming appendixes include a variety of useful tables and
reference tools, in addition to the customer service information in Appendix A:
■
A Menu Hierarchy flowchart on a fold-out page showing the system
programming hierarchy and menus (Appendix B)
■
Summary tables showing the meaning of status lights at the programming
console and the DSS used in conjunction with it
(Appendix C)
■
A description of general feature use on MLX, analog multiline, and singleline telephones (Appendix D)
7–8 Learning More
Guides
■
A helpful table of features, showing programming codes, the modes in
which the feature works on each type of telephone, and the name of the
feature as displayed on the MLX-20L telephone (Appendix D)
■
A description of the telephone programming that people in the system
can perform at their extensions (Appendix D)
■
Telephone button diagrams for MLX and analog multiline telephone in all
three modes of operation (Appendix E)
■
A table describing the SMDR reports available for the system, along with
samples of those reports (Appendix F)
■
A list of the procedures required to program a new system, in the order in
which they are performed (Appendix G)
■
Summary tables showing how to insert special characters (for example, a
pause in an automatic dialing sequence) for single-line, analog multiline,
MLX nondisplay, and MLX display telephones (Appendix H)
Special Tools
In addition to the common organizational elements described earlier in
“Common Elements,” this guide provides some other tools for quick reference
and to help you find the information you need:
■
In Chapter 1, a quick reference to the system programming menus,
presented in the order in which they appear in the system, and annotated
so that you can find out what they do.
■
In Appendix B, a fold-out Menu Hierarchy. Many system programmers
remove this chart and hang it on a wall for quick reference.
Using This Guide
To find the detailed procedure for one of the common system management
tasks described in Chapter 6 of this System Manager’s Guide, check the
contents list for Chapter 3 of System Programming. Otherwise, you can use the
quick reference in Chapter 1 and/or the main contents list at the front of the
guide or the index at the back of the guide to find a particular programming
procedure.
For information about entering or exiting system programming and using the
programming procedures, refer to Chapter 1.
To perform the procedures, you may find the Menu Hierarchy and other
reference tables in the appendixes helpful.
Learning More 7–9
Guides
Equipment and Operations Reference
This guide describes essentially three system elements: lines and trunks,
hardware, and applications. Its presentation is straightforward and the
organizational aids described earlier in “Common Elements” are all you need to
find the information you require.
NOTE:
The Equipment and Operations Reference does not include information about
hardware that was introduced after Release 3.0 of the system. Consult
Chapter 3 of this guide, “System Components,” for general descriptions. For
more detailed information about newer hardware components, contact your
AT&T representative. For general information about applications, disregard the
Equipment and Operations Reference and consult the Feature Reference
instead. For newer information about data communications, consult the
Data/Video Reference.
Contents and Organization
The Equipment and Operations Reference is organized into the following
chapters:
■
Introduction (Chapter 1). Provides an overview of the system, including
the hardware components, details about digital switching, descriptions of
modes of operation, FCC classifications, programming, differences
among releases, and a detailed description of system capacities and
requirements.
■
Hardware Components (Chapter 2). Provides details about system
hardware, including control unit modules and other components, MERLIN
II components that you can reuse with the system, details about and
illustrations of telephones and telephone buttons (including operator
consoles), descriptions of the adapters to connect adjunct equipment to
the system as a whole or to extensions, descriptions of systemwide and
extension-only adjuncts (such as fax machines, headsets, and
loudspeaker paging systems), and descriptions of power-related
components and accessories (for example, surge protectors and trouble
alarms).
■
Lines and Trunks (Chapter 3). Provides detailed and technical
information about the various lines, trunks, and digital facilities that can
provide service to the system.
7–10 Learning More
Guides
■
Applications (Chapter 4). Provides summary descriptions of applications
you can add to the system and is the primary system resource on the
subject. Detailed information is contained in the documentation for the
applications. This chapter also describes how the system supports
Centrex and Primary Rate Interface (PRI) and special information
regarding printers supported on the system, as well as the touch-tone
receiver (TTR) and jack requirements for voice messaging systems. It
helps you consider the security aspects of voice messaging systems as
well.
■
Data Communications (Chapter 5). Provides details about the hardware
and feature components of data stations, so that you can understand
how these are set up on the system and the lines and trunks they work
with. This chapter also supplies technical details about
videoconferencing and Group IV (G4) fax machine support on the
system.
Appendixes
Appendix B provides ordering information for all hardware components and
applications for the system.
Using This Guide
To find information about system components or applications, use the main
contents list at the front of the guide, or the index at the back of the guide. For
information about how to order components, refer to Appendix B.
User and Operator Guides
Most of the user and operator guides share a common format and are intended
for standalone use with a certain telephone or operator console. In other words,
an operator who has an MLX Direct-Line Console (DLC) requires only the
operator guide for that console and does not need to refer to the user’s guide as
well.
The following is a list of all the user and operator guides for the system:
■
MLX-10D, MLX-10DP, MLX-16DP, MLX-20L, and MLX-28D Display
Telephones User’s Guide (comes with MLX display telephones)
■
MLX-10 Nondisplay Telephone User’s Guide (comes with MLX-10
nondisplay telephones)
■
Analog Multiline Telephones User’s Guide (for analog multiline
telephones: BIS-10, BIS-10D, BIS-22, BIS-22D, BIS-34D)
■
MDC 9000 and MDW 9000 Telephones User’s Guide (for MDC 9000 and
MDW 9000)
■
Single-Line Telephones User’s Guide (for 8101 and 2500 YMGL
telephones, as well as older single-line telephones)
Learning More 7–11
Guides
■
MLX Direct-Line Consoles Operator’s Guide (for MLX DLC operator
consoles)
■
Analog Direct-Line Consoles Operator’s Guide (for analog DLC operator
consoles)
■
MLX Queued Call Consoles Operator’s Guide (for QCC operator
consoles)
■
Calling Supervisor’s Guide (ordered according to system needs)
■
Data/Video Reference (different format from other user guides, ordered
according to system needs)
Common Elements
With the exceptions of the Calling Supervisor’s Guide and the Data/Video
Reference, described later in this chapter, the user and operator guides include
some standard components and organizational aids:
■
On the front cover, a descriptive table of contents for rapidly locating
needed information
■
A diagram of the telephone buttons and display (if applicable),
explaining what each does
■
A description of the line buttons (SA, ICOM, Pool, and buttons labeled
with a telephone number) a person may find on his or her telephone. For
operators, descriptions of DSS buttons are also included. For QCC
operators, factory-set feature buttons are described.
■
Illustrated explanations of tones, rings, and line button lights
■
A Feature Finder that acts as an index of features according to the
activities people may want to perform; gives feature names and page
numbers
■
Where applicable in user and operator guides, an illustrated description
of headsets, their operation, and their installation
■
A section offering step-by-step general call handling instructions
(including, for example, the Transfer, Hold, and Conference features)
■
A section containing step-by-step instructions for messaging features
■
A general description showing the standard steps for using a feature and
a list of features with their feature codes
■
In alphabetical order, descriptions of and step-by-step instructions for
most or all the features available for the telephone or operator position.
Activation of the feature or setting is described; programming instructions
are included for features that don’t follow the standard programming
sequences described later in the guide (for example, Auto Dial).
7–12 Learning More
Guides
■
Where applicable, a detailed description of the telephone display and
how to use it, including illustrations of the various display menus. For
MLX telephones, a list of features shows feature names as they appear
on both small and large displays.
■
A section, where applicable, giving general programming instructions for
buttons and settings
■
On the inside back cover, where applicable, a list of features/settings
and the programming codes for them
■
On the outside back cover, where applicable, a list of features and
feature codes, as well as special characters with programming
instructions
In addition, where applicable, a pull-out card is included with blanks for
entering information such as speed dial codes, extension numbers for groups or
important line numbers or access codes, account codes, and other information.
People can place these cards in a location where they can easily refer to them
when necessary. (MLX telephones include tray cards for this purpose.)
The user and operator guides are booklets that fit underneath telephones or
consoles for easy storage and reference. They are printed in two colors for
rapid scanning.
Calling Supervisor’s Guide and Data/Video
Reference
These two user guides, which you must order separately, differ from the guides
described above:
■
Neither is a standalone guide, and both must be used in conjunction with
the guide for the telephone or console at the extension.
■
Both describe only the features and functions unique to the activity.
■
Calling Supervisor’s Guide is published in the standard booklet format
described above and fits under the phone.
■
Data/Video Reference is a reference tool, as well as offering step-by-step
instructions. It is provided in 8.5-inch by 11-inch format and is 3-hole
punched.
Calling Supervisor’s Guide describes agent and supervisor features, with stepby-step instructions.
Learning More 7–13
System Guides Information Finder
Data/Video Reference describes data communications in general, the different
types of data and video stations, and the features used in data communications.
It offers step-by-step dialing and programming instructions for data users who
have ISDN terminal adapters or modems. In addition, it explains data hunt
group operations and the system’s support of local-area networks (LANs),
videoconferencing systems, and host computer systems for data
communications.
System Guides Information Finder
The following tables are designed as a quick reference tool to help you locate
helpful information in System Programming and the Feature Reference.
Sometimes information is available in more than one guide and some summary
information is the same in two guides. When summary information is available in
both guides, both are listed.
This section includes the following Information Finders:
■
Features (Table 7−2). Tells you how to find complete and quick
reference (where available) feature information, including information
about feature programming and planning. This table also provides
information about maintenance and troubleshooting, security, and system
management, as well as about different feature categories.
■
Programming (Table 7−3). Tells you how to find both detailed and quick
reference (where available) programming information for system and
centralized telephone programming activities.
Table 7–2. Information Finder: Features
To Learn About These Features . . .
Check This Guide . . .
Basics
Finding out how feature works, including how it works
in different modes and on different phones, limitations
and considerations, interactions with other features
Feature Reference. See entry for feature.
Finding out whether a feature is programmed by a
user/operator or the system manager
Feature Reference. See entry for feature.
(System Manager’s Guide Feature Finders
in Chapter 4)
System Programming, Appendix D
Feature Reference, Appendix D
Learning about general extension feature use and
programming on each type of telephone: MLX, analog
multiline, and single-line
Checking feature activation codes
Feature Reference. See entry for feature.
(User and operator guides provide tables
of feature codes on their back covers.)
Continued on next page
7–14 Learning More
System Guides Information Finder
Table 7–2, Continued
To Learn About These Features . . .
Check This Guide . . .
Basics (continued)
Finding out about system reports offering details about
a feature as it is used on your system
Changing Automatic Route Selection (ARS)
Finding out about operator features, settings, and
options
Feature Reference. See entry for feature
and Appendix F.
System Programming, Appendix F
Consult your AT&T representative and see
System Programming, Chapter 4.
Feature Reference. See “Automatic Route
Selection.”
Feature Reference. See entry for console
(DLC or QCC) and for Direct Station
Selector (DSS).
Display Features: Labeling
Changing the information that appears about an
extension when you add, delete, or modify extensions
in the system
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing the information that appears about groups
when you add, delete, or modify groups in the system
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing the information that appears about lines and
trunks when you add, delete, or modify lines/trunks in
the system
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing Posted Messages
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing the System Directory for speed dialing
numbers that people call often
System Programming, Chapter 3
Planning and Programming Features
Feature factory settings
Feature Reference. See entry for feature.
How features interact with one another
Feature Reference. Under feature entry,
see “Feature Interactions.”
Feature Reference, Appendix I
System Programming, Appendix D
How features interact with applications
Feature programming codes
Planning features on buttons
Copying programmed telephone features from one
extension to another
Finding out which system planning forms to consult in
order to find out how features are programmed on
your system
Feature Reference, Appendixes B and G
System Programming, Appendix E
System Programming, Chapter 5
Feature Reference, Appendix B
Continued on next page
Learning More 7–15
System Guides Information Finder
Table 7–2, Continued
To Learn About These Features . . .
Check This Guide . . .
Planning and Programming Features (continued)
Finding out which system planning forms to change
when you modify or add features
Finding out which modes of operation in support a
systemwide feature
Feature Reference, Appendix B
System Programming. Entry for procedure
you are using.
Feature Reference, Appendix C
Programming special characters (Pause,
Stop, and others) in dialing sequences
Feature Reference, Appendix H
Finding out which modes a feature is supported in and
which type of phone it works on
System Programming, Appendix D
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Finding out which system planning forms to consult in
order to see how features are programmed on your
system
Feature Reference, Appendix B
Troubleshooting a feature when it doesn’t work as
expected
Feature Reference. Under feature entry,
see “Considerations and Constraints” and
“Feature Interactions.”
Feature Reference, Appendix I
Feature Reference. See entry for feature
and Appendix F.
System Programming, Appendix F
Feature Reference. Under feature entry,
see “Feature Interactions.”
System Programming, Chapter 4
Finding out how features interact with applications
Finding out about system reports that offer details
about a feature as it is used on your system
Finding out how features interact with one another
Canceling Reminder Service calls
Changing Recall timer when the switchhook, Recall or
Flash buttons are disconnecting callers
System Programming, Chapter 4
Feature Reference. See “Recall/Timed
Flash.”
Security
Setting up authorization codes
Setting up Remote Access barrier codes
Changing Automatic Route Selection (ARS) Facility
Restriction Levels for extensions or lines/trunks
Feature Reference. See “Authorization
Codes.”
System Programming, Chapter 3
Feature Reference. See “Remote Access.”
System Programming, Chapter 4
System Programming, Chapter 4
Feature Reference. See “Automatic Route
Selection.”
Continued on next page
7–16 Learning More
System Guides Information Finder
Table 7–2, Continued
To Learn About These Features . . .
System Management
Check This Guide . . .
Using and understanding memory cards
System Programming, Chapter 3 and 4
Backing up programming, automatically or manually
System Programming, Chapter 3
Understanding backup messages
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing the language in which reports are printed
System Programming, Chapter 3
Getting reports
System Programming, Chapter 3
Setting up your system to work with the Integrated
Administration feature of the Integrated Solutions
application
Consult your AT&T representative and see
System Programming, Chapter 4, and
Feature Reference, “Integrated
Administration.”
Table 7–3. Information Finder: Programming
To Learn About Programming . . .
Check This Guide . . .
Systemwide Basics
Finding out the modes of operation in which a
systemwide feature is available
Feature Reference, Appendix C
Changing the system’s mode of operation
Changing the system programming position
Consult your AT&T representative and
System Programming, Chapter 4
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing the system date and time
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing the system language
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing the system’s numbering of lines and
extensions
Consult your AT&T representative and
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing DSS buttons when you renumber the system
System Programming, Chapter 4
Setting up operator positions
System Programming, Chapter 3
Turning One-Touch Transfer or One-Touch Hold on or
off
System Programming, Chapter 4
Changing the timing for the return to the originator of
transferred, parked, or camped-on calls when the
destination extension remains busy
System Programming, Chapter 4
Changing what a caller hears when being transferred
System Programming, Chapter 4
Changing the number of rings for the Delay Ring
setting
System Programming, Chapter 4
Continued on next page
Learning More 7–17
System Guides Information Finder
Table 7–3, Continued
To Learn About Programming . . .
Check This Guide . . .
Extension Features and Buttons
Feature programming codes
System Programming, Appendix D
Allowing or disallowing trunk-to-trunk transfer at an
extension.
System Programming, Chapter 3
Planning features on buttons
Feature Reference, Appendixes B and G
System Programming, Appendix E
System Programming, Chapters 3 and 5
Copying programmed telephone features and line
buttons from one extension to another
Copying calling restrictions from one extension to
another
System Programming, Chapter 3
Finding out which system planning forms to consult in
order to see how features are programmed
Feature Reference, Appendix B
Finding out in which modes of operation a systemwide
feature is available
Feature Reference, Appendix C
Finding out which system planning forms to change
when you modify or add features
Feature Reference, Appendix B
Programming special characters (Pause, Stop, and
others) in dialing sequences
Feature Reference, Appendix H
System Programming, Appendix H
System Programming, Appendix D
Finding out the modes in which a feature works on
each type of telephone
Assigning line buttons to extensions
System Programming, Chapter 3
Specifying pool dial-out codes
System Programming, Chapter 3
Assigning extensions for fax machines
System Programming, Chapter 3
Programming headset operation for an extension
System Programming, Chapter 5
Feature Reference. See “Headset Options”
and “Auto Answer All.”
System Programming, Chapter 3
Assigning or change the following features or settings
at extensions:
Calling restrictions
Forced Account Code Entry
Microphone on or off
Authorization code
Remote call forwarding
Specifying which analog multiline telephones have the
Voice Announce to Busy capability
System Programming, Chapter 3
Specifying the analog multiline telephones at data
stations
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing the principal user of a personal line
System Programming, Chapter 4
Continued on next page
7–18 Learning More
System Guides Information Finder
Table 7–3, Continued
To Learn About Programming . . .
Check This Guide . . .
Group Features and Buttons
Setting up or changing the following group member
assignments:
Pickup groups
Calling groups
Coverage groups
Paging groups
Night Service groups
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing timing for Night Service
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing calling restrictions for Night Service
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing the delay before a call coming to a member
of a coverage group is covered
System Programming, Chapter 3
Assigning lines or pools to calling groups
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing the calling group Extension Status feature
System Programming, Chapter 3
Setting up or changing the following calling group
features or settings:
Set up call distribution (hunt type)
Assign delay announcement extension.
Assign extension to cover calls for group.
Specify when a group has too many waiting calls.
Specify when the group supervisor and/or
members are notified that too many calls are
waiting.
Assign an external alert to warn supervisor and/or
members when too many calls are waiting.
System Programming, Chapter 3
Feature Reference. See “Group Calling.”
Operators
Setting up operator positions
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing the hold timer when operators are
accidentally disconnecting people on hold
System Programming, Chapter 3
Programming Barge-In for an operator
System Programming, Chapter 5
Programming headset operation for an extension
System Programming, Chapter 5
Feature Reference. See “Headset Options”
and “Auto Answer All.”
System Programming, Chapter 3
Allowing DLC operators to put people on hold
automatically
Changing DSS buttons when you renumber the
system.
System Programming, Chapter 4
Allowing QCC operators to put a current call
on hold automatically when they press a Call button
System Programming, Chapter 3
Continued on next page
Learning More 7–19
System Guides Information Finder
Table 7–3, Continued
To Learn About Programming . . .
Check This Guide . . .
Operators (continued)
Allowing QCC operators to release a current call
automatically when they press another Call button
System Programming, Chapter 3
Allowing QCC operators to make voice-announced
calls
System Programming, Chapter 3
Feature Reference. See “Queued Call
Console.”
System Programming, Chapter 3
Feature Reference. See “Queued Call
Console.”
System Programming, Chapter 3
Feature Reference. See “Queued Call
Console.”
System Programming, Chapter 3
Feature Reference. See “Queued Call
Console.”
System Programming, Chapter 3
Feature Reference. See “Queued Call
Console.”
System Programming, Chapter 3
Changing the trunks assigned to ring at a QCC
Changing the types of calls assigned to ring at a QCC
Changing the priority that different types of calls
receive in the QCC queue
Allowing a call that has been waiting too long in the
QCC queue to get higher priority
Specifying whether QCCs are alerted when there are
too many calls waiting for their attention
Specifying when QCCs are alerted that there are too
many calls waiting for their attention
Specifying the backup calling group for QCCs
Specifying whether calls on hold return to QCC queue
after operator hold timer has expired twice
Specifying the number of times a call, directed by a
QCC, must ring at an unanswered extension before it
returns to the QCC queue or message center
Assigning a QCC to act as a message center for
directed, unanswered calls, group coverage calls, or
DID remote access calls to unassigned extensions
Allowing QCCs to finish call direction automatically
System Programming, Chapter 3
Feature Reference. See “Queued Call
Console.”
System Programming, Chapter 3
Feature Reference. See “Queued Call
Console.”
System Programming, Chapter 3
System Programming, Chapter 3
Feature Reference. See “Queued Call
Console.”
System Programming, Chapter 3
System Programming, Chapter 3
Lines and Trunks
Adding new lines or trunks to the system
Consult your AT&T representative and
System Programming, Chapter 4.
Changing the settings on lines and trunks
Consult your AT&T representative and
System Programming, Chapter 4.
Continued on next page
7–20 Learning More
Training
Table 7–3, Continued
To Learn About Programming . . .
Check This Guide . . .
Lines and Trunks (continued)
Changing the channels for T1 DS1 service
Changing settings for PRI or NI-1 BRI service
Changing the way malfunctioning trunks are taken out
of service
Setting up Remote Access trunks
Changing Automatic Route Selection (ARS) Facility
Restriction Levels for lines/trunks
Changing settings for DID or tie lines
Assigning trunks to pools
Consult your AT&T representative and
System Programming, Chapter 4.
Consult your AT&T representative and
network service provider.
Consult your AT&T representative and see
System Programming, Chapter 4.
Feature Reference. See “Automatic
Maintenance Busy.”
Feature Reference. See “Remote Access.”
System Programming, Chapter 4
System Programming, Chapter 4
Feature Reference. See “Automatic Route
Selection.”
Consult your AT&T representative.
System Programming, Chapter 4
Feature Reference. See “Pools.”
Training
When your system is set up and installed, your AT&T representative provides
training on how to use and manage the system.
In addition, training videotapes are available from AT&T. The videotapes are
designed to provide only an overview and are not intended to provide
comprehensive information. For detailed, comprehensive information, refer to
the system guides.
For more information about training, contact your AT&T representative.
Learning More 7–21
Training
7–22 Learning More
Troubleshooting the System
8
Contents
All Phones Are Dead (No Dial Tone or Lights)
8–2
Some Phones Are Dead (No Dial Tone or Lights)
8–3
Difficulty Making Outside Calls
8–4
Phone Does Not Ring
8–7
DLC Console Not Ringing for Incoming Calls
8–9
QCC Console Not Ringing for Incoming Calls
8–10
Single-Line Phones Ring Back after Completed Call
8–12
Cannot Transfer Call after
Answer on an Outside Line
8–13
Night Service Not Working
8–13
Calls Not Going to Voice Mail
8–15
Callers Getting Incorrect Response from Voice Mail
8–16
Calls Not Going to Coverage
8–17
Trouble Hearing Called Party
8–18
Programmed Button Fails
8–18
Reminder Messages Received with the Wrong Time
8–19
Recall/Switchhook Does Not Work
8–20
Calling Group Members Not Receiving Calls
8–21
Other or Unresolved Problems
8–22
Troubleshooting the System 8–i
Troubleshooting the System
8
This chapter provides procedures for solving the most common problems that
you may encounter with the system. You may be able to resolve a problem
quickly and easily by following the appropriate steps in this chapter.
NOTE:
See the Data/Video Reference for information about troubleshooting data and
video communications.
You will find it helpful to have the Feature Reference, System Programming, and
the system planning forms at hand to perform some of the procedures. If the
procedure involves using system programming or centralized telephone
programming to check a system or feature setting, the troubleshooting
procedures indicate where in System Programming you can find the
programming steps.
You should also have the System Information Sheet at the front of this guide.
!
WARNING:
If you must check something on the control unit, proceed with caution.
Avoid standing on a box or chair to reach the unit if it is installed out of
easy reach. If you do not have a stable ladder or other proper equipment,
do not proceed; wait for the AT&T technician.
Troubleshooting the System 8–1
All Phones Are Dead (No Dial Tone or Lights)
NOTES:
1. If power to the system is cut off, the system retains its programming for 4 to
5 days after it stops receiving power. Then all of the system’s programmed
settings may return to the factory settings.
2. Be sure to change the system time appropriately when Daylight Savings
Time starts and when it ends. System time affects the functioning of several
system features, including Automatic Backup, Night Service, Station
Message Detail Recording (SMDR) reports, standalone auto attendant
systems, voice mail, and Reminder Service.
3. For information about removing the control unit housing, see Appendix E.
All Phones Are Dead
(No Dial Tone or Lights)
Possible Cause 1: The control unit is not receiving power.
!
WARNING:
To check the power cord on the control unit as instructed in the following
procedure, avoid standing on a box or chair to reach the unit if it is out of
easy reach. If you do not have a stable ladder or other proper equipment,
do not proceed; wait for the AT&T technician.
What to do: Make sure the control unit’s power cord is plugged securely into the
wall outlet. Also, if convenient and safe to do so, make sure the other end of the
power cord is securely connected to the power supply in the control unit.
■
If all phones now have dial tone and lights, you have solved the problem.
■
If all phones are still dead, go to Possible Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: The power outlet to which the control unit is plugged in is
faulty.
What to do: Test the outlet by plugging in an appliance that you know is
working, for example, a lamp or radio.
■
If the appliance does not work, the outlet is faulty. If possible, plug the
control unit into a different outlet. Check the circuit breaker or call an
electrician.
■
If the appliance works, the wiring may be faulty elsewhere in the system.
Call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
8–2 Troubleshooting the System
Some Phones Are Dead (No Dial Tone or Lights)
Some Phones Are Dead
(No Dial Tone or Lights)
Possible Cause 1: The telephones are not receiving power.
What to do: Check that each telephone is plugged into a telephone wall jack
known to be working.
■
If the phones now have dial tone and lights, there may be a problem with
the system wiring or the control unit associated with the faulty phone(s).
Call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
■
If the phones are still dead, go to Possible Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: For single-line telephones, the Idle Line Selection may be
set incorrectly. (If not a single-line telephone, skip to Possible Cause 4.)
What to do: Use centralized telephone programming to ensure that the
Ringing/Idle Line Preference is set to On (see Chapter 5 in System
Programming). Check to see whether the phone now has dial tone.
■
If the phone receives dial tone, you have solved the problem.
■
If the phone is still dead, go to Possible Cause 3.
Possible Cause 3: For single-line telephones, the Auto Line Selection may be
set incorrectly; see Chapter 5 in System Programming. (If not a single-line
telephone, skip to Possible Cause 4.)
What to do: Use centralized telephone programming to set the Auto Line
Selection for the extension. Check to see whether the phone now has dial tone.
■
If the phone receives dial tone, you have solved the problem.
■
If the phone is still dead, go to Possible Cause 4.
Possible Cause 4: The telephones may be defective.
What to do: Test each telephone by replacing the dead telephone with a similar
telephone that you know is working properly.
■
If the replacement telephone receives dial tone and its lights function,
then replace it with the original telephone and check again. If the original
telephone still does not receive dial tone and its lights don’t function, then
the original telephone may be defective. Call the AT&T Helpline at
1 800 628-2888.
■
If the replacement telephone does not receive dial tone and its lights
don’t function, there may be a problem with the system wiring or the
control unit. To test one possible wiring problem, go to Possible Cause 5.
Troubleshooting the System 8–3
Difficulty Making Outside Calls
NOTE:
The following procedure may help AT&T Helpline technicians analyze your
problem. However, you should not perform this procedure unless you have
experience removing the control unit cover and working with control unit
extension jacks. Before proceeding, consult system planning Form 2a, System
Numbering: Extension Jacks.
!
WARNING:
If you must check something on the control unit, proceed with caution.
Avoid standing on a box or chair to reach the unit if it is installed out of
easy reach. If you do not have a stable ladder or other proper equipment,
do not proceed; wait for the AT&T technician.
Possible Cause 5: A module or modules may be defective.
What to do: Identify the control unit module or modules where the telephones
are connected.
■
If the telephones are all connected to one module, there may be a
problem with the module. Call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
■
If the dead telephones are connected to modules that also connect
working telephones, test the jacks on the modules. Identify the port
where each non-functional telephone is connected. Identify a second
port in the same module connected to a working telephone and unplug
the jack from the module. Plug the jack for the dead telephone into the
extension jack that is now open. If the telephone works, call the AT&T
Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
■
If the telephones do not work when plugged into module jacks that are
known to be functioning, call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
Difficulty Making Outside Calls
!
SECURITY ALERT:
When changing calling restrictions and other security settings, take care
not to compromise the security of your system. For more information,
consult “Security of Your System: Preventing Toll Fraud,” in Appendix A,
“Customer Support Information.”
Possible Cause 1: This extension is restricted from making outside calls.
What to do: Use system programming to check the extension’s calling
restrictions, if any (see Chapter 3 in System Programming). If the extension is
toll- or outward-restricted, change it to unrestricted, if appropriate. Try again to
make an outside call from the extension.
8–4 Troubleshooting the System
Difficulty Making Outside Calls
■
If outside calls can now be made from the extension, you have solved the
problem.
■
If there is still difficulty making outside calls, go to Possible Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: If the system uses pool dial-out codes, the extension may
be restricted from dialing the pool dial-out code.
What to do: Use system programming to find out whether the pool dial-out code
has been assigned for the extension (see Chapter 3 in System Programming).
■
If the pool dial-out code is missing, assign it if appropriate and try again
to make an outside call. If you can, you have solved the problem. If you
can’t, go to Possible Cause 3.
■
If the pool dial-out code is not missing, go to Possible Cause 3.
Possible Cause 3: If the system is set up for Automatic Route Selection (ARS),
the extension’s Facility Restriction Level (FRL) may be set too low (see Chapter
4 in System Programming). The extension’s FRL must be greater than or equal
to the route’s FRL. (For more information, )
What to do: Use system programming to check the extension’s FRL.
■
!
If the FRL is set to less than 6, increase the FRL to 6 and try again to
make an outside call. If the telephone can now make outside calls, adjust
the FRL as needed. You have solved the problem.
SECURITY ALERT:
Changing the extension’s Facility Restriction Level may compromise the
security of your system. If you leave the FRL at 6, ensure that that the
person at the extension is authorized to make toll calls. For more
information, consult the section entitled “Automatic Route Selection” in the
Feature Reference and “Security of Your System: Preventing Toll Fraud,”
in Appendix A, “Customer Support Information.”
■
If, after setting the FRL to 6, the problem still exists, change the FRL back
to the original setting and go to Possible Cause 4.
Possible Cause 4: A Disallowed List is assigned to the extension.
What to do: Use system programming to check whether a Disallowed List is
assigned to the extension (see Chapter 3 in System Programming).
■
If a Disallowed List is assigned to the extension, remove it if appropriate.
Try again to make an outside call. If you can, you have solved the
problem. If you can’t, go to Possible Cause 5.
■
If a Disallowed List is not assigned to the extension, go to Possible Cause
5.
Troubleshooting the System 8–5
Difficulty Making Outside Calls
Possible Cause 5: Night Service with Outward Restriction is activated.
What to do: Check to see whether Night Service with Outward Restriction is
activated by checking the light next to the Night Service button on the
operator’s console.
■
If the light is on, then Night Service is activated and there are restrictions
on outside calls. Use the Night Service password, if known, or use
system programming to put the extension on the Night Service Exclusion
List, if appropriate. Finally, try again to make an outside call. If you can,
you have solved the problem. If you can’t, go to Possible Cause 6.
NOTE:
Extensions on the Night Service Exclusion List have unrestricted calling
privileges and are not protected from unauthorized after-hours use.
■
If the light is off and Night Service is not activated, go to Possible
Cause 6.
Possible Cause 6: Forced Account Code Entry is assigned to the extension.
What to do: Use system programming to see whether Forced Account Code
Entry is required for that extension (see Chapter 3 in System Programming).
■
If it is, remove the extension from the list of extensions required to use
account codes if appropriate. Try again to make an outside call. If you
can, you have solved the problem. If you can’t, go to Possible Cause 7.
■
If the extension is not on the list, go to Possible Cause 7.
Possible Cause 7: In Hotel mode, the extension may be restricted from making
calls.
What to do: Check the Extension Status of the extension by observing its lights
on the operator’s DLC. To do this, change the console from a normal operator
position to a calling supervisor’s console by pressing the Feature button and
dialing 32, and then touching the Hold button. Check either the red light next to
the extension’s DSS button or the green light next to the Auto Dial button
programmed for the extension.
■
If the light is flashing or on, then the extension is restricted from making
outside calls. To change the Extension Status to 0 and remove
restrictions, press the Feature button and dial 760 followed by the DSS
button for the extension.
Change the console back to normal operator status by pressing the
Feature button and dialing 32, then touching the Drop button. Try again
to make an outside call. If you can, you have solved the problem. If you
can’t, go to Possible Cause 8.
8–6 Troubleshooting the System
Phone Does Not Ring
■
If the light is off, change the console back to the normal operator position
by pressing the Feature button and dialing 32, then touching the Drop
button. Go to Possible Cause 8.
Possible Cause 8: The telephone may be defective.
What to do: Test the telephone by replacing it with a similar telephone that you
know is working properly.
■
If the replacement telephone can make outside calls, then replace it with
the original telephone and check again. If the original telephone still
cannot make outside calls, then the original telephone may be defective.
Call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
■
If the replacement telephone cannot make outside calls, there may be a
problem with the system wiring or the control unit. Call the AT&T Helpline
at 1 800 628-2888.
Phone Does Not Ring
Possible Cause 1: The phone’s ringer volume control is set too low.
What to do: Adjust the volume control up while the phone is idle and the
handset is in the cradle. From another extension, dial the extension where the
problem is.
■
If you can now hear the phone ring, you have solved the problem.
■
If the phone still does not ring, go to Possible Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: The Do Not Disturb feature is turned on.
What to do: Check the green light next to the programmed Do Not Disturb
button to see if Do Not Disturb is turned on.
■
If the green light is on, then Do Not Disturb is turned on. Press the button
to deactivate the feature and to turn the light off. From another extension,
dial the extension where the problem is. If the phone now rings, you have
solved the problem. If not, go to Possible Cause 3.
■
If the green light is not on, then Do Not Disturb is not turned on; go to
Possible Cause 3.
Possible Cause 3: The Forward feature is turned on.
Troubleshooting the System 8–7
Phone Does Not Ring
What to do: Turn off the Forward feature. Use one of the following methods,
depending on the type of phone:
■
At an MLX or analog multiline telephone with a programmed Forward
button, deactivate the feature and turn the light off by pressing the button
(if the green light is on, indicating that the feature is active). From another
extension, dial the extension where the problem is. If the phone now
rings, you have solved the problem. If the phone still does not ring, go to
Possible Cause 4.
■
At an MLX telephone without a programmed Forward button, deactivate
Forward by pressing the Feature button and dialing 33 plus the
extension number of the phone that is not receiving calls. From another
extension, dial the extension where the problem is. If the phone now
rings, you have solved the problem. If the phone still does not ring, go to
Possible Cause 4.
■
At an analog multiline telephone, deactivate Forward by pressing the
programmed Feature button and dialing 33 plus the extension number of
the phone that is not receiving calls. From another extension, dial the
extension where the problem is. If the phone now rings, you have solved
the problem. If the phone still does not ring, go to Possible Cause 4.
■
At a single-line telephone, deactivate Forward by dialing #33 plus the
extension number of the single-line telephone. From another extension,
dial the extension where the problem is. If the phone now rings, you have
solved the problem. If the phone still does not ring, go to Possible
Cause 4.
Possible Cause 4: The Ringing Options Ring Timing feature for the extension is
programmed for No Ring or Delayed Ring.
What to do: Use centralized telephone programming or extension programming
to check the Ringing Options setting for the extension (see Chapter 5 of System
Programming).
NOTE:
You can check the Ringing Options setting at an MLX display telephone by first
pressing the Inspct button and then a line button. Ringing can be set for each
line or for all lines. To change a setting, use extension programming. At an
analog multiline or single-line telephone, check the Ringing Options settings for
each line by using centralized telephone programming.
■
If the Ringing Options setting is No Ring or Delay Ring, change the
setting to Immediate if appropriate. From another extension, dial the
extension where the problem is. If the phone now rings, you have solved
the problem. If not, go to Possible Cause 5.
■
If the Ringing Options setting is Immediate, go to Possible Cause 5.
8–8 Troubleshooting the System
DLC Console Not Ringing for Incoming Calls
Possible Cause 5: The telephone may be defective.
What to do: Test the telephone by replacing it with a similar telephone that you
know is working properly.
■
If the replacement telephone rings, then replace it with the original
telephone and check again. If the original telephone still does not ring,
then the original telephone may be defective. Call the AT&T Helpline at
1 800 628-2888.
■
If the replacement telephone does not ring, there may be a problem with
the system wiring or the control unit. To test one wiring possibility, go to
Possible Cause 6.
NOTE:
The following procedure may help AT&T Helpline technicians analyze your
problem. However, you should not perform this procedure unless you have
experience removing the control unit cover and working with control unit
extension jacks. Before proceeding, consult system planning Form 2a, System
Numbering: Extension Jacks.
!
WARNING:
If you must check something on the control unit, proceed with caution.
Avoid standing on a box or chair to reach the unit if it is installed out of
easy reach. If you do not have a stable ladder or other proper equipment,
do not proceed; wait for the AT&T technician.
Possible Cause 6: The wiring is faulty somewhere in the system.
What to do: Test the control unit module and jack where the telephone is
plugged in.
■
Identify the port where the non-functional telephone is connected.
Identify a second port in the same module connected to a functional
telephone and unplug the jack from the module. Plug the jack for the
non-working phone into the extension jack that is now open. If the
telephone works, call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
■
If the telephone still does not work, call the AT&T Helpline at
1 800 628-2888.
DLC Console Not
Ringing for Incoming Calls
Possible Cause 1: The Do Not Disturb feature is turned on.
What to do: Check the green light next to the programmed Do Not Disturb
button to see whether Do Not Disturb is turned on.
Troubleshooting the System 8–9
QCC Console Not Ringing for Incoming Calls
■
If the green light is on, then Do Not Disturb is turned on. Press the button
to deactivate the feature and to turn the light off. Finally, check whether
incoming calls ring at the console. If they do, you have solved the
problem. If not, go to Possible Cause 2.
■
If the green light is not on, then Do Not Disturb is not turned on; go to
Possible Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: The Ringing Options Ring Timing feature for the extension is
programmed for No Ring or Delayed Ring.
What to do: Use centralized telephone programming to check the Ringing
Options setting for the extension and each line (see Chapter 5 in System
Programming).
■
If the Ringing Options setting for one or more lines is No Ring or Delay
Ring, change the setting to Immediate, if appropriate. Finally, check to
see whether incoming calls ring at the console. If they do, you have
solved the problem. If not, go to Possible Cause 3.
■
If the Ringing Options setting is Immediate, go to Possible Cause 3.
Possible Cause 3: The telephone may be defective.
What to do: Test the telephone by replacing it with a similar telephone that you
know is working properly.
■
If the replacement telephone rings for incoming calls, then replace it with
the original telephone and check again. If the original telephone still does
not ring for incoming calls, then the original telephone may be defective.
Call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
■
If the replacement telephone does not ring for incoming calls, there may
be a problem with the system wiring or the control unit. Call the AT&T
Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
QCC Console Not Ringing
for Incoming Calls
Possible Cause 1: The lines are not assigned to the QCC queue.
What to do: Use system programming to assign the lines to the QCC queue (see
“QCC Operator to Receive Calls” in the “Lines and Trunks” section of Chapter 4,
System Programming). Finally, check to see whether incoming calls ring at the
console.
■
If the console rings for incoming calls, you have solved the problem. If
not, go to Possible Cause 2.
■
If the console is still not ringing, go to Possible Cause 2.
8–10 Troubleshooting the System
QCC Console Not Ringing for Incoming Calls
Possible Cause 2: The Position Busy feature is turned on.
What to do: Check the green light next to the Position Busy button.
■
If the green light is on, then Position Busy is turned on. Press the button
to deactivate the feature and to turn the light off. Finally, check to see
whether incoming calls ring at the console. If they do, you have solved
the problem. If not, go to Possible Cause 3.
■
If the green light is off, then Position Busy is not turned on; go to Possible
Cause 3.
Possible Cause 3: The Calls-In-Queue Alert option is disabled (this is the
factory setting). The number of calls in the queue have exceeded the
programmed threshold, and calls are being directed to a backup.
What to do: Use system programming to check and see whether the QCC’s
optional Calls-In-Queue Alert is disabled (see Chapter 3 in System
Programming).
■
If the Calls-In-Queue Alert option is set to Disable, change it to Enable, if
appropriate. Finally, check to see whether incoming calls ring at the
console. If they do, you have solved the problem. If not, go to Possible
Cause 4.
■
If the Calls-In-Queue Alert option is set to Enable, go to Possible
Cause 4.
Possible Cause 4: Night Service may be on, and calls may be ringing at
extensions assigned to the Night Service group rather than at the QCC.
What to do: Check the green light next to the Night Service button. If there is
more than one QCC, all must have Night Service activated in order for calls to
ring at Night Service group extensions
■
If the green light is on at all QCCs in the system, then Night Service is
turned on. Press the button to deactivate the feature and to turn the light
off. Finally, check to see whether incoming calls ring at the console. If
they do, you have solved the problem. If not, go to Possible Cause 5.
■
If the green light is off, then Night Service is not turned on; go to Possible
Cause 5.
Possible Cause 5: The telephone may be defective.
What to do: Test the telephone by replacing it with another MLX-20L telephone
that you know is working properly.
Troubleshooting the System 8–11
Single-Line Phones Ring Back after Completed Call
NOTE:
If only one MLX-20L is available, plug that telephone into a jack that you know is
working and then retest. If the telephone rings for incoming calls, then the
original jack may be faulty; call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888. If the
telephone still does not ring, there may be a problem with the system wiring or
the control unit; call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
■
If the replacement telephone rings for incoming calls, then replace it with
the original telephone and check again. If the original telephone still does
not ring for incoming calls, then the original telephone may be defective.
Call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
■
If the replacement telephone does not ring for incoming calls, there may
be a problem with the system wiring or the control unit. Call the AT&T
Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
Single-Line Phones Ring Back after
Completed Call
Possible Cause 1: The switchhook is pressed and released too quickly after a
call is completed.
NOTE:
Some single-line telephones have a positive disconnect switch. If the switch is
set to positive disconnect, Possible Cause 1 does not apply. In this case, skip
to Possible Cause 2.
What to do: Instruct the user to always replace the handset carefully for at least
1 to 2 seconds between calls. If the problem is not resolved, go to Possible
Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: The telephone may be defective.
What to do: Test the telephone by replacing it with a similar telephone that you
know is working properly.
■
If the replacement telephone does not ring back, then replace it with the
original telephone and check again. If the original telephone still rings
back, then the original telephone may be defective. Call the AT&T
Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
■
If the replacement telephone rings back, there may be a problem with the
system wiring or the control unit. Call the AT&T Helpline at
1 800 628-2888.
8–12 Troubleshooting the System
Cannot Transfer Call after Answer on an Outside Line
Cannot Transfer Call after
Answer on an Outside Line
Possible Cause 1: There may be custom calling features (for example, call
waiting or 3-way calling) from the local telephone company that are interfering
with system timer settings.
What to do: To check whether you have custom calling features, contact your
local telephone company representative.
■
If you have custom calling features, Transfer usually works. When it does
not, warn the caller that a loud tone will sound; then dial # while on the
call and try to transfer the call again. If you can transfer the call, you have
solved the problem. If you can’t, go to Possible Cause 2. If you don’t use
the custom calling features, have the central office (CO) remove them.
■
If you have no custom calling features, go to Possible Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: The telephone may be defective.
What to do: Test the telephone by replacing it with a similar telephone that you
know is working properly.
■
If the replacement telephone can transfer a call, then replace it with the
original telephone and check again. If the original telephone still cannot
transfer a call, then the original telephone may be defective. Call the
AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
■
If the replacement telephone cannot transfer a call, there may be a
problem with the system wiring or the control unit. Call the AT&T Helpline
at 1 800 628-2888.
Night Service Not Working
NOTE:
Be sure to change the system time appropriately when Daylight Savings Time
starts and when it ends. System time affects the functioning of several system
features, including Automatic Backup, Night Service, Station Message Detail
Recording (SMDR) reports, standalone auto attendant systems, voice mail, and
Reminder Service.
Possible Cause 1: The system time and/or day may be set incorrectly.
What to do: Use system programming to check the setting of the system time
and date (see Chapter 3 in System Programming) or check the time at an MLX
display telephone.
Troubleshooting the System 8–13
Night Service Not Working
■
If the settings are incorrect, correct them and activate Night Service
again. If it is now working, you have solved the problem. If not, go to
Possible Cause 2.
■
If the settings are correct, go to Possible Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: If the system has Night Service with Time Set, the start and
stop time or day of week may be set incorrectly (see Chapter 3 in System
Programming).
What to do: Use system programming to check the settings for the Night
Service with Time Set daily start and stop times.
■
If the settings are incorrect, correct them and activate Night Service
again. If it is now working, you have solved the problem. If not, go to
Possible Cause 3.
■
If the settings are correct, go to Possible Cause 3.
Possible Cause 3: The Night Service button may be programmed incorrectly at
one or more DLCs.
What to do: Use centralized telephone programming to check that the button on
the DLC operator console is, in fact, programmed for Night Service (see
Chapter 5 in System Programming); or, at the DLC, press the Inspct button and
then the programmed Night Service button.
■
If the Night Service button is not programmed, program it and activate
Night Service again. If it is now working, you have solved the problem. If
not, go to Possible Cause 4.
■
If the Night Service button is programmed correctly, go to Possible
Cause 4.
Possible Cause 4: If the system has more than one operator console and the
night destination is a voice mail system, one of the consoles may not have Night
Service on.
What to do: Check that the green light next to the Night Service button at each
console is lit.
■
If Night Service now works, you have solved the problem.
■
If Night Service is still not working, call the AT&T Helpline at
1 800 628-2888.
8–14 Troubleshooting the System
Calls Not Going to Voice Mail
Calls Not Going to Voice Mail
NOTE:
For calls to go to voice mail, the extension must be part of a coverage group,
the coverage group must have a receiver, and the receiver must be the voice
mail calling group. A quick way to check this is to check the planning forms for
group coverage and group calling.
Possible Cause 1: The extension may not be a member of a coverage group.
What to do: Use system programming to check that the extension is a member
of a coverage group (see “Group Coverage Member Assignments” in the
“Optional Group Features” section of Chapter 3, System Programming).
■
If the extension is not assigned, assign it if appropriate. Check to see
whether calls are now going to voice mail. If they are, you have solved
the problem. If not, go to Possible Cause 2.
■
If the extension is already assigned, go to Possible Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: The coverage group may not have the voice mail calling
group as its receiver.
What to do: Use system programming to check that the coverage group has a
receiver and that the receiver is the voice mail calling group (see “Group Calling
Member Assignments” in the “Optional Group Features” section of Chapter 3,
System Programming).
■
If the voice mail calling group is not assigned as the receiver, assign it if
appropriate. Check to see whether calls are now going to voice mail. If
they are, you have solved the problem.
■
If the voice mail calling group is assigned as the receiver, go to Possible
Cause 3.
Possible Cause 3: The user’s telephone has Coverage Off or Coverage VMS
Off activated.
What to do: Check the light next to the programmed Coverage Off button or the
programmed Coverage VMS Off button.
■
If the light is on, then outside calls will not go to voice mail. Press the
button to deactivate the feature and to turn the light off. Check to see
whether calls are now going to voice mail. If they are, you have solved
the problem.
■
If the lights are off, go to Possible Cause 4.
Possible Cause 4: The voice mail system may not be working.
Troubleshooting the System 8–15
Callers Getting Incorrect Response from Voice Mail
What to do: If convenient, check that the power light on the voice mail system
unit is on. Also, try placing a call to other extensions to see whether the calls go
to voice mail.
■
If the voice mail system power light is off and/or it does not work for other
extensions, then the voice mail system is not working. Check its
documentation; or, if it is an AT&T voice mail system, call the AT&T
Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
■
If the power light is on and voice mail works for other extensions, call the
AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
Callers Getting Incorrect Response
from Voice Mail
Outside callers who reach the system may get the wrong response when the
voice mail system answers calls. They may hear an off-hours message during
business hours, for example.
NOTE:
Be sure to change the system time appropriately when Daylight Savings Time
starts and when it ends. System time affects the functioning of several system
features, including Automatic Backup, Night Service, Station Message Detail
Recording (SMDR) reports, standalone auto attendant systems, voice mail, and
Reminder Service.
Possible Cause 1: The system time may be set incorrectly.
What to do: Check the time at the system programming console or another MLX
display telephone. If the time is correct, go to Possible Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: If the system uses the Night Service feature and has more
than one operator console, one of the consoles may not have the Night Service
button activated.
What to do: Check that the green light next to the Night Service button at each
operator’s console is on.
■
If a green light is off, then Night Service is not activated; press the button
to activate Night Service. Make a call to see if you get the correct voice
mail greeting. If you do, you have solved the problem.
■
If each green light is on, then Night Service is activated for that operator’s
console. Go to Possible Cause 3.
Possible Cause 3: The time settings for the voice mail system don’t match the
system date and time.
8–16 Troubleshooting the System
Calls Not Going to Coverage
What to do: Follow the instructions in your voice mail system documentation to
check that the settings match the system. If the settings are correct or if it is an
AT&T voice mail system, call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
Calls Not Going to Coverage
Possible Cause 1: An Individual Coverage receiver may not be assigned.
What to do: At the extension that is to receive calls, program a Cover button for
the sender’s extension. If a Cover button is programmed, go to Possible
Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: The user’s telephone has Coverage Off or Coverage VMS
Off activated.
What to do: Check the light next to the programmed Coverage Off button or the
programmed Coverage VMS Off button.
■
If the light is on, then outside calls will not go to coverage. Press the
button to deactivate the feature and to turn the light off. Check to see
whether calls are now going to coverage. If they are, you have solved the
problem.
■
If the lights are off, go to Possible Cause 3.
Possible Cause 3: The extension may not be assigned to a coverage group.
What to do: Use system programming to check that the extension is a member
of a coverage group (see “Group Coverage Member Assignments” in the
“Optional Group Features” section of Chapter 3, System Programming).
■
If the extension is not assigned, assign it if appropriate. Check to see
whether calls are now going to coverage. If they are, you have solved the
problem. If not, go to Possible Cause 4.
■
If the extension is assigned, go to Possible Cause 4.
Possible Cause 4: The coverage group may not have a receiver assigned.
What to do: Use system programming to check that a receiver is assigned to
the coverage group (see Chapter 4 in System Programming).
NOTE:
Before calling the Helpline, you may wish to consult the documentation
for your voice messaging system.
■
If a receiver is not assigned, assign one if appropriate. Check to see
whether calls are now going to coverage. If they are, you have solved the
problem. If not, call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
Troubleshooting the System 8–17
Trouble Hearing Called Party
■
If the receiver is assigned correctly, call the AT&T Helpline at
1 800 -628-2888.
Trouble Hearing Called Party
Possible Cause 1: If a speakerphone is being used, there may be
environmental factors that affect the performance of the speaker or microphone
(for example, too much background noise).
What to do: Eliminate the background noise or other interference. If the problem
persists or if a speakerphone is not being used, go to Possible Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: The telephone handset may be defective.
What to do: Replace the handset with a handset from the same type of
telephone. If you can now hear the called party, contact your AT&T
representative to order a new handset. If you still have trouble hearing, go to
Possible Cause 3.
Possible Cause 3: The telephone may be defective.
What to do: Test the telephone by replacing it with a similar telephone that you
know is working properly.
■
If you can hear the called party on the replacement telephone, then
replace it with the original telephone and check again. If you still have
trouble hearing the called party on the original telephone, then the
original telephone may be defective. Call the AT&T Helpline at
1 800 628-2888.
■
If you cannot hear the called party on the replacement telephone, there
may be a problem with the system wiring or the control unit. Call the
AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
Programmed Button Fails
NOTE:
Extension programming is not stored in the telephone itself. Therefore, if you
move a telephone to a different extension, the programming for the previous
telephone at that extension remains in effect. The extension must be
reprogrammed as appropriate.
Possible Cause 1: The programmed button may be incorrectly programmed or
may not be programmed at all.
8–18 Troubleshooting the System
Reminder Messages Received with the Wrong Time
NOTE:
You can check the programming of a button at an MLX display telephone by
first pressing the Inspct button and then the line button.
What to do: Use centralized telephone programming to check the programming
for the phone’s buttons.
■
If the programming is incorrect, reprogram it. Try to use a programmed
button. If the button works, you have solved the problem. If not, go to
Possible Cause 2.
■
If the programming is correct, go to Possible Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: The telephone may be defective.
What to do: Test the telephone by replacing it with a similar telephone that you
know is working properly. Program the buttons as appropriate.
■
If the programmed button works properly on the replacement telephone,
then replace it with the original telephone and check again. If the
programmed button on the original telephone still fails, then the original
telephone may be defective. Call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
■
If the programmed button on the replacement telephone fails, there may
be a problem with the system wiring or the control unit. Call the AT&T
Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
Reminder Messages
Received with the Wrong Time
NOTE:
Be sure to change the system time appropriately when Daylight Savings Time
starts and when it ends. System time affects the functioning of several system
features, including Automatic Backup, Night Service, Station Message Detail
Recording (SMDR) reports, standalone auto attendant systems, voice mail, and
Reminder Service.
Possible Cause: The system time may be set incorrectly.
What to do: At the programming console or any MLX display telephone, check
the system time. If the time is correct, call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
Troubleshooting the System 8–19
Recall/Switchhook Does Not Work
Recall/Switchhook Does Not Work
When this problem occurs, pressing the Recall button or switchhook
disconnects the call or fails to return dial tone.
NOTE:
If the telephone is an MLX or analog multiline telephone, pressing the
switchhook disconnects the call. On these phones, you must use a
programmed (on MLX telephones) or fixed (on analog telephones) Recall
button to activate custom or Centrex calling features.
Possible Cause 1: The Recall timer may be set incorrectly.
NOTE:
Some single-line telephones have a positive disconnect switch. If the switch is
set to positive disconnect, this Possible Cause 1 does not apply. If this is the
case, skip to Possible Cause 2.
What to do: Use system programming to check the setting of the Recall timer
system feature (see Chapter 3 in System Programming).
■
If the setting is less than 650 milliseconds, change the setting to 650 ms
or to 1 second. Have someone place a call to the extension, answer it,
and press the Recall button or the switchhook. If you don’t disconnect
the caller or you do get dial tone, you have solved the problem. If you do
disconnect the caller or you don’t get dial tone, go to Possible Cause 2.
■
If the setting is for 650 ms or for 1 second, go to Possible Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: The line may not have custom calling features.
What to do: Check with the central office (CO).
■
If there are custom calling features, obtain instructions on the use of the
features and the Recall timing.
■
If there are no custom calling features, go to Possible Cause 3.
Possible Cause 3: The telephone may be defective.
What to do: Test the telephone by replacing it with a similar telephone that you
know is working properly. Program the buttons as appropriate.
■
If the problem is resolved on the replacement telephone, then replace it
with the original telephone and check again. If the problem still persists
on the original telephone, then the original telephone may be defective.
Call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
■
If the problem persists on the replacement telephone, there may be a
problem with the system wiring or the control unit. Call the AT&T Helpline
at 1 800 628-2888.
8–20 Troubleshooting the System
Calling Group Members Not Receiving Calls
Calling Group Members
Not Receiving Calls
Possible Cause 1: The calling group member’s telephone is not available.
What to do: Log the member in by doing one of the following:
■
Using the operator’s or calling group supervisor’s DLC, enter supervisory
mode by pressing the Feature button, dialing 32, and pressing the Hold
button. Check the light next to the Auto Dial or DSS button for the
member’s extension. It is off or is flashing when the member is
unavailable to take calls. Log the member in by pressing a programmed
Available button or by pressing the Feature button and dialing 44 before
pressing the Auto Dial or DSS button for the extension. Finally, check to
see whether calls to the calling group are received. If they are, you have
solved the problem. If they are not, go to Possible Cause 2.
■
At the member’s telephone, do one of the following:
If the member’s telephone has a programmed Available button and
the light next to it is off, the member is logged out. Log the member in
by pressing the button. Check to see whether calls to the calling
group are now received. If they are, you have solved the problem. If
they are not, go to Possible Cause 2.
If the member’s phone does not have a programmed button
(including single-line telephones), log the member in by dialing #44
while off-hook on an SA or ICOM line. Check to see whether calls to
the calling group are now received. If they are, you have solved the
problem. If they are not, go to Possible Cause 2.
Possible Cause 2: The lines/trunks may not be assigned to the calling group.
What to do: Assign incoming lines to the calling group extension number (see
Chapter 3, System Programming). If calls on these lines still do not reach the
calling group members, go to Possible Cause 3.
Possible Cause 3: The telephone may be defective.
What to do: Test the telephone by replacing it with a similar telephone that you
know is working properly. Program the buttons as appropriate.
■
If calling group calls are received on the replacement telephone, then
replace it with the original telephone and check again. If the problem still
persists on the original telephone, then the original telephone may be
defective. Call the AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
■
If calling group calls are not received on the replacement telephone,
there may be a problem with the system wiring or the control unit. Call the
AT&T Helpline at 1 800 628-2888.
Troubleshooting the System 8–21
Other or Unresolved Problems
Other or Unresolved Problems
If you have a problem not listed in this chapter or if, after you complete the
appropriate troubleshooting procedure, the problem persists, call the AT&T
Helpline at 1 800 628-2888 for further assistance.
When you call the Helpline, use a copy of the System Information Sheet at the
front of this guide to note a few details about your system, along with
troubleshooting information.
8–22 Troubleshooting the System
Customer Support Information
A
Support Telephone Number
In the U.S.A. only, AT&T provides a toll-tree customer Helpline
(1 800 628-2888) 24 hours a day. If you need assistance when installing,
programming, or using your system, call the Helpline, or your AT&T
representative. Consultation charges may apply.
Outside the U.S.A., if you need assistance when installing, programming, or
using your system, contact your AT&T representative.
Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) Electromagnetic
Interference Information
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class
A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are
designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when
the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment
generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed
and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a
residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case the user
will be required to correct the interference at his or her own expense.
System Manager's Guide A–1
Customer Support Information
Canadian Department of
Communications (DOC)
Interference Information
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for radio noise
emissions set out in the radio interference regulations of the Canadian
Department of Communications.
Le Présent Appareil Numérique n’émet pas de bruits radioelectriques
depassant les limites applicables aux appareils numériques de la class A
préscrites dans le reglement sur le brouillage radioelectrique edicté par le
ministère des Communications du Canada.
FCC Notification
and Repair Information
This equipment is registered with the FCC in accordance with Part 68 of its
rules. In compliance with those rules, you are advised of the following:
■
Means of Connection. Connection of this equipment to the telephone
network shall be through a standard network interface jack, USOC
RJ11C, RJ14C, RJ21X. Connection to E&M tie trunks requires a USOC
RJ2GX. Connection to off-premises extensions requires a USOC RJ11C
or RJ14C. Connection to 1.544-Mbps digital facilities must be through a
USOC RJ48C or RJ48X. Connection to DID requires a USOC RJ11C,
RJ14C, or RJ21X. These USOCs must be ordered from your telephone
company. Connection to 56-Kbps or 64-Kbps facilities requires a USOC
RJ11C, RJ14C, or RJ21.
■
Party Lines and Coin Telephones. This equipment may not be used
with party lines or coin telephone lines.
■
Notification to the Telephone Companies. Before connecting this
equipment, you or your equipment supplier must notify your local
telephone company’s business office of the following:
— The telephone number(s) you will be using with this equipment.
— The appropriate registration number and ringer equivalence number
(REN), which can be found on the back or bottom of the control unit,
as follows:
¨ If this equipment is to be used as a Key system, report the number
AS593M-72914-KF-E.
¨ If the system provides both manual and automatic selection of
incoming/outgoing access to the network, report the number
AS593M-72682-MF-E.
A–2 System Manager's Guide
Customer Support Information
¨ If there are no directly terminated trunks, or if the only directly
terminated facilities are personal lines, report the number
AS5USA-65646-PF-E.
¨ The REN (Ringer Equivalence Number) for all three systems is
1.5A.
The facility interface code (FIC) and service order code (SOC):
¨ For tie line connection, the FIC is TL31M and the SOC is 9.0F.
¨ For connection to off-premises stations, the FIC is OL13C and the
SOC is 9.0F.
¨ For equipment to be connected to DID facilities, the FIC is
02RV2-T and the SOC is AS.2.
¨ For equipment to be connected to 1.544-Mbps digital service, the
SOC is 6.0P and the FIC is:
04DU9-BN for D4 framing format with AMI zero code
suppression.
04DU9-DN for D4 framing format with bipolar 8 zero code
suppression (B8ZS).
04DU9-IKN for extended superframe format (ESF) with
AMI zero code suppression.
04DU9-ISN with ESF and B8ZS.
¨ For equipment to be connected to 56-Kbps or 64-Kbps digital
facilities, the FIC is 02B1Q.
— The quantities and USOC numbers of the jacks required.
— For each jack, the sequence in which lines are to be connected, the
line types, the FIC, and the REN by position when applicable.
■
Ringer Equivalence Number (REN). The REN is used to determine the
number of devices that may be connected to the telephone line.
Excessive RENs on the line may result in the devices not ringing in
response to an incoming call. In most, but not all, areas the sum of the
RENs should not exceed five (5.0). To be certain of the number of
devices that may be connected to the line, as determined by the total
RENs, contact the local telephone company to determine the maximum
REN for the calling area.
■
Disconnection. You must also notify your local telephone company if
and when this equipment is permanently disconnected from the line(s).
System Manager's Guide A–3
Customer Support Information
Installation
and Operational Procedures
The manuals for your system contain information about installation and
operational procedures.
■
Repair Instructions. If you experience trouble because your equipment
is malfunctioning, the FCC requires that the equipment not be used and
that it be disconnected from the network until the problem has been
corrected. Repairs to this equipment can be made only by the
manufacturers, their authorized agents, or others who may be authorized
by the FCC. In the event repairs are needed on this equipment, contact
your authorized AT&T dealer or, in the U.S.A. only, contact the National
Service Assistance Center (NSAC) at 1 800 628-2888.
■
Rights of the Local Telephone Company. If this equipment causes
harm to the telephone network, the local telephone company may
discontinue your service temporarily. If possible, they will notify you in
advance. But if advance notice is not practical, you will be notified as
soon as possible. You will also be informed of your right to file a
complaint with the FCC.
■
Changes at Local Telephone Company. Your local telephone company
may make changes in its facilities, equipment, operations, or procedures
that affect the proper functioning of this equipment. If they do, you will be
notified in advance to give you an opportunity to maintain uninterrupted
telephone service.
■
Hearing Aid Compatibility. The custom telephone sets for this system
are compatible with inductively coupled hearing aids as prescribed by
the FCC.
■
Automatic Dialers. WHEN PROGRAMMING EMERGENCY NUMBERS
AND/OR MAKING TEST CALLS TO EMERGENCY NUMBERS:
— Remain on the line and briefly explain to the dispatcher the reason for
the call.
— Perform such activities in off-peak hours, such as early morning or
late evening.
■
Direct Inward Dialing (DID). This equipment returns answer supervision
signals to the Public Switched Telephone Network when:
— Answered by the called station
— Answered by the attendant
— Routed to a recorded announcement that can be administered by the
customer premises equipment user
— Routed to a dial prompt
A–4 System Manager's Guide
Customer Support Information
This equipment returns answer supervision on all DID calls forwarded
back to the Public Switched Telephone Network. Permissible exceptions
are when:
— A call is unanswered
— A busy tone is received
— A reorder tone is received
Allowing this equipment to be operated in such a manner as not to
provide proper answer supervision signaling is in violation of Part 68
rules.
New Network Area and Exchange Codes. The MERLIN LEGEND software
does not restrict access to any new area codes or exchange codes established
by a local telephone company. If the user has established toll restrictions on the
system that could restrict access, then the user should check the lists of
allowed and disallowed dial codes and modify them as needed.
Equal Access Codes. This equipment is capable of providing users access to
interstate providers of operator services through the use of access codes.
Modifications of this equipment by call aggregators to block access dialing
codes is a violation of the Telephone Operator Consumers Act of 1990.
DOC Notification
and Repair Information
NOTICE: The Canadian Department of Communications (DOC) label identifies
certified equipment. This certification means that the equipment meets certain
telecommunications network protective, operational, and safety requirements.
The DOC does not guarantee the equipment will operate to the user’s
satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to
connect it to the facilities of the local telecommunications company. The
equipment must also be installed using an acceptable method of connection. In
some cases, the company’s inside wiring for single-line individual service may
be extended by means of a certified connector assembly (telephone extension
cord). The customer should be aware that compliance with the above
conditions may not prevent degradation of service in some situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be made by an authorized Canadian
maintenance facility designated by the supplier. Any repairs or alterations made
by the user to this equipment, or any equipment malfunctions, may give the
telecommunications company cause to request the user to disconnect the
equipment.
System Manager's Guide A–5
Customer Support Information
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground
connections of the power utility, telephone lines, and internal metallic water pipe
system, if present, are connected. This precaution may be particularly important
in rural areas.
! CAUTION:
Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves, but
should contact the appropriate electrical inspection authority or
electrician, as appropriate.
To prevent overloading, the Load Number (LN) assigned to each terminal
device denotes the percentage of the total load to be connected to a telephone
loop used by the device. The termination on a loop may consist of any
combination of devices subject only to the requirement that the total of the Load
Numbers of all the devices does not exceed 100.
DOC Certification No.: 230 4095A
CSA Certification No.: LR 56260
Load No.: 6
Renseignements sur la notification du
ministère des Communications du
Canada et la réparation
AVIS: L’étiquette du ministère des Communications du Canada identifie le
matériel homologué. Cette étiquette certifie que le matériel est conforme à
certaines normes de protection, d’exploitation et de sécurité des réseaux de
télécommunications. Le Ministère n’assure toutefois pas que le matériel
fonctionnera à la satisfaction de l’utilisateur.
Avant d’installer ce matériel, l’utilisateur doit s’assurer qu’il est permis de le
raccorder aux installations de l’entreprise locale de télécommunication. Le
matériel doit également être installé en suivant une méthode acceptée de
raccordement. Dans certains cas, les fils intérieurs de l’enterprise utilisés pour
un service individuel à ligne unique peuvent être prolongés au moyen d’un
dispositif homologué de raccordement (cordon prolongateur téléphonique
interne). L’abonné ne doit pas oublier qu’il est possible que la conformité aux
conditions énoncées ci-dessus n’empêchent pas la dégradation du service
dans certaines situations. Actuellement, les entreprises de télécommunication
ne permettent pas que l’on raccorde leur matériel à des jacks d’abonné, sauf
dans les cas précis prévus pas les tarifs particuliers de ces entreprises.
A–6 System Manager's Guide
Customer Support Information
Les réparations de matériel homologué doivent être effectuées par un centre
d’entretien canadien autorisé désigné par le fournisseur. La compagnie de
télécommunications peut demander à l’utilisateur de débrancher un appareil à
la suite de réparations ou de modifications effectuées par l’utilisateur ou à
cause de mauvais fonctionnement.
Pour sa propre protection, l’utilisateur doit s’assurer que tous les fils de mise à
la terre de la source d’énergie électrique, des lignes téléphoniques et des
canalisations d’eau métalliques, s’il y en a, sont raccordés ensemble. Cette
précaution est particuliérement importante dans les régions rurales.
AVERTISSEMENT: L’utilisateur ne doit pas tenter de faire ces raccordements
lui-même; il doit avoir recours à un service d’inspection des installations
électriques, ou à un electricien, selon le cas.
L’indice de charge (IC) assigné à chaque dispositif terminal indique, pour éviter
toute surcharge, le pourcentage de la charge totale qui peut être raccordée à
un circuit téléphonique bouclé utilisé par ce dispositif. La terminaison du circuit
bouclé peut être constituée de n’importe quelle combinaison de dispositifs,
pourvu que la somme des indices de charge de l’ensemble des dispositits ne
dépasse pas 100.
No d’homologation: 230 4095A
No de certification: CSA LR 56260
L’indice de charge: 6
System Manager's Guide A–7
A–8 System Manager's Guide
TELEPHONE
EQUIPMENT
Le présent appareil numérique
radioélectriques dépassant les limites
numériques de la classe A prescrites
brouillage radioélectrique édicté
Communications du Canada.
n’émet pas de bruits
applicables aux appareils
dans le Règlement sur le
par le ministère des
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for radio
noise emissions set out in the radio interference reguations of the
Canadian Department of Communications.
®
AVERTISSEMENT:
Si l’equipment est
utilisé pour des applications extérieures,
l’installation d’un protector secondair est
requise. Voir le manuel d’Installation.
WARNING:
If equipment is used for
out–of–building applications, approved
secondary protectors are required. See
Installation Manual.
LR 56260
DR ID
CANADA
Complies with Part 68, FCC Rules. See the System Reference
Manual for proper FCC Classification.
FCC Reg. Nos. MF: AS593M-72682-MF-E
KF: AS593M-72914-KF-E
PF: AS5USA-65646-PF-E
REN: 1.5A
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is
subject to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not
cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any
interference received, including interference that may cause
undesired operation.
MERLIN LEGEND D.O.C.
Location Label Placement
Use only AT&T manufactured MERLIN LEGEND circuit modules,
carrier assemblies, and power units, as specified in the Installation
Manual, in this product. There are no user serviceable parts inside.
Contact your authorized agent for service and repair.
MADE IN U.S.A.
®
UL
LISTED
538E
Model 511A Control Unit
MERLIN LEGEND
Customer Support Information
Ministère des Communications
du Canada emplacement de
l’étiquette
Customer Support Information
Security of Your System:
Preventing Toll Fraud
As a customer of a new telephone system, you should be aware that there is an
increasing problem of telephone toll fraud. Telephone toll fraud can occur in
many forms, despite the numerous efforts of telephone companies and
telephone equipment manufacturers to control it. Some individuals use
electronic devices to prevent or falsify records of these calls. Others charge
calls to someone else’s number by illegally using lost or stolen calling cards,
billing innocent parties, clipping on to someone else’s line, and breaking into
someone else’s telephone equipment physically or electronically. In certain
instances, unauthorized individuals make connections to the telephone network
through the use of the Remote Access features of your system.
The Remote Access features of your system, if you choose to use them, permit
off-premises callers to access the system from a remote telephone by using a
telephone number with or without a barrier code. The system returns an
acknowledgment signaling the user to key in his or her barrier code, which is
selected and administered by the system manager. After the barrier code is
accepted, the system returns dial tone to the user. In Release 3.1 and later
systems, barrier codes are by default restricted from making outside calls. In
prior releases, if you do not program specific outward calling restrictions, the
user will be able to place any call normally dialed from a telephone associated
with the system. Such an off-premises network call is originated at, and will be
billed from, the system location.
The Remote Access feature, as designed, helps the customer, through proper
administration, to minimize the ability of unauthorized persons to gain access to
the network. Most commonly, phone numbers and codes are compromised
when overheard in a public location, through theft of a wallet or purse
containing access information, or through carelessness (for example, writing
codes on a piece of paper and improperly discarding it). Additionally, hackers
may use a computer to dial an access code and then publish the information to
other hackers. Enormous charges can be run up quickly. It is the customer’s
responsibility to take the appropriate steps to properly implement the features,
evaluate and administer the various restriction levels, protect access codes,
and distribute access codes only to individuals who have been fully advised of
the sensitive nature of the access information.
Common carriers are required by law to collect their tariffed charges. While
these charges are fraudulent charges made by persons with criminal intent,
applicable tariffs state that the customer of record is responsible for payment of
all long-distance or other network charges. AT&T cannot be responsible for
such charges and will not make any allowance or give any credit for charges
that result from unauthorized access.
System Manager's Guide A–9
Customer Support Information
To minimize the risk of unauthorized access to your communications system:
■
Use a nonpublished Remote Access number.
■
Assign access codes randomly to users on a need-to-have basis,
keeping a log of all authorized users and assigning one code to one
person.
■
Use random-sequence access codes, which are less likely to be easily
broken.
■
Use the longest-length access codes the system will allow.
■
Deactivate all unassigned codes promptly.
■
Ensure that Remote Access users are aware of their responsibility to
keep the telephone number and any access codes secure.
■
When possible, restrict the off-network capability of off-premises callers,
using calling restrictions, Facility Restriction Levels (Hybrid/PBX mode
only), and Disallowed List capabilities. In Release 3.1 and later systems,
a prepared Disallowed List (number 7) is provided and is designed to
prevent the types of calls that toll-fraud abusers often make.
■
When possible, block out-of-hours calling.
■
Frequently monitor system call detail reports for quicker detection of any
unauthorized or abnormal calling patterns.
■
Limit Remote Call Forwarding to persons on a need-to-have basis.
■
Change access codes every 90 days.
■
Use the longest-length barrier codes possible, following the guidelines
for passwords. (See “Choosing Passwords.”)
Toll Fraud Prevention
Toll fraud is the unauthorized use of your telecommunications system by third
parties to make long distance telephone calls. Under the law, you, the
customer, are responsible for paying part or all of those unauthorized calls.
Thus, the following information is of critical importance.
Unauthorized persons concentrate their activities in two areas with the MERLIN
LEGEND Communications System:
n
n
They try to transfer out of the MERLIN LEGEND Communications System
to gain access to an outgoing trunk and make long distance calls.
They try to locate unused or unprotected mailboxes and use them as
drop-off points for their own messages.
The following is a discussion of how toll fraud is often perpetrated and ways to
prevent unauthorized access that can lead to toll fraud.
A–10 System Manager's Guide
Customer Support Information
Physical Security, Social Engineering, and
General Security Measures
Criminals called hackers may attempt to gain unauthorized access to your
communications system and voice messaging system in order to use the
system features. Hackers often attempt to trick employees into providing them
with access to a network facility (line/trunk) or a network operator. This is
referred to as social engineering. Hackers may pose as telephone company
employees and employees of AT&T or your authorized dealer. Hackers will go
through a company’s trash to find directories, dialing instructions, and other
information that will enable them to break into the system. The more
knowledgeable they appear to be about the employee names, departments,
telephone numbers, and the internal procedures of your company, the more
likely it is that they will be able to trick an employee into helping them.
Preventive Measures
Take the following preventive measures to limit the risk of unauthorized access
by hackers:
n
n
n
n
Provide good physical security for the room containing your
telecommunications equipment and the room with administrative tools,
records, and system manager information. These areas should be locked
when not attended.
Provide a secure trash disposal for all sensitive information, including
telephone directories, call accounting records, or anything that may
supply information about your communications system. This trash should
be shredded.
Educate employees that hackers may try to trick them into providing
them with dial tone or dialing a number for them. All reports of trouble,
requests for moving extensions, or any other administrative details
associated with the MERLIN LEGEND Communications System should be
handled by one person (the system manager) or within a specified
department. Anyone claiming to be a telephone company representative
should be referred to this person or department.
No one outside of AT&T needs to use the MERLIN LEGEND
Communications System to test facilities (lines/trunks). If a caller
identifies him or herself as an AT&T employee, the system manager
should ask for a telephone number where the caller can be reached. The
system manager should be able to recognize the number as an AT&T
telephone number. Before connecting the caller to the administrative port
of the MERLIN LEGEND Communications System, the system manager
should feel comfortable that a good reason to do so exists. In any event,
it is not advisable to give anyone access to network facilities or
operators, or to dial a number at the request of the caller.
System Manager's Guide A–11
Customer Support Information
n
n
Any time a call appears to be suspicious, call the AT&T GBCS Fraud
Intervention Center at 1 800 628-2888 (fraud intervention for System 25,
®
®
PARTNER and MERLIN systems).
Customers should also take advantage of AT&T monitoring services and
SM
devices, such as the NetPROTECT family of fraud detection services,
®
CAS with HackerTracker , and CAT Terminal with Watchdog. Call
1 800 638-7233 to get more information on these AT&T fraud detection
services and products.
Security Risks Associated with Transferring
through Voice Messaging Systems
Toll fraud hackers try to dial into a voice mailbox and then execute a transfer by
dialing * T. The hacker then dials an access code (either 9 for Automatic
Route Selection or a pooled facility code) followed by the appropriate digit
string to either direct dial or access a network operator to complete the call.
NOTE:
In Release 3.1 and later systems, all extensions are initially and by default
restricted from dial access to pools. In order for an extension to use a pool to
access an outside line/trunk, this restriction must be removed.
Preventive Measures
Take the following preventive measures to limit the risk of unauthorized transfers
by hackers:
n
n
Outward restrict all MERLIN LEGEND voice mail port extensions. This
denies access to facilities (lines/trunks). In Release 3.1 and later
systems, voice mail ports are by default outward restricted.
As an additional security step, network dialing for all extensions,
including voice mail port extensions, should be processed through ARS
using dial access code 9
!
SECURITY ALERT:
The MERLIN LEGEND system ships with ARS activated with all
extensions set to Facility Restriction Level 3, allowing all
international calling. To prevent toll fraud, ARS Facility Restriction
Levels (FRLs) should be established using:
n
n
n
FRL 0 for restriction to internal dialing only
FRL 2 for restriction to local network calling only
FRL 3 for restriction to domestic long distance (excluding area
code 809 for the Dominican Republic as this is part of the
North American Numbering Plan, unless 809 is required)
A–12 System Manager's Guide
Customer Support Information
n
FRL 4 for international calling
In Release 3.1 and later systems, default local and default toll
tables are factory-assigned an FRL of 2. This simplifies the task of
restricting extensions: the FRL for an extension merely needs to be
changed from the default of 3.
Each extension should be assigned the appropriate FRL to match
its calling requirements. All voice mail port extensions not used
for Outcalling should be assigned to FRL 0 (the default setting
in Release 3.1 and later).
n
n
Deny access to pooled facility codes by removing pool dial-out codes
70, 890-899, or any others on your system.
Create a Disallowed List or use the pre-prepared Disallowed List number
7 (Release 3.1 and later systems only) to disallow dialing 0, 11, 10, 1700,
1809, 1900, and 976 or 1(wildcard)976. In Release 3.1 and later systems,
Disallowed List number 7 does not include 800 and 1800 and 411 and
1411, but AT&T recommends that you add them. Assign all voice mail
port extensions to this Disallowed List. AT&T recommends
assigning Disallowed List number 7. This is an added layer of
security, in case outward restriction is inadvertently removed. (In
Release 3.1 and later systems, voice messaging ports are assigned by
default to Disallowed List number 7.)
If Outcalling is required by voice messaging system extensions:
n
n
n
Program an ARS Facility Restriction Level (FRL) of 2 on voice mail port
extension(s) used for Outcalling.
If 800 and 411 numbers are used, remove 1800, 800, 411, and 1411 from
Disallowed List number 7.
If Outcalling is allowed to long distance numbers, build an Allowed List
for the voice mail port extension(s) used for Outcalling. This list should
contain the area code and the first three digits of the local exchange
telephone numbers to be allowed.
Additional general security for voice messaging systems:
n
n
n
Use a secure password for the General Mailboxes.
The default administration mailbox, 9997, must be reassigned to the
system manager’s mailbox/extension number and securely password
protected.
All voice messaging system users must use secure passwords known
only to the user.
System Manager's Guide A–13
Customer Support Information
Security Risks Associated with the Automated
Attendant Feature of Voice Messaging Systems
Two areas of toll fraud risk associated with the Automated Attendant feature of
voice messaging systems are the following:
n
n
Pooled facility (line/trunk) access codes are translated to a menu prompt
to allow Remote Access. If a hacker finds this prompt, the hacker has
immediate access. (In Release 3.1 and later systems, dial access to
pools is initially factory-set to restrict all extensions: to allow pool access,
this restriction must be removed by the system manager.
If the Automated Attendant prompts callers to use Remote Call
Forwarding (RCF) to reach an outside telephone number, the system may
be susceptible to toll fraud. An example of this application is a menu or
Submenu that says, “To reach our answering service, select prompt
number 5,” and transfers a caller to an external telephone number.
Remote Call Forwarding can only be used securely when the central
office provides “reliable disconnect” (sometimes referred to as forward
disconnect or disconnect supervision), which guarantees that the central
office will not return a dial tone after the called party hangs up. In most
cases, the central office facility is a loop-start line/trunk which does not
provide reliable disconnect. When loop-start lines/trunks are used, if the
calling party stays on the line, the central office will return a dial tone at
the conclusion of the call, enabling the caller to place another call as if it
were being placed from your company. Ground-start trunks provide
reliable disconnect and should be used whenever possible.
Preventive Measures
Take the following preventive measures to limit the risk of unauthorized use of
the Automated Attendant feature by hackers:
n
n
n
Do not use Automated Attendant prompts for Automatic Route Selection
(ARS) Codes or Pooled Facility Codes.
Assign all unused Automated Attendant Selector Codes to zero, so that
attempts to dial these will be routed to the system attendant.
If Remote Call Forwarding (RCF) is required, MERLIN LEGEND
Communications System owners should coordinate with their AT&T
Account Team or authorized dealer to verify the type of central office
facility used for RCF. If it is a ground-start line/trunk, or if it is a loop-start
line/trunk and central office reliable disconnect can be ensured, then
nothing else needs to be done.
A–14 System Manager's Guide
Customer Support Information
NOTE:
In most cases these will be loop-start lines/trunks without reliable
disconnect. The local telephone company will need to be involved to
change the facilities used for RCF to ground start lines/trunks. Usually a
charge applies for this change. Also, hardware and software changes
may need to be made in the MERLIN LEGEND system. The MERLIN
MAIL Automated Attendant feature merely accesses the RCF feature in
the MERLIN LEGEND system. Without these changes being made, this
feature is highly susceptible to toll fraud. These same preventive
measures must be taken if the RCF feature is active for MERLIN LEGEND
system extensions whether or not it is accessed by an Automated
Attendant menu.
Security Risks Associated with the Remote
Access Feature
Remote Access allows the MERLIN LEGEND Communications System owner to
access the system from a remote telephone and make an outgoing call or
perform system administration, using the network facilities (lines/trunks)
connected to the MERLIN LEGEND system. Hackers, scanning the public
switched network by randomly dialing numbers with war dialers (a device that
randomly dials telephone numbers, including 800 numbers, until a modem or
dial tone is obtained), can find this feature, which will return a dial tone to them.
They can even employ war dialers to attempt to discover barrier codes.
Preventive Measures
Take the following preventive measures to limit the risk of unauthorized use of
the MERLIN LEGEND Communications System Remote Access feature by
hackers:
n
n
n
The Remote Access feature can be abused by criminal toll fraud
hackers, if it is not properly administered. Therefore, this feature should
not be used unless there is a strong business need.
It is strongly recommended that customers invest in security adjuncts,
which typically use one-time passcode algorithms. These security
adjuncts discourage hackers. Since a secure use of the Remote Access
feature generally offers savings over credit-card calling, the break-even
period can make the investment in security adjuncts worthwhile.
If a customer chooses to use the Remote Access feature without a
security adjunct, then multiple barrier codes should be employed, with
one per user if the system permits. The MERLIN LEGEND system permits
a maximum of 16 barrier codes.
System Manager's Guide A–15
Customer Support Information
n
The maximum length should be used for each barrier code, and should
be changed periodically. Barrier codes, like passwords, should consist of
a random, hard-to-guess sequence of digits. While MERLIN LEGEND
Release 3.0 permits a barrier code of up to 11 digits, systems prior to
Release 3.0 permit barrier codes of up to only four digits.
If Remote Access is used, an upgrade to MERLIN LEGEND Communications
System Release 3.0 is encouraged to take advantage of the longer barrier code.
Other Security Hints
Make sure that the Automated Attendant Selector Codes do not permit outside
line selection.
Following are a number of measures and guidelines that can help you ensure
the security of your communications system and voice messaging system.
Multiple layers of security are always recommended to keep your system
secure.
Educating Users
Everyone in your company who uses the telephone system is responsible for
system security. Users and attendants/operators need to be aware of how to
recognize and react to potential hacker activity. Informed people are more likely
to cooperate with security measures that often make the system less flexible
and more difficult to use.
n
n
n
n
n
n
Never program passwords or authorization codes onto Auto Dial buttons.
Display telephones reveal the programmed numbers and internal
abusers can use the Auto Dial buttons to originate unauthorized calls.
Discourage the practice of writing down barrier codes or passwords. If a
barrier code or password needs to be written down, keep it in a secure
place and never discard it while it is active.
Operators or attendants should tell their system manager if they answer a
series of calls where there is silence on the other end or the caller hangs
up.
Users who are assigned voice mailboxes should frequently change
personal passwords and should not choose obvious passwords.
The system manager should advise users with special telephone
privileges (such as Remote Access, Outcalling, and Remote Call
Forwarding) of the potential risks and responsibilities.
Be suspicious of any caller who claims to be with the telephone company
and wants to check an outside line. Ask for a callback number, hang up
and confirm the caller’s identity.
A–16 System Manager's Guide
Customer Support Information
n
n
n
Never distribute the office telephone directory to anyone outside the
company; be careful when discarding it (shred the directory).
Never accept collect telephone calls.
Never discuss your telephone system’s numbering plan with anyone
outside the company.
Educating Operators
Operators or attendants need to be especially aware of how to recognize and
react to potential hacker activity. To defend against toll fraud, operators should
follow the guidelines below:
n
n
n
Establish procedures to counter social engineering. Social engineering is
a con game that hackers frequently use to obtain information that may
help them gain access to your communications system or voice
messaging system.
When callers ask for assistance in placing outside or long-distance calls,
ask for a callback extension.
Verify the source. Ask callers claiming to be maintenance or service
personnel for a callback number. Never transfer to *10 without this
verification. Never transfer to extension 900.
n
Remove the headset and/or handset when the console is not in use.
Detecting Toll Fraud
To detect toll fraud, users and operators should look for the following:
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
Lost voice mail messages, mailbox lockout, or altered greetings
Inability to log into voice mail
Inability to get an outside line
Foreign language callers
Frequent hang-ups
Touch-tone sounds
Caller or employee complaints that the lines are busy
Increases in internal requests for assistance in making outbound calls
(particularly international calls or requests for dial tone)
Outsiders trying to obtain sensitive information
Callers claiming to be the “phone” company
Sudden increase in wrong numbers
System Manager's Guide A–17
Customer Support Information
Establishing a Policy
As a safeguard against toll fraud, follow these guidelines for your MERLIN
LEGEND Communications System and voice messaging system:
n
n
n
n
n
n
Change passwords frequently (at least quarterly). Changing passwords
routinely on a specific date (such as the first of the month) helps users to
remember to do so.
Always use the longest-length password allowed.
Establish well-controlled procedures for resetting passwords.
Limit the number of invalid attempts to access a voice mailbox to five or
less.
Monitor access to the MERLIN LEGEND dial-up maintenance port.
Change the access password regularly and issue it only to authorized
personnel. Disconnect the maintenance port when not in use. (However,
this eliminates AT&T’s 24-hour maintenance surveillance capability and
may result in additional maintenance costs.)
Create a communications system management policy concerning
employee turnover and include these suggestions:
Delete all unused voice mailboxes in the voice mail system.
If a terminated employee had Remote Access calling privileges and a
personal authorization code, remove the authorization code
immediately.
If barrier codes and/or authorization codes were shared by the
terminated employee, these should be changed immediately.
n
n
n
n
n
Regularly back up your MERLIN LEGEND system files to ensure a timely
recovery should it be required. Schedule regular, off-site backups.
Keep the Remote Maintenance Device turned off when not in use by
AT&T or your authorized dealer.
Limit transfers to registered subscribers only.
Use the Security Violations Notification options (Mailbox Lock or Warning
Message) to alert you of any mailbox break-in attempts. Investigate all
incidents.
Review security policies and procedures and keep them up to date.
A–18 System Manager's Guide
Customer Support Information
Choosing Passwords
Passwords should be the maximum length allowed by the system.
Passwords should be hard to guess and should not contain:
n
n
n
n
All the same numbers (for example, 1111, 666666)
Sequential characters (for example 123456)
Numbers that can be associated with you or your business, such as your
name, birthday, business name, business address, telephone number, or
social security number.
Words and commonly used names.
Passwords should be changed regularly, at least on a quarterly basis.
Recycling old passwords is not recommended. Never program passwords (or
authorization codes or barrier codes) onto a speed dial button.
Physical Security
You should always limit access to the system console (or attendant console)
and supporting documentation. The following are some recommendations:
n
n
n
n
n
Keep the system console and supporting documentation in an office that
is secured with a changeable combination lock. Provide the combination
only to those individuals having a real need to enter the office.
Keep telephone wiring closets and equipment rooms locked.
Keep telephone logs and printed reports in locations that only authorized
personnel can enter.
Design distributed reports so they do not reveal password or trunk
access code information.
Keep the voice messaging system Remote Maintenance Device turned
off.
Limiting Outcalling
When Outcalling is used to contact subscribers who are off-site, use the
MERLIN LEGEND Communications System Allowed Lists and Disallowed Lists
or Automatic Route Selection features to minimize toll fraud.
System Manager's Guide A–19
Customer Support Information
If the Outcalling feature will not be used, outward restrict all voice messaging
system ports. If Outcalling will be used, ports not used for Outcalling should be
Outward Restricted (for Merlin Mail Voice Messaging Systems, port 2 on a twoport system, port 4 on a four-port system, ports 5 and 6 on a six-port system).
Use Outward Restriction, Toll Restrictions, Allowed Lists, Disallowed Lists and
Facility Restrictions Levels, as appropriate to minimize the possibility of toll
fraud.
Limited Warranty
and Limitation of Liability
AT&T warrants to you, the customer, that your MERLIN LEGEND
Communications System will be in good working order on the date AT&T or its
authorized reseller delivers or installs the system, whichever is later (“Warranty
Date”). If you notify AT&T or its authorized reseller within one year of the
Warranty Date that your system is not in good working order, AT&T will without
charge to you repair or replace, at its option, the system components that are
not in good working order. Repair or replacement parts may be new or
refurbished and will be provided on an exchange basis. If AT&T determines that
your system cannot be repaired or replaced, AT&T will remove the system and,
at your option, refund the purchase price of your system, or apply the purchase
price towards the purchase of another AT&T system.
If you purchased your system directly from AT&T, AT&T will perform warranty
repair in accordance with the terms and conditions of the specific type of AT&T
maintenance coverage you selected. If you purchased your system from an
AT&T-authorized reseller, contact your reseller for the details of the
maintenance plan applicable to your system.
This AT&T limited warranty covers damage to the system caused by power
surges, including power surges due to lightning.
The following will not be deemed to impair the good working order of the
system, and AT&T will not be responsible under the limited warranty for
damages resulting from:
■
Failure to follow AT&T’s installation, operation, or maintenance
instructions
■
Unauthorized system modification, movement, or alteration
■
Unauthorized use of common carrier communication services accessed
through the system
■
Abuse, misuse, or negligent acts or omissions of the customer and
persons under the customer’s control
■
Acts of third parties and acts of God
A–20 System Manager's Guide
Customer Support Information
AT&T’S OBLIGATION TO REPAIR, REPLACE, OR REFUND AS SET FORTH
ABOVE IS YOUR EXCLUSIVE REMEDY.
EXCEPT AS SPECIFICALLY SET FORTH ABOVE, AT&T, ITS AFFILIATES,
SUPPLIERS, AND AUTHORIZED RESELLERS MAKE NO WARRANTIES,
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AND SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM ANY WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
Limitation of Liability
Except as provided below, the liability of AT&T and its affiliates and suppliers for
any claims, losses, damages, or expenses from any cause whatsoever
(including acts or omissions of third parties), regardless of the form of action,
whether in contract, tort, or otherwise, shall not exceed the lesser of: (1) the
direct damages proven; or (2) the repair cost, replacement cost, license fee,
annual rental charge, or purchase price, as the case may be, of the equipment
that gives rise to the claim. Except as provided below, AT&T and its affiliates
and suppliers shall not be liable for any incidental, special, reliance,
consequential, or indirect loss or damage incurred in connection with the
equipment. As used in this paragraph, consequential damages include, but are
not limited to, the following: lost profits, lost revenues, and losses arising out of
unauthorized use (or charges for such use) of common carrier
telecommunications services or facilities accessed through or connected to the
equipment. For personal injury caused by AT&T's negligence, AT&T's liability
shall be limited to proven damages to person. No action or proceeding
against AT&T or its affiliates or suppliers may be commenced more than
twenty-four (24) months after the cause of action accrues. THIS
PARAGRAPH SHALL SURVIVE FAILURE OF AN EXCLUSIVE REMEDY.
Remote Administration
and Maintenance
The Remote Administration and Maintenance feature of your
telecommunications system, if you choose to use it, permits users to change the
system features and capabilities from a remote location.
System Manager's Guide A–21
Customer Support Information
The Remote Administration and Maintenance feature, through proper
administration, can help you reduce the risk of unauthorized persons gaining
access to the network. However, telephone numbers and access codes can be
compromised when overheard in a public location, are lost through theft of a
wallet or purse containing access information, or through carelessness (for
example, writing codes on a piece of paper and improperly discarding them).
Additionally, hackers may use a computer to dial an access code and then
publish the information to other hackers. Substantial charges can accumulate
quickly. It is your responsibility to take appropriate steps to implement the
features properly, evaluate and administer the various restriction levels, and
protect and carefully distribute access codes.
Under applicable tariffs, you will be responsible for payment of toll charges.
AT&T cannot be responsible for such charges and will not make any allowance
or give any credit resulting from unauthorized access.
To reduce the risk of unauthorized access through Remote Administration and
Maintenance, please observe the following procedures:
■
The System Administration and Maintenance capability of a Hybrid/PBX
or Key system is protected by a password.
— Change the default password immediately.
— Continue to change the password regularly.
— Only give the password to people who need it and impress upon them
the need to keep it secret.
— If anyone who knows the password leaves the company, change the
password immediately.
■
If you have a special telephone line connected to your Hybrid/PBX or Key
system for Remote Administration and Maintenance, you should do one
of the following:
— Unplug the line when it is not being used.
— Install a switch in the line to turn it off when it is not being used.
— Keep the Remote Administration and Maintenance telephone number
secret. Only give it to people who need to know it, and impress upon
them the need to keep it a secret. Do not write the telephone number
on the Hybrid/PBX or Key system, the connecting equipment, or
anywhere else in the system room.
■
If your Remote Administration and Maintenance feature requires that
someone in your office transfer the caller to the Remote Administration
and Maintenance extension, you should impress upon your employees
the importance of only transferring authorized individuals to that
extension.
A–22 System Manager's Guide
About Telecommunications
B
Many of the terms and concepts involved in telephone communications have
been in use since Alexander Graham Bell made the first phone call in 1876.
Because understanding them will help you to understand how the system
works, this section contains a brief history and description of telephone
communications.
Basically, telephone communications involves four elements:
■
Telephone Station (Extension) Equipment. The telephone instrument
and/or other equipment (for example, a fax machine) used to transmit
and receive the telephone signal.
■
Transmission Facilities. The equipment and media (for example, wire,
cable, and optical fiber) that provide the communications path that
carries the telephone signal.
■
Switching Equipment. The equipment that makes the electrical cross
connections so that the caller is connected to the called party.
■
Signaling. The transmission of information that controls the network, for
example, alerting the switch that a user wants to make a call, transmitting
the telephone number of the called party, and alerting the called party of
the call. Signals also tell the switch about how to make the connections.
This appendix provides information about each of the elements.
System Manager's Guide B–1
About Telecommunications
Telephone Station Equipment
Telephone station equipment is the user’s gateway to the global
communications network and an array of services. While today’s telephones
range from single-line telephones to multiline telephones with various features
and options, telephone station equipment can now also involve such things as
digital data terminals (for example, personal computers) or advanced
videoconferencing equipment. As sophisticated as the equipment has become,
many of the basic components and concepts are based on the original
telephones.
The first working model of a telephone was demonstrated on March 10, 1876 by
Alexander Graham Bell and his assistant, Thomas A. Watson. It consisted of a
microphone, called a transmitter, and a small loudspeaker-like device, called a
receiver, connected by a pair of wires and a battery.
Early telephones continued to be powered by direct current (dc) supplied by a
battery inside the telephone itself until, in 1894, the telephone company used a
common battery to power all the telephones connected to an exchange. The
telephone company office was called the central office (CO), as it is today, and
this was where the battery was located.
The flow of direct current to early telephones was controlled by the receiver (or
handset) which hung on a hook that activated electrical contacts. This hook was
called a switchhook, a term and concept that’s still used today. The status of the
switchhook signals the central office about the status of the telephone station
equipment:
■
Idle Status. When the handset is sitting on its cradle (on-hook), the
switchhook contacts are open (not connected) and no current is drawn
from the CO. This signals the CO that the telephone is available to
receive calls.
■
Busy Status. When the handset is removed from the cradle (off-hook),
the switchhook contacts are closed (connected) and current flows. This
signals the CO either that the caller is requesting service or that the user
is already on a call and is not available for another call.
Likewise, the CO signals the called party by sending current to his or her
phone, causing it to ring. When the called party lifts the handset from its cradle,
the current flows, indicating to the CO that the party has answered and that it
can stop the ringing. Originally, various bells and buzzers were used to signal
the called party to pick up the phone. But in 1878, Watson developed a bellringer with a hammer attached to an armature which was, in turn, powered by
magnetic energy and operated by a hand crank. A form of this ringer is still
used in some of today’s telephones.
B–2 System Manager's Guide
About Telecommunications
Identifying which telephone to ring (that is, supplying the identity of the called
party) was communicated verbally from the caller to the operator when human
operators handled call connections. After automatic switches were in place,
telephone numbers were assigned to telephone service subscribers. The caller
identified the called party to the switch by dialing the called party’s number. The
numbers were originally dialed by using a mechanical device called a rotary
dialer with a spring that was wound up by turning it in one direction; on its return
to normal position, it created interruptions in the flow of current, generating dial
pulses recognized by the switch.
Although there are still some rotary-dial telephones in use today, most modern
telephones have touch-tone dialing that involves the creation of unique tones
produced by pressing buttons on the dialpad. Touch-tone dialing is faster and,
with the advent of services available from touch-tone phones, more versatile.
Today’s telephones still consist of the components described above. But, with
continued innovations, these basic elements have been enhanced to include
many other features and components, for example, built-in speakerphones,
programmable features and buttons, and even the capability to transmit and
receive digital signals.
Transmission Facilities
The telephone network can transmit various types of information which
originates in either of two forms: analog (continuously variable physical signals,
for example, speech or video signals) or digital (representation of signals in
discrete elements such as zero and one, for example, signals from computers).
This information is conveyed from one place to another in the network over
communications paths provided by transmission facilities. These facilities
involve different types of media as well as electronic equipment.
There are various types of media, including:
■
Open Wire. Strung on poles, uninsulated copper wire was used in the
early days of telecommunications until physical congestion became a
problem. It’s still found, though rarely, in rural areas.
■
Paired Wire. Commonly called twisted pair. Consists of two copper
wires, individually insulated with wood pulp or plastic, twisted together.
■
Paired Cable. Combines many twisted pairs (from 6 to 3600) into a single
cable, originally sheathed in lead but now insulated with plastic. Cable
can be strung on poles, buried underground, or installed in a conduit of
either long blocks of concrete or plastic pipe. The first transoceanic
undersea cable was laid by AT&T in 1958.
A problem encountered, however, with many wire pairs running parallel
to each other is crosstalk, that is, the leaking of the electric signal from
one pair to another so that you can hear noise or intelligible speech.
System Manager's Guide B–3
About Telecommunications
■
Coaxial Cable. Consists of a number of one-way voice circuits. Two such
cables make a two-way pair, with each cable carrying the transmission in
one direction. Its high frequencies and copper grounding decrease
crosstalk. Used since 1946 for long-distance transmission, coaxial cable
is now being replaced by optical fiber.
■
Microwave Radio. Used to carry conversations across and between
continents, microwave radio was the backbone of the telephone system
until the advent of optical fiber. Because the microwave radio beam
follows a straight path, towers need to be located about every 26 miles to
allow for the curvature of the earth. Thus, it’s very costly to reach remote
telephone users, and can’t be used across great distances or oceans.
This problem was solved by the launching in 1962 of a “tower” very high
in the sky: Telstar I, the first communications satellite.
■
Optical Fiber. A long, hair-thin strand of high-quality glass surrounded
by a sheath of glass with different characteristics, clad in a plastic outer
sheath, and using a laser as the light source. First described in 1887 by a
British physicist, the idea of using light as a transmission medium was
implemented in 1880 by Bell. The first transoceanic undersea optical
cable was completed by AT&T in 1988.
Optical fiber is flexible, inexpensive, and not prone to electrical and
electromagnetic interference; there is no crosstalk, and it’s well-suited to
carrying digital signals.
Sometimes these media carry only one signal, while other times they carry many
signals combined together (multiplexed). They also vary greatly in the number
of signals they can carry.
Some of the equipment used in transmission facilities is located at different
points along the transmission media to amplify, and sometimes regenerate, the
transmitted signals. Other transmission equipment is used where transmission
facilities connect to switching systems.
The communications paths provided by transmission facilities can be classified
into three broad categories:
■
Lines. A facility that connects a customer’s telephone station equipment
and a switching system.
■
Trunks. A facility that connects two switching systems.
■
Channels. A facility dedicated to a specific customer to provide special
services.
As noted earlier in this guide, the differentiation between the terms line and
trunk has blurred and the two terms are now often used interchangeably.
B–4 System Manager's Guide
About Telecommunications
The services provided by channels can greatly enhance a company’s
effectiveness and efficiency. If the MERLIN LEGEND Communications System
has a DS1 facility as one of its incoming trunks, the one facility provides 24
“lines” that are called channels or B-channels, depending on the type of service
the facility is programmed for (T1 or PRI). If programmed for T1 service, the
channels can be configured to emulate different types of trunks (loop-start,
ground-start, DID, and tie) according to business needs, and can provide a
variety of special services. If programmed for PRI service, additional special
services are available and each B-channel can be programmed to dynamically
provide different services over the same B-channel.
Switching Equipment
The primary function of switching equipment is to interconnect the transmission
facilities at various key locations and route the telephone signals through the
telephone network. The telephone network is composed of a number of these
key centralized locations called central offices (COs). At the COs, the electrical
signal carried on one telephone circuit is connected, or switched, to another
circuit, forming a communications path; that is, the caller’s line is connected to
the called party’s line so they can hold a conversation.
In the early telephone network, switching was performed manually by human
operators. Today, electronic computer-controlled switching systems are fast,
flexible, and economical, providing reliable, efficient, and cost-effective service.
There are now also private switches that, rather than being located at the
telephone company’s CO, are located on a company’s premises. These
systems, called private branch exchanges (PBXs), were developed because
most of a business’ calls are between telephones on-site within the company.
The MERLIN LEGEND Communications System is a such a switch, located on
the customer’s premises, that provides advanced services and features and yet
also provides many of the special functions originally performed by human
operators.
The Evolution of Switches
The method, type, capabilities, and capacities of switches have evolved as
geographic areas expanded and technological advances became available.
Three basic types of technology have been used in switching:
■
Manually-Operated Switching. Human operators made the connections
of circuits by placing plug-ended wires into jacks on a switchboard.
Manual switching was slow, labor-intensive and, therefore, costly but
afforded some special functionality: calls could be forwarded, messages
taken, and calls interrupted.
System Manager's Guide B–5
About Telecommunications
■
Electromechanical Switching. Electrically operated devices with
mechanical parts and motion. Electromechanical switching automated
the manual labor and allowed telephone service to be universally
affordable, but the technology was inflexible since changes in service
required changes in the device itself. It also required high maintenance
due to wear and tear on parts, and did little more than switch calls.
■
Electronic Switching. Electronic, computer-controlled equipment.
Electronic switching reduced the size, power consumption, and cost. At
the same time, it increased operating speeds, ruggedness, and
reliability. Computer control provides flexibility because changes and
enhancements are made to the switching system’s software rather than
to the hardware.
Manual switching was used for the first few decades of telephone service.
Switching was performed by human operators who made the actual
connections of circuits at a switchboard by using cords that had plugs at each
end. Each of the plugs had a tip and a ring which completed the electrical
circuit over which the signals traveled. The operator plugged one end of the
cord into the caller’s jack, and then completed a call (that is, completed a
circuit) by plugging in the other end of the cord to the called party’s jack, one of
perhaps 10,000 subscriber jacks within reach
Approximately 120 lines terminated at answering jacks on the operator’s
switchboard. In turn, each operator had 18 cords that could be used to make
connections.
The first automatic switch was invented in 1892 by Almon B. Strowger, an
undertaker, whose competitor was getting all the undertaking business in the
townreferred by the other undertaker’s wife, who was the town’s telephone
operator. The Strowger switch was an electromechanical device controlled by
the caller’s telephone.
Strowger’s switch was adapted for use in the Bell System starting in 1919. It was
slow, noisy, and not very flexible with respect to offering new services but,
because it was more cost-effective than human operators, it was directly
responsible for making telephone service affordable and universal.
The next innovation in electromechanical switching was the Bell System’s
crossbar switch, first installed in 1938, and still in use in some areas today. It
had fewer switches, a sophisticated control mechanism, and lower maintenance
but, like its predecessor, was not flexible because it couldn’t be programmed.
It was, therefore, a natural progression to the idea of using a computer, with its
inherent programmable flexibility, to control the operation of the switching
network that resulted in the new generation of switching technology called an
electronic switching system (ESS).
B–6 System Manager's Guide
About Telecommunications
The No1. ESS, developed by AT&T and installed in 1965, served from 10,000 to
65,000 lines at a maximum of 25,000 calls in the busy hour. With everincreasing innovations in technology, the AT&T 5ESS digital switching system in
1983 could handle 100,000 lines and 650,000 telephone calls per hour.
Because most trunks are digital, the newer digital switching systems interface
easily with digital trunks.
The Evolution of Switching Offices
In the early days of the telephone network, there was little or no switching
involved in telephone service (see Figure 2−3 in Chapter 2, “About the
System”):
■
Private-Line Service. In the initial telephone installations, telephone
communication was from one telephone directly to another, as in Bell’s
demonstration that went from an instrument in one room to another
instrument a few rooms away. Thus, one telephone could communicate
with only one other telephone.
■
Party-Line Service. Several telephones were connected to one line so a
number of people could communicate in the same conversation. But
there was no way to reach a telephone on any other line.
■
Station Switching. All telephones were connected to all other
telephones. The telephone itself performed the switching and made the
connection. This was workable for a small number of telephones but
quickly became impractical as hundreds of telephones were installed.
As the number of telephones grew, centralized switching evolved, that is, all the
lines from all the telephones came to a common place, called a central office
(CO) or exchange, where the electrical cross connections could be made
between the telephones. The actual connections were made manually by
human operators.
As geographical areas enlarged, it was impractical to bring all the lines into one
CO, so more COs were created to serve the nearby surrounding areas.
Eventually a hierarchy of special switching offices (SOs) was created to connect
the COs locally and then connect cities and countries for long-distance (toll)
switching:
■
Trunking Between COs. A CO was interconnected to another CO by a
dedicated line called a trunk, so a call from a party served by one CO
could be made to a party served by another CO. This is referred to as the
local network and is the first level in the switching hierarchy.
■
Tandem Switching Between COs. As growth continued, special SOs,
called tandem offices, were developed to function as intermediaries and
handle the switching of calls over trunks between COs. This is referred to
as the tandem network and is the second level in the hierarchy.
System Manager's Guide B–7
About Telecommunications
■
Toll Switching Between Cities. As even more growth occurred,
extended switching systems, called toll offices, were then developed to
handle long-distance switching between cities. This is referred to as the
toll network and comprises the third and higher levels in the hierarchy.
The toll network involves national and international service.
The SO hierarchy is illustrated in Figure 2−4 in Chapter 2 of this guide.
Today, the hierarchy of the local exchange of the CO through tandem offices
and toll offices is still in use. An area within which there is a single uniform set of
charges for telephone service is called an exchange area. An exchange area
may be served by a number of COs, and a call between any two points within
an exchange area is a local call. A toll call is a call made to a point outside the
local exchange area, and includes service through the switching office
hierarchy.
In addition to the telephone company switches and switching hierarchy, private
switching systems (PBXs) were developed. In a PBX, the switch is located on
the company’s premises. The telephone company’s Centrex service enables a
business to have the services of a PBX, but supplied from the CO.
As noted in the previous section, the MERLIN LEGEND Communications System
is a private switch, located on a company’s premises, that offers access to even
more powerful telephone network applications and services. It can operate in
PBX mode, along with two other modes that define how the system works.
Signaling
Telephone service involves a vast network of transmission and switching
equipment whose status and operation must somehow be controlled. This is
done by means of various types of signals.
Originally, a caller alerted the operator that he or she wanted service by turning
the crank on the telephone, which caused a lamp to flash for that line on the
switchboard at the exchange office. The operator plugged in on that line, the
caller verbally gave the number of the called party, and the operator visually
checked the lamp of the called party to see whether the person was available. If
not, the operator told the caller that the line was busy. If the line was available,
the operator rang the called party’s telephone and connected the parties. When
the call was over, the operator could observe that both lamps went out.
If the call was between switching offices, the two operators completed the steps
of the process.
B–8 System Manager's Guide
About Telecommunications
Thus, the functions of signaling are:
■
Alerting for a request for service
■
Transmitting the address information (the telephone number) of the
called party.
■
Supervising the status of circuits and lines
■
Transmitting information such as dial tone to indicate service is available,
busy signal indicating that the called party is not available, and various
announcements
As switching systems were developed that automated much of the network’s
operation, an additional realm of signaling was required: machine-to-machine.
Because a primary objective of the telephone industry is for operation of the
telephone to be simple, universal, and practical, a relatively small number of
standard signals are required. On the other hand, since interoffice signaling is
between machines, the emphasis is on efficiency and flexibility rather than
usability. This has resulted in a large variety of signaling arrangements.
Signal Transmission
There are basically five types of signaling systems:
■
Direct current (dc)
■
Inband tone
■
Out-of-band tone
■
Digital
■
Common-channel interoffice
The signals for alerting and supervisory functions are generated by the flow (or
absence of flow) of the direct current between the telephones and the switching
office.
Address information is communicated either by interruptions in the direct
current produced by rotary-dial telephones, or by the unique tones produced by
touch-tone telephones. Information signals (dialtone, busy signal, and so on)
are provided by the transmission of certain combinations of tones. For touchtone telephone service, dual-tone multifrequency (DTMF) signaling is used.
The supervision of trunks between COs also occurs by the flow (or absence of
flow) of direct current. However, because long-distance trunks carry only
alternating current (AC), a different kind of frequency is used. In 1976, AT&T
introduced a new interoffice signaling scheme called common channel
interoffice signaling (CCIS) in which a separate circuit between the offices is
dedicated to digital signaling transmissions between the computers that control
the switches.
System Manager's Guide B–9
About Telecommunications
The enhanced CCIS system in use today is called common channeling
signaling (CCS) system and supports advanced features, such as callingnumber identification (Caller ID). The calling party’s number is transmitted from
switching office to office. This and other advanced services are available on the
“intelligent” network that has evolved because of the use of computers to
control signaling.
Telephone Numbering Plans
Unlike the verbal communication of the called party’s name in manually
switched systems, automated switching systems require that each telephone
station be identified by a unique address that is convenient, readily
understandable, and similar in format to other stations connected to the
network.
In the early days of telecommunications, when a maximum of 10,000 lines could
be serviced by a telephone exchange, a 4-digit alphanumeric “address” was
used to specify the called party, for example, WA51 (Waverly 51).
Subsequently, 3-digit area codes were introduced to specify the area of the
country to be reached, and country codes were introduced for international
dialing. Finally, the individual telephone numbers expanded to the seven-digit
numbers in use today: a 3-digit central office code and a 4-digit station number.
NOTE:
The North American Numbering Plan currently uses area codes that only have a
0 or 1 for the middle digit, for example, 908 or 215. In the very near future, the
numbering plan will be changed so that any number (0 through 9) can be used
for the middle digit. This system has already been designed to take that change
into account.
Various standardized numbers have also been created for special services, for
example, area code 800 for toll-free service, and 911 for emergency service.
A special numbering plan is also used within the MERLIN LEGEND
Communications System to identify individual telephones, adjuncts (for
example, fax machines), trunks, and other features and aspects of the system.
Depending on the number of extensions and the needs of your company, you
can choose from three different numbering plans that allow 2-digit numbers, 3digit numbers, or customizable variable-length numbers, respectively.
B–10 System Manager's Guide
System Capacities
C
This appendix provides some information about the hardware and software
capacities for the system. Detailed information about system capacities, as well
as environmental requirements for the control unit and power and grounding
requirements are contained in the Equipment and Operations Reference.
You can configure the system as a stand-alone unit or as part of a private
network. Maximum system capacities are as follows:
■
Up to 108 simultaneous two-party conversations
■
Up to 80 line/trunk jacks, including loop-start, ground-start, DID, and tie
■
Up to 255 extension endpoints that support a combination of the
following:
Up to 255 physical extension jacks for telephones and adjuncts
Up to 127 logical digital data ports (through 7500B data modules
connected to jacks on the MLX module) providing RS-232
connections to data terminals and personal computers
■
System call-handling capability of 3828 hundred call seconds per hour
(ccs/hr)
■
Up to three 100D DS1 modules
■
Up to five 800 NI-BRI modules (Release 4.0 and later only)
System Manager's Guide C–1
System Capacities
The system has a total capacity of 335 jacks (80 outside lines/trunks plus 255
extensions); however, each MLX module extension jack supports two logical
endpoints (extension devices that can operate simultaneously and
independently of each other). For example, an MLX telephone with a MultiFunction Module (MFM) plugs into one extension jack, but the jack supports
both the telephone and the equipment (for example, a fax or an answering
machine) connected to the MFM.
Similarly, although the 100D module has only one jack, it can serve up to 24
endpoints (emulated, T1 digital, or PRI facilities). Thus, you can configure the
system to connect up to 80 lines/trunks and 255 extension endpoints, a total of
335 endpoints.
IMPORTANT:
The system has a time-slot capacity of 216. If more than 216 endpoints are in
use at the same time, blocking can occur.
Table C–1 lists the hardware and software capacities of the system. Some
constraining factors appear with a checkmark (4) and are explained at the end
of the table.
If you are planning to expand your system, contact your AT&T representative for
additional considerations.
Table C–1. Hardware and Software Capacities
Limit
Allowed/Disallowed Lists
Number of lists
Entries per list
Digits per entry
Automatic Route Selection
Number of ARS tables
Subpatterns per table
Routes per subpattern
Entries per table
Entries across all tables
Default tables
Callback
Number of calls in queue
Constraining Factor
8
10
7
16
2
6
100
1600
4
64
Continued on next page
C–2 System Manager's Guide
System Capacities
Table C–1, Continued
Calling Groups
Number of groups
Members per group
Groups per member
Delay announcements per system
Delay announcements per group
Groups per delay announcement
External alerts per group
Coverage groups per group
Carriers
Line/trunk and extension module slots
per basic carrier
Line/trunk and extension module slots
per expansion carrier
Maximum slots available for line/trunk
and extension modules
Coverage Groups
Number of groups
Senders per group
Groups per sender
Receiver buttons per group
Groups per QCC receiver
Data Hunt Groups
Number of groups
Members per group
Groups per member
Direct Inward Dialing
Number of blocks
Number of trunks
Directories
System Directory
Listings per Directory
Extension Directory
Listings per Directory
Personal Directory (MLX-20L only)
Listings per Directory
100D Module (maximum 2 per carrier)
800 NI-BRI Module (maximum 3 per
carrier, Release 4.0 and later only))
Endpoints (devices)
Limit
Constraining Factor
32
20
1
32
1
32
1
1
3
4
5
6
17
30
144
1
8
30
4
32
20
1
2
80
1
130
1
144
48
50
3
5
255
Continued on next page
System Manager's Guide C–3
System Capacities
Table C–1, Continued
Limit
Extensions
Total physical jacks
Total endpoints
Fax Machines with Message Waiting
Lines/Trunks
Night Service
Groups
Members per group (including one
group calling number)
Groups per member
Emergency Allowed List entries
System Operating Consoles
DLCs
MLX-20L or MLX-28D
BIS-22D, BIS-34, BIS-34D, or MERLIN
II System Display Console
QCCs
DSSs
Combination of DLCs and QCCs
Number of consoles per module
Park Codes (number of codes)
Personal Lines
Pickup
Number of groups
Members per group
Groups per member
Pools (trunk groups)
Maximum number of pools
Maximum number of trunks in pool
Pool Buttons
Ports (not simultaneously)
Total
Voice and data (physical pools)
Voice Announce to Busy extensions
Voice-mail interface
7500B data module data
Paging
Delay announcements
255
255
16
80
Constraining Factor
4
8
144
8
10
8
4
8
4
16
8
2
8
64
30
15
1
11
80
64
224
144
127
20
127
3
32
4
4
Continued on next page
C–4 System Manager's Guide
System Capacities
Table C–1, Continued
Limit
Remote Access
Number of barrier codes
Digits per code, systemwide
Shared System Access Buttons
No. of buttons per principal extension
Speed Dial
Personal Speed Dial
Entries per telephone
Entries per system
Digits per entry
System Speed Dial
Entries per system
Digits per entry
System Programming Equipment
MLX-20L
RS-232 jack (to connect PC w/SPM)
Modem (built-in processor module)
Telephones (not simultaneously)
Single-line
Analog multiline
Without Voice Announce to Busy
With Voice Announce to Busy
MLX-20L
All other MLX telephones (with/without
7500B data module/MFM)
Power failure transfer
Traffic (100 call seconds/hr/system)
Two-Party Conversations
Voice-Messaging Systems
Constraining Factor
16
4–11
27
4
24
1200
28
130
40
1
1
1
4
200
136
68
48
127
20
3828
108
1
4
4
4
4
4
Constraining Factors
This section describes the constraining factors that limit the capacities supplied
in the table above.
Calling Groups
Members of groups. Queued Call Consoles (QCCs) cannot be members of
calling groups.
Coverage Groups
Senders per group. QCCs cannot be senders.
System Manager's Guide C–5
System Capacities
Fax Machines with Message Waiting
The system can support more than 16 fax machines, but those in excess of 16
cannot use the fax message-waiting indication.
System Operator Consoles
DLCs (Direct-Line Consoles). Two consoles are allowed for each MLX or analog
module, with a maximum of eight per system. Up to two Direct Station Selectors
(DSSs) can be attached to an MLX operator console, and one is built into the
MERLIN II System Display Console.
Ports (not achievable simultaneously)
Voice-mail interface
Although the system software supports up to 24
voice-mail interface (VMI) ports, all the VMI
ports must be in the same calling group, and
the maximum number of extensions in a calling
group is 20.
Paging
Software real-time limits, loop-start only
Speed Dial
Personal Speed Dial. Single-line and 5- or 10-button telephones only.
System Programming Equipment
Remote access overrides on-site programming except during backup or
restore.
Telephones (not achievable simultaneously)
Analog multiline without Voice 17 slots for each of 8 ports per board
Announce to Busy
MLX-20L
RAM limit and the total includes the MLX-20L
telephone used for system programming
Power-failure transfer
1 for each 4 LS/GS trunk jacks.
Traffic (hundred call seconds/hr/system)
Assumes 20 percent internal traffic.
Two-Party Conversations
216 time slots
C–6 System Manager's Guide
System Planning Forms
D
This appendix contains a table that lists each system planning form. The forms
are in numerical order and organized according to planning purpose as shown
in Table D−1. Information about filling in the forms is contained in System
Planning.
Also included is the Employee Communications Survey form. If you need to plan
system modifications as your company’s needs expand, use this form to
conduct a survey of system users’ needs. Make copies of the form and save the
original for future use.
Planning forms for data communications are not included in this list.
Table D–1. System Planning Forms
Used for Planning
Form No.
Form Title
Features and Calling
Privileges
N/A
Employee Communication Survey
Control Unit Assembly
and Operating
Conditions
1
System Planning
Continued on next page
System Manager's Guide D–1
System Planning Forms
Table D–1, Continued
Used for Planning
Form No.
Form Title
System Component
Numbering
2a
System Numbering: Extension Jacks
2b
System Numbering: Digital Adjuncts
2c
System Numbering: Line/Trunk Jacks
2d
System Numbering: Special Renumbers
3a
Incoming Trunks: Remote Access
3b
Incoming Trunks: DS1 Connectivity (100D
Module)
Incoming Line/Trunk
Connections
Features for Operators
3c
Incoming Trunks: Tie
3d
Incoming Trunks: DID
3e
Automatic Route Selection Worksheet
3f
Automatic Route Selection Tables
3g
Automatic Route Selection Default and
Special Numbers Tables
3h
LS-ID Delay
4a
Extension Copy: Analog Multiline
Telephone Template
4b
Analog Multiline Telephone
4c
Extension Copy: MLX Telephone Template
4d
MLX Telephone
4e
MFM Adjunct: MLX Telephone
4f
Tip/Ring Equipment
5a
Direct-Line Console (DLC): Analog
5b
Direct-Line Console (DLC): Digital
5c
MFM Adjunct: DLC
5d
Queued Call Console (QCC)
6a
Optional Operator Features
Features for User Groups 6b
6c
Optional Extension Features
Principal User of Personal Line
Continued on next page
D–2 System Manager's Guide
System Planning Forms
Table D–1, Continued
Used for Planning
Form No.
Form Title
Features for Systemwide
Use
6d
Message-Waiting Receivers
6e
Allowed Lists
6f
Disallowed Lists
6g
Call Restriction Assignments and Lists
6h
Authorization Codes
6i
Pool Dial-Out Code Restrictions
7a
Call Pickup Groups
7b
Group Paging
7c
Group Coverage
7d
Group Calling
8a
System Features
9a
Night Service: Group Assignment
9b
Night Service: Outward Restriction
9c
Night Service: Time Set
10a
Label Form: Posted Message
10b
System Speed Dial
System Manager's Guide D–3
System Planning Forms
D–4 System Manager's Guide
Removing/Reinstalling the
Control Unit Housing
E
This appendix provides instructions for removing the control unit housing, and
for reinstalling it.
IMPORTANT:
Use these instructions only as directed by your AT&T representative or the
AT&T Helpline representative.
Removing the Control Unit Housing
To remove the control unit’s housing, see Figure E−1.
y
1
2
Figure E–1. Removing the Control Unit Housing
System Manager's Guide E–1
Removing/Reinstalling the Control Unit Housing
Installing the Control Unit Housing
Installing the control unit’s housing involves two tasks: installing the top cover
and then installing the front cover.
This section contains instructions for both tasks.
Installing the Top Cover
To install the top cover, see Figure E−2 and follow these steps:
1. Be sure the cords have been pressed through the wire managers at the
base of the modules.
2. Hold the top cover with the hooks facing you.
3. Engage the tabs at the rear of the top cover with the carrier.
4. Lower the top cover so the legs lock into the vents on the module.
E–2 System Manager's Guide
Removing/Reinstalling the Control Unit Housing
Top cover
Empty
module
Figure E–2. Installing the Top Cover
System Manager's Guide E–3
Removing/Reinstalling the Control Unit Housing
Installing the Front Cover
To install the front cover, see Figure E−3 and follow these steps:
1. Hook the top of the front cover into the top cover.
2. Push down on the bottom of the front cover until it locks securely on the
base of the wire manager on the modules.
Front
cover
MERL
IN LE
GEND
MERLI
N LEGE
Figure E–3. Installing the Front Cover
E–4 System Manager's Guide
ND
Glossary
#
2B data
Digital information carried by two B-channels
simultaneously for better performance and quality; the bit
rate is twice that of one B-channel used alone.
account code
Code used to associate incoming and outgoing calls with
corresponding accounts, employees, projects, and clients.
Accunet
The AT&T switched digital service for 56-kbps, 64-kbps
restricted, and 64-kbps clear circuit-switched data calls.
address
A coded representation of the destination of data or of the
data’s originating terminal, such as the dialed extension
number assigned to the data terminal. Multiple terminals
on one communication line must each have a unique
address.
ADDS
(Automated Document Delivery System) Computer-based
application that stores documents in a database and
automatically faxes them on request.
adjunct
Optional equipment used with the communications
system, such as an alerting device or modem that
connects to a multiline telephone or to an extension jack.
ALS
(Automatic Line Selection) Programmed order in which the
system makes outside lines available to a user.
analog
transmission
Mode of transmission in which information is represented
in continuously variable physical quantities such as
amplitude, frequency, phase, or resistance. See also
digital transmission.
ANI
(Automatic Number Identification) Process of automatically
identifying a caller’s billing number and transmitting that
number from the caller’s local central office to another
point on or off the public network.
application
Software and/or hardware that adds functional capabilities
to the system. For example, MERLIN Identifier is an
application that provides caller identification information (if
available in the local area or jurisdiction).
ARS
(Automatic Route Selection) System feature that routes
calls on outside trunks according to the number dialed
and trunk availability.
A
System Manager's Guide GL–1
Glossary
ASCAP
(American Society of Composers, Artists, and Producers)
ASN
(AT&T Switched Network) AT&T telecommunications
services provided through an Integrated Digital Services
Network Primary Rate Interface (ISDN-PRI) trunk, Accunet
switched digital service, Megacom, Megacom 800,
Software Defined Network (SDN), Multiquest, and Shared
Access for Switch Services (SASS).
AT&T Attendant
Application with equipment that connects to one or more
tip/ring (T/R) extension jacks and automatically answers
incoming calls with a recorded announcement; directs
calls in response to touch tones.
AT&T Switched
Network
See ASN.
AUDIX Voice Power
A voice-processing application, part of IS II/III, that
provides Automated Attendant, Call Answer, Information
Service, Message Drop, Voice Mail, and, optionally, Fax
Attendant System for use with the system.
Automated
Attendant
IS II/III, MERLIN MAIL, and AT& T Attendant application
that automatically answers incoming calls with a recorded
announcement and directs callers to a department, an
extension, or the system operator.
Automated
Document Delivery
System
See ADDS.
Automatic Line
Selection
See ALS.
Automatic Number
Identification
See ANI.
GL–2 System Manager's Guide
Glossary
Automatic Route
Selection
See ARS.
auxiliary power unit
Device that provides additional power to the system.
backup
Procedure for saving a copy of system programming onto
a floppy disk or memory card. See also restore.
barrier code
Password used to limit access to the Remote Access
feature of the system.
basic carrier
Hardware that holds and connects the processor module,
power supply module, and up to five other modules in the
system. See also expansion carrier.
B-channel
(Bearer-channel) 64- or 56-kbps channel that carries a
variety of digital information streams, such as voice at 64
kbps, data at up to 64 kbps, wideband voice encoded at
64 kbps, and voice at less than 64 kbps, alone or
combined.
Basic Rate Interface
See BRI.
Bearer-channel
See B-channel.
Behind Switch
mode
One of three modes of system operation, in which the
control unit is connected to (behind) another telephone
switching system, such as Centrex or DEFINITY, which
provides features and services to telephone users. See
also Hybrid/PBX mode and Key mode.
BIS
(Built-In Speakerphone) Part of the model name of some
analog multiline telephones.
bit
(binary digit) One unit of information in binary notation; it
can have one of two values, zero or one.
bit rate
Speed at which bits are transmitted, usually expressed in
bps. Also called “data rate.”
BMI
(Broadcast Music Incorporated)
board
A module, for example, 100D or 408 MLX GS/LS, that
allows you to connect lines/trunks and extensions to the
communication system.
board assignment
System Programming and Maintenance (SPM) procedure
for assigning line/trunk and extension modules to slots on
the control unit.
B
System Manager's Guide GL–3
Glossary
board renumbering
System programming procedure for renumbering boards
that have already been assigned to specific slots on the
control unit.
BRI
(Basic Rate Interface) A standard protocol for accessing
Integrated Service Digital Network (ISDN) services.
button
Key on the face of a telephone that is used to access a
line, activate a feature, or enter a code on a
communications system.
byte
Sequence of bits (usually eight) processed together. Also
called “octet.”
Call Accounting
System
See CAS.
Call Accounting
Terminal
See CAT.
Calling group
Team of individuals who answer the same types of calls.
Call Management
System
See CMS.
CAS
(Call Accounting System) DOS- or UNIX System-based
application that monitors and manages
telecommunications costs.
CAT
(Call Accounting Terminal) Standalone unit with a built-in
microprocessor and data buffer that provides simple call
accounting at a low cost.
CCITT
(International Telegraph and Telephone Consultative
Committee)
CCS
(common-channel signaling) Signaling in which one
channel of a group of channels carries signaling
information for each of the remaining channels, permitting
each of the remaining channels to be used to nearly full
capacity. In the system’s 100D module, channel 24 can be
designated as the signaling channel for channels 1–23.
centralized
telephone
programming
Programming of features on individual telephones;
performed at a central location by the system manager.
See also system programming and extension
programming.
central office
See CO.
C
GL–4 System Manager's Guide
Glossary
Centrex
Set of system features to which a user can subscribe on
telephone trunks from the local telephone company.
channel
Telecommunications transmission path for voice and/or
data.
channel service
unit
See CSU.
clock
synchronization
Operation of digital facilities from a common clock.
CMS
(Call Management System) DOS-based application that
simulates the actions of a system operator by answering
and distributing calls. Also produces reports for call
analysis.
CO
(central office) Location of telephone switching equipment
that provides local telephone service and access to toll
facilities for long-distance calling.
coaxial cable
Cable consisting of one conductor, usually a small copper
tube or wire within and insulated from another conductor
of larger diameter, usually copper tubing or copper braid.
common channel
signaling
See CCS.
communications
system
Software-controlled processor complex that interprets
dialing pulses, tones, and or keyboard characters and
makes the proper interconnections both inside and
outside. Consists of a computer, software, a storage
device, and carriers with special hardware to perform the
actual connections. Provides voice and/or data
communications services, including access to public and
private networks, for telephones and other equipment.
Also referred to in this guide as “system,” short for
MERLIN LEGEND Communications System.
control unit
Processor module, power supply module, other modules,
carriers, and housing of the system.
console
Telephone and adjuncts (if any) at operator or system
programmer extension.
CONVERSANT
Entry-level voice response application that automatically
answers and routes calls and executes telephone
transactions.
Coverage
Set of system features that can determine how extensions’
calls are covered when the person at the extension is busy
or not available.
System Manager's Guide GL–5
Glossary
CSU
(channel service unit) Equipment used on customer
premises to provide DS1 facility terminations and signaling
compatibility.
Data-channel
See D-channel.
data
communications
equipment
See DCE.
data module
A type of ISDN terminal adapter that acts as the DCE at a
data station that communicates over high-speed digital
facilities.
data station
Special type of extension where data communications take
place; includes DTE and DCE; sometimes a telephone is
also part of a data station.
data terminal
An input/output device (often a personal computer) that
can be connected to the control unit via an interface.
data terminal
equipment
See DTE and data terminal.
DCE
(data communications equipment) Equipment such as
modems or data modules used to establish, maintain, and
terminate a connection between the system and data
terminal equipment (DTE), such as printers, personal
computers, host computers, or network workstations.
D-channel
(Data-channel) 16- or 64-kbps channel that carries
signaling information or data on a PRI.
dedicated feature
buttons
The imprinted feature buttons on a telephone: Conf or
Conference, Drop, Feature, HFAI (Hands Free Answer on
Intercom), Hold, Message, Mute or Microphone, Recall,
Speaker or Speakerphone, and Transfer.
desktop
videoconferencing
system
A system application that allows face-to-face,
simultaneous video and voice communications between
individuals and requires high-speed ISDN data
transmission facilities. See also group videoconferencing
system.
DFT
(direct facility termination) See personal line.
dial access
See feature code.
D
GL–6 System Manager's Guide
Glossary
Dialed Number
Identification
Service
See DNIS.
dial-out code
Digit (usually a 9 ) or digits dialed by telephone users to
get an outside line.
dial plan
Numbering scheme for system extensions, lines, and
trunks.
DID
(Direct Inward Dialing) Service that transmits from the
telephone company central office and routes incoming
calls directly to the called extension, calling group, or
outgoing trunk pool, bypassing the system operator.
DID trunk
Incoming trunk that receives dialed digits from the local
exchange, allowing the system to connect directly to an
extension without assistance from the system operator.
digital
Representation of information in discrete elements such as
off and on or zero and one. See also analog transmission.
Digital Signal 0
See DS0.
Digital Signal 1
See DS1.
digital subscriber
line
See DSL.
digital transmission
Mode of transmission in which the information to be
transmitted is first converted to digital form and then
transmitted as a serial stream of pulses. See also analog
transmission.
direct facility
termination
(DFT) See personal line.
Direct Inward
Dialing
See DID.
Direct-Line Console
See DLC.
Direct Station
Selector
See DSS.
display buttons
Buttons on an MLX display telephone used to access the
telephone’s display.
DLC
(Direct-Line Console) Telephone used by a system
operator to answer outside calls (not directed to an
individual or a group) and inside calls, transfer calls, make
outside calls for users with outward calling restrictions, set
up conference calls, and monitor system operation.
System Manager's Guide GL–7
Glossary
DNIS
(Dialed Number Identification Service) Service provided
by the AT&T Switched Network (ASN); it routes incoming
800 or 900 calls according to customer-selected
parameters, such as area code, state, or time of call.
door answering unit
Device connected to a basic telephone jack and used at
an unattended extension or front desk.
DOS
(disk operating system)
DS0
(Digital Signal 0) Single 64-kbps voice or data channel.
DS1
(Digital Signal 1) Bit-oriented signaling interface that
multiplexes twenty-four 64-kbps channels into a single
1.544-Mbps stream.
DSL
(digital subscriber line) A digital facility that supports T1
Switched 56 service.
DSS
(Direct Station Selector) 60-button adjunct that enhances
the call-handling capabilities of an MLX-20L or MLX-28D
telephone used as an operator console.
DTE
(data terminal equipment) Equipment that makes the
endpoints in a connection over a data connection; for
example, a data terminal, personal computer, host
computer, or printer.
DTMF signaling
(dual-tone multifrequency signaling) Touch-tone signaling
from telephones using the voice transmission path. DTMF
signaling provides 12 distinct signals, each representing a
dialed digit or character, and each composed of two
voiceband frequencies.
EIA
(Electronic Industries Association)
Electronic
Switching System
See ESS.
endpoint
Final destination in the path of an electrical or
telecommunications signal.
ESS
(Electronic Switching System) Class of central office (CO)
switching systems developed by AT&T in which the control
functions are performed principally by electronic data
processors operating under the direction of a stored
program.
E
GL–8 System Manager's Guide
Glossary
expansion carrier
Carrier added to the control unit when the basic carrier
cannot house all of the required modules. Houses a power
supply module and up to six additional modules.
extension
An endpoint on the internal side of the communications
system. An extension can be a telephone with or without
an adjunct. Also called “station.” See also data station.
extension jack
An analog, digital, or tip/ring physical interface on a
module in the control unit for connecting a telephone or
other device to the system. Also called “station jack.”
extension
programming
Programming performed at an extension to customize
telephones for personal needs; users can program
features on buttons, set the telephone ringing pattern, and
so on. See also centralized telephone programming and
system programming.
facility
Equipment (often a trunk) constituting a
telecommunications path between the system and the
telephone company central office (CO).
Facility Restriction
Level
See FRL.
factory setting
Default state of a device or feature when an optional
setting is not programmed by the user or system manager.
fax
(facsimile) Scanning and transmission of a graphic image
over a telecommunications facility, or the resulting
reproduced image, or the machine that does the scanning
and transmitting.
Fax Attendant
System
Fax handling and processing application available with
AUDIX Voice Power.
FCC
(Federal Communications Commission)
feature
Function or service provided by the system.
feature code
Code entered on a dialpad to activate a feature.
feature module
Prior to Release 3.0, a circuit pack inserted into the
processor module, used to provide system features and
replaced when the system is upgraded.
Feature screen
Display screen on MLX display telephones; provides quick
access to commonly used features.
F
System Manager's Guide GL–9
Glossary
forced idle
Condition of the system during certain programming or
maintenance procedures; system prevents initiation of new
calls.
foreign exchange
See FX.
frequency
generator
See ring generator.
FRL
(Facility Restriction Level) ARS calling restriction type that
restricts outgoing calls to certain specified routes.
FX
(Foreign exchange) Central office (CO) other than the one
that is providing local access to the public telephone
network.
General Purpose
Adapter
See GPA.
glare
Condition that occurs when a user tries to call out on a
loop-start trunk at the same time that another call arrives
on the same trunk.
GPA
(General Purpose Adapter) Device that connects an
analog multiline telephone to optional equipment such as
an answering machine or a fax machine.
ground-start trunk
Trunk on which the communications system, after verifying
that the trunk is idle (no ground on tip lead), transmits a
request for service (puts ground on ring lead) to the
telephone company central office (CO).
group
videoconferencing
system
A system application that allows face-to-face,
simultaneous video and voice communications between
groupss and requires high-speed ISDN data transmission
facilities. See also desktop videoconferencing system.
Hands Free Answer
on Intercom
See HFAI.
hands-free unit
See HFU.
headset
Lightweight earpiece and microphone used for hands-free
telephone operation.
G
H
GL–10 System Manager's Guide
Glossary
HFAI
(Hands Free Answer on Intercom) Feature that allows a
user to answer a voice-announced call.
HFU
(Hands-Free Unit) Unit for analog multiline telephones that
allows users to make and receive calls on the
speakerphone without using the handset.
Home screen
Display normally shown on an MLX display telephone;
shows time, date, and call information, and shows when
some features are in use.
host
Telephone company or other switch providing features
and services to the system users, usually when the system
is operating in Behind Switch mode.
Hybrid/PBX mode
One of three modes of system operation, in which the
system uses trunk pools and ARS in addition to personal
lines. Provides a single interface (SA buttons) to users for
both internal and external calling. See also Behind Switch
mode and Key mode.
ICOM buttons
(intercom buttons) Telephone buttons that provide access
to inside system lines for calling other extensions or
receiving calls from them.
Inspect screen
Display screen on an MLX display telephone that allows
the user to preview incoming calls and see a list of the
features programmed on line buttons.
Integrated
Administration
Capability of IS III that simplifies the programming of
common information for the system, AUDIX Voice Power,
and, if it is also installed, Fax Attendant System.
Integrated Services
Digital Network
See ISDN.
Integrated Solution
II/III
See IS II/III.
Integrated Voice
Power Automated
Attendant
IS II application that automatically answers incoming calls
with a recorded announcement and directs callers to a
department, an extension, or the system operator.
intercom buttons
See ICOM buttons.
interface
Hardware and/or software that links systems, programs, or
devices.
I
System Manager's Guide GL–11
Glossary
IROB protector
(In-Range Out-of-Building protector) Surge-protection
device for off-premises telephones at a location within
1000 feet (305 m) of cable distance from the control unit.
IS II/III
(Integrated Solution II or Integrated Solution III) Set of
UNIX System-based applications that augments and
provides additional services using the system.
ISDN
(Integrated Services Digital Network) Public or private
network that provides end-to-end digital connectivity for all
services to which users have access by a limited set of
standard multipurpose user and network interfaces;
provides digital circuit-switched or packet-switched
connections within the network and to other networks for
national and international digital connectivity.
ISDN terminal
adapter
(Integrated Services Digital Network terminal adapter) A
device that connects the communications system with
data terminal equipment (DTE); for example, a data
module or modem acting as data communications
equipment (DCE) for a PC.
jack
Physical connection point to the system for a telephone,
trunk, or other device. Also called “port.”
kbps
(kilobits per second)
Key mode
One of three modes of system operation, in which the
system uses personal lines on line buttons for outside
calls, with a separate interface (ICOM buttons) for internal
calling. See also Behind Switch mode and Hybrid/PBX
mode.
J
K
GL–12 System Manager's Guide
Glossary
L
LAN
(local area network) Arrangement of interconnected
personal computers or terminals, sometimes accessing a
host computer, sometimes sharing resources such as files
and printers.
LDN
(Listed Directory Number)
LED
(light-emitting diode) Semiconductor device that produces
light when voltage is applied; light on a telephone.
line
Connection between extensions within the
communications system; often, however, used
synonymously with trunk.
line and trunk
assignment
Assignment of lines and trunks connected to the system
control unit to specific buttons on each telephone.
line/trunk
Refers to inside system lines and outside trunks in general
terms. See also line and trunk.
line/trunk jack
Physical interface on a module in the control unit for
connecting an outside trunk to the communications
system. Also called “trunk jack.”
line/trunk and
extension module
Module on which the jacks for connecting central office
lines/trunks and/or the jacks for connecting the extensions
are located.
local host computer
access
A method for connecting an extension jack to an on-site
computer for data-only calls through a modem or data
module.
local loop
The two-way connection between a customer premises
and the central office (CO).
logical ID
Unique numeric identifier for each extension and line/trunk
jack in the system control unit.
loop-start trunk
Trunk on which a closure between the tip and ring leads is
used to originate or answer a call. High-voltage 20-Hz AC
ringing current from the central office signals an incoming
call.
System Manager's Guide GL–13
Glossary
M
Magic on Hold
An AT&T Music On Hold enhancement that promotes a
company’s products or services.
Mbps
(megabits per second)
Megacom
The AT&T tariffed digital WATS offering for outward calling.
Megacom 800
The AT&T tariffed digital 800 offering for inward calling.
memory card
Storage medium, similar in function to a floppy disk, that
allows information to be added to or obtained from the
communication system through the PCMCIA interface slot
on the processor module.
MERLIN Identifier
Adjunct that allows users to receive, store, and use
information provided by Caller ID.
MERLIN MAIL Voice
Messaging System
Application that provides automated attendant, call
answering, and voice-mail services on the system.
MFM
(Multi-Function Module) Adapter that has a tip/ring mode
for answering machines, modems, fax machines, and
tip/ring alerts, and an SAA mode for -48 VDC alerts. It is
installed inside an MLX telephone, and is used to connect
optional equipment to the telephone. The optional
equipment and the telephone operate simultaneously and
independently.
MLX-10, MLX-10D
or MLX-10DP
telephone
10-line button digital telephone offered with (MLX-10D) or
without (MLX-10) a 2-line by 24-character display. The
MLX-10DP allows connection of Passageway Direct
Connect Solution.
MLX-16DP
telephone
16-line button digital telephone offered with a 2-line by 24character display, allowing connection of Passageway
Direct Connect Solution.
MLX-20L telephone
20-line button digital telephone with a 7-line by
24-character display.
MLX-28D telephone
28-line button digital telephone with a 2-line by
24-character display.
modem
Device that converts digital data signals to analog signals
for transmission over a telephone line, and analog signals
received on a telephone line to digital signals.
GL–14 System Manager's Guide
Glossary
module
Circuit pack in the control unit that provides the physical
jacks for connection of telephones and/or outside trunks to
the communications system. In the name of a module, the
first digit indicates the number of line/trunk jacks it
contains; the last digit indicates the number of extension
jacks it contains. If no letters appear after the number, a
line/trunk module provides loop-start trunks or an
extension jack module provides analog or tip/ring jacks.
For example, a 408 GS/LS MLX module contains four
line/trunk jacks and eight digital (MLX) extension jacks,
and provides either loop-start (LS) or ground-start
(GS)trunks.
Multi-Function
Module
See MFM.
multiline telephone
An analog or digital (MLX) telephone that provides multiple
line buttons for making or receiving calls or programming
features.
multiplexing
The division of a transmission channel into two or more
independent channels, either by splitting the frequency
band into a number of narrower bands or by dividing the
channel into successive time slots.
Music On Hold
Customer-provided music source or Magic on Hold
connected to the system through a loop-start jack.
network
Configuration of communications devices and software
connected for information interchange.
network interface
Hardware, software, or both that links two systems in an
interconnected group of systems, for example, between
the local telephone company and a PBX.
NI-1 BRI
(National Integrated Services Digital Network 1 Basic Rate
Interface) A type of digital facility that carries the
equivalent of three lines. Two are called B-channels and
provide voice and data communications services. A third
D-channel controls signaling and maintains operations on
the B-channels.
N
System Manager's Guide GL–15
Glossary
O
off-hook
Telephone is said to be off-hook when the user has lifted
the handset, pressed the Speaker button to turn on the
speakerphone, or used a headset to connect to the
communications system or the telephone network.
off-premises
telephone
See OPT.
on-hook
Telephone is said to be on-hook when the handset is hung
up, the speakerphone is turned off, and the user is not
using a headset to connect to the communications system
or the telephone network.
OPT
(off-premises telephone) Single-line telephone or other
tip/ring device connected to the system via an 008 OPT
module in the control unit. Appears as an inside extension
to the system, but may be physically located away from
the system.
OPX
(off-premises extension)
P
parity
The addition of a bit to a bit string so that the total
number of ones is odd or even, used to detect and
correct transmission errors.
PassageWay Direct
Connect Solution
Set of software applications that provides an
interface between a personal computer and an
MLX telephone.
PBX
(private branch exchange) Local electronic
telephone switch that serves local stations (for
example, extensions within a business) and
provides them with access to the public network.
PC
personal computer
PCMCIA memory card
Personal Computer Memory Card International
Association memory card) See memory card.
personal line
Central office trunk that terminates directly on one
or more telephones. In Hybrid/PBX mode, a
personal line cannot be part of a trunk pool. Also
called “DFT” (direct facility termination).
GL–16 System Manager's Guide
Glossary
PFT
(Power Failure Transfer) Feature that provides
continuity of telephone service during a
commercial power failure by switching some of the
system’s trunk connections to telephones
connected to specially designated extension jacks.
pool
In Hybrid/PBX mode, a group of outside trunks that
users can access with a Pool button or by dialing
an access code on an SA button. Also used by the
ARS feature when choosing the least expensive
route for a call.
port
See jack. Also, refers to extension or line/trunk
jacks before these are numbered according to the
dial plan during programming. The lowest jack on a
module is always Port 1.
Power Failure Transfer
See PFT.
power supply module
Device that directs electricity to modules and
telephones on the system. One power supply
module is needed for each carrier, and an auxiliary
power unit is added if needed.
PRI
(Primary Rate Interface) Standard interface that
specifies the protocol used between two or more
communications systems. As used in North
America, it provides twenty-three 64-kbps Bchannels for voice and/or data and one 16-kbps Dchannel, which carries multiplexed signaling
information for the other 23 channels.
primary system operator
position
First jack on the first MLX or analog multiline
extension module in the control unit, that is, the
extension jack with the lowest logical ID in the
system.
prime line
Individual extension number assigned to a
telephone in a system operating in Behind Switch
mode. Each telephone user has his or her own
prime line and is automatically connected to that
line when he or she lifts the handset.
processor module
Module in the second slot of the control unit (Slot 0,
to the right of the power supply module). Includes
the software and memory that runs the system.
programming port
reassignment
Reassignment of the system programming jack
position to any of the first five extension jacks on
the first MLX module in the control unit.
System Manager's Guide GL–17
Glossary
protocol
Set of conventions governing the format and timing
of message exchanges between devices, such as
an MLX telephone and the control unit.
public network
Network that is commonly accessible for local or
long-distance calling. Also called “public switched
telephone network” or “public switched network.”
Q
QCC
(Queued Call Console) MLX-20L telephone used by a
system operator in Hybrid/PBX mode only. Used to
answer outside calls (directed to a system operator
position) and inside calls, direct inside and outside calls
to an extension or an outside telephone number, serve as
a message center, make outside calls for users with
outward calling restrictions, set up conference calls, and
monitor system operation.
R
RAM
(random-access memory) Computer memory in which an
individual byte or range of bytes can be addressed and
read or changed without affecting other parts of memory.
Remote Access
System feature that allows an outside caller to gain access
to the system, almost as if at a system extension.
restore
Procedure whereby saved and archived system
programming is reinstated on the system, from a floppy
disk or memory card. See also backup.
ring generator
Circuit pack added to the power supply that generates a
high-voltage, 20–30 Hz signal to ring a telephone.
RS-232
Physical interface, specified by the Electronics Industries
Association (EIA), that transmits and receives
asynchronous data at distances of up to 50 feet (15 m).
ROM
(read-only memory) Computer memory that can be read
but cannot be changed.
GL–18 System Manager's Guide
Glossary
S
SAA
(Supplemental Alert Adapter) Device that permits alerting
equipment to be connected to an analog multiline
telephone jack so that people working in noisy or remote
areas of a building can be alerted to incoming calls.
SA buttons
Telephone buttons that provide a single interface to users
for both internal and external calling.
SDN
(Software Defined Network) AT&T private networking
service created by specialized software within the public
network.
SID
[station (extension) identification]
signaling
Sending of control and status information between devices
to set up, maintain, or cease a connection such as a
telephone call.
single-line
telephone
Industry-standard touch-tone or rotary-dial telephone that
handles one call at a time and is connected to the system
via an extension jack on a 012, 016, or 008 OPT module.
slot
Position in a carrier for a module; numbered from 0.
SMDR
(Station Message Detail Recording) Feature that captures
detailed usage information on incoming and outgoing
voice and data calls.
SMDR printer
Printer used to produce SMDR reports. Connected to the
system via an RS-232 jack on the processor module.
Software Defined
Network
See SDN.
special character
Pause, Stop, or End-of-Dialing signal in a programmed
dialing sequence such as an Auto Dial or Personal Speed
Dial number.
SPM
(System Programming and Maintenance) DOS- or UNIX
System-based application for programming and
maintaining the system.
station
See extension.
station jack
See extension jack.
Station Message
Detail Recording
See SMDR.
Supplemental Alert
Adapter
See SAA.
System Manager's Guide GL–19
Glossary
switchhook flash
Momentary (320 ms to 1 second) on-hook signal used as a
control; may be directed to the control unit or to a host
switch outside the system. Also called “Recall” or “timed
flash.”
System Access
buttons
See SA buttons.
system date and
time
Date and time that appear on MLX display telephones and
SMDR reports.
system
programming
Programming of system functions and features that affect
most users, performed from an MLX-20L telephone or a
computer using SPM. See also extension programming
and centralized telephone programming.
System
Programming and
Maintenance
See SPM.
system
renumbering
Procedure used to change the numbers assigned to
telephones, adjuncts, calling groups, paging groups, park
zones, Remote Access, and lines/trunks.
T1
Type of digital transmission facility that in North America
transmits at the DS1 rate of 1.544 Mbps.
T1 Switched 56
service
T1 digital data transmission over the public network at 56
kbps.
telephone power
supply unit
Equipment that provides power to an individual telephone.
terminal adapter
See ISDN terminal adapter.
tie trunk
Private trunk directly connecting two telephone switches.
timed flash
See switchhook flash.
tip/ring
Contacts and associated conductors of a single-line
telephone plug or jack.
touch-tone receiver
See TTR.
T/R
See tip/ring.
trunk
Telecommunications path between the communications
system and the telephone company central office (CO) or
another switch. Often used synonymously with line.
trunk jack
See line/trunk jack.
T
GL–20 System Manager's Guide
Glossary
trunk pool
See pool and modem pool.
TTR
(touch-tone receiver) Device used to decode DTMF touchtones dialed from single-line telephones or Remote
Access telephones.
uninterruptible
power supply
See UPS.
UPS
(uninterruptible power supply) Device that connects to the
system to provide 117 VAC to the equipment when the
commercial power source fails.
VAC
(alternating-current voltage)
VDC
(direct-current voltage)
VMI
(voice messaging interface) An enhanced tip/ring port.
videoconferencing
system
System application that allows face-to-face meetings, with
voice and video, to occur between individuals or groups.
This application requires high-speed data transmission
facilities. See also desktop videoconferencing and group
videoconferencing.
voice mail
Application that allows users to send messages to other
extensions in the system, forward messages received with
comments, and reply to messages.
voice messaging
interface
See VMI.
WATS
(Wide Area Telecommunications Service) Service that
allows calls to certain areas for a flat-rate charge based on
expected usage.
U
V
W
System Manager's Guide GL–21
Glossary
GL–22 System Manager's Guide
Index
#
008 MLX module, 3-6, 5-12
008 module, 3-6
008 OPT module, 3-6, 3-9
012 module, 3-6, 3-9, 5-12
016 module, 2-25, 3-5, 3-9
100D module, 3-7, 3-10–3-11, 3-32, 5-27, 6-12
2B data, 2-30, 3-40
391A3 power supply, 3-43
400 GS/LS module, 3-6–3-7
400 module, 3-7
400EM module, 3-7
408 GS/LS module, 3-7
408 GS/LS-MLX module, 3-5, 3-7
408 module, 3-7
5ESS switch, 2-5
800 DID module, 3-7
800 GS/LS module, 3-7
800 GS/LS-ID module, 3-7, 3-35
800 module, 3-7
800 NI-BRI module, 3-12, 5-12
A
Accessories
power-related, 2-27, 3-43–3-44
protection, 3-44–3-45
Account codes
Account Code Entry feature, 4-48, 5-13
Forced Account Code Entry feature, 4-48
Accunet, 3-10, 3-11, 4-53
Adapters
channel service unit (CSU), 3-32
description, 3-32
ExpressRoute 1000 ISDN Terminal Adapter, 3-40, 3-41
General-Purpose Adapter (GPA), 3-34–3-35
ISDN terminal adapters, 3-40, 3-41
Loop-Start Trunk Adapter, 3-32
Multi-Function Module (MFM), 3-33–3-34
overview, 2-27
system, 3-32–3-33
telephone, 3-33–3-35
Universal Paging Access Module (UPAM), 3-32
Add-on products, see Applications
Adjuncts
adapters for connecting, 3-32–3-34
alerts, 3-41, 3-45, 5-29
answer/record machine, 3-41
AT&T Door Phone, 3-37, 3-41
credit card verification terminal, 3-41
data communications, 3-39–3-40
delay announcements, 3-37, 3-42
description, 3-35–3-39
dial dictation, 3-36, 3-41
Direct Station Selector (DSS), 3-41
examples (scenarios), 5-14–5-15
fax machines, 3-36–3-37, 3-42
Hands-Free Unit, 3-42
handsets, 3-38–3-39
headsets, 3-38, 3-42
loudspeaker paging, 3-36, 3-42
message-waiting indicator, 3-39, 3-42
modems, 3-37–3-38, 3-42
Multi-Function Module (MFM) and, 3-33
Music On Hold, 3-42
overview, 2-26
Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR) printer,
3-35–3-36, 3-42
summary, 3-39–3-42
system, 3-35–3-36
System Programming and Maintenance (SPM) PC, 3-36
telephone, 3-37–3-42
ADMIN jack, 3-2
Alarms
connecting maintenance alarms, 6-58
description, 3-45–3-46
power failure, 3-45
power failure DID busy-out, 3-46
system, 3-45–3-46
trouble, 3-45
Alerts, 3-41, 3-45, 5-29
Allowed/Disallowed Lists, 4-38–4-39, 6-61–6-63, 6-62,
6-64–6-66
Analog multiline telephones
adapter for attaching adjuncts to, 3-34
as Direct-Line Consoles (DLCs), 3-31
customizing (Feature Finder), 4-15–4-16
descriptions, 3-22–3-23
line buttons, 3-24
operation with headset, 3-38
Analog signals, 2-6
System Manager's Guide IN–1
Index
Applications
AT&T Attendant, 4-52
Automated Document Delivery System (ADDS), 4-53
Call Accounting System (CAS) for Windows, 4-51
Call Accounting System (CAS) Plus V3, 4-51
Call Accounting Terminal (CAT), 4-51–4-52
Call Management System (CMS), 4-52
Centrex, 4-53
CONVERSANT, 4-53, 5-32
descriptions, 4-50–4-58
Integrated Solution II package, 4-52
Integrated Solution III package, 4-52–4-53
interfacing between PC and system, 5-32–5-33
MERLIN Identifier, 4-52
MERLIN MAIL voice messaging system, 4-52
MERLIN PFC, 4-53
overview, 2-22–2-23, 4-50–4-51
PassageWay Direct Connect Solution, 4-51, 5-32–5-33
planning factors, 4-50
Primary Rate Interface (PRI), 4-53
summary (table), 4-51–4-53
System Programming and Maintenance (SPM) software,
4-51, 6-18–6-22
AT&T Attendant application, 4-52
AT&T Door Phone, 3-37, 3-41
AT&T Helpline number, 1-2
AT&T Switched Network (ASN) services, 3-10
AUDIX Voice Power application, 5-14
Authorization Codes feature, 4-13, 4-42, 5-13
Auto Dial buttons, 4-44, 5-6, 5-13–5-14
Automated Attendant service, 4-32, 5-30
Automated Document Delivery System (ADDS) application,
4-53
Automatic Callback feature, 4-46–4-47
Automatic Route Selection (ARS) feature, 4-36, 4-40–4-41,
4-48–4-49, 5-13
Auxiliary system components
connecting, 6-56–6-60
overview, 2-19, 2-26–2-29
B
B-channels, 2-14, 3-10, 5-27
Backing up the system
task description, 6-37–6-38
Translation memory card, 1-6
Barrier codes, 4-37, 4-40, 4-43
Basic calling and answering (Feature Finder), 4-4–4-10
Basic carrier, 3-2
IN–2 System Manager's Guide
Basic Rate Interface (BRI), see National Integrated
Services Digital Network 1 Basic Rate Interface
Battery backup, 3-43–3-44
Behind Switch mode
application and, 4-51–4-53
calling restrictions and, 4-13–4-14
line buttons, 3-27–3-28
overview, 2-16
prime lines, 4-29
sharing lines, 4-28–4-29
BRI, see National Integrated Services Digital Network 1
Basic Rate Interface
Buttons
Auto Dial, 4-44, 5-6, 5-13–5-14
automatic coverage using, 4-31
console, 6-13–6-15
Coverage Inside, 4-31
Coverage Off, 4-31
Coverage VMS button, 4-31
Direct Station Selector (DSS), 3-21–3-22, 3-24–3-25
Home button, 6-14
Inspct button, 6-7, 6-14
intercom (ICOM
ICOM), 3-24–3-25, 3-27–3-28
Last Number Dial, 4-45
line, 3-24, 4-13
Menu button, 6-14
MLX telephones, 3-14
More button, 6-14
Queued Call Console (QCC), 3-29–3-30
Shared SA (SSA
SSA), 3-26, 4-10, 4-29, 4-35
C
Call Accounting System (CAS) application, 4-43, 5-13
Call Accounting System (CAS) for Windows, 4-51, 5-30
Call Accounting System (CAS) Plus V3 application, 4-51
Call Accounting Terminal (CAT) application, 4-51–4-52, 5-6
Call Management System (CMS) application, 4-52, 5-29
Call-by-Call Service Selection, 3-10
Caller ID feature, 3-7, 3-15, 5-33
Calling groups
assignments, 6-60–6-61
description, 4-45
labels, 6-74–6-75
supervisor’s console, 5-29
troubleshooting problems, 8-1, 8-6–8-7, 8-15,
8-21–8-22
Calling group supervisor features (Feature Finder),
4-25–4-27
Calling restrictions
Index
Allowed/Disallowed Lists, 4-35–4-36
assigning Allowed Lists to extensions, 6-61–6-63, 6-64
assigning Disallowed Lists to extensions, 6-66–6-68,
6-64
Authorization Codes feature, 4-42
changing, 6-44–6-45
changing Allowed Lists, 6-61–6-63, 6-64
changing Disallowed Lists, 6-64–6-66
examples (scenarios), 5-5, 5-19–5-20
Facility Restriction Levels (FRLs), 4-36
Feature Finder, 4-13–4-14
Night Service lists, 4-36
overview, 4-35–4-41
pool dial-out code restriction, 4-36
Remote Access feature, 4-47–4-48
star codes and, 6-44
Toll and outward restrictions, 4-35
voice messaging systems (VMSs), 4-58
Calling Group Supervisor’s Guide, 7-13
Carriers, 3-2
Central office (CO), 2-6
Centralized switching, 2-7
Centralized telephone programming
guidelines, 6-24–6-25
overview, 6-22–6-24
procedure, 6-25–6-27
starting, 6-23–6-24
using the Copy Extension feature, 6-27
Centrex, 4-53
Channel service unit (CSU), 3-32
Channels, 2-14, 3-10
CO, see Central office (CO)
Components
auxiliary, 2-19, 2-26–2-29
connecting auxiliary equipment, 6-56–6-60
ordering information, 7-11
overview, 2-18–2-19
power-related, 3-43–3-46
sample setups (scenarios), 5-5, 5-14–5-16
Console
button
button programming, 6-13–6-15
lights, 6-16
overlay, 6-15–6-16
Control unit
battery backup, 3-43–3-44
carriers, 3-2
definition, 2-10
description, 3-1–3-14
environmental requirements, 1-6–1-7
line/trunk and extension modules, 2-21, 3-1, 3-9
modem connections to, 6-18–6-22
modules, 3-5
OPRE (Off-Premises Range Extender), 3-44–3-45
overview, 2-18
PCMCIA interface slot, 3-3–3-4
power supply, 3-4
processor module, 3-2–3-4
programming retention, 8-1–8-2
protective cover, 3-1
slot numbering, 3-2
super capacitor, 3-3
surge protectors, 3-45
system alarm, 3-45
troubleshooting problems, 8-2–8-3, 8-4, 8-9
CONVERSANT application, 4-53, 5-29, 5-32
Coverage features, 4-30–4-32, 4-10–4-12
Coverage groups, 4-34
Coverage Inside button, 4-31
Coverage Off button, 4-31
Coverage VMS button, 4-31
Covering calls
Coverage features, 4-30–4-32
coverage groups, 4-34
Coverage Inside button, 4-31
Coverage Off button, 4-31
Coverage VMS button, 4-31
Delayed Call Forwarding option, 4-30, 4-32–4-33, 4-34
Direct Voice Mail feature, 4-32–4-33
examples (scenarios), 5-5–5-6, 5-16–5-19
Feature Finder, 4-10–4-12
Forward and Follow Me features, 4-29–4-30, 4-34
Group Coverage feature, 4-34
Individual Coverage feature, 4-34–4-35
overview, 4-28–4-35
Pickup feature, 4-30, 4-35
planning factors, 4-28
Primary Coverage, 4-31
System Manager's Guide IN–3
Index
Covering calls continued
prime lines, 4-29
receiver, 4-30
Remote Call Forward feature, 4-34
Secondary Coverage, 4-31
sender, 4-30
Shared SA (SSA) buttons, 4-35
sharing lines, 4-28–4-29
summary, 4-33–4-35
Credit card verification terminal adjunct, 3-41
CSU, see Channel service unit (CSU)
D
Data communications, 2-13–2-14, 2-29–2-30, 4-46–4-47
Data communications equipment (DCE), 2-29–2-30,
3-39–3-40
Data entry screens, 6-7
Data modules, see ISDN terminal adapters
Data station, 2-29–2-30
Data terminal equipment (DTE), 2-29, 3-40
Data/Video Reference, 7-13–7-14
DCE, see Data communications equipment (DCE)
DEFINITY, 2-13–2-14, 3-11
Delay announcement devices, 3-37, 3-42, 5-29
Delayed Call Forwarding option, 4-30, 4-32–4-33, 4-34,
5-17
Desktop videoconferencing, 2-30, 4-46–4-47, 5-29
Diagnosing phone problems, See Troubleshooting
Diagnosing system problems, see Troubleshooting the
system
Dial dictation equipment, 3-36
Dialed Number Identification Service (DNIS), 3-10
Dialers, 2-5–2-6
Dialing features, 4-44–4-45
DID trunks, see Direct Inward Dialing (DID) trunks
Digital Signal 1 (DS1) facility
100D module and CSU, 3-10–3-11, 3-32
definition, 2-13–2-14
examples (scenarios), 5-27
Digital signals, 2-6
Direct Inward Dialing (DID) trunks
definition, 2-13
Direct Voice Mail feature, 4-32
example (scenario), 5-29
Direct local connection, 6-19–6-20
IN–4 System Manager's Guide
Direct Station Selector (DSS)
buttons, 3-21–3-22, 3-24–3-25
calling group supervisor’s console with, 5-29
description, 3-20–3-22
dialing features, 4-44
Direct-Line Console (DLC) with, 3-32
overview, 2-19
Queued Call Console (QCC) with, 3-30
summary, 3-41
Direct Voice Mail feature, 4-17, 4-32, 5-14
Direct-Line Consoles (DLCs)
adding an operator position, 6-48–6-51
adding operator features, 6-54–6-56
as calling group supervisor’s console, 5-29
description, 3-31–3-32
Direct Station Selector (DSS) and, 3-32
Feature Finders, 4-4–4-10, 4-12, 4-25–4-27
overview, 2-19
troubleshooting problems, 8-14, 8-9–8-10
DLC, see Direct-Line Consoles (DLCs)
DNIS, see Dialed Number Identification Service (DNIS)
service
Documentation, see System guides
DS1, see Digital Signal 1 (DS1) facility
DSS, see Direct Station Selector (DSS)
DTE, see Data terminal equipment (DTE)
E
Electromagnetic interference filters, 3-45
Employee Communications Survey form, 1-5
Environmental requirements, 1-6–1-7
Equipment and Operations Reference
description, 7-10–7-11
overview, 1-3, 7-3
using, 7-11
Error log, 6-33, 6-34
Exchange, see Central office (CO)
Expansion carriers, 3-2
ExpressRoute 1000 ISDN Terminal Adapter, 2-30, 3-40,
3-41, 5-13, 5-28–5-29
Extension Copy feature, 6-27
Extension forced idle state, 6-11–6-12
Extension jacks, 3-8–3-9
Extension modules, see Modules
Extension numbers, 3-8–3-9
Index
Extension programming, 6-24–6-25
Extension Status feature, 5-29
Extensions
adding, 6-39–6-41
moving, 6-41–6-42, 6-44
removing, 6-42–6-44
F
Facility, 2-12–2-16
Facility Restriction Levels (FRLs), 4-40–4-41
Fax machines, 3-34, 3-36–3-37, 3-42, 6-57–6-58
Feature Finders
basic calling and answering, 4-4–4-10
calling privileges and restrictions, 4-13–4-14
covering calls, 4-10–4-12
customizing phones, 4-15–4-16
messaging, 4-17–4-19
overview, 4-2–4-3
special operator/supervisor features, 4-25–4-27
system management, 4-20–4-24
timekeeping, 4-20
Feature Reference
description, 7-4–7-7
overview, 1-3, 7-3
using, 7-7
Feature upgrade, 1-5–1-6
Feature Upgrade memory card, 1-6
Features
adding, 6-54–6-56
descriptions, 4-28–4-50
dialing, 4-44–4-45
finding, see Feature Finders
group, 4-2, 4-45
operator, 4-2
overview, 2-22, 4-1–4-2
planning and programming, 7-15–7-16
security, 4-43–4-44
system management, 4-2, 4-49
systemwide, 4-2
troubleshooting problems, 8-1–8-22
user, 4-1–4-2
Forced Account Code Entry feature, 4-48
Forced idle reminder tones, 6-12
Forward and Follow Me features, 4-29–4-30, 4-32–4-33,
4-34, 5-17
Forwarding Delay option, see Delayed Call Forwarding
option
G
General-Purpose Adapter (GPA), 3-34–3-35
Global telephone network, 2-2
GPA, see General-Purpose Adapter (GPA)
Ground-start trunks, 2-12
Group Coverage feature, 4-34, 6-68–6-69
Group features, 4-45–4-46, 6-60–6-61, 6-68–6-70, 6-74–
6-75
Group Paging feature, 4-46, 5-28
Group videoconferencing, 3-11, 5-13, 5-31
H
Hands-Free Unit adjunct, 3-42
Handsets, 3-38–3-39
Hardware, see Components
Headsets, 3-38, 3-42
Helpline number, 1-2
Hybrid/PBX mode
application and, 4-51–4-53
Automatic Route Selection (ARS), 4-48–4-49
covering personal lines, 4-29
dual-location company scenario, 5-21–5-30
large professional office scenario, 5-7–5-21
line buttons, 3-25–3-27
overview, 2-2
personal lines, 4-29
sharing lines, 4-28–4-29
sharing SA buttons, 4-29
I
ICOM (Intercom) buttons, 3-24–3-25, 3-27–3-28
Idle states, 6-10–6-12
In-Range Out-of-Building (IROB) protection, 3-44
Incoming trunks, see Trunks
Individual Coverage feature, 4-34–4-35
System Manager's Guide IN–5
Index
Information Finder (quick reference table)
basics (features), 7-14–7-15
basics (systemwide), 7-17
extension features and buttons, 7-18
group features and buttons, 7-19
labeling display features, 7-15
lines/trunks, 7-20–7-21
maintenance and troubleshooting, 7-16–7-17
operators, 7-19–7-20
planning and programming features, 7-15–7-16
security, 7-16
system management, 7-16–7-17
Information screens, 6-6
Inspect feature, 6-7
Integrated Administration, 5-14
Integrated Solution application package, 4-52–4-53, 5-13,
6-18
Integrated Solution II application package, 4-52
Integrated Solution III application package, 4-52–4-53
Intercom buttons, see ICOM (Intercom) buttons
IROB, see In-Range Out-of-Building (IROB) protection
ISDN terminal adapter data station, 3-40
ISDN terminal adapters, 3-40, 3-41, 3-39, 5-13
L
Jacks
definition, 3-2
extension, 3-8–3-9
line/trunk, 3-5
MLX, 3-8
processor module, 3-2
Labels
changing for calling groups, 6-74–6-75
changing for lines/trunks, 6-72
changing for Posted Messages, 6-73–6-74
Extension Directory, 6-70–6-71
Last Number Dial button, 4-45
Line buttons
analog multiline telephones, 3-24
Behind Switch mode, 3-27–3-28
Hybrid/PBX mode, 3-25–3-27
Key mode, 3-24–3-25
single-line telephones, 4-13
Line or trunk idle state, 6-11
Line/trunk modules, see Modules
Lines/trunks
adding, 6-47–6-48
changing labels, 6-72
definition of, 2-21–2-22
examples (scenarios), 5-5, 5-27
overview, 2-14
removing, 6-47–6-48
shared lines, 4-28–4-29
Local Area Network (LAN), 5-28–5-30
Local exchange area, 2-9
Local loop, 2-2–2-4
Local network, 2-8
Logical ID, see Extension jacks
Loop-Start Trunk Adapter, 3-32, 3-36
Loop-start trunks, 2-12–2-16
Loudspeaker paging systems, 3-36, 3-42, 5-6, 5-13, 6-57
K
M
Key mode
applications and, 4-51–4-53
covering personal lines, 4-29
line buttons, 3-24–3-25
overview, 2-16
personal lines, 4-29
small medical office scenario, 5-2–5-6
Maintenance and troubleshooting, see Troubleshooting the
system
Maintenance upgrade, 1-5–1-6
Maintenance Upgrade memory card, 1-6
J
IN–6 System Manager's Guide
Index
Managing the system
adding a Direct-Line Console (DLC) operator position,
6-48–6-51
adding a line, 6-47–6-48
adding a Queued Call Console (QCC) operator
position, 6-51–6-54
adding an extension, 6-39–6-41
adding operator features, 6-54–6-56
adding/removing a line, 6-45–6-48
assigning Allowed Lists to extensions, 6-63–6-64
assigning Disallowed Lists to extensions, 6-66–6-68
backing up the system, 6-37–6-39
Call Accounting Terminal, 5-6
changing Allowed Lists, 6-61–6-63
changing calling group assignments, 6-60–6-61
changing calling group labels, 6-74–6-75
changing calling restrictions, 6-44–6-45
changing Disallowed Lists, 6-64–6-66, 6-68
changing Extension Directory labels, 6-70–6-71
changing Group Coverage assignments, 6-68–6-69
changing Night Service with group assignment, 6-69–
6-70
changing Posted Message labels, 6-73–6-74
changing System Directory labels, 6-75–6-76
changing trunk labels, 6-72–6-73
connecting auxiliary equipment, 6-56–6-60
error logs, 6-34
Feature Finder (system management), 4-20–4-24
idle states, 6-10
Information Finder (system management), 7-16–7-17
Integrated Administration, 5-14
Integrated Solution application package, 5-13
Integrated Solution II application package, 4-52
Integrated Solution III application package, 4-52–4-53
moving an extension, 6-41–6-42, 6-44
overview, 1-3
printing reports, 6-35–6-36
removing extensions, 6-42–6-44
reports, 5-6
setting system date and/or time, 6-36–6-37
system management features, 4-49–4-50, 4-2
system planning forms, 1-5
system programming introduction, 6-5–6-10
troubleshooting problems, 8-1–8-22
using reports, 6-32–6-37
using the programming procedures, 6-3–6-4
using the task descriptions, 6-1–6-3
Megacom 800 service, 3-10
Megacom WATS service, 3-10
Memory cards
Feature Upgrade, 1-6, 3-4
Maintenance Upgrade, 1-6, 3-4
PCMCIA interface slot, 3-3
Translation (backup and restore), 1-6, 3-4
Menu hierarchy, 7-8
Menu selection screens, 6-6–6-7
MERLIN Identifier application, 4-52
MERLIN MAIL voice messaging system application, 4-52
MERLIN PFC, 4-53
MERLIN Phone-Fax-Copier, see MERLIN PFC
Message-waiting indicator, 3-39, 3-42
Messaging
examples (scenarios), 5-6
Feature Finder, 4-17–4-19
message-waiting indicator, 3-39
MFM, see Multi-Function Module (MFM)
MLX jacks, 3-8
MLX telephones
adapters, 3-33–3-34
buttons, 3-14
Caller ID, 3-15
changing Extension Directory labels, 6-70–6-71
changing Posted Message labels, 6-73–6-74
changing System Directory labels, 6-75–6-76
changing system labels, 6-70–6-71
common features, 3-14–3-15
customizing (Feature Finder), 4-15–4-16
descriptions, 3-14–3-20
Direct-Line Consoles (DLCs), 3-31
headset operation with, 3-38
interfacing with PC, 5-32–5-33
language selection for display, 3-15
messaging (Feature Finder), 4-17–4-19
MLX-10, 3-20
MLX-10D, 3-19
MLX-10DP, 3-19, 5-5, 5-14
MLX-16DP, 3-18, 5-14
MLX-20L, 3-17, 5-5, 5-14, 6-5, 6-12–6-18
MLX-28D, 3-16, 5-5, 5-14
Multi-Function Module (MFM) adapter, 3-33–3-34
overview, 2-18
troubleshooting problems, 8-1–8-22
MLX-10 telephone, 3-20
MLX-10D telephone, 3-19
MLX-10DP telephone, 3-19, 5-5, 5-14
MLX-16DP telephone, 3-18, 5-14
MLX-20L telephone, 3-17, 5-5, 5-14, 6-5, 6-12–6-18
MLX-28D telephone, 3-16, 5-5, 5-14
System Manager's Guide IN–7
Index
Modem connections for system programming, 6-18–6-19,
6-20–6-22
Modems, 3-37–3-38, 3-42, 5-28–5-30
Modes of operation
applications supported, 4-51–4-53
Behind Switch, 2-16, 4-29
Hybrid/PBX, 2-16, 4-28–4-29, 5-7, 5-21
Key, 2-16, 4-29
modules and, 3-9
overview, 2-16–2-18
Modules
008, 3-6, 3-9
008 MLX, 3-6, 5-12
008 OPT, 3-9, 3-6
012, 3-6, 3-9, 5-12
016, 3-9, 3-5
100D, 3-10–3-11, 3-7, 3-32, 6-12
400, 3-7
400 GS/LS, 3-6–3-7
400EM, 3-7
408, 3-7
408 GS/LS, 3-7
408 GS/LS-MLX, 3-5, 3-7
800, 3-7
800 DID, 3-7
800 GS/LS, 3-7
800 GS/LS-ID, 3-7, 3-35
description, 3-5–3-14
examples (scenarios), 5-12
label names, 3-5
modes of operation and, 3-9
overview, 2-21–2-22
Power Failure Transfer (PFT) telephones, 3-9
slot numbers, 3-2
summary table, 3-6–3-8
touch-tone receivers (TTRs), 3-9
Multi-Function Module (MFM), 3-33–3-34
Multiline telephones, see Analog multiline telephones; MLX
telephones
MultiQuest service, 3-10
Music On Hold, 3-36, 3-42, 5-29, 6-57
IN–8 System Manager's Guide
N
National Integrated Services Digital Network 1 Basic Rate
Interface (NI-1 BRI), 2-13, 2-30, 4-53, 5-12
Night Service
emergency numbers, 4-36
group assignment, 6-69–6-70
outward restrictions, 4-39–4-40
Notify feature, 5-6
O
Off-hook, 2-5
Off-Premises Range Extender (OPRE), 3-44–3-45
On-hook, 2-5
Operating modes, see Modes of operation
Operator consoles
adding a Direct-Line Console (DLC) operator position,
6-48–6-51
adding a Queued Call Console (QCC) operator
position, 6-51–6-54
adding operator features, 6-54–6-56
description, 3-28–3-32
Direct-Line Consoles (DLCs), 3-31–3-32
examples (scenarios), 5-14, 5-30
Feature Finder, 4-25–4-27
maximum number, 3-28–3-29
overview, 2-19, 3-28
Queued Call Consoles (QCCs), 3-29
troubleshooting problems, 8-16, 8-13–8-15, 8-21, 8-9–
8-12
Operator guides, 1-3, 7-11–7-14
Operators, 3-28
OPRE, see Off-Premises Range Extender (OPRE)
Outward and toll restrictions, 4-38
Index
P
PagePac Plus, 3-36
PagePac Port Saver, 3-36
PagePal paging adapter, 3-32
Paging groups, 4-46
Party-line service, 2-7
PassageWay Direct Connect Solution application, 4-51,
5-32–5-33
Passwords, see Barrier codes
PBX, see Private branch exchanges (PBXs)
PC, see Personal computer (PC)
PCMCIA, see Memory cards
Personal computer (PC)
Caller ID, 5-33
interface with system, 5-32–5-33
PassageWay Direct Connect Solution application, 5-32–
5-33
programming with SPM, systemwide, 6-18–6-22
with SPM software, 6-5
Personal Directory feature, 5-13–5-14
Personal lines, 3-26, 4-10, 4-29, 4-34
Personal Speed Dial feature, 5-6
PFT, see Power-failure transfer (PFT) telephone
Pickup feature, 4-30, 4-35
Pickup groups, 4-46
PictureTel 4000, 5-13
Pool dial-out code restriction, 4-40
Port, see Extension jacks
Posted Messages feature, 6-73–6-74
Power
alarms for problems with, 3-45–3-46
auxiliary, 3-43
battery backup, 3-43–3-44
hardware description:, 3-43–3-45
module in control unit, 3-4
protection for, 3-44–3-45
telephones and, 3-44
Power accessories
battery backup, 3-43–3-44
calculating unit load, 3-43
description, 3-43–3-44
overview, 2-27
telephone power units, 3-44
Power failure alarms, 3-45–3-46
Power Failure DID Busy-Out, 3-46
Power Failure Transfer (PFT) feature
modules with PFT jacks, 3-6–3-8
telephones, 3-9–3-10, 3-46
Power supply module, 3-4
Power-related hardware
800 NI-BRI and 100D modules, power supply for, 3-43
accessories, 2-27, 3-43–3-44
auxiliary power units, 3-43
electromagnetic interference filters, 3-45
In-Range Out-of-Building (IROB) protection, 3-44
Off-Premises Range Extender (OPRE), 3-44–3-45
overview, 3-43–3-45
Power Failure Transfer (PFT) telephones, 3-46
surge protection, 3-45
system alarms, 3-45–3-46
telephone power units, 3-44
Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS), 3-43–3-44
PRI, see Primary Rate Interface (PRI)
Primary Coverage, 4-31
Primary Rate Interface (PRI)
Call-by-Call Service Selection, 3-10
description, 3-10–3-11, 4-53
examples (scenarios), 5-27
overview, 2-14
Prime lines, 4-10, 4-29, 4-35
Private branch exchanges (PBXs), 2-2
Private-line service, 2-6–2-7
Processor module
description, 3-2–3-4
PCMCIA interface slot, 3-2–3-3
super capacitor, 3-3
System Manager's Guide IN–9
Index
Programming screens, 6-5–6-10
Programming the system, see System programming
Protection accessories
description, 2-27, 3-44–3-45
electromagnetic interference filters, 3-45
IROB (In-Range Out-of-Building), 3-44
OPRE (Off-Premises Range Extender), 3-44–3-45
surge protectors, 3-45
Q
Queued Call Consoles (QCCs)
adding a QCC operator position, 6-52–6-53
adding an operator position, 6-51–6-54
adding operator features, 6-54–6-56
automatic coverage, 4-31
buttons, 3-29–3-30, 3-31
description, 3-29–3-31
Direct Station Selector (DSS) and, 3-30
examples (scenarios), 5-14, 5-30
Feature Finder, 4-25–4-27
operator restrictions, 4-21–4-27
overview, 2-19
terminal adapter and modem restrictions, 3-40
troubleshooting problems, 8-10–8-12
Voice Announce to Busy feature, 3-29, 6-52
Quick reference tables, see Feature Finders; Information
Finders
R
Recall button, 8-19–8-21
Receiver (Coverage), 4-30
Reference guides, see System reference guides
Release 3.1 and later systems
Allowed Lists, 6-62
Allowed/Disallowed Lists, 4-39
calling restrictions, 4-13
Disallowed List provided with, 4-39
Disallowed Lists, 6-64–6-66
Facility Restriction Levels (FRLs), 4-40–4-41
star code dialing pause, 4-43
star codes, 4-36, 6-44, 6-62
trunk-to-trunk transfers, 4-43
voice messaging ports, 4-38, 4-54, 6-45
IN–10 System Manager's Guide
Release 4.0 and later systems
2B data, 3-40
applications, 4-53
calling group overflow option, 4-45
Delayed Call Forwarding option, 4-30, 4-32–4-33, 4-34,
5-17
lines/trunks, 2-13–2-14
modules for, 2-25, 3-12, 3-9
single-line telephones and, 4-13
T1 data operation, 3-11
telephone company services, 4-53
Voice Announce to Busy feature, 3-29, 6-52
Remote Access feature, 4-47–4-48, 5-14, 5-29–5-30, 6-19
Remote Call Forward feature, 4-34, 4-37, 5-29–5-30
Reports
Call Accounting Terminal, 5-6
overview, 6-32–6-36
printing SMDR reports, 6-35
printing system programming reports, 6-35–6-36
Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR), 3-35
Ring generator, 3-9
Rotary-dial telephones, 2-5–2-6
S
SA (System Access) buttons, 3-24, 3-25–3-26
Scenarios
dual-location company, 5-21–5-30
large professional office, 5-7–5-21
optimizing the system, 5-30–5-33
overview, 5-1
small medical office, 5-2–5-6
Screen keys, 6-8–6-10
SDN, see Software Defined Network (SDN)
Secondary Coverage, 4-31
Security
barrier codes, 4-43
features, 4-42–4-44
Information Finder, 7-16
overview, 4-36–4-37, 4-43–4-44
Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR), 4-43
voice messaging systems (VMSs), 4-56–4-58
Sender (Coverage), 4-30
Setting system date and/or time, 6-36–6-37
Shared lines, 4-10, 4-28–4-29, 4-34
Shared SA (SSA
SSA) buttons, 3-26, 4-29, 4-35, 4-10
Signaling feature, 5-6
Index
Simultaneous voice and data, 3-34
Single-line telephones
disabling Transfer on, 4-13
list of, 3-23
modules for, 3-9
Power Failure Transfer and, 3-46
removing line buttons from, 4-13
troubleshooting problems, 8-3–8-4, 8-12–8-13, 8-19–
8-21
SMDR, see Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR)
SMDR jack, 3-2
SO, see Switching offices (SOs)
Software Defined Network (SDN), 3-10
Speakerphones, 3-38
Speed dialing, 4-44–4-45, 5-6
SPM, see System Programming and Maintenance (SPM)
software
SSA buttons, see Shared SA buttons
Star (*) codes, 4-36, 4-43, 6-44, 6-62, 6-64–6-66
Star code dialing pause, 4-43
StarSet headpiece, 3-38
Station Busy screen, 6-10
Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR)
description, 3-35–3-36, 4-49
example (scenario), 5-15
jack, 3-2
printer, 3-35–3-36, 3-42
printing reports, 6-35
records, 3-35
reports, 6-32–6-33
security, 4-43
Station switching, 2-7
Super capacitor, 3-3
Supra Binaural headpiece, 3-38
Supra Binaural Noise-Canceling (NC) headpiece, 3-38
Supra Monaural headpiece, 3-38
Supra Monaural Noise-Canceling (NC) headpiece, 3-38
Surge protection, 3-45
Switches
automatic, 2-9
definition, 2-2
electromechanical, 2-9
electronic switching system (ESS), 2-10
global telephone network, 2-2
hierarchy, 2-8
Hybrid/PBX mode, 2-2
manual, 2-9
overview, 2-2
party-line service, 2-7
PBXs (private branch exchanges), 2-2
private-line service, 2-6–2-7
station switching, 2-7
switching offices (SOs), 2-8
Switchhook, 2-5, 8-19–8-21
Switching offices (SOs), 2-8
System adjuncts, see Adjuncts
System alarms, see Alarms
System applications, see Applications
System backup, see Backing up the system
System capacities, 2-25–2-26
System components, see Components
System date, 6-36
System Directory feature, 5-6, 5-13–5-14, 6-75
System features, see Features
System forced idle state, 6-11–6-12
System guides
Calling Group Supervisor’s Guide, 7-12
Data/Video Reference, 7-12, 7-13–7-14
Equipment and Operations Reference, 7-10–7-11
Feature Reference, 7-4–7-7
Information Finder, 7-14–7-21
ordering, 7-2
overview, 1-3, 7-1–7-2
System Programming, 7-7–7-10
system reference guides, 1-2–1-3, 7-2–7-11
user and operator guides, 1-2–1-3, 7-1, 7-11–7-13
using this book, 1-2–1-3
System Manager's Guide IN–11
Index
System Information Sheet, 8-1
System management, see Managing the system
System management features, 4-49–4-50
System manager
responsibilities, 1-4–1-5
role, 1-3–1-4
System operator consoles, see Operator consoles
System overview
applications, 2-22–2-23
auxiliary components, 2-26–2-27
capacities, 2-25–2-26
components, 2-18–2-19
data communications, 2-29
features, 2-22
introduction, 1-1–1-2, 2-10–2-12
modes of operation, 2-16–2-18
modules, 2-21
system programming, 2-25
trunks, 2-12–2-14
System Planning, 1-3
System planning forms
Employee Communications Survey, 1-5
overview, 1-5
System Information Sheet, 8-1
System Programming
description, 7-7–7-10
overview, 1-3, 7-3
using, 7-9–7-10
System programming
accessing from a PC with SPM software, 6-19
accessing from the console, 6-16
backup, 3-4, 6-37–6-38
direct local connection, 6-19–6-20
exiting, 6-17–6-18
extensions, 2-25
features, 4-2–4-25
forced idle reminder tones, 6-12
from a PC with SPM software, 6-18–6-22
from the console, 6-12–6-18
idle states, 6-10–6-12
introduction, 6-5–6-10
menu and options, 6-7–6-8
menu hierarchy, 7-3
modem connections, 6-18–6-19, 6-20, 6-22
moving among screens, 6-8–6-10
overview, 2-23–2-25, 6-5
printing reports, 6-35–6-36
programming retention, 8-1–8-2
programming screens, 6-5–6-10
remote access, 6-19
reports overview, 6-33–6-35
saving entries, 6-8–6-10
IN–12 System Manager's Guide
System programming continued
screen keys, 6-8–6-10
screens and menus, 6-5–6-10
Station Busy screen, 6-10
systemwide, 2-25
types of, 6-5
using the programming procedures, 6-3–6-4
System Programming and Maintenance (SPM) software
ADMIN jack, 3-2
description, 4-51
example (scenario), 5-30
PC with, 2-25, 3-36
using, 6-5, 6-18–6-22
System programming console, 6-1, 6-5, 6-12–6-18
System Programming menu, 6-7
System programming reports, 6-33–6-35, 6-36
System reference guides
common elements, 7-2–7-3
Equipment and Operations Reference, 7-10–7-11
Feature Reference, 7-3, 7-4–7-7
Information Finder (quick reference table), 7-2–7-3
ordering, 7-2
overview, 1-3, 7-2–7-3
System Programming, 7-7–7-10
System Speed Dial feature, 5-13–5-14, 6-75–6-76
System time, 6-36
System upgrade, see Upgrading the system
T
T/R, see Tip/ring (T/R)
T1 operation
data, 2-14, 3-11, 4-53
description, 3-11
example (scenario), 5-27
overview, 2-13–2-14, 3-11–3-12
voice, 2-13, 3-11
T1 Switched 56 service, see T1 operation, data
Tandem network, 2-8
Telephone adapters
description, 3-33–3-35
Multi-Function Module (MFM), 3-33–3-34
Telephone adjuncts
description, 3-37–3-39
handsets, 3-38–3-39
headsets, 3-38
message-waiting indicator, 3-39
modems, 3-37–3-38
overview, 2-26
Telephone programming, 2-25
Index
Telephones
adapters, 2-27, 3-33–3-34
analog multiline, 3-27
analog signals, 2-6
Caller ID, 3-15
cradle, 2-5
customizing (Feature Finder), 4-15–4-16
descriptions, 3-14–3-28
digital signals, 2-6
global network, 2-2
handsets for, 3-38–3-39
history of, 2-2–2-6
labeling display features, 7-15
language selection for display, 3-15
messaging (Feature Finder), 4-17–4-19
MLX, 3-14–3-20
off-hook, 2-5
on-hook, 2-5
overview, 2-5, 2-18
Power Failure Transfer (PFT), 3-46
power units, 3-44
receiver, 2-5
rotary-dial, 2-5
single-line, 3-23–3-24
switchhook, 2-5
touch-tone, 2-5
transmitter, 2-5
troubleshooting problems, 8-1–8-22
Terminal adapters, see ISDN terminal adapters
Tie trunks, 2-12–2-13, 2-14, 5-13, 5-27
Timekeeping (Feature Finder), 4-20
Tip/ring (T/R)
adjuncts, 3-33–3-34
devices, 2-6, 3-9
General-Purpose Adapter (GPA), 3-34–3-35
Multi-Function Module (MFM) adapter, 3-33–3-34
original meanings, 2-5
Toll fraud, see Security
Toll network, 2-8
Touch-tone phones, 2-5–2-6
Touch-tone receivers (TTRs)
description, 3-9
modules with, 3-6–3-8
Remote Access feature, 4-47
Training, 7-21
Transferring calls, 5-5
Translation (backup and restore) memory card, 1-6
Trouble alarm, 3-45
Troubleshooting the system
all phones dead, 8-2–8-3
callers getting incorrect response from voice mail,
8-16–8-17
calling groups, 8-21–8-22
calls not going to coverage, 8-17–8-18
calls not going to voice mail, 8-14–8-16
cannot hear caller, 8-18
difficulty making outside calls, 8-4–8-7
Direct-Line Consoles (DLCs), 8-9–8-10, 8-21
error logs, 6-34
Information Finder, 7-16–7-17
Night Service not working, 8-13–8-14
operator consoles, 8-13–8-15, 8-9–8-12
other problems, 8-22
overview, 8-1–8-2
phone does not ring, 8-7–8-9
problems with Recall button or switchhook, 8-19–8-21
programmed button fails, 8-18–8-19
Queued Call Consoles (QCCs), 8-10–8-12
Reminder Service messages with wrong time, 8-19
single-line phones ring back, 8-12–8-13
some phones dead, 8-3–8-4
System Information Sheet, 8-1
transfer problem on outside line, 8-13
Trunk-to-trunk transfers, 4-43
Trunks
definition, 2-8
DID (direct inward dialing), 2-13
DS1 (T1 and PRI), 2-13–2-14
ground-start (GS), 2-12
loop-start, 2-12
overview, 2-12–2-16
tie, 2-12–2-13, 2-14
types of, 2-12–2-16
TTRs, see Touch-tone receivers (TTRs)
U
Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS), 3-44, 5-5, 5-14,
5-28–5-30
Universal Paging Access Module (UPAM), 3-32, 3-36
Upgrading the system, 1-5–1-6
UPS, see Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS)
User and operator guides, 1-3, 7-11–7-14
System Manager's Guide IN–13
Index
V
Videoconferencing
data communications equipment for, 3-39–3-40
desktop, 2-30, 4-46–4-47
group, 3-11, 5-31, 5-13
tie trunks for, 5-13
IN–14 System Manager's Guide
VMSs, see Voice messaging systems (VMSs)
Voice Announce to Busy feature, 3-8, 6-52
Voice messaging systems (VMSs), 4-38, 4-54–4-58, 5-30,
6-45, 6-58