Sierra Wireless MP 700 Series Specifications

Product Technical Specification
& Customer Design Guidelines
AirPrime MC7710
2400089
Rev 6
Contents subject to change
Preface
Important
Notice
Due to the nature of wireless communications, transmission and reception of data
can never be guaranteed. Data may be delayed, corrupted (i.e., have errors) or be
totally lost. Although significant delays or losses of data are rare when wireless
devices such as the Sierra Wireless modem are used in a normal manner with a
well-constructed network, the Sierra Wireless modem should not be used in
situations where failure to transmit or receive data could result in damage of any
kind to the user or any other party, including but not limited to personal injury,
death, or loss of property. Sierra Wireless accepts no responsibility for damages
of any kind resulting from delays or errors in data transmitted or received using
the Sierra Wireless modem, or for failure of the Sierra Wireless modem to
transmit or receive such data.
Safety and
Hazards
Do not operate the Sierra Wireless modem in areas where blasting is in progress,
where explosive atmospheres may be present, near medical equipment, near life
support equipment, or any equipment which may be susceptible to any form of
radio interference. In such areas, the Sierra Wireless modem MUST BE
POWERED OFF. The Sierra Wireless modem can transmit signals that could
interfere with this equipment.
Do not operate the Sierra Wireless modem in any aircraft, whether the aircraft is
on the ground or in flight. In aircraft, the Sierra Wireless modem MUST BE
POWERED OFF. When operating, the Sierra Wireless modem can transmit
signals that could interfere with various onboard systems.
Note: Some airlines may permit the use of cellular phones while the aircraft is on the
ground and the door is open. Sierra Wireless modems may be used at this time.
The driver or operator of any vehicle should not operate the Sierra Wireless
modem while in control of a vehicle. Doing so will detract from the driver or
operator's control and operation of that vehicle. In some states and provinces,
operating such communications devices while in control of a vehicle is an offence.
Limitation of
Liability
The information in this manual is subject to change without notice and does not
represent a commitment on the part of Sierra Wireless. SIERRA WIRELESS AND
ITS AFFILIATES SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM LIABILITY FOR ANY AND ALL
DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, GENERAL, INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL,
PUNITIVE OR EXEMPLARY DAMAGES INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
LOSS OF PROFITS OR REVENUE OR ANTICIPATED PROFITS OR REVENUE
ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE ANY SIERRA WIRELESS
PRODUCT, EVEN IF SIERRA WIRELESS AND/OR ITS AFFILIATES HAS BEEN
ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES OR THEY ARE
FORESEEABLE OR FOR CLAIMS BY ANY THIRD PARTY.
Notwithstanding the foregoing, in no event shall Sierra Wireless and/or its
affiliates aggregate liability arising under or in connection with the Sierra Wireless
product, regardless of the number of events, occurrences, or claims giving rise to
liability, be in excess of the price paid by the purchaser for the Sierra Wireless
product.
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Proprietary and Confidential - Contents subject to change
3
Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
Patents
This product may contain technology developed by or for Sierra Wireless Inc.
This product includes technology licensed from QUALCOMM®.
This product is manufactured or sold by Sierra Wireless Inc. or its affiliates under
one or more patents licensed from InterDigital Group and MMP Portfolio
Licensing.
Copyright
©2013 Sierra Wireless. All rights reserved.
Trademarks
AirCard® is a registered trademark of Sierra Wireless. Sierra Wireless™,
AirPrime™, Watcher™, and the Sierra Wireless logo are trademarks of Sierra
Wireless.
Windows® and Windows Vista® are registered trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation.
Macintosh and Mac OS X are registered trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in
the U.S. and other countries.
QUALCOMM® is a registered trademark of QUALCOMM Incorporated. Used
under license.
Other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Contact
Information
Sales Desk:
Phone:
1-604-232-1488
Hours:
8:00 AM to 5:00 PM Pacific Time
E-mail:
sales@sierrawireless.com
Post:
Sierra Wireless
13811 Wireless Way
Richmond, BC
Canada
V6V 3A4
Technical support:
support@sierrawireless.com
RMA support:
repairs@sierrawireless.com
Fax:
1-604-231-1109
Web:
www.sierrawireless.com
Consult our website for up-to-date product descriptions, documentation,
application notes, firmware upgrades, troubleshooting tips, and press releases:
www.sierrawireless.com
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2400089
Preface
Revision
History
Revision
number
Release date
Changes
1
October 2010
Initial release.
2
May 2011
Draft release.
3
September 2011
Updated LED table
Updated UMTS Tx and Rx test sequences
Updated LTE power consumption
Added suggested antenna part number
4
January 2013
Updated preface.
Removed note indicating LTE Band 1 support was SKU-dependent.
Added Windows 8 support.
Corrected HSDPA data rate category.
Corrected GPRS/EDGE class details.
Updated current consumption - standby+sleep activated, LPM+sleep deactivated
(Table 6-1)
5
February 2013
Updated developer zone URL
6
March 2013
Removed DC-HSPA+ SKU-dependency, and LTE Band 1 SKU-dependency note
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
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2400089
Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Supported RF bands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Physical features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Application interface features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Packet mode features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
LTE features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Short Message Service (SMS) features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Position location (GPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Warranty and support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Supporting documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Required connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Ordering information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Integration requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Technology Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
LTE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
UMTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
HSPA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
HSPA+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
DC-HSPA+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
GPRS / EDGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Standards Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Electrical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Host interface pin assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
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USB interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
USB high / full speed throughput performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
User-developed drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
SIM interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
SIM implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Control interface (Signals) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
WAKE_N — Wake host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
W_DISABLE_N and GPS_EN_N — Wireless disable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
WLAN_LED_N — LED output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Digital interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
RF Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
RF connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Shielding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Antenna and cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Ground connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Interference and sensitivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Interference from other wireless devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Host-generated RF interference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Device-generated RF interference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Methods to mitigate decreased Rx performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Radiated Spurious Emissions (RSE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Radiated sensitivity measurement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Sierra Wireless’ sensitivity testing and desensitization investigation . . . 43
Sensitivity vs. frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Supported frequencies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Conducted Rx sensitivity / Tx power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
GPS specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Power consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Module power states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Power state transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
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Contents
Power interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Power ramp-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Power-up timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Transmit power waveform (GSM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Power supply noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
SED (Smart Error Detection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Software Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Support tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
USB interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Mechanical and Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Device views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Labeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Electrostatic discharge (ESD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Thermal considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Regulatory and Industry Approvals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Important notice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Safety and hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
EU regulatory conformity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Antenna Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Recommended GPS antenna specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Antenna tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Design Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
AT command entry timing requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Acceptance testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Acceptance test requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Acceptance test procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
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Certification testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Production testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Functional production test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Production test procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
UMTS RF transmission path test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
UMTS RF receive path test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
LTE RF receive path test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
GPS standalone connector test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Quality assurance testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Suggested testing equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Testing assistance provided by Sierra Wireless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
IOT/Operator testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Extended AT commands for testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Packaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Web site support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Sierra Wireless documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Command documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Other Sierra documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Industry / other documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
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2400089
List of Tables
Table 1-1: Supported RF bands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Table 1-2: Required host-module connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Table 2-1: Supported GPRS / EDGE power classes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Table 3-1: Standards compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Table 4-1: Connector pin assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Table 4-2: Power and ground specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Table 4-3: USB interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Table 4-4: SIM interface signal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Table 4-5: Module control signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Table 4-6: LED states (Default behavior) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Table 4-7: GPIO signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Table 5-1: LTE frequency band support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Table 5-2: LTE bandwidth support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Table 5-3: WCDMA frequency band support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Table 5-5: Conducted Rx (Receive) sensitivity — LTE bands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Table 5-6: Conducted Rx (Receive) sensitivity — UMTS bands. . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Table 5-7: Conducted Rx (Receive) sensitivity — GSM / EDGE bands. . . . . . . . 45
Table 5-4: GSM frequency band support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Table 5-8: Conducted Tx (Transmit) power tolerances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Table 5-9: GPS specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Table 6-1: Averaged standby DC power consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Table 6-2: Averaged call mode DC power consumption (LTE / WCDMA / HSUPA) .
50
Table 6-3: Averaged call mode DC power consumption (GSM / EDGE) . . . . . . 50
Table 6-4: Miscellaneous DC power consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Table 6-5: Module power states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Table 6-6: Power state transitions (including voltage / temperature trigger levels). .
52
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Table 8-1: Mechanical and environmental specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Table A-1: Antenna requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Table A-2: GPS standalone antenna requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Table B-1: Hardware integration design considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Table C-1: Test settings — Transmission path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Table C-2: Test settings — Receive path. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Table C-3: Test settings — Receive path. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Table C-4: Extended AT commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Table F-1: Acronyms and definitions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
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List of Figures
Figure 4-1: System block diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Figure 4-2: Expanded RF block diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Figure 4-3: SIM application interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Figure 4-4: SIM card contacts (contact view) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Figure 4-5: Recommended WAKE_N connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Figure 4-6: Recommended wireless disable connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Figure 4-7: Example LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Figure 5-1: Module connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Figure 6-1: Voltage / temperature monitoring state machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Figure 6-2: Power-up timing diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Figure 6-3: GSM transmit power waveform (class 10 operation) . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Figure 8-1: Top and bottom views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Figure 8-2: Dimensioned view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Figure 8-3: Unit label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Figure 8-4: Shield locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Figure 4-1: Device placement in module tray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Figure 4-2: Shipping package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
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2400089
1
1: Introduction
The Sierra Wireless MC7710 PCI Express Mini Card is a compact,
lightweight, wireless LTE- and UMTS-based modem.
The MC7710 provides LTE, DC-HSPA+, HSPA+, HSDPA, HSUPA,
WCDMA, GSM, GPRS, EDGE, and GPS connectivity for portable
and handheld computers, point-of-sale devices, telemetry products
and other machine-to-machine and vertical applications over several
radio frequency bands.
Supported RF bands
The modem, based on Qualcomm's MDM9200 baseband processor,
supports data operation on LTE, DC-HSPA+, HSPA+, EDGE, GPRS,
and GSM networks.
Table 1-1: Supported RF bands
Technology
LTE
UMTS (WCDMA)
HSDPA
HSUPA
HSPA+
DC-HSPA+
GSM
GPRS
EDGE
GPS
Bands
•
Band 1 (2100 MHz)
•
Band 3 (1800 MHz)
•
Band 7 (2600 MHz)
•
Band 8 (900 MHz)
•
Band 20 (DD800 MHz)
•
Band 1 (2100 MHz)
•
Band 8 (900 MHz)
•
GSM 900 (900 MHz)
•
DCS 1800 (1800 MHz)
•
PCS 1900 (1900 MHz)
•
1575.42 MHz
Diversity

(MIMO)


n/a
Physical features
Rev 6 Mar.13
•
Small form factor—conforms to F1 as specified in PCI Express
Mini Card Electromechanical Specification Revision 1.2.
•
Operating temperature range: -30 °C to +60 °C
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
Application interface features
•
USB interface (QMI and Direct IP)
•
NDIS NIC interface support for Windows 7, Windows Vista, and Windows XP
platforms
•
Support for Windows 8 in-box NDIS MBIM driver
•
Multiple non-multiplexed USB channel support
•
USB selective suspend to maximize power savings
•
AT command interface ([1] AT Command Set for User Equipment (UE)
(Release 6) (Doc# 3GPP TS 27.007), plus proprietary extended AT
commands)
•
Software Development Kit (SDK) including a Linux API (Application Program
Interface)
Packet mode features
•
LTE data rates (category 3, MIMO)
· 100 Mbps DL within 20 MHz bandwidth
· 50 Mbps UL within 20 MHz bandwidth
•
Circuit-switched data bearers (up to 64 kbps for GSM and UMTS)
•
Quad-mode UMTS (WCDMA) / HSDPA / EDGE / GPRS operation
•
HSDPA data rates up to category 24
•
HSUPA data rates up to category 6
•
GPRS multislot class 10
EDGE multislot class 12
LTE features
16
•
Basic cell selection and system acquisition
· PSS / SSS / MIB decode
· SIB1–SIB8, SIB10, SIB11 decoding
•
NAS / AS security procedures
· Snow 3G/AES security
•
CQI / RI / PMI reporting
•
Paging procedures
· Paging in Idle and Connected mode
•
Dedicated bearer
· Network-initiated dedicated bearer
· UE-initiated dedicated bearer
•
Multiple PDN connections (IPv4 and IPv6 combinations)
•
Connected mode intra-LTE mobility
•
Idle mode intra-LTE mobility
•
iRAT between LTE / 2G (future release)
iRAT between LTE / 3G for idle and connection release with redirection
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Introduction
•
Detach procedure
· Network-initiated detach with reattach required
· Network-initiated detach followed by connection release
Short Message Service (SMS) features
•
Mobile-terminated SMS for UMTS
•
Mobile-originated SMS for UMTS
•
SMS over SGs (LTE)
Position location (GPS)
•
Standalone mode
•
A-GPS SUPL1.0
•
A-GPS SUPL2.0 (future release)
•
GLONASS support on GPS connector 1 (future release)
•
DC bias on GPS connector 1 to support external active GPS antenna
Warranty and support
The MC7710 offers the following support features:
•
Standard 1-year warranty
•
Enabling software (drivers, SDK, etc.) for Android, Linux, Windows 8,
Windows 7, Windows Vista, and Windows XP
Supporting documents
Several additional documents describe Mini Card design, usage, integration, and
other features. See References on page 89.
Accessories
The Universal Development Kit (UDK) is a hardware development platform for
AirPrime MC-series modules. It contains hardware components for evaluating
and developing with the module, including:
•
Development board
•
Cables
•
Antennas (Bands 17, 13, and 7 are not supported by supplied antennas)
•
Documentation suite
•
Initial allotment of support hours
•
Other accessories
For instructions on setting up the UDK, see [4] PCI Express Mini Card Dev Kit
Quick Start Guide (Doc# 2130705).
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
For over-the-air LTE testing, ensure that suitable antennas are used. (Two
antennas are required for this testing; Sierra Wireless offers an LTE-capable
antenna covering 700–2600 MHz BW — please order part number 6000492
(Qty 1 — this contains two antennas).)
Required connectors
Table 1-2 describes the connectors used to integrate AirPrime MC-series
modules into your host device.
Table 1-2: Required host-module connectors 1
Connector type
RF cables
EDGE (52-pin)
SIM
Description
•
Mate with Hirose U.FL connectors
(model U.FL #CL331-0471-0-10)
•
Two or three connector jacks, depending on module
support for diversity and GPS functionality. (Note: The
UDK has two connector jacks.)
•
Industry-standard mating connector
•
Some manufacturers include Tyco, Foxconn, Molex
•
Example: UDK board uses Molex 67910-0001
•
Industry-standard connector. Type depends on how host
device exposes the SIM socket
•
Example: UDK board uses ITT CCM03-3518
1. Manufacturers/part numbers are for reference only and are subject to change. Choose
connectors that are appropriate for your own design.
Ordering information
To order, contact the Sierra Wireless Sales Desk at +1 (604) 232-1488 between
8 AM and 5 PM Pacific Time.
Integration requirements
Sierra Wireless provides, in the document suite, guidelines for successful Mini
Card integration and offers integration support services as necessary.
When integrating the MC7710 PCI-Express Mini Card, the following items need to
be addressed:
•
Mounting—Effect on temperature, shock, and vibration performance
•
Power supply—Impact on battery drain and possible RF interference
•
Antenna location and type—Impact on RF performance
•
Regulatory approvals—As discussed in Regulatory and Industry Approvals on
page 63.
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2400089
Introduction
Rev 6 Mar.13
•
Service provisioning—Manufacturing process
•
Software—As discussed in Software Interface on page 55.
•
Host Interface, compliance with interface voltage levels
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
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2400089
2
2: Technology Overview
LTE
LTE (Long Term Evolution) is a 4th-generation wireless standard.
The 3GPP Release 8 specification outlines the features and
requirements.
Key features include.
•
Peak data rate:
· 100 Mbps DL within 20 MHz bandwidth
(Peak DL data rate in 10 MHz bandwidth: 70 Mbps (approx.) for
Cat 3 device)
· 50 Mbps UL within 20 MHz bandwidth
Actual throughput is dependent on the network configuration,
bandwidth assigned to the UE, the number of users, and RF signal conditions.
•
Up to 200 active users in a cell (5 MHz)
•
Less than 5 ms user-plane latency
•
Supported bandwidths: 5 MHz / 10 MHz / 20 MHz
•
Spectrum flexibility: 1.4–20 MHz (3–20 MHz in future F/W
release)
•
Enhanced support for end-to-end QOS
•
Physical layer uses:
· DL: OFDMA (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access).
Modulation: QPSK, 16QAM, and 64QAM
· UL: Single Carrier FDMA (single carrier modulation and
orthogonal frequency multiplexing)
Modulation: QPSK, 16QAM
•
MIMO (Multi-Input Multi-Output) antenna support
UMTS
The Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS)
specification is the 3G mobile systems standard based on an
evolution of GSM core network components. High-speed 3G systems
implementing the UMTS standard enable improved performance for
wireless data applications, delivery of enhanced multimedia content,
and improved network capacity to support additional subscribers.
HSPA
HSPA is a third generation (3G) evolution of WCDMA that combines
two extensions to UMTS — HSDPA (High Speed Downlink Packet
Access) and HSUPA (High Speed Uplink Packet Access).
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
HSPA+
HSPA+ is an enhanced version of HSPA (High Speed Packet Access), as defined
by the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Release 7 UMTS Specification
for Mobile Terminated Equipment. Using improved modulation schemes and
refined data communication protocols, HSPA+ permits increased uplink and
downlink data rates.
DC-HSPA+
Dual-Carrier HSPA+ is an enhanced version of HSPA+, as defined by the 3GPP
Release 8 UMTS Specification for Mobile Terminated Equipment. DC-HSPA+
uses paired spectrum allocations to double the bandwidth available and,
therefore, double downlink data rates.
GPRS / EDGE
GPRS and EDGE are 2G wireless technologies providing end-to-end packet data
services through reuse of existing GSM infrastructure.
Note: The network
controls slot assignments
based on current network
loads and the bandwidth
required by the mobile
device - users cannot
change slot assignments.
GPRS / EDGE packet data rates are determined by the number of timeslots
available for downlink (Rx) and uplink (Tx), and the coding scheme used for any
given transmission.
The MC7710 supports:
•
All standardized coding schemes (CS 1 to CS 4, and MCS1 to MCS9)
•
Multislot class 10 (GPRS)
· 2 Tx slots (maximum); 4 Rx slots (maximum)
· Up to 5 active slots
· No backoff
•
Multislot class 12 (EDGE)
· 4 Tx slots (maximum); 4 Rx slots (maximum)
· Up to 5 active slots
· For MCS1-4 (GMSK), up to 6dB backoff used for Tx slots 3 and 4
Table 2-1: Supported GPRS / EDGE power classes
Feature
Notes
EGSM 900 Power Class 4
2 W, 33 dBm
GSM 1800 / 1900 Power Class 1
1 W, 30 dBm
EDGE Power Class for 900MHz
Class E21
27 dBm, 0.5 W
EDGE Power Class for 1800 / 1900MHz
Class E21
26 dBm, 0.4 W
1. E2 power class applies to 8PSK modulation.
22
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2400089
3
3: Standards Compliance
The MC7710 Mini Card complies with the mandatory requirements
described in the following standards. The exact set of requirements
supported is carrier-dependent.
Table 3-1: Standards compliance
Technology
Standards
LTE
•
3GPP Release 8
UMTS
•
3GPP Release 5
•
3GPP Release 6
•
3GPP Release 7
•
3GPP Release 8
GSM / GPRS / EDGE •
•
Rev 6 Mar.13
3GPP Release 99
GERAN Feature Package #1
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
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2400089
4
4: Electrical Specifications
The system block diagram in Figure 4-1 represents the MC7710
module integrated into a host system. The module includes the
following interfaces to the host:
•
Power — Supplied to the module by the host.
•
W_DISABLE_N — Active low input from a hardware switch to the
MC7710 that disables the main RF radio.
•
GPS_EN_N — Active low input from a hardware switch to the
•
WAKE_N— Signal used to wake the host when specific events
MC7710 that disables the GPS radio.
occur.
•
WLAN_LED_N — Active-low LED drive signal provides an
indication of RADIO ON state, either WAN or GPS.
•
Antenna — Three U.FL RF connectors (two for Rx / Tx, and one for
GPS). For details, see RF Specifications on page 39.
Note that GPS can use either the dedicated GPS port, or the
diversity/MIMO port. GLONASS is supported only on the
dedicated GPS port.
•
SIM — Supported through the interface connector. The SIM
cavity / connector must be placed on the host device for this
feature.
•
USB — Interface to the host for data, control, and status infor-
mation.
•
GPIO — Four GPIOs reserved for future use.
The MC7710 has two main interface areas — the host I/O connector
and the RF ports. Details of these interfaces are described in the
sections that follow.
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
VCTCXO
TCXO_RTR
VCTCXO_DFF
RF
BLOCK
PA_BOOST_EN
VGA_MONITOR
VGA_UMTS_MONITOR
PCB ID
PCB_ID_1
PCB_ID_0
GPIO55
GPIO8
GPIO56
XO_OUT_EN
PMIC_SSBI
PM_INT_N
MDM9200
GPIO57
HW_ID_2
HW Rev ID
HW_ID_3
HW_ID_4
HW_ID_5
MFG_MODE0_N
MFG MODE
MFG_MODE1_N
MFG_MODE2_N
USIM
VPH/
VBAT
GPIO65
GPIO66
GPIO69
GPIO_3
GPIO70
GPIO_4
GPIO25
WAKE_N
GPIO24
HSUSB
GPIO23
GPIO102
GPS_EN_N
XO_OUT_A0
VCC_3.3V
GPIO_2
GPIO68
XTAL_19M_IN
USIM
GPIO_1
GPIO67
WLAN_LED_N
INTERFACE CONNECTOR
HW_ID_1
XO_OUT_D0
PM_INT_N
USIM
HW_ID_0
PM8028
SSBI
KPD_PWR_N
MPM_GPIO_2
TCXO_EN
BATT_THERM/MPP7
MPM_GPIO_1
PCB_ID_2
MPP4
Internal
64MB DDR
SDRAM
EBI2
BATT_ID/MPP8
External NAND
1Gb NAND
PWM_OUT
MPP11
RF + GRFC_GPIO
W_DISABLE_N
PS_HOLD
Figure 4-1: System block diagram
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2400089
Electrical Specifications
B7
PRX_HB
TX_HB
TX_LB1
PRX_ I
TX_LB3
B20
PA
B8
PA
B3
PA
B1
PA
B3
PRX_MB2
TX_MB3
PRX_MB1
DAC REF
PA
B8 + GSM900
PRX_LB2
PRX_Q
B7
B20
PRX_LB1
RF Main
Connector
SP10T
B1
TX_MB4
TX_I
TX_Q
DRX_MB1
Jammer Det
GSM1800 + GSM1900
GSM850/900
TX_LB4
PA
TCXO
GSM1800/1900
TX_MB1
RTR_SSB
Power Det
DRX_I
DRX_Q
DRX_LB1
B20d + B8d
B20
SP2T
B8
RF Diversity/MIMO/GPS
Connector 2
DRX_MB2
B3d
B3
SP5T
Diplexer
DRX_HB
B1
B1d + B7d
SP2T
B7
GPS
GNSS_I
GNSS
LNA
SP2T
GPS Connector 1
GNSS_Q
BASEBAND:
MDM9200
RTR8600
Figure 4-2: Expanded RF block diagram
Host interface pin assignments
The MC7710 host I/O connector provides pins for power, serial communications,
and control. Pin assignments are listed in Table 4-1. See the following tables for
pin details based on interface types:
•
Table 4-2, Power and ground specifications, on page 31
•
Table 4-3, USB interface, on page 31
•
Table 4-4, SIM interface signal, on page 32
•
Table 4-5, Module control signals, on page 35
Note: On any given interface (USB, SIM, etc.), leave unused inputs and outputs as noconnects.
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
Note: The following table describes the internal structure of the module.
GPIO pins are reserved for future use. For applications not requiring GPIO functionality,
leave these pins not connected on the host.
Table 4-1: Connector pin assignments 1
Pin
Signal name
1
WAKE_N
2
VCC
3
GPIO1
Pin
type 2
3
Description
Direction
to module
Voltage levels (V)
Active
state
Min
Typ
Max
Wake host
Output
Low
-
-
0.2
V
3.3 V supply
Input
Power
3.0
3.3
3.6
-
General purpose I/O
Input high
-
1.17
1.80
2.10
Input low
-
-0.3
-
0.63
Output high
-
1.35
-
1.80
Output low
-
0
-
0.45
4
GND
V
Ground
Input
Power
-
0
-
5
GPIO2
-
General purpose I/O
Input high
-
1.17
1.80
2.10
Input low
-
-0.3
-
0.63
Output high
-
1.35
-
1.80
Output low
-
0
-
0.45
6
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
7
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
8
USIM_PWR
-
SIM VCC supply
Output
Power
2.95 (3V SIM)
3.00 (3V SIM)
3.05 (3V SIM)
1.75 (1.8V SIM)
1.8 (1.8V SIM)
1.85 (1.8V SIM)
9
GND
V
Ground
Input
Power
-
0
-
10
USIM_DATA
-
SIM IO pin
Input
Low
-0.3 (3V SIM)
-
1.05 (3V SIM)
-0.3 (1.8V SIM)
High
Output
0.63 (1.8V SIM)
1.95 (3V SIM)
3.0 (3V SIM)
3.3 (3V SIM)
1.17 (1.8V SIM)
1.8 (1.8V SIM)
2.1 (1.8V SIM)
Low
0
-
0.45
High
2.55 (3V SIM)
-
3.0 (3V SIM)
1.35 (1.8V SIM)
1.8 (1.8V SIM)
11
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
12
USIM_CLK
-
SIM Clock
Output
Low
0
-
0.45
High
2.55 (3V SIM)
-
3.0 (3V SIM)
1.35 (1.8V SIM)
13
NC
28
-
No connect
-
-
-
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1.8 (1.8V SIM)
-
-
2400089
Electrical Specifications
Table 4-1: Connector pin assignments 1 (Continued)
Pin
14
Signal name
USIM_RST
Pin
type
-
2
Description
SIM Reset
Direction
to module
Output
Voltage levels (V)
Active
state
Min
Typ
Max
Low
0
-
0.45
High
2.55 (3V SIM)
-
3.0 (3V SIM)
1.35 (1.8V SIM)
1.8 (1.8V SIM)
15
GND
V
Ground
Input
Power
-
0
-
16
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
17
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
18
GND
V
Ground
Input
Power
-
0
-
19
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
20
W_DISABLE_N
-
Wireless Disable (main
RF radio)
Input
Low
-
-
0.4
21
GND
V
Ground
Input
Power
-
0
-
22
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
23
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
24
VCC
V
3.3 V supply
Input
Power
3.0
3.3
3.6
25
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
26
GND
V
Ground
Input
Power
-
0
-
27
GND
V
Ground
Input
Power
-
0
-
28
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
29
GND
V
Ground
Input
Power
-
0
-
30
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
31
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
32
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
33
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
34
GND
V
Ground
Input
Power
-
0
-
35
GND
V
Ground
Input
Power
-
0
-
36
USB_D-
-
USB data negative
Input/Output
Differential
-
-
-
37
GND
V
Ground
Input
Power
-
0
-
38
USB_D+
-
USB data positive
Input/Output
Differential
-
-
-
39
VCC
V
3.3 V supply
Input
Power
3.0
3.3
3.6
40
GND
V
Ground
Input
Power
-
0
-
41
VCC
V
3.3 V supply
Input
Power
3.0
3.3
3.6
42
WLAN_LED_N
-
LED Driver
Output
Low
0
-
0.45
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
Table 4-1: Connector pin assignments 1 (Continued)
Pin
Signal name
Pin
type
2
Description
Direction
to module
Voltage levels (V)
Active
state
Min
Typ
Max
43
GND
V
Ground
Input
Power
-
0
-
44
GPIO3
-
General purpose I/O
Input high
-
1.17
1.80
2.10
Input low
-
-0.3
-
0.63
Output high
-
1.35
-
1.80
Output low
-
0
-
0.45
45
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
46
GPIO4
-
General purpose I/O
Input high
-
1.17
1.80
2.10
Input low
-
-0.3
-
0.63
Output high
-
1.35
-
1.80
Output low
-
0
-
0.45
47
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
48
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
49
NC
-
No connect
-
-
-
-
-
50
GND
V
Ground
Input
Power
-
0
-
51
GPS_EN_N3
-
Wireless disable (GPS
radio)
Input
Low
-
-
0.7
52
VCC
V
3.3 V supply
Input
Power
3.0
3.3
3.6
1. The host should leave all ‘NC’ (‘no connect) pins unconnected.
2. A —Analog; I — Input; NP — No pull; O — Digital output; PU — Digital input (internal pull up); PD — Digital output (internal pull down);
V — Power or ground
3. Support for this signal is firmware dependent. Contact your Sierra Wireless account representative to determine specific availability.
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Electrical Specifications
Power supply
The host provides power to the MC7710 through multiple power and ground pins
as summarized in Table 4-2.
The host must provide safe and continuous power at all times; the module does
not have an independent power supply, or protection circuits to guard against
electrical issues.
Table 4-2: Power and ground specifications
Name
Pins
Specification
Min
VCC
2, 24, 39, 41, 52
Voltage range
See Table 4-1 on page 28.
Ripple voltage
-
-
100
mVpp
-
-
0
-
V
GND
4, 9, 15, 18, 21, 26,
27, 29, 34, 35, 37,
40, 43, 50
Typ
Max
Units
USB interface
The USB interface is the path for communication between the host and module.
The interface complies with the [11] Universal Serial Bus Specification, Rev 2.0,
and the host device must be designed to the same standard. (When designing
the host device, careful PCB layout practices must be followed.)
Table 4-3: USB interface
Name
Pin
Description
USB_D-
36
USB data negative
USB_D+
38
USB data positive
USB interface features include:
•
Data rate: Full-speed (12 Mbps) / High-speed (480 Mbps)
•
Module enumeration:
· Windows: Modem or COM ports, using host Windows drivers
· Linux: / dev / ttyUSBn devices for Linux systems with the Sierra Wireless
driver installed
•
USB-compliant transceivers
•
Selective suspend mode
•
Resumption initiated by host or module
USB high / full speed throughput performance
This device has been designed to achieve optimal performance and maximum
throughput using USB high speed mode. Although the device may operate with a
full speed host, throughput performance will be on an “as is” basis and needs to
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31
Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
be characterized by the OEM. Note that throughput will be reduced and may vary
significantly based on packet size, host interface, and firmware revision. Sierra
Wireless does not recommend using this device in USB full speed mode.
User-developed drivers
If you will be developing your own USB drivers, see [5] AirCard / AirPrime USB
Driver Developer’s Guide (Doc# 2130634).
SIM interface
The module supports one SIM (Subscriber Identity Module) (1.8 V or 3 V). The
SIM holds account information, allowing users to use their account on multiple
devices.
The SIM pins (Table 4-4) provide the connections necessary to interface to a SIM
socket located on the host device as shown in Figure 4-3 on page 33. Voltage
levels over this interface comply with 3GPP standards.
Table 4-4: SIM interface signal
Name
Pin
Description
SIM contact
number 1
Notes
USIM_PWR
8
SIM voltage
1
Power supply for SIM
USIM_DATA
10
Data I/O
7
Bi-directional SIM data line
USIM_CLK
12
Serial clock
3
Serial clock for SIM data
USIM_RST
14
Reset
2
Active low SIM reset
Ground
5
Ground reference
USIM_GND is common to module ground
USIM_GND
1. See Figure 4-4 on page 33 for SIM card contacts.
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Electrical Specifications
USIM_PWR
4.7uF
X5R
typ
0.1uF
(Optional.
Locate near the
SIM socket)
15 k - 30 k
Located near
SIM socket
(Optional.
Locate near the
SIM socket)
47 pF, 51 
USIM_CLK
(C1)
(C3)
USIM_DATA
(C7)
USIM_RST
(C2)
USIM_GND
(C5)
SIM card connector
AirPrime
embedded
module
Located near SIM socket.
NOTE: Carefully consider if ESD
protection is required – it may
increase signal rise time and
lead to certification failure
ESD
protection
Figure 4-3: SIM application interface
Contact View (notched corner at top left)
RFU
C8
C4
RFU
I/O
C7
C3
CLK
VPP
C6
C2
RST
GND
C5
C1
VCC
Figure 4-4: SIM card contacts (contact view)
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
SIM implementation
Note: For interface design
requirements, refer to:
(2G) 3GPP TS 51.010-1,
section 27.17, or
(3G) ETSI TS 102 230
V5.5.0, section 5.2.
34
When designing the remote SIM interface, you must make sure that SIM signal
integrity is not compromised.
Some design recommendations include:
•
Total impedance of the VCC and GND connections to the SIM, measured at
the module connector, should be less than 1  to minimize voltage drop
(includes any trace impedance and lumped element components — inductors,
filters, etc.).
•
Position the SIM connector 10 cm from the module. If a longer distance is
required because of the host device design, use a shielded wire assembly —
connect one end as close as possible to the SIM connector and the other end
as close as possible to the module connector. The shielded assembly may
help shield the SIM interface from system noise.
•
Reduce crosstalk on the USIM_DATA line to reduce the risk of failures during
GCF approval testing.
•
Avoid routing the USIM_CLK and USIM_DATA lines in parallel over distances
2 cm — cross-coupling of these lines can cause failures.
•
3GPP has stringent requirements for I / O rise time (<1 µs), signal level limits,
and noise immunity — consider this carefully when developing your PCB
layout.
· Keep signal rise time <1 µs — keep USIM signals as short as possible, and
keep very low capacitance traces on the USIM_DATA and USIM_CLK
signals. High capacitance increases signal rise time, potentially causing
your device to fail certification tests.
•
Add external pull-up resistors (15 k–30 k), if required, between the
USIM_DATA and USIM_PWR lines to optimize the signal rise time.
•
VCC line should be decoupled close to the SIM socket.
•
SIM is specified to run up to 5 MHz (SIM clock rate). Take note of this speed
in the placement and routing of the SIM signals and connectors.
•
You must decide whether additional ESD protection is required for your
product, as it is dependent on the application, mechanical enclosure, and SIM
connector design. The SIM pins will require additional ESD protection if they
are exposed to high ESD levels (i.e. can be touched by a user).
•
Putting an optional decoupling capacitor at USIM_PWR near the SIM socket
is recommended — the longer the trace length (impedance) from the socket to
the module, the greater the capacitance requirement to meet compliance
tests.
•
Putting an optional series capacitor and resistor termination (to ground) at
USIM_CLK at the SIM socket to reduce EMI and increase signal integrity is
recommended if the trace length between the SIM socket and module is
long — 47 pF and 50  resistor are recommended.
•
Test your first prototype host hardware with a Comprion IT3 SIM test device at
a suitable testing facility.
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Electrical Specifications
Control interface (Signals)
The MC7710 provides signals for:
•
Waking the host when specific events occur
•
Power control of the module from the host
•
LED driver output
These signals are summarized in Table 4-5 and paragraphs that follow.
Table 4-5: Module control signals
Name
Pin
Description
Type 1
WAKE_N2
1
Wake host
O
W_DISABLE_N
20
Wireless disable (Main RF)
PU
WLAN_LED_N
42
LED driver
O
GPS_EN_N2
51
Wireless disable (GPS)
PU
1. O — Digital pin Output; PU — Digital pin Input, internal pull up
2. Support for this signal is firmware dependent. Contact your Sierra Wireless account representative to determine specific availability.
WAKE_N — Wake host
The module uses WAKE_N to wake the host when specific events occur. (Support
for this signal is firmware dependent. Contact your Sierra Wireless account
representative to determine specific availability.)
The host must provide a 5 k–100 k pullup resistor that considers total line
capacitance (including parasitic capacitance) such that when WAKE_N is
deasserted, the line will rise to 3.3 V in < 100 ns.
See Figure 4-5 on page 35 for a recommended implementation.
3.3V
5k-100k
Host
WAKE_N
3
1
Q
Control
R
2
MiniCard
Figure 4-5: Recommended WAKE_N connection
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
W_DISABLE_N and GPS_EN_N — Wireless
disable
The host device uses:
•
W_DISABLE_N (pin 20) to enable / disable the WWAN or radio modem. When
•
GPS_EN_N (pin 51) to enable / disable GPS functionality on the device.
disabled, the modem cannot transmit or receive information.
(Support for this signal is firmware dependent. Contact your Sierra Wireless
account representative to determine specific availability.)
Letting these signals float high allows the module to operate normally. These
switches follow the behavior described in [10] PCI Express Mini Card
Electromechanical Specification Revision 1.2. These pins have 20 k pull-up
resistors. See Figure 4-6 on page 36 for a recommended implementation.
When integrating with your host device, keep the following in mind:
•
The signal is an input to the module and should be driven LOW only for its
active state (controlling the power state); otherwise it should be floating or
(High impedance). It should never be driven to a logic high level. The module
has an internal pull-up resistor to Module Power (3.3V) in place, so if the
signal is floating or (high impedance), the module will power on.
•
Wait for two seconds after asserting W_DISABLE_N before disconnecting
power.
•
If the host never needs to assert this power state control to the module, leave
this signal unconnected from the host interface.
3.3V
Host
Wireless disable control
(W_DISABLE_N;
GPS_EN_N)
20k
3
1
Q
R
2
MiniCard
Figure 4-6: Recommended wireless disable connection
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Electrical Specifications
WLAN_LED_N — LED output
The module drives the LED output according to [10] PCI Express Mini Card
Electromechanical Specification Revision 1.2, as described in Table 4-6 (below).
If desired, LED behavior can be configured using AT!LEDCTRL.
Table 4-6: LED states (Default behavior)
LED behavior
!LEDCTRL
index
State
Period (s)
On
Off
Description
Off
0
0%
100%
Module is not powered.
(W_DISABLE_N asserted with PCOFFEN=1)
N/A
Airplane mode
2
50%
50%
Module is in low power mode.
(W_DISABLE_N asserted with PCOFFEN=0)
4
Power up
5.2
96%
4%
Module is performing initial power up activities.
96%
4%
Module is searching service.
1
Searching
N/A
Connected
0.5
80%
20%
Module has an active context.
3
Connected, with data
transfer occuring
0.5
80%
20%
Module has an active context and data is being
transferred.
5
Error
1.6
20%
80%
Device error has occurred.
Attached
1
100%
0%
Module has attached to a network and is not
currently in a call.
N/A
2
VCC 3.3V
Current limiting Resistor
LED
MiniCard
MIO
Figure 4-7: Example LED
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
Digital interface
The MC7710 Mini Card provides the general purpose digital I/O (GPIO) signals
listed in Table 4-7:
•
By default, all GPIO pins are set as inputs.
•
Voltage should not be applied until > 1s after VCC is applied to the minicard.
•
GPIO pins are available for OEM-defined purposes but may, in future
firmware releases, be allocated by Sierra Wireless for specific functionality.
•
For applications not requiring GPIO functionality, leave these pins not
connected on the host.
Table 4-7: GPIO signals
Name
Pin
Description
Type 1,2
GPIO1
3
General purpose IO
PU
GPIO2
5
General purpose IO
PU
GPIO3
44
General purpose IO
PU
GPIO4
46
General purpose IO
PU
1. GPIO pins are initialized as PU by the firmware.
2. PU — Digital pin Input, internal pull up
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5
5: RF Specifications
The MC7710 includes three RF connectors for use with host-supplied
antennas:
•
Main RF connector — Rx / Tx path
•
GPS connector 1 — Standalone GPS
•
Diversity / MIMO / GPS connector 2— Diversity, MIMO, or GPS
The module does not have integrated antennas.
I/O connector
Main RF connector
GPS connector 1
Diversity/MIMO/GPS
connector 2
Figure 5-1: Module connectors
RF connections
When attaching antennas to the module:
Note: To disconnect the
antenna, make sure you
use the Hirose U.FL
connector removal tool
(P / N UFL-LP-N-2(01)) to
prevent damage to the
module or coaxial cable
assembly.
•
Use Hirose U.FL connectors (3 mm x 3 mm, low profile; model
U.FL #CL331-0471-0-10) to attach antennas to connection points
on the module, as shown in Figure 5-1 on page 39.
•
Match coaxial connections between the module and the antenna
to 50 .
•
Minimize RF cable losses to the antenna; the recommended
maximum cable loss for antenna cabling is 0.5 dB.
•
To ensure best thermal performance, if possible use the
mounting holes to attach (ground) the device to the main PCB
ground or a metal chassis.
Note: If the antenna connection is shorted or open, the modem will not
sustain permanent damage.
Shielding
The module is fully shielded to protect against EMI and must not be
removed.
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
Antenna and cabling
When selecting the antenna and cable, it is critical to RF performance to match
antenna gain and cable loss.
Note: For detailed electrical performance criteria, see Appendix A: Antenna Specification
on page 65.
Choosing the correct antenna and cabling
When matching antennas and cabling:
•
The antenna (and associated circuitry) should have a nominal impedance of
50  with a return loss of better than 10 dB across each frequency band of
operation.
•
The system gain value affects both radiated power and regulatory (FCC, IC,
CE, etc.) test results.
Designing custom antennas
Consider the following points when designing custom antennas:
•
A skilled RF engineer should do the development to ensure that the RF
performance is maintained.
•
If both CDMA and UMTS modules will be installed in the same platform, you
may want to develop separate antennas for maximum performance.
Determining the antenna’s location
When deciding where to put the antennas:
•
Antenna location may affect RF performance. Although the module is
shielded to prevent interference in most applications, the placement of the
antenna is still very important — if the host device is insufficiently shielded,
high levels of broadband or spurious noise can degrade the module’s performance.
•
Connecting cables between the module and the antenna must have 50 
impedance. If the impedance of the module is mismatched, RF performance
is reduced significantly.
•
Antenna cables should be routed, if possible, away from noise sources
(switching power supplies, LCD assemblies, etc.). If the cables are near the
noise sources, the noise may be coupled into the RF cable and into the
antenna. See Interference from other wireless devices on page 41.
Disabling the diversity antenna
•
Use the AT command !RXDEN=0 to disable receive diversity or !RXDEN=1 to
enable receive diversity.
Note: A diversity antenna is used to improve connection quality and reliability through
redundancy. Because two antennas may experience difference interference effects (signal
distortion, delay, etc.), when one antenna receives a degraded signal, the other may not be
similarly affected.
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RF Specifications
Ground connection
When connecting the module to system ground:
•
Prevent noise leakage by establishing a very good ground connection to the
module through the host connector.
•
Connect to system ground using the two mounting holes at the top of the
module (shown in Figure 5-1 on page 39).
•
Minimize ground noise leakage into the RF.
Depending on the host board design, noise could potentially be coupled to
the module from the host board. This is mainly an issue for host designs that
have signals traveling along the length of the module, or circuitry operating at
both ends of the module interconnects.
Interference and sensitivity
Several interference sources can affect the module’s RF performance
(RF desense). Common sources include power supply noise and devicegenerated RF.
RF desense can be addressed through a combination of mitigation techniques
(Methods to mitigate decreased Rx performance on page 42) and radiated
sensitivity measurement (Radiated sensitivity measurement on page 43).
Note: The MC7710 is based on ZIF (Zero Intermediate Frequency) technologies. When
performing EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) tests, there are no IF (Intermediate
Frequency) components from the module to consider.
Interference from other wireless devices
Wireless devices operating inside the host device can cause interference that
affects the module.
To determine the most suitable locations for antennas on your host device,
evaluate each wireless device’s radio system, considering the following:
•
Any harmonics, sub-harmonics, or cross-products of signals generated by
wireless devices that fall in the module’s Rx range may cause spurious
response, resulting in decreased Rx performance.
•
The Tx power and corresponding broadband noise of other wireless devices
may overload or increase the noise floor of the module’s receiver, resulting in
Rx desense.
The severity of this interference depends on the closeness of the other antennas
to the module’s antenna. To determine suitable locations for each wireless
device’s antenna, thoroughly evaluate your host device’s design.
Host-generated RF interference
All electronic computing devices generate RF interference that can negatively
affect the receive sensitivity of the module.
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
Proximity of host electronics to the antenna in wireless devices can contribute to
decreased Rx performance. Components that are most likely to cause this
include:
•
Microprocessor and memory
•
Display panel and display drivers
•
Switching-mode power supplies
Device-generated RF interference
The module can cause interference with other devices. Wireless devices such as
AirPrime embedded modules transmit in bursts (pulse transients) for set durations
(RF burst frequencies). Hearing aids and speakers convert these burst
frequencies into audible frequencies, resulting in audible noise.
Methods to mitigate decreased Rx performance
It is important to investigate sources of localized interference early in the design
cycle. To reduce the effect of device-generated RF on Rx performance:
•
Put the antenna as far as possible from sources of interference. The
drawback is that the module may be less convenient to use.
•
Shield the host device. The module itself is well shielded to avoid external
interference. However, the antenna cannot be shielded for obvious reasons.
In most instances, it is necessary to employ shielding on the components of
the host device (such as the main processor and parallel bus) that have the
highest RF emissions.
•
Filter out unwanted high-order harmonic energy by using discrete filtering on
low frequency lines.
•
Form shielding layers around high-speed clock traces by using multi-layer
PCBs.
•
Route antenna cables away from noise sources.
Radiated Spurious Emissions (RSE)
When designing an antenna for use with AirPrime embedded modules, the host
device with an AirPrime embedded module must satisfy the radiated spurious
emission (RSE) test cases described in:
•
CE/ETSI EN 301 908 (WCDMA), test numbers 5.3.1 (‘Radiated Emissions
(UE)’)
•
CE/ETSI EN 301 511 (GSM), test 5.2.16 (‘Radiated Spurious Emissions - MS
allocated a channel’). This test uses the procedure and requirement outlined
in 3GPP 51.010 (GSM) section 12.2.1 of the same test name.
Note that antenna impedance affects radiated emissions, which must be
compared against the conducted 50-ohm emissions baseline. (AirPrime
embedded modules meet the 50-ohm conducted emissions requirement.)
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RF Specifications
Note: GSM spurious emissions are most likely to have RSE issues, but in general, RSE
requirements must be met on all models with user-designed antennas.
Radiated sensitivity measurement
A wireless host device contains many noise sources that contribute to a reduction
in Rx performance.
To determine the extent of any receiver performance desensitization due to selfgenerated noise in the host device, over-the-air (OTA) or radiated testing is
required. This testing can be performed by Sierra Wireless or you can use your
own OTA test chamber for in-house testing.
Sierra Wireless’ sensitivity testing and
desensitization investigation
Although AirPrime embedded modules are designed to meet carrier requirements
for receiver performance, they are still susceptible to various performance
inhibitors.
As part of the Engineering Services package, Sierra Wireless offers modem OTA
sensitivity testing and desensitization (desense) investigation. For more
information, contact your account manager or the Sales Desk (see Contact
Information on page 4).
Note: Sierra Wireless has the capability to measure TIS (Total Isotropic Sensitivity) and
TRP (Total Radiated Power) according to CTIA's published test procedure.
Sensitivity vs. frequency
Sensitivity is defined as the input power level in dBm that produces a BER (Bit
Error Rate) of 2% (GSM) or 0.1% (UMTS). Sensitivity should be measured at all
GSM / UMTS frequencies across each band.
For LTE bands, sensitivity is defined as the RF level at which throughput is 95% of
maximum.
Supported frequencies
The MC7710 supports:
Rev 6 Mar.13
•
Penta-band LTE — See Table 5-1 on page 44.
•
Dual-band WCDMA / HSDPA / HSUPA / HSPA+ / DC-HSPA+ — See Table 5-3 on
page 44.
•
Dual-band WCDMA receive diversity
•
Tri-band GSM / GPRS / EGPRS — See Table 5-4 on page 45.
•
GPS
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•
Radio transceiver requirements for 3GPP Release 7
•
Inter-RAT and inter-frequency cell reselection and handover between
supported frequency bands
Table 5-1: LTE frequency band support
Band
Frequencies
Band 1
Tx: 1920–1980 MHz
Rx: 2110-2170 MHz
Band 3
Tx: 1710–1785 MHz
Rx: 1805–1880 MHz
Band 7
Tx: 2500–2570 MHz
Rx: 2620–2690 MHz
Band 8
Tx: 880–915 MHz
Rx: 925–960 MHz
Band 20
Tx: 832–862 MHz
Rx: 791–821 MHz
Table 5-2: LTE bandwidth support 1
Band
1.4 MHz
3 MHz
5 MHz
10 MHz
15 MHz
20 MHz
Band 1






Band 3




2
2
Band 7





2
Band 8



2


Band 20



2
2
2
1. Table contents are derived from 3GPP TS 36.521-1 v9.4.1, table 5.4.2.1-1.
2. Bandwidth for which a relaxation of the specified UE receiver sensitivity requirement
(Clause 7.3 of 3GPP TS 36.521-1 v9.4.1) is allowed.
Table 5-3: WCDMA frequency band support1
Band
Frequencies
Band 1
WCDMA 2100
Tx: 1920–1980 MHz
Rx: 2110–2170 MHz
Band 8
WCDMA 900
Tx: 880–915 MHz
Rx: 925–960 MHz
1. WCDMA channel spacing is 5 MHz, but this can be adjusted to
optimize performance in a particular deployment scenario.
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RF Specifications
Table 5-4: GSM frequency band support
Band
Frequencies
EGSM 900
Tx: 880–915 MHz
Rx: 925–960 MHz
GSM 1800
Tx: 1710–1785 MHz
Rx: 1805–1880 MHz
GSM 1900
Tx: 1850–1910 MHz
Rx: 1930–1990 MHz
Conducted Rx sensitivity / Tx power
Table 5-5: Conducted Rx (Receive) sensitivity — LTE bands
Conducted Rx sensitivity (dBm)
LTE bands
Primary
(Typical)
LTE Band 1
SIMO 
(Typical)
Secondary
(Typical)
SIMO 1
(Worst case)
-98.5
-98.5
-101.5
-96.3
-100.0
-99.0
TBD
-93.3
-97.5
-98.5
-99.5
-94.3
LTE Band 8
-100.0
-100.0
-102.5
-93.3
LTE Band 20
-97.5
-96.5
-99.5
-93.3
LTE Band 3
LTE Band 7
Full RB
BW: 10 MHz2
1. Per 3GPP specification
2. Sensitivity values scale with bandwidth:
x_MHz_Sensitivity = 10_MHz_Sensitivity - 10*log(10 MHz/x_MHz)
Table 5-6: Conducted Rx (Receive) sensitivity — UMTS bands
Conducted Rx sensitivity (dBm)
UMTS bands
Band 1 (UMTS 2100)
0.1% BER
12.2 kbps
Band 8 (UMTS 900)
Primary
(Typical)
Secondary
(Typical)
Primary / Secondary
(Worst case)
-111.5
-111.5
-106.7
-111.0
-111.5
-106.7
Table 5-7: Conducted Rx (Receive) sensitivity — GSM / EDGE bands
Conducted Rx sensitivity (dBm)
GSM / EDGE bands
2% BER
EGSM 900
Rev 6 Mar.13
10% BLER
Typical
Worst case
CS1
-109
-102
GMSK (CS1)
-111
-104
EDGE (MCS5)
-102
-98
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Table 5-7: Conducted Rx (Receive) sensitivity — GSM / EDGE bands
Conducted Rx sensitivity (dBm)
GSM / EDGE bands
2% BER
DCS 1800
10% BLER
2% BER
PCS 1900
10% BLER
Typical
Worst case
CS1
-108
-102
GMSK (CS1)
-111
-104
EDGE (MCS5)
-101
-98
CS1
-108
-102
GMSK (CS1)
-111
-104
EDGE (MCS5)
-101
-98
1. CS = Circuit Switched
Table 5-8: Conducted Tx (Transmit) power tolerances
Parameter
Conducted
transmit power
(dBm)
Notes
LTE
LTE Band 1,3,7,8
+22  11
LTE Band 20
+23  11
UMTS
Band 1 (IMT 2100 12.2 kbps)
Band 8 (UMTS 900 12.2 kbps)
+23  1
Connectorized (Class 3)
+32  1
GMSK mode, connectorized
(Class 4)
+27  1
8PSK mode, connectorized
(Class E2)
+29  1
GMSK mode, connectorized
(Class 1)
+26  1
8PSK mode, connectorized
(Class E2)
GSM / EDGE
GSM900 CS
DCS1800 CS
PCS1900 CS
1. Preliminary value
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RF Specifications
GPS specifications
Note: For detailed electrical performance criteria, see Recommended GPS antenna specifications on page 67.
Table 5-9: GPS specifications 1
Parameter/feature
Description
Satellite channels
12 channel, continuous tracking
Protocols
NMEA 0183 V3.0
Acquisition time
Hot start: 1 s
Warm start: 29 s
Cold start: 32 s
Accuracy
Horizontal: < 2 m (50%); < 5 m (90%)
Altitude: < 4 m (50%); < 8 m (90%)
Velocity: < 0.2 m/s
Sensitivity
Tracking2: -161 dBm
Acquisition3 (Assisted): -158 dBm
Acquisition (Standalone): -145 dBm
Operational limits
Altitude <6000 m or velocity <100 m/s
(Either limit may be exceeded, but not both.)
1. All values are preliminary.
2. Tracking sensitivity is the lowest GPS signal level for which the device can still detect an
in-view satellite 98% of the time when in sequential tracking mode.
3. Acquisition sensitivity is the lowest GPS signal level for which the device can still detect
an in-view satellite 50% of the time.
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6
6: Power
Power consumption
Note: All specifications in
these tables are preliminary, based on chipset
published expectations.
Power consumption measurements in the tables below are for the
MC7710 Mini Card module connected to the host PC via USB.
The module does not have its own power source and depends on the
host device for power. For a description of input voltage
requirements, see Power supply on page 31.
Table 6-1: Averaged standby DC power consumption 1
Current 3
Signal
Description
Bands
2
Typ
VCC
Max 4 Unit
Notes /
configuration
Standby current consumption (Sleep mode activated5)
LTE
LTE Bands
3.2
7
mA
DRX cycle = 8 (2.56 s)
HSDPA / WCDMA
UMTS bands
3.2
7
mA
DRX cycle = 8 (2.56 s)
GSM / GPRS / EDGE
GSM bands
3.9
6
mA
MFRM = 5 (1.175 s)
Standby current consumption (Sleep mode deactivated5)
LTE
LTE bands
55
65
mA
HSDPA / WCDMA
UMTS bands
55
60
mA
DRX cycle = 8 (2.56 s)
GSM / GPRS / EDGE
GSM bands
65
70
mA
MFRM = 5 (1.175 s)
Low Power Mode (LPM) / Offline Mode (Sleep mode activated5)
RF disabled, but module is operational
2.5
3.0
mA
Low Power Mode (LPM) / Offline Mode (Sleep mode deactivated5)
RF disabled, but module is operational
45
50
mA
1. 3.3V supply voltage
2. For supported bands, see Table 5-1, LTE frequency band support, on page 44, Table 5-3, WCDMA frequency
band support, on page 44, and Table 5-4, GSM frequency band support, on page 45.
3. All measurements are preliminary.
4. Measured at 30ºC / nominal voltage.
5. Assumes USB bus is fully suspended during measurements
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Table 6-2: Averaged call mode DC power consumption (LTE / WCDMA / HSUPA) 1
Current
Band 2
Signal
Description
VCC
Data current consumption
(includes USB bus current)
LTE category 3
WCDMA
LTE bands
UMTS bands
HSUPA
(1.8 / 3.6 / 7.2 / 21.1 Mbps)
UMTS bands
Max 3
Unit
1100
mA
Notes / configuration
•
100 / 50 Mbps — 23 dBm Tx
power
•
Over temperature (worst case
measured at upper / lower
temperature extreme)
•
Bandwidth ≤ 10 MHz
•
Continuous data traffic
+150
mA
Additional current draw for 20MHz
bandwidth (if supported by band /
operator)
750
mA
384 kbps at 20 dBm Tx power4
300
mA
0 dBm Tx power
800
mA
All speeds at 20 dBm Tx power5
450
mA
0 dBm Tx power
1. All measurements are preliminary values
2. For supported bands, see Table 5-1, LTE frequency band support, on page 44, Table 5-3, WCDMA frequency
band support, on page 44, and Table 5-4, GSM frequency band support, on page 45.
3. Measured at 30ºC / nominal voltage.
4. Highest current is on Band 2 (PCS1900)
5. Approximate current difference between speeds = 30 mA
Table 6-3: Averaged call mode DC power consumption (GSM / EDGE) 1
Current
Signal
Description
Band
Output power for number
of timeslots (dBm)
Max 2
Unit
1
2
3
4
700
mA
32
32
n/a
n/a
550
mA
27
27
27
27
26
26
26
26
2.75
A
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Data current consumption
(assumes USB bus current)
GSM / GPRS
VCC
EDGE
Peak current
(averaged over
100 s)
900 /
1800 / 1900
900
1800 / 1900
GSM bands
1. All measurements are preliminary values.
2. Measured at 30ºC / nominal voltage.
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Power
Table 6-4: Miscellaneous DC power consumption 1
Current
Signal
Description
Typ
Unit
Notes / configuration
Max
Module OFF leakage
current
490
830
A
Full operating temperature range
USB active current
18
25
mA
High speed USB connection, CL = 50 pF
on D+ and D- signals
VCC
Inrush current
GPS signal
connector
750
Active bias on GPS port
3000
mA
3.3
(100 mA)
V
•
Assumes power supply turn on time
> 100µs
•
Dependent on host power supply
rise time.
GPS connector 1 in Figure 5-1 on
page 39.
1. All measurements are preliminary values
Module power states
The module has five power states, as described in Table 6-5.
Module is active
•
Current consumption is affected by several factors, including:
•
•








Default state when VCC is first applied in the absence of W_DISABLE_N control
Module is capable of placing / receiving calls, or establishing data connections on the
wireless network
•
•
•
•
•
Low power
(‘Airplane
mode’)
RF enabled
•
•
•
USB interface active
Normal
(Default
state)
Details
Module is powered
State
Host is powered
Table 6-5: Module power states
Radio band being used
Transmit power
Receive gain settings
Data rate
Number of active Tx time slots
Module is active
State is controlled by host interface using software commands:
• +CFUN=0 ([1] AT Command Set for User Equipment (UE) (Release 6)
(Doc# 3GPP TS 27.007)))
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Disconnected
Normal state of module between calls or data connections
•
•
•
Host keeps module powered off by driving W_DISABLE_N low
•
Host power source is disconnected from the module and all voltages associated with
the module are at 0 V.
RF enabled
Off
•
•
USB interface active
Sleep
Details
Module is powered
State
Host is powered
Table 6-5: Module power states (Continued)












Module cycles between wake (polling the network) and sleep, at network providerdetermined interval.
Module draws minimal current
See W_DISABLE_N and GPS_EN_N — Wireless disable on page 36 for more information.]
Power state transitions
The module uses state machines to monitor supply voltage and operating
temperature, and notifies the host when critical threshold limits are exceeded.
(See Table 6-6 for trigger details and Figure 6-1 for state machine behavior.)
Power state transitions may occur:
•
Automatically, when critical supply voltage or module temperature trigger
levels are encountered.
•
Under host control, using available AT commands in response to user choices
(for example, opting to switch to airplane mode) or operating conditions.
Table 6-6: Power state transitions (including voltage / temperature trigger levels)
Temperature 1
Voltage
Transition
Notes
V2
Trigger
°C
VOLT_HI_CRIT
3.6
TEMP_LO_CRIT
-25
VOLT_LO_CRIT
2.9
TEMP_HI_CRIT
95
Low Power to Normal
VOLT_HI_NORM
3.5
TEMP_NORM_LO
-15
Low Power to Normal
or
Remain in Normal
(Remove warnings)
VOLT_LO_NORM
3.1
TEMP_HI_NORM
80
Normal (Issue warning)
VOLT_LO_WARN
3.0
TEMP_HI_WARN
85
Trigger
Normal to Low Power
Power off / on
(Host-initiated)
52
-
-
-
•
RF activity suspended
•
RF activity resumed
•
Power off recommended when
supply voltage or module
operating temperature is critically
low or high.
-
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Power
1. Module-reported temperatures at the printed circuit board.
2. Supply voltage — 3.3V
Normal mode
current_vcc < VOLT_LO_WARN
current_temp > TEMP_HI_WARN
current_vcc > VOLT_LO_NORM
current_temp < TEMP_HI_NORM
current_vcc > VOLT_LO_NORM
current_temp <= TEMP_HI_NORM
current_vcc > VOLT_HI_CRIT
current_temp < TEMP_LO_CRIT
current_vcc < VOLT_HI_NORM
current_temp > TEMP_NORM_LO
Normal mode
Low supply voltage warning
or
High temperature warning
current_vcc < VOLT_LO_CRIT
current_temp > TEMP_HI_CRIT
Low power mode
Handled by Power
State state machine.
(Manual transition)
Host asserts
W_Disable#
Off mode
Handled by Power
State state machine.
Figure 6-1: Voltage / temperature monitoring state machines
Power interface
Power ramp-up
On inital power up, inrush current depends on the power supply rise time — turn
on time >100 µs is required for < 3A inrush current.
The supply voltage must remain within specified tolerances while this is occurring.
Power-up timing
The unit is ready to enumerate with a USB host within a maximum of 3–5
seconds after power-up. Figure 6-2 on page 53 illustrates the power-up timing
sequence.
3.3V
W_Disable#
USB D+
Enumeration
Startup time
Figure 6-2: Power-up timing diagram
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
Note: Startup time is the time after power-up when the modem is ready to begin the
enumeration sequence.
Transmit power waveform (GSM)
As shown in Figure 6-3, at maximum GSM transmit power, the input current can
remain at 2.4 A for up to 25% of each 4.6 ms GSM cycle (1.15 ms) after reaching
an initial peak of 2.75 A (average over 100 µs, with an instantaneous peak current
of 3.5 A). For class 12 operation, the peak could remain for 2.3 ms (four
timeslots).
The 2.4 A current draw is for 50 ohm systems (1:1 VSWR). For worst-case
antenna designs (3.5:1 VSWR), the current draw could increase to 2.75 A, as
shown in the diagram. Beyond 3.5:1 VSWR, the current draw could increase to
3.5 A.
2.75A peak
2.75
2.4
3.5:1 VSWR = 2.75A
1:1 VSWR = 2.40A
Current
(A)
0.15
25 µs
1.15 ms
4.6 ms
Figure 6-3: GSM transmit power waveform (class 10 operation)
Power supply noise
Noise in the power supply can lead to noise in the RF signal.
The power supply ripple limit for the module is no more than 200 mVp-p 1 Hz to
100 kHz. This limit includes voltage ripple due to transmitter burst activity.
Additional decoupling capacitors can be added to the main VCC line to filter noise
into the device.
SED (Smart Error Detection)
The module uses a form of SED to track premature modem resets.
54
•
Module tracks consecutive resets occuring soon after power-on.
•
After a sixth consecutive reset, the module waits in boot-and-hold mode for a
firmware download to resolve the power-cycle problem.
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7
7: Software Interface
Support tools
The MC7710 is compatible with the following support tools from
Sierra Wireless and authorized third parties:
•
Firmware update utilities from Sierra Wireless
•
QXDM from QUALCOMM
•
QUALCOMM Product Support Tool (QPST)
•
Windows and Linux SDKs (including API and drivers)
USB interface
The device supports two USB interface types — the Sierra Wireless
Direct IP high speed interface supported by previous generation
minicard devices, and the Qualcomm QMI interface. The interfaces
are not supported simultaneously — device configuration changes are
required to switch between the interface types.
Please contact your Sierra Wireless account representative for
Direct IP and QMI interface documentation.
Rev 6 Mar.13
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8: Mechanical and Environmental Specifi- 8
cations
The MC7710 module complies with the mechanical and
environmental specifications in Table 8-1. Final product conformance
to these specifications depends on the OEM device implementation.
Table 8-1: Mechanical and environmental specifications
Mode
Details
Operational
-30ºC to +60ºC – Full RF compliance
Non-operational
-40ºC to +85ºC, 96 hours
(from MIL-STD 202 Method 108)
Relative humidity
Non-operational
85ºC, 85% relative humidity for 48 hours
(non-condensing)
Vibration
Non-operational
Random vibration, 10 to 1000 Hz, nominal
6 G rms in each of three mutually perpendicular axes.
Test duration of 60 minutes for each axis, for a total test
time of three hours.
Shock
Non-operational
Half sine shock, 2 ms, 180 in/s (375 g).
Tested in each of three mutually perpendicular axes,
positive and negative (5 x 6, 30 bumps total).
Drop
Non-operational
1 m on concrete on each of six faces, two times (module
only).
(Electrostatic discharge
(See Electrostatic
discharge (ESD) on
page 59.)
Operational
The RF port (antenna launch and RF connector) complies
with the IEC 61000-4-2 standard:
• Electrostatic Discharge Immunity: Test: Level3
Contact Discharge: ±6 kV
Air Discharge: ±8 kV
Non-operational
The host connector Interface complies with the following
standards only:
• +/- 1 kV Human Body Model (JESD22-A114-B)
Temperature
•
+/- 125 V Charged Device Model (JESD22-C101)
Thermal considerations
See Thermal considerations on page 60.
Form factor
PCI-Express Mini Card shielded with metal and metalized
fabric
Dimensions
Length:
Width:
Thickness:
Weight:
Rev 6 Mar.13
50.95 mm
30 mm
4.75 mm
Approximately 10 g
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
Device views
Top view
Top view
Bottom view
Bottom view
Figure 8-1: Top and bottom views
Figure 8-2: Dimensioned view
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Mechanical and Environmental Specifications
Labeling
MC77XX
IMEI # 352678011234569
FPPDDDYNNNNHH
BB
|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
FCC ID: N7Nxxxxxx
PRODUCT OF CHINA
Figure 8-3: Unit label
Note: The displayed label is an example only. The production label will vary by SKU.
The MC7710 label is non-removable and contains:
•
Sierra Wireless logo and product name
•
IMEI number in Code-128 barcode format
•
SKU number (when required)
•
Factory Serial Number (FSN) in alphanumeric format
•
Manufacturing date code (incorporated into FSN)
•
Licensed vendor logo
•
Certification marks/details
Note: The MC7710 supports OEM partner-specific label requirements.
Electrostatic discharge (ESD)
The OEM is responsible for ensuring that the Mini Card host interface pins are not
exposed to ESD during handling or normal operation. (See Table 8-1 on page 57
for specifications.)
ESD protection is highly recommended for the SIM connector at the point where
the contacts are exposed, and for any other signals from the host interface that
would be subjected to ESD by the user of the product. (The device includes ESD
protection on the antenna.)
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Thermal considerations
Embedded modules can generate significant amounts of heat that must be
dissipated in the host device for safety and performance reasons.
Transmitter
Receiver
Baseband 1
Baseband 2
Pin 1
Pin 1
Top
Bottom
Figure 8-4: Shield locations
The amount of thermal dissipation required depends on:
•
Supply voltage — Maximum power dissipation for the module can be up to
3.1 W (or 3.5 W in HSPA+ mode) at voltage supply limits.
•
Usage — Typical power dissipation values depend on the location within the
host, amount of data transferred, etc.
Specific areas requiring heat dissipation are shown in Figure 8-4:
•
Transmitter — Top face of module near RF connectors. Likely to be the hottest
area.
•
Baseband 1 —Top face of module, below the transmitter.
•
Receiver — Bottom face of module, behind the transmitter.
•
Baseband 2 — Bottom face of module, behind Baseband 1.
To enhance heat dissipation:
•
Maximize airflow over / around the module.
•
Locate the module away from other hot components.
•
If possible, use the mounting holes to attach (ground) the device to the main
PCB ground or a metal chassis.
Note: Adequate dissipation of heat is necessary to ensure that the module functions
properly, and to comply with the thermal requirements in [10] PCI Express Mini Card
Electromechanical Specification Revision 1.2.
Caution: Thermal putty is not recommended — incorrect application of the material could
require exessive pressure to be applied when seating the board, resulting in damage to the
board.
60
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Mechanical and Environmental Specifications
Module integration testing
When testing your integration design:
•
Test to your worst case operating environment conditions (temperature and
voltage)
•
Test using worst case operation (transmitter on 100% duty cycle, maximum
power)
•
Monitor temperature at all shield locations. Attach thermocouples to the areas
indicated in Figure 8-4 on page 60 (Transmitter, Baseband 1, Receiver,
Baseband 2).
Note: Make sure that your system design provides sufficient cooling for the module. RF
shield temperature should be kept below 90°C when integrated to prevent damage to the
module’s components. (For acceptance, certification, quality, and production (including RF) test
suggestions, see Testing on page 71.)
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9
9: Regulatory and Industry Approvals
This module is designed to and, upon commercial release, will be
certified to meet regulatory requirements (e.g. CE).
Upon commercial release, the following regulatory approvals will
have been attained:
•
CE
Upon commercial release, the following industry approvals will have
been obtained:
•
GCF-CC
Additional approvals may be obtained upon customer request —
contact your Sierra Wireless account representative for details.
Additional testing and certification may be required for the end
product with an embedded MC7710 modem and are the
responsibility of the OEM. Sierra Wireless offers professional
services-based assistance to OEMs with the testing and certification
process, if required.
Important notice
Because of the nature of wireless communications, transmission and
reception of data can never be guaranteed. Data may be delayed,
corrupted (i.e., have errors) or be totally lost. Although significant
delays or losses of data are rare when wireless devices such as the
Sierra Wireless modem are used in a normal manner with a wellconstructed network, the Sierra Wireless modem should not be used
in situations where failure to transmit or receive data could result in
damage of any kind to the user or any other party, including but not
limited to personal injury, death, or loss of property. Sierra Wireless
and its affiliates accept no responsibility for damages of any kind
resulting from delays or errors in data transmitted or received using
the Sierra Wireless modem, or for failure of the Sierra Wireless
modem to transmit or receive such data.
Safety and hazards
Do not operate your MC7710 modem:
Rev 6 Mar.13
•
In areas where blasting is in progress
•
Where explosive atmospheres may be present including
refuelling points, fuel depots, and chemical plants
•
Near medical equipment, life support equipment, or any
equipment which may be susceptible to any form of radio interference. In such areas, the MC7710 modem MUST BE
POWERED OFF. Otherwise, the MC7710 modem can transmit
signals that could interfere with this equipment.
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
In an aircraft, the MC7710 modem MUST BE POWERED OFF. Otherwise, the
MC7710 modem can transmit signals that could interfere with various onboard
systems and may be dangerous to the operation of the aircraft or disrupt the
cellular network. Use of a cellular phone in an aircraft is illegal in some
jurisdictions. Failure to observe this instruction may lead to suspension or denial
of cellular telephone services to the offender, or legal action or both.
Some airlines may permit the use of cellular phones while the aircraft is on the
ground and the door is open. The MC7710 modem may be used normally at this
time.
EU regulatory conformity
Sierra Wireless hereby declares that the MC7710 modem conforms with all
essential requirements of Directive 1999 / 5 / EC, where applicable.
The Declaration of Conformity made under Directive 1999 / 5 / EC is available for
viewing at the following location in the EU community:
Sierra Wireless (UK) Limited
Suite 5, the Hub
Fowler Avenue
Farnborough Business Park
Farnborough, United Kingdom GU14 7JP
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A
A: Antenna Specification
This appendix describes recommended electrical performance
criteria for main path, diversity path, and GPS antennas used with
AirPrime embedded modules.
The performance specifications described in this section are valid
while antennas are mounted in the host device with antenna feed
cables routed in their final application configuration.
Note: Antennas should be designed before the industrial design is finished
to make sure that the best antennas can be developed.
Table A-1: Antenna requirements a
Parameter
Requirements
Antenna system
External multi-band 2x2 MIMO
antenna system (Ant1 / Ant2)b
Operating bands of Ant1
and Ant2 c
700–960 MHz
Comments
If Ant2 includes GPS, then it must also satisfy
requirements in Table A-2 on page 67.
1710–1990 MHz
2110–2170 MHz
2500–2700 MHz
VSWR of Ant1 and Ant2
1:1 (ideal)
< 2.5:1 (recommended)
On all bands including band edges
Total radiated efficiency of
Ant1 and Ant2
> 50% on all bands
•
Measured at the RF connector.
•
Includes mismatch losses, losses in the
matching circuit, and antenna losses,
excluding cable loss.
•
Sierra Wireless recommends using
antenna efficiency as the primary
parameter for evaluating the antenna
system.
Peak gain is not a good indication of
antenna performance when integrated
with a host device (the antenna does not
provide omni-directional gain patterns).
Peak gain can be affected by antenna
size, location, design type, etc. — the
antenna gain patterns remain fixed unless
one or more of these parameters change.
Radiation patterns of Ant1
and Ant2
Rev 6 Mar.13
Nominally Omni-directional
radiation pattern in azimuth plane.
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
Table A-1: Antenna requirements (Continued) a
Parameter
Requirements
Envelope correlation
coefficient between Ant1
and Ant2
Comments
< 0.4 on 730–960 MHz band
< 0.3 on 1800–1990 MHz and
2110–2170 MHz bands
< 0.2 on 2600–2700 MHz band
Mean Effective Gain of
Ant1 and Ant2 (MEG1,
MEG2)
 -3 dBi
Ant1 and Ant2 Mean
Effective Gain Imbalance I
MEG1 / MEG2 I
< 2 dB for MIMO operation
< 6 dB for diversity operation
Maximum antenna gain
To be determined by the RF
exposure requirements and ERP /
EIRP limits, where applicable.
Isolation between Ant1 and
Ant2 (S21)
> 10 dB
Power handling
•
> 2 W RF power on low bands
•
> 1 W on high bands
•
If antennas can be moved, test all
positions for both antennas.
•
Make sure all other wireless devices
(Bluetooth or WLAN antennas, etc.) are
turned OFF to avoid interference.
•
Measure power endurance over 4 hours
(estimated talk time) using a 2 W CW
signal — set the CW test signal frequency
to the middle of the PCS Tx band
(1880 MHz for PCS).
•
Visually inspect device to ensure there is
no damage to the antenna structure and
matching components.
•
VSWR / TIS / TRP measurements taken
before and after this test must show
similar results.
a. These worst-case VSWR figures for the transmitter bands may not guarantee RSE levels to be within regulatory limits. The
device alone meets all regulatory emissions limits when tested into a cabled (conducted) 50 ohm system. With antenna
designs with up to 2.5:1 VSWR or worse, the radiated emissions could exceed limits. The antenna system may need to be
tuned in order to meet the RSE limits as the complex match between the module and antenna can cause unwanted levels of
emissions. Tuning may include antenna pattern changes, pahse/delay adjustment, passive component matching. Examples of
the application test limits would be included in FCC Part 22 and Part 24, test case 12.2.1 for GSM (3GPP TS 51.010), and test
case 4.2.2 for WCDMA (ETSI EN 301 511).
b. Ant1 — Primary, Ant2 — Secondary (Diversity / MIMO / GPS connector 2)
c. Stated band ranges satisfy requirements for both Ant1 and Ant2.
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Antenna Specification
Recommended GPS antenna
specifications
Table A-2: GPS standalone antenna requirements
Parameter
Frequency range
Field of view (FOV)
Requirements
•
1575.42 MHz ±2 MHz
minimum
•
1565–1606 MHz recommended
•
Omni-directional in azimuth
•
-45° to +90° in elevation
Comments
Polarization
(average Gv/Gh)
> 0 dB
Vertical linear polarization is
sufficient.
Free space average gain
(Gv+Gh) over FOV
> -6 dBi (preferably > -3 dBi)
Gv and Gh are measured and
averaged over -45° to +90° in
elevation, and 180° in azimuth.
Gain
•
Maximum gain and uniform
coverage in the high elevation
angle and zenith.
•
Gain in azimuth plane is not
desired.
Average 3D gain
> -5 dBi
Isolation between GPS and
Ant1
> 10 dB in all uplink bands
Typical VSWR
< 2.5:1
Polarization
Any other than LHCP (left-hand
circular polarized) is acceptable.
Antenna tests
The following guidelines apply to the requirements described in Table A-1 on
page 65 and Table A-2 on page 67:
Rev 6 Mar.13
•
Perform electrical measurements at room temperature (+20°C to +26°C)
unless otherwise specified
•
For main and diversity path antennas, make sure the antennas (including
contact device, coaxial cable, connectors, and matching circuit with no more
than six components, if required) have nominal impedances of 50  across
supported frequency bands.
•
All tests (except isolation / correlation coefficient) —Test the main or diversity
antenna with the other antenna terminated.
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
•
Any metallic part of the antenna system that is exposed to the outside
environment needs to meet the electrostatic discharge tests per IEC61000-42 (conducted discharge +8kV).
•
The functional requirements of the antenna system are tested and verified
while the embedded module’s antenna is integrated in the host device.
Note: Additional testing, including active performance tests, mechanical, and accelerated
life tests can be discussed with Sierra Wireless’ engineering services. Contact your Sierra
Wireless representative for assistance.
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B
B: Design Checklist
This chapter provides a summary of the design considerations
mentioned throughout this guide. This includes items relating to the
power interface, RF integration, thermal considerations, cabling
issues, and so on.
Note: This is NOT an exhaustive list of design considerations. It is expected
that you will employ good design practices and engineering principles in your
integration.
Table B-1: Hardware integration design considerations
Suggestion
Section where discussed
Component placement
Protect the SIM socket so the SIM cannot be removed while the
host is powered up.
SIM implementation on
page 34
If an ESD suppressor is not used, allow space on the SIM
connector for series resistors in layout. (Up to 100  may be
used depending on ESD testing requirements).
SIM implementation on
page 34
Minimize RF cable losses as these affect performance values
listed in product specification documents.
RF connections on page 39
Antennas
Match the module / antenna coax connections to 50 —
mismatched antenna impedance and cable loss negatively
affect RF performance.
RF connections on page 39
If installing CDMA and UMTS modules in the same device,
consider using separate antennas for maximum performance.
Antenna and cabling on
page 40
Power
Make sure the power supply can handle the maximum current
specified for the module type.
Power consumption on
page 49
SIM implementation on
Limit the total impedance of VCC and GND connections to the
page 34
SIM at the connector to less than 1  (including any trace
impedance and lumped element components — inductors, filters,
etc.). All other lines must have a trace impedance less than 2 .
Decouple the VCC line close to the SIM socket. The longer the
trace length (impedance) from socket to module, the greater the
capacitance requirement to meet compliance tests.
SIM implementation on
page 34
EMI / ESD
Investigate sources of localized interference early in the design
cycle.
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Methods to mitigate decreased
Rx performance on page 42
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Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
Table B-1: Hardware integration design considerations (Continued)
Suggestion
Section where discussed
SIM implementation on
Provide ESD protection for the SIM connector at the exposed
contact point (in particular, the CLK, VCC, IO, and RESET lines). page 34
Keep very low capacitance traces on the USIM_DATA and
USIM_CLK signals.
SIM implementation on
page 34
To minimize noise leakage, establish a very good ground
connection between the module and host.
Ground connection on page 41
Route cables away from noise sources (for example, power
supplies, LCD assemblies, etc.).
Methods to mitigate decreased
Rx performance on page 42
Shield high RF-emitting components of the host device (for
example, main processor, parallel bus, etc.).
Methods to mitigate decreased
Rx performance on page 42
Use discrete filtering on low frequency lines to filter out unwanted
high-order harmonic energy.
Methods to mitigate decreased
Rx performance on page 42
Use multi-layer PCBs to form shielding layers around high-speed
clock traces.
Methods to mitigate decreased
Rx performance on page 42
Thermal
Test to worst case operating conditions — temperature, voltage,
and operation mode (transmitter on 100% duty cycle, maximum
power).
Thermal considerations on
page 60
Use appropriate techniques to reduce module temperatures (for
example, airflow, heat sinks, heat-relief tape, module placement,
etc.).
Thermal considerations on
page 60
Host / Modem communication
70
Make sure the host USB driver supports remote wakeup,
resume, and suspend operations, and serial port emulation.
[5] AirCard / AirPrime USB
Driver Developer’s Guide
(Doc# 2130634)
When no valid data is being sent, do not send SOF tokens from
the host (causes unnecessary power consumption).
[5] AirCard / AirPrime USB
Driver Developer’s Guide
(Doc# 2130634)
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C
C: Testing
Note: All AirPrime embedded modules are factory-tested to ensure they
conform to published product specifications.
Developers of OEM devices integrating Sierra Wireless AirPrime
embedded modules should include a series of test phases in their
manufacturing process to make sure that their devices work properly
with the embedded modules.
Suggested phases include:
•
Acceptance testing — Testing of modules when they are received
from Sierra Wireless
•
Certification testing — Testing of completed devices to obtain
required certifications before beginning mass production
•
Production testing — Testing of completed devices with the
modules embedded
•
Quality assurance testing — Post-production
AT command entry timing
requirement
Some AT commands require time to process before additional
commands are entered. For example, the modem will return “OK”
when it receives AT!DAFTMACT. However, if AT!DASBAND is received
too soon after this, the modem will return an error.
When building automated test scripts, ensure that sufficient delays
are embedded where necessary to avoid these errors.
Acceptance testing
Note: Acceptance testing is typically performed for each shipment received.
When you receive a shipment from Sierra Wireless, you should make
sure it is suitable before beginning production.
From a random sampling of units, test that:
Rev 6 Mar.13
•
Units are operational
•
Units are loaded with the correct firmware version
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Acceptance test requirements
To perform the suggested tests, you require a test system in which to temporarily
install the module, and you must be able to observe the test device’s LED
indicator.
Acceptance test procedure
The following is a suggested acceptance testing procedure using Sierra Wireless’
Watcher™ software:
Note: You can perform
these tests using appropriate AT commands.
Test 1: Check power-up and initialization
1. After installing the module, start the test system.
2. Launch Watcher.
3. Check the LED — If the LED is off, there is a problem with the module or with
the connection to the LED.
Test 2: Check version numbers
1. From Watcher, select Help > About.
2. Verify that the firmware version in the About window is correct.
3. Close the About window.
If the module fails either of these tests, or is not recognized by Watcher:
1. Replace the module with one that is known to work correctly and repeat the
tests.
2. If the tests are successful, reinstall the original module and repeat the tests.
If the module still does not work correctly, contact your account manager.
Certification testing
Note: Typically, certification testing of your device with the integrated module is required
one time only.
The AirPrime embedded module has been certified as described in Regulatory
and Industry Approvals on page 63.
When you produce a host device with a Sierra Wireless AirPrime embedded
module, you must obtain certifications for the final product from appropriate
regulatory bodies in the jurisdictions where it will be distributed.
The following are some of the regulatory bodies from which you may require
certification — it is your responsibility to make sure that you obtain all necessary
certifications for your product from these or other groups:
72
•
FCC (Federal Communications Commission — www.fcc.gov)
•
Industry Canada (www.ic.gc.ca)
•
CSA (Canadian Standards Association — www.csa.ca)
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Testing
•
Factory Mutual (FM Global — www.allendale.com)
•
Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (www.ul.com)
•
CDG (CDMA Development Group — www.cdg.org)
•
GCF (Global Certification Forum — www.globalcertificationforum.org) outside
of North America
•
PTCRB (PCS Type Certification Review Board — www.ptcrb.com) in North
America
Production testing
Note: Production testing typically continues for the life of the product.
Production testing ensures that, for each assembled device, the module is
installed correctly (I / O signals are passed between the host and module), and the
antenna is connected and performing to specifications (RF tests).
Typical items to test include:
•
Host connectivity
•
Baseband (GPIO, host / module connectors)
•
RF assembly (Tx and / or Rx, as appropriate)
•
Network availability
•
Host / device configuration issues
Note: The amount and types of tests to perform are your decision — the tests listed in this
section are guidelines only. Make sure that the tests you perform exercise functionality to
the degree that your situation requires.
Use an appropriate test station for your testing environment (see Acceptance test
requirements on page 72 for suggestions) and use AT commands to control the
integrated module.
Note: Your test location must be protected from ESD to avoid interference with the module
and antenna(s), assuming that your test computer is in a disassembled state.
Also, consider using an RF shielding box — local government regulations may prohibit
unauthorized transmissions.
Functional production test
This section presents a suggested procedure for performing a basic manual
functional test on a laboratory bench using an AirPrime embedded module and a
Mini Card Dev Kit. When you have become familiar with the testing method, use it
to develop your own automated production testing procedures.
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Suggested production tests
Consider the following tests when you design your production test procedures for
devices with the AirPrime module installed.
•
Visual check of the module’s connectors and RF assemblies
•
Module is operational
•
USB connection is functional
•
LED is functional
•
W_DISABLE_N (module power down)
•
Firmware revision check
•
Rx tests on main and auxiliary paths
•
Tx test
Production test procedure
The following is a suggested test plan — you must decide which tests are
appropriate for your product. You may wish to add additional tests that more fully
exercise the capabilities of your product.
Using an appropriate Dev Kit-based test station, and referring to the appropriate
AT command references:
1. Visually inspect the module’s connectors and RF assemblies for obvious
defects before installing it in the test station.
2. Ensure that the module is turned off before beginning your tests — Drive
W_DISABLE_N low.
3. If using Linux, determine if any USB devices are currently connected to the
computer:
a. Open a shell window and enter the command ls / dev / tty / USB*.
b. Record the ttyUSBn values that are returned; these are the currently
connected USB devices. If the command returns “no such file or
directory”, there are no devices currently connected.
4. Test W_DISABLE_N — Turn on the module by letting W_DISABLE_N float
(high impedance).
5. Test USB functionality — Check for USB enumeration.
· (Windows systems) The Device Manager shows Sierra Wireless items
under Ports (COM & LPT). The devices shown depend on the module type.
For example:]
· (Linux systems) Enter the command ls / dev / tty / USB* and then record and
compare the results with those from Step 3. If there are any new ttyUSBn
devices, then the modem has enumerated successfully. (There should be
seven new devices) For example:
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Testing
·
With one other USB device already connected and assigned to
ttyUSB1:
(Note: The AT port is the fourth new device — / dev / ttyUSB4.)
6. Make sure your modem is connected and running, and then establish contact
with the module:
· Windows systems: Use a terminal emulation / communications program
such as Microsoft HyperTerminal® to connect over the COM port reserved
for AT commands (see listings in Step 5):
a. Start HyperTerminal.
b. Select File > Connection Description. The Connection Description dialog
box appears.
i. Type Sierra in the Name box and click OK. The Connect To dialog box
appears.
ii. Click OK without changing any of the displayed information. The
Connect dialog box appears.
iii. Click Cancel.
iv. Type ATZ in the HyperTerminal window. If the connection is
established, the message OK appears.
· Linux systems: Use a terminal emulation / communications program such
as minicom to connect over the device handle for AT commands (see
listings in Step 5):
Note: If necessary, use
AT E1 to enable echo.
Note: If the command
“minicom” is not found,
then use a different
program, or download
minicom and repeat this
step. See Downloading
and configuring minicom
for Linux systems on
page 76 for details.
Rev 6 Mar.13
i. Start minicom:
·
First use of the modem: From the command line, type
minicom -s. (The ‘-s’ switch shows the configuration menu.)
·
Subsequent uses: From the command line, type minicom. (The
‘-s’ switch is assumed.)
The minicom configuration details appear and the message OK
appears when the connection is established.
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7. Display the firmware version:
· AT!GVER
8. Test the LED — Set the LED in blinking mode using this command, then
visually verify that the LED turns off and on:
· AT!LEDCTRL
9. Unlock the extended AT command set:
· AT!ENTERCND
10. Put the module in diagnostic / factory test mode:
· AT!DAFTMACT
11. Communicate with the SIM using +CPIN or +CIMI.
When performing RF tests, use a test platform as described in Suggested
testing equipment on page 83.
12. Test RF transmission, if desired:
· (UMTS) See UMTS RF transmission path test on page 77.
· (LTE) To test the LTE transmission path, use a call box.
13. Test RF reception, if desired:
· (UMTS) See UMTS RF receive path test on page 79.
· (LTE) See LTE RF receive path test on page 81.
14. Test standalone GPS functionality — See GPS standalone connector test on
page 82.
15. Drive W_DISABLE_N low and confirm that the module powers down:
· Windows systems — The Sierra Wireless items under the Ports (COM &
LPT) entry in Device Manager disappear as the module powers off.
· Linux systems — Enter the command ls / dev / tty / USB*. The devices
enumerated in Step 5 will not appear after the module powers off.
Downloading and configuring minicom for Linux systems
Note: This procedure is for Ubuntu systems. If you are using a different Linux distribution,
use the appropriate commands for your system to download minicom.
To download and configure minicom in a Ubuntu system:
Note: To install minicom,
you must have root
access, or be included in
the sudoers list.
1. Download and install minicom — enter the following command:
sudo apt-get install minicom
2. When prompted, enter your user password to begin the download and installation. When minicom is installed, the shell prompt appears.
3. Configure minicom to communicate with your modem:
a. Start minicom with the following command:
minicom -s
4. Use the down-arrow key to select the Serial port setup option.
5. Refer to Step 5 on page 74 to identify the device file handle ( / dev / ttyUSBn)
used for AT commands.
6. Indicate the file handle to use for AT commands — Enter A and then replace
the serial device string with the AT file handle (for example, / dev / ttyUSB4 as
shown in the example in Step 5 on page 74).
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Testing
7. Press Enter twice.
8. Use the down-arrow key to select Save setup as dfl.
9. Select Exit.
UMTS RF transmission path test
Note: This procedure segment is performed in Step 12 of the Production test procedure on
page 74.
Table C-1 contains parameters used in the suggested test procedure that follows.
Table C-1: Test settings — Transmission path
Mode
WCDMA
GSM
Bands
Test
category
850
900
1800
1900
2100
Band
22
29
n/a
15a
9
Channelb
4182
2812
n/a
9400
9750
Band
n/a
10
11
12
n/a
Channelb
n/a
65
697
661
n/a
a. Either 15 (WCDMA1900A) or 16 (WCDMA1900B) may be used for testing.
b. Channel values shown are at the center of the corresponding bands.
To test the DUT’s transmitter path:
Note: This procedure
describes steps using the
"Power Meter: Gigatronics
8651A” (with Option 12
and Power Sensor
80701A).
1. Set up the power meter:
a. Make sure the meter has been given sufficient time to warm up, if
necessary, to enable it to take accurate measurements.
b. Zero-calibrate the meter.
c. Enable MAP mode.
2. Prepare the DUT using the following AT commands:
a. AT!ENTERCND=”<password>” (Unlock extended AT command set.)
b. AT!DAFTMACT
(Enter test mode.)
c. AT!DASBAND=<bandValue> (Set frequency band.)
·
See Table C-1 for appropriate <bandValue> values
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d. AT!DASCHAN=<channel>
(Set modem channel)
·
See Table C-1 for appropriate <channel> values
e. (GSM mode only)
AT!DAGSTXFRAME=0, 1, 3000, 0
f.
AT!DASTXON
(Set Tx frame structure.)
(Turns on the transmit path.)
g. (WCDMA mode only)
AT!DAWSTXCW=0
AT!DASPDM=2, 75
(Use a modulated carrier.)
(Set the power level. Repeat command with
different offsets until desired Tx power is obtained.)
AT!DAWSPARANGE=3 (Set to high PA gain state.)
h. Offset the tracking (If necessary, repeat with different offsets until the
desired frequency is obtained.)
(WCDMA mode) AT!DASPDM=4,35100
(GSM mode) AT!DASPDM=0,2240
i.
Take the measurement.
j.
AT!DASTXOFF
(Turn off the transmitter.)
3. Test limits — Run ten or more good DUTs through this test procedure to
obtain a nominal output power value.
· Apply a tolerance of 5 to 6 dB to each measurement (assuming a good
setup design).
· Monitor these limits during mass-production ramp-up to determine if further
adjustments are needed.
· For GSM mode, the transmit signal is bursted, so the transmit power will
appear averaged on the power meter reading.
Note: The module has a nominal output power of +23 dBm 1 dB in WCDMA mode.
However, the value measured by the power meter is significantly influenced (beyond the
stated 1 dB output power tolerance) by the test setup (host RF cabling loss, antenna
efficiency and pattern, test antenna efficiency and pattern, and choice of shield box).
Note: When doing the same test over the air in an RF chamber, values are likely to be
significantly lower.
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Testing
UMTS RF receive path test
Note: This procedure segment is performed in Step 13 of the Production test procedure on
page 74.
Table C-2 contains parameters used in the suggested test procedure that follows.
Table C-2: Test settings — Receive path
Bands
Mode
WCDMA
Test category
850
900
1800
1900
2100
Frequencya (MHz)
882.60
948.60
n/a
1961.2
2141.2
Band
22
29
n/a
15b
9
Channelc
4182
2812
n/a
9400
9750
n/a
948.067 1842.267
1960.067
n/a
Band
n/a
10
11
12
n/a
Channelc
n/a
65
697
661
n/a
Frequencyd
GSM
(MHz)
a. All values offset from actual center channel by +1.2 MHz
b. Either 15 (WCDMA1900A) or 16 (WCDMA1900B) may be used for testing.
c. Channel values shown are at the center of the corresponding bands.
d. All values offset from actual center channel by +67 kHz
To test the DUT’s receive path:
Note: This procedure
describes steps using the
Agilent 8648C signal
generator — the Rohde &
Schwarz SML03 is shown
for reference only.
1. Set up the signal generator:
a. Set the amplitude to:
·
-80 dBm (WCDMA mode)
·
-60 dBm (GSM mode)
b. Set the frequency for the band being tested. See Table C-2 for frequency
values.
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2. Set up the DUT:
a. AT!ENTERCND (Unlock extended AT command set.)
b. AT!DAFTMACT (Put modem into factory test mode.)
c. AT!DASBAND=<band> (Set frequency band.)
·
See Table C-2 on page 79 for <band> values
d. AT!DASCHAN=<channel> (Set modem channel)
·
See Table C-2 on page 79 for <channel> values
e. AT!DASLNAGAIN=0 (Set the LNA to maximum gain.)
f.
(WCDMA mode)
i. AT!DAWGAVGAGC=9400,0 (For PCS1900, channel 9400 as an
example.)
(GSM mode)
ii. AT!DAGSRXBURST=0 (Set to receive bursted mode.)
iii. AT!DAGGAVGRSSI=190,0 (For channel 190, for example.)
The returned value is the RSSI in dBm.
3. Test limits — Run ten or more good DUTs through this test procedure to
obtain a nominal received power value.
· Apply a tolerance of 5 to 6 dB to each measurement (assuming a good
setup design).
· Make sure the measurement is made at a high enough level that it is not
influenced by DUT-generated and ambient noise.
· The Signal Generator power level can be adjusted and new limits found if
the radiated test needs greater signal strength.
· Monitor these limits during mass-production ramp-up to determine if further
adjustments are needed.
Note: The value measured from the DUT is significantly influenced by the test setup and
DUT design (host RF cabling loss, antenna efficiency and pattern, test antenna efficiency
and pattern, and choice of shield box).
4. Test diversity paths:
Note: Diversity is not
available in GSM mode.
a. Set up the signal generator as in Step 1.
Note: Setup of the DUT is
the same as in Step 2,
except for a change to
AT!DAWGAVGAGC and
the addition of
AT!DAWSSCHAIN.
b. Set up the DUT:
i. AT!ENTERCND (Unlock extended AT command set.)
ii. AT!DAFTMACT (Put modem into factory test mode.)
iii. AT!DASBAND=<band> (Set frequency band.)
· See Table C-2 on page 79 for <band> values
iv. AT!DAWSSCHAIN=1 (Enable the secondary chain.)
v. AT!DASCHAN=<channel> (Set modem channel)
· See Table C-2 on page 79 for <channel> values
vi. AT!DASLNAGAIN=0 (Set the LNA to maximum gain.)
vii.AT!DAWGAVGAGC=9400,0,1 (The ‘1’ indicates the diversity path is
used.)
c. Test the limits as in Step 3.
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Testing
LTE RF receive path test
Note: This procedure segment is performed in Step 13 of the Production test procedure on
page 74.
Table C-3 contains parameters used in the suggested test procedure that follows.
Table C-3: Test settings — Receive path
Bands
Mode
LTE
Test category
B13
B17
B4
Frequencya (MHz)
753.0
742.0
2134.5
Band
36
37
42
Channelb
23230
23790
20175
a. All values offset from actual center channel by +2 MHz
b. Channel values shown are at the center of the corresponding bands.
To test the DUT’s receive path (or diversity path, while connected to the diversity
antenna):
Note: This procedure
describes steps using the
Agilent 8648C signal
generator — the Rohde &
Schwarz SML03 is shown
for reference only.
1. Set up the signal generator:
a. Set the amplitude to -70 dBm
b. Set the frequency for the band being tested. See Table C-3 for frequency
values.
2. Set up the DUT:
a. AT!ENTERCND (Unlock extended AT command set.)
b. AT!DAFTMACT (Put modem into factory test mode.)
c. AT!DASBAND=<band> (Set frequency band.)
·
See Table C-3 on page 81 for <band> values
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d. AT!DASCHAN=<channel> (Set modem channel)
·
See Table C-3 on page 81 for <channel> values
e. AT!DALGAVGAGC=<channel>,0 (Get averaged Rx AGC)
·
See Table C-3 on page 81 for <channel> values
3. Test limits — Run ten or more good DUTs through this test procedure to
obtain a nominal received power value.
· Apply a tolerance of 5 to 6 dB to each measurement (assuming a good
setup design).
· Make sure the measurement is made at a high enough level that it is not
influenced by DUT-generated and ambient noise.
· The Signal Generator power level can be adjusted and new limits found if
the radiated test needs greater signal strength.
· Monitor these limits during mass-production ramp-up to determine if further
adjustments are needed.
Note: The value measured from the DUT is significantly influenced by the test setup and
DUT design (host RF cabling loss, antenna efficiency and pattern, test antenna efficiency
and pattern, and choice of shield box).
GPS standalone connector test
GPS testing should be done on devices that support a dedicated GPS connector.
If the MC7710 supports a dedicated GPS connector/path (that is, not shared with
the diversity connector), then GPS testing may be done by characterizing some
known-good MC devices and checking for carrier to noise levels.
To test the GPS path:
1. Inject a carrier signal at -110dBm, frequency 1575.52 MHz into the GPS Rx
path. (Note that this is 100kHz higher than the actual GPS frequency.)
2. Test the signal carrier-to-noise level at the GPS receiver:
a. AT!ENTERCND (Unlock extended AT command set.)
b. AT!DAFTMACT (Put modem into factory test mode.)
c. AT!DACGPSTESTMODE=1 (Start CGPS diagnostic task.)
d. AT!DACGPSSTANDALONE=1 (Enter standalone RF mode.)
e. AT!DACGPSMASKON (Enable log mask.)
f.
AT!DACGPSCTON (Return signal-to-noise and frequency measurements.)
g. Repeat AT!DACGPSCTON five to ten times to ensure the measurements
are repeatable and stable.
3. Leave the RF connection to the Mini Card device intact, and turn off the
signal generator.
4. Take several more !DACGPSCTON readings. This will demonstrate a 'bad'
signal in order to set limits for testing, if needed. This frequency offset should
fall outside of the guidelines in the note below, which indicates that the CtoN
result is invalid.
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5. (Optional) Turn the signal generator on again, and reduce the level to 120dBm. Take more !DACGPSCTON readings and use these as a reference
for what a marginal / poor signal would be.
Note: The response to AT!DACGPSCTON for a good connection should show CtoN within
58 +/- 5dB (preliminary value) and Freq (frequency offset) within 100000 Hz +/- 5000 Hz .
Quality assurance testing
Note: QA is an ongoing
process based on random
samples from a finished
batch of devices.
The quality assurance tests that you perform on your finished products should be
designed to verify the performance and quality of your devices.
The following are some testing suggestions that can confirm that the antenna is
interfaced properly, and that the RF module is calibrated and performs to
specifications:
•
Module registration on cellular networks
•
Power consumption
•
Originate and terminate data and voice (if applicable) calls
•
Cell hand-off
•
Transmitter and receiver tests
•
FER (Frame Error Rate) as an indicator of receiver sensitivity / performance
•
Channel and average power measurements to verify that the device is transmitting within product specifications
•
RF sensitivity tests
•
UMTS:
· RF sensitivity testing — BER / BLER for different bands and modes
· Transmitter and receiver tests (based on relevant sections of the 3GPP
TS51010 and 3GPP 34121 documents)
Suggested testing equipment
To perform production and post-production tests, you will require appropriate
testing equipment. A test computer can be used to coordinate testing between the
integrated module (on the development kit or host) and the measurement
equipment, usually with GPIB connections. The suggested setup includes a
power meter to test RF output power and a signal generator to evaluate the
receiver.
Testing assistance provided by Sierra
Wireless
Extended AT commands have been implemented to assist with performing FTA
GCF tests and portions of CE Mark tests requiring radio module access. These
are documented in the [2] AirCard / AirPrime UMTS Devices Supported AT
Command Reference (Doc# 2130617) and [3] AirPrime MC8xxx Embedded
Modules Extended AT Command Reference (Doc# 2130616).
Rev 6 Mar.13
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83
Product Technical Specification & Customer Design Guidelines
Sierra Wireless offers optional professional services based assistance to OEMs
with regulatory approvals.
IOT/Operator testing
Interoperability and Operator/Carrier testing of the finished system is the
responsibility of the OEM. The test process will be determined with the chosen
network operator(s) and will be dependent upon your business relationship with
them, as well as the product's application and sales channel strategy.
Sierra Wireless offers assistance to OEMs with the testing process, if required.
Extended AT commands for testing
Sierra Wireless provides proprietary AT commands that may help in hardware
integration design and testing (these commands are NOT intended for use by end
users):
•
[3] AirPrime MC8xxx Embedded Modules Extended AT Command Reference
(Doc# 2130616)
•
[2] AirCard / AirPrime UMTS Devices Supported AT Command Reference
(Doc# 2130617)
Some useful commands from these documents for use in hardware integration
are listed in Table C-4 on page 84.
Table C-4: Extended AT commands
Command
Description
Password commands
!ENTERCND
Enable access to password-protected commands
!SETCND
Set AT command password
Modem reset and status commands
!GRESET
Reset the modem
!GSTATUS
Return the operation status of the modem (mode, band,
channel, and so on)
Diagnostic commands
!BAND
Select a set of frequency bands or reports current selection
!GBAND
Read / set the current operating band
Test commands
84
!DAFTMACT
Put the modem into FTM (Factory Test Mode)
!DAFTMDEACT
Put the modem into online mode
!DAGGRSSI
Return the RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator) in
dBm (GSM mode)
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Testing
Table C-4: Extended AT commands (Continued)
Command
Rev 6 Mar.13
Description
!DAGGAVGRSSI
Return an averaged RSSI (Received Signal Strength
Indicator) in dBm (GSM mode)
!DAGGRSSIRAW
Return the raw RSSI (GSM mode)
!DAGINFO
Return GSM mode RF information
!DAGSLOCK
Return the RF synthesizer lock state
!DAGSRXBURST
Set the GSM receiver to burst mode
!DAGSRXCONT
Set the GSM receiver continually on
!DAGSTXBURST
Set the GSM transmitter to burst mode
!DAGSTXFRAME
Set the GSM Tx frame structure
!DAOFFLINE
Place modem offline
!DASBAND
Set the frequency band (UMTS / GSM)
!DASCHAN
Set the modem channel (frequency) (UMTS / GSM)
!DASLNAGAIN
Set the LNA (Low Noise Amplifier) gain state
!DASPDM
Set the PDM (Pulse Duration Modulation) value
!DASTXOFF
Turn off the Tx PA (Power Amplifier)
!DASTXON
Turn on the Tx PA (Power Amplifier)
!DAWGAVGAGC
Return averaged RX AGC value (WCDMA)
!DAWGRXAGC
Return the Rx AGC (Automatic Gain Control) value (UMTS)
!DAWINFO
Return WCDMA mode RF information
!DAWSCONFIGRX
Set the UMTS receiver to factory calibration settings
!DAWSPARANGE
Set the PA range state machine (UMTS)
!DAWSCHAINTCM
Place receive chain in test call mode (WCDMA)
!DAWSSCHAIN
Enable secondary receive chain (WCDMA)
!DAWSTXCW
Set the waveform used by the transmitter (UMTS)
!DAWSTXPWR
Set desired Tx power level (WCDMA)
!OSDSM
Display memory usage for DSM (Distributed Shared
Memory) buffer pools
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D
D: Packaging
Sierra Wireless AirPrime Mini Cards are shipped in sealed boxes.
The standard packaging (see Figure 4-1), contains a single tray with
a capacity of 100 modules . (Note that some SKUs may have custom
packaging — contact Sierra Wireless for SKU-specific details.)
In the standard packaging, Mini Cards are inserted, system
connector first, into the bottom portion (T1) of a two-part tray. all
facing the same direction. This allows the top edge of each Mini Card
to contact the top of the triangular features in the top portion (T2) of
the tray (see Detail A).
The top and bottom portions of the tray snap together at the four
connection points.
Figure 4-1: Device placement in module tray
The tray is placed in a manufacturing box (T2 at the top), sealed with
a security tape (P1), and a manufacturing label is placed on the
bottom-right corner, above the security tape. (See Figure 4-2.)
Figure 4-2: Shipping package
Rev 6 Mar.13
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E
E: References
This guide deals specifically with hardware integration issues that are
unique to AirPrime embedded modules.
Web site support
For additional documents describing embedded module design,
usage, and integration issues (AT command references, integration
guides, etc.), visit developer.sierrawireless.com.
Sierra Wireless documents
The following Sierra Wireless documents are available from
developer.sierrawireless.com.
Command documents
[1] AT Command Set for User Equipment (UE) (Release 6)
(Doc# 3GPP TS 27.007)
[2] AirCard / AirPrime UMTS Devices Supported AT Command
Reference (Doc# 2130617)
[3] AirPrime MC8xxx Embedded Modules Extended AT Command
Reference (Doc# 2130616)
Other Sierra documents
[4] PCI Express Mini Card Dev Kit Quick Start Guide
(Doc# 2130705)
[5] AirCard / AirPrime USB Driver Developer’s Guide (Doc# 2130634)
Industry / other documents
The following non-Sierra Wireless references are not included in your
documentation package:
[6] FCC Regulations - Part 15 - Radio Frequency Devices
[7] IEC-61000-4-2 level 3
[8] IEC-61000-4-2 level (Electrostatic Discharge Immunity Test)
[9] Mobile Station (MS) Conformance Specification; Part 4:
Subscriber Interface Module (Doc# 3GPP TS 11.10-4)
[10] PCI Express Mini Card Electromechanical Specification Revision
1.2
[11] Universal Serial Bus Specification, Rev 2.0
Rev 6 Mar.13
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[12] JESD22-A114-B
[13] JESD22-C101
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F
F: Acronyms
Table F-1: Acronyms and definitions
Acronym or term
Definition
3GPP
3rd Generation Partnership Project
8PSK
Octagonal Phase Shift Keying
AGC
Automatic Gain Control
A-GPS
Assisted GPS
API
Application Programming Interface
BER
Bit Error Rate — A measure of receive sensitivity
BLER
Block Error Rate
bluetooth
Wireless protocol for data exchange over short distances
CDG
CDMA Development Group—a consortium of companies that develop and
promote the products and services for CDMA wireless systems.
CDMA
Code Division Multiple Access.
A wideband spread spectrum technique used in digital cellular, personal
communications services, and other wireless networks. Wide channels (1.25
MHz) are obtained through spread spectrum transmissions, thus allowing many
active users to share the same channel. Each user is assigned a unique digital
code, which differentiates the individual conversations on the same channel.
CQI
Channel Quality Indication
COM
Communication port
CS
Circuit-switched
CSA
Canadian Standards Association
CW
Continuous waveform
dB
Decibel = 10 x log10 (P1 / P2)
P1 is calculated power; P2 is reference power
Decibel = 20 x log10 (V1 / V2)
V1 is calculated voltage, V2 is reference voltage
Rev 6 Mar.13
dBm
A logarithmic (base 10) measure of relative power (dB for decibels); relative to
milliwatts (m). A dBm value will be 30 units (1000 times) larger (less negative)
than a dBW value, because of the difference in scale (milliwatts vs. watts).
DC-HSPA+
Dual Carrier HSPA+
DCS
Digital Cellular System
A cellular communication infrastructure that uses the 1.8 GHz radio spectrum.
DL
Downlink (network to mobile)
DRX
Discontinuous Reception
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Table F-1: Acronyms and definitions (Continued)
Acronym or term
92
Definition
DSM
Distributed Shared Memory
DUT
Device Under Test
EDGE
Enhanced Data rates for GSM Evolution
EIRP
Effective (or Equivalent) Isotropic Radiated Power
EMC
Electromagnetic Compatibility
EMI
Electromagnetic Interference
ERP
Effective Radiated Power
ESD
Electrostatic Discharge
FCC
Federal Communications Commission
The U.S. federal agency that is responsible for interstate and foreign
communications. The FCC regulates commercial and private radio spectrum
management, sets rates for communications services, determines standards for
equipment, and controls broadcast licensing. Consult www.fcc.gov.
FDMA
Frequency Division Multiple Access
FER
Frame Error Rate — A measure of receive sensitivity.
firmware
Software stored in ROM or EEPROM; essential programs that remain even when
the system is turned off. Firmware is easier to change than hardware but more
permanent than software stored on disk.
FOV
Field Of View
FSN
Factory Serial Number—A unique serial number assigned to the mini card during
manufacturing.
GCF
Global Certification Forum
GLONASS
Global Navigation Satellite System
GMSK
Gaussian Minimum Shift Keying modulation
GND
Ground
GPRS
General Packet Radio Service
GPS
Global Positioning System
A system that uses a series of 24 geosynchronous satellites to provide
navigational data.
GSM
Global System for Mobile Communications
Host
The device into which an embedded module is integrated
HSDPA
High Speed Downlink Packet Access
HSPA+
Enhanced HSPA, as defined in 3GPP Release 7 and beyond
HSUPA
High Speed Uplink Packet Access
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Acronyms
Table F-1: Acronyms and definitions (Continued)
Acronym or term
Rev 6 Mar.13
Definition
Hz
Hertz = 1 cycle / second
IC
Industry Canada
IF
Intermediate Frequency
IMEI
International Mobile Equipment Identity
inrush current
Peak current drawn when a device is connected or powered on
inter-RAT
Radio Access Technology
IOT
Interoperability Testing
IS
Interim Standard.
After receiving industry consensus, the TIA forwards the standard to ANSI for
approval.
IS-95
2G radio standards targeted for voice (cdmaONE)
LED
Light Emitting Diode.
A semiconductor diode that emits visible or infrared light.
LHCP
Left-Hand Circular Polarized
LNA
Low Noise Amplifier
LPM
Low Power Mode
LPT
Line Print Terminal
LTE
Long Term Evolution—a high-performance air interface for cellular mobile
communication systems.
MCS
Modulation and Coding Scheme
MHz
Megahertz = 10e6 Hz
MIMO
Multiple Input Multiple Output—wireless antenna technology that uses multiple
antennas at both transmitter and receiver side. This improves performance.
NAS / AS
Network Access Server
NC
No Connect
NDIS
Network Driver Interface SpecificationSpecification—a programming interface
specification for connecting network interface cards in Windows.
NIC
Network Interface Card
NMEA
National Marine Electronics Association
OEM
Original Equipment Manufacturer—a company that manufactures a product and
sells it to a reseller.
OFDMA
Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access
OTA
‘Over the air’ (or radiated through the antenna)
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Table F-1: Acronyms and definitions (Continued)
Acronym or term
94
Definition
PA
Power Amplifier
packet
A short, fixed-length block of data, including a header, that is transmitted as a unit
in a communications network.
PCB
Printed Circuit Board
PCS
Personal Communication System
A cellular communication infrastructure that uses the 1.9 GHz radio spectrum.
PDN
Packet Data Network
PMI
Pre-coding Matrix Index
PSS
Primary synchronisation signal
PTCRB
PCS Type Certification Review Board
QAM
Quadrature Amplitude Modulation.
This form of modulation uses amplitude, frequency, and phase to transfer data on
the carrier wave.
QMI
Qualcomm MSM/Modem Interface
QOS
Quality of Service
QPSK
Quadrature Phase-Shift Keying
QPST
Qualcomm Product Support Tools
RAT
Radio Access Technology
RF
Radio Frequency
RI
Ring Indicator
RSE
Radiated Spurious Emissions
RSSI
Received Signal Strength Indication
SDK
Software Development Kit
SED
Smart Error Detection
Sensitivity
(Audio)
Measure of lowest power signal that the receiver can measure.
Sensitivity (RF)
Measure of lowest power signal at the receiver input that can provide a prescribed
BER / BLER / SNR value at the receiver output.
SG
An LTE signaling interface for SMS (“SMS over SGs”)
SIB
System Information Block
SIM
Subscriber Identity Module. Also referred to as USIM or UICC.
SIMO
Single Input Multiple Output—smart antenna technology that uses a single
antenna at the transmitter side and multiple antennas at the receiver side. This
improves performance and security.
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Acronyms
Table F-1: Acronyms and definitions (Continued)
Acronym or term
Rev 6 Mar.13
Definition
SISO
Single Input Single Output—antenna technology that uses a single antenna at
both the transmitter side and the receiver side.
SKU
Stock Keeping Unit—identifies an inventory item: a unique code, consisting of
numbers or letters and numbers, assigned to a product by a retailer for purposes
of identification and inventory control.
SMS
Short Message Service.
A feature that allows users of a wireless device on a wireless network to receive
or transmit short electronic alphanumeric messages (up to 160 characters,
depending on the service provider).
S/N
Signal-to-noise (ratio)
SNR
Signal-to-Noise Ratio
SOF
Start of Frame — A USB function.
SSS
Secondary synchronisation signal.
SUPL
Secure User Plane Location
TIA/EIA
Telecommunications Industry Association / Electronics Industry Association.
A standards setting trade organization, whose members provide communications
and information technology products, systems, distribution services and
professional services in the United States and around the world. Consult
www.tiaonline.org.
TIS
Total Isotropic Sensitivity
TRP
Total Radiated Power
UDK
Universal Development Kit (for PCI Express Mini Cards)
UE
User Equipment
UICC
Universal Integrated Circuit Card (Also referred to as a SIM card.)
UL
Uplink (mobile to network)
UL
Underwriters Laboratory
UMTS
Universal Mobile Telecommunications System
USB
Universal Serial Bus
USIM
Universal Subscriber Identity Module (UMTS)
VCC
Supply voltage (3.3 V)
VSWR
Voltage Standing Wave Ratio
WAN
Wide Area Network
WCDMA
Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (also referred to as UMTS)
WLAN
Wireless Local Area Network
ZIF
Zero Insertion Force
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Index
Numerics
3D gain, average
gain
3D average (GPS), 67
3GPP compliance
GSM / GPRS / EDGE, 23
LTE, 23
UMTS, 23
A
acceptance tests, 71
accessories, 17
accuracy (GPS), 47
acquisition time (GPS), 47
acronyms and definitions, 91– 96
A-GPS, 17
antenna
connection considerations, 39
connectors, 25
custom, design, 40
diversity antenna, disabling, 40
GPS, specifications, recommended, 67
limit, matching coaxial connections, 39
location, considerations, 40
matching, considerations, 40
maximum cable loss, 39
routing, 40
specification, 65– 68
specifications, recommended, 65
testing, 67
antennas
design checklist, 69
API, 55
application interface features, 16
approvals, regulatory and industry, 63
AT commands, 84
averaged call mode LTE / WCDMA / HSPA / HSPA+ DC
power consumption, 50
averaged standby DC power consumption, 49
B
bands supported, RF
summary, 15
GSM, 45
LTE, 44
WCDMA, 44
bearers, dedicated, 16
BER (Bit Error Rate), 43
bit error rate (BER)
measure of sensitivity, 43
Rev 6 Mar.13
block diagram
expanded RF, 27
system, 26
bottom view, 58
C
cable loss
antenna, maximum, 39
capacitors
with SIM, 34
with XIM_DATA / XIM_CLK, 34
carrier/operator testing, 84
CE approval, 63
cell selection, 16
certification tests, 72
checklist, design, 69
communications, host to modem
design checklist, 70
conducted Tx power tolerances, 46
connection
grounding, 41
connectors, 39
connectors, required
host-module, 18
control interface, 35
CQI, 16
D
DC power consumption
averaged call mode LTE / WCDMA / HSPA /
HSPA+, 50
averaged standby, 49
DC-HSPA+
overview, 22
desense. See RF
design checklist
antennas, 69
component placement, 69
EMI/ESD, 69
host/modem communications, 70
power, 69
thermal, 70
detach procedure, 17
Development Kit contents, 17
digital interface, 38
dimensioned view, 58
dimensions, 57, 58
Direct IP interface, 55
diversity antenna
disabling, 40
diversity connector, location, 39
drop specifications, 57
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E
EDGE
overview, 22
bands supported, 15
connector, required, 18
power classes, 22
electrical specifications, 25
electrostatic discharge specifications, 57
electrostatic discharge. See ESD
envelope correlation coefficient, 66
environmental specifications, 57– 59
ESD
design checklist, 69
protection requirements, 59
ESD specifications, 57
expanded RF block diagram, 27
F
field of view, 67
filtering, RF desense, 42
form factor, 57
FOV, 67
free space average gain, 67
frequencies supported, 43
frequency band support
GSM, 45
LTE, 44
WCDMA, 44
G
gain
GPS, 67
maximum, 66
mean effective, 66
mean effective imbalance, 66
GCF-CC approval, 63
General purpose IO (GPIO), 38
GERAN compliance
GSM / GPRS / EDGE, 23
GLONASS, 17
GPIO (General purpose IO), 38
GPRS
overview, 22
bands supported, 15
power classes, 22
GPS
antenna specifications, recommended, 67
connector location, 39
DC bias on connector, 17
features supported, 17
specifications, 47
GPS_EN_N, 36
GPS_EN_N (Wireless disable, second radio), 35
ground specifications, 31
grounding
connection considerations, 41
GSM
bands supported, 15
frequency band support, 45
GSM / GPRS / EDGE
3GPP compliance, 23
GERAN compliance, 23
H
host interface
pin assignments, 27
HSDPA
bands supported, 15
HSPA
overview, 21
HSPA+
overview, 22
bands supported, 15
HSUPA
bands supported, 15
power consumption, 50
humidity specifications, 57
I
I/O connector location, 39
I/O rise time requirements, 34
impedance
module–antenna, 40
SIM, 34
industry approvals, 63
integration requirements, 18
interface
control interface, 35
digital interface, 38
Direct IP, 55
feature summary, 16
host, pin assignments, 27
QMI, 55
SIM, 32
software, 55
USB, 31
interference
device generated, 42
host-generated, 41
power supply noise, 54
wireless devices, 41
Interoperability testing, 84
intra-LTE mobility, 16
IOT testing, 84
iRAT, 16
isolation, 66, 67
L
labeling, 59
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Index
LED
example, 37
states, 37
LED output, 25, 35, 37
LTE
3GPP compliance, 23
overview, 21
bands supported, 15
bandwidth support, 44
features, 16
frequency band support, 44
M
mean effective gain, 66
mean effective gain imbalance, 66
mechanical specifications, 57– 59
MIB, 16
MIMO support, 15
minicom
downloading and installing, 76
module
power states, 51– 53
N
NAS/AS security, 16
NDIS NIC interface support, 16
NIC interface support, 16
noise
leakage, minimizing, 41
RF interference, power supply, 54
O
OEM
assistance with testing, 84
labeling, 59
operator/carrier testing, 84
ordering information, 18
P
packaging, 87
packet mode features, 16
paging procedures, 16
PCB
multi-layer, shielding for RF desense, 42
PDN connections, multiple, 16
pin assignments, host interface, 27
PMI, 16
polarization, 67
position location, 17
Rev 6 Mar.13
power
design checklist, 69
handling, 66
power-up timing, 53
ramp-up timing, 53
state machines, 52
states, module, 51– 53
supply, RF interference, 54
supply, ripple limit, 54
transmit, waveform, 54
power classes for GPRS and EDGE, 22
power consumption, DC
averaged call mode LTE / WCDMA / HSPA / HSPA+, 50
averaged standby, 49
power specifications, 31
power tolerances, conducted Tx, 46
Product Support Tool, QUALCOMM (QPST), 55
production tests, 73
PSS, 16
Q
QMI interface, 55
QPST (QUALCOMM Product Support Tool), 55
QUALCOMM Product Support Tool (QPST), 55
quality assurance tests, 83
QXDM support, 55
R
radiated efficiency, total, 65
radiated sensitivity measurement, 43
radiated spurious emissions, 42
radiation patterns, 65
references, 89– 90
regulatory approvals, 63
regulatory information, 63– 64
EU, 64
limitation of liability, 63
safety and hazards, 63
resistors, external pull-up, 34
RF
antenna cable loss, maximum, 39
antenna connection, considerations, 39
connectors, required, 18
desense
device-generated, 41
harmonic energy, filtering, 42
mitigation suggestions, 42
shielding suggestions, 42
interference
other devices, 42
power supply, 54
wireless devices, 41
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RF bands supported
summary, 15
GSM, 45
LTE, 44
WCDMA, 44
RF block diagram, expanded, 27
RF connector location, 39
RF specifications, 39– 47
RI, 16
RSE, 42
Rx sensitivity
conducted, 45
SSS, 16
standalone mode, GPS, 17
standby DC power consumption, averaged, 49
state machines, 52
support
features, 17
testing assistance by Sierra Wireless, 83
tools, 55
system acquisition, 16
system block diagram, 26
S
temperature specifications, 57
temperature, module. See thermal
testing
overview, 71
acceptance tests, 71
assistance provided by Sierra Wireless, 83
certification tests, 72
equipment, suggested, 83
interoperability and operator/carrier testing, 84
manual functional test, suggested, 73
production tests, 73
quality assurance tests, 83
RF receive path, LTE, 81
RF receive path, UMTS, 79
RF transmission path, UMTS, 77
suggestions, 71– 85
thermal
considerations, 60– 61
design checklist, 70
dissipation, factors affecting, 60
dissipation, suggestions, 60
RF shield temperature, maximum, 61
testing, module, 61
timing
power ramp-up, 53
power-up, 53
top view, 58
transmit power waveform, 54
Tx power tolerances, conducted, 46
sales
ordering, 18
SDKs available, 55
SED
see Smart Error Detection
See also GPS_EN_N, 25
See also W_DISABLE_N, 36
sensitivity
conducted, RF parameter, 45
defined, 43
radiated measurement, overview, 43
testing, overview, 43
shielding
module, compliance, 39
reducing RF desense, 42
shock specifications, 57
SIB, 16
signals, 35
GPS_EN_N, 36
W_DISABLE_N, 36
WAKE_N, 35
WLAN_LED_N, 37
SIM
capacitor recommendations, 34
card contacts, 33
clock rate, 34
connector, required, 18
electrical specifications, 34
impedance, connectors, 34
interface, 32
interface diagram, 33
operation, 34
Smart Error Detection
detecting module reset, 54
SMS features, 17
Snow 3G/AES security, 16
software interface, 55
specifications
electrical, 25
environmental specifications, 57– 59
GPS, 47
mechanical, 57– 59
RF, 39– 47
100
T
U
UDK, 17
UMTS
3GPP compliance, 23
overview, 21
bands supported, 15
Universal Development Kit, 17
USB
drivers, user-developed, 32
enumeration, power-up, 53
high / full speed throughput performance, 31
interface, 31
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Index
V
vibration specifications, 57
VSWR, 65, 67
W
W_DISABLE_N, 35, 36
WAKE_N, 25, 35
warranty, 17
Rev 6 Mar.13
WCDMA
frequency band support, 44
Wireless Disable, 25, 35
Wireless Disable (GPS), 25
Wireless Disable (Main RF), 36
WLAN_LED_N, 35, 37
Z
ZIF (Zero Intermediate Frequency), 41
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