Celestron CI-700 Specifications

Installation and Operations
Manual
February 2001
RAMONA
17849
RAMONA,
TECHNOLOGY
HIGHWAY
67
CA 92065
WWW.RAMONATECH.COM
Information in this document is subject to change without notice.
© 2001
RAMONA TECHNOLOGY.
All rights reserved
Reproduction in any manner whatsoever without written permission of
is strictly forbidden
TECHNOLOGY
9l)II
is a registered trademark of
RAMONA
TECHNOLOGY
February 2001
({ ·?O'L:/
C,··l;-f
2
RAMONA
Table Of Contents
Introduction
6
Safety Instructions
Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Astronomy Terms
Notational Conventions
6
6
6
Chapter 1
7
Installation - Losmandy telescope mount
7
DEC Motor Installation
RA Motor Installation
Dovetail Knob Installation
Digital Controller Installation
Hand Controller Installation
7
8
9
9
9
Chapter 2
10
Installation - Celestron CI 700 telescope mount
10
DEC Motor Installation
RA Motor Installation
Digital Controller Installation
Hand Controller Installation
Initial Operation and Checkout
10
11
11
12
13
Chapter 3
~
14
System Operation
14
Three steps for successful operation of the 9~II system
14
Command Descriptions
15
Slew
Set
Guide
Displaying Local Time
Displaying Local Sidereal Time
Quick Align
Focus Near/Far
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
Mode Descriptions
16
CA TLOG (Catalog)
ALIGN
A-STAR (Align Star)
RATE
PEC (Periodic Error Correction)
ENTER
GOTO
SETUP
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
17
LED Display Information
18
18
Flashing BrightJDim
3
Men u Tree
19
Chapter 4
21
Periodic Error Correction (PEC)
21
Adjusting the mount for polar alignment (Losmandy)
22
Making the telescope's axis of rotation parallel to the Earth's
23
Polar aligning your G-8/G-11 or CI 700Mount...
Where are the Poles?
Latitude Scales
Pointing at Polaris
The Polar Axis Finder
Declination Drift
~
23
23
24
24
25
25
A brief explanation of time
27
Greenwich Mean Time (GMT)
Sidereal Time
27
27
Maintenance
Hardware
Replacing Hand Controller Batteries (wireless option)
Cleaning display lens
Lubrication of the Motorlgearbox
Firmware
Upgrading the Firmware and Object Database
Chapter 6
29
29
29
29
29
29
29
30
Tro ubleshooting
30
Chapter 7
31
Support
31
Chapter 8
32
User Connector Information
32
Main Power Connector
Focus Motor
Reticle / Shutter
Auto Guider
RS-232
32
32
32
32
33
Chapter 9
34
Spee iiilea tiIons **
34
Digital Controller
Hand Contoroller
Hand Controller (Wireless Option)
Stepper Motor / Gearbox Losmandy Mount
Stepper Motor / Gearbox Celestron CI-700 Mount..
4
34
35
35
35
36
Chapter 10
37
Glossary
37
Chapter 11
38
Warranty
38
5
Introduction
Congratulations
on your purchase of your new
9()II system
for the Losmandy
G-8 (or G-11) or Celestron CI 700 Equatorial telescope Mount.
Before starting the installation, verify the condition of the all equipment for signs
of damage. If damage exists contact the shipping company.
Inventory the shipment. If anything is missing contact Ramona Technology.
Caution: Please read Chapter 1 or 2
It
Installation" completely, Before
Proceedin with the Installation
Safety Instructions
Safety instructions for setting up and using your new system are given throughout this
manual.
Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Astronomy Terms
Abbreviations, acronyms, and astronomy terms are identified or defined as they are
used in this manual. For a complete listing refer to the Glossary
Notational Conventions
CAUTION: A CAUTION indicates
either potential
damage to personnel
equipment and tells you how to avoid the problem
6
or
Chapter 1
Installation - Losmandy telescope mount
The following step-by-step procedure will convert your existing Losmandy telescope to a
complete stand-alone 9011 system. No permanent modifications to the original mount
are required and the mount can be converted back to the original Losmandy
configuration at any time. All special tools (Allen head hex wrenches) not normally
found in the average home shop and required for this installation are provided. The
installation is the same for the either the G8 and G 11 mounts.
Step 1:
Disconnect all cables and power from the Losman
DEC Motor Installation
Fig 1 shows an unmodified G8 mount. In the
next series of steps the DEC and RA motors
will be removed and replaced with the ones
supplied with your
9~II system.
The
procedure is identical for either the G8 or G11
mount and is the same for the RA and DEC
motors
Fig. 1
Step 2:
With reference to Figures 1 and 2 remove the
plastic (or optional aluminum) motor cover.
Step 3:
To remove the existing Losmandy DEC motor
from the mount, remove the two #6/32 button
head screws using the 7/64" Allen wrench. In
Fig 2 the worm gear cover has been removed
to show the coupler.
Fig. 2
f
1
U
Caution: Do not remove the worm
cover as this could expose the gears
to possible damage.
Part of the
Shaft
coupler
remains on
the mount
The motor and worm gear are attached with
self-aligning coupler. Gently pull on the motor.
The coupler will split apart. The plastic piece
may stay with the motor or mount.
Step 4:
Remove the coupler from the motor shaft using
the 0.05" Allen wrench. Set the coupler
aside, it will be used in Step 5 below. Fig 3
7
Fig. 3
Coupler
Interface
Shown
Slid
partially
off
shows the G8 mount with DEC motor removed. Note the
portion of the of the coupler still attached to the worm shaft.
I Shaft Coupler I
Step 5:
Refer to Fig 4 for the following. The plastic coupler
interface is symmetrical and either side can be installed
on the motor/gearbox. Install coupler (removed at step
2) on the new DEC Motor/Gearbox
Note: the DEC Motor/Gear Box is the one with the long
Fig 4
cab/e.
Make sure the setscrews line up with the flats on motor shaft. The coupler should be
pressed on the shaft as far as it will go. Tighten both setscrews
Step 6:
If the Plastic piece came out with the motor make sure it is
centered on the coupler.
Step 7:
Refer to Fig 5, Insert 2ea #6-32 x 1 % long Allen head screws
through the gearbox from the motor side.
. Mounting Screws
I
Rotate the shaft to align the slot in the plastic coupler with rod on the
Fig 5
coupler section on the mount. Push the motor/gearbox on the mount and tighten the 2
screws using the Allen wrench provided.
Fig 6. Shows the DEC motor/gearbox attached to the
mount. The worm cover has been removed to show how
the coupler should look.
i ~ Caution:
Ur~
Do not remove the worm cover as this
could expose the gears to possible damage.
RA Motor Installation
Fig 6
Step 8:
Repeat steps 2 through 7 except for RA Motor. Fig 7 shows the RA motor properly
attached to the G 11 mount.
Fig 7
8
Dovetail Knob Installation
Step 9:
If a telescope is installed on the mount remove it before
proceeding.
The Losmandy Dovetail knob will not clear the DEC
gearbox and must be replaced. The knob supplied is made
up of two pieces, This was done so that the gripping
surface is large enough to be able to tighten the dovetail
easily. Remove the Losmandy knob and replace with the
one supplied as shown in Fig 8.
Fig 8
_"
f
Caution: In using the new knob the large section must
be removed after tightening the telescope in the
X
dovetail, and before the telescope is moved to
U
avoid possible damage. See Fig 9.
Digital Controller Installation
Step 10:
With reference to Fig 5, install the digital controller using
the hand screws removed during step 1. Adjust the angle
of the controller as desired. Tighten one of the hand
screws so that the controller is snugged tightly to the
mounting bracket. Then tighten the other hand screw.
Fig 9
Step 11:
Connect RA and DEC Motor cables to the controller.
if
U
Caution: Dress and tie cables so that they do not interfere with the mount as
it is rotated throughout the entire range
Hand Controller Installation
Step 12:
If the wireless option has be purchased, Install 2 AA batteries (supplied)
j>
6]
;,'c
Caution: To prolong the life of the batteries, they should be removed when the
controller is turned off or stored
Step13:
If desired the hand controller can be attached to either side of the
9"11 controller
or to
the Losmandy mount with Velcro strips (supplied)
Even if the system is to be operated in the wireless mode connect the hand controller to
the digital controller using the 6-conductor cable supplied.
9
Chapter 2
Installation - Celestron CI 700 telescope mount
The following step-by-step procedure will convert your existing CI 700 telescope to a
complete stand-alone 9()II system. No permanent modifications to the original mount
are required and the mount can be converted back to the original Celestron configuration
at any time. All special tools (Allen head hex wrenches) not normally found in the
average home shop and required for this installation are provided.
Step 1:
Disconnect all cables and power from the Celestron controller.
DEC Motor Installation
Fig 10 shows an unmodified CI 700 mount. In the next series
of steps the DEC and RA motors will be removed and
replaced with the ones supplied with your
9~II system.
The
procedure is identical for both the RA and DEC motors
Step 2:
To remove the existing Celestron DEC motor from the mount,
Insert the 7/64" Allen head hex wrench in the lower slots as
shown in Fig 11. Find the Allen head cap screws with the
wrench. Hold the drive motor with one hand and remove the
two #6/32 Cap head screws using the 7164" Allen wrench. The
Fig 10
whole assembly will come away from the mount. Note: the
screws and washers may be removed from the gearbox by
shaking the gear in the vertical position.
Step 3:
Fig 12 shows the Ramona Technology motor-gearbox and
mounting screws. Except for the cable length the units are
identical. The declination drive is the one with longest cable.
To install the new motor, place washers on each of the 2 W'
long 6-32 cap head screws. Insert one of the screws through
the gearbox as shown in Fig 12.
With reference to Fig 13, Locate the 2 threaded holes in the
underside of the dec plate. Position the gearbox so that the
screw can be inserted in the hole closest to the worm gear.
Turn the screw till there is approximately 1/32" between the
gearbox and bottom of the dec plate. Insert the second
screw in the rear hole and turn the screw until it is inserted
as far as the first screw. Now slide the gearbox away from
the worm as far as it will go. Align the output gear on the
gearbox with the gear on the worm shaft. Snug up both
screws so that gearbox can be held in position but still be
Fil! 11
Fig 12
10
slid on the dec plate. Slide the gearbox toward the worm
until the output gear on the gearbox and the gear on the
worm shaft engage. You may have to turn the knob on the
worm shaft for them to line up. There should be a small
amount of backlash so the gears do not bind. Tighten up
both screws. To check the backlash turn the knob on the
worm shaft back and forth. There should be a perceptible
movement in the gear on the worm shaft before the gear on
the gearbox starts to rotate.
RA Motor Installation
Fig 13
Step 4:
Repeat steps 2 through 7 except for RA Motor. Fig
14 shows both motors properly attached to the CI700 mount.
Digital Controller Installation
Step 5:
With reference to Fig 15, using a No.2 Phillips head
Fig 14
screwdriver remove the 4
Remove
screws (in the corners) that
these screws
hold the CI 700 Drive
Controller in its enclosure. Using the screws
just removed, attach the Ramona Controller
mounting bracket as shown in Fig 16. With
reference to Fig 17 install the
digital
9()n
controller on the mounting bracket with the 2
knobs supplied. Adjust the angle of the
controller as desired. Tighten both of the
hand screws so that the controller is
snugged tightly to the mounting bracket.
Fig 15
11
Fig 16
Fig 17
Step 6:
Connect RA and DEC Motor cables to the controller.
i ~Caution:
U "n
Dress and tie cables so that they do not interfere with the mount as
it is rotated throughout the entire range
Hand Controller Installation
Step 7:
If the wireless option has be purchased, Install 2
;.'(
f
6
M batteries (supplied)
Caution: To prolong the life of the batteries, they should be removed when the
controller is turned off or stored
Step 8:
If desired the hand controller can be attached to either side of the
91)11 controller or to
the Celestron mount with Velcro strips (supplied)
Even if the system is to be operated in the wireless mode connect the hand controller to
the digital controller using the 6-conductor cable supplied.
12
Initial Operation and Checkout
Step 9:
If a telescope is installed on the mount make sure it is well balanced.
mount is not set near the end of any travel range.
Make sure the
Initial checkout should be done with the AC power supply provided even if the system
will be operated from a battery or other power source. Make sure the power supply is
disconnected from the AC source. Connect the power supply to the
controller.
9~n
_"
f
A
U
Caution: Make sure there is sufficient clearance around mount because when
the power supply is plugged into the AC source the system will start
operating automatically. There is no ON/OFF switch in the system.
_"~ Warning: Never Never Plug or Un-plug the RA or DEC motors
611
with power applied to the system. Damage to the controller
will occur!!
Step 10:
Connect the power supply to the AC source and observe the following:
1. The RA motor should be "tracking"
2. The
controller should display the sign-on message
9~n
3. All the hand controller pushbuttons should be illuminated
Step 11:
Depress the "MODE" push button on the hand controller and observe that the display
shows the word "MODE"
Step 13:
With one hand depress the "SLEW" pushbutton. With the other hand depress the
"NORTH" push button and verify the Declination ramps up and slews in the proper
direction
Step 14:
With one hand depress the "SLEW" pushbutton. With the other hand depress the
"SOUTH" push button and verify the Declination ramps up and slews in the opposite
direction
Step 15:
With one hand depress the "SLEW" pushbutton. With the other hand depress the
"EAST" push button and verify the RA motor ramps up and slews in the proper direction
Step 16:
With one hand depress the "SLEW" pushbutton. With the other hand depress the
"WEST" push button and verify the RA ramps up and slews in the opposite direction
Step 17:
Unplug the AC power supply
13
Chapter 3
System Operation
After the
1)
2)
9()IIsystem is installed and power is turned on one of two things happens:
If the hand controller is not connected to the digital controller by cable, the system remains in
the boot loader waiting for commands from a PC to update the firmware. The controller will
stay in this mode for 10 seconds. Instructions to upgrade firmware are explained in Chapter
5 -Maintenance.
If the hand controller is connected to the 9l)II controller by cable, the system will boot up and
become ready for normal operation
If wireless hand controller is installed, the cable may now be disconnected and the system will
operate in the wireless mode. Operation is identical in the cabled and wireless modes.
The system operation will be explained using a series of menu trees. The tree shows graphically
a sequence of button pushes and the resulting display information.
Display abbreviations
are expanded in the glossary in Chapter 9.
There are two main sections of the menu tree. The first is the SETUP section, where all
parameters and operating modes are entered. All parameters in this section are stored in nonvolatile memory. When power to the controller is removed and restored the parameters
previously entered are used.
There is one command that does not fit into the normal menu tree. It is explained as follows:
To increase/decrease the brightness of the buttons on the hand controller, with the left hand
simultaneously depress the SLEW and SET buttons. With the right hand depress the UP or
DOWN button.
In the menu tree the two-line display is shown in bold outline. The push button operation is shown
in normal outline. The sequence of operation and corresponding display, flows from left to right
and top to bottom.
Three steps for successful operation of the 9()II system.
1.
Polar alignment - The
9l)II
system assumes that the user has performed an accurate Polar
alignment of the mount. Accurate pointing and tracking of all objects and RAlDEC references
requires this. See Chapter 4 (Making the telescope's axis of rotation parallel to the
Earth's) for information on how to polar align your system.
2.
Initial SETUP parameters - The user must initialize the information in the SETUP menu. This
includes TIME, MONTH, DATE, YEAR, UT-OFFSET, LATATUDE, LONGITUDE, DISPLAY
BRIGHTNESS, RETICLE BRIGHTNESS, FOCUS SPEED, SCROLL SPEED, SLEW SPEED,
TSCOPE, DECBAK, and RABAK. See the section on (Mode Descriptions)
for information
on how to use the SETUP mode.
3.
Initial alignment of either a bright star or an object. This is accomplished using the A-STAR
mode for bright stars or CATLOG for NGC, IC, Planets or Messier objects.
14
Command Descriptions
Slew
Pressing the SLEW button along with a direction button (NORTH, SOUTH, EAST,
WEST) will slew the telescope in the direction desired. Also note that the display will
update both RA and DEC to reflect the current position, this assumes the telescope was
previously ALIGNED.
Set
Pressing the SET button along with a direction button (NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST)
will move the telescope at 10x the Sidereal rate in the direction desired. This mode is
intended for centering an object in the eyepiece or in the field of view of a eeD or film
camera
Guide
Pressing one of the direction buttons (NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST) will move the
telescope at O.5x the Sidereal rate in the direction desired. This mode is intended for
guiding an object in the eyepiece or in the field of view of a CCD or film camera
Displaying Local Time
Pressing the EAST button along with the WEST button, displays the current local time.
This will be displayed until a direction or Mode button is pressed.
Displaying Local Sidereal Time
Pressing the NORTH button along with the SOUTH button, displays the current local
sidereal time. This will be displayed until a direction or Mode button is pressed.
Quick Align
Pressing the SET button along with the ENTER button, will place the controller in the
ALIGN mode. This facilitates in aligning the telescope to an object or a previously entered
RAIDEe position.
Focus Near/Far
Pressing the SLEW button along with either the UP or DOWN button, will focus (near or
far) the eyepiece if an appropriate focus motor is connected to the controller.
L,Au
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.
Mode Descriptions
CA TLOG (Catalog)
This mode allows the user to select an object from the built-in database. There are 4
catalogs in the database. NG (contains all objects in the NGC catalog of John Dreyer
published in 1888) M (contains all the objects in the lists of Charles Messier) IC the
"Indexed Catalog" and P (8 Planets excluding earth). After the object is selected pressing
the ENTER button will display relevant information about the selected object. Pressing
the ENTER button again re-displays the objects information. Pressing the UP/DOWN
button while in this mode will display the next/previous object. After selecting the object
the controller will prompt the user (by flashing bright/dim) the RAIDEC to be selected.
Pressing the ENTER button sets this object as the next object to GOTO or ALIGN to.
ALIGN
This mode aligns the telescope to an object or RAlDEC that was previously selected or,
aligns a selected object that was centered using the SLEW commands. After the object is
selected, the controller will prompt the user (by flashing bright/dim) the RAlDEC to be
aligned. Pressing the ENTER button sets this object as the current aligned position
RAlDEC.
A-STAR (Align Star)
This mode allows the user to select from a list of approximately 25 bright stars (+1 mag
and brighter) to facilitate aligning the telescope. After the star is selected, the controller
will prompt the user (by flashing bright/dim) the RAlDEC of the selected star. Pressing
the ENTER button selects the star RAlDEC as the current position.
RATE
This mode selects the tracking rate of the telescope. The rate options are Sidereal, Solar,
Lunar, and King. Pressing the ENTER button selects the displayed rate.
PEC (Periodic Error Correction)
This mode selects one of three modes for Periodic Error Correction, These modes are,
RECORD, ON, and OFF. When the RECORD mode is selected the controller will record
any guide corrections entered on the hand controller. While in this mode, 'RECORD' will
flash in the display for one revolution of the worm, (4-min. for a 360-tooth worm gear)
then the PEC mode will switch to ON. In the ON mode the controller will playback the
corrections that were input during the RECORD mode. Selecting OFF deactivates the
PEC mode. (See PEC description later in this chapter).
ENTER
This mode allows the user to enter a specific RAlDEC directly. This input will be used for
a subsequent ALIGN or GOTO command.
GOTO
This mode slews the telescope to the object or RAlDEC that was previously selected.
After the command is selected with the ENTER button, the controller will prompt the user
(by flashing bright/dim) the RAlDEC. Pressing the ENTER button while RAlDEC is
flashing starts the telescope slewing. Pressing the SLEW button while the telescope is
moving will halt movement. Entering the GOTO mode again will cause the telescope to
continue to the selected object or RAlDEC.
NOTE: Pressinq any motion button (SLEW, SET, NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST) will escape
from ANY mode.
16
Mode Descriptions (cont.)
SETUP
This mode allows the user to enter specific values for the operation of the controller. The
following parameters are stored in battery backed-up memory, allowing these values to
be re-Ioaded the next time the controller is powered up.
TIME, MONTH, DAY, YEAR
Current Time, Month, Day, Year
This information is required for the correct operation of the system. It is used for setting
the telescope limits as well a calculating the Planet positions.
UT-OFF
Universal Time Offset from GMT
The Universal time offset is used to calculate the local sidereal time. The local sidereal
time is used for performing the meridian flip of the mount.
LAT
Your Site Latitude (.:!:.DD.dd_degrees,tenths of deg)
LONG
Your Site Longitude (!:DDD.d degrees, tenths of deg)
These values are used for checking the horizon limits and calculating local sidereal time
DISBRI
LED Display Brightness (0 - 9)
RETBRI
Illumined Reticle Brightness (0 - 9)
FOCSPD
Focus Motor Speed (0 - 9)
SCRSPD
Display Scroll Speed (0 - 9)
These values are user configurable for setting preferences.
SLWSPD
Slew Speed (30 - 70)
This value sets the motor maximum slew speed. A slower speed might be required for a
mount that is heavily loaded or un-balanced.
TSCOPE
Telescope Type (0 - 3)
This entry selects the current mount that is being used. This is used for calculating the
PEC and tracking rates.
Losmandy G-11
1 Losmandy GM-8 Mount
2 = Celestron CI700 mount
3 Reserved for future use
o=
=
=
DECBAK
DEC Backlash Reduction (0 - 99)
RABAK
RA Backlash Reduction (0 - 99)
These two values are available to the user for Telescope types 2 and above. These
values can be adjusted the remove the gear-train backlash that exists. Adjustment is
performed while looking through an eyepiece while alternately pressinq the SET button
along with a direction button (N,S,E,W) and adjusting the backlash value until the motor
delay is removed.
NOTE: Pressing any motion button (SLEW, SET, NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST) will escape
from ANY mode.
The table on the following pages shows the system control flow in tabular form. The contents of
the display are outlined in bold. A light line outlines push button action. The menu flows from left
to right with the ENTER key and up/down with the UP/DOWN keys
17
LED Display Information
Flashing Bright/Dim
The flashing bright/dim of RAlDEC alerts the user to choice between two options.
1.
Pressing 'ENTER' -In the ALIGN, A-STAR, ENTER modes, pressing the 'ENTER'
button sets the displayed RAlDEC as the current location.
2.
Pressing any motion button - Exits the current mode.
18
Menu Tree
Menu Tree
Display
Button
I
MODE
I
Display
Button
Display
Button
Display
Button
MOOE
any
UP!
DOWN
I
ISetup
SETUP
I
SETUP
UP!
SETUP
any
DOWN
TIME
I
Enter Local Time of Day
SETUP
UP!
Enter Current Month (number)
MONTH
DOWN
MODE
I
Mode
MODE
ENTER
I
IDescription
Display
Button
UP!
SETUP
DOWN
DAY
Enter Current Day (number)
Enter Current Year (number)
UP!
SETUP
DOWN
YEAR
UP!
DOWN
SETUP
UT .()fF
Universal cooromatec Time
Enter Local Latitude
UP!
SETUP
DOWN
LAT
UP!
SETUP
DOWN
LONG
UP!
SETUP
DOWN
DISBRI
UP!
SETUP
DOWN
RETBRI
UP!
SETUP
DOWN
FOCSPD
UP!
SETUP
DOWN
SCRSPD
UP!
SETUP
DOWN
SLWSPD
Enter the Offset (hours) from
Enter Local Longitude
Enter Display
Brightness
Enter Reticle
Brightness
Enter Focus Speed
Enter Display Scroll Speed
Enter Motor Slew Speed
MOOE
any
UP!
DOWN
I
I Enter
I
Mode
MODE
ENTER
ENTER
I
MVRA
Enter RA and DEC to which
0000.0
the Scope is to be moved
ENTER
I
MVDEC
+0099
I
MODE
any
UP!
DOWN
I
ENTER
I
MODE
I
I
IGOTOMode
MODE
GO TO
I
0000.0
+00.00
Start movement
RA and DEC
I
to selected
MODE
any
UP!
DOWN
I
ICatalog
MODE
CATILOG
ENTER
I
Mode
CATLOG
any
UP!
CATLOG
To find an object
DOWN
NGOOOO
in the data base
UP!
CATLOG
DOWN
UP!
DOWN
MOOO
CATLOG
1£0000
ENTER
19
I
object
scroll
I
I
Menu Tree (cont.)
Menu Tree
Button
I
MODE
Display
I
Display
Button
Display
Button
Display
Button
IDescription
Display
Button
MODE
any
UPI
DOWN
I
IAllgn Mode
MODE
ALIGN
ENTER
I
ALIGN
object
I
I
Align to an Object
oran RAIDEe
1 Sec
0000.0
Delay
+00.00
ENTER
I
MODE
I
MODE
any
UPI
DOWN
I
IA-5ll1r Mode
MODE
A-5TAR
ENTER
I
A-5TAR
any
UPI
DOWN
I
A-5TAR
stamame
I
I
Align to a selected
bright star
continue
on next
line
a-star
continued
1 Sec
0000.0
Delay
+00.00
ENTER
I
MODE
I
MODE
any
UPI
DOWN
I
IRate Mode
MODE
RATE
ENTER
I
RATE
current rate
UPI
DOWN
RATE
SIDREL
UPI
DOWN
RATE
SOLAR
UPI
DOWN
RATE
LUNAR
UPI
DOWN
RATE
KING
Select a guide
Rate
ENTER
I
RATE
DONE
I
MODE
any
PEC Mode
UPI
DOWN
MODE
PEe
ENTER
PEe
current pec
UPI
DOWN
PEe
RECORD
UPI
DOWN
PEC
ON
UPI
DOWN
PEe
OFF
Select a PEe
mode
ENTER
20
I
Chapter 4
Periodic Error Correction (PEC)
Periodic Error Correction, or PEC, is a system that improves the tracking accuracy of the drive.
PEG is designed to improve photographic quality by reducing the amplitude of the worm gear
errors. Periodic error is a slight oscillation in right ascension caused by imperfections in all drive
gears. The cycle of the periodic error is equal to one rotation of the worm gear, which is four
minutes for the G-11 and two minutes for the G-8 and CI-700. No matter how precise, all
telescope drives will have some periodic error. Using the PEC function is a two-step process.
First, you must guide for at least four minutes (two minutes for the G-8 and CI-700), keeping the
guide star centered on the cross hairs of your guiding eyepiece, during which time the system
records the correction you make. It takes the worm gear four minutes to make one complete
revolution, hence the need to guide for four minutes. The second step is to play back the
corrections you made during the recording phase. The microcomputer inside the electronic
console does this automatically after one revolution of the worm gear. Keep in mind that this
feature is for advanced astra-photographers and requires careful guiding. Here's how to use the
PEG function most effectively.
1. Find a bright star relatively close to the object you want to photograph.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Insert a high power eyepiece with illuminated cross hairs into your telescope. Orient
the guiding eyepiece cross hairs so that one is parallel to the declination axis while
the other is parallel to the R.A. axis.
Center the guide star on the illuminated cross hairs, focus the telescope, and study
the periodic movement.
Take a few minutes to practice guiding. This will help you familiarize yourself with the
periodic error of the drive and the operation of the hand controller.
Enter the "PEC" mode and select 'RECORD' then press 'ENTER'. 'RECORD' will
flash once a second for four minutes. For best results, the star should be centered on
the cross hairs for a few seconds before activating the PEC - RECORD function.
Guide for two or four minutes depending on your telescope mount. Try not to
overshoot corrections in right ascension. Ignore drift in declination.
After fourltwo minutes, the system will automatically
the corrections made during the first four minutes.
switch to the PEC - ON mode to playback
Once you have used the PEC function for a while you may mistake its operation for the way the
drive normally operates. The best way to see how well the PEC function works is to turn if off and
note the change in tracking. PEC results improve with practice and patience.
21
Adjusting the mount for polar alignment (Losmandy)
Note: Currently the system is designed to operate only in the Northern Hemisphere. A Future
release of the firmware will allow the system to operate from the Southern Hemisphere.
In order for the clock drive to track accurately, the telescope's axis of rotation must be parallel to
the Earth's axis of rotation, a process known as polar alignment. Polar alignment is achieved
NOT by moving the telescope in R.A, or DEC, but by adjusting the mount vertically, which is
called altitude, and horizontally, which is called azimuth. This section simply covers the correct
movement of the telescope during the polar alignment process. The actual process of polar
alignment, (Making the telescope's axis of rotation parallel to the Earth's) is described later
in this manual in the section on Polar Alignment. To adjust the mount in altitude:
1.
2.
Locate the altitude adjustment knob - directly below the counterweight shaft.
Turn the altitude adjustment knob until the mount is at the right elevation. Each
complete revolution of the knob raises or lowers the polar axis 3.2°.
The altitude range is from 14° to 64°. If you live at latitudes closer to the poles, you will need the
Zero Degree Latitude Adapter which is sold as an optional accessory by Losmandy and increases
the latitude range from 0° to 84°. To adjust the mount in azimuth:
1. Locate the azimuth lock screws and adjustment knobs on the back of the mount.
2.
3.
4.
Loosen the two azimuth lock screws on each side of the mount.
Turn either of the azimuth adjustment knobs until the polar axis is pointing in the right
direction. Each complete revolution of the knob is .82°.
Tighten the azimuth lock screws to hold the mount in place.
The mount can be moved ± 8.50 in azimuth using these knobs. Keep in mind that adjusting the
mount is done during the polar alignment process only. Once polar aligned, the mount must
NOT be moved. Pointing the telescope is done by moving the mount in right ascension and
declination. Once the appropriate adjustments have been made and telescope is aligned on the
celestial pole, apply power to the controller and the telescope will track.
22
Making the telescope's axis of rotation parallel to the Earth's
Polar aligning your G-8/G-11 or CI700Mount
In order for the telescope to track the stars, you must meet two criteria; first, you need a drive
motor that moves at the same rate as the stars. A polar axis finder is offered as an optional
accessory. The second thing you need is to set the telescope's axis of rotation so that it tracks in
the right direction. Since the motion of the stars across the sky is caused by the Earth's rotation
about its axis, the telescope's axis must be made parallel to the Earth's. The polar axis is the axis
around which the telescope rotates when moved in right ascension. This axis points in the same
direction even when the telescope moves in right ascension.
Polar alignment is the process by which the telescope's axis of rotation (called the polar axis) is
made parallel with the Earth's axis of rotation. Once aligned, a telescope with a
_9{)II
system will
track the stars as they move across the sky. The result is that objects observed through the
telescope appear stationary. They will not drift out of the field of view because the motors and
gears exactly compensate for the motion caused by the Earth's rotation. Even if you are not using
the clock drive, polar alignment is still desirable since it will reduce the number of corrections
needed to follow an object and limit all corrections to R.A. axis. There are several methods of
polar alignment, all of which work on a similar principal, but perform somewhat differently. Each
method will be considered separately, beginning with the easier methods and working to the more
difficult.
Although there are several methods mentioned here, you will never use all of them during one
particular observing session. Instead, you may use only one if it is a casual observing session.
Or, you may use two methods, one for rough alignment followed by a more accurate method if
you plan on doing astro-photography.
Where are the Poles?
In each hemisphere, there is a point in the sky around which all the other stars appear to rotate.
These points are called the celestial poles and are named for the hemisphere in which they
reside. For example, in the Northern Hemisphere all stars move around the North Celestial Pole.
When a telescope's polar axis is pointed at the celestial pole, it is parallel to the Earth's rotational
axis. The North Celestial Pole is the point in the Northern Hemisphere around which all stars
appear to rotate. The counterpart in the Southern Hemisphere is referred to as the South
Celestial Pole.
Many of the methods of polar alignment require that you know how to find the celestial pole by
identifying stars in the area. For those in the Northern Hemisphere, finding the celestial pole is not
too difficult. Fortunately, we have a naked eye star less than a degree away. This star, Polaris, is
the end star in the handle of the Little Dipper. Since the Little Dipper (technically called Ursa
Minor) is not one of the brightest constellations in the sky, it may be difficult to locate from urban
areas. If this is the case, use the two end stars in the bowl of the Big Dipper (the pointer stars).
Draw an imaginary line (away from the "pan") through them toward the Little Dipper. They point
almost directly to Polaris. Since the position of the Big Dipper rotates throughout the night as well
as during the year it may be difficult to locate, or even perhaps be below the horizon .
Observers in the Southern Hemisphere are not as fortunate as those in the Northern Hemisphere.
The stars around the south celestial pole are not nearly as bright as those around the North
Celestial Pole. The closest star that is relatively bright is Sigma Octantis. This star is just within
the naked eye limit (magnitude E.5) and lies about 59 arc minutes from the pole. For more
information about stars around the south celestial pole, please consult a star atlas.
23
Latitude Scales
The easiest way to polar align a telescope is with a latitude scale. Unlike other methods that
require you to find the celestial pole by identifying certain stars near it, this method works off of a
known constant to determine how high the polar axis should be pointed. The Losmandy G-11
mount can be adjusted from 14° to 64°.
The constant, mentioned above, is a relationship between your latitude and the angular distance
the celestial pole is above the northern (or southern) horizon. The angular distance from the
northern horizon to the North Celestial Pole is always equal to your latitude. To illustrate this,
imagine that you are standing on the North Pole. latitude +90°. The North Celestial Pole. which
has a declination of +900• would be directly overhead (900 above the horizon). Now. let's say that
you move 1° south. Your latitude is now +89° and the celestial pole is no longer directly
overhead. It has moved 10 closer toward the northern horizon. This means the pole is now 890
above the northern horizon. If you move 1 ° further south. the same thing happens again. As you
can see from this example, the distance from the northern horizon to the celestial pole is always
equal to your latitude.
If you are observing from San Diego, which has a latitude of 32°57', then the celestial pole is
32°57' above the northern horizon. All a latitude scale does then is to point the polar axis of the
telescope at the right elevation above the northern (or southern) horizon. To polar align your
telescope:
1.
2.
3.
Make sure the polar axis of the mount is pointing due north. Use a landmark that you
know faces north.
Level the tripod. There is a bubble level built into the mount for this purpose. Please
note that leveling the tripod is only necessary if using this method of polar alignment.
Perfect polar alignment is still possible using other methods described later without
leveling the tripod.
Adjust the mount in altitude until the latitude indicator points to your latitude. Moving
the mount affects the angle the polar axis is pointing. For specific information on
adjusting the equatorial mount, please see the section Adjusting the Mount.
This method can be done in daylight, thus eliminating the need to fumble around in the dark.
Although this method does NOT put you directly on the pole. it will limit the number of corrections
you will make when tracking an object. It will also be accurate enough for short exposure prime
focus planetary photography (a couple of seconds) and short exposure piggyback astrophotography (a couple of minutes).
Pointing at Polaris
This method utilizes Polaris to polar align your mount. Since Polaris is less than 1 from the North
Celestial Pole. you can simply point the polar axis of your telescope at Polaris. Although this is by
no means perfect alignment. it does get you within 1°. Unlike the previous method, this must be
done in the dark when Polaris is visible.
0
1.
2.
Set the telescope up so that the polar axis is pointing north.
Loosen the DEC clutch knob and move the telescope so that the tube is parallel to
the polar axis. When this is done, the declination setting circle will read +90 If the
declination setting circle is not aligned, move the telescope so that the tube is parallel
to the polar axis.
Adjust the mount in altitude and/or azimuth until Polaris is in the field of view of the
finder.
Center Polaris in the field of the telescope using the fine adjustment controls on the
wedge.
0
•
3.
4.
24
Remember, while polar aligning, do NOT move the telescope in R.A. or DEC. You do not want to
move the telescope itself, but the polar axis. The telescope is used simply to see where the polar
axis is pointing.
Like the previous method, this gets you close to the pole but not directly on it. The following
methods help improve your accuracy for more serious observations and photography.
The Polar Axis Finder
The Polar Axis Finder is designed to minimize polar alignment set-up time while maintaining
maximum accuracy. The installation of this optional accessory is described in the section on
Installing the Polar Axis Finder. Here's how to use it:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Tum the Polar Axis Finder illuminator on.
Place Polaris in the field of the polar axis finder by adjusting the mount in altitude and
azimuth.
Rotate the polar scope until the orientation of the stars on the reticle matches the star
pattern in the sky (as seen with the naked eye).
Adjust the mount in altitude and azimuth until Polaris is in the small space on the line
between Eta h Ursa Major (Alkaid - at the end of the handle of the Big Dipper) and
Epsilon e Cassiopeia (Segin - the beginning of the W).
Note the second brightest star in the field.
Place this star in space on the line between Cassiopeia and the bowl of the Big
Dipper. If you can not get Polaris and this second star in their respective places,
rotate the polar axis finder until you can.
When finished, the mount is accurately polar aligned.
Declination Drift
This method of polar alignment allows you to get the most accurate alignment on the celestial
pole and is required if you want to do long exposure deep-sky astra-photography through the
telescope. The declination drift method requires that you monitor the drift of selected guide stars.
The drift of each guide star tells you how far away the polar axis is pointing from the true celestial
pole and in what direction. Although declination drift is quite simple and straightforward, it
requires a great deal of time and patience to complete when first attempted. The declination drift
method should be done after anyone of the previously mentioned methods has been completed.
To perform the declination drift method you need to choose two bright stars. One should be near
the eastern horizon and one due south near the meridian. Both stars should be near the celestial
equator (0° declination). You will monitor the drift of each star one at a time and in declination
only. While monitoring a star on the meridian, any misalignment in the east-west direction will be
revealed. While monitoring a star near the east/west horizon, any misalignment in the north-south
direction will be revealed. As for hardware, you will need an illuminated reticle ocular to help you
recognize any drift. For very close alignment. a Barlow lens is also recommended since it
increases the magnification and reveals any drift faster.
When looking due south with the scope on the side of the mount, insert the diagonal so it points
straight up. Insert the cross hair ocular and align cross hairs to be parallel to declination and right
ascension motion Use ±16x guide setting to check parallel alignment.
First choose your star near where the celestial equator and the meridian meet. The star should be
approximately ± 1/2 hour of the meridian and ±5° of the celestial equator. Center the star in the
field of your telescope and monitor the drift in declination .
• If the star drifts south, the polar axis is too far east.
• If the star drifts north, the polar axis is too far west.
25
Make the appropriate adjustments to the polar axis to eliminate any drift. One you have managed
to eliminate all drift, move to the star near the east horizon. The star should be 20° above the
horizon and ± 5° of the celestial equator.
• If the star drifts south, the polar axis is too low
• If the star drifts north, the polar axis is too high.
Once again, make the appropriate adjustments to the polar axis to eliminate any drift.
Unfortunately, the latter adjustments interact with adjustments ever so slightly. Therefore, repeat
the process again to improve the accuracy checking both axes for minimal drift. Once the drift has
been eliminated, the telescope is very accurately aligned. You will be able to do prime focus
deep-sky astra-photography for long periods.
NOTE: If the eastern horizon is blocked, you may choose a star near the western horizon
however, you will have to reverse the polar high/low error directions. If using this method in the
Southern Hemisphere, the procedure is the same as described above. However, the direction of
drift is reversed.
26
A brief explanation of time
To simplify matters, nations have generally agreed to employ, on an earth wide basis, only 24
varieties of time, differing by whole hours from one another. We subdivide the 360 degrees of
longitude around the equator into 24 intervals of 15 degrees, one for each hour. Thus the ZERO
MERIDIAN, the meridian of Greenwich, is centered on one of these 15-degree strips. Within
each segment of the earth, time remains constant; across the boundary of the neighboring 15
degree segment, time shifts by one hour, and so on, in orderly progression. A glance at a map of
standard time zones, however, shows that the boundaries actually adopted are often quite
irregular, to suit the convenience of individual communities. Eastern Standard Time is 5 hours
earlier than Greenwich Standard Time, Central Standard Time, 6 hours earlier, Mountain
Standard 7, Pacific Standard 8, and so on. These figures, which represent the difference
between Greenwich Standard Time and your own standard time, we shall refer to as Standard
Longitude Difference, abbreviated as SLD.
Greenwich Mean Time (GMT)
Which is also called Greenwich Standard Time, Greenwich Civil Time and Universal Time (UT), is
the basic reference time used for most astronomical work. To avoid the cumbersome A.M. and
P.M., astronomer's number the hours from 0 to 24, starting with midnight.
To derive GMT, add to your own Standard Mean Time (SMT) the number of whole hours
corresponding to the Standard Longitude Difference (SLD): GMT
SMT + SLD. For example if
you live in the zone of Central Standard Time. SLD = 6hours. If your SMT is 21 h 32m, GMT =
21h 32m + 6h OOm 27h 32m. Subtract 24 hours if necessary, in order to give a result in the
normal range from 0 to 24: 27h 32m
3h 32m. If you live east instead of west of Greenwich, the
SLD is negative.
=
=
=
To calculate your Local Mean (solar) Time (LMT) the following formula is often useful:
LMT SMT + SLD - LLD. Suppose you live in Cleveland Ohio, longitude 81 degrees 45min W.
Divide by 15 to obtain the Local Longitude Difference of 5h 27m. Since Cleveland operates in the
Eastern Standard Time, SLD
5h. So, if the standard clock (Greenwich time) reads 3:49 PM
(15h 49m), the Local Mean Time is:
LMT (15h 49m) + (5h) - (5h 27m)
15h 22m. If necessary, add or subtract 24 hours, as
explained above.
=
=
=
=
Sidereal Time
The earth's revolution in its orbit causes the sun to drift eastward approximately 1 degree per day
with respect to the stars. Thus, at the end of a year, when the earth has completed 365.2422
rotations with reference to the sun, it has made exactly 1 additional rotation, with reference to the
stars; and so our year contains 366.2422 sidereal, or star, days. A Sidereal Day, in
consequence, is about 4 minutes shorter than a solar day (24 hours divided by 366.2422).
On or about March 21, when the sidereal and solar years start, Sidereal "noon" (or zero hours
sidereal time) occurs as solar noon (or about 12 hours on the solar clock). Hence the sidereal
and solar clocks, whose time scales run consecutively from 0 hours to 23 hours 59 minutes, do
not really coincide until 6 months later, at the autumnal equinox, on or about September 21. By
this time the sidereal clock has gained 12 hours on the solar clock and both read midnight, or Oh
OOm. The sidereal clock continues to gain on a mean time solar clock by 3m 56.555s of sidereal
time for each solar day.
27
To calculate the sidereal time approximately, figure out the number of months and days that have
elapsed since the autumnal equinox. Allow 2 hours for each month and 4 minutes for each day in
excess of the months. Add this figure to the Greenwich Mean Time to get a rough estimate of the
Greenwich Sidereal Time. For example, on May 29 at 17h 30m GMT, 8 months and 8 days after
the autumnal equinox, figure as follows:
8 months at 2h per month
=
8 days at 4m per day
GMT
=
Total
Subtract 24h to obtain the approximate
GST = 10h 02m.
=
16h
Oh 32m
17h 30m
33h 62m
Greenwich Sidereal Time:
Sidereal time is the elapsed sidereal interval since the vernal equinox was last on the meridian.
The equinox is the point on the celestial sphere where the sun crosses the equator in the spring.
Sometime called the point of Aries. To obtain a more accurate value of the sidereal time at a
given instant, corrections would have to be made for rotation and precession.
28
Chapter 5
Maintenance
Hardware
Replacing Hand Controller Batteries
(wireless option)
Depress the battery cover latch (on the rear of the hand controller case) and slide off
Remove old batteries and replace with two new AA alkaline batteries (Duracell MN1500 or
equivalent). Make sure the polarity of batteries matches the marking on case. Replace battery
cover. Note: in order to prolong the life of batteries they should be removed from the hand
controller when it is not in use.
Cleaning display lens
The red display lens is made from an acrylic plastic and as such it can be easily scratched. Care
must be taken to keep dust and dirt from accumulating on the surface. Periodically blow or brush
off the lens using a product such as "Dust Off' a compressed gas duster or a camel hair lens
brush. When the lens requires more than that, first dust as above then carefully clean with a
product such as Windex and a soft facial tissue.
Lubrication of the Motor/gearbox
Under normal use the lubrication should last for the life of the system. Should you suspect that
lubrication is called for contact Ramona Technology for lubricating instructions. If you choose you
may return the motor assemblies to the factory and they will be inspected and lubricated for a
nominal charge.
Firmware
Upgrading the Firmware and Object Database
Upgrading the controller's firmware or database requires using the included RS-232 cable and
placing the controller in the Auto-Load mode. This mode is entered during normal power-up when
the Hand Controller is not connected. The system will stay in this mode for 10 seconds after
power-up at which time the controller will Auto-Boot into the current firmware.
Full instructions for downloading new firmware and databases will be placed at ramonatech.com
Check this website often as firmware and database upgrades will be posted with a version
number to let you know if you have the most current version.
If you do not have access to the Internet, contact Ramona Technology by mail and the update will
be mailed to you on a floppy disk or CD-ROM
If you choose you may return the controller to the factory and the system will be updated for a
nominal charge.
NOT~: Firmware and Database upgrades require a computer running Microsoft Windows 95 or
later.
29
Chapter 6
Trou bleshooti n9
This will be Future addition if required
30
Chapter 7
Support
Ramona Technology
17849 Hwy. 67
Ramona, Ca. 92065
Sales Support
Technical Support
sales@ramonatech.com
support@ramonatech.com
Website
http://www.ramonatech.com
31
Chapter 8
User Connector Information
_',
f
The following information is supplied for use in interfacing to the
A
U
9l)II
system. When connecting
equipment not supplied by Ramona Technology make sure you understand what you are
doing before proceeding. If you have any doubts contact Ramona Technology. We will be
glad to help.
Main Power Connector
Pin 1 + 12VDC
Pin 2 12 Volt Return
Front Panel View
Focus Motor
The Focus motor is a differential
signal. The motor must be
isolated from ground. When the
voltage at the TI P is positive with
respect to the RING the system
will Focus in one direction. When
the voltage at the RING is
positive with respect to the TIP
the system will Focus in the
opposite direction.
Reticle / Shutter
The TIP is always positive with
respect to the RI NG when the
function is activated
Tip
Ring
n
1~
2
G---U
3.5 mm Phone Jack
Schematic
0
Tip
1
Ring
2
\1
n
3.5 mm Phone Jack
Schematic
Auto Guider
Pin
Pin
Pin
Pin
Pin
Pin
1 Gnd
2 Gnd
3 Guide
4 Guide
5 Guide
6 Guide
North
South
East
West
6 Pin RJ11 Jack
Front Panel View
32
RS-232
Pin
Pin
Pin
Pin
Pin
Pin
1 No connection
2 Controller Transmit
3 Controller Receive
4 Ground
5 No connection
6 No connection
Front Panel View
33
Chapter 9
Specifications**
Digital Controller
Tracking:
Sidereal Rate
King Rate
Lunar Rate
Solar Rate
Resolution: 0.28 arc-second/ustep
Resolution: 0.56 arc-second/ustep
Resolution: 0.28 arc-second/ustep
for G11
for G8
for CI 700
PEe
Manual Movement:
Slewing Speed = 3 deg/sec max. (adjustable)
Setting Speed
10 x Sidereal rate
Guiding Speed = 0.5 Sidereal rate
=
Data Base:
Over 7000 objects
Updateable over www
Compatible with "TheSky" and "SkyMap"
Display:
2 Line red dimmable LED
Display scrolls under processor control
6 Alpha-numeric characters/line
Character matrix 5x7
Character height 0.7 inches
Focus Motor Driver:
Focus in/out
Focus rate is adjustable
Will operate 12-volt motors with a current requirement of
0.05 amp max
Reticle Intensityl
Shutter Driver:
Adjustable
Will provide up to 10 Vdc at 0.05 amp max
AutoGuider Input:
Accepts 4 dry contact inputs
Interfaces:
RA Motor: RJ45 Connector
DEC Motor: RJ45 Connector
Focus Motor: 1/8 mono phone jack
Wiring Tip
Sleeve
34
Specifjcations (cont.)
Interfaces (cont.):
Reticle! Shutter: 1!8 mono phone jack
Wiring: Tip
Sleeve
Auto Guider RJ11 6x6
SBIG Compatible
Wiring: Pin1 Common
Pin2 Common
Pin3 North Switch
Pin4 South Switch
Pin5 East Switch
Pin6 West Switch
Hand Controller RJ 11 6x6
RS232 RJ11 6x6
Power Requirements:
12 VDC @ 2 amps (average current -0.5 amp)
Power Connector Conxall
Real Time Clock Battery:
Battery Life -5 years
Battery: 3v Lithium Coin 23mm Type: CR2330
Hand Contoroller
10 key adjustable brightness lighted keypad
North, South, East, West for direction
Slew, Set for speed
Enter, Mode, Up, Down for database and menu selection
Dimensions: 5x2.7x1.25
Cable Length: 10ft
Hand Controller (Wireless Option)
Operational Distance from Controller: 10-ft max.
Standby mode: blinks lighted keys for 2 hours after 10 minutes
Of inactivity for ease of finding hand controller in the dark
Any key exits standby mode
Battery: AA Alkaline 2 each (Duracell MN1500 or equivalent)
Battery Life: approximately 200 Hours
Stepper Motor / Gearbox Losmandy Mount
Gear Ratio: 4: 1
Output Shaft Dia.: 0.187
Shaft Length: 0.500 from mounting surface of gearbox
Dimensions: 2.60 x 3.00 x2.5 (excluding shaft)
Motor full step: 1.8 degrees
Motor Voltage: 3.7v
Motor Current: 1.2 amp
Motor Holding torque: 44 in-oz
Motor Drive: bipolar, mico-stepped in tracking modes
Cable Length: 16 inches RA, 32 inches DEC
35
Stepper Motor / Gearbox Ce/estron CI-700 Mount
Gear Ratio: 8: 1
Output Gear 64 pitch 80 tooth 55
Dimensions: 2.00 x2.50 x 3.40)
Motor full step: 1.8 degrees
Motor Voltage: 3.7v
Motor Current: 1.2 amp
Motor Holding torque: 44 in-oz
Motor Drive: bipolar, mica-stepped in tracking modes
Cable Length: 16 inches RA, 32 inches DEC
** Specifications
subject to change without notice.
36
Chapter 10
Glossary
CATLOG
Catalog
DEC
Dedination Angle
DISBRI
Display Brightness
FIRMWARE
FOCSPD
Focus Speed
KGRAT
King_Rate
LAT
Latitude
LED
Light Emitting Diode
LONG
Longitude
LUNRAT
Lunar Rate
MVDEC
Move to Declination angle
MVRA
Move to Right Assencion angle
PC IBM
Compatable Personal Computer
PE
Periodic Error
PEC
Periodic Error Correction
RA
Right Assencion Angle
RETBRI
Reticle Brightness
RF
Radio Frequency
RTC
Real Time Clock
SCRSPD
Display Scroll Speed
SIDRAT
Siderial Rate
SLWSPD
Slew Speed
SOLRAT
Solar Rate
UT-OFF
Universal Time Offset
37
Chapter 11
Warranty
9~II
WARRANTY
Ramona Technology warrants to the original user that the system will be free
from design and manufacturing defects for 1 year from purchase.
This warranty does not apply to any unit (i) damaged during shipping or
installation, (ii) unless that it is installed strictly in accordance with the
instructions in this manual, (iii) subjected to accident, abuse or misuse
Our liability under this warranty is limited to repair or replacement of the
defective component. The defective component will be shipped, prepaid, to
Ramona Technologies for repair or replacement. We shall not be liable for any
labor, or other installation costs, indirect or consequential damage or any other
damages in connection with this system
THE FOREGOING CONSTITUTES OUR EXCLUSEVE OBLIGATION, AND
WE MAKE NO EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES OR ANY WARRANTY
OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE
WHATSOEVER, EXCEPT AS STATED ABOVE
Prior to returning any merchandise the customer / owner shall obtain an RMA
number from Ramona Technology. The customer / owner is required to return
said defective merchandise, freight prepaid to Ramona Technology 17849
Highway 67, Ramona California 92065
SERIAL NUMBERS
Digital Controller........................
Hand Controller
.
RA Motor Assy
DEC Motor Assy
.
RAMONA
TECHNOLOGY
17849
HIGHWAY
RAMONA,
67
CA 92065
WWW.RAMONATEOH.OOM