Motorola 5440SM - Canopy 5.4 GHz Subscriber Module User guide

Canopy® Software Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
Issue 1
May 2009
Notices
See important regulatory and legal notices in Section 10 on Page 34.
Trademarks, Product Names, and Service Names
MOTOROLA, the stylized M Logo, Canopy, and all other trademarks indicated as such herein are
registered trademarks of Motorola, Inc. ® Reg. US Pat & Tm. Office. All other product or service
names are the property of their respective owners.
© 2009 Motorola, Inc. All rights reserved
http://www.motorola.com/canopy
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
Table of Contents
1
2
Introduction ............................................................................................................... 6
1.1
Notes and Highlights .......................................................................................... 6
1.2
Abbreviations ..................................................................................................... 7
1.3
Names ............................................................................................................... 7
1.4
Identifying Hardware Series (P7, P8, P9, P10, P11) .......................................... 8
1.5
Document Change History ................................................................................. 8
1.6
Feedback on Documentation ............................................................................. 9
1.7
Technical Support .............................................................................................. 9
Features and Enhancements .................................................................................. 10
2.1
Release 9.4.2 Enhancements .......................................................................... 10
2.2
Performance – Packets per Second ................................................................. 10
2.3
Support for P11 Hardware................................................................................ 11
3
Resolved Issues ...................................................................................................... 12
4
Known Open Issues ................................................................................................ 14
5
Notes and Reference ............................................................................................... 16
5.1
Notes ............................................................................................................... 16
5.2
Operation Based on Region Code and Frequency Band .................................. 19
6
Canopy MIB.............................................................................................................. 21
7
Upgrading to Release 9.4.2 ..................................................................................... 22
8
9
7.1
Before You Upgrade ........................................................................................ 22
7.2
Obtaining and preparing CNUT or Prizm.......................................................... 24
7.3
Obtaining Upgrade Packages .......................................................................... 25
7.4
Performing the Upgrade Via CNUT or Prizm .................................................... 25
Collocation............................................................................................................... 28
8.1
Collocating 5.2-GHz and 5.4-GHz Modules...................................................... 28
8.2
Collocating 5.4-GHz and 5.7-GHz modules...................................................... 29
8.3
Collocating Same-Frequency Band Modules ................................................... 29
Performance Benchmarking Process .................................................................... 31
10 Regulatory and Legal Notices................................................................................ 34
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 3
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
10.1 Important Note on Modifications ...................................................................... 34
10.2 National and Regional Regulatory Notices....................................................... 34
10.3 RF Exposure Separation Distances ................................................................. 40
10.4 Legal Notices................................................................................................... 43
10.5 Limit of Liability ................................................................................................ 45
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 4
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
List of Tables
Table 1: Product Names................................................................................................7
Table 2: Release 9.4.2 enhancements ........................................................................10
Table 3: Packet per Second (pps) performance ..........................................................10
Table 4: Issues resolved in Release 9.4.2 ...................................................................12
Table 5: Known open issues .......................................................................................14
Table 6: New Notes for Release 9.4.2 .........................................................................16
Table 7: Previous Notes ..............................................................................................17
Table 8: Release 9.4.2 operation based on Region Code and frequency band ...........20
Table 9: Radios Upgradeable to Release 9.4.2 ...........................................................22
Table 10: 5.4- and 5.2-GHz interfering frequencies .....................................................28
Table 11: US FCC IDs and Industry Canada Certification Numbers and covered
configurations ..............................................................................................34
Table 12: Disclosure table ...........................................................................................40
Table 13: Exposure separation distances....................................................................40
Table 14: Calculated exposure distances and power compliance margins ..................41
List of Figures
Figure 1: Board Type on modules running Release 8....................................................8
Figure 2: Scheduling option – if viewable, indicates this is a P9 board. .........................8
Figure 3: Upgrade path for operating sectors ..............................................................23
Figure 4: Benchmark test setup...................................................................................33
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 5
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
1 Introduction
These notes cover Canopy Release 9.4.2. This release is a general release applicable to

PMP 100 and PTP 100 (FSK)

PMP 54400 and PTP 54200 (5.4-GHz OFDM)

PMP 49400 and PTP 49200 (4.9-GHz OFDM)
Release 9.4.2 is not applicable to PMP 35500 (3.5-GHz OFDM)
For details on applicability, see section 7.1.1 and Table 9: Radios Upgradeable to Release 9.4.2
on page 22.
1.1
NOTES AND HIGHLIGHTS
Highlights of Canopy Release 9.4.2 include

One uniform release for PMP 100 and PTP 100 (FSK), PMP 54400 and PTP
54200 (5.4-GHz OFDM), and PMP 49400 and PTP 49200 (4.9-GHz OFDM).
This release brings all these products up to the same level of features and
resolved issues.

PMP 54400 and PTP 54200 (5.4-GHz OFDM) now offer the Release 9
feature set.

PTP 49200 bridges (4.9-GHz OFDM BHs) are now supported.
Release 9.4.1 was a manufacturing-only release, never released for download. If you receive new
radios with Release 9.4.1, upgrade them to Release 9.4.2.
For detailed information, see

Table 2: Release 9.4.2 enhancements on Page 10

Table 4: Issues resolved in Release on Page 12

Table 5: Known open issues on Page 14
Either CNUT 3.12 or Prizm 3.1 with Patch 7 is recommended for upgrading modules to Release
9.4.2. For details, see Upgrade Tool Options on Page 23.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 6
Release 9.4.2
1.2
Release Notes
ABBREVIATIONS
The following abbreviations may be used in these notes:
BH
BHM
Backhaul Module – timing master
BHS
Backhaul Module – timing slave
AP
Access Point Module
SM
Subscriber Module
CNUT
Canopy Network Updater Tool
CMM
Cluster Management Module
DFS
Dynamic Frequency Selection for radar avoidance
MIB
Management Information Base
P7/P8/P9/P10/P11
1.3
Backhaul Module, either timing master or timing slave
Shorthand for hardware series levels
ETSI
European Telecommunications Standards Institute
PMP
Point to Multi-Point
PTP
Point to Point
NAMES
Table 1 maps product names to previous names, older names, and example model numbers.
Table 1: Product Names
Product Name
PMP 100 Series
Older Name
Model
Number
(example)
Canopy FSK point-to-multipoint
—
Previous
Name
PMP 100 and
PMP 200 Series
CAP 120
CAP 100
Classic AP
5700AP
CAP 130
CAP 200
Advantage AP
5750AP
Lite SM
5760SM
CSM 110
—
CSM 120
CSM 100
SM
5700SM
CSM 130
CSM 200
Advantage SM
5750SM
Canopy FSK BHs
—
PTP 100 Series
—
PTP 110
—
PTP 120
PTP 100 Lite
BH10 (7 Mbps BH)
5700BH
PTP 130
PTP 100 Full
BH20 (14 Mbps BH)
5700BH20
PMP 54400 Series
—
4 Mbps BH, 2 Mbps BH
Canopy 5.4-GHz OFDM PMP
—
—
CAP 54400
—
5.4-GHz OFDM AP
5440AP
CSM 54400
—
5.4-GHz OFDM SM
5440SM
PTP 54200 Series
—
Canopy 5.4-GHz OFDM BH
PMP 49400 Series
—
Canopy 4.9-GHz OFDM PMP
5440BH
—
CAP 49400
—
4.9-GHz OFDM AP
4940AP
CSM 49400
—
4.9-GHz OFDM SM
4940SM
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 7
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
Product Name
Older Name
Previous
Name
Model
Number
(example)
PTP 49200 Series
—
Canopy 4.9-GHz OFDM BH
PMP 500 Series
—
Canopy 3.5-GHz OFDM PMP
CAP 35500
—
3.5-GHz OFDM AP
3540AP
CSM 35500
—
3.5-GHz OFDM SM
3540SM
1.4
4940BH
—
IDENTIFYING HARDWARE SERIES (P7, P8, P9, P10, P11)
The following methods can be used to identify the hardware series of a module:

For modules that are running Release 8 or Release 9, look on the Home =>
General Status tab, under Board Type as shown in Figure 1.
Figure 1: Board Type on modules running Release 8

◦
For modules that are running Release 7.3.6, view the Configuration web
page.
If a Scheduling option is present, as shown in Figure 2, then the hardware series
is P9.
Figure 2: Scheduling option – if viewable, indicates this is a P9 board.
◦
If no Scheduling option is present, then the series is either P7 or P8.

1.5
Issue 1
For modules running any release, open a telnet interface to the module
and enter version. The hardware series is shown under Hardware
Platform as 7, 8, 9, 10, or 11.
DOCUMENT CHANGE HISTORY
First issue
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 8
Release 9.4.2
1.6
Release Notes
FEEDBACK ON DOCUMENTATION
Is this document accurate, complete, and clear? How can it be improved? Please send your
feedback on Canopy documentation to technical-documentation@canopywireless.com.
1.7
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Tip!
Do not clear the Event Log after you encounter issues. It may be useful to
Technical Support, if you need to escalate the issue.
Here is the escalation path for resolution of a problem:
1. Check documentation:

this document

Canopy System Release 8 Users Guide, available at
http://motorola.motowi4solutions.com/support/library/.
2. Consider checking the Community Forum and Knowledge Base at
http://motorola.motowi4solutions.com/support/community.
3. Escalate the problem to your Canopy supplier or reseller.
4. Escalate the problem to Canopy Technical Support or other designated Tier 3
technical support:
Worldwide Canopy Technical Support
email: technical-support@canopywireless.com
phone: 1-888-605-2552 or +1 217 824 9742
Canopy Technical Support, Europe
email: essc@motorola.com
phone: +44 (0)1793 564680
Calls are logged 24 x 7, cases are worked Mon-Fri 09:00 – 17:00 GMT.
When you send e-mail or call, please include, as appropriate, software release on each module,
IP addresses, MAC addresses, and features enabled, like NAT, VLAN, high priority channel, or
CIR. You may be asked to run the Support Tool on CNUT or Prizm to provide a complete network
picture.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 9
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
2 Features and Enhancements
The following sections list features and enhancements for Release 9.4.2.
2.1
RELEASE 9.4.2 ENHANCEMENTS
Release 9.4.2 adds the enhancements listed in Table 2.
Table 2: Release 9.4.2 enhancements
Product Family
Enhancement
Summary
PMP 100
PTP 100
None
—
PTP 49200
Support for PTP
49200
With Release 9.4.2, 4.9-GHz OFDM radios are now
offered as BHs, as well as APs and SMs.
PMP 49400
Change to existing
feature: per-SM query
replaces Link Status
table
On sectors with large numbers of SMs, rapid refresh of the
Link Status table on the AP’s Tools => Link Status page
could potentially cause performance issues on the sector.
To avoid this, the table has been replaced with the ability
to query each SM for all bidirectional link data, but not
display a table.
PMP 54400
PTP 54200
Support for features
and enhancements
since previous
release
5.4-GHz OFDM radios now support the general features
and enhancements listed in
◦
◦
Release 9.0 Release Notes
Release 9.3 Release Notes
◦
Release 9.4 Release Notes
Please refer to those release notes for details.
2.2
PERFORMANCE – PACKETS PER SECOND
Packet per Second (PPS) performance for Release 9.4.2 is the same as for recent releases.
Benchmark values are shown in Table 3.
Table 3: Packet per Second (pps) performance
Hardware series
Product
P11 or P10
P9
PMP 5x100 and PMP 24100
6200
3500
PMP 5x100 and PMP 24100 with
VLAN
5200
3200
PMP 09100 (900 MHz)
4600
3600
PTP 5x100 and PTP 24100
6200
3200
PMP 54400
6800
—
PTP 54200
4800
—
PMP 49400
6300
—
PMP 49400 with VLAN
5300
—
Issue 1, May 2009
1
Page 10
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
Hardware series
Product
P11 or P10
P9
Note: No significant difference between DES and AES
1: Links with a P9 module on one end and a P10 or P11 module on the other
perform between 3200 and 3500 pps
Section 9, Performance Benchmarking Process, on page 31 describes the benchmarking process
used to measure packets per second and discusses the meaning and limitations of the
benchmark.
2.3
SUPPORT FOR P11 HARDWARE
5.2-GHz and 5.4-GHz P11 modules require, at a minimum, Release 9.4 and will initially ship with
Release 9.4 or Release 9.4.1 installed. These modules should be upgraded to Release 9.4.2
before being deployed.
5.7-GHz P11 modules require, at a minimum, Release 9.3 and will initially ship with Release 9.3
installed.
P11 modules exhibit performance similar to P10, as shown in Table 3 on page 10.
2.3.1
Mixing Hardware Vintages
P11 APs and SMs can be mixed with other hardware vintages in a sector. P11 BHs can be mixed
with P9 and P10 BHs on a link.
2.3.2
Mixing Software Releases
To smooth the transition to P11 hardware, mixing Releases 9.0 and 9.4.2, or Releases 9.0 and
9.3, in a sector is supported. For example, if you purchase an SM and it is P11 hardware running
Release 9.3 from the factory, it can be run in a sector with an AP and other SMs running Release
9.0. Or, if you purchase an AP and it is P11 hardware running Release 9.4.2 from the factory, it
can be run with a sector of SMs running Release 9.0.
Before deploying P11 hardware into a sector, existing APs and SMs in the sector should first be
upgraded to at least Release 9.0.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 11
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
3 Resolved Issues
Issues resolved in Release 9.4.2 are listed in Table 4.
Table 4: Issues resolved in Release 9.4.2
Product Family
Description
Explanation
All
PPPoE-configured SM stuck
in “LCP (Link Control
Protocol) Negotiating”
Before, on a link with some re-regs, the SM might get
stuck in “LCP Negotiating” mode if a PPPoE session
was started, but the LCP and IPCP stages never
completed. Connect/disconnect buttons wouldn’t
have resolved the issue. Release 9.4 partially
resolved this issue, and Release 9.4.2 fully resolves
it.
A new stage of PPPoE session status called
Connecting was added. Now if there is a problem
setting up the PADI/PADO part of the PPPoE
session Connecting will be reported rather than LCP
Negotiating.
All
TFTP server option available
for upgrades (9958, 10352)
The TFTP server option for distributing files to SMs
during upgrading now works.
Using a TFTP server can significantly speed up
upgrades because
◦
Each sector can have 20 SMs under upgrade at
a time (network performance permitting) instead
of the 4 SMs maximum when files are served
from the AP.
The TFTP server doesn’t use a 20-minute
inactivity timer between servicing different
hardware series (P7/8/9, P10, and P11) as it can
serve any hardware series SM on demand.
To use a TFTP server for upgrading SMs
◦
◦
The TFTP server must be located on the same
machine as the CNUT or Prizm software.
◦
The SMs must be configured with Public
Network Accessibility (not Local) and have
assigned IP addresses.
For additional information on using the TFTP server
option see the CNUT Help user guide.
PMP 100
On P9 FSK APs, unable to
change Config Source and
VLAN Allow Frame types
(10357)
On P9 FSK APs, Release 9.4 doesn’t allow changing
of the Config Source or VLAN Allow Frame types
using the GUI. This is resolved in Release 9.4.2
PMP 100
P9 FSK 900-MHz radios
may show erratic Received
Power (10380)
A Release 9.4 improvement in P10 FSK 900-MHz
radios’ displayed Received Power caused an issue
with displayed Received Power on P9 FSK 900-MHz
radios in some cases. The underlying performance of
the radio was not affected.
Release 9.4.2 resolves this display issue for P9 900MHz radios and retains the improvements in P10
900-MHz Received Power reporting accuracy.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 12
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
Product Family
Description
Explanation
PMP 54400
PMP 49400
Downlink broadcast traffic
can exhibit packet loss
(9492)
This issue affected all systems (OFDM/PMP 400 and
FSK/PMP 100). It is resolved for OFDM in Release
9.4.2, but can still affect FSK systems.
For OFDM (PMP 400) systems, set the Broadcast
Repeat Count to 0 or 1 on an AP handling broadcast
video and to the default of 2 on other APs.
For FSK (PMP 100) systems, to reduce the potential
for packet loss, the Broadcast Repeat Count on the
AP’s Configuration => Radio page should not be set
to 0. Use either 1 or 2 repeats.
PMP 54400
PTP 54200
Same default for both
read/write and read-only
community strings for 5.4GHz OFDM radios (10264)
5.4-GHz OFDM modules running Release 8.4.3 used
“canopy” as the default for both the read/write and
read-only community strings. With Release 9.4.2,
these radios now default to “canopy” for the
read/write community string and “canopyro” for the
read-only community string, the same as other
radios.
PMP 54400
PTP 54200
Resolves general issues
since Release 8.4.3 (the
previous 5.4-GHz OFDM
release)
For 5.4-GHz radios, Release 9.4.2 resolves general
issues listed in
◦
Release 9.0 Release Notes
◦
Release 9.3 Release Notes
◦
Release 9.4 Release Notes
Please refer to those release notes for details.
PMP 49400
PTP 49200
Issue 1, May 2009
Resolves general issues
since Release 9.3.1 (the
previous 4.9-GHz OFDM
release)
For 4.9-GHz radios, Release 9.4.2 resolves general
issues listed in the following Release Notes:
◦
Release 9.4 Release Notes
Please refer to those release notes for details.
Page 13
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
4 Known Open Issues
Known open issues for Release 9.4.2 are listed in Table 5.
Table 5: Known open issues
Product Family
Description
Discussion and Recommendations
All
PPPoE In Session
message not
syncing to AP
(10385)
Under some conditions, occasionally an SM establishes a
PPPoE session successfully and correctly displays PPPoE In
Session on the SM’s Home => General Status page, but the AP
does not show the SM in a PPPoE session on the AP’s Home
=> Session Status page.
Workaround: If in doubt about the status of a PPPoE session to
an SM, check the SM’s Home => General Status page.
All
Anomalous Event
Log messages
associated with
NTP server
(10402)
Starting with Release 9.4, some Event Log messages were
added to aid debug of NTP server issues. If you have configured
an NTP server IP Address on the AP’s Configuration => Time
page, you may get “zero delay no update necessary” messages
in the Event Log. The message can mean either the NTP server
did not respond (in which case the message wording should be
different), or the NTP server did respond but there was no time
difference from the previous NTP message and no display
update was needed (in which case it is an extraneous error
message that can be ignored). Currently there is no way to tell
from the message which case is indicated.
Workaround: Ignore the “zero delay no update necessary”
message and continue to use previous methods for debugging
NTP server issues.
All
ARP table shows
00-00-00-00-00-00
for the NAT WAN
interface (9711)
The SM’s Statistics => ARP page shows a physical address of
00-00-00-00-00-00 in the NAT WAN ARP Table in error. The
correct physical address for the IP address is shown in the
Public RF NAT Table further down on the page.
All
No SNMP support
for Translation
Table (10053)
OIDs do not exist for the data on the SM’s Statistics =>
Translation Table page and therefore the data is not retrievable
using SNMP. (For background, the Translation Table is
associated with Translation Bridging and only displays data
when Translation Bridging is enabled at the AP.)
All
No SNMP support
for counters on
Scheduler page
(10595)
OIDs do not exist for the data on the Statistics => Scheduler
page and therefore the data is not retrievable using SNMP. (The
Scheduler page appears on every module type - AP, SM, and
BH.)
All
Prizm 3.1 cannot
change LED Panel
Mode.
Prizm 3.1 cannot set the LED Panel Mode to Revised Mode.
LEDs are in Legacy Mode by default.
Workaround: Set LED Panel Mode using the GUI.
(9764)
PMP 100
Downlink
broadcast traffic
on FSK radios can
exhibit packet loss
(9492)
Broadcast Repeat Count on the AP’s Configuration => Radio
page should not be set to 0. Use either 1 or 2 repeats.
Workaround: When using applications such as broadcast video
that make significant use of downlink broadcast packets, set the
parameter to 1. Otherwise, in most cases, leave the parameter
set to the default of 2.
This issue has been resolved for OFDM radios, but can still
affect FSK radios running Release 9.4.2.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 14
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
Product Family
Description
Discussion and Recommendations
PMP 49400
PMP 54400
Ranging issues at
maximum settings
(9798)
Workaround: Due to occasional ranging issues at higher
settings, a sector configured for a Max Range of 11 miles or
greater should have its Downlink Data set no higher than
80%. Max Range and Data Downlink are set on the AP's
Configuration => Radio page.
Sectors configured for a Max Range of 10 miles or less are not
affected by this limitation.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 15
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
5 Notes and Reference
5.1
NOTES
Table 6 lists notes new for this release.
Table 7 lists continuing notes first mentioned in previous Release Notes.
Table 6: New Notes for Release 9.4.2
Product
Family
Description
Discussion and Recommendations
All
A derived
temperature is
now shown on a
module’s web
page (10379)
The temperature is board (not ambient air) temperature. Different
hardware vintages use different methods for deriving temperature. Newer
hardware vintages will see a temperature indication that tracks more
closely with temperature changes and is more consistent from radio to
radio, whereas older hardware vintages may see significant differences
between radios and from the same radio over time.
All
Disable TCP
ACK prioritizing
in broadcast
video
applications
(10263)
When optimizing a system for broadcast video, on the AP’s Configuration
=> General page configure Prioritized TCP ACK to Disabled.
5.4-GHz OFDM
BHs may see a
600 kbps
reduction in
uplink or
downlink
throughput
(9574)
Guard times in the OFDM PTP scheduler were increased slightly,
changing the ranges at which time slots are lost to air delay. Depending
on the distance between BHs and the configured Downlink Data %, this
may or may not affect a given installation. For example, at 0 miles and
50% Downlink Data the uplink/downlink slots change from 33/33 in
Release 8.4.3 to 33/32 with Release 9.4.2, resulting in 600 Mbps less
downlink throughput. However, at 3 miles the slots are 32/32 for both
Release 8.4.3 and Release 9.4.2 resulting in no change in throughput
between the releases.
PTP
54200
Issue 1, May 2009
In a system being used for internet access or similar applications
prioritizing TCP ACKs improves downloading of FTP files and other
activities making significant use of TCP ACKs under heavy load.
However, in a system being used for broadcast video or video
surveillance, prioritizing TCP ACKs can cause sporadic choppy video in
the uplink.
Page 16
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
Table 7: Previous Notes
ID
Description
Discussion and Recommendations
-
Changes to
boxTemperature
OIDs
Starting with Release 9.4 the boxTemperature (1.3.6.1.4.1.161.19.3.3.1.5)
OID (which returned an octet string value) is no longer valid. Two new OIDS
which return integer values are added:
boxTemperatureC
Object ID: 1.3.6.1.4.1.161.19.3.3.1.35
Syntax: INTEGER
Access: read-only
Status: current
Radio temperature in Celsius.
boxTemperatureF
Object ID: 1.3.6.1.4.1.161.19.3.3.1.36
Syntax: INTEGER
Access: read-only
Status: current
Radio temperature in Fahrenheit.
-
More accurate
Received Power
readings for P10
900-MHz radios
For P10 900-MHz radios, Release 9.4 included improvements in the
accuracy of the displayed Received Power based on improvements in
temperature measurement. The displayed Received Power may be lower or
higher than for the same radio running a previous release. The actual
performance of the radio has not changed. With this accuracy improvement,
P10 900-MHz radios should see less variation of displayed Received Power
over time (as temperature changes) and from radio to radio.
8484
Procedures for
saving an XML file
of a spectrum
graph
When the SpectrumAnalysis.xml button is clicked on the SM’s Tools =>
Spectrum Analyzer page or the AP’s Tools => Remote Spectrum Analyzer
page, the spectrum graph is redisplayed using XML and XSL if the browser
supports XSL. To save the underlying XML file, right click and select “Save
Target As” on a Windows PC, or equivalent action for other operating
systems.
8172
SM scan
frequencies not
“cancelled” by
SNMP actions
If you make frequency changes on the SM GUI, and then back them out
using SNMP, the Reboot Required message remains on the GUI.
Avoid power
cycling modules
during upgrading
Power cycling a module while it is upgrading can cause anomalous events,
such as rebooting every time you try to access the GUI.
8241
Issue 1, May 2009
Workaround:
If it says Reboot Required, go ahead and reboot, just to clear the message.
Recovery: Attempt to upgrade again. If CNUT reports the module as
upgraded and refuses to upgrade again, downgrade the module and then
upgrade it again.
Page 17
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
ID
Description
Discussion and Recommendations
None
Managing module
accounts and
passwords
The best security practice is to be aware the unit starts with root and
admin accounts, to plan your approach to accounts, and set passwords for
all accounts.
A module that either is fresh from the factory or has been operator-reset to
factory defaults has two user accounts: root and admin, both with
ADMINISTRATOR level permissions.
To secure a module, access the Account => Change Users Password tab
and add a password to each of these accounts. Adding a password to only
one account still leaves the other open. Furthermore, an account without a
password will accept any password potentially giving the impression the unit
is protected when it isn’t.
Alternatively, an operator’s practices may be to delete the admin account or
delete the root account and replace them with their own account(s). By
default Prism and CNUT use the root account to manage the module, so if
you delete root accounts on modules you will need to make coordinated
changes to Prizm and CNUT to access them with your own accounts.
7808
Use up to 16
alphanumeric
characters in user
account names,
passwords, and
Community
Strings
SNMP doesn’t do data-entry checking, so more than 16 characters may be
entered, but only 16 characters will be saved and displayed.
7442
Timed Spectrum
Analyzer settings
anomaly
Values of Timed Spectrum Analyzer duration and Spectrum Analysis on
Boot get saved by clicking any button on the page, not just when clicking
Save Changes or Start Time Spectrum Analysis (which is typical
operation for other pages).
None
Best Practice is to
set SM to same
Region Code as
AP
When an SM registers to an AP, it assumes the Region Code and
associated parameters of the AP, disregarding any Region code set in the
SM by you. However, the best practice is still for you to set a Region Code
in the SM so that displayed options are consistent with the region.
4831
Details on pinging
Canopy modules
A ping size larger than 1494 Bytes to a Canopy module times out and fails.
However, a ping of this size or larger to a system that is behind a Canopy
module typically succeeds. It is generally advisable to ping such a system,
since Canopy handles that ping with the same priority as is given all other
transport traffic. The results are unaffected by ping size and by the load on
the Canopy module that brokers this traffic.
5298
AP may be listed
twice in AP
Evaluation tab
To help during aiming, the Tools => AP Evaluation tab maintains AP entries
for 15 minutes. If the frequency of an AP is changed, for 15 minutes the AP
is listed twice in the AP Evaluation tab, once with the former frequency, and
once with the new.
4789
Lowest settable
Transmitter
Output Power
varies
The low end of the Transmitter Output Power can vary from radio to radio
due to manufacturing tolerances. If you set this parameter to lower than the
range capable on a radio, the value is automatically reset to the lowest
capable.
NOTE: The high end of the range of settable Transmitter Output Power
does not vary from radio to radio.
Issue 1, May 2009
You can set Community Strings that include characters like
~`!@#$%^&;*()_+[]{}|;:,./<>? from the GUI, but SNMP only accepts
alphanumeric characters and SNMP get or set commands will return errors.
Page 18
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
ID
Description
Discussion and Recommendations
4844,
2756
When using Link
Test with MIR,
need to set both
ends
To see the effects of MIR capping, you can run a link test with MIR enabled.
To get meaningful results, set Link Test with MIR to Enabled on the
Tools => Link Capacity Test tab in both the SM and the AP. When it is
enabled on only one end, results are misleading.
After you run perform a link test with MIR capping enabled, consider
immediately changing Link Test with MIR to Disabled in both the SM and
the AP, to avoid mistakenly capping only one end of the link test.
5284
Click Spectrum
Analyzer Enable
button twice
After you click the Enable button in the Tools => Spectrum Analyzer tab, the
resulting display may omit bars for some frequencies, especially in
frequency bands that have a large number of center channels, such as
the 5.4-GHz band. If you clicking Enable again, the display includes the
entire spectrum bar graph.
TIP: In the Configuration => General tab, set the Webpage Auto Update
parameter to a few seconds, to have the Spectrum Analyzer automatically
fully displayed and refreshed. You can later reset the Webpage Auto
Update time back to 0, to disable refresh.
4706
Blank screen after
logging in to SM
through AP
Session Status
tab
In some instances, depending on network activity and network design, the
interface presents a blank screen to a user who logs in to an SM through the
Home => Session Status tab in the AP. If you observe this, refresh your
browser window.
5407
5590 through
5660 may
interfere with
weather radar, not
allowed in Europe,
Canada, and
Australia
Canopy center channel frequencies of 5590 MHz through 5660 MHz may
interfere with, or be interfered by, weather radar in several Regions,
including Europe, the US, Canada, and Australia. In Europe, Canada, and
Australia, to be in regulatory compliance, operators must not transmit on
these frequencies. Setting the Region Code to Europe, Canada or
Australia notches out these frequencies and ensures compliance.
Operators who perform a site survey in the United States should use the
built-in Spectrum Analyzer or a stand-alone spectrum analyzer to check for
activity on these channels and select other channels as appropriate.
7557
When connecting
to a hub, use only
half duplex
Ethernet settings
Ethernet connections set to 10 Base T Full Duplex or
100 Base T Full Duplex will not connect to an SM through a hub, due to the
way a hub works. Use half duplex settings when using a hub.
5.2
OPERATION BASED ON REGION CODE AND FREQUENCY BAND
There are no changes to Region Code operation in Release 9.4.2. For reference, Table 8 shows
operation based on Region Code, by frequency band and module type.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 19
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
Table 8: Release 9.4.2 operation based on Region Code and frequency band
Region
1
Code
United
States
Canada
Europe
Brazil
Australia
900
MHz
2.4
GHz
4.9
GHz
5.1 GHz
AP/SM
AP/SM
/BH
AP/SM
/BH
AP/SM/
BH
No
effect
No
effect
NA
NA
No
effect
No
effect
No
effect
No
effect
No
effect
No
effect
No
effect
NA
No
effect
NA
5.2 GHz
AP/
BHM
≥P10:
FCC/IC
DFS
≤ P9:
no DFS
NA
≥ P10:
FCC/IC
DFS
≤ P9:
no DFS
NA
NA
NA
NA
5.4 GHz
SM/
BHS
No
effect
No
effect
NA
NA
AP/
BHM
FCC/IC
DFS
5.7 GHz
SM/
BHS
AP/
BHM
SM/
BHS
No
effect
No
effect
No effect
No
effect
No
effect
No effect
P11: ETSI
1.4.1 DFS
P11: ETSI
1.4.1 DFS
≤ P10: ETSI
1.3.1 DFS
≤ P10: ETSI
1.3.1 DFS
P11:
ETSI
1.4.1
DFS
>July 1, 08:
5590-5660
MHz not
2,4
available
>July 1, 08:
5590-5660
MHz not
2,4
available
≤ P10:
ETSI
1.3.1
DFS
No
effect
No
effect
No effect
No
effect
No
effect
No effect
FCC/IC
DFS
5590-5660
MHz not
2
available
P11: ETSI
1.4.1 DFS
≤ P10: ETSI
1.3.1 DFS
FCC/IC
DFS
P11:
ETSI
1.4.1 DFS
≤ P10:
ETSI
1.3.1 DFS
No
effect
No
effect
NA
NA
NA
Display
Community
options
No
effect
No
effect
NA
NA
No
effect
No effect
No
effect
No
effect
No
effect
No
effect
No
effect
No
effect
No effect
Russia
NA
NA
No
effect
Other
No
effect
No
effect
No
effect
5590-5660
MHz not
2
available
1.
In all cases, set the Region Code to the region you are in, and the software will determine the correct use of DFS.
2.
Weather radar operates on frequencies from 5600 through 5650 MHz. In some countries a “weather notch” is required to
avoid impinging on these frequencies.
3.
Radios placed on market in Europe after July 1, 2008, can’t impinge on weather radar frequencies. To meet this requirement,
the software checks the date code of the module and implements the weather notch accordingly. You can tell if a 5.4 GHz
module is “newer” or “older” by setting the Region Code to Europe – if the notch frequencies are not shown on the
Configuration => Radio page, then the module is “newer”, if the notch frequencies are shown, the module is “older”.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 20
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
6 Canopy MIB
The Canopy Enterprise MIB (Management Information Base), consisting of 5 MIB definition files,
supports SNMP access to Canopy modules. The MIB files are available for download from the
Canopy tab of http://motorola.motowi4solutions.com/software/.
Detailed information on the Canopy MIBs is available at
http://motorola.motowi4solutions.com/support/online_tools/.
MIB files are used by Network Management Systems and Element Management Systems, such
as the Motorola Prizm system, to support a host of surveillance, monitoring, control, and
operational tasks.
Information on the Motorola Prizm element management system is available at
http://motorola.motowi4solutions.com/products/prizm/.
Prizm documentation and installers are available for download from the Canopy tab of
http://motorola.motowi4solutions.com/software/.
If you are using Prizm: Prizm software includes the MIB information. You do not need to load
MIB files.
If you are using an SNMP network management system (NMS) or element management
system (EMS) other than Prizm: Load the MIBs per the instructions for your NMS or EMS.
Important!
When loading the Canopy MIB files
1. First load the standard MIB files.
2. Then load the Canopy MIB files.
Some NMSs are not sensitive to order, but some require a specific loading order to build a MIB
tree. Loading in the recommended order avoids any problems arising from loading sequence.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 21
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
7 Upgrading to Release 9.4.2
7.1
BEFORE YOU UPGRADE
7.1.1
Applicability
Table 9 shows the product series, hardware series, and radio types that are upgradeable to
Release 9.4.2.
Table 9: Radios Upgradeable to Release 9.4.2
Product Family
Radio
Type
Product Encryption Type
DES Product
AES Product
Hardware Vintage
PMP 100
(Canopy FSK)
PTP 100
P7, P8
P9, P10, P11
P7, P8
P9, P10, P11
SM
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
AP
No
Yes
No
Yes
BH
No
Yes
No
Yes
(Canopy FSK)
PMP 54400
All vintages
All vintages
SM, AP
Yes
Yes
BH
Yes
Yes
SM, AP
Yes
Yes
BH
Yes
Yes
(5.4-GHz OFDM)
PTP 54200
(5.4-GHz OFDM)
PMP 49400
(4.9-GHz OFDM)
PTP 49200
(4.9-GHz OFDM)
Release 9.4.2 is not applicable to
7.1.2

PMP 500 Series modules (Canopy 3.5 GHz OFDM APs and SMs)

PTP 300 Series Bridges

PTP 400 Series Bridges (formerly 30-/60-Mbps backhaul modules)

PTP 500 Series Bridges

PTP 600 Series Bridges (formerly 150-/300-Mbps backhaul modules)

CMMs (Cluster Management Modules)

Powerline MU Gateway and Modem
Supported Upgrade Path
Upgrade paths for operating sectors are shown in Figure 3.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 22
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
PMP 100
PTP 100
(FSK)
PMP 54400
PTP 54200
(5.4-GHz
OFDM)
PMP 49400
PTP 49200
(4.9-GHz
OFDM)
8.2.7
8.2.4
8.4.3
9.0
9.3
9.3.1
9.4
Use a .pkg3
file and
CNUT 3.12
or Prizm 3.1
for all
upgrades
9.4.1
9.4.2
9.4.2
9.4.2
Figure 3: Upgrade path for operating sectors
Each release has new feature content and may have changes to message structures and
protocols used between the AP and the SMs. These changes may affect operation of APs and
SMs operating on untested mixed releases during the upgrade period, resulting in features or
indicators not working properly, or in the worst case SMs being stranded by the use of untested
combinations. Following the tested upgrade path is strongly recommended for operating sectors.
Standalone modules such as spares can be upgraded from any Release 8.x (or any hardware
scheduling release) to Release 9.4.2. For details on upgrading modules running software
scheduling see previous release notes, especially the Release 7.3.6 Release Notes.
7.1.3
Upgrade Tool Options
Use either CNUT or Prizm for the upgrade.
CNUT
CNUT (Canopy Network Updater Tool) is a free tool for upgrading Canopy modules.
For information and details on installing CNUT on a PC or Linux machine, download the CNUT
software and help file from the Canopy tab of http://motorola.motowi4solutions.com/software/. If
you need to upgrade from a previous CNUT release, ensure you back up your network file before
upgrading CNUT.
CNUT 3.12 supports upgrades of P11 modules, including 2 Mbps and 4 Mbps BHs, and should
be used for upgrading modules to Release 9.4.2. See the CNUT 3.12 release notes for additional
details.
Prizm
Motorola offers Prizm as an EMS that provides monitoring and management functions, including
module upgrade. Prizm 3.1 with Patch 7 supports upgrading modules to Release 9.4.2.
Prizm 3.1 or later does not include the Hardware Scheduler Update tool, so sectors that run
software scheduling must first be switched to hardware scheduling using CNUT, before using
Prizm 3.1 or later to manage upgrades. For details on switching to hardware scheduling, see
previous release notes, especially the release notes for Canopy Release 7.3.6.
Operators running Prizm releases earlier than Release 3.1 should upgrade to the current Prizm
release, then use Prizm to upgrade their Canopy modules to Release 9.4.2.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 23
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
Information on the Motorola Prizm element management system is available at
http://motorola.motowi4solutions.com/products/prizm/.
Prizm documentation and installers are available for download from the Canopy tab of
http://motorola.motowi4solutions.com/software/.
.pkg3 Packages
Upgrades use package files whose name extensions are .pkg3. Earlier packages (.pkg or
.pkg2 files) cannot be used with CNUT Release 3.12 and Prizm Release 3.1. A key aspect of
.pkg3 packages and the tools that use them is that they support upgrading modules using
module accounts other than root and therefore do not require a module to have an account
named root.
7.1.4
Special Planning for European Operators using 5.4 GHz Radios
Operators with modules set to a Region Code of Europe are well-served to ensure they are not
using any channels with center frequencies of 5590 to 5660 MHz inclusive (in the weather notch)
before upgrading. A sector currently using 5590 to 5660 MHz inclusive will complete the upgrade
successfully and existing SMs will register and function, but since these channels are not
available on equipment placed on market in Europe from July 1, 2008, adding SMs or replacing
SMs or APs becomes problematic.
Operators with modules set to a Region Code of Europe may need to perform channel planning
and coordinated change of the transmitting channel on APs and BHMs before the upgrade.
7.2
OBTAINING AND PREPARING CNUT OR PRIZM
Use either CNUT Release 3.12 or later or Prizm Release 3.1 with Patch 7 or later for the
upgrade.
7.2.1
1.
Obtaining and Preparing CNUT
From the Canopy tab of http://motorola.motowi4solutions.com/software/, download

Network Updater Tool Release 3.12 for Windows
or

Network Updater Tool Release 3.12 for Linux

Network Updater Tool Release 3.12 Release Notes
2.
Install CNUT Release 3.12 on Windows or Linux using the CNUT release notes.
3.
If you do not have a previously stored network archive file within CNUT, add your Canopy
infrastructure elements (APs, BHs, and CMMs) to the network root and Move and Modify
the elements until you have captured your network.
IMPORTANT! Pay particular attention to the connectivity that you establish in the
network tree. This should be the connectivity as viewed at the point from where you connect
to the network to perform the upgrade. If you are connecting at your POP, this will be the
same as your network hierarchy. If you are connecting at some point other than your POP, it
should reflect connectivity from that point. When CNUT discovers the network and when it
steps through the infrastructure elements during an upgrade, it relies on the connectivity
information you enter in the network tree.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 24
Release 9.4.2
7.2.2
Release Notes
Obtaining and Preparing Prizm
1.
Download Prizm 3.1 Patch 7 and Prizm 3.1 Patch 7 Release Notes. If upgrading PMP
49400 or using PTP 49200 modules, also download Prizm 3.1 Patch 4.9 OFDM.
2.
From the Canopy tab of http://motorola.motowi4solutions.com/software/, download

Prizm 3.1 Patch 7

Prizm 3.1 Patch 7 Release Notes.

If upgrading PMP 49400 or using PTP 49200 modules, also download Prizm
3.1 Patch 4.9 OFDM.
3.
Install Patch 7 using the Patch 7 Release Notes.
4.
If upgrading PMP 49400 or using PTP 49200 modules, install Patch 4.9 OFDM.
5.
If you do not have a previously stored network archive file within Prizm, add your Canopy
infrastructure elements (APs, BHs, and CMMs) to the network root and Move and Modify
the elements until you have captured your network.
7.3
OBTAINING UPGRADE PACKAGES
To download the Canopy software to your computer, perform the following steps:
1.
Go to http://www.motowi4solutions.com/software/.
2.
Follow the directions on that page to access the software download page.
3.
On the software download page, select the appropriate package or packages. Options
include

Release 9.4.2 FSK Software - DES

Release 9.4.2 FSK Software - AES

Release 9.4.2 OFDM Software - DES

Release 9.4.2 OFDM Software - AES
PMP 100 and PTP 100 series (Canopy FSK radios) use the FSK software.
PMP 400 and PTP 200 series (Canopy OFDM radios, both 5.4 GHz and 4.9 GHz) use
the OFDM software.
7.4
4.
Click Accept User Agreement and Request Download Links.
RESULT: You will receive an email with a link or links to the software.
5.
In the email sent to you, click on the desired link or links.
RESULT: The appropriate.pkg3 package or packages will download to your computer.
PERFORMING THE UPGRADE VIA CNUT OR PRIZM
Upgrade using the following steps. For additional details on using CNUT, see the CNUT help file
or click on the Help menu in the CNUT application. For additional details on using Prizm, see the
Prizm user guide. The CNUT help file and Prizm user guide are available for download from the
Canopy tab of http://motorola.motowi4solutions.com/software/.
1. Enter the password(s) for the root login accounts of all modules you are upgrading into
CNUT or Prizm. If taking advantage of the ability to use accounts other than root, enter
the accounts and passwords.
2. Refresh/Discover Entire Network to auto-detect all of your SMs and to display information
about your network elements.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 25
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
3. Add the appropriate .pkg3 file(s) to the managed packages list. Depending on the
package downloaded in section 7.3, Obtaining Upgrade Packages, you will have one or
more of the following .pkg3 files:

CANOPY94_2BUILDOFFICIAL_DES.pkg3

CANOPY94_2BUILDOFFICIAL_AES.pkg3

CANOPY94_2BUILDOFFICIAL_OFDM_DES.pkg3

CANOPY94_2BUILDOFFICIAL_OFDM_AES.pkg3
4. Consider rebooting APs on sectors you plan to update to eliminate any memory
fragmentation issues and ensure there is space to hold the new image.
5. Just before doing any updates, use Refresh/Discover to confirm that all SMs are active.
6. Choose the elements that you want to update at this time: a selection of elements,
a network branch, or the entire network. Most operators gain experience by upgrading
a portion of their network at a time, depending on network size and their own procedures.
7. Use Prizm or CNUT to confirm use of SM Auto-update, as appropriate. With SM Autoupdate, SMs are updated by their AP instead of by CNUT, which significantly reduces the
time needed for updating an entire network. In addition, SM Auto-update must be used to
update any SMs that have their Network Accessibility parameter set to Local, as these
SMs are not addressable by CNUT or Prizm over the network.
8. Initiate the Update operation.
9. Monitor the update progress through the Network Tree.
10. Allow the update to run, leaving CNUT/Prizm active, until all involved SMs are upgraded.
An AP enabled for Auto-update
a. updates all registered or registering P7/8/9 SMs that require an upgrade.
b. waits for 20 minutes of no upgrade or new P7/8/9 registration activity.
c.
updates all registered or registering P10 SMs that require an upgrade.
d. waits for 20 minutes of no upgrade or new P10 registration activity.
e. updates all registered or registering P11 SMs that require an upgrade.
f.
waits for 20 minutes of no upgrade or new P11 registration activity.
g. continues this cycle until Auto-update is disabled (using CNUT or Prizm) or until the
AP is rebooted.
With this algorithm, any SMs that are not properly upgraded are found by CNUT or Prizm
on a subsequent cycle and then successfully upgraded, without operator action.
There will be quiet times during a sector upgrade due to the 20-minute inactivity timer,
followed by active updating of SMs.
With CNUT 3.12 or Prizm 3.1 with Patch 7, the operator can choose the update order
among P7/P8/P9 SMs, P10 SMs, and P11 SMs by setting the SM Autoupdate
Configuration. For example, sectors with no P7/8/9 SMs should be set to upgrade P10
SMs first and not upgrade P7/P8/P9 SMs to avoid a 20 minute wait until upgrade of P10
SMs begins.
11. After the upgrade appears to have completed, Refresh/Discover.
12. Verify that the Software Version for each module is shown as CANOPY 9.4.2.
13. If any SM completed the software loading and then failed to reboot, or did reboot but
CNUT or Prizm displayed a message such as “Reboot failed” or
“Failed to find Element in update. Cannot open new telnet connection to device”, and if
the rest of the sector successfully upgraded and became stable on Release 9.4.2,
perform the following steps:
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 26
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
a. Refresh/Discover.
b. Check whether the resulting elements list shows the SM as operating on the new
release.
c.
If it does not, reboot the problem SM.
d. Check whether the SM is shown as operating on Release 9.4.2.
e. If it is not, re-initiate the upgrade of the SM using CNUT or Prizm.
14. Disable SM Auto-update on CNUT or Prizm, according to CNUT help file or Prizm
documentation.
7.4.1
Setting the Region Code
After a sector or link or standalone module has been upgraded to Release 9.4.2, confirm that the
Region Code on each module is set to the local region. If needed, set the Region Code and
associated parameters correctly on each module, Save Changes, and Reboot.
On new APs or BHMs, or APs or BHMs that have been reset to factory defaults, the Region Code
must be set before the module will transmit.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 27
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
8 Collocation
8.1
COLLOCATING 5.2-GHz AND 5.4-GHz MODULES
5.4-GHz radios that are set to a center channel frequency of 5595 MHz or lower produce a signal
that is 280 MHz below their center channel. This signal can interfere with 5.2-GHz channels as
shown In Table 10. Because of this, care needs to be taken in choosing 5.4-GHz channels where
5.4 GHz systems are collocated with 5.2-GHz systems.
Choosing 5.4-GHz channels of 5495 through 5540 MHz or 5600 through 5705 MHz avoids this
collocation issue and is often the best option. Alternatively, provide 100 ft (30 m) of vertical
separation between the 5.2-GHz and the 5.4-GHz radios, or in cases of partial clusters of
5.2-GHz radios, select 5.4-GHz channels that will not interfere.
Table 10: 5.4- and 5.2-GHz interfering frequencies
This 5.4-GHz center
channel (in MHz)…
may interfere with these 5.2-GHz
channels (in MHz)
5545
5275
5550
5275, 5280
5555
5275, 5280, 5285
5560
5275, 5280, 5285, 5290
5565
5275, 5280, 5285, 5290, 5295
5570
5280, 5285, 5290, 5295, 5300
5575
5285, 5290, 5295, 5300, 5305
5580
5290, 5295, 5300, 5305, 5310
5585
5295, 5300, 5305, 5310, 5315
5590
5300, 5305, 5310, 5315, 5320
5595
5305, 5310, 5315, 5320, 5325
Background
What causes this collocation issue? As part of their radio operation, Canopy radios produce a low
level signal outside of their frequency band. By design, this signal is above the band for some
center channel frequencies and below the band for other center channel frequencies. This signal
is present at all times (both during transmit and receive), and is well within regulatory
requirements for out-of-band emissions. However, it is strong enough to interfere with a closely
collocated Canopy radio in another band, if that radio is using a channel impinged upon by the
out of band signal, as can happen between 5.4- and 5.2-GHz radios.
If a CMM provides sync and ensures compatible receive start times (as advised in Collocating
Same-Frequency Band Modules on Page 29), aren’t collocation issues avoided? No. Using sync
and ensuring compatible receive start times are necessary to avoid other collocation issues, but
do not help this collocation issue, because the interfering signal is present at all times, during
transmit and receive.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 28
Release 9.4.2
8.2
Release Notes
COLLOCATING 5.4-GHz AND 5.7-GHz MODULES
For collocation design, the 5.4-GHz and 5.7-GHz frequency bands are essentially one continuous
band. When collocating 5.4-GHz and 5.7-GHz modules, use the guidelines for collocating
modules within a band listed under Collocating Same-Frequency Band Modules on Page 29.
Alternatively, either

provide 100 ft (30 m) of vertical separation between the 5.4-GHz and 5.7GHz radios.

if 100 ft (30 m) of vertical separation is not possible, provide as much vertical
separation as possible, and choose frequencies far apart within the
combined
5.4-GHz and 5.7-GHz bands. The physical and spectral separation and local
RF conditions, influenced by tower geometries, layout and position of
modules, and use of reflectors on BHs, among other variables, may support
good performance, but testing and monitoring will be required to confirm that
they do.
For example, when collocating a cluster of six 5.4-GHz APs with a cluster of six 5.7-GHz APs, all
hardware scheduled, set them all to the same range, downlink data %, and control slots, and use
standard frequency re-use around each cluster (ABCABC).
For another example, when collocating a cluster of six 5.4-GHz APs with a 5.7-GHz BH that is
retrofitted with a reflector, provide 100 vertical feet of separation. If this is not possible
1. choose channels for the AP that are at the bottom of the 5.4-GHz band.
2. choose a channel for the BH that is at the top of the 5.7-GHz band.
3. locate the modules so the reflector on the BH shields the APs from the BH
module.
4. ensure the over-illumination around the edges of the reflector is not directed at
the APs.
5. confirm with simultaneous link tests.
Background
Why are 5.4-GHz and 5.7-GHz bands considered one band for Canopy collocation, whereas
other bands (say 5.2-GHz and 5.7-GHz) are considered separate? 5.4-GHz and 5.7-GHz radios
use the same radio front end, whereas 5.2-GHz and 5.7-GHz Canopy modules have different
radio front ends. For collocation design, the 5.4-GHz and 5.7-GHz bands are essentially one
continuous band, albeit one with possibilities for large spectral separation of channels.
8.3
COLLOCATING SAME-FREQUENCY BAND MODULES
Canopy can avoid self-interference if collocated modules in the same frequency band are of the
same type, start each frame transmission at the same time, and start each frame reception at the
same time. If you collocate radios of the same frequency band, do the following also:

Within the same band, collocate only one type of module (only APs, only
BHMs, or only BHSs).

Use a CMM, so that transmit start times are in sync.

Use identical scheduler type (hardware or software)

Either
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 29
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
−
Set identical range, downlink data %, and slot settings
−
Use the Frame Calculator (see Using the Frame Calculator below) to ensure
compatible receive start times.
This ensures that at any one instant the collocated modules are either all receiving or all
transmitting. This avoids, for example, the issue of one AP attempting to receive a signal from a
distant SM, while a nearby AP is transmitting and overpowering the signal from the distant SM.
8.3.1
Using the Frame Calculator
Parameters that affect receive start times include range, slots, downlink data percentage, and
high priority uplink percentage (with software scheduling only). A frame calculator is included in
every module as a helper application to help calculate compatible settings. The frame calculator
does not itself configure or change any settings on the module.
The frame calculator in a module can be used to perform all frame calculations. The operator
enters settings into the calculator, and the calculator outputs details on the frame including an
Uplink Rcv SQ Start value. This calculation should be done for each AP that has different
settings. Then the operator varies the Downlink Data % in each calculation until the calculated
values of Uplink Rcv SQ Start for all collocated APs are within 150 time bits.
For more details on using the frame calculator, refer to the Canopy Release 8 User Guide,
available at http://motorola.canopywireless.com/support/library/ under User Guides.
8.3.2
Establishing Vertical Separation
If you do not use the Frame Calculator

provide 100 ft (30 m) of vertical separation between same-band modules.

if 100 ft (30 m) of vertical separation is not possible, alternatively provide as
much vertical separation as possible, and choose frequencies far apart within
the band. The physical and spectral separation and local RF conditions
(influenced by tower geometries, layout and position of modules, and use of
reflectors on BHs, among other variables) may support good performance,
but testing and monitoring will be required to confirm that they do.
A system that is under no load with SMs registered and is able to communicate indicates basic
connectivity, but does not indicate that the system will function well under heavy load. The more
conservatively you design collocation, the less you will see interference issues, which may be
hidden under light loads, but cause problems when the system becomes heavily loaded.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 30
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
9 Performance Benchmarking Process
9.1.1
Definitions
The following terms are used where these release notes discuss packet processing:
Aggregate Throughput
Sum of uplink plus downlink traffic.
Offered Load
Test equipment generates a specified load to the Ethernet interface
of a module (SM or the AP). The specifications of the load include
both packet size and packet rate.
Carried Load
Test equipment measures the load delivered at the Ethernet interface
of a module. The load is calculated from packet size and number of
packets. As resources are exhausted at any point in the system,
packets may be dropped. The Carried Load equals the Offered Load
minus Dropped Packets.
Downlink/Uplink Load Ratio
The ratio of downlink Carried Load to uplink Carried Load.
NOTE: Do not confuse the Downlink/Uplink Load Ratio with the
Downlink Data configuration parameter. The Downlink/Uplink Load
Ratio is determined from the Carried Loads. The Downlink Data is
set by the operator and determines the split of downlink and uplink
slots in the air frame.
9.1.2
System Performance and System Constraints
In any complex system like Canopy there are multiple performance constraints. Different
combinations of system inputs will result in different constraints limiting system performance.
Larger Packets
With larger packets (Canopy handles packets up to 1522 Bytes), the system constraint is airtime,
which can also be stated as slots, or maximum bits per second. This can be calculated as follows:
64 Bytes/fragment x 2 fragments/slot x 34 slots/frame x 400 frames/sec x 8 bits/byte = 14
Mbps
This is an aggregate (uplink plus downlink) limit, as the Canopy system is a Time Division Duplex
(TDD) system.
14 Mbps is a typical maximum aggregate throughput for larger packet sizes for an FSK system.
Longer range settings can reduce the number of slots in a frame and packet size (breakage on
64-byte boundaries) can affect packing efficiency (the percentage of fragments fully packed with
64 bytes).
Smaller Packets
With smaller packets, the system constraint is processing power in any module handling the
traffic stream. Even though there may be airtime or slots available, the overall throughput is
limited by packet handling ability.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 31
Release 9.4.2
9.1.3
Release Notes
Benchmark Definition
In a complex system, any measurement depends on system configuration, traffic mix, various
settings, and measurement techniques, and so to have reproducible results a “benchmark” is
defined.
System configuration
The PMP benchmark system consists of 3 SMs and 1 Advantage AP, as shown in Figure 4 on
page 33. Traffic generation and measurement equipment is connected to both SMs and the AP.
Traffic is generated such that any one packet attempts to traverse an SM and then the AP, or the
AP and then an SM. No SM-to-SM traffic is included in the benchmark. RF conditions are
maintained such that all links run at max rate (2X or 3X).
The PTP benchmark system consists of 1 BHM and 1 BHS, with traffic generation and
measurement equipment connected to both BHs.
Traffic mix/Packet size
All generated packets have a size of 64 Bytes. The packet format used is a valid Ethernet/IP
packet. The performance of interest is performance near a 50% Downlink/Uplink Load Ratio.
PMP Settings

Downlink Data: 50%

Control Slots: 2

Range: 2 miles

Max rate (2X or 3X) Enabled

Encryption: Enabled (DES modules)

MIR: 20,000 kbits/sec sustained rate and 500,000 kbits burst allocation
(defaults)

CIR: 0 (default)

NAT: Disabled (default)

VLAN: Disabled (default)

High Priority: Disabled (default)

Downlink Data: 50%

Max rate (2X or 3X) Enabled

Encryption: Enabled (DES modules)
PTP Settings
Measurement technique
1. Send a specific number of frames at a specific rate through SMs and AP (uplinks) and AP
and SM (downlink) simultaneously. This is the Offered Load. Count the frames that are
received correctly at both sides. This is the Carried Load. Repeat this through the load
rates of interest. Review the results, noting where the packet loss (the difference between
the Offered Load and Carried Load) is essentially zero (<0.001%).
2.
Confirm results by running longer tests at selected load rates.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 32
Release 9.4.2
3.
Release Notes
Confirm results by varying Downlink/Uplink Load Ratios to ensure no significant changes
around the 50% benchmark.
x/6 pps
SM1
x
pps
x/6 pps
x/6 pps
SM2
AP
x/6 pps
x/2 pps
x/2 pps
SM3
x/6 pps
x/6 pps
Ixia Test Controller
and Load Modules
All packets 64 Bytes
Figure 4: Benchmark test setup
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 33
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
10 Regulatory and Legal Notices
10.1 IMPORTANT NOTE ON MODIFICATIONS
Intentional or unintentional changes or modifications to the equipment must not be made unless under the
express consent of the party responsible for compliance. Any such modifications could void the user’s
authority to operate the equipment and will void the manufacturer’s warranty.
10.2
10.2.1
NATIONAL AND REGIONAL REGULATORY NOTICES
U.S. Federal Communication Commission (FCC) Notification
For 900-MHz, 2.4-GHz, 5.2-GHz. 5.4-GHz, and 5.7-GHz devices:
This device complies with Part 15 of the US FCC Rules and Regulations. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) This device must
accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to
Part 15 of the US FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency
energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with these instructions, may cause harmful interference
to radio communications. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television
reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment on and off, the user is encouraged to correct
the interference by one or more of the following measures:

Increase the separation between the affected equipment and the unit;

Connect the affected equipment to a power outlet on a different circuit from that which
the receiver is connected to;

Consult the dealer and/or experienced radio/TV technician for help.
FCC IDs and the specific configurations covered are listed in Table 11.
For 4.9-GHz devices:
The 4.9-GHz band is a licensed band allocated to public safety services. State and local government entities
that provide public safety services are eligible to apply for 4.9 GHz licenses. For additional information, refer
to FCC regulations.
Table 11: US FCC IDs and Industry Canada Certification Numbers and covered configurations
FCC ID
Industry
Canada Cert
Number
ABZ89FC5809
109W-9000
Issue 1, May 2009
Frequencies
8 MHz channels,
centered on 906-924
MHz in 1 MHz
increments (within the
902-928 MHz ISM
band)
Maximum
Transmitter
Output
1
Power
Module
Families
Antenna,
Reflector, or
1
Lens
9000 SM,
AP
12 dBi integrated
antenna
24 dBm
(250 mW)
10 dBi Maxrad
Model # Z1681,
flat panel
26 dBm
(400 mW)
10 dBi Mars
Model # MA-IS91T2, flat panel
26 dBm
(400 mW)
10 dBi MTI Model
#MT-2630003/N,
flat panel
26 dBm
(400 mW)
Page 34
Release 9.4.2
FCC ID
ABZ89FC5808
ABZ89FC3789
Release Notes
Industry
Canada Cert
Number
109W-2400
109W-5200
ABZ89FC5807
for P7/8/9
109W-5210
for P78/9
ABZ89FC3789
for P10/11
109W-5200
for P10/11
ABZ89FT7623
---
ABZ89FC5804
---
109W-5400
109W-5700
Frequencies
20 MHz channels,
centered on 24152457.5 MHz in 2.5
MHz increments
(within the 24002483.5 MHz ISM
band)
20 MHz channels,
centered on 52755325 MHz in 5 MHz
increments (within the
5250-5350 MHz U-NII
band)
20 MHz channels,
centered on 52755325 MHz in 5 MHz
increments (within the
5250-5350 MHz U-NII
band)
20 MHz channels,
centered on 54955705 MHz in 5 MHz
increments (within the
5470-5725 MHz U-NII
band)
20 MHz channels,
centered on 54955575 and 5675-5705
MHz in 5 MHz
increments (within the
5470-5725 MHz U-NII
band with 5600-5650
MHz excluded)
20 MHz channels,
centered on 57355840 MHz in 5 MHz
increments (within the
5725-5850 MHz ISM
band)
Module
Families
Maximum
Transmitter
Output
1
Power
8 dBi integrated
antenna (Indoor
SM)
26 dBm
(400 mW)
8 dBi internal
25 dBm
(340 mW)
2400 BH,
SM
8 dBi internal +
11 dB reflector
25 dBm
(340 mW)
5200 BH,
SM, AP
P7/8/9
7 dBi internal
23 dBm
(200 mW)
7 dBi internal +
18 dB reflector
5 dBm
(3.2 mW)
7 dBi internal +
9 dB lens
14 dBm
(25 mW)
7 dBi internal +
18 dB reflector
5 dBm
(3.2 mW)
7 dBi internal
23 dBm
(200 mW)
7 dBi internal +
18 dB reflector
5 dBm
(3.2 mW)
7 dBi internal +
9 dB lens
14 dBm
(25 mW)
7 dBi internal
23 dBm
(200 mW)
7 dBi internal +
18 dB reflector
5 dBm
(3.2 mW)
7 dBi internal +
9 dB lens
14 dBm
(25 mW)
7 dBi internal
23 dBm
(200 mW)
7 dBi internal +
18 dB reflector
23 dBm
(200 mW)
7 dBi internal +
10 dB lens
23 dBm
(200 mW)
7 dBi internal +
10 dB lens
19 dBm
(80 mW)
2400 BH,
SM, AP
5200 BH
SM, AP
P10/11
5210 BH
5400 BH,
SM, AP
5400 BH,
SM, AP
5700 BH,
SM, AP
5700 BH,
SM
5700 AP
Issue 1, May 2009
Antenna,
Reflector, or
1
Lens
Page 35
Release 9.4.2
FCC ID
Release Notes
Industry
Canada Cert
Number
Frequencies
Module
Families
Antenna,
Reflector, or
1
Lens
Maximum
Transmitter
Output
1
Power
Note 1: To ensure regulatory compliance, including DFS compliance, the professional installer is responsible
for
◦
◦
◦
setting the Transmitter Output Power on the Confiiguration => Radio page no higher than listed for a
given configuration
setting the Region Code on the Configuration => General page to the correct region
setting the External Gain on the Configuration => Radio page, if displayed, to the gain of any external
device (reflector, lens)
10.2.2
Industry Canada (IC) Notification
For 900-MHz, 2.4-GHz, 5.2-GHz. 5.4-GHz, and 5.7-GHz devices:
This device complies with RSS-210 of Industry Canada. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
(1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) This device must accept any interference
received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Users should be cautioned to take note that in Canada high power radars are allocated as primary users
(meaning they have priority) of 5250 – 5350 MHz and 5650 – 5850 MHz and these radars could cause
interference and/or damage to license-exempt local area networks (LELAN).
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to
RSS-210 of Industry Canada. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency
energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with these instructions, may cause harmful interference
to radio communications. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television
reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment on and off, the user is encouraged to correct
the interference by one or more of the following measures:

Increase the separation between the affected equipment and the unit;

Connect the affected equipment to a power outlet on a different circuit from that which
the receiver is connected to;

Consult the dealer and/or experienced radio/TV technician for help.
To reduce potential radio interference to other users, the antenna type and its gain should be chosen so its
Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power (EIRP) is not more than that permitted for successful communication.
Industry Canada Certification Numbers and the specific configurations covered are listed in Table 11.
This device has been designed to operate with the antennas listed in Table 11 and having a maximum gain
as shown in Table 11. Antennas not included or having a gain greater than as shown in Table 11 are strictly
prohibited from use with this device. Required antenna impedance is 50 ohms.
For 4.9-GHz devices:
The 4.9-GHz band is a licensed band allocated to public safety services. Government entities that provide
public safety services are eligible to apply for 4.9 GHz licenses. For additional information, refer to Industry
Canada regulations.
10.2.3 Regulatory Requirements for CEPT Member States (www.cept.org)
When operated in accordance with the instructions for use, Motorola Canopy Wireless equipment operating
in the 2.4 and 5.4 GHz bands is compliant with CEPT Recommendation 70-03 Annex 3 for Wideband Data
Transmission and HIPERLANs. For compliant operation in the 2.4 GHz band, the transmit power (EIRP)
from the built-in patch antenna and any associated reflector dish shall be no more than 100mW (20dBm).
For compliant operation in the 5.4 GHz band, the transmit power (EIRP) from the built-in patch antenna and
any associated reflector dish shall be no more than 1 W (30 dBm).
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 36
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
The following countries have completely implemented CEPT Recommendation 70-03 Annex 3A (2.4 GHz
band):

EU & EFTA countries: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Spain, Finland, Germany, Greece,
Iceland, Italy, Ireland, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal,
Switzerland, Sweden, UK

New EU member states: Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Estonia, Hungary,
Lithuania, Latvia, Malta, Poland, Slovenia, Slovakia

Other non-EU & EFTA countries: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Turkey
The following countries have a limited implementation of CEPT Recommendation 70-03 Annex 3A:

France – Outdoor operation at 100mW is only permitted in the frequency band 2400
to 2454 MHz;
−
Any outdoor operation in the band 2454 to 2483.5MHz shall not exceed 10mW (10dBm);
−
Indoor operation at 100mW (20dBm) is permitted across the band 2400 to 2483.5 MHz

French Overseas Territories:
−
Guadeloupe, Martinique, St Pierre et Miquelon, Mayotte – 100mW indoor & outdoor is allowed
−
Réunion and Guyana – 100mW indoor, no operation outdoor in the band 2400 to 2420MHz

Italy – If used outside own premises, general authorization required

Luxembourg - General authorization required for public service

Romania – Individual license required. T/R 22-06 not implemented
Motorola Canopy Radios operating in the 2400 to 2483.5MHz band are categorized as “Class 2” devices
within the EU and are marked with the class identifier symbol
, denoting that national restrictions apply
(for example, France). The French restriction in the 2.4 GHz band will be removed in 2011.
This 2.4 GHz equipment is “CE” marked
to show compliance with the European Radio &
Telecommunications Terminal Equipment (R&TTE) directive 1999/5/EC. The relevant Declaration of
Conformity can be found at http://motorola.canopywireless.com/doc.php.
Where necessary, the end user is responsible for obtaining any National licenses required to operate this
product and these must be obtained before using the product in any particular country. However, for CEPT
member states, 2.4 GHz Wideband Data Transmission equipment has been designated exempt from
individual licensing under decision ERC/DEC(01)07. For EU member states, RLAN equipment in both the
2.4 & 5.4GHz bands is exempt from individual licensing under Commission Recommendation 2003/203/EC.
Contact the appropriate national administrations for details on the conditions of use for the bands in question
and any exceptions that might apply. Also see www.ero.dk for further information.
Motorola Canopy Radio equipment operating in the 5470 to 5725 MHz band are categorized as “Class 1”
devices within the EU in accordance with ECC DEC(04)08 and are “CE” marked
to show compliance
with the European Radio & Telecommunications Terminal Equipment (R&TTE) directive 1999/5/EC. The
relevant Declaration of Conformity can be found at http://motorola.canopywireless.com/doc.php.
A European Commission decision, implemented by Member States on 31 October 2005, makes the
frequency band 5470-5725 MHz available in all EU Member States for wireless access systems. Under this
decision, the designation of Canopy 5.4GHz products become “Class 1 devices” and these do not require
notification under article 6, section 4 of the R&TTE Directive. Consequently, these 5.4GHz products are only
marked with the
symbol and may be used in any member state.
For further details, see
http://europa.eu.int/information_society/policy/radio_spectrum/ref_documents/index_en.htm
10.2.4 European Union Notification for 5.7 GHz Product
The 5.7 GHz connectorized product is a two-way radio transceiver suitable for use in Broadband Wireless
Access System (WAS), Radio Local Area Network (RLAN), or Fixed Wireless Access (FWA) systems. It is a
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 37
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
Class 2 device and uses operating frequencies that are not harmonized throughout the EU member states.
The operator is responsible for obtaining any national licenses required to operate this product and these
must be obtained before using the product in any particular country.
This equipment is marked
0977to show compliance with the European R&TTE directive 1999/5/EC.
The relevant Declaration of Conformity can be found at http://www.canopywireless.com/doc.php.
10.2.5 Equipment Disposal
Waste (Disposal)
of Electronic
and Electric
Equipment
Please do not dispose of Electronic and Electric Equipment or Electronic and Electric Accessories with your
household waste. In some countries or regions, collection systems have been set up to handle waste of
electrical and electronic equipment. In European Union countries, please contact your local equipment
supplier representative or service center for information about the waste collection system in your country.
10.2.6 EU Declaration of Conformity for RoHS Compliance
Motorola hereby, declares that these Motorola products are in compliance with the essential requirements
and other relevant provisions of Directive 2002/95/EC, Restriction of the use of certain Hazardous
Substances (RoHS) in electrical and electronic equipment.
The relevant Declaration of Conformity can be found at http://www.canopywireless.com/doc.php.
10.2.7 UK Notification
The 5.7 GHz connectorized product has been notified for operation in the UK, and when operated in
accordance with instructions for use it is compliant with UK Interface Requirement IR2007. For UK use,
installations must conform to the requirements of IR2007 in terms of EIRP spectral density against elevation
profile above the local horizon in order to protect Fixed Satellite Services. The frequency range 5795-5815
MHz is assigned to Road Transport & Traffic Telematics (RTTT) in the U.K. and shall not be used by FWA
systems in order to protect RTTT devices. UK licensing specifies that radiolocation services shall be
protected by a Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) mechanism to prevent co-channel operation in the
presence of radar signals.
10.2.8 Belgium Notification
Belgium national restrictions in the 2.4 GHz band include

EIRP must be lower then 100 mW

For crossing the public domain over a distance >300m the user must have the
authorization of the BIPT.

No duplex working
10.2.9 Luxembourg Notification
For the 2.4 GHz band, point-to-point or point-to-multipoint operation is only allowed on campus areas.
5.4GHz products can only be used for mobile services.
10.2.10Czech Republic Notification
2.4 GHz products can be operated in accordance with the Czech General License No. GL-12/R/2000.
5.4 GHz products can be operated in accordance with the Czech General License No. GL-30/R/2000.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 38
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
10.2.11Norway Notification
Use of the frequency bands 5725-5795 / 5815-5850 MHz are authorized with maximum radiated power of 4
W EIRP and maximum spectral power density of 200 mW/MHz. The radio equipment shall implement
Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) as defined in Annex 1 of ITU-R Recommendation M.1652 / EN
301 893. Directional antennae with a gain up to 23 dBi may be used for fixed point-to-point links. The power
2
flux density at the border between Norway and neighboring states shall not exceed – 122.5 dBW/m
measured with a reference bandwidth of 1 MHz.
Canopy 5.7 GHz connectorized products have been notified for use in Norway and are compliant when
configured to meet the above National requirements. Users shall ensure that DFS functionality is enabled,
maximum EIRP respected for a 20 MHz channel, and that channel spacings comply with the allocated
frequency band to protect Road Transport and Traffic Telematics services (for example, 5735, 5755, 5775 or
5835 MHz are suitable carrier frequencies). Note that for directional fixed links, TPC is not required,
conducted transmit power shall not exceed 30 dBm, and antenna gain is restricted to 23 dBi (maximum of
40W from the Canopy 5.7 GHz connectorized products).
10.2.12Brazil Notification
Local regulations do not allow the use of 900 MHz, 2.4 GHz, or 5.2 GHz Canopy modules in Brazil.
For compliant operation of an AP in the 5.7 GHz band, the Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power from the
built-in patch antenna and any associated reflector dish or LENS shall not exceed 36 dBm (4 W). When
using the passive reflector (18 dB), transmitter output power must be configured no higher than 11 dBm.
When using the LENS (10 dB at 5.7 GHz), transmitter output power must be configured no higher than 19
dBm.
For compliant operation in the 5.4 GHz band, the Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power from the built-in patch
antenna and any associated reflector dish or LENS shall not exceed 30 dBm (1 W). When using the passive
reflector (18 dB), transmitter output power must be configured no higher than 5 dBm. When using the LENS
(9 dB at 5.4 GHz), transmitter output power must be configured no higher than 14 dBm. When not using the
passive reflector or the LENS, the transmitter output power of the radio must be configured no higher than
23 dBm.
The operator is responsible for enabling the DFS feature on any Canopy 5.4 GHz radio by setting the
Region Code to “Brazil”, including after the module is reset to factory defaults.
Important Note: This equipment operates as a secondary application, so it has no rights against harmful
interference, even if generated by similar equipment, and cannot cause harmful interference on systems
operating as primary applications.
10.2.13Australia Notification
900 MHz modules must be set to transmit and receive only on center channels of 920, 922, or 923 MHz so
as to stay within the ACMA approved band of 915 MHz to 928 MHz for the class license and not interfere
with other approved users.
After taking into account antenna gain (in dBi), 900 MHz modules’ transmitter output power (in dBm) must
be set to stay within the legal regulatory limit of 30 dBm (1 W) EIRP for this 900 MHz frequency band.
10.2.14Labeling and Disclosure Table for China
The People’s Republic of China requires that Motorola’s products comply with China Management Methods
(CMM) environmental regulations. (China Management Methods refers to the regulation Management
Methods for Controlling Pollution by Electronic Information Products.) Two items are used to demonstrate
compliance; the label and the disclosure table.
The label is placed in a customer visible position on the product.

Issue 1, May 2009
Logo 1 means that the product contains no substances in excess of the maximum
concentration value for materials identified in the China Management Methods
regulation.
Page 39
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes

Logo 2 means that the product may contain substances in excess of the maximum
concentration value for materials identified in the China Management Methods
regulation, and has an Environmental Friendly Use Period (EFUP) in years, fifty years
in the example shown.
Logo 1
Logo 2
The Environmental Friendly Use Period (EFUP) is the period (in years) during which the Toxic and
Hazardous Substances (T&HS) contained in the Electronic Information Product (EIP) will not leak or mutate
causing environmental pollution or bodily injury from the use of the EIP. The EFUP indicated by the Logo 2
label applies to a product and all its parts. Certain field-replaceable parts, such as battery modules, can
have a different EFUP and are marked separately.
The Disclosure table is intended to communicate compliance with only China requirements; it is not intended
to communicate compliance with EU RoHS or any other environmental requirements.
Table 12: Disclosure table
有毒有害物质或元素
部件名称
铅
(Pb)
汞
(Hg)
镉
(Cd)
六价铬
(Cr6+)
多溴联苯
(PBB)
多溴二苯醚
(PBDE)
金属部件
×
○
×
×
○
○
电路模块
×
○
×
×
○
○
电缆及电缆组件
×
○
×
×
○
○
塑料和聚合物部件
○
○
○
○
○
×
○:
表示该有毒有害物质在该部件所有均质材料中的含量均在SJ/T11363-2006 标准规定的限量要求以下。
×:
表示该有毒有害物质至少在该部件的某一均质材料中的含量超出SJ/T11363-2006
标准规定的限量要求。
10.3
RF EXPOSURE SEPARATION DISTANCES
To protect from overexposure to RF energy, install Canopy radios so as to provide and maintain
the minimum separation distances from all persons shown in Table 13.
Table 13: Exposure separation distances
Module Type
Separation Distance from Persons
Canopy Module
At least 20 cm (approx 8 in)
Canopy Module with Reflector Dish
At least 1.5 m (approx 60 in or 5 ft)
Canopy Module with LENS
At least 0.5 m (approx 20 in)
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 40
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
Antenna of connectorized or integrated 900 MHz
module
At least 60 sm (24 in)
Indoor 900 MHz SM
At least 10 cm (4 in)
The following section and its Table 14 provide details and discussion of the associated
calculations.
10.3.1 Details of Exposure Separation Distances Calculations and Power
Compliance Margins
Limits and guidelines for RF exposure come from:

US FCC limits for the general population. See the FCC web site at
http://www.fcc.gov, and the policies, guidelines, and requirements in Part 1 of
Title 47 of the Code of Federal Regulations, as well as the guidelines and
suggestions for evaluating compliance in FCC OET Bulletin 65.

Health Canada limits for the general population. See the Health Canada web
site at http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/rpb and Safety Code 6.

ICNIRP (International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection)
guidelines for the general public. See the ICNIRP web site at
http://www.icnirp.de/ and Guidelines for Limiting Exposure to Time-Varying
Electric, Magnetic, and Electromagnetic Fields.
The applicable power density exposure limits from the documents referenced above are
2

6 W/m for RF energy in the 900-MHz frequency band in the US and
Canada.

10 W/m for RF energy in the 2.4-, 5.2-, 5.4-, and 5.7-GHz frequency bands.
2
Peak power density in the far field of a radio frequency point source is calculated as follows:
P"G
S=
4 # d2
!
where
2
S = power density in W/m
P = RMS transmit power capability of the radio, in W
G = total Tx gain as a factor, converted from dB
d = distance from point source, in m
P"G
4# S
d=
Rearranging terms to solve for distance yields
Table 14 shows calculated minimum separation distances d, recommended distances and
resulting power compliance margins for each frequency band and antenna combination.
Table 14: Calculated exposure distances and power compliance margins
!
Band
Antenna
Issue 1, May 2009
P
Variable
d
G
(calculated)
S
Recommended
Separation
Distance
Power
Compliance
Margin
Page 41
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
Variable
d
Recommended
Separation
Distance
P
G
S
(calculated)
Power
Compliance
Margin
external
0.4 W
(26 dBm)
10.0
(10 dB)
6 W/m
2
23 cm
60 cm
(24 in)
7
integrated
0.25 W
(24 dBm)
15.8
(12 dB)
6 W/m
2
23 cm
60 cm
(24 in)
7
indoor, integrated
Simulation model used to estimate Specific
Absorption Rate (SAR) levels
10 cm
(4 in)
2
integrated
0.34 W
(25 dBm)
6.3
(8 dB)
10
2
W/m
13 cm
20 cm
(8 in)
2.3
integrated
plus reflector
0.34 W
(25 dBm)
79.4
(19 dB)
10
2
W/m
46 cm
1.5 m
(5 ft)
10
integrated
0.2 W
(23 dBm)
5.0
(7 dB)
10
2
W/m
9 cm
20 cm
(8 in)
5
integrated plus
reflector
0.0032 W
(5 dBm)
316
(25 dB)
10
2
W/m
9 cm
1.5 m
(5 ft)
279
integrated plus
LENS
0.025 W
(14 dBm)
40
(16 dB)
10
2
W/m
9 cm
50 cm
(12 in)
31
integrated
0.2 W
(23 dBm)
5.0
(7 dB)
10
2
W/m
9 cm
20 cm
(8 in)
5
integrated plus
reflector
0.0032 W
(5 dBm)
316
(25 dB)
10
2
W/m
9 cm
1.5 m
(5 ft)
279
integrated plus
LENS
0.020 W
(13 dBm)
50
(17 dB)
10
2
W/m
9 cm
50 cm
(12 in)
31
integrated
0.2 W
(23 dBm)
5.0
(7 dB)
10
2
W/m
9 cm
20 cm
(8 in)
5
integrated plus
reflector
0.2 W
(23 dBm)
316
(25 dB)
10
2
W/m
71 cm
1.5 m
(5 ft)
4.5
Integrated plus
LENS
0.2 W
(23 dBm)
50
(17 dB)
1
2
W/m
28 cm
50 cm
(12 in)
3.13
Band
Antenna
900 MHz
2.4 GHz
5.2 GHz
5.4 GHz
5.7 GHz
The Recommended Separation Distance is chosen to give significant compliance margin in all
cases. It is also chosen so that a given item (bare module, reflector, or LENS) always has the
same distance, regardless of frequency band, to simplify following exposure distances in the field.
These are conservative distances:

They are along the beam direction (the direction of greatest energy).
Exposure to the sides and back of the module is significantly less.

They meet sustained exposure limits for the general population (not just
short-term occupational exposure limits), with considerable margin.

In the reflector cases, the calculated compliance distance d is greatly
overestimated because the far-field equation models the reflector as a point
source and neglects the physical dimension of the reflector.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 42
Release 9.4.2
10.4
Release Notes
LEGAL NOTICES
10.4.1 Software License Terms and Conditions
ONLY OPEN THE PACKAGE, OR USE THE SOFTWARE AND RELATED PRODUCT IF YOU ACCEPT
THE TERMS OF THIS LICENSE. BY BREAKING THE SEAL ON THIS DISK KIT / CDROM, OR IF YOU
USE THE SOFTWARE OR RELATED PRODUCT, YOU ACCEPT THE TERMS OF THIS LICENSE
AGREEMENT. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO THESE TERMS, DO NOT USE THE SOFTWARE OR
RELATED PRODUCT; INSTEAD, RETURN THE SOFTWARE TO PLACE OF PURCHASE FOR A FULL
REFUND. THE FOLLOWING AGREEMENT IS A LEGAL AGREEMENT BETWEEN YOU (EITHER AN
INDIVIDUAL OR ENTITY), AND MOTOROLA, INC. (FOR ITSELF AND ITS LICENSORS). THE RIGHT TO
USE THIS PRODUCT IS LICENSED ONLY ON THE CONDITION THAT YOU AGREE TO THE
FOLLOWING TERMS.
Now, therefore, in consideration of the promises and mutual obligations contained herein, and for other good
and valuable consideration, the receipt and sufficiency of which are hereby mutually acknowledged, you and
Motorola agree as follows:
Grant of License. Subject to the following terms and conditions, Motorola, Inc., grants to you a personal,
revocable, non-assignable, non-transferable, non-exclusive and limited license to use on a single piece of
equipment only one copy of the software contained on this disk (which may have been pre-loaded on the
equipment)(Software). You may make two copies of the Software, but only for backup, archival, or disaster
recovery purposes. On any copy you make of the Software, you must reproduce and include the copyright
and other proprietary rights notice contained on the copy we have furnished you of the Software.
Ownership. Motorola (or its supplier) retains all title, ownership and intellectual property rights to the
Software and any copies,
including translations, compilations, derivative works (including images) partial copies and portions of
updated works. The Software is Motorola’s (or its supplier's) confidential proprietary information. This
Software License Agreement does not convey to you any interest in or to the Software, but only a limited
right of use. You agree not to disclose it or make it available to anyone without Motorola’s written
authorization. You will exercise no less than reasonable care to protect the Software from unauthorized
disclosure. You agree not to disassemble, decompile or reverse engineer, or create derivative works of the
Software, except and only to the extent that such activity is expressly permitted by applicable law.
Termination. This License is effective until terminated. This License will terminate immediately without
notice from Motorola or judicial resolution if you fail to comply with any provision of this License. Upon such
termination you must destroy the Software, all accompanying written materials and all copies thereof, and
the sections entitled Limited Warranty, Limitation of Remedies and Damages, and General will survive any
termination.
Limited Warranty. Motorola warrants for a period of ninety (90) days from Motorola’s or its customer’s
shipment of the Software to you that (i) the disk(s) on which the Software is recorded will be free from
defects in materials and workmanship under normal use and (ii) the Software, under normal use, will
perform substantially in accordance with Motorola’s published specifications for that release level of the
Software. The written materials are provided "AS IS" and without warranty of any kind. Motorola's entire
liability and your sole and exclusive remedy for any breach of the foregoing limited warranty will be, at
Motorola's option, replacement of the disk(s), provision of downloadable patch or replacement code, or
refund of the unused portion of your bargained for contractual benefit up to the amount paid for this Software
License.
THIS LIMITED WARRANTY IS THE ONLY WARRANTY PROVIDED BY MOTOROLA, AND MOTOROLA
AND ITS LICENSORS EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, EITHER EXPRESS OF
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. MOTOROLA DOES NOT
WARRANT THAT THE OPERATION OF THE SOFTWARE WILL BE UNINTERRUPTED OR ERRORFREE, OR THAT DEFECTS IN THE SOFTWARE WILL BE CORRECTED. NO ORAL OR WRITTEN
REPRESENTATIONS MADE BY MOTOROLA OR AN AGENT THEREOF SHALL CREATE A WARRANTY
OR IN ANY WAY INCREASE THE SCOPE OF THIS WARRANTY. MOTOROLA DOES NOT WARRANT
ANY SOFTWARE THAT HAS BEEN OPERATED IN EXCESS OF SPECIFICATIONS, DAMAGED,
MISUSED, NEGLECTED, OR IMPROPERLY INSTALLED. BECAUSE SOME JURISDICTIONS DO NOT
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 43
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF IMPLIED WARRANTIES, THE ABOVE LIMITATIONS MAY
NOT APPLY TO YOU.
Limitation of Remedies and Damages. Regardless of whether any remedy set forth herein fails of its
essential purpose, IN NO EVENT SHALL MOTOROLA OR ANY OF THE LICENSORS, DIRECTORS,
OFFICERS, EMPLOYEES OR AFFILIATES OF THE FOREGOING BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR ANY
CONSEQUENTIAL, INCIDENTAL, INDIRECT, SPECIAL OR SIMILAR DAMAGES WHATSOEVER
(including, without limitation, damages for loss of business profits, business interruption, loss of business
information and the like), whether foreseeable or unforeseeable, arising out of the use or inability to use the
Software or accompanying written materials, regardless of the basis of the claim and even if Motorola or a
Motorola representative has been advised of the possibility of such damage. Motorola's liability to you for
direct damages for any cause whatsoever, regardless of the basis of the form of the action, will be limited to
the price paid for the Software that caused the damages. THIS LIMITATION WILL NOT APPLY IN CASE
OF PERSONAL INJURY ONLY WHERE AND TO THE EXTENT THAT APPLICABLE LAW REQUIRES
SUCH LIABILITY. BECAUSE SOME JURISDICTIONS DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY FOR CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, THE ABOVE
LIMITATION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
Maintenance and Support. Motorola shall not be responsible for maintenance or support of the software.
By accepting the license granted under this agreement, you agree that Motorola will be under no obligation
to provide any support, maintenance or service in connection with the Software or any application developed
by you. Any maintenance and support of the Related Product will be provided under the terms of the
agreement for the Related Product.
Transfer. In the case of software designed to operate on Motorola equipment, you may not transfer the
Software to another party except: (1) if you are an end-user, when you are transferring the Software together
with the Motorola equipment on which it operates; or 2) if you are a Motorola licensed distributor, when you
are transferring the Software either together with such Motorola equipment or are transferring the Software
as a licensed duly paid for upgrade, update, patch, new release, enhancement or replacement of a prior
version of the Software. If you are a Motorola licensed distributor, when you are transferring the Software as
permitted herein, you agree to transfer the Software with a license agreement having terms and conditions
no less restrictive than those contained herein. You may transfer all other Software, not otherwise having an
agreed restriction on transfer, to another party. However, all such transfers of Software are strictly subject to
the conditions precedent that the other party agrees to accept the terms and conditions of this License, and
you destroy any copy of the Software you do not transfer to that party. You may not sublicense or otherwise
transfer, rent or lease the Software without our written consent. You may not transfer the Software in
violation of any laws, regulations, export controls or economic sanctions imposed by the US Government.
Right to Audit. Motorola shall have the right to audit annually, upon reasonable advance notice and during
normal business hours, your records and accounts to determine compliance with the terms of this
Agreement.
Export Controls. You specifically acknowledge that the software may be subject to United States and other
country export control laws. You shall comply strictly with all requirements of all applicable export control
laws and regulations with respect to all such software and materials.
US Government Users. If you are a US Government user, then the Software is provided with
"RESTRICTED RIGHTS" as set forth in subparagraphs (c)(1) and (2) of the Commercial Computer
Software-Restricted Rights clause at FAR 52 227-19 or subparagraph (c)(1)(ii) of the Rights in Technical
Data and Computer Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013, as applicable.
Disputes. You and Motorola hereby agree that any dispute, controversy or claim, except for any dispute,
controversy or claim involving intellectual property, prior to initiation of any formal legal process, will be
submitted for non-binding mediation, prior to initiation of any formal legal process. Cost of mediation will be
shared equally. Nothing in this Section will prevent either party from resorting to judicial proceedings, if (i)
good faith efforts to resolve the dispute under these procedures have been unsuccessful, (ii) the dispute,
claim or controversy involves intellectual property, or (iii) interim relief from a court is necessary to prevent
serious and irreparable injury to that party or to others.
General. Illinois law governs this license. The terms of this license are supplemental to any written
agreement executed by both parties regarding this subject and the Software Motorola is to license you under
it, and supersedes all previous oral or written communications between us regarding the subject except for
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 44
Release 9.4.2
Release Notes
such executed agreement. It may not be modified or waived except in writing and signed by an officer or
other authorized representative of each party. If any provision is held invalid, all other provisions shall
remain valid, unless such invalidity would frustrate the purpose of our agreement. The failure of either party
to enforce any rights granted hereunder or to take action against the other party in the event of any breach
hereunder shall not be deemed a waiver by that party as to subsequent enforcement of rights or subsequent
action in the event of future breaches.
10.4.2 Hardware Warranty in US
Motorola US offers a warranty covering a period of 1 year from the date of purchase by the customer. If a
product is found defective during the warranty period, Motorola will repair or replace the product with the
same or a similar model, which may be a reconditioned unit, without charge for parts or labor.
10.5
LIMIT OF LIABILITY
IN NO EVENT SHALL MOTOROLA BE LIABLE TO YOU OR ANY OTHER PARTY FOR ANY DIRECT,
INDIRECT, GENERAL, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, EXEMPLARY OR OTHER DAMAGE
ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE PRODUCT (INCLUDING, WITHOUT
LIMITATION, DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF BUSINESS PROFITS, BUSINESS INTERRUPTION, LOSS OF
BUSINESS INFORMATION OR ANY OTHER PECUNIARY LOSS, OR FROM ANY BREACH OF
WARRANTY, EVEN IF MOTOROLA HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
(Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so the above
exclusion or limitation may not apply to you.) IN NO CASE SHALL MOTOROLA’S LIABILITY EXCEED THE
AMOUNT YOU PAID FOR THE PRODUCT.
Issue 1, May 2009
Page 45