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THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE YAMAHA USERS GROUP
AUGUST 1987
--
G YAMAHA®
-Editor
Tom Darter
----
Operations
Sibyl Darter
Editorial Board
Bob Frye
Bill Hinely
Mark Koenig
Jim Smerdel
Cover Photograph
Jim Hagopian
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August 1987
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Volume 3, Number 8
Issue #23
4
FUNK SYNTH PIANO
5
FULL LEAD PIPES
A new DX9 voice created by Brian William Niles.
A new DX9 voice created by Brian William Niles.
6
Harmallets
A new DXlOO voice created by Dave Anderson.
7
Great 88
A new DXlOO voice created by S.E. McMayon.
8
COSMOS
A new DXlOO voice created by Daniel P. Estabrooks.
9
MSS1
Yamaha unveils its new MIDI SMPTE synchronizer.
10 QX3
An introduction to Yamaha's newest digital sequence recorder.
By Tom Darter.
12 MEP4
Using the MEP4 MIDI event processor in live applications. By
Scott Plunkett.
14 StringsUp
A new MEP4 setup created by Scott Plunkett.
AFfERTOUCH is published monthly. Third class
postage paid at Long
Prairie, MN and additional
points of entry.
SUBSCRIPTIONS: Free.
Address subscription correspondence to AFTERTOUCH, P.O. Box 7938,
Northridge, CA 913277938. POSTMASTER:
Send form 3579 to P.O.
Box 7938, Northridge, CA
91327-7938.
2
16 Hot Tips
Reader tips for the SPX90, CXSM,
FB~Ol,
and DX7 II.
18 Questions
Answers to questions from readers. By Torn Darter.
© 1987 Yamaha Music Corporation USA. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or rransmmed in any form or by any means,
electronically, mechanically, photocopying:, recording, or otherwise, without the prior wrirren permiSSion of Yamaha lnrernational Corporation.
AFfERTOUCH/Vol. 3 No. 8
From The Editor
M
ANY OF YOU may have recognized the
cover art from last month's "Return of
the Reader" issue as being part of an
AfterTouch poster that appeared earlier this
year. It was a special project, put together by
photographer Wynn Miller. Unfortunately, we
didn't give Wynn credit last month. Our regular
cover photographer, Jim Hagopian, was listed
on the masthead, and we neglected to add a
notice with the proper credit for the "Reader"
cover. Our apologies to Wynn Miller for this
oversight, and our thanks to him for doing such
a great job on this AfterTouch poster and cover.
This month's issue features 4-operator
patches from readers, covering two generations
of instruments-the DX9 and the DXlOO. There
are also Hot Tips and Questions from readers,
plus the MEP4 applications article postponed
from an earlier issue. You will also find short
introductions to the two new products featured
on the cover: the QX3 digital sequence recorder
and the MSS 1 MIDI SMPTE synchronizer.
Next month, we'll continue with more 4-operator patches from readers, once again covering two generations of instruments-the DXlOO
and the TX81Z. There will be reader articles
too, plus more Hot Tips and Questions. Also,
there will be information on more new products
from Yamaha. And, before the end of the year,
we will finally publish the long-promised, longanticipated article on 6-operator to 4-operator
patch conversion.
So, keep your suggestions, hot tips, patches,
questions, and articles coming in. Keep letting
us know what you want and need, and we'll do
our best to get it into AfterTouch for you.
Also, please notice that we have a new mailing address, which became effective beginning
with last month's issue. The new address is as
follows: AfterTouch, P.O. Box 7938,
Northridge, CA 91327-7938.
In closing, here is our monthly repeat of
some information we get asked for every month:
Back Issues: If a request for back issues is
combined with a subscription request or other
material, chances are it will not be fulfilled. All
requests for AfterTouch subscriptions must go
to our Mailing List input service. After the
addresses are entered, the letters are normally
kept on file, in keeping with various postal
regulations. To be absolutely sure that you
receive any available back issues that you want,
make back issue requests separately, and include
the indication "ATTN: Back Issues" on the envelope. Please do not send back issue requests
on the attached subscription postcard.
Product Literature: All requests for literature on specific products must go directly to
Yamaha. (The address is: Yamaha Music Corporation USA, P.O. Box 6600, Buena Park,
CA 90622.) We at AfterTouch are happy to
receive specific questions concerning the use of
Yamaha professional music products, and we
will answer as many of them as we can in the
Questions column; however, requests for general product information must be sent directly
to Yamaha.
-TD
AFTER~
TOUCH is a
monthly
informational
publication from
Yamaha
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Voice By Dave
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LFO & FUNCTtoNS
TRI
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This is a good African mallet
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playing touch wilt produce the
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wiU produce "harmonics."
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These DXlOO
voices can also
be loaded into
the DX21,
DX27, and
DX27S 4,oper,
ator FM digital
synthesizers,
and into the
newTX81Z
4,operator FM
digital tone
generator.
Vol. 3 No. 8/ AFTERTOUCH
7
DXlOO
COSMOS. A
NewDXlOO
Voice By
Daniel P.
Estabrooks.
Notes:
You should be able to "feel"
this one! Amplitude of lOOdb
@ 3 feet with a range of
80Hz w 20kHz flat should
about do it.
Play the lowest and highest C
S/H
84
0
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SPEED
DELAY
5
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AFTERTOUCH!Vol. 3 No. 8
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MSSl
T
HE YAMAHA MSS 1 is a SMPTEcompatible MIDI synchronizer designed
for use in home recording as well as motion picture, television, and professional recording
applications. It provides an easy, cost-effective
way to synchronize MIDI devices to SMPTE
time code. The MSSl can lock any clockdriven MIDI device precisely to SMPTE time
code replayed from a multitrack tape recorder or
video tape unit.
The MSSl is fully compatible with all four
SMPTE formats: 30-frame, 30-drop-frame, 25frame, and 24-frame. In addition, a precision
SMPTE time code generator is built into the
MSS 1, so that you can generate and record your
own SMPTE time code tracks on virtually any
type of audio or video reproduction equipment.
The MSS 1 can also be programmed to transmit MIDI Program Change and Control
Change messages in a precisely-timed sequence
timed to SMPTE time code from a master tape.
The MSS 1's memory holds up to 7168
beats-obviously, it can record extremely long
compositions. The overall memory is divided
into 10 memory banks, which can be called up
in any order in Chain mode to create full-length
compositions from smaller parts.
Tempos can be entered into the MSS1 simply by tapping a button on the front panel. This
does away with stiff, robotic performances, and
adds a new sense of human feel to sequenced
music.
Front-Panel Displays
The MSS 1 provides a number of front-panel
displays to give you constant feedback on the
status of the unit's operations, including a 16 x
1 backlit LCD, two rows of large, 10-position,
8-segment LED displays, a green LED indicator
light, and two red LED indicator lights. These
various displays give you the following
information.
16 x 1 LCD (Message/Data Display): shows
operating modes, program data, and user
prompts when necessary.
Upper LED (Time Code Display): shows
SMPTE time code in hours, minutes, seconds, and bits.
Lower LED (MIDI Data Display): in PLAY
and RECORD modes, shows bank, measure, beat, and tempo. In MIDI Event
mode, shows command type, step number,
MIDI channel, and command data.
Green LED (SYNC/CLOCK indicator):
lights when the MSS1 is locked to received
SMPTE data.
Yamaha
Unveils Its
New MIDI
SMPTESyn..
chronizer.
Red RUN LED indicator: lights when the
MSSl is in RECORD or PLAY mode.
Red METRONOME LED indicator: blinks as
a visual tempo display.
Front-Panel Controls
The MSSl gives the user a multitude of
front-panel controls, including six MODE keys,
six FUNCTION keys, a 10-key numeric dataentry pad (which, in addition to the 10 numbered keys, has a </NO key, a YES/> key, and
an ENTER key), and START and STOP keys.
These give you control over the following:
MODE Keys: These allow you to access the
MSS 1's six basic modes of operation:
PLAY, RECORD, EDIT, CHAIN, GENERATOR, and UTILITY.
FUNCTION Keys: These allow you to access
the MSS1's six basic function modes, JOB,
SONG CUE, TIME CUE, BANK,
CHASE, and METRONOME. In EDIT
mode, the last four function keys access
the REPLACE, COPY, DELETE, and INSERT functions.
10-Key (+)Numeric Pad: These keys are for
entering virtually all types of data. The
NO and YES keys allow selection of certain types of data (as well as allowing control over incrementing and decrementing
data). The function of the ENTER key is
obvious.
START and STOP Keys: These start and stop
most functions; the STOP key is also used
to cancel or exit in certain situations.
With its list price of $1195.00, the new
Yamaha MSS1 MIDI-SMPTE synchronizer is a
cost-effective time-code controller-one that
offers both great flexibility and ease of
operation.
Vol. 3 No. 81 AITERTOUCH
9
QX3
An lntroduc..
tion To
Yamaha's
Newest Digital
Sequence
Recorder. By
Tom Darter.
T
HE NEW QX3 digital sequence recorder is
a 16-track MIDI sequencer with a built-in
3.5" disk drive. Each of the 16 tracks can contain unlimited simultaneous polyphony. The
total capacity of the QX3 is 48,000 notes with
velocity (in Chain Play mode). Up to 24,000
notes can be recorded in one pass. The time
resolution of the unit is 96 clocks per quarternote.
The QX3 is designed to be a full-feature sequencer like the QX1; at the same time,
though, the QX3 offers a number of significant
improvements over its older brother. Some of
the most obvious ( 16 tracks instead of 8 and a
disk drive that uses the smaller, denser, more
durable 3.5" disks) are mentioned above, but
there are many more. Unlike the QX1, the
QX3 receives and records aftertouch data. It
generates and receives MIDI Song Position
Pointer, and can be synced to an external MIDI
clock or tape clock for both recording or
playback. The QX3 features 512K of internal
RAM, which almost completely eliminates the
long "executing now!" delays found on the
QXl. Finally, the QX3 offers a combined Play/
Record mode and greater accessibility to all
functions, both of which make the QX3 significantly easier and less time-consuming to operate
than the QXl.
The unit's front panel includes a number of
features designed for ease of operation. These
include a 40x2 LCD with a variable contrast
control, Note Value and Note Name keys, a
numeric keypad for entering data, Track Select
keys, an Editing Dial, F1 and F2 keys, and
much more. The Editing Dial can be used to set
tempo, move through measures (in Play/Record
mode), move through events in a track (in Edit
mode), or to select a file number (when saving
to or loading from disk). The Function Key feature allows you to assign any procedure up to
128 keystrokes long to the F1 or F2 keys.
Record/Play Mode
The QX3 offers Real Time, Step Time, and
Punch-In recording. Punch-In recording may
be performed manually or automatically.
Punch-In can begin or end anywhere (even in
the middle of a measure), and can be used in
conjunction with a fully-implemented AutoLocate feature.
The QX3 offers great range in defining time
signatures. The basic beat for a time signature
ranges from whole notes (x/1) to thirty-second
10
AITERTOUCH!Vol. 3 No.8
notes (x/32), and the number of beats ranges
from 1 to 64. As with the QX1, different time
signatures may be used in a single song, and
time signature changes are shared by all tracks.
However, unlike the QX1, the time signature of
a measure cannot be changed once the measure
has been recorded.
Each track on the QX3 holds data for one
MIDI channel. In other words, channel data is
not recorded. The MIDI channel of outgoing
data is determined by the Output Channel setting for each track. If you want to record incoming data that involves a number of MIDI channels simultaneously, you need to record on two
or more tracks, and set each track to receive on
a different MIDI channel. Receive Channel
and Output Channel settings may be different.
The QX3 has two MIDI OUT ports, and
each track may be assigned to either or both of
these two OUTs for playback. The unit also has
an Echo Back function that allows incoming
MIDI data to be merged with outgoing MIDI
data at the unit's MIDI OUT ports.
The QX3 has 32 Job Commands available in
the Record/Play mode, as follows:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)
10)
11)
12)
13)
14)
15)
16)
17)
18)
19)
20)
21)
22)
23)
24)
25)
26)
27)
28)
29)
Click
Click Beat
Count In
Measure Locate
Auto Punch Point
Foot Switch
Setup Save
Setup Load
Song Clear
Erase Track
Sync Clock
Echo Back
Output Channel
Output Port
Receive Channel
Receive Event
Remote In
Remote Out
Song Select In
MIDI Monitor
Memory Status
Disk Status
Disk Format
Disk Copy
Number ofFiles
File Rename
File Kill
E-Seq File Load
QX1 Data In
QX3 digital sequence
recorder.
30) QX1 Data Out
31) Rel Tempo Record
32) Time Display
Edit Mode
In the Edit mode, the QX3 offers an extensive set of 29 Job Commands, as follows:
1) Clock/Beat
2) Gate Time Ratio
3) MIDI Control
4) Event Display
5) Measure Copy
6) Measure Erase
7) Measure Create
8) Measure Delete
9) Mix Track
10) Erase Track
11 ) Transpose
12) Note Shift
13) Gate Time Modify
14) Velocity Modify
15) Crescendo
16) Quantize
17) Chord Sort
18) Chord Separate
19) Clock Move
20) Rel Tempo Erase
21) Memory Status
22) File Include
23) Note Extract
24) Ctrl Extract
25) P.Bend Extract
26)
27)
28)
29)
Prog Extract
A. Touch Extract
Excl Extract
Spot Extract
Many of these Jobs access functions that are
self-evident, and still others will be familiar to
QX1 users. Here is a quick rundown on some of
the new Edit mode features:
Transpose allows you to shift all notes a fixed
amount over a specific area of a track.
Note Shift allows you to convert any given note
to another note over a specific area of a
track.
Chord Sort allows you to rearrange chords
vertically.
Chord Separate allows you to separate chords
by a given clock interval to create "instant
arpeggios."
File Include allows you to combine 2 songs into
a new song; additional parts can then be
added to this new song.
Spot Extract allows you to remove all data in a
specific range.
The QX3 combines the professional features
of the QX1 with the ease of operation and flexibility of the QX5 . Moderately priced at
$1595.00, this newest addition to the QX series
offers the operating ease and reliability that
only a dedicated hardware sequencer can
provide.
Vol. 3 No. 8/ AFTERTOUCH
11
MEP4
Using The
MEP4 In Live
Applications.
By Scott
Plunkett.
W
ITH ITS ABILITY to solve MIDI system problems and create MIDI effects,
the MEP4 MIDI event processor has proven itself to be a great tool in studio applications.
One of the hidden strengths of the MEP4,
though, is its usefulness in live applications.
If you have never worked with the MEP4,
you will need a brief tour before you can understand what follows: The MEP4 MIDI event processor has four microprocessors, each of which
is capable of manipulating MIDI data that
appears at its MIDI IN independently. Each
microprocessor has six programmable sections,
as follows:
1) Data Presetter: This section allows you to
send a program change, a pitch bend
position, and any two controller
messages.
2) Channel Filter: This section allows you
to filter incoming channel messages so
that only certain channels are recognized. Any combination of channels may
be selected.
3) Message Filter: This section can be used
selectively-like the channel filter-to
recognize only certain MIDI messages
and ignore others.
4) Data Modifier: This section allows you to
alter MIDI messages. There are a number
of possible changes that can be made to
any selected message.
5) Delay Processor: This section can be used
to delay the MIDI output of a processor
for up to three seconds.
6) Output Assigner: This section allows you
to select the output channel and OUT
port (there are four MIDI OUT ports on
the MEP4).
Each processor can be programmed separately,
and any number of processors can be combined
to create complex effects.
To show you the usefulness of the MEP4 in
performance, I will describe a MIDI system I
recently used in a number of live shows. While
preparing the system, I encountered familiar
problems-those that are inherent to all large
MIDI systems. The MEP4 helped solve these
problems by offering alternatives that would not
have been possible otherwise.
The system consisted of two controller keyboards-a KX88 and a DX7 Il-plus a rack of
·tone generators, including a Yamaha TX816, a
sampler, and an analog synthesizer. The DX7 II
12
AITERTOUCH/Vol. 3 No.8
could also be accessed as a tone generator
through MIDI (as well as being controlled by its
own keyboard). The MIDI outputs of the two
controllers were merged together, sent to the
MEP4, and distributed to the tone generators
through a Yamaha MJC8 MIDI junction
controller.
The biggest setup problem with a system like
this is deciding how the controllers and tone
generators will be split up. That is, how can
each tone generator be addressed both separately and in a group? There are basically two
solutions to this problem: 1) Separate the tone
generators by MIDI channel; or 2) Keep all of
the tone generators on the same MIDI channel
and use key limiting or zoning to separate them.
The advantage of putting the instruments
on different MIDI channels is that you can
access the entire MIDI note range of any single
tone generator without affecting any other tone
generator. The disadvantage is that you can't
play multiple tone generators on different MIDI
channels unless your controller keyboard has
split and dual modes that will output more than
one channel at a time. Or, to put it a slightly
different way, the number of tone modules you
can address simultaneously will depend on the
number of channels your controller will output
at the same time.
The advantage of key zoning is that you can
keep all of the tone generators on the same
MIDI channel, so it's easy to address all of them
at the same time. The disadvantage is that it
isn't always easy to keep musical parts from
overlapping into adjacent zones. You must con:stantly transpose all of your voices, depending
on whether they appear in a zone on the upper
or lower part of the keyboard. And, since all of
the tone generators are on the same channel,
they all respond to the same program change,
pitch bend, and controller information.
In my case, I needed three or four separate
sounds at my disposal during some songs, but
only one main sound for others. So, I wanted a
system which would allow me to address at least
four sounds separately, but which would also
allow me to combine all of the tone generators
at times to create one of those tasteless, largerthan-life, MIDI monstrocity, sounds.
Using The MEP4 To Channelize
The solution to my problem was to divide
the system four ways (by MIDI channel), and
MEP4 MIDI et~ent processor.
let the MEP4 change the controller channel
assignments. The MIDI channel assignments
were set as follows:
Controller
KX88
DX711
Tone Generator
TX816 modules 1-4
Analog Synthesizer
TX816 modules 5-8
DX7 II
Sampler
Transmit Channel(s)
1,2
3
Receive Channel
1
1
2
3
4
With this setup in mind, let's say that you
want the KX88 to control the first four modules
of the TX816, the analog synthesizer, and the
sampler. This means that when the KX88 outputs chan nell, its output needs to be converted
to channel 1 and channel 4. Let's also say that
you want the DX7 II to play the second four
modules of the TX816, so you want to convert
the DX7 II's output from MIDI channel 3 to
channel 2.
You can use two of the MEP4 processors to
take care of the KX88. First, set the Channel
Filters so that both processors only recognize
data coming in on MIDI channel 1. This guarantees that no data from the DX7 II (which is
transmitting on MIDI channel 3) will be mistakenly sent to the wrong tone generators. You
can then set the Output Assigner on the first
processor to channel 1, and the Output
Assigner on the second processor to channel4.
Similarly, you can use a single processor to
handle the output of the DX7 II. This time, the
Channel Filter will be set to recognize data on
MIDI channel 3, and you'll use the Output Assigner to send the data out on MIDI channel 2.
The advantage of this system is that, by
using the Channel Filters and Output Assigners
on the MEP4, any of the tone modules can be
accessed in any combination by either of the
controllers. And, since the MEP4 can make
program changes (via its 60 different programs),
the relationship between the controllers and
tone modules can be chan ged as often as
necessary.
Program Changes
By using the Data Presetters on the MEP4,
you can send up to four separate program
change commands at once. This means that, by
changing a program on your controller keyboard, you can send four different program
changes on four different MIDI channels.
For instance, by pressing program number 1
on the KX88, you could make the following
changes in the system described above:
Tone
Generators
analog synth
TX816 1-4
TX816 5-8
DX7 II
Sampler
MIDI
Channel
1
1
2
3
4
Program
Change
3
3
5
2
9
The great thing about this arrangement is
that you don't have to set all of the patches for a
particular song to the same program number. If
you were accessing all of these instruments on
the same MIDI channel, they would all jump to
the same program when you made a program
change from the KX88. If you wanted to use the
same sound from a particular tone generator in
different MIDI configurations, you would be
forced to save that sound to at least two different patch memories. The MEP4 lets you
avoid this problem.
Another advantage of this system is that it is
easy to set up and modify. If you decide to mix a
group of brass sounds from different tone generators, you can easily change which sounds are
mixed by changing the programs that are called
from the Data Presetters.
Continued on page 15
Vol. 3 No. 8/ AITERTOUCH
13
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This is an MEP4 program
that I use to solve a problem
that is very similar to the one
described in the accompanying
article. The KX88 keyboard is
split, and a high string sound is
played from the lower half of
the keyboard. A slightly busier
part is being played in the right
hand. Here's a bnef description of what each processor is
doing:
Processor I sends a program
change ( 15) and volume command (07,55) to the first four
modules of the TX816 and the
analog synthesizer. This is the
sound that is being played by
the right hand on the upper
half of the KX88. The upper
half of the KX88 is transmitting on MIDI channel/, so
the Channel Filter is set to
accept only messages that
appear on this channel. All of
the messages on channel I are
recognized (Message Filter),
except for Polyphonic
Aftertouch, since the KX88
doesn't transmit this message.
The Data Modifier is used to
transpose the voice down an
octave, and the processor is set
to output on MIDI channel/.
Continued on page 15
14
AITERTOUCH/Vol. 3 No. 8
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Setup Notes, Continued.
Processor 2 sends a program
change (9) and volume command (07, 55) to the last four
modules of the TXB I6. This
is the sound that is being
played by the left hand on the
lower half of the KX88. The
lower half of the KX88 is
transmitting on MIDI channel
2, so the Channel Filter is set
to accept only messages that
appear on this channel.
Again, all of the messages on
channel 2 are recognized
except for Polyphonic
Aftertouch. The Data Modifier is used to transpose the
voice up three octaves, and the
processor is set to output on
MIDI channel2.
Processor 3 sends a program
change (I I) and volume command (07,46) to the DX7 II.
Notice that the Channel Filter
is set to receive messages on
MIDI channel2, so the DX7
II will also be playing parts
from the lower half of the
KX88 keyboard. This is a
good example of how the
MEP4 allows you to use more
than one· tone generator to
play the same part. The Message Filter of processor 3 is set
differently than that of the first
two processors. In addition to
filtering out Polyphonic
Aftertouch, the processor is
filtering out Control Changes
(the ' ' ' ' means that all
Control Changes are ignored). The reason for this is
that processor 4 wiU be used to
modify Control Change messages for the DX7 II. The
Data Modifier moves the
voice up three octaves, and the
data is sent out on MID I
channel3.
Processor 4 is normally
reserved for the sampler in my
setup. Since the sampler isn't
being used here, the processor
is being put to a different use.
Once again, the Channel Filter is set to receive only channel2. The Message Filter only
recognizes Control Channel
messages. The Data Modifier
then offsets the volume message (Bn, 07) by -20, and
the processor sends data out
on MIDI channel 3. Basically, this setup is used to keep
the DX7 II's volume mixed
down in relation to that of the
last four modules of the
TX8I6.
Continued from page 13
Transposing Voices
In live performance, you are often forced to
play parts on the lower part of the keyboard
that, ideally, should be located on the upper
part of the keyboard. For instance, if there is a
fairly busy right hand part that has to be played
at the same time as a high string line, the string
line will end up being played by the left hand on
the lower part of the keyboard. Unless you want
that high string part to sound like a 'cello part,
you will have to transpose the string voice. In
addition, if you want to use the same string
voice with four different transpositions during a
show, you would need to store four different versions of the same sound for each affected tone
generator.
The Data Modifiers in the MEP4 can take
care of this problem. This sort of change is very
simple, but requires some knowledge of MIDI
messages. If you normally go glassy-eyed when
dealing with technical things, don't panic. You
can save yourself a lot of time and work by
learning just a few of the most useful messages.
In order to transpose a voice, you need to
modify a MIDI Note On message. This message
consists of three bytes (bytes, bits, and all of
those other computer terms aren't really important to the musical applications we are talking
about here-The MEP4 owners manual explains
most of these terms if you would like to know
more about them). The Note On message looks
like this:
9n,xx,yy
The first byte- "9n" -is called the status byte.
Very simply, the "9" says that "This is a Note
On message," while the "n" represents the
MIDI channel that the message is in. The first
data byte- "xx" -corresponds to the MIDI note
number: It tells the tone generator which note
to play (and is the byte we will want to change
to transpose the voice). The second data byte"yy"-indicates how hard the note is played,
and is called the velocity byte.
With the MEP4's Data Modifier, you can
use the Offset feature to add or subtract a fixed
value to either "xx" or "yy." If you Offset the
"xx" byte (the MIDI note number) of a Note
On message, you will transpose the voice.
Now, here comes the payoff of this little
MIDI lesson. In the case of our string line example, let's say we want to transpose the voice up
three octaves. Since adding 12 to a note num-
ber will move it up an octave, we can transpose
a voice up 3 octaves by setting an "xx" Offset of
+ 36. [NOTE: Not all keyboards use the same
system of sending Note Off messages. If you run
into a problem with the dreaded stuck-note syndrome, you may have to use one of the MEP4's
other processors to offset the Note Off
messages.]
You can also use the idea outlined above to
offset volume. The Data Presetter sends a onetime-only volume command when an MEP4
program is selected, but if you move a MIDI volume pedal, all of the tone generators will jump
to the same volume. Normally, you will want
one tone generator to have a lower volume than
the others. The tricky part is keeping the proper
mix as you change the volume with a MIDI volume pedal. By applying a volume offset with the
MEP4, you can do this.
The MIDI message for volume is as follows:
Bn,07,yy
The status byte-"Bn"-says that "This is a
MIDI Control Change message." The second
byte-"07"-indicates that this message will
control MIDI volume. The final byte-"yy"-is
the data byte, and its value will be determined
by the position of the volume pedal. The possible values for "yy" are 0-127.
By offsetting the value of "yy," the MEP4
can control the relative volumes between tone
generators. If you Offset "yy" by - 20 on one of
the processors, for instance, the MEP4 will
always subtract 20 from the current volume
pedal position. Whichever tone generator is
affected by this will consistently be playing at a
lower volume relative to the other tone generators. Once again, this saves you the effort of
individually modifying the volume of the
patches within the tone generators themselves.
Beating MIDI
I like to think of the MEP4 as a sort of MIDI
"Swiss Army Knife." The above examples only
begin to suggest the possible uses of the MEP4,
but they do describe some of the uses that I find
most valuable in live applications. As MIDI systems grow, they have a tendency to become unwieldy: They create restrictions that make it difficult to do all of the things you expect to be
able to do. The MEP4 can help you overcome
these restrictions, so that you can make the
most efficient use of your system.
Vol. 3 No. 8/ AITERTOUCH
15
/
Hot Tips
An SPX90 Patch For Recording Guitars And
Basses Direct
By John R. Barnes
I have a very simple SPX90 patch that works
very well for guitars and basses recorded direct. I
am just one of the many people with small 4track studios on tight budgets where direct is the
only possible way to record. I have never really
liked the direct sound of a guitar or bass, but
this patch makes the instrument sound as if it
were being played and recorded through a
miked amplifier-with better fidelity!
Start with the Early Reflection 1 preset, #5,
and use these settings:
Reader Tips
For The
SPX90,
CX5M, ffi ..Ol,
And More.
1) The FM Music Composer begins counting
voices on Part 1, then on Part 2, and so on
to Part 8.
2) After it counts 8 internal (SFG) voices-if
no MIDI voices have been counted, it will
then count up to 8 MIDI voices.
3) Once it counts any MIDI voices, all voices
after that are counted as MIDI voices.
4) Once it counts 8 MIDI voices, it won't play
any more voices after that.
TYPE: HALL
ROOM SIZE: 1. 7
LIVENESS: 4
DELAY: 10.0 ms
LPF: THRU
In other words, there are as many as 16 notes
that can be assigned to the Music Composer's 8
Parts, if you keep the above scheme in mind.
This is how you can make this scheme work
for you:
SPX90 digital multi-effects
processor.
I use four different versions of this patch (depending on the mood I'm in), but this is my
favorite. Other users might like to try the
"Plate" and increase the room size. The balance
should be set from about 30% to 40% effect.
Create Sequences With 16,Note Polyphony
Using The CX5M Music Composer Cartridge
By Boyd Stamey
There is a way to use the FM Music Composer Cartridge programs ( YRM 101 and
YRM501) to create sequences up to 16 notes
wide. You can play up to 8 voices with the
CX5M's internal tone module (SFG01 or
SFG05) and 8 more independent notes on a
MIDI synthesizer. The secret lies in the way you
assign MIDI channels to the parts.
As explained in the Music Composer manual, you can simply double the parts played via
the FM Music Composer by assigning them to a
16
AFfERTOUCH!Vol. 3 No.8
MIDI channel and having a MIDI synthesizer
play the same part. This is good, but I wanted to
be able to play additional parts via MIDI. Well,
there is a way, but you have to understand how
the FM Music Composer counts voices to take
advantage of it. Here is the scheme:
1) Assign parts to be played only by the CX5M
to Part 1, then Part 2, and so on.
2) If any of these parts are to be doubled by the
MIDI synthesizer, assign them to the next
available higher numbered Parts.
3) Assign the parts to be played only by the
MIDI synthesizer to the remaining Part
numbers as needed.
Here is an example using the CX5M's 8
internal voices and a completely independent
set of 8 other voices being played by a MIDI
synthesizer:
PART 1:
PART 2:
PART 3:
PART 4:
PART 5:
PART 6:
PART 7:
BASS
BRASS
PIANO
FLUTE
STRINGS
SYNTH
GUITAR
(poly= 1)
(poly=3)
(poly=3)
(poly= 1)
(poly= 3) MOON= 1; VOL= 0
(poly= 3) MOON= 2; VOL= 0
(poly=2) MOON=3; VOL=O
Parts 1 through 4 will be played only by the
CX5M voices (for a total of 8 voices), and Parts
5 through 7 will be played only by the external
MIDI synthesizer-an FB-01 would be ideal for
this application-for an additional 8 voices.
Now let's say that we want to double the
MIDI synthesizer SYNTH part with the CX5M
BRASS part. We need to change the order of
the parts, or we will lose some of the voices on
the highest tracks. If, for example, we simply
assign a MIDI channel to Part 2 and delete Part
6, we will have the following: By the time we
get to Part 5, the FM Music Composer will have
counted seven MIDI voices, leaving only one
voice-and we need four. (Remember, once .the
program counts one MIDI voice, all subsequent
voices are counted as MIDI voices.)
Creating Subtle Harps Voices With The FB01
By Don F. Hill
I use an FB-01 FM tone module with my
Yamaha ME- 50 organ. The FB module has three
harp voices: 3-28 Harp, 7125 Harp2, and 7126
Harp3. I was dissatisfied with these. They didn't
sound the way harps ought to sound, especially
in a glissando-where a harpist runs his or her
hands over a series of strings, leaving them
vibrating. On a keyboard instrument, one can
try to produce a glissando effect, but the "plucking" and "snapping" of the strings doesn't sound ,
right.
Without other means of voicing, it occurred
to me to try to create better harp sounds using
voices already at hand in the FB-01. This could
be done by stacking in the Configuration mode.
I started with the 3/28 Harp voice on
Instrument # 1, channel 1, with 4 notes assigned as the maximum level of 127. I like the
harp set down one octave (- 1) on my upper
organ keyboard manual, since the lower harp
strings are the usual ones we hear. To modify
this basic sound, I tried to increase the plucked
effect, and found that if I set instrument #2 on
channel 1 also and gave it 3 notes, I was left
with 1 note for Instrument #3 (on channel l)
for another voice. It turned out that both were
needed.
On Instrument #2, I experimented until I
located 7I 18 PluckGt. At a level of 116, with
octave at 0 and detune at + 10, this addition
gave a bit more pluck to the harp string sound.
On Instrument #3, the voice added was the 7 I
22 Lute, also at level 116 and octave 0.
This combined harp sound seems much
more harp-like to me, and one can run a finger
over an octave of keys, holding the last by aiming at it as one's finger glides-this causes a glis-
FB-0 1 FM digiwl tone
module.
sando effect with more plucking sounds of
strings, the way a harpist catches them along
the way up or down a glissando.
For the sound of a softer harp, the same
Configuration can be used; but instead of 7122
Lute on Instrument #3, use the 7124 SftHarp.
The above two Configurations are much
alike, both recreating the sound of the harp's
lower strings. For the higher harp strings, a
third Configuration is needed, as follows: For
Instrument # 1, keep the 3/28 Harp set at volume 12 7 and octave - 1 as before. Add 7I 2 7
SftKoto on Instrument #2, with a level of 110,
octave ofO, and detune of+ 10. On Instrument
#3, add 7124 SftHarp at level 116. Somehow,
this combination produces a higher sound, even
though the Instrument # 1 harp voice hasn't
changed. Evidently, the SftKoto creates the
effect.
These settings will give you three additional
harp voices on your FB-0 1. They can all be
stored as Configurations; or, you can store just
the first one as a Configuration, and make the
slight changes that create the other two setups
manually.
Setting Up An AlB Balance Control For The
DX7 II In Voice Mode
By Eugene Beer
After playing with my new DX7 II for a couple of weeks, I began to wish that it had an AlB
balance control to set the patch balance for
tone generators A and B in Dual and Split
modes. This capability is provided for in Performance mode, but that requires one to decide in
advance what pairs of patches are to be stored
together in Performance memory. I have 64
Single patches, and, on the spur of the moment, I want to be able to hear any one of them
paired with any other with adjustable balance.
Continued on page 20
Vol. 3 No. 8/ AITERTOUCH
17
Questions
Answers To
Questions From
Readers. By
Tom Darter.
I own a TX81Z, which I use primarily with my
QXl. Is there any way of accessing the Performance patches via MIDI Program Changes? It
seems that Program Changes only call up the
Internal and ROM Voice patches.
The TX8IZ's MIDI Program Change parameter has three basic settings-Off, Common,
and Individual-which determine how the unit
will respond to Program Change messages:
Off: The TX81Z ignores MIDI Program
Change messages.
Common: The TX8IZ looks up the corresponding Voice Number or Performance Number
in its Program Change memory, and reacts
accordingly.
Individual: The TX8IZ's "instruments" receive
Program Changes separately (over the assigned MIDI channels), and each looks up
its Voice Number from the Program Change
Table. If the Table entry is a Performance
Number, it is ignored.
The TX81Z's internal memory contains 4
banks of 32 permanent (ROM) Voice memories, I bank of 32 programmable (RAM) Voice
memories, and I bank of 24 programmable
(RAM) Performance memories. In the Program
Change Table, these memory locations appear
as follows:
Memory Bank
RAM: Voice Bank I (1-32)
ROM: Voice Bank A (1-32)
ROM: Voice Bank B (1-32)
ROM: Voice Bank C (1-32)
ROM: Voice Bank D (1-32)
RAM: Performances (1-24)
Abbreviation
I01-I32
A01-A32
B01-B32
COI-C32
D01-D32
PF01-PF24
When shipped from the factory, the
TX8IZ's Program Change parameter is set to
"Common," and the factory defined Program
Change Table assigns the available Program
Change numbers (1-128) as follows:
Program Change
Number
1-32
33-64
65-96
97-128
TX81 Z Program
Number
I01-I32
A01-A32
BOI-B32
C01-C32
In order to call up Performance memories
using MIDI Program Change messages, you
18
AITERTOUCH/Vol. 3 No.8
need to program the TX81Z's Program Change
Table accordingly. The most straightforward
approach involves setting the TX81Z to
respond to MIDI Program Change numbers 124 by calling up Performances 1-24. To do so,
follow these steps:
1) Press the Utility button.
2) Press the left and right Parameter keys until
the LCD reads as follows:
UTILITY MODE
Midi Control?
3) Press the + I /YES button to access the
MIDI parameters.
4) Press the ~ight Parameter key (12 times) until the LCD reads:
UT MIDI CONTROL
Edit P.Cng Tbl?
5) Press the
now read:
+ 1/YES button. The LCD will
UT MIDI CONTROL
PGM 1
I01
6) Press and hold the + 1I INC button until the
LCD reads as follows:
UT MIDI CONTROL
PGM 1 = PF01
7) Press the right parameter button. The LCD
will now read:
UT MIDI CONTROL
PGM 2
I01
8) Press and hold the + 1/INC button until the
LCD reads as follows:
UT MIDI CONTROL
PGM 2 = PF02
Continue the above process until you have
assigned PF01-PF24 (the TX8IZ's Performance
memories) to Program Change numbers I-24 in
the unit's Program Change Table. These Table
settings are stored as part of the TX81Z's System
Setup memory, and will be retained in the unit
even when the power is turned off.
Continued on page 19
My basic setup consists of a DX7 and a Korg
DW-8000. When I MIDI the two together,
the DX7 is the master keyboard, and both
units are set to MIDI channel!. When I need
to disconnect the two (so that they play independently), I simply change the Korg to
MIDI channel 2. When I do this, though, the
last notes or chords continue to ring out of the
Korg. The only way to stop this is to hit the
"Write" button on the Korg (which resets its
circuitry). What gives?
The basic MIDI messages for a note played
on a keyboard consist of two parts: A Note On
(transmitted when you press down a key) and a
Note Off (transmitted when you let go of a
key).
If you hold down a chord on your DX7 when
the Korg is set to receive on MIDI channel 1, it
receives the Note On messages for the notes in
the chord from the DX7; however, if you
change the Korg to MIDI channel 2 while you
are still holding the chord on the DX7, the Korg
will not receive the Note Off messages when
you let go of the chord on the OX's keyboard.
The Note Off messages are still being sent on
MIDI channel 1 by the OX, but the Korg is now
set to MIDI channel 2.
The solution is simple: Always make sure
that you are not holding down any keys on the
DX7 when you change the Korg from MIDI
channel 1 to MIDI channel 2. Let go of the
chord first {which will cause the DX7 to send
Note Off messages to the Korg), and then
change the Korg's MIDI channel setting.
This is not an isolated situation caused by
your particular combination of instruments-it
is universal to all MIDI keyboards. The MIDI
slave unit must receive Note Off commands
before you change its MIDI channel assignment; otherwise, you will be left with the infamous "stuck note" syndrome.
TET US HEAR FROM YOU! We want AfterTouch to be an information network
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By the way, we cannot assume liability for the safe return of unused ideas,
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Vol. 3 No. 81 AFTERTOUCH
19
AFTERTOUCH
P.O. Box 7938
Northridge, CA 91327~ 7938
Hot Tips
Continued from page 17
This would require 4096 Performance memories
to set the pairs of patches up in advance, assigning balance to CS 1.
Fortunately, there is a way to achieve A/B
balance control while not in Performance
mode. It requires editing MIDI IN Control Volume in each of the voices for which Dual mode
operation is desired. Once this parameter is
changed, it is important to note that these
voices will not sound at all in Single or Dual
modes unless a MIDI cable is used as described
below. Follow these steps:
1) Connect the MIDI OUT of the DX7 II to its
own MIDI IN. (If the OX is controlling
another tone generator, connect the MIDI
OUT of the OX to the MIDI IN of the tone
generator, and connect the MIDI THRU of
the tone generator to the MIDI IN of the
OX.)
2) Press the Edit button, and then press the
20
AITERTOUCH!Vol. 3 No. 8
MIDI 1 button (31) until you access the
MIDI IN display; set the MIDI Control
Number of CS1 to 11, and set the MIDI
Control Number of CS2 to 12. (Note that
this and the next step involve global
changes.)
3) Using the MIDI 1 button (31), access the
display that includes the "Local" parameter,
and set Local to OFF (or you will only get 4note polyphony from the OX in Dual mode).
4) Edit all of the Voice memories that you think
you might want in Dual or Split combinations as follows: Using Voice Edit button 26,
set the MIDI IN Control parameter to a
value of 99.
Now, when you call up any of these voices in
the Dual or Split Voice modes, CS1 will control
the volume of Voice A, while CS2 will control
the volume of Voice B.