Operating Manual
BTR-240
TR-240
Wireless Intercom System
Thank you from Bosch
We, at Bosch Security Systems, Inc, would like to take this opportunity to thank you for choosing the RTS
BTR-240 Wireless Intercom System. Many of the features in this product are the result of years of
development work with many of the features developed from customer feedback. We hope that your
experience with this product is a pleasant one and hope to provide you with a continuing line of RTS
products well into the future. In order to get the most out of your new wireless intercom system, please take a
few moments to look through this operating manual before using the product for the first time.
Proprietary Notice
The product information and design disclosed herein were
originated by and are the property of Bosch Security Systems,
Inc. Bosch reserves all patent, proprietary design,
manufacturing, reproduction, use and sales rights thereto, and to
any article disclosed therein, except to the extent rights are
expressly granted to others.
Copyright Notice
Copyright 2011 by Bosch Security Systems, Inc. All rights
reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without prior
written permission from Bosch is prohibited.
All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.
Warranty and Service Information
For warranty and service information, refer to the appropriate
web site below:
RTS Intercoms.......................www.rtsintercoms.com/warranty
•
•
•
RTS Digital
RTS TW
Audiocom
RadioCom...........................www.telexradiocom.com/warranty
Headsets ........................www.intercomheadsets.com/warranty
Customer Support
Technical questions should be directed to:
Customer Service Department
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
12000 Portland Avenue South
Burnsville, MN 55337 U.S.A.
Telephone: 800-863-4169
Fax: 800-323-0498
Info@rtsintercoms.com
Technical Questions EMEA
Bosch Security Systems Technical Support EMEA
http://www.rtsintercoms.com/contact_main.php
Disclaimer
The manufacturer of the equipment described herein makes no
expressed or implied warranty with respect to anything
contained in this manual and shall not be held liable for any
implied warranties of fitness for a particular application or for
any indirect, special, or consequential damages.The
information contained herein is subject to change without prior
notice and shall not be construed as an expressed or implied
commitment on the part of the manufacturer.
-i-
Table of Contents
Section 1 Introduction . . . . . . . .
General Description . . . . .
System Features . . . . . . .
Important Safety Instructions
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1-1
1-1
1-1
1-2
Section 2 BTR-240 Base Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Controls and Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Technical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Section 3 TR-240 Beltpack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Controls and Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Technical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Section 4 Initial Equipment Setup. . . .
Unpacking . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating for the First Time . . .
Battery Installation and Removal
Battery Charging Instructions . .
Beltpack Direct Charge . .
CHG-240 Quick Charge .
Beltclip Installation. . . . . . . .
Antenna Connection . . . . . . .
Antenna Polarization . . . . . . .
Antenna Placement . . . . . . . .
BTR-240 Base Station . .
TR-240 Beltpack . . . . .
Improving Range and Reception .
System Quick Start Guide . . .
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4-1
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-2
4-2
4-2
4-2
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-4
4-5
Section 5 BTR-240 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . .
Basic Operation Description . . . . . . . . .
Powering the Base Station . . . . . . . . . .
Boot Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start-up Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Status Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RF Channel Selection . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local Headset Interface . . . . . . . . . . .
Talk Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Channel Select Button . . . . . . . .
Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Microphone Gain and Sidetone Level
Squelch Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
External Audio Interface Settings . . . . . .
2-Wire Intercom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Echo Cancellation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-Wire (Matrix) Intercom . . . . . . . . . .
Auxiliary Input / Output . . . . . . . . . . .
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5-1
5-1
5-1
5-1
5-1
5-2
5-2
5-2
5-2
5-2
5-2
5-3
5-3
5-4
5-4
5-7
5-7
5-8
-ii-
Speaker Output . . . . . .
ClearScan . . . . . . . . .
Lockout . . . . . . . . . .
Software Version . . . . .
Contrast . . . . . . . . . .
System Restore . . . . . .
BTR-240 Menu Structure.
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5-10
5-12
5-12
5-12
5-12
5-12
5-14
Section 6 TR-240 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Basic Operation Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Powering the Beltpack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local Headset Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Channel Select Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Talk button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Microphone Gain Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sidetone Level Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mode of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wireless Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wired Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Master Wireless Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Low Battery Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mode Identification / Software Version . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using TR-240 Beltpacks as Replacements for TR-24 Beltpacks
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6-1
6-1
6-1
6-1
6-1
6-1
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-3
6-3
6-3
6-4
6-4
Section 7 System Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wireless Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wireless Capacity Limit . . . . . . . .
Wired Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wired Capacity Limit . . . . . . . . . .
Wireless and Wired Mixed-Mode . . . . . . .
Set-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mixed-Mode Capacity Limit . . . . . .
Master Wireless Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Master Wireless Mode Capacity Limit .
Tour Group Example . . . . . . . . . .
Linking Multiple Base Stations . . . . . . . .
Cell-Type Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Channel Spacing and Utilization . . . .
Separation Distance and Antenna Gain .
Type of Environment . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for Deployment Optimization
with Multiple BTR-240s . . . . . . . .
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7-1
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-2
7-2
7-2
7-2
7-2
7-3
7-3
7-4
7-4
7-4
7-5
7-5
7-5
7-6
7-6
BTR-240s Linked via Ethernet.
BTR-240s Linked via 2-Wire .
BTR-240s Linked via 4-Wire .
Network Requirements . . . . .
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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
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7-7
7-8
7-8
7-9
Section 8 User Configuration Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Computer Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Logging into a Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Menu Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enter New Login Password . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display/Edit Audio Encryption Key . . . . . . . .
Display/Change Squelch Setting (TR-240 only) . .
Enable/Disable Full-Duplex (TR-240 only) . . . .
Enable/Disable Out of Range Alert (TR-240 only) .
Display/Edit IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display/Edit SSID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enable/Disable 802.11 WEP Encryption . . . . . .
Display/Edit WEP Encryption Key . . . . . . . . .
Display Device MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . .
Enable/Disable MAC Filtering . . . . . . . . . . .
Display/Edit MAC Filter List . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enable/Disable Beacon Broadcast . . . . . . . . .
Exit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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8-1
8-1
8-1
8-2
8-3
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-5
8-5
8-5
8.5
8-5
8-5
8-5
8-6
Section 9 Maintenance and Care .
Li-Ion Batteries. . . . . . .
Battery Care . . . . . . . .
Long Term Battery Storage
Battery Transportation . . .
Cleaning . . . . . . . . . .
Temperature and Humidity.
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9-1
9-1
9-1
9-1
9-1
9-1
9-1
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Section 10 RF Channels and Interference . .
802.11 RF Channels . . . . . . . . .
802.11 “Non-overlapping” Channels .
CSMA-CA . . . . . . . . . . .
Data vs. Real time Audio . . .
802.11 Wireless / RF Interference . .
Wired / Network Interference. . . . .
Section 11 Hardware Specifications
2-Wire. . . . . . . . . . . .
Local Headset . . . . . . . .
4-Wire. . . . . . . . . . . .
Auxiliary Input . . . . . . .
Auxiliary Output . . . . . .
Speaker Output . . . . . . .
Program . . . . . . . . . . .
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10-1
10-1
10-2
10-2
10-2
10-3
10-4
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11-1
11-1
11-2
11-2
11-2
11-3
11-3
11-3
-iv-
Section 12 Troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1
Section 13 Regulatory Information . .
FCC and Industry Canada . . .
EU Compliance Information . .
China Compliance Information .
Japan Compliance Information .
Korea Compliance Information .
EU Declaration of Conformity .
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13-1
13-1
13-2
13-3
13-4
13-4
13-5
Section 14 Accessories and Replacement Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-1
Section 15 Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-1
-v-
Section 1 - Introduction
General Description
System Features
The RTS BTR-240 is a digital, multi-channel, wireless intercom
system offering reliable and secure, full-duplex communication
with up to 8 wireless TR-240 beltpacks and almost an unlimited
number of half-duplex beltpacks.
•
Uses the widely adopted 2.4GHz IEEE 802.11 WLAN
technology.
•
No FCC license required and no license required in most
countries world-wide.
•
•
Multi-level wireless security and audio encryption.
•
Two audio intercom channels to be used independently or
simultaneously.
•
Up to 8 wireless full-duplex TR-240 beltpacks per base station
and nearly an unlimited number of half-duplex beltpacks.
•
•
Multiple options for antenna connections and accessories.
•
BTR-240 base stations and BTR-24 access points can be
linked together to provide a wider wireless coverage area.
•
Compatible with RTS, Audiocom, Clear-Com, and other
wired intercom types.
•
•
Auto selection of Electret or Dynamic microphones.
•
A TR-240 beltpack can be configured to serve as an access
point for other beltpacks in the absence of a base station.
•
•
Durable, ABS, beltpack case.
Operating in the 2.4 GHz frequency band, the BTR-240 system
uses the widely adopted IEEE 802.11 technology and is approved
for license free use in most countries. The system also incorporates
ClearScan intelligence which will automatically select the optimal
radio frequency (RF) channel for communication.
The RTS BTR-240 has the ability to configure multi-level 802.11
wireless security features, such as packet encryption and MAC
address filtering, as well as 64-bit audio encryption to provide a
highly secure wireless intercom system.
The BTR-240 offers two audio channel operation, allowing users to
select between two individual audio channels of communication.
The system permits users to talk and listen, or listen only, to any
individual audio channel or both channels simultaneously.
The BTR-240 is perfectly suited for stand-alone operation and
can also interface with two-wire intercom systems including
RTS, Audiocom (Telex), and Clear-Com1, as well as four-wire
intercom systems such as the RTS Matrix. The BTR-240 allows
both the two-wire and four-wire intercoms to be used
simultaneously. In addition to the external intercom interfaces,
the BTR-240 also provides connectivity for auxiliary balanced
audio input and output, and speaker output.
The TR-240 beltpacks have the ability to be configured in one of
three operating modes: wireless, wired or master wireless. In
wireless (normal) mode, beltpacks communicate to each other
using the base station as a relay. In wired mode, beltpacks turn off
their wireless ability and communicate via an Ethernet cable or
through a building's existing Ethernet infrastructure. In master
wireless mode, a beltpack itself acts as a mobile access point to
provide wireless coverage for other beltpacks to communicate
without an actual BTR-240 base station.
ClearScan intelligence to automatically select the best RF
channel to operate.
Easy to read LCD display that indicates the number of active
full-duplex TR-240 beltpacks.
TR-240 beltpacks can be easily configured to communicate
either wired or wireless.
Removable, dependable, rechargeable, wide temperature
range, Li-Ion batteries with low battery indicator.
The TR-240 beltpack has a removable Li-Ion battery pack that
will provide up to 8 hours of uninterrupted operation. The battery
pack can be charged directly in the case by plugging a power
adapter into the beltpack or by placing the battery in the CHG-240
four-bay charger.
1
See “Copyright Notice” on page i.
1-1
Important Safety Instructions
Prior to operation, read and follow all safety instructions.
Throughout this manual, the following notations are used:
WARNING:
Indicates a situation which, when not avoided,
has the potential to result in death or severe
injury.
CAUTION:
Indicates a situation which, when not avoided,
has the potential to cause the system to no longer
function properly or cause equipment damage.
NOTE:
Indicates important additional information.
WARNING:
To reduce the risk of fire or electrical shock, adhere to the
following instructions:
•
Do not expose the system components to rain or
moisture.
•
Always connect the BTR-240 base station to a main
socket outlet having a protective earth ground
connection.
•
Ensure that the power cords are in a safe and secure
place that is protected from being walked on or
pinched.
•
Do not remove the cover or product casing. All
technical service must be performed by qualified
service personnel.
WARNING:
Excessive sound pressure from headsets can cause hearing
loss! The duration of exposure to high volumes must be
shortened to reduce the chance of hearing damage. Signs of
prolonged exposure to excessive audio levels include:
•
•
Ringing sounds heard in ears.
Can no longer hear high frequency tones, if only for a
short time.
WARNING:
Only use the BP-240 battery pack as a replacement battery. A
risk of personal injury and equipment damage exists if the
battery is replaced with an incorrect type.
1-2
Section 2 - BTR-240 Base Station
Controls and Connections - Front Panel
10 1
2 3
4
6
5
BTR-240
menu
set
RF Ch: 6
Assoc: 0
7 8 9
CHANNEL
SELECT
10
TALK
1
2W:1&2
4W:1&2
AuxIn:1&2L
AuxOut:1&2G
2
POWER
VOLUME
Figure 2-1
BTR-240 Front View
1.
Power on/off switch – turns the power on/off to the
BTR-240.
2.
<MENU> button – used to navigate the menu options on
the LCD.
3.
<SET> button – used to navigate the menu and select
options on the LCD.
4.
Backlit Graphics LCD (liquid crystal display).
5.
<UP> and <DOWN> buttons – used to navigate the
menu options on the LCD.
6.
<VOLUME> control knob – controls the volume for the
local headset.
7.
<CHANNEL SELECT> button – controls the intercom
channel to which the local headset is connected. Each
press of the button changes the connection and cycles
between: Intercom 1, Intercom 2, and both. The
corresponding LEDs will illuminate.
8.
<TALK> button – press to enable/disable the audio path
from the local headset. The green LED above the <TALK>
button will illuminate when active.
9.
Local Headset Connector – standard 4-pin XLR
connector. Male XLR connector for Telex units, female
XLR connector for RTS units. A dynamic or electret
headset microphone is automatically detected by the base
station and a bias voltage is supplied if necessary.
10. Antenna Mount Knockouts – remove as desired to
mount the antennas on the front panel instead of the rear
panel via coaxial cables.
2-1
Controls and Connections - Rear Panel
13
11 12
BTR-240
PROGRAM
10 26
MADE IN USA
PUSH
Illlll ll lllll lll lll llllllllllllllll llll lll llll lllll
Illllllll llllll llllllllllllll lllllllllll llll lllllllllll
Illlllllllllll llll llll lll llll lllll lll llllllllll lll
Illlll lllllllllll llll llllll ll llll lll llll lllll
Illlll lll
Illlllllll ll lll
S.N. 00000
TX
INTERCOM 2
INTERCOM 1
BTR-240
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
2 WIRE
AUDIO
PUSH
2 WIRE
PUSH
AUDIO
18 19
AUXILARY
AUDIO
12/15/VDC
1.5A
4 WIRE
4 WIRE
lll ll lllllll
ll lllll lllllll
17
16
15
14
RX
SPEAKER
INPUT
IP: 192.168.1.1
OUTPUT
Figure 2-2
BTR-240 Rear View
11.
Transmit Antenna – reverse “TNC” connector.
12.
Programming Input – RJ-45 jack used for wired
Ethernet connections, configuration, and to update
firmware.
13.
Receive Antenna – reverse “TNC” connector.
14.
Speaker Output – one 2-pin connector to attach cables
and a speaker.
15.
Intercom Channel 1 Input/Output – interface to wired
intercom system 1.
2-Wire –
male and female 3-pin XLR connectors
wired in parallel. The connectors are
switched to the appropriate intercom
configuration via the menu options.
4-Wire –
an RJ-11 jack compatible with “Matrix”
type intercom systems.
16.
2-2
Intercom Channel 2 Input/Output – interface to wired
intercom system 2.
2-Wire –
male and female 3-pin XLR connectors
wired in parallel.The connectors are
switched to the appropriate intercom
configuration via the menu options.
4-Wire –
an RJ-11 jack compatible with “Matrix”
type intercom systems.
17.
Auxiliary Input/Output – one 3-pin female XLR / ¼
inch combination input connector and one 3-pin male
XLR output connector.
18.
DC Input Jack – accepts 12-15 VDC, 1.5 Amp source
to power the base station.
19.
Chassis Ground – grounding point of the base station.
Technical Specifications - BTR-240
RF Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IEEE 802.11b (Wi-Fi)
FCC License . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No License Required
Frequency Band of Operation
North America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.412 to 2.462 GHz
Europe / China / Japan / Korea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.412 to 2.472 GHz
Transmitter Output Power (conducted)
North America. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 mW
Europe / China . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 mW
Japan / Korea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 mW/MHz
Antennas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Multiple omni and directional available
Security and Encryption Technology
802.11 Wi-Fi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40-bit and 104-bit WEP
Audio Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64-bit DES
Number of full-duplex beltpacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Number of half-duplex beltpacks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unlimited2
Audio Frequency Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350 Hz to 3800 Hz3
Dynamic Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ³ 62 dB4
Local Headset Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 mW into 300W
4-Wire Input / Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Level Adjustable (2 Vrms typical)
RTS 2-Wire Intercom Input / Output . . . . . . . . Level Adjustable (0.775 Vrms typical), Line impedance 200W
AudioCom 2-Wire Intercom Input / Output . . . . . . Level Adjustable (1 Vrms typical), Line impedance 300W
ClearCom 2-Wire Intercom Input / Output . . . . . . . Level Adjustable (1 Vrms typical), Line impedance 200W
Auxiliary Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Level Adjustable (2 Vrms typical)
Auxiliary Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Level Adjustable (2 Vrms typical into 600W)
Speaker Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Level Adjustable (1 W max into 8W)
Front Panel LCD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122-32 dot matrix with adjustable contrast
Programming Port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ethernet (RJ-45)
Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 - 15 VDC, 1.5 Amps
Temperature Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -4º F to 130º F (-20º C to 55º C)
Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 RU unit, 7.5" L x 19" W x 1.75" H (191mm x 483mm x 45mm)
Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 lb. 7.5 oz (1.58 kg)
1
2
3
With no interference on the RF channel of operation.
Tested with over 28 half-duplex users.
4
2-3
Measured ± 3dB.
Over the frequency range of operation.
[This page intentionally left blank]
2-4
Section 3 - TR-240 Beltpack
Controls and Connections - Top Panel
1
2 3 4 5
OFF
ON
Figure 3-1
TR-240 Beltpack
Top View
1.
On/Off & Volume Control – turns the beltpack power
on/off and controls headset volume.
2.
Battery Light –
4.
The active intercom channel light will remain
illuminated when the microphone path is enabled. The
active intercom channel light will blink when the
microphone path is disabled.
GREEN
= Battery OK
YELLOW = Battery Low (~15 mins. of use left)
RED
= Battery Low (battery needs charge)
3.
<TALK> Button – press to enable/disable the audio
path from the headset microphone.
5.
Channel <1> “Green” Button and Light – selects the
“Channel 1” intercom. The green light next to the button
will illuminate upon selection.
3-1
Channel < 2 > “Blue” Button and Light – selects the
“Channel 2” intercom. The green light next to the button
will illuminate upon selection.
Controls and Connections - Bottom Panel
6 7
8
9
OFF
Figure 3-2
TR-240 Beltpack
Bottom View
6.
Charge Jack – used to charge the Li-Ion battery.
Accepts a 5.5mm x 2.5mm plug with the center positive.
Must be supplied with a 12VDC regulated power supply
with at least a 400mA current capacity.
7.
Charge Light –
RED
GREEN
= Beltpack battery is charging.
= Beltpack battery is charged.
3-2
8.
Headset Connector – standard 4-pin XLR connector.
Male XLR connector for Telex units, female XLR
connector for RTS units. A dynamic or electret
microphone headset is automatically detected by the
beltpack and a bias voltage is supplied if necessary.
9.
Programming Input – this RJ-45 jack is used for wired
Ethernet connections, configuration, and to update
firmware.
Technical Specifications - TR-240
RF Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IEEE 802.11b (Wi-Fi)
FCC License . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No License Required
Frequency Band of Operation
North America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.412 to 2.462 GHz
Europe / China / Japan / Korea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.412 to 2.472 GHz
Transmitter Output Power (conducted)
North America / Europe / China . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 mW
Japan / Korea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 mW/MHz
Antennas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Dipoles
Security and Encryption Technology
802.11 Wi-Fi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40-bit and 104-bit WEP
Audio Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64-bit DES
Number of full-duplex beltpacks (TR-240 in master mode) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91,2
Number of half-duplex beltpacks (TR-240 in master mode) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unlimited3
Audio Frequency Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350 Hz to 3800 Hz4
Dynamic Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ³ 62 dB5
Local Headset Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 mW into 300W
Programming Port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ethernet (RJ-45)
Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Li-Ion Rechargeable (BP-240)
Battery Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Up to 8 hours
Battery Recharge Time
via TR-240 beltpack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~ 8 hours
via CHG-240 four-bay charger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~ 2½ hours
Low Battery Indication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~15 minutes of battery life left
Temperature Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -4º F to 130º F (-20º C to 55º C)
Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ¾" L x 3 ¾" W x 5 ¼" H (45mm x 95mm x 133 mm)
Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.9 oz (0.37 kg)
1
4
2
5
With no interference on the RF channel of operation.
Total number of full-duplex beltpacks include (8) wireless and (1) master.
3
Tested with over 28 half-duplex users.
3-3
Measured ±3dB.
Over the frequency range of operation.
[This page intentionally left blank]
3-4
Section 4 - Initial Equipment Setup
Unpacking
The battery pack is designed to fit only one way in the TR-240
beltpack. Be certain that the gold contacts on the battery align
with the contacts on the beltpack. When inserted correctly, the
battery locking mechanism will “click” and the battery will not be
able to slide out.
Unpack the RTS System and retrieve the Package Contents list.
Verify that all contents have been received according to the
Package Contents list. Also, ensure that none of the system
components have acquired any damage.
Contact the shipper or dealer immediately if anything is damaged
or missing.
To remove the battery pack, simply slide the battery locking
mechanism as indicated by the arrow to release the lock. At this
point, the battery will be free to slide out and be removed from the
beltpack
Operating for the First Time
After unpacking, ensure that all the BTR-240 and TR-240
devices do not have the same IP address. If so, refer to the "User
Configuration" section in this operating manual for instructions
on how to change the IP address.
Push
Down
Prior to use, the TR-240 beltpacks should always have their
batteries fully charged. Refer to the "Battery Charging
Instructions" in this section of the operating manual.
The capacity, or number of allowable full-duplex beltpacks, is
dependent upon the environment in which the system is used.
When operating for the first time, it is recommended that only a
few beltpacks are used to verify the system operation. Once
communication has been verified with a few beltpacks, more can
be added.
Figure 4-2
Unlocking Battery Mechanism on TR-240
Battery Charging Instructions
Prior to use, the BP-240 battery packs should be fully charged.
The battery packs can be charged either directly in the TR-240
beltpack via supplied wall adapter, or by using the CHG-240
four-bay quick charger.
After system operation has been initially verified, it is strongly
recommended that the user login to each of the devices and
change the audio encryption key, SSID, wireless encryption key,
or all, to something different from the factory defaults. This will
ensure that the system is unique and other nearby system devices
cannot connect and communicate. Refer to the "User
Configuration" section in this operating manual for instructions
to change these settings.
NOTE: Battery packs should always be charged in a room
temperature location.
Beltpack Direct Charge
A beltpack direct charge will require approximately 8 full hours
to completely charge a dead battery. Once charging is complete,
beltpacks may be left charging indefinitely. A beltpack can also
be used while charging via beltpack direct charge. This is
especially common for beltpacks in wired mode.
Battery Installation and Removal
The TR-240 features a removable and rechargeable Li-Ion
battery pack (Model: BP-240) that requires low maintenance and
superior performance for a wide range of temperatures. Battery
care and maintenance is further reviewed in Section 9.
1.
Ensure the TR-240 is in the “OFF” position.
2.
Plug the AC end of the supplied 12VDC wall adapter into a
standard AC wall outlet. Plug the charge connector into the
charge jack on the bottom of the beltpack.
3.
The Charge Light on the bottom of the TR-240 indicates the
battery charge status.
The BP-240 battery pack is inserted into the TR-240 beltpack by
sliding the battery in from the side.
RED
GREEN
=
=
Charging in progress
Charging is done
NOTE: Batteries may not charge completely if the beltpack is
being used while charging. Ensure that the beltpack is
in the “OFF” position to completely charge the battery
pack.
Figure 4-1
Inserting Battery into TR-240
4-1
CHG-240 Quick Charge
Antenna Connection
Charging the batteries in the CHG-240 quick charger will only
require approximately 2½ hours to completely charge a dead
battery. Once charging is complete, batteries may be left charging
indefinitely.
The BTR-24 base station is supplied with two (2) antennas for
transmitting and receiving. Both antennas are 3dBi
omni-directional (Model: RA-3) with reverse polarity TNC
connectors.
NOTE: Review the instruction booklet for the CHG-240
quickcharger prior to use.
Attach one of the antennas to the transmitter antenna jack labeled
"TX" on the rear panel. The antenna should be vertically aligned.
1.
Ensure the TR-240 is in the “OFF” position and remove the
BP-240 battery pack.
2.
Plug in the CHG-240 into a standard AC wall outlet.
Figure 4-5
Attaching Transmit Omni-directiona Antenna
Attach the second antenna to the receiver antenna jack labeled
"RX" on the rear panel. The antenna should also be vertically
aligned.
Figure 4-3
CHG-240 Quick Charge
3.
Insert the BP-240 battery pack into one of the bays on the
quick charger. The LED next to the battery bay indicates the
charge status.
YELLOW =
GREEN
=
4.
Charging in progress
Charging is done
Once the battery is completely charged, remove it from the
CHG-240 bay, install it back in a TR-240 beltpack and turn
the beltpack “ON” to resume operation.
Beltclip Installation
Figure 4-6
Attaching Receive Omni-directiona Antenna
Install the beltclip by sliding it into the beltclip connector on the
back of the TR-240 beltpack. When inserted correctly, the
beltclip locking mechanism will “click” and the beltclip will not
be able to slide out.
Antenna Polarization
The supplied antennas are vertically polarized. This means that
both the transmitting and receiving antennas should operate in the
vertical position for the best performance.
Antenna Placement
BATTERY
ON
Proper antenna placement has a significant effect on the overall
performance of the RTS Wireless Intercom System. The
following suggestions will help optimize system performance.
OFF
1
MIC
ADJ
TALK
S.T.
ADJ
TR-240
2
Figure 4-4
Inserting Beltclip into TR-240 Beltpack
NOTE: To avoid scratching the TR-240 case, lift the metal tab
as the beltclip is inserted.
4-2
BTR-240 Base Station
The supplied omni-directional antennas have a circular antenna
pattern and radiate RF signals equally in all directions. When
using the omni-directional antennas, the base station should be
located as close to the center of the wireless coverage area as
possible.
NOTE: Antennas should never be mounted on, or next to metal,
such as beams, walls with metal studs, equipment
racks, etc. This will “detune” the antennas, by altering
the antenna pattern characteristics, which can result in
noise or loss of RF signal at the base station. This also
applies to the antennas when connected directly to the
base station.
The antenna placement and separation distance for the receiver
and transmitter is not adjustable when the antennas are connected
directly to the base station on the back of the unit. If desired, the
antennas can be remotely mounted or mounted on the front panel
for a better signal path. A coax assembly with remote antennas
may be required. See the “Accessories and Replacement Parts”
section for ordering information.
NOTE: If the base station is to be located in a shielded rack
mount enclosure or other poor RF location, the
antennas must be mounted remotely with coax
assemblies. See Figure 4-7 for antenna mounting
options when using in an equipment rack.
2.
1.
Placing the BTR on top of a
shelf or equipment rack unobstructed
without remoting the antennas is OK.
3.
Placing the BTR in a shelf or
equipment rack and using
remote antennas is OK.
BTR-240
menu
set
RF Ch: 6
Assoc: 0
CHANNEL
SELECT
2
VOLUME
Telex
RF Ch: 6
Assoc: 0
Telex
Telex
BTR-240
BTR-240
set
TALK
1
2W:1&2
4W:1&2
AuxIn:1&2L
AuxOut:1&2G
POWER
menu
Placing the BTR in a shelf or
equipment rack with the antennas
mounted on the back of the BTR
or the side of the rack is NOT OK.
CHANNEL
SELECT
TALK
menu
1
2W:1&2
4W:1&2
AuxIn:1&2L
AuxOut:1&2G
set
2
POWER
RF Ch: 6
Assoc: 0
CHANNEL
SELECT
1
2W:1&2
4W:1&2
AuxIn:1&2L
AuxOut:1&2G
2
POWER
VOLUME
VOLUME
#1
#2
Figure 4-7
Equipment Rack Antenna Placement
4-3
#3
TALK
TR-240 Beltpack
Improving Reception and Increasing Range
The TR-240 beltpack contains two internal antennas which are
located on the sides of the beltpack. The beltpack should be worn
on the belt, or attached to a pocket, at the hip with the buttons
facing up. Place the beltpack in a position that allows for greatest
visibility to the BTR-240 base station antennas.
The optimal and most reliable performance will result from
keeping the distance from the base station and beltpacks as short
and unobstructed as possible.
Line-of-sight (LOS) is where the transmitters and receivers of
devices have a clear “sight” to each other, and the RF signal can
travel in a straight line between those devices. The best
performance will be obtained by having line-of-sight from the
base station to each beltpack. This can be achieved by having the
beltpack facing the base station antennas while being worn on the
belt or in a pocket.
Attempting to operate the wireless intercom system through or
around obstructions such as walls, ceilings, metal objects, etc.,
will reduce strength of the RF signal and therefore reduce system
range and performance. The human body is also considered an
obstruction to the RF signal.
The antennas that are supplied with the base station should
provide satisfactory system performance in most applications.
System range and reliability can be enhanced, however, by
remotely mounting the antennas or by using alternate antennas
that can be found in the “Accessories and Replacement Parts”
section of this manual.
NOTE: The antennas listed in the “Accessories and Replacement
Parts” section of this manual have been approved and authorized
for use with the BTR-240 base station. Using an unauthorized
antenna may be illegal.
Figure 4-8
Beltpack on Hip
NOTE: For the best RF signal path, do not allow the TR-240 to
be within 6 inches (15cm) of other objects while being
worn on the belt.
4-4
System Quick Start Guide
The following is a list to quickly get the BTR-240 base station and
wireless TR-240 beltpacks operating.
NOTE:
1.
Prir to use, the TR-240s should have their battery packs fully
charged. Refer to the “Battery Charging Instructions” in this
section.
NOTE:
While booting, avoid pressing the beltpack buttons so the mode
of operation is not changed unintentionally.
Additional setup information can be found in the "Operating for
the First Time" section of the operating manual.
Select a location for the BTR-240 base station and connect
the power cord and antennas.
•
NOTE:
When using omni-directional antennas, place the base
station as close to the center of the coverage area as
possible.
2.
Connect any desirable external audio interfaces. For
example: 2-Wire, 4-Wire, Auxiliary, Speaker, local headset.
3.
Turn on the base station.
BTR-240
CHANNEL
SELECT
TALK
set
POWER
4.
•
The menu buttons and LCD backlight illuminate and a
progress bar displays the status while the unit is booting.
•
After approximately 25 seconds, the base station will
have completed the boot cycle and the Status Screen will
be displayed.
•
Activate the connected audio interfaces by navigating
the menu on the LCD screen.
Perform a ClearScan.
•
Figure 4-9
BTR-240 Supporting 8 Wireless TR-240s
After the base station has completely booted, press and
hold the <MENU> + <SET> buttons for approximately 3
seconds.
•
5.
The base station will run the CleaerScan operation and
select the optimal RF channel for operation.
Plug headsets into the TR-240 beltpacks and turn them on,
one by one.
•
If the beltpack has not been previously set to wireless
mode, press and hold the button while the beltpack
boots.
•
•
Allow a few seconds between each beltpack power on.
•
The base station will increment the association status on
the Status Screen next to “Assoc: XX” for each of the
active full-duplex beltpacks.
VOLUME
After approximately 20 seconds, a voice prompt will
announce “wireless” in the beltpack headphones
indicating that wireless communications has started.
The BTR-240 wireless intercom system is now ready for
operation!
4-5
[This page intentionally left blank]
4-6
Section 5 - BTR-240 Operation
Powering the Base Station
The BTR-240 base station is powered from an external 12 – 15
VDC supply. The base station accepts a 5.5 mm by 2.5 mm screw
on plug. The source must supply at least 1.5 Amps.
Power the base station via the front panel switch labeled “Power”
by moving the switch to the on, “ | ”, position. Turn off the base
station by moving the switch to the off, “ O ”, position.
NOTE: The supplied power source has been approved for use
with the BTR-240. Users should only use the supplied
power source when operating the BTR-240. For
replacement power supplies, see the “Accessories and
Replacement Parts” section for ordering information.
BTR-240 Operation
Boot Screen
This section discusses the operation and features of the BTR-240
base station. This section outlines the basic operation, hardware
interfaces, and setup of the base station.
Once the power switch on the BTR-240 has been turned on, the
buttons and LCD backlights will illuminate. The base station
takes approximately 25 seconds to complete its boot cycle. While
the base station is booting, the status is indicated by a progress bar
on the LCD.
Basic Operation Description
The BTR-240 digital wireless intercom system offers one of the
most comprehensive, user friendly and versatile set of features
available in wireless intercom systems anywhere in the world.
Bosch Communications
BTR-240
The base station comes with the ClearScan intelligence which
automatically selects the optimal RF channel for communication.
Figure 5-1
Boot Progress Screen
The BTR-240 base station can accommodate up to 8 full-duplex
wireless TR-240 beltpacks. The base station may also be used
with an unlimited number of beltpacks in half-duplex operation.
Start-up Screen
The base station, via the local headset or the associated beltpacks,
allows communication with other wireless or wired users. The
2-wire and 4-wire intercoms may even be used simultaneously.
The wired audio interfaces to the base station are:
•
2-Wire (RTS, Audiocom (Telex), Clear-Com) – 2 intercom
channels
•
•
•
•
4-Wire – 2 intercom channels
Once the base station has finished booting and the progress bar
has been filled completely, the Start-up Screen will be displayed
for approximately 3 seconds. While this screen is displayed, it
will blink the software version numbers of the base station. The
first one will be shown in the lower left corner and the second in
the lower right corner of the LCD.
Auxiliary (input and output)
Speaker (output)
Bosch Communications
BTR-240
Local base station headset
A(1.0.0)
4.0
Figure 5-2
Start-up Screen
NOTE: A complete screen flowchart of the base station is
available in Figure 5-47 at the end of this section.
5-1
Status Screen
The Status Screen is the main information screen of the base
station. It displays the status of all the system items:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
4.
Use the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons to move to a different RF
channel, or press <MENU> to abort changes and display
current settings.
5.
Once the desired RF channel is flashing, press <SET> to
select and activate the channel.
6.
After the channel is set, the RF channel will stop flashing
and the LCD will pause while the wireless channel is
reconfigured. The LCD will automatically go back to the
Main Menu screen after this process is complete (return to
Step 2).
RF Channel of operation
Beltpack (full-duplex) Association
2-Wire Intercom Settings
4-Wire Intercom Settings
Auxiliary Input Settings
Auxiliary Output Settings
Speaker Setting Indicator
RF Ch: 1
Assoc: 0
NOTE: The RF channel of operation is remembered and
BTR-240 will continue to boot on the same channel
until it is set differently by the user.
2W:Off
4W:Off
AuxIn:Off
AuxOut:Off
Local Headset Interface
Figure 5-3
Status Screen
BTR-240
menu
set
RF Ch: 6
Assoc: 0
CHANNEL
SELECT
POWER
Local Headset Interface
The RF Channel Selection screen allows the user to manually
select the RF channel of operation.
Figure 5-6
Local Headset Interface
Steps to change the RF Channel:
Talk Button
1.
From the Status Screen, press <MENU> on the BTR-240
front panel.
2.
Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the cursor to
the “RF Channel” menu option, then press <SET> to select
the menu.
Press the <TALK> button on the front panel to enable the audio
path from the local headset microphone. The green LED above
the talk button will illuminate when the audio path is enabled and
will be off when the audio path is disabled. The amount of time
the button is pressed indicates how the audio path is enabled.
Momentary:
-> RF Channel
Local Headset
Squelch Settings
more....
Press and hold the <TALK> button for longer
than ½ second and the microphone path will be
enabled. When the <TALK> button is released,
the microphone path will be disabled.
Push-to-Latch: Tap the <TALK> button for less than ½ second
and the microphone path will latch and remain
enabled after the button is released. Tap the
button again to turn off the latch and disable the
microphone path.
Figure 5-4
Main Menu Screen
The RF Channel Selection Screen is now displayed. The
current RF channel will be flashing indicating that it is ready
to be modified.
Channel Select Button
Pressing the <CHANNEL SELECT> button will select the
intercom channel for the local headset. Each press of the button
will cycle through the options: Intercom 1, Intercom 2, and both.
The green LEDs above the button will illuminate for which
intercom channel is currently active for the local headset.
RF Channel
Channel: 1
2
VOLUME
RF Channel Selection
3.
TALK
1
2W:1&2
4W:1&2
AuxIn:1&2L
AuxOut:1&2G
2412 MHZ
Volume
The local headset volume is controlled from the front panel by
turning the <VOLUME> knob clockwise and counterclockwise
to increase and decrease the volume respectively.
Figure 5-5
RF Channel Selection Screen
5-2
Microphone Gain and Sidetone Level
The microphone gain controls the level of audio from the local
headset microphone path that is distributed to the external audio
interfaces and transmitted to wireless devices. The sidetone level
is the amount of a user's own voice that is fed back in the local
headset.
5.
Use the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons to move the bar level up
and down and change the corresponding audio level.
6.
When the desired level is flashing, press <SET> to select it. The
cursor and number will stop blinking indicating that the
level has been set.
7.
At this point, the user has four options.
The local headset microphone gain and sidetone levels are
adjusted by navigating to the correct menu on the LCD.
a. Press <SET> again to re-adjust the same level (return to
Step 5).
Steps to change the Microphone Gain and Sidetone Level:
1.
From the Status Screen, press <MENU> on the BTR-240
front panel.
2.
Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the cursor to
the “Local Headset” menu option, then press <SET> to
select the menu.
b. Use the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons and navigate to
another selection to modify (return to Step 4).
c. Press the <MENU> button to go back one menu screen
(return to Step 2).
d. Press and hold the <MENU> button for 1/2 second to
return directly to the Status Screen.
Squelch Level
RF Channel
-> Local Headset
Squelch Settings
more....
The squelch setting is a feature that can be enabled to reduce
noise and/or echo that is transmitted from the base station. The
squelch level is a specified level of audio that must be met, or
exceeded, in order for that audio to be transmitted. The squelch
setting effectively acts as a noise gate at the base station for the
transmitting audio.
Figure 5-7
Main Menu Screen
3.
The Local Headset Screen is now displayed with two
options, “Mic Gain” and “Sidetone”, and a bar level
indicating their current status.
->Mic Gain:
Sidetone:
For example, a squelch level of “00” is off and the base station
will transmit all audio from the base station. A very low squelch
level of “01” or “02” will transmit all audio but will reduce noise
when the intercom channels are inactive. A high squelch level of
“10” or more will prevent the base station from transmitting low
levels of audio. If two users are standing next to each other, this
will significantly reduce acoustic echo between those users.
08
08
The default squelch level is set to “01” for each intercom channel.
The squelch levels are modified by navigating to the correct
menu on the LCD.
Figure 5-8
Local Headset Screen
4.
Use the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons to navigate the cursor to
the desired setting to modify and press <SET> to select it.
Steps to change the Squelch Level:
Both the cursor and the number will flash indicating that the
level is ready to be modified.
1.
From the Status Screen, press <MENU> on the BTR-240
front panel.
2.
Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the cursor to
the “Squelch Settings” menu option, then press <SET> to
select the menu.
->Mic Gain:
Sidetone:
08
08
RF Channel
Local Headset
-> Squelch Settings
more....
Figure 5-9
Local Headset “Flash” Screen
Figure 5-10
Main Menu Screen
5-3
External Audio Interface Settings
3.
The base station can be configured to work with several different
external audio interfaces including:
The Squelch Settings Screen is now displayed with two
options “IC1 Squelch” and “IC2 Squelch” and a bar level
indicating their current status.
->IC1 Squelch:
01
IC2 Squelch:
01
•
•
•
•
•
Figure 5-11
Squelch Settings Screen
4.
2-Wire Intercom
4-Wire Intercom
Auxiliary Input
Auxiliary Output
Speaker Output
2-Wire Intercom
Use the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons to navigate the cursor to
the desired setting to modify and press <SET> to select it.
BTR-240
PROGRAM
Both the cursor and the number will flash indicating that the
level is ready to be modified.
BTR-240
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Illlll ll lllll lll lll llllllllllllllll llll lll llll lllll
Illllllll llllll llllllllllllll lllllllllll llll lllllllllll
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Illlll lllllllllll llll llllll ll llll lll llll lllll
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S.N. 00000
TX
10 26
MADE IN USA
lll ll lllllll
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RX
SPEAKER
INTERCOM 2
INTERCOM 1
PUSH
2 WIRE
L
O
O
P
AUDIO
PUSH
4 WIRE
2 WIRE
L
O
O
P
PUSH
AUDIO
AUXILARY
AUDIO
12/15/VDC
1.5A
4 WIRE
T
H
R
U
T
H
R
U
INPUT
IP: 192.168.1.1
OUTPUT
2-Wire Intercom
5.
6.
7.
Use the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons to move the bar level up
and down and change the corresponding squelch level
Figure 5-12
2-Wire Intercom
When the desired level is flashing, press <SET> to select it.
The cursor and number will stop blinking indicating that the
level has been set.
The BTR-240 base station has the ability to interface to two,
2-wire external audio intercom systems. As shown in Figure
5-12, these XLR jacks are designated as “Intercom 1” and
“Intercom 2” on the rear panel. They accept RTS, Audiocom
(Telex) and Clear-Com types of intercom systems. The hardware
specifications and pinouts for each of these intercom types will
vary. It is important to ensure that the cables are wired correctly
for proper system operation. Refer to Section 11 for the 2-wire
hardware specifications and pinouts for each of these intercom
types.
At this point, the user has four options.
a. Press <SET> again to re-adjust the same level (return to
Step 5).
b. Use the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons and navigate to
another selection to modify (return to Step 4).
c. Press the <MENU> button to go back one menu screen
(return to Step 2).
The 2-wire intercom may be used at the same time as the 4-wire
intercom.
d. Press and hold the <MENU> button for 1/2 second to
return directly to the Status Screen.
The base station does not require “wet” intercom lines for
operation. Wet intercom lines are those with D.C. voltages on
them for powering 2-wire devices. The base station will loop thru
wet intercom lines with currents up to 2 Amps.
NOTE: The squelch setting never disables the base station
wireless transmitter. The base station continues to
transmit data regardless if the squelch level is met or
exceeded.
CAUTION:
Do not loop thru more than 2 Amps of current. Damage to the
base station may occur.
CAUTION:
Only connect and remove 2-wire connections from the
BTR-240 when the settings have been turned “off”.
Operating the BTR-240 while 2-wire settings are active and
without the proper system load could result in undesirable
audio quality including potentially loud audio bursts.
5-4
Figure 5-13 shows an example of a loop thru connection of two
BTR-240 base stations with AudioCom and Clear-Com systems.
Steps to change the 2-Wire Intercom Settings:
TWO CHANNELS OF TELEX OR
CLEAR-COM INTERCOM
(from wired power supply)
BTR-240
PROGRAM
BTR-240
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Illlll ll lllll lll lll llllllllllllllll llll lll llll lllll
Illllllll llllll llllllllllllll lllllllllll llll lllllllllll
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Illlll lllllllllll llll llllll ll llll lll llll lllll
Illlll lll
Illlllllll ll lll
S.N. 00000
MADE IN USA
TX
INTERCOM 2
INTERCOM 1
PUSH
2 WIRE
AUDIO
PUSH
From the Status Screen, press <MENU> on the BTR-240
front panel.
2.
Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the cursor to
the “Intercom Settings” menu option, then press <SET> to
select the menu.
AUXILARY
AUDIO
PUSH
2 WIRE
AUDIO
12/15/VDC
1.5A
4 WIRE
4 WIRE
lll ll lllllll
ll lllll lllllll
1.
RX
SPEAKER
10 26
INPUT
IP: 192.168.1.1
OUTPUT
Prev....
-> Intercom Settings
Auxiliary Settings
Speaker Settings
BTR-240
PROGRAM
BTR-240
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Illlll ll lllll lll lll llllllllllllllll llll lll llll lllll
Illllllll llllll llllllllllllll lllllllllll llll lllllllllll
Illlllllllllll llll llll lll llll lllll lll llllllllll lll
Illlll lllllllllll llll llllll ll llll lll llll lllll
Illlll lll
Illlllllll ll lll
S.N. 00000
MADE IN USA
TX
INTERCOM 2
INTERCOM 1
PUSH
2 WIRE
AUDIO
PUSH
2 WIRE
PUSH
AUDIO
AUXILARY
AUDIO
12/15/VDC
1.5A
4 WIRE
4 WIRE
lll ll lllllll
ll lllll lllllll
RX
SPEAKER
10 26
INPUT
IP: 192.168.1.1
OUTPUT
Figure 5-15
Main Menu Screen 2
TO OTHER 2-WIRE EQUIPMENT
3.
Figure 5-13
Loop Thru Connection with AudioCom and Clear-Com
-> 2W Intercom
4W Intercom
Since RTS systems carry both channels of audio on one cable, the
four intercom XLR connectors are connected in parallel when
RTS is active. Thus, any one of the four intercom XLRs may be
used for RTS input. As shown in Figure 5-14, looping thru of the
audio may also be accomplished via any of the rear panel XLRs
when an RTS system is selected and active.
Figure 5-16
Intercom Menu Screen
4.
TWO CHANNELS OF RTS INTERCOM
(from wired power supply)
BTR-240
PROGRAM
BTR-240
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Illlll ll lllll lll lll llllllllllllllll llll lll llll lllll
Illllllll llllll llllllllllllll lllllllllll llll lllllllllll
Illlllllllllll llll llll lll llll lllll lll llllllllll lll
Illlll lllllllllll llll llllll ll llll lll llll lllll
Illlll lll
Illlllllll ll lll
S.N. 00000
MADE IN USA
TX
2 WIRE
L
O
O
P
lll ll lllllll
ll lllll lllllll
AUDIO
PUSH
2 WIRE
L
O
O
P
4 WIRE
PUSH
AUDIO
From the 2W Intercom Menu Screen, there are two
selectable options, “2W Settings” and “2W Levels”.
-> 2W Settings
2W Levels
AUXILARY
AUDIO
12/15/VDC
1.5A
4 WIRE
T
H
R
U
T
H
R
U
RX
SPEAKER
10 26
INTERCOM 2
INTERCOM 1
PUSH
Once again, using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate
the cursor to the “2W Intercom” menu option, then press
<SET> to select the menu.
INPUT
IP: 192.168.1.1
OUTPUT
Figure 5-17
2W Intercom Menu Screen
BTR-240
PROGRAM
BTR-240
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Illlll ll lllll lll lll llllllllllllllll llll lll llll lllll
Illllllll llllll llllllllllllll lllllllllll llll lllllllllll
Illlllllllllll llll llll lll llll lllll lll llllllllll lll
Illlll lllllllllll llll llllll ll llll lll llll lllll
Illlll lll
Illlllllll ll lll
S.N. 00000
TX
10 26
MADE IN USA
lll ll lllllll
ll lllll lllllll
RX
SPEAKER
IP: 192.168.1.1
INTERCOM 2
INTERCOM 1
PUSH
2 WIRE
L
O
O
P
T
H
R
U
AUDIO
4 WIRE
PUSH
2 WIRE
L
O
O
P
PUSH
AUDIO
AUXILARY
AUDIO
12/15/VDC
1.5A
4 WIRE
T
H
R
U
INPUT
The “2W Settings” option will allow the user to modify the
type of intercom system interface and which audio channels
are active. The “2W Levels” option will allow the user to
change the input and output levels for the active intercoms.
OUTPUT
TO OTHER 2-WIRE EQUIPMENT
Figure 5-14
Loop Thru Connection with RTS
To modify the “2W Settings”, continue with Step 4a. To
modify the “2W Levels”, jump to Step 4d.
When connecting a BTR-240 base station to a 2-wire system, the
system grounds should be connected together for the best audio
performance. On the BTR-240, use the screw lug on the rear
panel with the chassis ground label
.
5-5
To modify the 2W Settings:
To modify the 2W Levels:
a. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the cursor
next to the option “2W Settings” and press <SET> to select
the menu.
d. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the
cursor next to the menu option “2W Levels” and press
<SET> to select the menu.
The 2W intercom options menu is displayed and the
current status is flashing.
The levels are displayed only for the active intercom
channels. If no intercom channels are active, this menu
option will not be accessible.
2W Intercom: Off
IC1: OFF
->2W
2W
2W
2W
IC2: OFF
Figure 5-18
2W Type Settings Screen
08
11
08
11
Figure 5-20
2W Levels Menu Screen
b. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, find the desired
intercom type (off, Telex, RTS, or ClearCom) and press
<SET> to select.
e. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate to the
desired level to modify and press <SET> to select it.
The corresponding cursor and level number will begin
flashing which indicates that the level can now be
modified.
CAUTION:
Do not switch between 2-wire types when the BTR-240 base
station is connected to a powered 2-wire system. The voltage
differences between systems may cause damage to the
equipment.
f. Use the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons to move the bar level up
and down to the desired audio level and press <SET> to
select it.
The intercom type will stop flashing indicating that the
type has been set. Now, the intercom channels will flash
indicating that they are ready to be modified.
g. From the 2W Levels Screen, the user has four options:
i.
Press <SET> again to re-adjust the same level
(return to Step 4f).
ii. Use the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons to navigate to
another level to modify (return to Step 4e).
2W Intercom: RTS
IC1: ON
IC1 In:
IC1 Out:
IC2 In:
IC2 Out:
IC2: ON
iii. Press the <MENU> button to go back to the 2W
Intercom Menu Screen (return to Step 4).
Figure 5-19
2W Channel Settings Screen
iv. Press and hold the <MENU> button for 1/2 second
to return directly to the Status Screen.
c. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, find the desired
intercom channels to activate and press <SET> to select.
5.
The menu screen will stop flashing and the LCD will
pause for approximately 3 seconds while the 2W is
configured. The LCD will automatically go back to the
2W Intercom Menu Screen after this process is complete
(return to Step 4).
When finished editing, from the 2W Intercom Menu Screen,
the user has two options:
a. Press the <MENU> button to go back one menu screen
(return to Step 3).
b. Press and hold the <MENU> button for for 1/2 second to
return directly to the Status Screen.
5-6
Echo Cancellation
4-Wire (Matrix) Intercom
When any digital intercom system is connected to a 2-wire
system, there will be some “echo”, called network (line) echo,
due to the audio latency of that digital intercom system. In a
2-wire intercom system, the transmitting and receiving audio
signals exist together on a single wire. At the base station, a
“nulling” circuit is used to isolate the transmitting and receiving
signals. Network (line) echo occurs because the nulling circuit
alone is insufficient at separating the transmit and receive signals
and a small portion of the 2-wire transmit signal is also present on
the 2-wire receive signal which gets transmitted back to the
beltpack devices. For digital systems, echo cancellation is used to
further isolate the 2-wire transmit and recieve signals.
BTR-240
PROGRAM
BTR-240
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Illlll ll lllll lll lll llllllllllllllll llll lll llll lllll
Illllllll llllll llllllllllllll lllllllllll llll lllllllllll
Illlllllllllll llll llll lll llll lllll lll llllllllll lll
Illlll lllllllllll llll llllll ll llll lll llll lllll
Illlll lll
Illlllllll ll lll
S.N. 00000
TX
10 26
MADE IN USA
lll ll lllllll
ll lllll lllllll
RX
SPEAKER
INTERCOM 2
INTERCOM 1
PUSH
2 WIRE
L
O
O
P
AUDIO
PUSH
2 WIRE
4 WIRE
L
O
O
P
PUSH
AUDIO
AUXILARY
AUDIO
12/15/VDC
1.5A
4 WIRE
T
H
R
U
T
H
R
U
INPUT
IP: 192.168.1.1
OUTPUT
4-Wire (Matrix) Intercom
Figure 5-21
4-Wire Intercom
The BTR-240 base station has the ability to interface to two,
4-wire external audio intercom systems. As shown in Figure
5-21, these RJ-11 jacks are designated as “Intercom 1” and
“Intercom 2” on the rear panel.
The BTR-240 base station features automatic and adaptable
echo cancellation (AAEC). The BTR-240 will quickly “learn”
and adapt to the echo characteristics of a connected 2-wire
system. Once the echo has been characterized, the BTR-240 will
assist in removing echo for improved communication.
The 4-wire intercom may be used at the same time as the 2-wire
intercom.
The 4-wire intercom uses two pairs of wires to support one
full-duplex audio channel. One pair for the sending balanced
audio and one pair for the receiving balanced audio. Refer to
Section 11 for the 4-wire hardware specifications and pinouts.
The learning process takes approximately three to five seconds.
During this time, users should talk only into the BTR-240 local
headset, or associated TR-240 beltpacks, and the users on the
2-wire beltpacks should have their talk features disabled. This
procedure only needs to be performed initially when the 2-wire
first becomes activated.
Many Matrix systems also have an additional pair of wires to
transfer data between devices. The BTR-240 4-wire connection
does not use these data lines and supports only the audio
interface.
After the echo cancellation has learned the characteristics of the
system, it will continuously adapt as changes to the system occur.
Steps to change the 4-Wire Intercom Settings:
NOTE: Excessive noise or talking on the 2-wire side will
prevent the echo cancellation from learning and echo
will be present. As soon as the audio on the 2-wire side
becomes quiet enough, the echo cancellation
learning cycle will complete and the echo will be
removed.
1.
From the Status Screen, press <MENU> on the BTR-240
front panel.
2.
Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the cursor to
the “Intercom Settings” menu option, then press <SET> to
select the menu.
Other Sources of Echo
Prev....
-> Intercom Settings
Auxiliary Settings
Speaker Settings
Users need to be aware that there are several sources of echo. In
addition to line echo, there is also a type referred to as acoustic
echo.
Figure 5-22
Main Menu Screen 2
Acoustic echo is commonly heard by a user when their audio
arrives at a second user’s headset and a portion of that audio in the
headset gets back into the second user’s microphone (by having
the volume and/or microphone gain set fairly high or by using a
headset with poor acoustical isolation). That portion of audio is
then transmitted back to the first user and heard as “echo”.
3.
Once again, using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate
the cursor to the “4W Intercom” menu option, then press
<SET> to select the menu.
2W Intercom
-> 4W Intercom
To reduce the effects of acoustical echo, users should first turn off
their <TALK> buttons one by one to identify which devices are
the sources of echo. Once the source(s) have been identified,
acoustical echo is avoided by decreasing the headset volume,
microphone gain, sidetone level, or increasing the squelch
settings of that device.
Figure 5-23
Intercom Menu Screen
NOTE: Do not leave any headsets unattended with the
<TALK> button enabled. When headsets are removed,
always ensure that the microphone path is disabled.
5-7
4.
d. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate to the
desired level to modify and press <SET> to select it.
From the 4W Intercom Menu, there are two selectable
options, “4W Settings” and “4W Levels”.
The corresponding cursor and level number will begin
flashing which indicates that the level can now be
modified.
-> 4W Settings
4W Levels
e. Use the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons to move the bar level
up and down to the desired audio level and press <SET>
to select it.
Figure 5-24
4W Intercom Menu Screen
f. From the 4W Levels Screen, the user has four options.
The “4W Settings” option will allow the user to modify
which audio intercom channels are active. The “4W Levels”
option will allow the user to change the input and output
levels for the active intercoms.
i. Press <SET> again to re-adjust the same level
(return to Step 4e).
To modify the “4W Settings”, continue with Step 4a. To
modify the “4W Levels”, jump to Step 4c.
iii. Press the <MENU> button to go back to the 4W
Intercom Menu Screen (return to Step 4).
ii. Use the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons to navigate to
another level to modify (return to Step 4d).
iv. Press and hold the <MENU> button for 1/2 second
to return directly to the Status Screen.
To modify the 4W Settings:
5.
a. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the cursor
next to the menu option “4W Settings” and press <SET>
to select the menu.
When finished editing, from the 4W Intercom Menu Screen,
the user has two options:
a. Press the <MENU> button to go back one menu screen
(and return to Step 3).
The 4W intercom options menu is displayed and the
current status is flashing.
b. Press and hold the <MENU> button for 1/2 second to
return directly to the Status Screen.
4W Intercom: Off
IC1: OFF
IC2: OFF
Auxiliary Input / Output
Figure 5-25
4W Settings Screen
BTR-240
PROGRAM
BTR-240
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Illlll ll lllll lll lll llllllllllllllll llll lll llll lllll
Illllllll llllll llllllllllllll lllllllllll llll lllllllllll
Illlllllllllll llll llll lll llll lllll lll llllllllll lll
Illlll lllllllllll llll llllll ll llll lll llll lllll
Illlll lll
Illlllllll ll lll
S.N. 00000
TX
10 26
MADE IN USA
lll ll lllllll
ll lllll lllllll
RX
SPEAKER
INTERCOM 2
INTERCOM 1
PUSH
2 WIRE
L
O
O
P
T
H
R
U
AUDIO
4 WIRE
PUSH
2 WIRE
L
O
O
P
IP: 192.168.1.1
b. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, find the desired
intercom channels to activate and press <SET> to select.
12/15/VDC
1.5A
INPUT
OUTPUT
Figure 5-27
Auxiliary Input/Output
The BTR-240 base station can interface with external audio
devices via the auxiliary audio ports on the rear panel. As shown
in Figure 5-27, the auxiliary input is a XLR and ¼" combination
jack and the auxiliary output is a XLR jack. The auxiliary input
connector will accept balanced audio at line level and the
auxiliary output connector will supply balanced audio at line
level. Refer to Section 11 for the 4-wire hardware specifications
and pinouts.
To modify the 4W Levels:
c. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the cursor
next to the menu option “4W Levels” and press <SET>
to select the menu.
The levels are displayed only for the active intercom
channels. If no intercom channels are active, this menu
option will not be accessible.
IC1 In:
IC1 Out:
IC2 In:
IC2 Out:
AUXILARY
AUDIO
4 WIRE
Auxiliary Input/Output
The LCD will go back to the 4W Intercom menu (return
to Step 4).
->4W
4W
4W
4W
PUSH
AUDIO
T
H
R
U
The auxiliary input and output settings are individually
configured so that any combination of the two intercom channels
can be routed to and from these ports. The auxiliary input/output
settings can be set to one of three modes: Off, Local and Global.
08
08
08
08
Figure 5-26
4W Levels Screen
5-8
These modes are defined as follows:
Off:
The auxiliary input or output for the intercom
channel is disabled.
Local:
Any audio placed into the auxiliary input port
is routed only to the base station’s local headset
and beltpack(s). The audio that is routed from
the base station to the auxiliary output port is
only from the base station’s local headset and
beltpack(s).
Global:
To modify the Auxiliary Input Settings:
a. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the cursor
next to the menu option “Aux IN Settings” and press
<SET> to select the menu.
The Auxiliary Input options menu is displayed and the
current status is flashing.
Aux IN: Off
Any audio placed into the auxiliary input port
is routed to the base station’s local headset and
beltpack(s) as in the Local setting, but also to
the 2-wire and 4-wire systems that are
connected to the base station. The audio that is
routed from the base station to the auxiliary
output port comes from the base station’s local
headset and beltpack(s) as in the Local setting,
but also from the active 2-wire and 4-wire
intercom systems connected to the base station.
IC1: OFF
Figure 5-30
Auxiliary Input Mode Settings Screen
b. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, find the desired
intercom type (off, Local, or Global) and press <SET> to
select.
The auxiliary input mode will stop flashing which
indicates that it has been set, and the intercom channels
will now flash indicating that they are ready to be
modified.
Steps to change the Auxiliary Settings:
1.
2.
From the Status Screen, press <MENU> on the BTR-240
front panel.
Aux IN: Local
Using the <UP>/<DOWN> Buttons, navigate the cursor to
the “Auxiliary Settings” menu option, then press <SET> to
select the menu.
IC1: ON
3.
IC2: OFF
Figure 5-31
Auxiliary Input Channel Settings Screen
Prev....
Intercom Settings
-> Auxiliary Settings
Speaker Settings
>.
IC2: OFF
c. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, find the desired
intercom channels to activate. Press <SET> to activate
those channels and the LCD will go back to the
Auxiliary Menu Screen (return to Step 3).
Figure 5-28
Main Menu Screen 2
To modify the Auxiliary Output Settings:
From the Auxiliary Menu Screen there are three selectable
options: “Aux IN Settings”, “Aux OUT Settings”, and “Aux
Levels”.
d. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the cursor
next to the menu option “Aux OUT Settings” and press
<SET> to select the menu.
->Aux IN Settings
Aux OUT Settings
Aux Levels
The Auxiliary Output options menu is displayed and the
current status is flashing.
Figure 5-29
Auxiliary Menu Screen
Aux OUT: Off
IC1: OFF
The “Aux IN Settings” and the “Aux OUT Settings” options
will allow the user to modify which audio channels are active
for the particular auxiliary device. The “Aux Levels” options
will allow the user to change the corresponding input and
output levels for the active devices.
IC2: OFF
Figure 5-32
Auxiliary Output Mode Settings Screen
To modify the “Aux IN Settings”, continue with Step 3a. To
modify the “Aux OUT Settings”, jump to Step 3d. To modify
the “Aux Levels”, jump to Step 3g.
5-9
4.
e. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, find the desired
intercom type (off, Local, or Global) and press <SET>
to select.
When finished editing, from the Auxiliary Menu Screen, the
user has two options:
a. Press the <MENU> button to go back one menu screen
(return to Step 2).
The auxiliary output mode will stop flashing which
indicates that it has been set, and the intercom channels
will now flash indicating that they are ready to be
modified.
b. Press and hold the <MENU> button for 1/2 second to
return directly to the Status Screen.
Speaker Output
Aux OUT: Global
IC1: OFF
IC2: ON
BTR-240
PROGRAM
BTR-240
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Illlll ll lllll lll lll llllllllllllllll llll lll llll lllll
Illllllll llllll llllllllllllll lllllllllll llll lllllllllll
Illlllllllllll llll llll lll llll lllll lll llllllllll lll
Illlll lllllllllll llll llllll ll llll lll llll lllll
Illlll lll
Illlllllll ll lll
S.N. 00000
TX
Figure 5-33
Auxiliary Output Channel Settings Screen
10 26
SPEAKER
L
O
O
P
AUDIO
PUSH
4 WIRE
T
H
R
U
2 WIRE
L
O
O
P
PUSH
AUDIO
AUXILARY
AUDIO
12/15/VDC
1.5A
4 WIRE
T
H
R
U
IP: 192.168.1.1
INPUT
OUTPUT
The BTR-240 also features a speaker port in which the intercom
channels from the base station can be monitored. The speaker port
outputs balanced audio with a maximum output of 1W into 8
Ohms. As shown in Figure 5-35, the speaker port is a 2-pin
Phoenix type connector. Refer to Section 11 for the speaker
hardware specifications and pinouts.
g. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the cursor
next to the menu option “Aux Levels” and press <SET> to
select the menu
Steps to change the Speaker Settings:
The levels are displayed only for the active auxiliary
ports. If no auxiliary port is active, this menu option will
not be accessible.
Level:
2 WIRE
Figure 5-35
Speaker Connector
To modify the Auxiliary Levels:
->AuxIN
INTERCOM 2
INTERCOM 1
PUSH
lll ll lllllll
ll lllll lllllll
RX
Speaker Connector
f. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, find the desired
intercom channels to activate. Press <SET> to activate
those channels and the LCD will go back to the Auxiliary
Menu Screen (return to Step 3).
AuxOUT Level:
MADE IN USA
1.
From the Status Screen, press <MENU> on the BTR-240
front panel.
2.
Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the cursor to
the “Speaker Settings” menu option, then press <SET> to
select the menu.
08
08
Figure 5-34
Auxiliary Levels Screen
Prev....
Intercom Settings
Auxiliary Settings
-> Speaker Settings
h. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate to the
desired level to modify and press <SET> to select it.
Figure 5-36
Main Menu Screen 2
The corresponding cursor and level number will begin
flashing which indicates that the level can now be
modified.
3.
i. Use the<UP>/<DOWN> buttons to move the bar level
up and down to the desired audio level and press <SET>
to select it.
From the Speaker Menu Screen there are two selectable
options, “Spk Settings” and “Spk Level”.
->Spk Settings
Spk Level
j. At this point, the user has three options.
i.
Press <SET> again to re-adjust the same level
(return to Step 4i).
Figure 5-37
Speaker Menu Screen
ii. Use the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons to navigate to
another level to modify (return to Step 4h).
The “Spk Settings” option will allow the user to select which
audio intercom channels are routed to the speaker port. The
“Spk Level” option will allow the user to change the output
level for the speaker port.
iii. Press the <MENU> button to go back to the
Auxiliary Menu Screen (return to Step 3).
iv. Press and hold the <MENU> button for 1/2 second
to return directly to the Status Screen.
5-10
To modify the “Spk Settings”, continue with Step 3a. To
modify the “Spk Level”, jump to Step 3c.
f. From the Speaker Level Screen, the user has three
options:
i. Press <SET> again to re-adjust the level (return to
Step 3e).
To modify the Speaker Settings:
ii. Press the <MENU> button to go back to the
Speaker Menu Screen (return to Step 3).
a. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the
cursor next to the menu option “Spk Settings” and
press <SET> to select the menu.
iii. Press and hold the <MENU> button for 1/2 second
to return directly to the Status Screen.
The Speaker options menu is displayed and the current
status is flashing.
4.
Speaker
IC1: OFF
a. Press the <MENU> button to go back one menu screen
(return to Step 2).
IC2: OFF
b. Press and hold the <MENU> button for 1/2 second to
return directly to the Status Screen.
Figure 5-38
Speaker Settings Screen
b. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, find the desired
intercom channels to activate at the speaker port and
press <SET> to select.
RF Ch: 6
Assoc: 0
The LCD will go back to the Speaker Menu Screen
(return to Step 3).
2W:1&2
4W:1&2
AuxIn:1&2L
AuxOut:1&2G
Figure 5-40
Speaker Activated Status Screen
To modify the Speaker Level:
The speaker icon will change depending on which audio intercom
channels are active at the speaker port.
c. Using the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons, navigate the cursor
next to the menu option “Spk Level” and press <SET> to
select the menu.
The level is displayed only if the speaker port is active. If
the speaker port is inactive, this menu option will not be
accessible.
->Spk Level:
When finished editing, from the Speaker Menu Screen, the
user has two options:
intercom channel 1 only.
intercom channel 2 only.
10
both intercom channel 1 and 2.
Figure 5-39
Speaker Level Screen
d. Since there is only one level option, press <SET> and
the cursor and level number will begin flashing which
indicates that the level can now be modified.
e. Use the <UP>/<DOWN> buttons to move the bar level
up and down to the desired audio level and press <SET>
to select it.
5-11
ClearScan
Software Version
When ClearScan is activated, the BTR-240 base station will
temporarily shut down it's transmitter and begin scanning the
available RF channels. The base station will determine which RF
channel has the least activity and then begin transmitting on it.
The software version of the BTR-240 can be briefly displayed at
any time form the Status Screen.
Key Sequence:
Key Sequence:
<MENU> + <SET>
for approximately 3 seconds.
<SET> + <DOWN>
for approximately 3 seconds.
When the key sequence is pressed, the “Start-up Screen” (see
Figure 5-2) will be displayed for approximately 3 seconds which
flashes the software versions before returning back to the Status
Screen.
While the ClearScan process is running, the scanning status is
indicated by a progress bar on the LCD.
Contrast
ClearScanTM
The contrast of the LCD screen can be adjusted after the BTR-240
has completely booted.
Key Sequence:
Figure 5-41
ClearScan Progress Screen
After the ClearScan operation has completed, the LCD returns to
the Status Screen to indicate the active RF channel of operation.
<UP> -or- <DOWN>
for approximately 3 seconds.
Continue holding to adjust.
The contrast setting is remembered every time the base station is
booted until set differently by the same sequence, or a system
restore is performed.
Lockout
System Restore
The lockout function will prevent a user from changing any menu
options at the base station via the LCD screen. The <TALK> and
<CHANNEL SELECT> buttons, and <VOLUME> knob will
still work at the local headset on the front panel.
Key Sequence:
The BTR-240 base station has the ability to restore settings and
parameters back to the default states. There are two options for
performing a restore: user default restore and factory default
restore.
<UP> + <DOWN>
for approximately 3 seconds.
User Defaults:
When the lockout is activated, a padlock icon will appear in the
lower left corner of the LCD indicating that the base station is
locked.
RF Ch: 9
Assoc: 0
This option will restore all the settings that are
selectable from the BTR-240 base station front
panel and menu options. (i.e., RF Channel,
Local Headset settings, Squelch settings,
2-wire settings, 4-wire settings, auxiliary
settings, and speaker settings.)
Factory Defaults: This option will restore all the settings as in the
User Defaults, but will also restore the User
Configuration Settings (described in Section 8).
2W:2
4W:1
AuxIn:Off
AuxOut:1G
These items include:
Login Password
IP address
SSID
Audio Encryption Key
Wireless Encryption Key
MAC filtering
Figure 5-42
Lockout Activated Status Screen
In lockout mode, a user is allowed to navigate through the menu
options and view the current status, but the options cannot be
modified.
–
–
–
–
–
–
To unlock a base station, use the same key sequence and the
padlock will disappear from the LCD screen.
Key Sequence:
NOTE: The lockout feature is remembered every time the base
station is booted.
5-12
<MENU> + <SET> + <UP> + <DOWN>
for approximately 3 seconds.
After pressing the key sequence for System Restore, a menu will
be indicated on the LCD to select one of the restore options.
Once the restore is complete, the base station will flash “Reboot
the BTR-240”.
BTR-240 Restore Menu
Reboot the BTR-240
->User Defaults
Factory Defaults
Figure 5-46
Reboot Screen
Figure 5-43
System Restore Screen
Use the <UP>/<DOWN> keys to navigate to the desired restore
setting and press the <SET> button to initiate the restore.
At this time, the BTR-240 must be powered off using the
<POWER> switch and then turned back on.
CAUTION:
Do not remove the power to the base station while settings are
being restored. This could potentially corrupt the
configuration and cause the BTR-240 to fail when booting.
NOTE: When rebooting the BTR-240 base station, the power
should remain off for at least 3 seconds before it is
switched back on. This allows the unit time to settle and
completely power down before power is reapplied.
If the “User Default” restore option is selected, the restore will
initiate and the screen will flash indicating that the settings are
being restored.
Resetting
User Defaults
Please wait...
Figure 5-44
User Default Reset Screen
Once the “User Defaults” restore is complete, the base station will
briefly display the Start-up screen with the software version
before returning to the Status Screen which now displays the user
default settings.
If the “Factory Default” restore option was selected, the restore
will initiate and the screen will flash indicating that the settings
are being restored.
Resetting
Factory Defaults
Please wait...
Figure 5-45
Factory Default Reset Screen
5-13
Figure 5-47
BTR-240 Menu Structure
5-14
<MENU> + <SET>
+ <UP> + <DOWN>
<MENU> + <SET>
->User Defaults
Factory Defaults
TM
<MENU>
Reboot the BTR-240
Please wait...
Resetting
Factory Defaults
Please wait...
Resetting
User Defaults
ClearScan
ClearScanTM
Contrast Down
Contrast Up
<SET> + <DOWN>
Software
Version
Status Screen
Prev....
Intercom Settings
Auxiliary Settings
Speaker Settings
Menu Screen 2
<UP>/
<DOWN>
->RF Channel
Local Headset
Squelch Settings
more...
Menu Screen 1
Save settings and exit Set Mode.
Change settings up.
Change settings down.
Enter Set Mode - or - select current
item and move forward in menu.
Move cursor up.
Move cursor down.
<SET>
<UP>
<DOWN>
Dashed lines represent special key sequences (ie., Lockout, System Restore, ClearScan,TM
Contrast Up/Down, and Software Version). These key sequences must be pressed and held for
approximately 3 seconds to activate the menu.
Exit Set Mode, do not save changed settings
and return to the Status Screen.
Exit Set Mode and do not save changed settings.
Previous menu.
<MENU>
<MENU>
Status Screen.
+ hold ½ sec
Set Mode
Menu Mode
When navigating through the BTR-240 Menu Structure, there are two operating modes, Menu Mode and Set Mode.
In Set Mode, some or all of the LCD characters will be flashing which indicates that settings are being modified.
In Menu Mode, no LCD characters are flashing and the menu buttons are used for navigation.
The following table shows the functions for the menu buttons in each of the modes:
NOTES:
<UP>
<DOWN>
2W:1&2
4W:1&2
AuxIn:1L
AuxOut:2G
4.0
BTR-240 Restore Menu
Restore Menu
Toggle
Lockout
<DOWN>
+
<UP>
RF Ch: 6
Assoc: 8
Status Screen
A(1.0.0)
Bosch Communications
BTR-240
Start-up Screen
Bosch Communications
BTR-240
Boot Screen
08
08
01
01
->Spk Settings
Spk Level
Speaker Menu
->Aux IN Settings
Aux OUT Settings
Aux Levels
Auxiliary Menu
->2W Intercom
4W Intercom
Intercom Menu
->I C1 Squelch:
I C 2 Squelch:
Squelch Settings
->Mic Gain:
Sidetone:
Local Headset
Channel: 6 2437 MHz
RF Channel
RF Channel
I C 2: OFF
AuxOUT Level:
10
I C 2: ON
->SPK Level:
Speaker Level
I C 1: ON
Speaker
Speaker Settings
08
08
->Aux IN Level:
Auxiliary Levels
I C 1: OFF I C 2: ON
Aux OUT: Global
Auxiliary Output Settings
I C 1: ON
Aux IN: Local
Auxiliary Input Settings
->4W Settings
4W Levels
4W Intercom Menu
->2W Settings
2W Levels
2W Intercom Menu
IC2:
IC1 In:
IC1 Out:
IC2 In:
IC2 Out:
->4W
4W
4W
4W
IC2:
IC1 In:
IC 1 Out:
IC2 In:
IC2 Out:
4W Levels
IC1 ON
4W Intercom:
4W Settings
->2W
2W
2W
2W
2W Levels
IC1 ON
08
08
08
08
ON
08
10
08
10
ON
2W Intercom: RTS
2W Settings
Section 6 - TR-240 Operation
Local Headset Configuration
The local headset on the beltpack is configurable with the
following adjustable settings:
•
•
•
•
•
Channel Select buttons
Talk button
Volume knob
Microphone gain adjustment
Sidetone level adjustment
Channel Select Buttons
Press the <1> button to activate the audio path associated with
only Intercom 1. Press the < 2 > button to activate the audio path
associated with only Intercom 2. Press the <1> and < 2 > buttons
simultaneously to select the audio path from both intercom
channels. The green LEDs above to the channel select buttons
will illuminate when the intercom channel is active.
TR-240 Operation
This section discusses the operation and features of the TR-240
beltpack. This section outlines the basic operation, hardware
interfaces, and setup of the beltpack.
Talk Button
The <TALK> button is used to enable and disable the headset
microphone path. When the microphone path is enabled, the
green LEDs above the active audio channel(s) will be solid.
When the microphone path is disabled, the green LEDs above the
active audio channel(s) will blink. By default, the audio path from
the attached headset is enabled after the unit has booted.
Basic Operation Description
The TR-240 full-duplex beltpack offers a very comprehensive,
user friendly, and extremely versatile set of features to be custom
configured to a user's specific requirements.
A beltpack is full-duplex, simultaneous talk and listen, when the
microphone path is enabled and the channel LED(s) are solid. A
beltpack is half-duplex, listen only, when the microphone path is
disabled and the channel LED(s) are blinking.
The TR-240 can be uniquely configured in one of three operating
modes which allow it to work in conjunction with a BTR-240
base station or with other beltpacks in the absence of a base.
In wireless mode, a BTR-240 base station provides the wireless
coverage for the communication between TR-240 beltpacks. In
wired mode, the beltpacks communicate with each other via
Ethernet cable and do not require the use of a base station. In
master wireless mode, the beltpack is now a mobile access point
and provides the wireless coverage for communication between
other TR-240s in wireless mode. Further details of these modes
are discussed later in this section.
The TR-240 has two talk modes that dictate how the microphone
path is enabled when the <TALK> button is pressed. These
modes are Push-to-Latch mode and Momentary-Only mode.
The talk mode can be toggled by pressing the following key
sequence after the beltpack has booted.
Key Sequence:
Powering the Beltpack
To turn on the beltpack, rotate the On/Off & Volume Control
knob clockwise and move the knob pointer away from the “OFF”
position. The switch will “click” and the Battery Light will
immediately illuminate.
<1> + <TALK> + < 2 >
Hold until the voice prompt indicates
“Push-to-Latch” or “Momentary” (approx. 5
seconds).
In Push-to-Latch mode (default), if the <TALK> button is tapped
quickly (less than ½ second), the microphone path will enable and
“latch”, or remain enabled, after the button is released. The
microphone path is disabled by quickly pressing the <TALK>
button again. If the <TALK> button is pressed and held down
(longer than ½ second), the microphone path will be enabled
“momentarily” while the button is held, and will be disabled
when the <TALK> button is released.
To turn the beltpack off, simply rotate the knob pointer counter
clockwise until it “clicks” into the “OFF” position and the Battery
Light will turn off.
NOTE: Ensure that the battery packs is fully charged prior to
use. Refer to the Battery Charging Instructions in
Section 4.
6-1
Mode of Operation
The TR-240 has the ability to operate in one of three modes
depending on the desired system configuration. These modes are
wireless, wired and master wireless. This section describes each
of these modes and how the mode is changed. The different
system configurations are further discussed in Section 7.
In Momentary-Only (push-to-transmit) mode, the microphone
path will only be enabled while the <TALK> button is pressed.
Press and hold the <TALK> button to enable the microphone
path and release the <TALK> button to disable the microphone
path.
Volume
NOTE: The mode of operation is remembered and the TR-240
will continue to boot in the same mode until it is set
differently by the user.
The volume of the audio that the beltpack receives is controlled by
turning the Volume Control knob clockwise and counterclockwise
to increase and decrease the volume, respectively.
Wireless Mode
Microphone Gain Adjustment
The wireless (default) mode is the most used mode of the
beltpack. In wireless mode, the beltpack’s radio is active and the
wired Ethernet port is deactivated.
The microphone gain controls the level of audio from the
microphone path that is transmitted from the TR-240 beltpack.
The default microphone gain (level 4) has been adjusted for
typical performance, but may require adjustments depending on
the loudness and proximity of a user's mouth to the microphone.
Key Sequence:
Key Sequence:
<1> + <TALK>
Hold until the voice prompt indicates
“Mic Adjust” (approx. 3 seconds).
In wireless mode, a base station is required to provide the wireless
coverage over the area in which the beltpacks will be used. The
base station serves as an access point, or “relay”, for audio
packets going between beltpacks. A base station could be a
BTR-240 or a TR-240 in master wireless mode. One base station
can serve up to 8 full-duplex wireless beltpacks and many more
half-duplex beltpacks.
Once the “Mic Adjust” voice prompt is heard in the headset, the
current microphone gain level is repeated. To adjust, continue to
hold the <TALK> button down. Press and hold the <1> button to
decrease the level or the < 2 > button to increase the level. There
are 10 microphone gain levels and a voice prompt will indicate
the current level setting as adjustments are made. When the
desired level is achieved, release all the buttons. A tone will be
heard to indicate that the microphone gain has been successfully
changed.
Wired Mode
When a beltpack is in wired mode, the beltpack’s radio is
deactivated and the Ethernet port is activated.
Sidetone Level Adjustment
The sidetone level is the amount of a user's own voice that is fed
back in the local headset. The beltpack sidetone level is
independent of the volume knob and microphone gain setting.
The default sidetone level (level 4) has been adjusted for typical
performance, but may require adjustments depending on the
loudness and proximity of a user's mouth to the microphone.
Key Sequence:
Press and hold <TALK> while booting.
Release the button once the voice prompt
“wireless” is heard in the headset indicating
that communication has started.
Key Sequence:
Press and hold < 2 > while booting.
Release the button once the voice prompt
“wired” is heard in the headset indicating
that communication has started.
In wired mode, no base stations are required for beltpacks to
communicate with other beltpacks that are also in wired mode.
The connection between beltpacks could be a direct connection
via Ethernet cable (100m, 328ft max.) or connected via the
buildings existing Ethernet infrastructure (see “Network
Requirements” in Section 7 for configuration details).
< 2 > + <TALK>
Hold until the voice prompt indicates
“Sidetone Adjust” (approx. 3 seconds).
Once the “Sidetone Adjust” voice prompt is heard in the headset,
the current sidetone level is repeated. To adjust, continue to hold
the <TALK> button down. Press and hold the <1> button to
decrease the level or the < 2 > button to increase the level. There
are 10 sidetone levels and a voice prompt will indicate the current
level setting as adjustments are made. When the desired level is
achieved, release all the buttons. A tone will be heard to indicate
that the sidetone level has been successfully changed.
A BTR-240 base station would be required, however, for a
mixed-mode system configuration where there are both wired
beltpacks and wireless beltpacks.
6-2
b. Simply wait without pressing any buttons for
approximately 3 seconds. A tone will sound indicating
that the RF channel that was last indicated by a voice
prompt is now active and the beltpack has resumed to
normal master wireless operation.
Master Wireless Mode
The master wireless mode feature of the TR-240 is one of the key
reasons that the unit is so versatile. In the absence of an actual
BTR-240 base station, the beltpack itself can be configured to act
as an access point, but with mobile capabilities, and continue to
provide coverage for up to 8 full-duplex wireless TR-240
beltpacks.
NOTE: The RF channel of operation is remembered and the
TR-240 will continue to boot on the same RF channel in
master wireless mode until it is set differently by the
user.
When a beltpack is in master wireless mode, the beltpack’s radio
is activated and the Ethernet port is deactivated.
Key Sequence:
Press and hold <1> while booting.
Release the button once the voice prompt
“master wireless” is heard in the headset
indicating that communication has started.
Low Battery Indicator
In master wireless mode, the beltpack has all the functionality of a
wireless beltpack, but now also acts as a base station to support
other beltpacks in wireless mode.
When operating the TR-240 beltpack, there are two indicators for
when the battery pack is almost depleted. The first indicator is the
battery light on the top panel of the beltpack will switch to yellow.
The second indicator is a battery alert tone (three tone pulses)
heard in the beltpack headset. These indicators will occur when
the battery pack has approximately 15 minutes of use left.
The user of the master mode beltpack also has the ability to set the
RF channel manually or perform a ClearScan to select the optimal
RF channel for operation.
Mode Identification / Software Version
Once a TR-240 has booted successfully, a user can determine the
mode in which the beltpack is operating as well as the current
software version of the beltpack.
Steps to change the RF Channel or perform ClearScan:
1.
Boot the unit into Master Wireless mode by pressing and
holding the <1> button down while the unit boots.
Key Sequence:
<1> + <2>
For approximately 5 seconds.
Release the buttons once the voice prompts
begin and the green channel LEDs turn off.
2.
Continue to hold the <1> button after the voice prompt
“master wireless” is heard for approximately 3 seconds.
3.
Release the button when the voice prompt “RF Selection” is
heard in the headset followed by the current RF channel.
After the button sequence has been pressed, the beltpack will
announce a sequence of three voice prompts.
4.
At this point the user has three options:
The beltpack will first identify which of the modes it is operating.
The voice prompt will announce “wireless”, “wired” or “master
wireless” in the headset. A voice prompt will then announce the
beltpack model number followed by the software version number
in the headset. For example, “Wireless”, “TR-240”, “Rev A”.
a. Press the <2> button to move the RF channel up. For
each channel increment, a voice prompt will follow.
b. Press the <1> button to move the RF channel down. For
each channel decrement, a voice prompt will follow.
For a beltpack that does not have a headset attached, a blinking
sequence is also displayed by using the Battery LED indicator to
indicate the mode of operation.
c. Press the <TALK> button to perform a ClearScan. The
voice prompt “ClearScan” will be indicated in the
headset. This operation takes a few seconds and when
finished, a voice prompt will indicate the selected
channel.
5.
Wireless mode:
Wired mode:
Master wireless mode:
When the desired channel is selected, the following options
will exit the RF selection menu and return to the main audio
program:
a. Press the <1> + <2> buttons simultaneously. A tone will
sound indicating that the RF channel that was last
indicated by a voice prompt is now active and the
beltpack has resumed to normal master wireless
operation.
6-3
no blink sequence
-**-**-**- * - * - * -
System Restore
The beltpack has the ability to restore all the settings and
parameters back to the factory default state. The settings that are
restored include the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Mode of Operation
Talk Mode
Microphone Gain
Sidetone Level
User Configurations (described in Section 8)
Login Password
IP address
SSID
Audio Encryption Key
Wireless Encryption Key
MAC filtering
Squelch
Out of Range Alert
Full-Duplex
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Key Sequence:
Press and hold <1> + <TALK> + < 2 >
while booting. Release the buttons once the
voice prompt “Factory Reset” is heard in the
headset.
When the factory reset operation has been finished, the beltpack
will return to normal operation in the wireless (default) mode.
Using TR-240 beltpacks as Replacements for
TR-24 beltpacks
A user with an existing system comprised of TR-24 beltpacks
may replace or add a TR-240 beltpack to their system. However,
the TR-240 must be properly configured to operate with other
TR-24 beltpacks.
1. IP Address Verification
• Ensure that the TR-240 does not have the same
IP address as any other system devices. If so,
refer to Section 8 for instructions on how to
change the IP address of the TR-240.
2. Change the SSID to "TELEX24"
• The default SSID of the TR-24 beltpacks is
"TELEX24" and a new TR-240 must be changed
to match. Refer to Section 8 for instructions on
how to change the SSID of the TR-240.
3. Disable 802.11 WEP Encryption
• The TR-24 beltpacks do not support wireless
encryption and a new TR-240 must be changed
to match. Refer to Section 8 for instructions on
how to disable the 802.11 WEP encryption of the
TR-240.
6-4
Section 7 - System Operation
System Operation
This section describes the different system configurations of the
BTR-240 base station and the TR-240 beltpacks.
4.
NOTE: For all system configurations, the TR-240 battery packs
should be fully charged. Refer to the Battery Charging
Instructions in Section 4.
5.
Wireless Mode
The most common configuration for the BTR-240 system is the
wireless mode configuration, shown in Figure 7-1. In this set-up,
the BTR-240 base station serves as the “relay” and provides
wireless coverage for up to 8 full-duplex beltpacks in wireless
mode.
BTR-240
CHANNEL
SELECT
Perform a ClearScan.
•
After the base station has completely booted, press and
hold the <MENU> + <SET> buttons for approximately 3
seconds.
•
The base station will run the ClearScan operation and
select the optimal RF channel for operation.
Plug headsets into the TR-240 beltpacks and turn them on,
one by one.
•
If the beltpack has not been previously set to wireless
mode, press and hold the <TALK> button while the
beltpack boots.
•
•
Allow a few seconds between each beltpack power on.
•
The base station will increment the association status on
the Status Screen next to “Assoc: XX” for each of the
active full-duplex beltpacks.
After approximately 20 seconds, a voice prompt will
announce “wireless” in the beltpack headphones
indicating that wireless communications has started.
TALK
menu
Wireless Capacity Limit
set
POWER
VOLUME
Up to 8 full-duplex wireless beltpacks can be used with a single
BTR-240 base station for reliable and uninterrupted
communications on a clear RF channel. Many more half-duplex
beltpacks can be used.
If a BTR-240 base station is loaded beyond its capacity limit, the
usability becomes highly subjective. Users will begin to
experience drop outs and potentially delays in the audio.
Figure 7-1
Eight Beltpacks in Wireless Mode
For example, a BTR-240 base station has 6 full-duplex wireless
beltpacks and 28 half-duplex beltpacks. If 2 of the half-duplex
beltpacks became full-duplex at the same time, the system will
still be operating within the system limitations. If 4 of the
half-duplex beltpacks were to become full-duplex, for a total of
10 full-duplex beltpacks, then the system would be operating
beyond its loading limit and the users will begin to experience
audio drop outs and potentially delays in the audio.
Set-up
1.
Select a location for the BTR-240 base station and connect
the power cord and antennas.
•
When using omni-directional antennas, place the base
station as close to the center of the coverage area as
possible.
2.
Connect base station to external audio interfaces. For
example: 2-wire, 4-wire, Auxiliary, Speaker, local headset.
3.
Turn on the base station.
•
The menu buttons and LCD backlight illuminate and a
progress bar displays the status while the unit is booting.
•
After approximately 25 seconds, the base station will
have completed the boot cycle and the Status Screen will
be displayed.
•
Activate the connected audio interfaces by navigating
the menu on the LCD screen.
NOTE: The capacity limit may not be achieved if there is
interference on the RF channel of operation. For further
details, refer to Wireless Interference in Section 10.
7-1
Wired Mode
Wired Capacity Limit
A wired mode configuration consists of only TR-240 beltpacks
connected together via Ethernet cable or through a building’s
existing Ethernet infrastructure. This type of configuration is
shown in Figure 7-2.
Up to 12 full-duplex wired beltpacks can be used in the absence
of a BTR-240 base station, on a dedicated network, for reliable
and uninterrupted communications. Many more half-duplex
beltpacks can be used.
Location
1
If the TR-240 network is loaded beyond the capacity limit, the
usability becomes highly subjective. The users will begin to
experience drop outs and potentially delays in the audio.
H
U
B
NOTE: The capacity limit may not be achieved if there is
interference on the network. For further details, refer to
Network Interference in Section 10.
H
U
B
Wireless and Wired Mixed-Mode
Location
2
A BTR-240 base station can also support a mixture of wired and
wireless TR-240 beltpacks. Figure 7-3 shows an example of this
type of configuration.
H
U
B
Building
Infrastructure
Figure 7-2
Ten TR-240's Communicating via Ethernet Infrastructure
H
U
B
Set-up
1.
2.
BTR-240
menu
set
POWER
RF Ch: 6
Assoc: 0
CHANNEL
SELECT
TALK
1
2W:1&2
4W:1&2
AuxIn:1&2L
AuxOut:1&2G
2
VOLUME
Connect the TR-240(s) to each other via Ethernet cables.
•
Use category 5e or better Ethernet cables that are wired
to standards T-568A or T-568B (most Ethernet cables
are built to these standards).
•
Do not use more than 100m (328ft) of Ethernet cable
between devices.
•
If desired, a user can plug the TR-240 into an AC outlet
with the supplied external power supply while being
used in wired mode.
Figure 7-3
Five Wired TR-240's Communicating with
5 Wireless TR-240's
Set-up
1.
Plug headsets into the TR-240 beltpacks and turn them on,
one by one.
•
If the beltpack has not been previously set to wired mode,
press and hold the < 2 > button while the beltpack boots.
•
•
Allow a few seconds between each beltpack power on.
Select a location for the BTR-240 base station and connect
the power cord and antennas.
•
2.
After approximately 20 seconds, the “wired” voice
prompt will be announced in the headset indicating that
communication has started.
7-2
When using omni-directional antennas, place the base
station as close to the center of the coverage area as
possible.
Connect base station to external audio interfaces. For
example: 2-wire, 4-wire, Auxiliary, Speaker, local headset.
3.
4.
5.
Connect the BTR-240 to all the wired TR-240s via Ethernet
cables.
•
Use category 5e or better Ethernet cables that are wired
to standards T-568A or T-568B (most Ethernet cables
are built to these standards).
•
Do not use more than 100m (328ft) of Ethernet cable
between devices.
Up to 8 full-duplex wireless beltpacks can be used with a single
BTR-240 base station for reliable and uninterrupted
communications on a clear RF channel. Many more half-duplex
beltpacks can be used.
While using 8 full-duplex wireless beltpacks, an additional 2
wired beltpacks can be used with the base station and maintain a
reliable communication link.
Turn on the base station.
•
The menu buttons and LCD backlight illuminate and a
progress bar displays the status while the unit is booting.
•
After approximately 25 seconds, the base station will
have completed the boot cycle and the Status Screen will
be displayed.
•
Activate the connected audio interfaces by navigating
the menu on the LCD screen.
If a BTR-240 base station is loaded beyond it’s capacity limit, the
usability becomes highly subjective. The users will begin to
experience drop outs and potentially delays in the audio.
Any combination of wired and wireless beltpacks is supported as
long as there are no more than 8 wireless full-duplex beltpacks,
and no more than 10 beltpacks overall.
NOTE: The capacity limit may not be achieved if there is
interference on the RF channel of operation or the
network. For further details, refer to Wireless
Interference and Network Interference in Section 10.
Perform a ClearScan.
•
•
6.
Mixed-Mode Capacity Limit
After the base station has completely booted, press and
hold the <MENU> + <SET> buttons for approximately 3
seconds.
Master Wireless Mode
A master wireless mode configuration consists of only TR-240
beltpacks. Only one of the beltpacks is configured as the master
and provides the coverage area for other beltpacks in wireless
mode. This type of configuration is shown in Figure 7-4.
The base station will run the CleaerScan operation and
select the optimal RF channel for operation.
Plug headsets into the TR-240 beltpacks and turn them on,
one by one.
•
For a wireless beltpack that has not been previously set to
wireless mode, press and hold the <TALK> button while
the beltpack boots.
•
For a wired beltpack that has not been previously set to
wired mode, press and hold the <2> button while the
beltpack boots.
•
•
Allow a few seconds between each beltpack power on.
•
The base station will increment the association status on
the Status Screen next to “Assoc: XX” for each of the
active full-duplex beltpacks.
MASTER TR-240
SERVING AS A
BASE STATION
After approximately 20 seconds, a voice prompt will
announce “wireless” or “wired” in the beltpack
headphones indicating that communication has started.
Figure 7-4
One Master TR-240 serving 8 other TR-240s
7-3
Set-up
Tour Group Example
1.
Select one of the beltpacks to operate in master wireless
mode and plug in a headset.
A good example of a master wireless mode application is a tour
group within a noisy manufacturing environment.
2.
Turn on the master-mode TR-240 beltpack.
3.
•
If the beltpack has not been previously set to master
wireless mode, press and hold the <1> button while the
beltpack boots.
•
After approximately 20 seconds, the “master wireless”
voice prompt will be announced in the headset indicating
that communication has started.
•
The voice prompt will also announce the current RF
channel of operation, for example, “Channel 1”.
If the user desires to change the RF channel, continue
holding the <1> button until the voice prompt announces
“RF Selection”.
•
4.
TOUR GUIDE
At this time, the user may run a ClearScan or manually
select the RF channel of operation.
TOUR GROUP
Figure 7-5
Tour Group Application
Once the master-mode TR-240 has booted, plug headsets
into the wireless TR-240 beltpacks and turn them on, one by
one.
•
•
•
As shown in Figure 7-5, a single TR-240 is set to boot in master
wireless mode. This beltpack would be worn by the tour guide.
If the beltpack has not been previously set to wireless
mode, press and hold the <TALK> button while the
beltpack boots.
The rest of the beltpacks are set to boot in wireless mode. They
are all kept in half-duplex mode by having their talk mode set to
“momentary-only”. The members of the tour group would wear
these beltpacks.
Allow a few seconds between each beltpack power on.
After approximately 20 seconds, a voice prompt will
announce “wireless” in the beltpack headphones
indicating that wireless communications has started.
The group size could be up to 28 people (or more) when the
beltpacks are in momentary-only mode. This is because when in
momentary-only mode, the beltpack is half-duplex until the
<TALK> button is pressed activating the microphone path. When
the <TALK> button is pressed, the beltpack becomes full-duplex
and will transmit continuously until the user releases the
<TALK> button. A maximum of 8 members of the group could
push their <TALK> buttons and talk at once.
Master Wireless Mode Capacity Limit
Up to 8 full-duplex wireless beltpacks can be used with a single
TR-240 in master mode (9 total beltpacks) for reliable and
uninterrupted communications on a clear RF channel. Many more
half-duplex beltpacks can be used.
If a master-mode TR-240 is loaded beyond it’s capacity limit, the
usability becomes highly subjective. The users will begin to
experience drop outs and potentially delays in the audio.
NOTE: The capacity limit may not be achieved if there is
interference on the RF channel of operation. For further
details, refer to Wireless Interference in Section 10.
7-4
Linking Multiple Base Stations
Users have several options when linking, or connecting, multiple
BTR-240 base stations together. This can be accomplished by a
digital connection (via Ethernet) or analog connection (via 2-wire
or 4-wire). Each type of link has tradeoffs regarding capacity,
latency, and audio quality.
BTR-240
menu
set
RF Ch: 6
Assoc: 0
CHANNEL
SELECT
When deploying multiple 2.4GHz 802.11 access points, such as
the BTR-240 base stations, there are interference considerations
that must be taken into account to ensure that users obtain the
optimal performance.
BTR-240
TALK
menu
1
2W:1&2
4W:1&2
AuxIn:1&2L
AuxOut:1&2G
2
RF Ch: 6
Assoc: 0
set
POWER
POWER
CHANNEL
SELECT
TALK
1
2W:1&2
4W:1&2
AuxIn:1&2L
AuxOut:1&2G
2
VOLUME
VOLUME
Figure 7-7
Example of Good Cell-Type Deployment
The interference between multiple access points on the same RF
channel is called co-channel interference (CCI) and the
interference between multiple access points on different RF
channels is called adjacent channel interference (ACI). These
types of interference are discussed in further detail in Section 10
“RF Channels and Interference” of this manual. To avoid the
effects of RF interference with multiple access points, however, a
specific deployment strategy, called a cell-type architecture, is
required to ensure optimal performance.
BTR-240
menu
set
POWER
RF Ch: 6
Assoc: 0
CHANNEL
SELECT
BTR-240
CHANNEL
SELECT
TALK
1
2W:1&2
4W:1&2
AuxIn:1&2L
AuxOut:1&2G
menu
2
set
RF Ch: 6
Assoc: 0
TALK
1
2W:1&2
4W:1&2
AuxIn:1&2L
AuxOut:1&2G
POWER
VOLUME
2
VOLUME
Figure 7-8
Example of Poor Cell-Type Deployment
Figure 7-7 is an example of a good cell-type deployment strategy
where the coverage areas from multiple base stations do not
overlap. Figure 7-8 shows an example of poor cell-type
deployment where the coverage areas from multiple base stations
do overlap which will cause interference.
Cell-Type Architecture
A cell-type architecture is a deployment strategy where the
BTR-240 base station provides wireless coverage for it’s own
co-located beltpacks only. The coverage area is the area around
the access point in which the receiver can receive and decode the
data packets with minimal error rates. The Clear Channel
Assessment (CCA) area is the area around the access point in
which the error rate of a receiver is high (out of range) but the
receiver can still “sense” the environment and detect if the
channel is busy before transmitting a signal.
There are many factors that affect the amount of interference that
a BTR-240 will be subject to. These include:
•
•
•
Channel Spacing and Utilization
Separation Distance and Antenna Gain
Type of Environment
Channel Spacing and Utilization
BTR-240
menu
set
RF Ch: 6
Assoc: 0
CHANNEL
SELECT
TALK
1
2W:1&2
4W:1&2
AuxIn:1&2L
AuxOut:1&2G
POWER
Many channels, overlapping and non-overlapping, can co-exist
without noticeable interference if channel utilization, or amount
of channel activity, is minimal. For example, a BTR-240 with 8
wireless full-duplex TR-240s is operating at maximum channel
utilization. A second BTR-240 operating on an adjacent channel
may cause no interference if there are no TR-240s associated with
it. If the second BTR-240 acquires 2 wireless full-duplex
TR-240s, then there may be significant interference.
2
VOLUME
Coverage
Area
CCA
Area
When deploying a BTR-240 in the presence of other BTR-240s
and/or other Wi-Fi access points, it is necessary to select the RF
channel that will have the least amount of energy. The ClearScan
algorithm will scan nearby access points and automatically select
the channel with the least activity and least amount of RF energy.
Figure 7-6
BTR-240 Coverage and CCA Areas
In a cell-type architecture, the coverage areas from multiple base
stations should not overlap. When coverage areas do overlap,
there will be interference. Interference also exists even if the base
stations are operating on “non-overlapping” RF channels if the
base stations are in very close proximity to each other (e.g., rack
equipment).
NOTE: When using multiple BTR-240s in close proximity,
users should always operate them on different
non-overlapping channels.
7-5
Separation Distance and Antenna Gain
Guidelines for Deployment Optimization with
Multiple BTR-240s
Interference is greatly reduced as the physical separation between
access points is increased. The separation distance required for
multiple access points to operate without interference from each
other is dependent upon the type of antennas used.
For BTR-240s operating on non-overlapping RF channels, Table
7-1 can be used as a guideline for separation distances to obtain
the optimal system performance for indoor applications.
Antenna
Separation
Distance
3dBi (supplied)
70ft
7dBi
165ft
11dBi (pointed at each other)
400ft
11dBi (at 45° to each other)
70ft
Table 7-1
BTR-240 Spacing for Non-Overlapping RF Channels
NOTE: When overlapping RF channels are being used, farther
spacing will be required to obtain the same optimal
system performance.
Type of Environment
When BTR-240 base stations are operating indoors and through
walls, the interference will be greatly reduced and the separation
distances required to keep them from interfering will also be
reduced.
Indoor and outdoor environments behave very different because
of the amount of reflections that are present. In general, for
outdoor environments, every antenna gain increase (or decrease)
of 6dB will cause the coverage area to double (or half). For indoor
environments, every antenna gain increase (or decrease) of 9dB
will cause the coverage area to double (or half).
7-6
•
When using omni-directional antennas, place the BTR-240
base station as close to the center of the coverage area as
possible.
•
When possible, always operate multiple BTR-240s on
different “non-overlapping” RF channels.
•
Maintain a minimal separation distance (Table 7-1) between
base stations, even when operating on “non-overlapping” RF
channels.
•
When possible, place multiple BTR-240s such that they do not
have direct LOS to each other.
•
Always try to ensure that wireless beltpacks are separated by at
least 3ft from each other.
Number of Wireless TR-240 Beltpacks
BTR-240s Linked via Ethernet
The Ethernet link between base stations can be used to provide
the fastest connection to maintain low latency between all
devices. The drawback is capacity.
Pros: Minimal latency
Cons: Reduced capacity
A complete system (BTR-240 base stations and TR-240
beltpacks) can support a maximum of 12 full-duplex devices. A
maximum of 8 full-duplex devices can be wireless on a single
base station. Each BTR-240 base station will occupy 1.7
full-duplex devices and each TR-240 will occupy 1 full-duplex
device.
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Number of BTR-240 Base Stations
Figure 7-9
System Capacity via Ethernet Link – BTR-240 Full-Duplex
The system capacity for Ethernet connections is best described by
the graph in Figure 7-9.
Number of Wireless TR-240 Beltpacks
For example, when two BTR-240s are linked together, the system
can support up to a combined total of 8 wireless full-duplex
beltpacks. This could be 4 full-duplex beltpacks on Base#1 and 4
full-duplex beltpacks on Base#2.
The results shown in Figure 7-9 assume that the base station is on
and transmitting. The BTR-240 also features an AP-only mode
where if the <TALK> button is disabled and all of the external
audio interfaces are turned off, the BTR-240 will be placed into
half-duplex and therefore will not occupy 1.7 full-duplex devices.
Figure 7-10 shows the graph for number of beltpacks with the
BTR-240s in AP-only mode.
A much larger system capacity is now obtainable with the
BTR-240s operating in AP-only mode. However, each individual
BTR-240 can still support a maximum of 8 wireless full-duplex
devices.
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Number of BTR-240 Base Stations
Figure 7-10
System Capacity via Ethernet Link – BTR-240 Half-Duplex
For example, when two BTR-240s are linked together and they
are both in AP-only mode, the system can now support up to a
total of 11 wireless full-duplex beltpacks. The total 11 full-duplex
devices could be divided such that 8 full-duplex beltpacks are on
Base#1 and 3 beltpacks on Base#2.
7-7
BTR-240s Linked via 2-Wire
BTR-240s Linked via 4-Wire
Linking base stations via 2-wire has several advantages. Since the
2-wire link is analog, there will be no extra overhead associated
with multicast data transfer as in the Ethernet link. This means
that as long as the base stations are on clear and non-overlapping
RF channels, the base stations can operate completely
independent and therefore much larger capacities can be
achieved.
Linking BTR-240 base stations via 4-wire has similar benefits
(capacity) and constraints (latency) as 2-wire. When used with a
Matrix system, several BTR-240s can be linked together. Since
4-wire does not have the loop thru capabilities as 2-wire, no more
than two (2) BTR-240s can be linked together in the absence of a
Matrix system. The additional benefit to using a 4-wire link is no
reduction in the audio frequency response as with 2-wire.
The drawback is latency. When base stations are linked via
2-wire, and beltpacks from one base station communicate to
beltpacks of another base station, the latency will be double.
However, the echo cancellation algorithm is also operating on the
2-wire interface so this will help in eliminating the resulting
latency effects. The second drawback is a more limited frequency
response of the 2-wire interface.
Pros: Higher capacity, optimal frequency response
Cons: Longer latency
NOTE: When linking two BTR-240s together without a Matrix
system, a custom made “cross-over” cable would be
required to link the 4-wire audio inputs to outputs. See
Section 11 for the wiring diagram and hardware
specifications for the 4-wire interface.
Pros: Highest capacity, echo cancellation
Cons: Longer latency, limited frequency response
CAUTION:
Operating the BTR-240 while 2-wire settings are active and
without the proper system load could result in undesirable
audio quality including potentially loud audio bursts.
Once again, because the BTR-240s are linked with an analog
connection, there is no additional data overhead associated with
the link. As long as the base stations have clear, non-overlapping
RF channels and are separated by the appropriate distance, then
up to 8 wireless full-duplex users can be supported on each
BTR-240 base station.
NOTE: For users that do not have an actual powered 2-wire
system, the link can still be configured. 2-wire
termination loads must be used on one of the base
stations. See the “Accessories and Replacement Parts”
section for ordering information.
N O T E: RF chann els must be co mpletely clear and
non-overlapping and separation distances to obtain the
maximum capacity on each BTR-240 base station.
The loop-thru feature of 2-wire enables the user to link several
base stations together with or without an actual 2-wire intercom
system. As long as the base stations have clear, non-overlapping
RF channels and are separated by the appropriate distance, then
up to 8 wireless full-duplex users can be supported on each
BTR-240 base station.
N O T E: RF chann els must be co mpletely clear and
non-overlapping and separation distances to obtain the
maximum capacity on each BTR-240 base station.
7-8
Network Requirements
These network requirements apply to interconnect BTR-240 base
stations and wired-mode TR-240 beltpacks. In general, the
BTR-240 and the TR-240 follow the same rules as other Ethernet
networked devices. These rules are:
1.
All BTR-240 base stations and TR-240 beltpacks must have
a unique IP (internet protocol) address and cannot have the
same IP address.
Also, no other devices on the wired network can have the
same IP addresses as the BTR-240s or TR-240s being used.
2.
Use category 5e (CAT5e) or better Ethernet cables that are
wired to standards T-568A or T-568B (most Ethernet cables
are built to these standards).
3.
When connecting TR-240s or BTR-240s together directly
without the use of a building's network infrastructure, do not
use more than 100m (328ft) of Ethernet cable between
devices.
4.
If using an existing building's Ethernet network, consult
your network administrator as to the locations you plan on
connecting your BTR-240s or TR-240s to the network. They
can then check to make sure distance limitations of the
network are met and that existing in-house routers / switches
are set to pass TR-240 and BTR-240 packets.
Description
IP Type
Destination IP Protocol
Audio
Packet
1
Multicast
239.192.168.1
UDP
Audio
Packet
2
Multicast
239.192.168.2
UDP
Multicast
239.192.168.3
UDP
Audio 1 + 2
Table 7-2
BTR-240/TR-240 Wired Data Packets
7-9
[This page intentionally left blank]
7-10
Section 8 - User Configuration Options
User Configuration Options
Network Configuration
The BTR-240 base station and TR-240 beltpack both have
additional features that can be accessed by logging into the unit
from a personal computer.
Use the following instructions to properly configure the
computers Ethernet adapter to communicate to the BTR-240 or
TR-240 device.
These features include:
1.
Unplug any current RJ-45 network connection from the
computer.
2.
Navigate to the “Network Connections” window.
•
•
•
•
•
Login password
•
•
•
Squelch Setting (TR-240 only)
Audio Encryption key
IP Address
– Start -> Control Panel
– Double-click on Network Connections.
SSID
Wireless Security
WEP Encryption Key
MAC Filtering
3.
–
–
Open the properties window for the “Local Area
Connection”.
– Right-click on Local Area Connection.
– Select Properties.
Out-of-Range Alert (TR-240 only)
Full-duplex Mode (TR-240 only)
Computer Requirements
Hardware
•
Laptop or desktop computer with a Network card (10/100
Based).
•
Ethernet straight through cable (use the green cable supplied
with the system).
Operating System
Microsoft1 Windows1 XP, Windows Vista1, and Windows 7,
Mac OS1, Linux1.
Software
Figure 8-1
Network Connections
Telnet or similar application that lets you communicate to a
specified IP address (most all computers have the Telnet
application or a similar program installed by default).
4.
Open the properties window for “Internet Protocol
(TCP/IP)”.
Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
– Select
mouse.
– Click on the Properties button.
NOTE: Not all operating systems have the Telnet application
enabled by default (i.e., Windows Vista and Windows
7). Consult the operating system help documents for
assistance enabling this application.
1
8-1
See “Copyright Notice” on page i.
with the
5.
Select the check box next to Use the following IP address:
6.
Enter the following information:
– IP address:
– Subnet mask:
192.168.1.40
255.255.255.0
7.
Once the above information is entered, hit the OK button to
exit the Internet Protocol menu.
8.
Press the OK or Close button to exit the Local Area
Connections properties window.
NOTE: Depending on the computer and operating system, it
may give notification that it should be restarted before
the IP address changes will take effect.
Logging into a Device
Before continuing, ensure that all the steps have been
successfully completed in the previous “Network Configuration”
section.
1.
Figure 8-2
Local Area Connection Properties
NOTE:
Ensure that the BTR-240 or TR-240 device is first powered
off before connecting the Ethernet cable.
NOTE: Only the device being logged into should be connected
to the computer. If using a hub, all other connected
BTR-240s or TR-240s need to be powered off.
At this point, make a note of the current settings on this
screen (so they can be placed back when done editing
the devices).
2.
Identify the IP address of the BTR-240 or TR-240 device
that is going to be logged into by locating the sticker on the
unit.
SSID: RTS240
IP: 192.168.1.1
IP: 192.168.1.1
Figure 8-4
IP Address on TR-240
IP: 192.168.1.240
BTR-240
PROGRAM
BTR-240
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Illlll ll lllll lll lll llllllllllllllll llll lll llll lllll
Illllllll llllll llllllllllllll lllllllllll llll lllllllllll
Illlllllllllll llll llll lll llll lllll lll llllllllll lll
Illlll lllllllllll llll llllll ll llll lll llll lllll
Illlll lll
Illlllllll ll lll
S.N. 00000
TX
10 26
Figure 8-3
Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties
MADE IN USA
lll ll lllllll
ll lllll lllllll
RX
SPEAKER
INTERCOM 2
INTERCOM 1
PUSH
2 WIRE
L
O
O
P
T
H
R
U
AUDIO
4 WIRE
PUSH
2 WIRE
L
O
O
P
IP: 192.168.1.240
Figure 8-5
IP Address on BTR-240
8-2
PUSH
AUDIO
AUXILARY
AUDIO
12/15/VDC
1.5A
4 WIRE
T
H
R
U
INPUT
OUTPUT
3.
4.
Connect the BTR-240 or TR-240 device to the computer by
using the supplied green Ethernet cable.
NOTE: The password entry does not give user feedback to the
screen.
Turn on the BTR-240 or TR-240 device and allow it to boot
completely.
8.
NOTE: The TR-240 needs to be booted in “wired mode” in
order to activate the Ethernet port. If it isn’t already,
press and hold the < 2 > button while the beltpack is
booting.
5.
After a successful login, the User Menu Options will be
displayed.
Start a “Command Prompt” console window.
– Start -> Programs -> Accessories
– Click on Command Prompt.
6.
In the console window, type the following command:
– “telnet 192.168.1.X”
<Enter>
NOTE: “X” is the last digit of the IP address on the device
sticker.
Figure 8-8
User Menu Options (TR-240)
NOTE: If the computer says, “failed to connect” after typing
the “telnet” command in Step 6. First wait 15 seconds
and try the command one more time. If that does not
work, turn off the BTR-240 or TR-240 device, check
the settings in the “Network Configuration” section,
and repeat all the instructions in the section “Logging
into a Device”.
NOTE: The “backspace” keyboard button may not work on
all computers using Telnet. If this is the case, use
the “delete” button instead.
Figure 8-6
Telnet Command
7.
Software Version
From the User Menu Options screen (Figure 8-8), the software
version of the unit is displayed on the top line. Please note the
revision letter, number and the release date. These three items will
change if the software is ever modified or upgraded. For example,
the beltpack login screen in Figure 8-8 has a software revision
letter of “A”, revision number of “1.0.0”, and a release date of
“FEB 25, 2011”. Similar numbers will be shown when logging
into a BTR-240.
After approximately 20 seconds, the device will respond
with a login request. Enter the following information:
– Login:
– Password:
rts240 <Enter>
legacy <Enter>
NOTE: For software version 2.0.0 and greater, a letter to
indicate the region is appended to the revision number.
For example, "B(2.0.0)n", where the "n" is for North
America. Other region codes are: "e" for Europe &
China, "j" for Japan and "k" for Korea.
Figure 8-7
Login Screen
The second line of the User Menu Options screen indicates the
system model and location. For example, the beltpack login in
Figure 8-8 indicates that it is a TR-240 and that it has been
configured for use in North America.
8-3
User Menu Options
There are several ways that a particular BTR-240 or TR-240 can
be custom configured to the unique and specific requirements of a
user. There are ten options that are available to both the BTR-240
and the TR-240. The TR-240 also has an additional three options
that are specific to the functionality of the beltpack.
4.
Enable/Disable Full-Duplex (TR-240 only)
This option allows the user to change the BTR-240 or TR-240
login password. The maximum password length is 8 characters.
The default factory password is “legacy”. The user is never
allowed to change the login name of “rts240”.
The Full-Duplex menu option is only accessible to a TR-240
beltpack. When full-duplex is enabled, the beltpack <TALK>
button will activate the microphone path as normal operation. For
some applications, a user may want to configure some of the
TR-240 beltpacks to be listen-only and never be able to transmit
and take up system bandwidth. When full-duplex is disabled, the
beltpack <TALK> button will never activate the microphone path
and a user will hear an error tone (three tone pulses) when the
button is pressed to notify the user that they are restricted to
half-duplex only.
2.
By default, full-duplex is enabled and the <TALK> button will be
able to activate the microphone path as normal.
1.
Enter New Login Password
Display/Edit Audio Encryption Key
This option allows the user to view the current audio encryption
key as well as modify it. The audio encryption must be the
same on all devices to communicate. The maximum key length is
80 characters. The key is upper and lower case sensitive Any
combination of letters, numbers, punctuation, and spaces can be
used. For example, “This RTS BTR-240 System is great!” may be
used as the encryption key.
5.
The Out of Range Alert menu option is only accessible to a
TR-240 beltpack. When a TR-240 beltpack is in wireless mode
and is out of range from an access point (BTR-240 or TR-240 in
master mode) an alert tone will sound in the beltpack headset to
notify the user that they should move closer to the access point for
reliable communication. This feature can also be disabled so that
no alert tone is heard in the headset.
By default, the encryption key is set to “2345”.
By default, the Out of Range Alert is enabled.
CAUTION:
Use a key that is easy to remember or write down the key
when changed. ALL beltpacks must have the same key
entered in order to communicate.
3.
Enable/Disable Out of Range Alert (TR-240 only)
6.
Display/Edit IP Address
The IP address is a unique set of numbers to identify a particular
device on a network. The IP address must be different on each
device to operate and communicate with each other. Due to the
fact that the BTR-240 and TR-240s are packaged and sold
individually, it is possible that an IP address will match and need
to be changed.
Display/Change Squelch Setting (TR-240 only)
The Squelch Setting menu option is only accessible for a TR-240
beltpack (the squelch setting for the BTR-240 is controlled from
the LCD screen). The squelch setting is a feature that can be
enabled to reduce noise and/or echo that is transmitted from the
beltpack. The squelch setting effectively acts as a noise gate at the
beltpack for the transmitting audio. If the beltpack audio input
level does not meet or exceed the level that is set by the squelch,
then no audio is transmitted.
The IP address format for the BTR-240 and TR-240 is
192.168.1.X
where ‘X’ is a number between 1 and 254.
For example, a squelch level of “00” is off and the beltpack will
transmit all audio. A very low squelch level of “01” or “02” will
transmit all audio but will reduce noise when the intercom
channels are inactive. A high squelch level of “10” or more will
prevent the beltpack from transmitting low levels of audio. If two
users are standing next to each other, this will significantly reduce
acoustic echo between those users.
CAUTION:
Be sure not to use the same IP address for more than one
system device. ALL base stations and beltpacks must have
different IP addresses in order to communicate.
NOTE: Each BTR-240 and TR-240 device comes with a sticker
that indicates the IP address it was set at the factory.
When changing the IP address, make sure to record, or
write it underneath the original IP address in permanent
marker.
By default, the squelch is set to “0”, or off. The squelch can be
modified to a level between 0-16.
8-4
7.
Display/Edit SSID
11. Enable/Disable MAC Filtering
The Service Set Identifier (SSID) is a phrase to identify a
particular wireless network. The SSID must be the same on all
wireless devices to communicate. The maximum SSID length is
32 characters. The SSID is upper and lower case sensitive. Any
combination of letters, numbers, punctuation, and spaces can be
used. For example, “Hello world, this is my SSID!” may be used
as the SSID.
MAC address filtering is an additional layer of security to a
wireless network. Each access point holds a list of wireless
physical devices that are allowed (or denied) when trying to
connect.
MAC address filtering only needs to be enabled on an access
point (BTR-240 base station or TR-240 beltpack in master
wireless mode).
By default, the SSID is set to “RTS240”.
By default, MAC address filtering is disabled.
CAUTION:
Write down the SSID when changed. ALL wireless base
stations and beltpacks must have the same SSID entered in
order to communicate.
8.
CAUTION:
MAC address filtering adds additional security, but also
adds additional complexity. Only advanced users should
enable this feature for setup. If done incorrectly, devices
may no longer communicate.
Enable/Disable 802.11 WEP Encryption
The Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) encryption adds security to
a wireless network by encrypting the entire 802.11 packet. This
feature is used in conjunction with the audio encryption for a
dual-layer encryption scheme. WEP encryption can be enabled or
disabled.
12. Display/Edit MAC Filter List
When this menu option is selected, the current list of MAC
address entries are displayed. When MAC address filtering is
enabled (from Menu Option 11), the access point will “allow”
only wireless physical devices from this list to connect to it. Users
can add MAC addresses to the list, or delete them from the list.
The maximum number of MAC address entries is 50.
By default, the WEP encryption is enabled.
9.
Display/Edit WEP Encryption Key
NOTE: Before entering the list of MAC addresses into the
access point, the user must first login to each unit and
record the wireless MAC address from it (Menu
Option 10).
When WEP encryption is enabled (from Menu Option 8), a
paraphrase will be used to encrypt the entire 802.11 packet. The
WEP key must be the same on all wireless devices to
communicate. The paraphrase can be a 40-bit key (WEP-40) or a
104-bit key (WEP-140). The maximum WEP key length is 13
characters. The WEP key is upper and lower case sensitive. Any
combination of letters, numbers, punctuation, and spaces can be
used. For example, “~W]E(p*K-e#Y^” may be used as the WEP
key.
A MAC address has the format of
XX : XX : XX : XX : XX : XX
where “X” is a hexadecimal number (numbers 0-9, and letters
“A”, “B”, “C”, “D”, “E”, and “F”).
By default, the WEP key is set to “bosch”.
13. Enable/Disable Beacon Broadcast
CAUTION:
Write down the WEP key when changed. ALL wireless base
stations and beltpacks must have the same WEP key entered
in order to communicate.
In normal operation, an access point (BTR-240 or TR-240 in
master wireless mode) will broadcast its SSID. In doing so, it
becomes visible to other nearby Wi-Fi enabled devices (i.e.,
computers, cell phones, etc.). Each of these devices can "see" this
SSID as a possible wireless network to connect to.
10. Display Device MAC Addresses
In some instances, it may be desirable to hide the SSID broadcast
to reduce traffic on the RF channel from other devices attempting
to gain unauthorized access to the system. By disabling the
beacon broadcast, the SSID of the system will no longer appear to
other devices.
When connecting devices to an existing network or
infrastructure, users may want to know what the Media Access
Control (MAC) addresses are for both the wired and wireless
network interfaces. By selecting this menu option, both of these
MAC addresses are displayed.
By default, the Beacon Broadcast is enabled.
CAUTION:
ClearScan will not avoid a RF channel that is being used by
an access point with its Beacon Broadcast is disabled. Other
8-5
frequency coordination efforts may be required to avoid
interference among access points.
NOTE: This feature was added in firmware version B(2.1.0)
which was released in 07/2013.
14. Exit
This menu option will exit the login and closes the Telnet
connection to the BTR-240 or TR-240. If any changes were
made, the unit must be rebooted before they take effect.
8-6
Section 9 - Maintenance and Care
Li-Ion Batteries
The BP-240 Li-Ion battery pack used in the TR-240 beltpacks are
excellent batteries for portable, indoor/outdoor applications.
They have a high energy density (energy per weight) compared to
other rechargeable battery technologies (NiCd, NiMH, Alkaline,
gel Cells), are low maintenance, and offer superior performance
at low temperatures.
3.
Battery Care
One of the major risks associated with transportation of batteries
is short circuit of the battery as a result of the battery terminals
coming into contact with other batteries, metal objects or
conductive surfaces.
Battery Transportation
To ensure the long life and safe handling of the BP-240 Li-Ion
batteries, please note and adhere to the following precautions:
1.
Store the BP-240s in a clean, cool, dry location away from
heat.
2.
Do not burn or expose batteries to excessive heat such as
direct sunlight, fire, or other heat sources.
3.
Do not disassemble, puncture, crush or subject the BP-240
(or TR-240 containing the battery pack), to excessive
impact.
4.
Dispose of a BP-240 in proper Li-Ion recycling location.
The BP-240 features a special design with recessed battery
terminals to avoid this scenario from happening. The BP-240
battery pack also contains internal safety circuits itself to prevent
any major risk associated with shorted terminals. However, care
should be taken to prevent short circuits or damage to terminals
when transporting the batteries. The following guidelines must be
followed to ensure safe transportation of the BP-240 rechargeable
Li-Ion battery packs.
Long Term Battery Storage
Li-Ion batteries retain nearly all their capacity if stored for long
term in dry, cool temperatures with only 30% to 50% of their full
charge capacity. They can loose up to 20% capacity if stored for
long term immediately after being fully charged.
Transport the BP-240 battery pack while it is locked into a
TR-240 beltpack.
2.
Transport spare BP-240 battery packs in a padded case,
separated from one another with non-conductive materials
(i.e., a plastic bag).
3.
Do not transport batteries bundled together.
The BTR-240 system should only be cleaned with a soft and
damp cloth. Never spray chemicals or cleaning solvents directly
onto the units.
For the best performance, RTS recommends that the battery
packs be charged to 30 – 50% of capacity before being placed in
storage. This is the typical battery capacity left after 4 – 6 hours of
full-duplex wireless usage.
Temperature and Humidity
The BTR-240 system is robust and designed to work in a wide
range of environmental conditions. When possible, the BTR-240s
and TR-240s should be stored and used in an environment as close
to indoor room temperature and humidity conditions as possible.
To place a BP-240 into long term storage:
After the last event:
a. If the battery pack was used for four hours or less then
do not recharge the battery pack.
NOTE: Always perform system setup and configuration
indoors and before deployment. Especially for
operation of the devices in temperatures that are near
the system limitations.
b. If the battery pack was used for more than four hours
then recharge the pack for two hours (via direct charge).
2.
1.
Cleaning
The phrase “long term storage” is defined as no use of the device
for 1 month or longer. Care should be taken for Li-Ion batteries
when moving them into long term storage.
1.
Every 6 months, charge the BP-240s for three hours (via
direct charge) then remove them from charging. Do not fully
charge. This procedure prevents the battery packs from over
discharging and helps maintain the battery’s performance.
The devices should never be exposed directly to extreme weather
conditions. The BTR-240 base station and power supply should
be located where they will not have exposure to dust and
moisture. When using the TR-240 in conditions where moisture
may occur, the protective beltpack case should be used. See
“Accessories and Replacement Parts” for ordering information.
Store the BP-240s in a clean, cool, dry location away from
heat. The recommended temperature range of the storage
location is 32 – 77 ºF (0 – 25ºC). The temperature of the
storage location should not rise above or below the
recommended storage temperature.
9-1
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9-2
Section 10 - RF Channels & Interference
802.11 RF Channels
Although there are several different frequency channel settings,
there is overlap between the channels. In North America, there
are three non-overlapping channels available (Channels 1, 6, and
11). In Europe, China, and Japan, there are more non-overlapping
channels available.
Figure 10-1 displays the entire 802.11 RF channel spectrum for
2.4GHz. In North America, the BTR-240 system has the ability to
operate on any RF channel between 1 and 11. In Europe, China,
and Japan, the BTR-240 system has the ability to operate on any
RF channel between 1 and 13.
\
Channel Numbers
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
5
10
2
13
7
12
6
1
2.432
2.427
14
14
8
2.422
13
9
3
2.417
12
10
4
2.412
11
11
2.452
2.442
2.437
2.447
2.462
2.457
2.472
2.467
2.484
2.477
Channel Center Frequencies (in GHz)
22 MHz
Channel Bandwidth
Fig 10-1
BTR-240 & TR-240 RF Channelization Scheme
BTR-240 & TR-240 RF Channelization Scheme
10-1
802.11 “Non-Overlapping” Channels
CSMA-CA
Each of the RF channels in the 2.4GHz spectrum has a “22MHz
bandwidth” which allows channels 1, 6 and 11 to exist with no
overlap.
The reason devices can communicate without collisions in the
environment is a mechanism in the 802.11 protocol called Carrier
Sense Multiple Access-Collision Avoidance (CSMA-CA).
Before a device transmits an 802.11 packet over the wireless
channel, the device performs a Clear Channel Assessment (CCA)
which is a measurement of the amount of energy in the channel. If
the CCA fails, the device identifies the channel as busy and has to
back-off/wait to send it’s transmission until the channel is all
clear.
In reality, the 802.11 protocol for 2.4GHz does not actually
define a “width” of the channel. It does, however, define a
“spectral mask”, or channel shape, to which a transmitter must
conform. The specific requirements are that the signal must be at
least -30dB at ±11MHz from the center frequency. This defines
the “main lobe” and is where the “22MHz bandwidth” is derived.
The signal must also be at least -50dB at ±22MHz from the center
frequency and beyond.
The CSMA-CA mechanism is also the reason why interference
must be avoided. When using overlapping channels, or
“non-overlapping” channels, portions of the spectrum are shared
and transmissions can be heard by all devices. The CCA of a
device will fail if it detects a strong enough interfering signal,
even if that it is not intended for that device.
0 dBr
Main Lobe
-30 dBr
Data vs. Real-time Audio
Interference can exist with any IEEE 802.11 WLAN. In many
areas, users may find several near-by access points to which they
can connect, all of them may even be on non-overlapping RF
channels. The difference is the application of data vs. real-time
audio.
-50 dBr
Sideband Lobe
fc22 MHz
fc11 MHz
fc
For data applications in the presence of RF interference, the effect
may be slightly longer download / upload speeds while the
devices are waiting for the channel to become clear. This may
even go un-noticed to a user when browsing the internet or
downloading files.
fc+
fc+
11 MHz 22 MHz
Figure 10-4
802.11 Transmitter Spectral Mask at 2.4GHz
For a real-time audio application, like the BTR-240 system,
devices cannot simply wait for extended periods of time for the
channel to become clear. If the channel is not clear after a specific
waiting period, the information packet is simply dropped. When
this happens, the result is a “tick” or “pop” in the received audio.
For speech applications, an occasional tick or pop may be
tolerable, but for systems with a lot of interference, consecutive
ticks and pops present themselves in the form of audio “break-up”
which may render the system unacceptable or unusable.
Figure 10-5 shows that the “non-overlapping” RF channels
actually do overlap at lower signal levels. The reality is that even
though the overlap of “non-overlapping” RF channels is
measured at -30dB or -50dB, those levels are still strong enough
to cause interference, especially when in close proximity to each
other.
2.412 GHz
(Channel 1)
2.437 GHz
(Channel 6)
2.462 GHz
(Channel 11)
Figure 10-5
Actual Spectrum of “Non-overlapping” RF Channels
10-2
802.11 Wireless / RF Interference
3.
The BTR-240 system offers many benefits by operating in the
2.4GHz ISM frequency band. The main reason is that it allows
users to operate without a license requirement in most countries.
The 802.11 protocol also has world-wide acceptance which
permits users to travel with their system to locations where
802.11 devices are allowed.
Along with the many benefits of the 802.11 technology, there are
some constraints. Because the 802.11 protocol is license-free and
so widely adopted, there exist numerous devices that utilize these
frequencies all over the world. These devices must coexist and
share the RF spectrum. When multiple devices that are sharing
the RF spectrum are located in close proximity to each other, they
create wireless interference.
Wireless interference for 2.4GHz could come from a wide
variety of sources including: Bluetooth enabled devices,
microwave ovens, cordless telephones, cellular phones with
Wi-Fi capabilities, and other nearby Wi-Fi access points.
In the presence of wireless interference, users of the BTR-240
system may experience performance degradation. Performance
degradation may be in the form of capacity reduction, wireless
range reduction, or audio quality degradation in the form of
“break-up”.
4.
How to Avoid RF Interference?
In some environments, RF interference can be controlled, and in
others, it cannot. There are numerous ways that a BTR-240
system operator can avoid a significant impact to RF interference.
1.
•
The omni-directional antennas supplied with the
BTR-240 provide a wireless coverage area in a circle
around the BTR-240 equally in all directions which gives
wireless users the ability to roam in all directions. This
also means that the antennas will pick up interference
from all these directions. Make sure the BTR-240 is
located at the center of the wireless coverage area.
•
If the users are co-located, a directional antenna may be
used as a better antenna option. This will provide a
wireless coverage area in one direction and prevent
coverage and interference from other directions.
•
Ensure that a BTR-240 is spaced far enough away from
interfering sources including other access points and
other BTR-240s, even if operating on “non-overlapping”
RF channels. Refer to Table 7-1 in Section 7 for
separation distances.
•
Prevent a BTR-240 from having LOS to other BTR-240s
or access points, even if operating on “non-overlapping”
RF channels.
BTR-240 and BTR-24 Cell Type Deployment
•
Multiple base stations (BTR-240s and BTR-24s) can be
deployed and linked to provide a wider coverage area or
wireless coverage in separate locations.
•
If users are co-located in multiple areas and/or separated
by a large distance, linking multiple base stations with
smaller antenna gains would be a better option than a
single base station with large antenna gain to minimize
interference and provide the same coverage area.
•
Keep coverage areas separate and do not allow coverage
areas from multiple BTR-240s, BTR-24s or other access
points to overlap.
Analyze the Environment
•
•
2.
BTR-240 Location and Antennas
The ClearScan intelligence in the BTR-240 will scan the
environment for surrounding Wi-Fi access points and
select the optimal RF channel to operate. A ClearScan
should be performed prior to the event. If a user suddenly
experience performance degradation while operating, it
is possible that a new source of RF interference became
present and ClearScan could be run again.
5.
There are many RF site surveying tools available that
will detect more 2.4GHz interference than other Wi-Fi
access points. This could be used to identify an optimal
RF channel to operate on.
Reduce the Number of Full-Duplex Users
•
Prevent the Interference from Transmitting
•
In some cases, it may be possible to find the source of
interference and shut it down. Other Wi-Fi devices may
include nearby laptop/desktop computers or Wi-Fi
enabled mobile phones. These devices should be shut
down or their Wi-Fi capabilites could be temporarily
disabled when operating near a BTR-240 system. Other
non-Wi-Fi devices would be Bluetooth headsets,
microwave ovens, and cordless telephones. These
devices should also be turned off and not operating near a
BTR-240 system.
6.
Move Wireless Users to Wired
•
10-3
Any users that do not really need to be in full-duplex
mode (transmitting all the time), should be placed in
half-duplex mode (transmitting only while the <TALK>
button is pressed). This reduces the capacity load and
will perform significantly better in an environment that
contains interference.
If wireless users are located near the base station and do
not need roaming capabilities, they could be attached to
the base station via Ethernet cable. This would reduce the
wireless capacity load and perform significantly better in
an environment that contains interference.
Wired / Network Interference
The BTR-240 system allows both wireless and wired users to
operate at the same time. Similar to wireless interference, wired
users may experience performance degradation if operating over
an existing Ethernet infrastructure that has a lot of traffic.
How to Avoid Network Interference?
When connected to an existing Ethernet infrastructure, it will be
difficult to control the network interference because many users
may be connected. If other connected users are performing any
operations such as video streaming or large file downloads and
transfers, this may render the performance of the BTR-240 and
wired TR-240s unusable.
1.
Use a Dedicated Network for the BTR-240 System
•
2.
The recommended and absolute best option for the
BTR-240 system is to use a dedicated network for wired
devices. In this scenario, only BTR-240 and TR-240
devices will be connected and performance will not be
degraded.
Reduce the Number of Full-Duplex Users
•
Any users that do not need to be in full-duplex mode
(transmitting all the time), should be placed in
half-duplex mode (transmitting only while the
<TALK> button is pressed). This reduces the network
capacity load and will perform significantly better on an
Ethernet infrastructure that contains interference.
10-4
Section 11 - Hardware Specifications
2-Wire
The 2-wire intercom uses a standard 3-pin XLR for connectivity.
The 2-wire specifications and wiring diagrams will vary depending
on which type of intercom is connected (RTS, AudioCom (Telex),
or Clear-Com).
It is important to ensure that the cables are wired correctly for
proper system operation. Refer to Figure 11-1 for the 3-pin XLR
wiring diagrams and specifications for each intercom type.
RTS
COMMON
Input Impedance: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200W
Output Level: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.775 Vrms nominal
AUDIO 1 PLUS POWER
Bridging Impedance: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . >10kW
1
2
Call Signaling:
Send: . . . . . . . . . . . 20k Hz ± 100 Hz, 240 mVrms
AUDIO 2
3
Receive: . . . . . . . . 20k Hz ± 800 Hz, 100 mVrms
Power Voltage: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28.0 VDC nominal
MALE
AudioCom/Telex
COMMON
Input Impedance: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300W
Output Level: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 Vrms nominal
AUDIO ( - ) PLUS POWER
1
Bridging Impedance: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . >10kW
2
Call Signaling:
Send: . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20k Hz ± 100 Hz, 5 mVrms
AUDIO (+) PLUS POWER
3
Receive: . . . . . . . . 20k Hz ± 800 Hz, 100 mVrms
Power Voltage: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24.0 VDC nominal
MALE
Clear-Com
COMMON
Input Impedance: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200W
Output Level: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 Vrms nominal
POWER
1
Bridging Impedance: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . >10kW
Call Signaling:
Send: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 ± 3 VDC
Receive:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 VDC Minimum
Power Voltage: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.0 VDC nominal
2
3
MALE
Figure 11-1
2-Wire Specifications and Wiring Diagrams
11-1
AUDIO
Local Headset
4-Wire
The local headset connector is a standard 4-pin XLR. A male
XLR is used for Telex devices and a female XLR is used for RTS
devices. Figures 11-2 and 11-3 show the wiring diagrams for each
headset configuration.
The 4-wire intercoms use a standard 6-pin modular jack (RJ-11)
for connectivity. The 4-wire intercom uses two pairs of wires to
support one full-duplex audio channel. One pair for sending
balanced audio, and one pair for receiving balanced audio. It is
important to ensure that the cables are wired correctly for proper
system operation. Refer to Figure 11-4 for the 4-wire 6-pin wiring
diagram.
Telex Units
PIN 6 5 4 3 2 1
(4) Headphone
Low (-)
(1) Microphone
Shield (-)
NC = NOT CONNECTED
(3) Headphone
High (+)
(2) Microphone
Audio (+)
NC
(4) Headphone
Low (-)
RTS Units
PUSH
(3) Headphone
High (+)
NC
AUDIO IN AUDIO OUT -
(1) Microphone
Shield (-)
Auxiliary Input
Figure 11-2
BTR-240 Headset Wiring Diagram
The auxiliary input jack is a combination jack. It will accept either
a 3-pin XLR or ¼" (6.3mm) plug. The expected input is a
balanced line level input. Refer to Figure 11-5 for the wiring
diagram of the auxiliary.
+ AUDIO
Telex Units
- AUDIO
(4) Headphone
Low (-)
GROUND
1
2
(3) Headphone
High (+)
(2) Microphone
Audio (+)
AUDIO OUT +
Figure 11-4
4-Wire Wiring Diagram
(2) Microphone
Audio (+)
(1) Microphone
Shield (-)
AUDIO IN +
SLEEVE
RING
3
TIP
RTS Units
PUSH
(4) Headphone
Low (-)
(3) Headphone
High (+)
(1) Microphone
Shield (-)
Figure 11-5
Auxiliary Wiring Diagram
(2) Microphone
Audio (+)
Figure 11-3
TR-240 Headset Wiring Diagram
11-2
Auxiliary Output
Program
The auxiliary output jack is a 3-pin XLR. It outputs balanced
audio at line level. Refer to Figure 11-6 for the wiring diagram of
the auxiliary output.
The Program connector is a standard 8-pin modular jack (RJ-45).
This port is to be used with standard Ethernet cables of Category
5e or better. The program connector has automatic crossover
detection so both straight and crossover cables can be used. Refer
to Figure 11-8 for the wiring diagram of the program port.
GROUND
- AUDIO
+ AUDIO
1
RESERVED
TX+
RXRX+
2
RESERVED
TXRESERVED
RESERVED
3
MALE
Figure 11-6
Auxiliary Output Wiring Diagram
PIN 1
PIN 8
Speaker Output
Figure 11-8
Program Wiring Diagram
The speaker jack is a 2-pin jack that will accept a Pheonix type
connector. The speaker jack outputs balanced audio with a
maximum output of 1W into 8 Ohms. The speaker jack can drive
a mono speaker as low as 4 Ohms. Refer to Figure 11-7 for the
wiring diagram of the speaker jack.
+ AUDIO
- AUDIO
Figure 11-7
Speaker Wiring Diagram
11-3
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11-4
Section 12 - Troubleshooting
Prior to troubleshooting, please reread the sections of this manual
to ensure the system is properly set-up. The following table
contains troubleshooting tips that may be helpful in solving the
problem.
Problem
RF range of all the beltpacks is less than
normal and/or beltpacks are experiencing
“break-up” of audio in an area where they have
worked well in the past.
If you are unable to solve the problem, contact the manufacturer
or dealer from whom you purchased the system for assistance.
Possible Cause
Solution
• Antenna(s) not connected to the BTR-240.
• Connect the antenna(s) to the BTR-240.
The antenna connectors on the rear panel of
the BTR-240 are labeled transmit (TX) and
receive (RX). If antenna has cables, make
sure the correct cable of the antenna goes to
the corresponding connector on the
BTR-240.
• The two antenna connections are not
connected to the right connectors on the
BTR-240.
• If the antenna has cables, they are labeled
transmit (TX) and receive (RX). The
antenna connectors on the rear panel of the
BTR-240 are also labeled TX and RX.
Antennas with cables must be connected to
the properly labeled port.
• RF interference has occurred.
• Review Section 10 of this manual and
sub-section titled “802.11 Wireless
Interference” for instructions on how to
avoid RF interference.
When the TR-240 beltpack power was turned
on, the unit's power light came on, but the
Channel 1 button light never came on and
communication never started.
• The TR-240
exhausted.
pack is nearly
• Charge the battery pack, or replace it with a
fully charged one.
• On boot, an error occurred and the unit
could not finish the boot cycle
• Turn off the power to the TR-240, wait
three seconds, and then power on again.
When the BTR-240 base station power was
turned on, the LCD and button backlights
came on, but the progress bar did not complete
and communication never started.
• On boot, an error occurred and the unit
could not finish the boot cycle.
• Turn off the power to the BTR-240, wait
three seconds, and then power on again.
Headphone audio from another beltpack(s) is
loud and distorted.
• Microphone gain on the other beltpack(s) is
set too high.
• Review Section 5 (BTR-240) and Section 6
(TR-240) of this manual and sub-sections
titled “Microphone Gain Adjustment” for
instructions on how to decrease the
microphone gain.
• On boot, an error occurred and the unit
booted with extra headset gain.
• Turn off the power to the BTR-240 or
TR-240, wait three seconds, and then
power on again.
• Microphone gain on the other beltpack(s) is
set too low.
• Review Section 5 (BTR-240) and Section 6
(TR-240) of this manual and sub-sections
titled “Microphone Gain Adjustment” for
instructions on how to increase the
microphone gain.
• The headset microphone element on the
other beltpack(s) is too far away from the
user's mouth.
• Adjust the headset microphone element on
the suspected beltpack(s) so it is one index
finger width straight out from the user's
mouth.
Headphone audio from another beltpack(s) is
too low.
battery
12-1
Problem
The “Assoc” number on the BTR-240 does not
increment when a wireless TR-240 is booted
and communication does not happen.
Possible Cause
Solution
• The TR-240 did not boot in wireless mode.
• Review Section 6 of this manual and the
sub-section titled “Wireless Mode” for
instructions on how to boot the beltpack in
wireless mode. Ensure that the <TALK>
button is held down the whole time the unit
is booting.
• The TR-240 is not in full-duplex.
• If the Channel button lights(s) on the
TR-240 are blinking, the TR-240 is in
half-duplex (listen-only) and the BTR-240
will not increment the “Assoc”. Review
Section 6 of this manual and the sub-section
titled “Talk Button” for instructions on how
to engage the microphone path and place
the TR-240 in full-duplex.
• There is a network configuration problem.
• Review Section 8 of this manual and the
sub-section titled “User Configuration”.
There are several potential sources for
network configuration error that will not
allow devices to communicate:
– IP addresses of units are the same
– SSID do not match
– Encryption is not enabled/disabled on all
devices.
– WEP encryption keys do not match.
– MAC address filtering (if enabled) has not
been configured properly and is blocking
the device.
• If the network configuration problem
cannot be identified, perform a Factory
Reset on all devices to restore all the
factory defaults. Review Section 5
(BTR-240) and Section 6 (TR-240) of this
manual for instructions on how to perform a
factory reset.
Extremely loud static is heard on some or all of
the system devices.
• The audio encryption key on the devices do
not match.
• Review Section 8 of this manual and the
sub-section “Display/edit audio encryption
key” for instructions on how to view and
modify the encryption key.
Cannot login to the unit via telnet.
• Login password was forgotten.
• Perform a Factory Reset on the device to
reset the password to the factory default.
Review Section 5 (BTR-240) and Section 6
(TR-240) of this manual for instructions on
how to perform a factory reset.
• There is a problem with the network
configuration on the computer that is trying
to telnet into the device.
• Review Section 8 of this manual and the
sub-section titled “Network Configuration”
and ensure all instructions have been
followed.
12-2
Problem
Possible Cause
“Echo” is heard in base station or beltpacks.
• Acoustical Echo
Solution
• First, ensure that any disconnected or
unused audio interfaces are turned off. If
necessary, perform a factory reset to turn
off all audio interfaces and ensure that all
audio levels are set to their defaults.
• Disable the <TALK> buttons of each
BTR-240 and TR-240 device one-by-one to
identify if the echo is coming from one
particular source.
• When the echo source(s) have been
identified, try the following echo avoidance
techniques at that device:
– Use a headset with a better acoustical
isolation between headphones and boom
microphone.
– Ensure all active devices have headsets
attached.
– Reduce the headset volume.
– Reduce the microphone gain.
– Reduce the sidetone level.
– Increase the squelch level (see Sections 5
and 8 for the BTR-240 and TR-240
instructions, respectively).
\
• Line (network) Echo
(only if a 2-wire system is connected and
active)
• First, follow all the solutions listed under
“Acoustical Echo” to ensure that is not an
acoustical echo problem.
• Verify that the 2-wire settings and
connections have been properly configured.
Use the following procedure:
– Turn off the 2-wire settings.
– Disable the <TALK> buttons on all 2-wire
devices.
– Turn the 2-wire settings back on.
– Talk into the base station local headset (or
an associated beltpack) for at least 5
seconds at a normal level with the
microphone spaced one index finger width
straight out from the user's mouth.
– Re-enable the <TALK> buttons on 2-wire
devices.
• If echo persists, reduce the 2-wire output
and/or input levels or increase the squelch
settings at the base station.
After changing the RF channel or running a
Clear-Scan,
beltpack(s)
no
longer
communicate. The “Assoc” is incorrect on
the BTR-240 Status Screen and the Out of
Range alert is heard in the beltpack(s).
• Beltpack(s) did not re-associate on the new
RF channel.
12-3
• The beltpack(s) that did not re-associate
will need to be rebooted.
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12-4
Section 13 - Regulatory Information
FCC and Industry Canada
The BTR-240 and TR-240 comply with Part 15 of FCC rules and
Canada RSS-210.
`
Le BTR-240 et TR-240 conforme à la Partie 15 des reglements
de
la FCC et Industrie Canada RSS-210.
Operation is subject to the following conditions:
1.
This device may not cause harmful interference.
2.
This device must accept any interference received, including
interference that may cause undesired operation.
3.
Use only the manufacturer or dealer supplied beltclip and/or
accessories for this device.
5.
This device must not be co-located or operated in conjunction
with any other antenna or transmitter.
The beltpack complies with FCC and Industry Canada RF
exposure limits. The beltpack is intended to be worn on the belt of
the user. Placing the beltpack in other locations on the body may
reduce performance and void the user’s authority by the FCC and
Industry Canada to operate.
To comply with FCC and Industry Canada RF exposure
requirements a separation distance of at least 20 cm (7.9 inches)
should be maintained between the antennas of the BTR-240 base
station and all persons.
Pour se conformer aux exigences FCC et Industrie Canada
'
l'exposition aux RF sur une distance de separation
d'au
moins 20 cm (7,9 pouces) doit etre maintenue entre les
antennes de la station de base BTR-240 et toutes les
personnes.
CAUTION:
Any changes or modification not expressly approved by the
party responsible for compliance could void the user’s
authority to operate this equipment.
ATTENTION:
'
Tout changement ou modification non expressement
'
approuvee par la partie responsable de la conformite'
pourraient annuler l'autorite' de l'utilisateur à utiliser cet
'equipement.
13-1
EU Compliance Information
This equipment is in compliance with the following directives;
The following
requirements:
2011/65/EU RoHS Directive
2002/96/EC WEEE Directive
country
has
additional
restrictions
or
France
If the product is used outdoors, output power must be
restricted in some parts of the band. The table below details
the information. Please check with http://www.arcep.fr/ for
more details or any recent compliance changes.
Please dispose of the base station and beltpacks at the end of its
operational life by taking it to your closest collection point or
recycling center.
France
Dans le cas d’une utilisation en extérieur, la puissance de
sortie est limitée pour certaines parties de la bande.
Reportezvous à la table ou visitez le site Web
http://www.art-telecom.fr/ pour de plus amples détails.
This equipment is intended for use in professional intercom
applications.
Area
Indoors
(no restrictions)
Outdoors
Outdoors
The European version of the BTR-240 and TR-240 are intended
to be operated in (ISO 3166-1, 2 letter country code):
RF
Channel
1 - 13
1-7
8 - 13
RF Power, EiRP
100mW
100mW
10mW
AT
BE
CY
CZ
DK
EE
FI
FR
DE
GR
HU
IE
IT
LV
LT
LU
Antenna Configurations
MT
NL
PL
PT
SK
SI
ES
SE
GB
IS
LI
NO
CH
BG
RO
TR
The European version of the BTR-240 has a typical output power
of the 50mW. The EiRP (Effective isotropic Radiated Power)
limit for the European Union is 100mW, however, always check
the regulations within the country of use. The standard, 3dB gain,
omni-pattern antennas shipped with the European version of the
BTR-240, combined with its output power, are under this limit.
However, some applications may require the installation of
remote antennas by the use of extension coaxial cables. For this
purpose the European BTR-240 has been approved for use with
kits in Table 13-1. The kits contain an antenna, coaxial cable(s) of
a length to make the EiRP compliant with the European Union
regulations, and an adapter for coupling the antenna / antenna
pigtail to the coaxial cable.
Almost all EU and other European countries have made the 2.4
GHz band available for use with this type of wireless equipment.
However, the requirements for any country may change. Always
check with the local authorities for the latest status of regulations
in the 2.4 GHz band.
13-2
The user must install only the kits listed below. Combinations of
extension coaxial cables and antennas that result in a radiated
power level exceeding 100mW EiRP are illegal in the
European Union.
The user will find more information on these kits in Section 11,
“Accessories and Replacement Parts”.
China Compliance Information
The China version and European version of the BTR-240 are the
same product. This BTR-240 has a typical output power of the
50mW. The EiRP (Effective isotropic Radiated Power) limit for
China is 100mW. The standard, 3dB gain, omni-pattern antennas
shipped with the European/China version of the BTR-240,
combined with its output power, are under this limit. However,
some applications may require the installation of remote antennas
by the use of extension coaxial cables. For this purpose the China
version of the BTR-240 has been approved for use with kits in
Table 13-1. The kits contain an antenna, coaxial cable(s) of a
length to make the EiRP compliant with the European Union and
Chinese regulations, and an adapter for coupling the antenna /
antenna pigtail to the coaxial cable.
Combinations of extension coaxial cables and antennas that
result in a radiated power level exceeding 100mW EiRP are
illegal in China.
Antenna Kit
Description
RA-5E
5dBi gain, omni, magnetic mount
antenna with 1.2m (4 ft) pigtail and an
additional 1.5m (5 ft) of coaxial cable
and an adapter.
RA-7E
FP-11E
ANT-FBE
BTR-240
(European/China)
Output, dBm
7dBi gain, omni, with AB-24 antenna
mounting bracket and 4.6m (15ft) of
coaxial cable.
11dBi gain, directional, flat panel
antenna with 7.6m (25ft) of coaxial cable
and and adapter.
11dBi dual flat panel antenna with dual
pieces of 7.6m (25ft) coaxial cable and
two adapters.
Maximum
Transmitted
Power, dBm
Cable
Loss, dB
Antenna
Gain, dB
+17
(50mW)
2.4
5
+19.6
(91mW EiRP)
+17
(50mW)
4.2
7
+19.8
(96mW EiRP)
+17
(50mW)
8.2
11
+19.8
(96mW EiRP)
+17
(50mW)
8.2
11
+19.8
(96mW EiRP)
Table 13-1
Approved antenna kits for use in the European Union and China that ensure an EiRP of 100mW or less.
13-3
Japan Compliance Information
The Japanese version of the BTR-240 system complies with the
RF limits as directed by the MIC (Ministry of Internal Affairs and
Communications). These RF power limits are 10mW/MHz at the
antenna port and up to a 12.14dBi external antenna may be placed
on the base station. The external antenna limit is high enough that
any external antenna offered in the accessories section of this
manual may be used with the product. If other external antennas
are used with the product the user must not exceed the antenna
gain limit of 12.14dBi as set by MIC.
Korea Compliance Information
The BTR-240 system with Korea type approval complies with the
RF limits as directed by the RRA (Radio Research Agency)
division of the Korea Communication Commission. The RF
power limit is 10mW/MHz at the antenna port and up to a 6dBi
external antenna may be placed on the base station. Please see
Table 13-2 for antennas and antenna kits which may be used in
Korea. The effective antenna gain in the table is the antenna gain
subtract the cable loss. If other external antennas are used with the
product the user must not exceed the antenna gain limit of 6dBi.
Antenna Kit
Description
Cable Loss,
dB
Antenna
Gain, db
Effective
Antenna
Gain, db
RA-3
3dBi gain, omni, antenna (included
0
3
3
RA-5
5dBi gain, omni, magnetic mount
antenna with 1.2m (4ft) pigtail.
0
5
5
5
2.6
with base station)
RA-5E
5dBi gain, omni, magnetic mount
antenna with 1.2m (4ft) pigtail and an
additional 1.5m (5ft) of coaxial cable
and an adapter.
2.4
RA-7E
7dBi gain, omni, with AB-24
antenna mounting bracket and
4.6m (15ft) of coaxial cable.
4.2
7
2.8
FP-11E
11dBi gain, directional, flat panel
antenna with 7.6m (25ft) of coaxial
cable and an adapter.
8.2
11
2.8
ANT-FBE
11dBi dual flat panel antenna with
dual pieces of 7.6m (25ft) coaxial
cable and two adapters.
8.2
11
2.8
8.2
Table 13-2
Antennas and Antenna Kits for use in Korea
13-4
EU Declaration of Conformity
The version of the BTR-240 and TR-240 which display the
“CE” mark on the product label are compliant with the essential
requirements of the R&TTE Directive of the European Union.
The Declaration of Conformity is displayed below:
Communications Systems
EC Declaration of Conformity
The undersigned, representing the following manufacturer
Manufacturer
Bosch Security Systems, Inc.
Address:
8601 East Cornhusker Highway, Lincoln, NE 68507, USA.
Authorized Representative where Technical Construction File is held:
EVI Audio GmbH, Sachsenring 60, D-94315, Straubing, Germany
hereby declares that the following product(s)
Material No / CTN/ Description:
F01U168688 / BTR-240, A4M-EU / Wireless Intercom Base Station with A4M Headset Connector
F01U168689 / TR-240, A4M-EU / Wireless Intercom Beltpack with A4M Headset Connector
F01U169595 / BTR-240, A4F-EU / Wireless Intercom Base Station with A4F Headset Connector
F01U169596 / TR-240, A4F-EU / Wireless Intercom Beltpack with A4F Headset Connector
Frequency Band: 2.412 - 2.472 GHz, IEEE 802.11 channels 1 - 13.
is (are) in conformity with the regulations of the following marked EC-directive(s)
and bear(s) the
- mark accordingly
Reference number
2004/108/EC
Title
EMC Directive (EMC)
2006/95/EC
Low-Voltage Directive (LVD)
2011/65/EU
Restriction of the use of certain Hazardous Substances (RoHS)
1999/5/EC
Radio equipment and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment
(R&TTE), according to annex IV
The conformity of the product(s) with (above ticked) EC directives is provided by the compliance
with the following standard(s):
Standard(s) / Date
EN 300 328 v1.7.1 (2006-10) (Radio Performance)
EN 301 489-1 v1.8.1 (2008-04), EN 301 489-17 v2.1.1 (2009-05) (EMC)
EN 50371:2002 (Health), EN 60950:2006 + A1:2010 (Safety)
Year of affixing the CE mark: 2011
Place, date:
Bosch - Lincoln,
May 18, 2011
Doc No. REG0004462
Manager, Business Line
R + D Manager, Business Line
Printed name: Ralph Strader ST-CO/PRM2
Printed name: Keith Jenkins ST-CO/ENG3.3
Version : 1.00
Form No. ST-PB-Q6507-CO-RTS
-CO-RTS Version 3.01
13-5
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13-6
Section 14 - Accessories and Replacement Parts
Model Number
TR-240
Part Number
Description
F01U168687
F01U168689
F01U168691
F01U273854
F01U273858
North America
Euro
China
Japan
Korea
TR-240 beltpack with 4-pin male XLR jack,
rechargeable battery and charger/power supply.
F01U169594
F01U169596
F01U169598
F01U273856
F01U273860
North America
Euro
China
Japan
Korea
TR-240 beltpack with 4-pin female XLR jack,
rechargeable battery and charger/power supply.
\\
Lithium-ion rechargeable battery pack for
TR-240.
BP-240
F01U149581
CHG-240
F01U168552 North America
F01U169599 Euro
F01U169600 China
HOL-240
F01U169866
Fabric holster with belt clip for TR-240
XOB
F01U117870
Nylon Belt, adjustable
24-PS
F01U144926
North American power supply/charger for
TR-240, 100-240 VAC input, 12VDC 1.5A
output, 5.5 x 2.5 x 11mm plug.
24-PSE
F01U117878
Euro, UK, China, Japan and Australian/
New Zealand power supply/charger comes with
interchangeable plug sets for the different
regions. Power supply is for TR-240 100-240
VAC input, 12 VDC. 1.5A output, 5.5 x 2.5 x
11 mm plug.
BTR-24
F01U120575 North America
F01U120576 Euro / China
RA-3
F01U144918
Omni Antenna (3dB) with TNC reverse polarity
plug connector.
RA-7
F01U117871
Omni Antenna (7dB) with TNC reverse polarity
plug connector.
AB-24
F01U117875
Antenna mounting bracket for omni antennas
with 6 ft (1.8m) coax cable.
RA-7E
F01U117876
Kit. Omni Antenna (7dB), with TNC reverse
polarity plug connector, AB-24 antenna mount
bracket with 4.6m (15 ft) coaxial cable.
RA-5
F01U144919
Omni Antenna (5dB) magnetic mount with 4 ft
(1.2m) pigtail and TNC reverse polarity plug
connector.
RA-5E
F01U117877
Kit. Omni Antenna (5dB), magnetic mount with
TNC reverse polarity plug connector, plus 1.5m
(5 ft) coaxial, cable and TNC reverse polarity
coupler (jack to jack).
14-1
4 Bay Charger for BP-240.
BTR-24 Base Station and power supply.
Model Number
Part Number
FP-11
F01U117872
Flat Panel Directional antenna (11dB) with
TNC reverse polarity plug connector.
FP-11E
F01U144923
Kit. Flat panel directional antenna (11 dB), with
TNC reverse polarity plug connector, 7.6m (25
ft) coaxial, cable and TNC reverse polarity
coupler (jack to jack).
ANT-FP
F01U117869
Dual Diversity, Flat Patch Antenna with Dual
Coax, 11dBi.
ANT-FBE
F01U144924
Kit. Dual Diversity, Flat Patch Antenna (11dB)
with dual coax and TNC reverse polarity plug
connector, two 7.6m (25 ft) coaxial, cables and
two TNC reverse polarity couplers (jack to
jack).
ANT-FPM
F01U117868
Metal Tilt and Swivel Antenna Mounting
bracket for ANT-FP Antenna. Use for
permanent mount of ANT-FP Flat Panel
Antenna.
RPT-3
F01U144920
3 ft. (0.9m) coax with TNC reverse polarity
plug connectors.
RPT-10
F01U117873
10 ft. (3m) coax with TNC reverse polarity plug
connectors.
TNC-RP
F01U144921
TNC reverse polarity coupler. Coupler is a
reverse polarity jack to jack.
F01U145150
Communications Cable, Ethernet CAT. 5e
Cable, 3 ft. (09m).
F01U195019
Power supply for BTR-240, 100-240 VAC
input, 12VDC, 1.5A output, 5.5 x 2.5 screw on
plug. AC power cord not included.
F01U117972
North American Power Cord for BTR-240
Power Supply.
F01U117970
EURO and Korea Power Cord for BTR-240
Power Supply.
F01U117971
U.K. Power Cord for BTR-240 Power Supply.
F01U183685
Japan Power Cord for BTR-240 Power Supply.
F01U195272
China Power Cord for BTR-240 Power Supply.
14-2
Description
Model Number
Part Number
Description
F01U118470 Telex Type
2-Wire Termination Load XLR Type
F01U118472 RTS Type
2-Wire Termination Load XLR Type
ME-2
F01U148674 2 ft. (.61m)
Single channel intercom cables with
XLR-3 M/F connectors
ME-6
F01U144090 6 ft. (1.83m)
ME-25
F01U118903 25 ft. (7.6m)
ME-50
F01U118904 50 ft. (15.2m)
ME-100
F01U143100 100 ft. (30.5m)
14-3
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14-4
Section 15 - Glossary
AAEC
Automatic and Adaptable Echo Cancellation. Automatically and continuously detect “line” echo and
assist in removing it for improved communication.
ACI
Adjacent Channel Interference. The interference between multiple access points on different RF
channels.
Acoustic Echo
The coupling of audio from a headset back into it’s own attached microphone, or another microphone
nearby. Result from using a digital intercom system with latency when (1) headsets are used with poor
acoustical isolation between the headphones and boom microphone; (2) multiple users are located very
close to each other; (3) by having a device with the microphone path enabled without an attached
headset; (4) by one user having their volume or microphone gain settings too high.
AP-only Mode
When a BTR-240 has all of it’s audio input interfaces disabled (local headset talk, 2-wire, 4-wire,
auxiliary), it will be in half-duplex.
Capacity
The number of full-duplex TR-240s that can be associated with a specific access point for reliable and
uninterrupted communications.
CCA
Clear Channel Assessment. When a wireless device senses the environment for energy on it’s frequency
before it transmits the signal. If the CCA fails, the device determines that the channel is busy and will
back-off / wait before attempting to send the signal again.
CCA Area
The area around an access point where the error rate of the receivers is high, “out of range”, but the
receiver can still sense the environment and detect if the channel is busy before transmitting it’s signal.
CCI
Co-channel Interference. The interference between multiple access points on the same RF channel.
Cell-Type
Architecture
WLAN deployment strategy with multiple access points operating on non-overlapping RF channels,
with non-overlapping coverage areas.
Channel Utilization
The amount of activity on a particular wireless RF channel.
ClearScan
Intelligence that selects the optimal radio frequency channel to operate.
Coverage Area
Area around an access point where the receivers of devices can accurately receive and decode the data
packets with a minimal error rate.
De-tune
When the characteristics of the antenna become un-optimized for the frequency of use and results in RF
signal loss. Typically occurs when antenna is used near large metal objects.
Echo
When a user's voice is heard in the headset at a noticeable time interval after they have actually spoke.
Occurs from any digital system with audio latency.
Ethernet
(IEEE 802.3) standard for implementing local area networks.
Full-duplex
Mode of operation when a device has simultaneous talk and listen capabilities.
Half-duplex
Mode of operation when a device has listen-only capabilities.
IEEE 802.11
Set of standards for implementing wireless local area networks developed by the Institute of Electrical
and Electronics Engineers.
IP address
Internet Protocol address. A unique set of numbers to identify a particular device on a network.
LAN
(Wired) Local Area Network.
15-1
Latency
Time interval from when audio is sent from a device until it is received by another device.
LCD
Liquid Crystal Display.
LED
Light Emitting Diode.
License Free
Device uses frequency bands that do not require the user to obtain an approval for use. Specifically, the
2.4GHz ISM frequency band for 802.11 WLAN.
LOS
Line-of-Sight. When the transmitters and receivers of wireless devices have a clear “sight” to each other
by having no obstructions in-between them. RF signals can travel in a straight line between those
devices.
MAC address
Media Access Control address. Unique identifier for a particular physical device on a network.
Master Wireless
Mode
The TR-240’s radio is active and the Ethernet port is deactivated. A “master” TR-240 serves as an access
point and provides wireless coverage for communication between itself and other TR-240’s in wireless
mode.
Momentary
The microphone path of the device is temporarily enabled/disabled. Enabled while the button is pressed
and disabled when the button is released.
Multicast
Delivery of a network information packet to a group of destination devices simultaneously in a single
transmission.
Network (line) echo
The result from connecting a digital intercom system with latency to an external 2-wire intercom system
without sufficient “nulling” capabilities and/or echo cancellation.
Omni-directional
Pertaining to antennas where the power is radiated uniformly in all directions.
Push-to-latch
The microphone path will enable and remain enabled when the button is pressed quickly. The microphone
path will be disabled when the button is pressed again.
Push-to-transmit
(Push-to-TX), see “Momentary”.
RF channel
Radio Frequency channel. Set of frequencies in which the device transmits and receives.
Sidetone
The amount of a user’s own voice that is fed back in the local headset.
SSID
Service Set Identifier. A phrase used to identify a particular wireless network.
Squelch Level
A specified level of audio that must be met, or exceeded, in order for that audio to be transmitted.
WEP
Wired Equivalent Privacy. An encryption algorithm for security on wireless networks.
Wi-Fi
A wireless product that is based on the IEEE 802.11 standards.
Wired Mode
The TR-240’s Ethernet port is active and the radio is deactivated. TR-240’s in wired mode can
communicate to other TR-240’s in wired mode without a BTR-240 base station.
Wireless Mode
The TR-240’s radio is active and the Ethernet port is deactivated. A BTR-240 base station serves as the
access point and provides wireless coverage for communication between the TR-240’s.
WLAN
Wireless Local Area Network. Defined by the 802.11 protocol.
15-2
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15-3
Bosch Security System, Inc.
8601 East Cornhusker Highway, Lincoln, NE 68507
Made in U.S.A. of Domestic & Foreign Content
09/2013
PN F01U196141 Rev 03