Induction Motors/
Generators
Horizontal – Medallion
500, 580, 880, SH400, SH450, SH560 Frames
TEFC Enclosures
Type CZ, NCZ, CGZ, CMZ, NCMZ, 1LA4
ANIM-03522-0814
(Supercedes all previous issues of ANIM-03522)
©2014 Siemens Industry, Inc. All rights reserved.
Installation
Operation
Maintenance
Table of Contents
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SAFETY PROCEDURES
INTRODUCTION
Warranty
Receiving
Handling
Temporary Storage
Type Designations
INSTALLATION
Motor Dimensions
Location
Foundation
Mounting
Coupling of Sleeve Bearing Motors
External Wiring
Changing Direction of Rotation
Alignment
Hot Alignment
Vibration
Doweling
Force Feed Lubrication
Oil Mist Purge
Typical Motor Control Settings
Page
1
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
8
8
9
9
9
10
OPERATION
Initial Start
Oil Circulating Systems
Normal Operation
Voltage/Frequency Variation
Trouble Shooting
MAINTENANCE
Preventive Maintenance
Inspection
Hazardous Location
Corrective Maintenance
Rotor Cleaning
Stator Cleaning
Insulation Resistance
Drying Insulation
Bearings
Bearing Lubrication
Bearing Replacement
SPARE PARTS
Identification
MOTOR SERVICE RECORD
VIBRATION ANALYSIS SHEET
NOTES
Page
11
11
11
11
11
12
14
14
15
15
16
17
17
17
17
18
21
22
26
26
31
32
33
Note - These instructions do not purport to cover all details or variations in equipment, nor to provide for every
possible contingency to be met in connection with installation, operation or maintenance. Should further
information be desired or should particular problems arise which are not covered sufficiently for the user’s
purposes, the matter should be referred to;
1. Your local Siemens Sales Office.
--Or-2. Siemens Technical Support Communication Center:
Inside the U.S.: 1-800-333-7421
Outside the U.S.: +1 423-262-5710
Online: www.industry.usa.siemens.com/industry and click on Industry Services
The contents of this instruction manual shall not become part of or modify any prior or existing agreement,
commitment or relationship. The sales contract contains the entire obligation of Siemens. The warranty
contained in the contract between the parties is the sole warranty of Siemens. Any statements contained herein
do not create new warranties or modify the existing warranty.
Siemens machines are built in accordance with the latest applicable revision of the National Electric Code,
Underwriters Laboratories Standards and Procedures, and NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association)
Standards. These publications and this instruction manual should be thoroughly read and understood prior to
beginning any work on this equipment.
The information contained within is intended to assist operating personnel by providing information on the general
characteristics of the purchased equipment. It does not relieve the user of the responsibility of using accepted
engineering practices in the installation, operation and maintenance of this equipment.
Should a conflict arise between the general information in this manual and the contents of the drawings and
supplementary material, the latter shall take precedence.
The illustrations in this book show typical machines. Special features deviate from those pictured.
-1-
Safety Procedures
This equipment contains hazardous voltages. Death,
serious personal injury or property damage can result
if safety instructions are not followed.
Do not operate this equipment in excess of the values
given on nameplate or contrary to the instructions
contained in this manual. The equipment (or a
prototype) has been factory tested and found
satisfactory for the condition for which it was sold.
Operating in excess of these conditions can cause
stresses and strains beyond design limitations.
Failure to heed this warning may result in equipment
damage and possible personal injury.
The successful and safe operation of motors and
generators is dependent upon proper handling,
installation, operation and maintenance, as well as
upon proper design and manufacture. Failure to
follow
certain
fundamental
installation
and
maintenance requirements may lead to personal injury
and the failure and loss of the motor as well as
damage to other property.
DANGER
Hazardous voltage.
Only qualified personnel should work on or around
this equipment after becoming thoroughly familiar with
all warnings, safety notices and maintenance
procedures contained herein.
Only qualified
personnel should be involved in the inspection,
maintenance and repair procedure and all plant safety
procedures must be observed.
Will cause death, serious injury,
electrocution or property damage.
Disconnect all power before working on
this equipment.
NOTE
Qualified Person: For the purpose of this manual
and product labels, a Qualified person is one who is
familiar with the installation, construction and
operation of the equipment, and the hazards involved.
In addition, he or she has the following qualifications:
Squirrel cage induction machines can be driven by
various types of prime movers. These will act as induction
generators. This instruction manual applies to both motors
and induction generators. However, for clarity reasons,
the machine will be referred to as a “motor”.
a. Is trained and authorized to energize, de-energize,
clear, ground and tag circuits and equipment in
accordance with established safety practices.
b. Is trained in the proper care and use of protective
equipment, such as rubber gloves, hard hat,
safety glasses, face shields, flash clothing, etc., in
accordance with established safety practices.
c. Is trained in rendering first aid.
Danger: For the purpose of this manual and product
labels, Danger indicates an imminently hazardous
situation which, if not avoided, will result in death or
serious injury.
Warning: For the purpose of this manual and product
labels, Warning indicates a potentially hazardous
situation which, if not avoided, may result in minor or
moderate injury.
Caution: For the purpose of this manual and product
labels, Caution indicates a potentially hazardous
situation which, if not avoided, may result in minor or
moderate injury. It is also used to alert against unsafe
practices.
Motors should be installed and grounded per local and
national codes.
-2-
Introduction
temporary film of rust inhibiting oil or, when a motor is
supplied specifically with “provisions for oil mist
lubrication” (oil supply system furnished by the user),
the motor is shipped from the factory with grease in
the bearings.
DANGER
Hazardous voltage.
Will cause death, serious injury,
electrocution or property damage.
Disconnect all power before working on
this equipment.
When receiving a motor with sleeve bearings:
1. Remove shaft blocking materials.
2. Visually inspect bearing condition through sight
glass and bearing drain opening.
3. Check for moisture accumulation. Remove any
traces of oxidation before putting the motor into
service.
4. Fill bearing reservoirs to normal level with a high
grade industrial lubricating oil. See Maintenance
Section of this instruction book to determine
proper oil level.
5. Rotate the shaft a minimum of 10 complete turns
by hand to distribute oil over bearing parts. Make
sure the oil rings in each bearing rotate freely.
These instructions present general recommendations
for installation, operation and maintenance of
induction motors built at the Norwood plant.
If
additional information is required, contact Siemens
Industry.
Warranty
See your sales contract for warranty coverage.
Documentation of storage maintenance, alignment
and regreasing may be required for certain warranty
considerations.
When receiving a motor with grease lubricated
anti-friction bearings:
Motors having grease lubricated antifriction bearings
are shipped with the bearings already lubricated and
ready for operation.
Receiving
Motors are shipped in first class condition. They have
been inspected and are skidded to prevent damage
from ordinary handling during shipment.
If the elapsed time from the time of shipment to the
time in which the unit is to be started is in excess of
thirty (30) days, regrease per the lubrication plate
mounted on the motor.
Inspect new motors for shipping invoice. Make the
examination before removing from cars or trucks. If
damage or indication of rough handling is evident, file
a claim with the carrier at once, and notify your
Siemens sales representative.
When receiving a motor with oil mist lubricated
anti-friction bearings:
1. Be sure that the motor is not stored outdoors.
2. Be sure that the oil mist lubrication is connected
and operating before starting the motor.
3. The oil mist lubrication should be in operation
within two weeks after the motor is received from
the factory.
Remove only the shipping invoice. Do not remove
tags pertaining to lubrication, operation and storage
instructions. Read and follow all instructions to insure
that no damage to motor bearings, (due to
condensation) and motor windings occurs during
storage.
Use care in handling.
Dropping the motor or
otherwise imposing shock loads can cause unseen
and undetected damage to bearings. This damage
such as false brinelling of the races of anti-friction
bearings can result in early bearing failure.
When receiving a motor with “provisions for oil
mist lubrication”:
1. Leave the grease in the bearings if the motor is to
be stored.
2. Before operating the motor with oil mist
lubrication, disassemble the motor, and clean the
grease from bearings, end caps, and the bearing
housing cavities with a suitable solvent.
If supplied, energize space heaters to help prevent
condensation within the motor enclosure.
Motors having sleeve bearings or oil lubricated
antifriction bearings are shipped WITHOUT OIL in the
bearing reservoir.
These bearings and journal
surfaces are protected during shipment by a
-3-
Introduction
Temporary Storage
WARNING
Heavy equipment.
Improper handling may cause death, serious injury or
property damage.
Check lifting devices before lifting. Use proper slings,
chains and spreaders.
Note any warning plates on motor and follow
instructions on each plate.
Handling
Lifting devices are provided for handling only. An
experienced rigger should be used to install motors.
To avoid damage, the use of spreader bars is
recommended on other than single point lifts. Lifting
devices are provided to facilitate handling with
shackles and cables. Avoid pounding or bumping
shaft, coupling or bearing parts, as shocks may
damage bearings.
If the equipment is not to be installed and operated
soon after arrival, store it in a clean, dry, wellventilated place, free from vibration and rapid or wide
variations in temperature. Rotate the shaft a minimum
of 10 complete turns by hand each month to coat the
bearings with lubricant which will retard oxidation or
corrosion, and prevent possible false brinelling. If drain
plugs are provided in enclosed motors, they must be
removed periodically to drain any water accumulation
from the motor. Consider a unit in storage when:
1. It has been delivered to the job site and is awaiting
installation.
2. It has been installed but operation is delayed over
30 days pending completion of plant construction.
3. There are long (30 day) periods between operating
cycles.
4. The plant (or department) is shut down for 30 days.
NOTE
Storage requirements vary, depending on the length of
storage and the climate. For storage periods of thirty (30)
days or longer or climate variations, consult Siemens
Storage Recommendations ANIM-03114. Storage
maintenance is to be documented for warranty
information.
NOTE WEIGHT BEFORE LIFTING. The weight is
indicated on the outline drawing.
Apply tension
gradually to cables. Do not jerk or attempt to move the
unit suddenly.
Motor Weights (in pounds)
Frame Size
Minimum
Maximum
500
3300
5300
580
4600
6700
880
15800
19700
SH400
8200
9900
SH450
11500
13700
SH560
18078
22267
Type Designations
The motor type designation consists of a basic letter or
letters indicating the motor enclosure type to which
other letters may be added denoting modifications.
-4-
Motor Type
Motor Enclosure
CZ, NCZ, CGZ,
CMZ, CMZ, or
1LA4
Totally-Enclosed Fan Cooled
Installation
Motor Dimensions
For motors built in the frame sizes covered by this
manual, the letter dimensions have the same
definitions
as
established
NEMA
standards.
Established dimensions for these frames may be found
on catalog sheets or certified drawings.
CAUTION
Before pouring, locate foundation bolts by use of
template frame and provide secure anchorage (not
rigid). It is recommended that a fabricated steel base
be used between motor feet and foundation. See
certified drawings of motor, base, and driven unit for
exact location of foundation bolts. Allow for grouting
base when pouring. Cast the base footpads level and
in the same plane.
Mounting
Damp Location.
Mount the motor base (if used) on foundation or other
support. Shim as required to level. Use laser or spirit
o
level (check two directions at 90 ) to insure motor feet
will be in one plane (base not warped) when base
bolts are tightened. Set motor on the base, install nuts
and tighten.
DO NOT TIGHTEN UNTIL AFTER ALIGNMENT.
Can cause property damage if equipment is operated
intermittently.
Use space heaters to prevent dampness. Grease
machine fits when unit is reassembled to prevent
corrosion.
Location
Select a location for the motor and driven unit that will:
1. Be clean, dry, well ventilated, properly drained, and
provide accessibility for inspection, lubrication and
maintenance.
2. Provide adequate space for motor removal without
shifting the driven unit.
3. Permit the motor to safely deliver adequate power.
Temperature rise of a standard motor is based on
operation at an altitude not higher than 3,300 feet
above sea level.
4. Avoid condensation of moisture in bearings and on
windings. Motors should not be stored or operated
in areas subject to rapid temperature changes
unless motors are energized or protected with
space heaters.
Foundation
Concrete (reinforced as required) makes the best
foundation, particularly for large motors and driven
units. In sufficient mass it provides rigid support that
minimizes deflection and vibration. It may be located
on soil, structural steel, or building floors provided the
total weight (motor, driven unit, foundation) does not
exceed the allowable bearing load of the support.
Allowable bearing loads of structural steel and floors
can be obtained from engineering handbooks. Building
codes of local communities give the recommended
allowable bearing loads for different types of soil. For
rough calculation the foundation should be
approximately 2-1/2 times total unit weight.
NOTE
Experience has shown that any base-mounted
assemblies of motor and driven units temporarily aligned
at the factory may twist during shipment. Therefore,
alignment must be checked after mounting.
Realignment is to be documented for warranty
information.
Coupling of Sleeve Bearing Motors
Sleeve bearings cannot withstand externally generated
axial thrust.
Antifriction bearings are normally
designed to handle a minimum thrust. As the motor
and driven equipment get hot they may expand
towards each other and with the wrong coupling this
could produce an axial force. Therefore, the selection
of coupling is of extreme importance. If properly
installed, the following types of couplings are
considered to be free from the development of axial
thrust and may be used:
1. Laminated Metal Disk Type
2. Rubber Biscuit Type (Designed for the Speed)
Limited end float models of the following types are
available from several coupling manufacturers and
may be used by selecting the proper end float (See
“End Float – Sleeve Bearings” under Bearing
Replacement)
3. Pin and Bushing Type
4. Gear Type
-5-
Installation
External Wiring
Motor Fan Direction
Motor Speed
Frame
DANGER
3600 – 3000
RPM
1800 – 1500
RPM
1200 RPM &
SLOWER
500
Hazardous voltage.
Will cause death, serious injury,
electrocution or property damage.
Disconnect all power before working on
this equipment.
580
SH400
NON-DIRECTIONAL
SH560
NOTE
880
DIRECTIONAL
Before running motor, see Initial Start.
SH450
Starting and overload control devices must be matched
to motor rating. For safety or convenience they may
need to be installed some distance from the motor.
Follow the control manufacturer’s instructions to make
proper installations and connections. Observe the
following:
1. Connect electrical power supply to conform with
National Electric Code and any local regulations.
Line voltage and wire capacity must match motor
rating stamped on the nameplate.
2. With the driven equipment disconnected,
momentarily energize the motor to check rotation.
3. If motor is three-phase type, reverse rotation (if
required) by interchanging any two of the three
power leads.
NOTE
It will be necessary to rebalance the rotor if the fans are
changed.
Alignment
Accurate shaft alignment between motor and driven
equipment is essential. Improper alignment may result
in vibration, bearing overloads and excessive shaft
stresses. Flexible couplings will not compensate for
excessive misalignment.
NOTE
Changing Direction of Rotation
Look for rotation plates usually mounted on fan
housing of the motor.
A basic rule is to not have more than five shims in a shim
pack under any one motor foot. Thick shim packs
consisting of many thin shims will cause soft foot,
excessive vibration or twisted frame (motor foot out of
plane).
CAUTION
Excessive heat.
Motor may overheat if motor cooling fans run in the
wrong direction.
Run motor in direction shown on motor or change fans.
External fan direction must be considered if changing
direction of rotation is contemplated on motors
equipped with shaft mounted external fans. See the
following Motor Fan Direction table to identify which
motors have directional external fans. All directional
fans must be replaced with a fan designed for the
desired direction of rotation.
Parallel Alignment
After positioning unit for correct end float, separate the
coupling halves and mount a dial indicator rigidly on
one coupling half with the button on the cylindrical
surface of the other half. Rotate the shafts together,
and take readings at top, bottom and side positions.
Align shaft so difference between top and bottom
readings and the side readings is a maximum of
0.002 inch for a flexible coupling.
-6-
Installation
Angular Alignment
Hold each shaft at maximum end float. Rotate both
shafts together, and measure between matching points
at the outside diameter of the coupling faces for the
top, bottom and both sides. Use two indicators
because of possible axial shaft movement. Read
difference of variation between them.
3. If no change is indicated, retighten the bolt and
repeat the process for each of the remaining three
mounting bolts.
4. If a change is indicated, add shims under motor
foot and retighten until indicator movement is
reduced or eliminated.
Align shafts so that the total indicator variation does
not exceed 0.002 inch. (See Figure 1.)
NOTE
1.
NOTE
2.
If vibration levels increase cold to hot, alignment should
be checked hot to verify that motor and driven equipment
are properly aligned at operating temperature. Adjust if
necessary.
3.
The foot plane is of concern for each unit of rotating
equipment. Check driven equipment if necessary.
Base or foundation rigidity can also affect vibration;
check for resonance in supporting structure.
Recheck alignment after any change in shims and
document alignment readings for warranty
information.
V-Belts
Check belt manufacturer’s recommendations for
maximum speed of sheaves and belts, minimum pitch
diameters, maximum allowable number of belts and
maximum sheave width.
When motor is ordered for V-belt drive, check motor
outline for motor manufacturer’s limits on belt pull,
sheave distance from motor, and sheave diameter.
Use only matched-belt sets. V-grooves must be in line;
sheaves must be parallel and axially aligned. Belts
must enter and leave sheaves with no side bending.
For long bearing life, the belt tension is important;
consult belt manufacturer for proper tension to suit
drive. Protect belts from grease and oil. NEVER use
belt dressing.
Figure 1. Diagrams Showing Parallel and
Angular Misalignment
Foot Plane
The proper foot plane exists when adequate shims
have been installed to assure equal pressure on each
foot or corner of motor when the mounting bolts are
loose.
To determine proper foot plane:
1. Mount dial indicator on shaft to be checked so that
contact will rest on either the adjacent shaft or a
bracket from the foundation or base.
2. With mounting bolts tight and indicator set at zero,
release one bolt at the shaft extension end of the
unit and check indicator for a maximum change
of 0.001 inch.
-7-
Installation
Hot Alignment
Vibration
It is possible for the motor shaft height to change
relative to the driven equipment and this should be
compensated for during the alignment procedure.
Heat from driven equipment can also cause horizontal
misalignment.
The standard unfiltered housing vibration limits
measured at no load, uncoupled, and with rigid
mounting are as follows based on the requirements of
NEMA MG1-7.8.
Speed
1200 – 3600 RPM
1000 RPM
900 RPM
750 RPM
720 RPM
600 RPM
WARNING
Rotating parts.
Can cause serious injury.
Disconnect and lock out power before working on
equipment.
If motor application is abnormal (high temperature,
extreme vibration, etc.) consult the factory for special
instructions or additional information.
Check for vertical alignment (parallelism) of coupled
drive as follows:
1. Operate unit until normal temperature is reached
(may require several hours).
2. Shut down motor and lock out switch.
3. Mount dial indicator as in Figure 2.
4. Rotate shaft, noting readings at 0°, 90°, 180°, and
270° (both sides, top, and bottom). If within 0.002
inch total indicator reading, or other limit specified
by the factory, unit is satisfactory for operation.
5. If not within limits, add or remove shims as
required to raise or lower motor.
6. If shims are changed for high temperature
operation, repeat alignment procedure to extent
necessary to assure proper alignment. Document
readings for warranty information.
Velocity, inches/sec peak
0.120
0.105
0.096
0.079
0.075
0.063
After alignment is complete and foot mounting bolts are
tight, run motor at no load (or minimum possible).
Check for vibration. If excessive vibration exists and
the alignment is acceptable, check foot plane by
loosening one drive end-mounting bolt at a time as
detailed below. This is to be documented for warranty
information. When resiliently mounted, allowed levels
are 25% higher.
Base or foundation rigidity can also affect vibration;
check for resonance in supporting structure.
Recheck alignment after any change in shims and
document alignment readings for warranty information.
Completing Mechanical Installation
After controlling rotor end float and establishing
accurate alignment, it is recommended to drill and
ream the foundation plate and motor feet together for
dowel pins. (See Doweling).
Recheck parallel and angular alignment before bolting
the coupling together. Motor shaft should be level
within 0.03 inch after alignment.
Figure 2. Check of Vertical Alignment
-8-
Installation
Doweling
Doweling the motor (and driven unit) accomplishes the
following:
1. Restricts movement.
2. Eases realignment if motor is removed from base.
3. Temporarily restrains the motor, should mounting
bolts loosen.
Inserting Dowel Pins
The following procedure is recommended:
a. Check the alignment after the unit has been in
operation approximately one week. Correct as
necessary.
b. Using pre-drilled dowel holes in motor feet as
guides, drill into the mounting base.
c. Ream holes in the feet and base to the proper
diameter for tapered dowel pins. Clean out the
chips.
d. Insert dowel pins.
Force Feed Lubrication
If force feed lubrication is used, flush lubrication lines
thoroughly to make sure the lines are clean before
connecting lines to bearing housings. Be sure that
bearing cavities are filled with oil to the proper level
before starting.
See motor outline drawing to
determine proper oil level. Be sure that proper oil
pressure and flow are provided by the supply system.
Verify that the oil drain flow agrees with the factory
requirements. The orientation and size of oil drain
piping supplied with the motor must not be altered. Oil
drain piping should be of the same size or larger from
the motor piping to the oil sump. Piping must slope
downward. Pressure build up in the drain line between
the oil sump and the motor bearing housing can lead to
oil leakage.
Document readings for warranty
information.
Oil Mist Purge
When connecting 500/580 frame motors for oil mist
purge, it is important to note that the drive and nondrive end bearing cavities operate at different
pressures. To avoid high or low oil levels, care should
be taken when connecting the system so that cavity
pressures are maintained.
-9-
Installation
Typical Motor Control Settings
Alarm
Trip
(Shutdown)
Winding Temperature
• Class B Insulation
• Class F Insulation
130°C
155°C
155°C
170°C
Motor Bearing Temperature
(Thermocouple or RTD’s)
• Sleeve Bearing
• Antifriction Bearing
100°C
100°C
105°C
105°C
4 Amps (2)
Primary
Circuit
8 Amps (2)
Primary
Circuit
Ground Fault
Timer Trip
Setting (1)
0.2 sec. (2)
Instantaneous Overcurrent
•
•
1.8 times Locked Rotor Amps (2)
2.4 times Locked Rotor Amps (2)
With ½ Cycle Delay
Without Time Delay
Maximum Voltage
Minimum Voltage (the minimum voltage
110 % of Rated Voltage
10 sec.
90 % of Rated Voltage
10 sec.
Maximum Frequency Deviation
±5%
10 sec.
Maximum of Voltage Plus Frequency Deviation
±10%
10 sec.
Maximum Voltage Unbalance (3)
1%
15 sec.
Maximum Current Unbalance (3)
8%
15 sec.
Suggested Vibration Limits
3600
1800
1200
3.3
0.25
4.3
0.25
900 and
Slower
5.0
0.25
also applies to starting unless otherwise
specified)
RPM
Shaft (mils, pk-to-pk)
Housing (in./sec.)
3.7
0.25
(1)
Maximum time at maximum condition before control device is to operate.
Increase as necessary to avoid nuisance trips.
(3)
This is the maximum deviation from the average of the three phases.
(2)
- 10 -
Operation
Initial Start
Oil Circulating Systems
For motors with oil circulating systems, proceed as
follows before startup;
CAUTION
Do not exceed number of Siemens specified hot and
cold starts per hour.
1. Fill motor reservoirs to normal level (see motor
outline drawing).
2. Follow instructions provided by the oil circulating
system supplier.
3. Put oil circulating system into operation before
starting motor.
Will cause overheating.
Allow time between starts to permit stator windings and
rotor cage to cool.
NOTE
Normal Operation
If motor has been out of service or in storage for more
than 30 days, consult Siemens Storage
Recommendations ANIM-03114, Preparation for
Service
After installation is completed, but before motor is put
in regular service, make an initial start as follows:
1. Check that motor, starting, and control device
connections agree with wiring diagrams.
2. Check that voltage, phase, and frequency of line
circuit (power supply) agree with motor nameplate.
3. Check
motor
service
record
and
tags
accompanying motor. Be certain bearings have
been properly lubricated and oil wells are filled.
See motor outline drawing to determine proper oil
level.
4. If possible, remove external load (disconnect drive)
and turn shaft by hand to assure free rotation. This
may have been done during installation procedure;
if so, and conditions have not changed, this check
may not be necessary.
5. If drive is disconnected, run motor at no load long
enough to be certain that no unusual condition
exists. Listen and monitor for excessive noise,
vibration, clicking or pounding and that oil rings are
turning if so equipped. If present, stop motor
immediately. Investigate the cause and correct
before putting motor in service.
6. If drive cannot be disconnected, interrupt the
starting cycle after motor has accelerated to low
speed. Carefully observe for unusual conditions as
motor coasts to a stop. Repeat several times if
necessary. Refer to motor’s Starting Duty
nameplate (if so equipped) or Motor Data Sheet for
recommended number of starts and cooling period
between starts.
7. When checks are satisfactory, operate at lowest
load possible and look for any unusual condition.
Increase load slowly to maximum, checking unit for
satisfactory operation.
Start the motor in accordance with standard
instructions for the starting equipment used.
Sometimes the load should be reduced to the
minimum, particularly for reduced voltage starting,
and/or high inertia connected loads.
Voltage/Frequency Variation
Motors will operate successfully under the following
conditions of voltage and frequency variation, but not
necessarily in accordance with the standards
established for operating under rated conditions:
1. If the variation in voltage does not exceed
10% above or below rated voltage, with all
phases balanced. Voltage unbalance should not
exceed 1%.
2. If the variation in frequency does not exceed 5%
above or below rated frequency.
3. If the sum of the voltage and frequency variations
does not exceed 10% above or below rated
values provided the frequency variation does not
exceed 5%.
- 11 -
Operation
Trouble Shooting
DANGER
Hazardous voltage.
Between regular maintenance inspections, be
alert for signs of motor trouble.
Common
symptoms are listed in the following table.
Correct any trouble immediately and AVOID
COSTLY REPAIR AND SHUT DOWN.
TROUBLE
Motor will not start.
Will cause death, serious injury,
electrocution or property damage.
Disconnect all power before working on
this equipment.
POSSIBLE CAUSES
CORRECTION
Usually line trouble. Single phasing at
starter.
Check power source. DO NOT check with
motor energized! Check overloads, controls
and fuses. Check voltage and compare with
nameplate rating.
Under Voltage.
Check voltage at motor terminals. Compare to
nameplate.
Excessive Load.
Disconnect motor from load to see if it starts
without load. Reduce load or replace motor
with unit of greater capacity.
High Voltage.
Check input voltage. Check for proper
connections.
Unbalanced rotor.
Balance rotor.
Excessive wear of sleeve bearings.
Replace bearings. Check to determine cause
of wear and replace as necessary. Check
alignment.
Regular clicking.
Foreign matter in air gap.
Remove foreign matter.
Rapid knocking.
Bad anti-friction bearing or dirt in lubricant.
Replace bearing, clean grease cavities and
renew lubricant.
Vibration.
Misalignment in coupling or feet.
Realign motor and driven equipment.
Accumulation of dirt on fan.
Clean motor.
Vibration in driven machine.
Run motor disconnected from driven load and
check for vibration. Eliminate source in driven
equipment.
Excessive hum.
System natural frequency (resonance).
Alter rigidity of base structure.
Vibration following motor
repair.
Rotor out of balance; balance weights of
fans shifted on rotor.
Balance rotor.
Motor overheating.
(Check with thermocouple
or by resistance method,
do not depend on touch).
Overload.
Measure load and compare with nameplate
rating. Check for excessive friction in motor or
complete drive. Reduce load or replace motor
with unit of greater capacity.
Single phase.
Check current, all phases.
Dirt in motor.
Check flow of air.
Check filters if so equipped.
Clean motor.
Unbalanced voltage.
Check voltage, all phases.
Rotor rubbing on stator.
Check air gap. Repair motor as necessary.
- 12 -
Operation
Trouble Shooting
DANGER
Hazardous voltage.
Will cause death, serious injury,
electrocution or property damage.
Disconnect all power before working on
this equipment.
TROUBLE
Motor overheating
(continued…)
POSSIBLE CAUSES
CORRECTION
Open stator windings.
Disconnect motor from load. Check idle amps
for balance in all three phases. Check stator
resistance in all three phases for balance.
Air Recirculation.
Check air intake and exhaust for obstructions.
Check air inlet temperature.
Over voltage/under voltage.
Check voltage and compare to rating plate.
Ground.
Locate with test lamp or insulation tester and
repair.
Improper electrical connections.
Recheck electrical connections.
Heat exchanger tubes blocked.
Clean tubes, if so equipped.
Loose heat exchanger tubes.
If so equipped, Roll tubes to expand tube
inside diameter using proper expansion tool.
Fine dust under coupling
having rubber buffers or
pins.
Misalignment.
Realign motor and driven equipment.
Inspect coupling.
Bearing overheating.
Oil level too high or low (sleeve bearing).
Correct oil level. See Maintenance section of
this instruction book to determine proper oil
level.
Misalignment.
Realign motor and driven equipment.
Excessive tension in belt drive.
Reduce tension to point of adequacy.
Excessive end thrust.
Reduce thrust. Recheck mounting and
alignment.
Too much grease (ball or roller bearing).
Relieve supply to point set by manufacturer.
Sticking oil ring (sleeve bearing).
Clean, repair, or replace. Recheck mounting.
Parts not sealed properly.
Seal pipe plugs and connections.
Seal bearing housing split line.
Seal oil seal joint.
Clogged oil return holes in oil seals.
Dismantle and clean oil seals.
High pressure or vacuum in bearing cavity.
Measure pressure or vacuum using
manometer (See “Cavity Pressures” under
Bearings).
Oil leakage or excessive
oil usage.
Excessive oil level
fluctuation.
Check atmospheric vents for obstructions.
Check oil seal gap for uniformity.
- 13 -
Maintenance
Preventive Maintenance
Motors are designed to give many years of reliable
service with a minimum of attention. Trouble-free
operation cannot be expected if proper maintenance
is postponed or neglected.
Provide proper maintenance on the equipment.
Follow carefully the instructions contained herein. Be
certain personnel review, understand, and follow
these procedures during periodic maintenance
inspections.
DANGER
Hazardous voltage.
Will cause death, serious injury,
electrocution or property damage.
Disconnect all power before working
on this equipment.
Maintenance should be performed
only by qualified personnel.
CAUTION
Flying dirt, dust or other particles.
May cause eye injury.
Wear safety glasses and dust mask when using
compressed air.
CAUTION
Maintenance Checklist
1. Verify motor is clean and verify that stator and
rotor ventilation passages are unobstructed.
2. Check for excessive loading or service factor.
3. Verify winding temperature rise not in excess of
rated value.
4. Verify
insulation
resistance
is
above
recommended minimum.
5. Verify voltage and frequency variation.
6. Check air gap.
7. Verify that bearing temperatures are within limits
and that lubricant is clean and proper level
maintained.
8. Verify no unusual vibration or noise exists.
9. Check alignment.
10. Check for proper lubrication.
A definite schedule of preventive maintenance
inspections should be established to avoid
breakdown, serious damage and extensive
downtime. The schedule will depend on operating
conditions and experience with similar equipment.
To assure adequate maintenance, and warranty
consideration, it is essential that complete records
be kept for each motor, including description and
rating, maintenance schedule and repairs required
or carried out.
This checklist does not represent an exhaustive
survey of maintenance steps necessary to ensure
safe operation of this equipment.
Particular
applications may require further procedures. Should
further information be desired or should particular
problems arise which are not covered sufficiently for
the purchaser’s purposes, the matter should be
referred to the local Siemens Sales Office.
Loose parts or fire.
Can result in product failure or serious property damage.
WARNING
Improper maintenance can cause death, serious
injury or property damage.
Use only factory authorized parts for repair of
equipment.
Maintenance should be performed only by qualified
personnel.
- 14 -
Maintenance
Hazardous Location
WARNING
Explosion or fire.
Can cause death, serious injury or property damage.
Do not modify or change any motor accessories, which
are not suitable for the area classification. Any part
replacements are accurate duplicates of the original to
maintain the hazardous area classification.
Consult manufacturer for the replacement part and for
repair process.
Inspection
Each motor should be inspected at regular intervals.
The frequency and thoroughness will depend on the
operating hours, nature of service, and the
environment.
Sleeve Bearing - 580, 880, SH400, SH450, SH560
Frames
Access to the motor interior can be gained by
removal of the bearing bracket as follows:
1. First remove the bearing housing cap and
bearing liners as described under Bearing
Replacement.
2. Remove floating labyrinth seals or oil seals as
equipped.
3. Remove the bearing housing from the bearing
bracket.
4. Carefully remove the bearing bracket with inner
motor seal from the motor.
Cleanliness
The exterior should be kept free of oil, dust, dirt,
water, and chemical. It is particularly important to
keep the air intake and exhaust openings free of
obstructions.
NOTE
Antifriction Bearing
Access to the motor interior can be gained by
removal of the bearing housing.
1. Remove the bolts holding the inner bearing end
cap to the housing.
2. Remove the bolts holding the bearing housing to
the yoke.
3. Remove the bearing housing by pulling it away
from the face of the yoke. It will be necessary to
first remove the fan housing and external fan
from the non-drive end of the motor to gain
access to the bearing housing.
Sleeve Bearing - 500 Frame
Access to the motor interior can be gained by
removal of the upper half of the horizontally split
bearing bracket.
If equipment is operated intermittently in very damp
locations, it should be protected by space heaters. To
retard corrosion, grease all machined fits when the
unit is reassembled after a maintenance check.
Loading
Overloading causes overheating and reduces
insulation life. A winding subjected to a 10°C
temperature rise above the maximum limit for its
class may have its insulation life halved.
Underloading a motor is improper as it lowers the
motor power factor and efficiency which results in
higher power cost.
1. Remove the parting bolts at the horizontal split.
2. Remove the bolts at the outer circumference of
the upper half of the split-bearing bracket.
3. Pull the upper bracket away from the face of the
frame and remove bracket.
The entire procedure can be done without disturbing
the bearing enclosure or coupling alignment of the
motor to the load. The split-bearing capsule is held
together by bolts.
- 15 -
Maintenance
Temperature
Electrical apparatus operating under normal
conditions becomes quite warm. Although some
places may feel hot to the touch, the unit may be
within limits. If checking total temperature by winding
resistance or imbedded detector (RTD), the total
temperature should not exceed the following:
When operating at full load:
Class of Insulation System
Temp. by
Resistance
Temp. by
Embedded
Detector
B
F
H
All HP
120°C
(248°F)
145°C
(293°F)
165°C
(329°F)
1500HP
or less
130°C
(266°F)
155°C
(311°F)
180°C
(356°F)
125°C
(257°F)
150°C
(302°F)
175°C
(347°F)
120°C
(248°F)
145°C
(293°F)
165°C
(329°F)
Over
1500HP
-Under
7000V
Over
1500HP
-Over
7000 V
Class of Insulation System
B
F
H
All HP
1500HP
or less
Temp. by
Embedded
Detector
Over
1500HP
-Under
7000V
Over
1500HP
-Over
7000 V
More important than the actual vibration is the
vibration change over a period of time.
Corrective Maintenance
Two factors that require corrective maintenance are
electrical failure or mechanical failure. The first sign
of electrical failure is usually low insulation
resistance. Mechanical failures are usually preceded
by excessive bearing noise or heat.
Low Insulation Resistance
Factors that usually cause low insulation readings
are:
When operating at 1.15 service factor load:
Temp. by
Resistance
4. Foundation construction - Base, grouting and
associated equipment supporting drives must be
in good condition. Vibration can be amplified by
weak construction. Vibration of base just below
motor feet should not exceed 25% of motor
vibration.
5. History - When was vibration first noted? Was
there a change in loading and/or duty of
equipment? Has ambient vibration changed?
130°C
(266°F)
155°C
(311°F)
175°C
(347°F)
140°C
(284°F)
165°C
(329°F)
190°C
(373°F)
135°C
(275°F)
160°C
(320°F)
185°C
(365°F)
130°C
(266°F)
155°C
(311°F)
175°C
(347°F)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Dirty winding can be cleaned and moist windings
dried; however, items 3 and 4 require extensive
repairs by a certified service center.
CAUTION
Flying dirt, dust or other particles.
These temperatures represent the maximum
temperature for each class of insulation and include a
40°C ambient temperature. Operation above these
temperatures will result in reduced insulation life.
Vibration
Most problems can be detected when inspected
visually. Check for;
1. Loose or missing parts, such as fan blades, nuts,
bolts, screws, couplings, etc.
2. Accumulation of dirt on fan or rotor.
3. Associated equipment - Disconnect equipment to
determine where the vibration is being generated.
Dirty windings (oil, dust, grease, salt, etc.).
Excessive moisture.
Mechanically damaged insulation.
Heat deterioration
May cause eye injury.
Wear safety glasses and dust mask when using
compressed air.
Cleaning
Clean the outside of the motor regularly. Actual
conditions existing around the motor dictate the
frequency of cleaning operations. Use the following
procedures as they apply.
1. Wipe off dust, dirt, oil, water, etc., from external
surfaces of the motor.
2. Remove dirt, dust, or other debris from ventilating
air inlets and exhausts. Do not operate motor
with air passages blocked or restricted.
- 16 -
Maintenance
Rotor Cleaning
Drying Insulation
Remove rotor. Inspect and clean.
Stator Cleaning
Micalastic™ form wound VPI (vacuum pressure
impregnated) insulated coils may be cleaned with
solvent using lint free cloths or steam cleaned with
low-pressure steam, then the entire stator oven
baked at 170°F for 6 hours and then 245°F for 12
hours.
If the insulation resistance is less than satisfactory,
and the cause is believed to be excessive moisture in
the windings, dry the windings by applying heat from:
1. A warm air oven.
2. Electric strip heaters.
3. Circulating currents through the coils.
The heat should be applied slowly so the desired
temperature will not be obtained in less than six
hours.
The stator winding insulation resistance should be
measured before and after any cleaning operation.
Insulation Drying Temperature*
Micalastic™ is a Siemens trademark.
DANGER
Check insulation resistance periodically. Use a hand
cranked or solid state insulation resistance tester and
test with at least 500 volts, but not greater than motor
rated voltage.
For motors with newer insulation systems such as
Micalastic™ VPI, the insulation resistance after one
minute should be greater than 1000 megohms.
(Values in excess of 5000 megohms are common.)
For older motors, the minimum value recommended
in IEEE Standard 43 can be used. The value in
megohms, when corrected to 40°C, is equal to the
motor rated voltage in kilovolts plus 1. For example,
for a motor with a rated voltage of 2300 volts, the limit
value would be + 1 = 3.3 (megohms).
200°F
245°F*
275°F*
94°C
118°C
135°C
NOTE
High Voltage.
Insulation Resistance
Class “H”
Insulation resistance should be measured before the
heat is applied, and every six to eight hours
thereafter.
CAUTION
May damage semi-conductors, small transformers,
voltage regulators, and other devices.
Disconnect from circuit before testing insulation
resistance.
Class “F”
*Class “F” and “H” insulated units should be baked at 70%
specified temperature (to avoid steam inside winding) for about
six hours, before temperature is raised to drying temperature.
Hazardous voltage.
Will cause death, serious injury,
electrocution or property damage.
Disconnect all power before working
on this equipment.
Class “B”
Insulation resistance will decrease as the motor warms
up; but will begin to increase as the drying process
continues.
A uniform temperature must be maintained in the
motor to obtain constant resistance readings. When
the megger readings remain constant, the drying
process is complete and may be discontinued.
Check for other causes if readings are still low.
Warm Air Oven Drying
1. Remove bearing housings.
2. Remove rotor.
Bake in oven at temperatures specified in Insulation
Drying Temperature table, and follow procedures
described for drying insulation.
- 17 -
Maintenance
Electric Strip Heater Drying
1. Remove bearing housings.
2. Remove rotor.
3. Direct a fan on stator to carry away the moisture.
4. Attach temperature indicators to winding and
apply heat as specified in the Insulation Drying
Temperature table and follow procedures
described for drying insulation.
5. Radiant type heaters are not recommended
because some parts may become scorched
before remote parts reach desired temperature.
Circulating Current Drying
1. Remove bearing housings.
2. Center the rotor in the stator core.
3. Wedge fiber strips into the lower part of the air
gap so rotor does not touch stator core, or
remove rotor.
4. Direct fan on unit to blow away excessive
moisture.
5. Attach temperature indicators to windings. Do not
exceed the drying temperatures in the Insulation
Drying Temperature table.
6. An external source of current can be used to
circulate direct current through the winding of any
type of alternating current motor. A portable low
voltage motor-generator set, such as is used for
welding, is usually suitable.
When this method is used on the stator, the stator
phases may be connected in series or in parallel to
suit the available power supply if both ends of all
phases are accessible. If only three leads are
brought out of the motor, the current may be
circulated between one terminal and the other two
connected together. If this is done, the temperature
of the single lead connection must be checked
frequently, and it is desirable to shift the leads
occasionally. Usually 50 to 100% of full load current
will produce the required temperature. The dc voltage
required for this current will be 0.25 - 5.0% of the
normal voltage per phase, and the corresponding
power will be 0.50 - 3.25% of the rating.
Alternating current can be used on the stators of
squirrel cage induction motors if the rotors are
removed. Alternating current is usually not as easy
to control as required voltage control, and a.c.
requires a higher voltage source, approximately 10 to
30% of the rated winding voltage. In addition, care
must be taken that miscellaneous parts adjacent to
the windings, such as lead studs, core supporting
member, etc., do no overheat due to induced
currents and the lack of normal ventilation.
CAUTION
High temperatures.
May cause damage to insulation.
Avoid hot spots and radiant type heat
Bearings
Long life of bearings is assured by maintaining proper
alignment, belt tension, and lubrication at all times.
Incorrect alignment of solid and flexible couplings can
cause excessive load on bearings, and excessive
vibration and thrust. Misalignment of belt drives can
cause thrust or harmful shaft oscillation. Improper
alignment of gear drives will produce shock loads and
may bend the shaft.
Excessive belt tension often causes overheating and
failure of bearings. Bearings tend to overheat when
pulley centers are too close, pulley diameters are too
small, or belt speed is too high.
Bearing Construction
Two types of bearings are employed in induction
motors. These are;
1. Antifriction bearings.
2. Sleeve bearings.
The type of bearing mounting and supporting
structure will depend upon the type of bearing.
Bearing housing construction will also vary with the
type of bearing. Antifriction bearing motors have one
piece bearing bracket construction. Sleeve bearing
motors have split bearing housings.
- 18 -
Maintenance
Insulated Bearings
One or both bearings may be insulated to prevent
shaft currents from pitting bearing surfaces. The
insulation is located at the joint between the bearing
housing or bracket and the bearing. Insulated
bearings are designated by an instruction plate on
the bearing housing.
Check periodically to be sure the insulation has not
been weakened or destroyed.
The bearing insulation can be checked using an
ohmmeter or circuit test light. For sleeve bearing
motors with one bearing insulated, the shaft must be
raised a few mils at the non-drive end of the motor so
that it is not in contact with the bearing and the shaft
coupling must be parted so that the shaft is not
grounded through the driven equipment. For motors
with both bearings insulated, disconnect bearing
grounding strap before testing for insulation integrity.
Bearing temperature devices must be disconnected
and oil rings must not be in contact with both the
shaft and the bearing.
Antifriction Bearings
Antifriction bearings are selected to give long service
when they are given proper maintenance. Bearing
failure can be caused by too little or too much
lubrication, contamination, excessive bearing load,
improper installation, alignment, or vibration.
The symptoms of antifriction bearing failure are
excessive vibration, noise, and excessive heat
generation. The races and balls should be
periodically inspected for damage. Any damage
requires replacement of the bearing.
Sleeve Bearings
Check sleeve bearings daily to be sure the oil rings
are turning properly. See motor outline drawing to
determine proper oil level. Add oil through the oil ring
sight glass opening or oil inlet pipe, if so equipped.
Be careful not to overfill.
Drain the oil reservoir by removing pipe plug. Clean
and flush with solvent and refill with fresh filtered oil
every three months to one year, depending on
severity of service. Use a high grade turbine oil
having a viscosity of 300-350 SSU at 100°F for units
of 1800 rpm and lower, and 140-160 SSU at 100°F
for machines above 1800 rpm to 3600 rpm.
In addition, seasonal oil changes are desirable if unit
is subject to wide variations in temperature.
Bearing babbitt temperatures that exceed 90°C
(194°F) or a sudden rise in temperature should be
investigated.
Common causes of hot bearings are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Lack of oil.
Incorrect viscosity.
Poor quality oil.
Inoperative oil ring.
Misalignment of couplings or bearings.
Insufficient bearing clearance.
Oil seal rubbing on shaft.
Shaft or bushing rough spots.
Plugged oil passages on circulating oil systems.
(Note that circulating oil systems include a filter in
the oil line to strain the oil after it leaves the
pump. Check and clean or replace filter when
necessary.)
10. End thrust on bearing face.
Sleeve bearings are bored to an even dimension and
shaft journals are slightly smaller to obtain running
clearance. Side reliefs are provided to distribute oil
axially and reduce friction. During normal operation,
the shaft is supported on an oil film 0.001 to 0.005
inch thick, depending on speed, load and viscosity.
Unless adverse conditions exist which tend to break
down the oil film, metallic contact occurs only during
starting and stopping. Under normal circumstances,
bearing wear is very small.
Oil Rings
Inspect oil level and oil ring operation frequently. Oil
ring operation can be observed through the oil sight
glass. Oil rings should be perfectly round, free of
burrs or rough edges, turn at a constant speed, and
carry a noticeable amount of oil to the top of the
bearing journal. Failure of the oil ring to turn freely
may be caused by:
1. Ring out of round - rings should be round within
0.062 inch.
2. Fouling on a projection of the bearings, bushing,
or housing.
3. Ring not balanced (heavy side will tend to remain
down).
4. Adhesion to guide slot (trapezoidal section
reduces adhesion).
5. Oil too cold, too viscous, or oil level too high.
6. Shaft not level – oil rings tend to bind.
7. Vibration causing oil ring to bounce and slow
down.
- 19 -
Maintenance
At the first sign of oil discoloration or contamination,
replace with new oil. Rapid discoloration is caused by
bearing wear, often from vibration or thrust. Change
oil as required to keep clean.
When assembling the bearing, it is possible to foul
the rings so that they will not turn freely. Check ring
operation by rotating shaft by hand after assembly
Oil Seals
580 frame motors use fixed, labyrinth oil seals to
close off the bearing cavity. The 500, 880, SH400,
SH450, and SH560 frame motors utilize floating type
oil seals to close off the bearing cavity. The primary
purposes of the oil seal are:
1. To prevent the entrance of dirt in to the bearing
cavity.
2. To retain the oil in the bearing cavity.
3. To provide pressure regulation in the bearing
cavity.
To achieve these purposes it is necessary that a
specific diametrical clearance of oil seal to shaft be
held. The cooling fans of the motor tend to create a
suction or a pressure in the bearing cavity, which, if
large enough, will push or draw oil out along the
shaft. The close fitting oil seal gives a pressure drop
across it and minimizes the differential pressure.
Frame
500
580
880
SH400
SH450
SH560
Standard oil seal clearances
Diametrical Clearance
0.008 to 0.015 inches
0.014 to 0.020 inches
0.003 to 0.008 inches
0.003 to 0.008 inches
0.003 to 0.008 inches
0.003 to 0.008 inches
Bearing Clearance Too Large
Too large a bearing clearance or clogged oil return
holes in the bearing will permit excessive oil to seep
out the ends of the bearing. This seepage, combined
with the rotation of the shaft, will create an oil mist
inside the bearing cavity which will tend to leak
through the oil seals. Excessive pressure in a force
feed lubrication system can also cause an oil mist to
build up.
Cavity Pressures
Motors are sensitive to the amount of pressure or
vacuum existing in the bearing cavity. The table
below shows the maximum allowable oil cavity
pressure or vacuum in terms of plus or minus inches
of water:
Frame
Drive End
500
580
880
SH400
SH450
SH560
±0.12
±0.12
±0.12
±0.12
±0.12
±0.12
Non-Drive
End
+3.00, -0.12
+3.00, -0.12
±0.50
±0.50
±0.50
±0.50
For the correction of a high or low reading it is
important that:
1. The parts and joints around the bearing cavity
and oil seals are sealed.
2. Condensation drains, piping, sight gauges and
breathers are functioning properly.
3. Auxiliary equipment extending into the motor
must be sealed to prevent a transfer of air from
inside to outside the motor.
Besides using close clearances to correct differential
pressures, some oil seals are vented to the
atmosphere. It is important that the piping and
venting for these oil seals be kept clean.
The clearance between the journal and the bearing
will permit the journal center to be slightly below the
bearing center.
With the motor operating, the
presence of the oil film between the journal and the
bearing will cause the shaft to rise slightly.
NOTE
When a sleeve bearing becomes worn and requires
replacement, the labyrinth oil seal should also be
replaced.
- 20 -
Maintenance
Sealing Parts
Even though joints may seem to match perfectly,
minute clearances exist through which oil may leak.
Sealant should be applied to the mating surfaces of
parts where oil is present to prevent seepage of oil.
The frequency of lubricating bearings depends on
three factors - speed, type of bearing, and service.
Sealant should be applied as follows:
Lubricate with the type of grease specified on the
lubrication plate mounted on the motor, or a
compatible grease.
Mixing of non-compatible
greases can cause bearing failure.
1. Surfaces shall be clean of dirt, grease, and oil
sealant. Use a non-oil base solvent if necessary.
2. The mating surfaces should be flat with no nicks
or burrs raised above the surface. There should
be no gap when mating surfaces are together.
Remove all excess paint from parting line
surfaces and degrease thoroughly. Do not grind
mating surfaces.
3a. For 500, 880, SH400, SH450, and SH560
frames, apply a small bead of silicone RTV at the
bearing housing parting surfaces. Loctite 518
may be used in replace of RTV in environments
where silicon is prohibited. Do not apply too
much sealant as excess will be squeezed out and
get into labyrinth seals, bearing, oil cavities, etc.
Apply a uniform, thin layer (about 0.05" thick) of
Curil T* to the floating oil seal surfaces that mate
with the bearing housing. Allow Curil T to cure on
the seals for 15 minutes before insertion into
bearing housing.
3b. For 580 frames, apply a small bead of silicone
RTV to all mating surfaces of parts where oil is
present, including fixed oil seals and bearing
housing parting lines.
4. Assemble parts.
*CURIL-T may be ordered through Siemens Customer Service in
Norwood, Ohio. Part number 53-688-487-001 should be used for
ordering purposes.
Bearing Lubrication
Operating environment or application may dictate
more frequent lubrication.
Higher stator temperatures will result in increased
bearing temperatures. Bearing temperatures should
not exceed the limits as stated in Typical Motor
Control Settings. For specific recommendation,
consult factory.
Procedure for Lubrication:
1. Stop the motor and lock out the switch.
2. Thoroughly clean the grease inlet fitting or plug.
If the motor has plug, remove plug and clean the
inlet.
3. Remove the drain plug and clean out any
hardened grease.
4. Slowly pump the correct amount of grease into
the grease inlet, per the lubrication plate mounted
on the motor.
5. Start motor and allow to run at least one (1) hour
to expel any excess grease from the drain
opening before re-installing the drain plug.
6. Stop the motor and lock out the switch.
7. Re-install the drain plug.
8. Put the motor back in operation.
The amount of grease for bearings may be calculated
by the following:
G = 0.1 x D x B
Where:
Grease Lubricated Antifriction Bearings
NOTE
A common mistake is over-lubrication of bearings.
When grease is added without removing the drain
plug, the excess grease may be forced into and
through the inner bearing cap and thrown on to the
windings. If bearing is over-lubricated, bearing could
run hot, and may lead to failure.
All antifriction bearing motors will have an affixed
plate with lubricating instructions. The instructions on
this plate should be followed to achieve optimum
bearing life and to avoid consequential damage to
rotating parts.
- 21 -
G = Amount of grease in fluid ounces
D = Outside diameter of bearing in inches
B = Width of bearing in inches
Maintenance
1.
2.
3.
Sleeve Bearings
CAUTION
4.
Maintain proper oil level.
Failure to do so may cause improper lubrication of motor
resulting in damage to the equipment.
Follow lubrication instructions carefully. Avoid adding oil
while unit is running.
Motors with sleeve bearings are shipped without oil.
A rust-inhibiting film is applied at the factory to protect
bearing and journal surfaces during shipment.
Before attempting to operate any sleeve bearing
motor, the following steps must be performed.
1. Visually inspect the bearing condition. Oil ring
inspection ports and drain openings in the
housing are normally provided for this purpose.
2. Check for any accumulation of moisture. If
oxidation is discovered, all traces of it must be
removed before motor is put in service, which will
require disassembly.
3. Flush all oil piping. Fill bearing reservoirs to
normal level. Fill to mark indicated on gauge or
to center of gauge. See the table below for
recommended grades of oil.
4. Rotate shaft several turns by hand to distribute oil
over bearing parts. Make sure oil rings rotate
freely.
Recommended Grades of Turbine Oil
Motor Speed
Oil Viscosity at 100°F
ISO
Grade
3600 or 3000 RPM
1800 & slower
140 - 160 SSU
300 - 350 SSU
32
68
NOTE
The oil viscosity at operating temperature is very
important in selecting proper oil and may vary in
different climates.
It is important to maintain the correct oil level, as lack
of lubrication is often the cause of bearing failure.
Inspect oil level and oil ring operation frequently. Oil
ring operation can be observed through the sight
glass mounted at the top of the bearing capsule. Oil
rings should be perfectly round, free of burrs or rough
edges, turn at constant speed and carry a noticeable
amount of oil to the top of the journal. Failure of the
oil ring to turn freely may be caused by:
5.
6.
Ring out of round (should be round to 0.062 inch)
Fouling on a projection of the bearing bushing.
Ring not balanced (heavy side will tend to remain
down).
Adhesion to guide slot (trapezoidal section reduces
adhesion).
Oil too cold, viscous, or oil level too high.
Shaft not level – oil ring tends to bind.
At the first sign of oil discoloration or contamination,
replace with new oil. Rapid discoloration is caused by
bearing wear, often from vibration or thrust. Change oil
as required to keep clean.
Force Feed Lubrication
Oil is metered through an orifice in oil inlet line to allow
the proper amount of lubricating oil to enter the bearing.
Conventional oil rings are also supplied with the motor
to insure temporary bearing lubrication in the event the
force feed oil supply should fail. It is important to check
oil flow frequently. Lack of lubrication may cause
bearing failure.
Checking Sleeve Bearing Clearance
Excessive clearance can cause rapid bearing failure,
and decreased air gap between stator and rotor at the
bottom of the motor.
Diametrical sleeve bearing
clearances for the 500 and 580 frame motors are in the
range of 1.7 to 2.7 mils per inch of bearing diameter.
Diametrical sleeve bearing clearances for the 880,
SH400, SH450, and SH560 frames are in the range of
1.0 to 2.0 mils per inch of bearing diameter.
An accurate check of bearing clearance is obtained with
micrometer measurements of the shaft journal and
bearing bore.
Bearing Replacement
Antifriction Bearings
For typical antifriction bearing configuration, see Figures
3, 4 and 5.
Replacement bearings may be of a different manufacturer
but must be equal to the originals used in the motor.
When ordering bearings specify as follows:
1. The complete A.F.B.M.A. (Anti-Friction Bearing
Manufacturers’ Association) bearing number from the
motor nameplate.
2. Identifying numerals and manufacturer stamped on
the bearing.
3. Bearing tolerance class, i.e. - A.B.E.C.-1 (Annular
Bearing Engineers’ Committee Tolerance Class One).
4. Internal radial clearance, i.e. – A.F.B.M.A.-3
(Clearance Class Three).
5. Electric motor quality.
- 22 -
Maintenance
To Replace Antifriction Bearings
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Remove bolts holding end caps to housings.
Remove bolts holding bearing housings to yoke.
Remove bearing housings.
Remove the bearing with a puller. See Figure 6.
Check shaft and housing diameter for proper size
with micrometer.
6. Heat the new bearing in an oven (200°F). While
it is hot, slide the bearing onto shaft – make
certain that the inner race makes a firm even
contact with shaft shoulder. Do not subject
bearing to impact.
7. Let bearing cool - pack bearing caps with the
proper grease.
8. Reassemble end caps and housings.
The amount of grease to be used when repacking a
bearing after cleaning or replacement is shown in the
table below:
Figure 4. Ball Bearing Construction
880 & SH450 Frames
Grease Quantity*
(End Caps)
Outer
Inner
Type
Bearing
Operating
Bearing
(Shaft)
Deep Groove
Ball
Horizontal
2/3 Full
1/3 Full
Roller
Horizontal
1/3 Full
1/3 Full
*Pack all open bearings full between balls or roller but remove
excess grease on outside of retainers.
Shaft Seal
See NOTE box;
1.) is for CGZ, CZ,
CMZ, NCMZ, & 1LA4
Figure 5. Ball Bearing Construction
SH560 Frame
NOTE
1.
Figure 3. Ball Bearing Construction
500, 580 & SH400 Frames
- 23 -
For best results, seal should be positioned
flush with outer-most bearing housing
surface. (Some frame sizes have shaft seal
on only one end of the motor)
Maintenance
4. Remove the top half of the sleeve bearing.
5. Remove bearing temperature probes if so
equipped.
6. Displace the oil rings axially away from the
bottom half of the sleeve bearing.
7. Raise the shaft slightly and support it.
8. Rotate the lower bearing half 180° and remove
the lower half of the bearing.
9. Reassemble, reversing the steps above. Apply
sealant. The side faces of the labyrinth seals
must be sealed with CURIL-T or equivalent nonhardening sealing compound. Be careful not to
disturb or jam the seals when replacing the
upper half of the bearing capsule.
10. Lubricate. Turn motor by hand to be sure of
proper fit and oil ring operation.
11. Start motor without load and check oil ring
operation.
Protect the shaft end with a cap. If bearing is reusable,
make certain the puller applies pressure against the
bearing inner race only. If puller will not hook the bearing
inner race, fabricate a split bushing and install it between
the bearing and the puller hooks.
Figure 6. Removing Bearing with a Puller
Sleeve Bearing
When replacing sleeve bearings, it is always
desirable to check the fit (contact pattern) of the
bearing to the shaft.
When ordering sleeve
bearings, be sure to provide complete motor
nameplate and bearing data.
Whenever a bearing is replaced, cleanliness must
be observed through every step of the operation.
Figure 7. Sleeve Bearing Construction with
Floating Type Oil Seals-500 Frame
Always inspect the bearing journal surfaces; they
must be smooth and polished. Slight scoring can be
removed with crocus cloth. If the motor shaft has
been seriously scored it must be put between
centers and reground. Journals can be ground
0.001 inch under size, but they must be round and
concentric with shaft center.
580 Frame (See Figure 8)
1. Check replacement bearings for nicks or
shipping damage. Do not scrape.
2. Loosen outer oil seal and remove.
3. Remove the two long bolts (2:00 and 10:00
o’clock positions) that go through to the inner oil
seal.
4. Remove the upper half of the bearing capsule.
5. Remove the top half of the sleeve bearing.
6. Remove bearing temperature probes if so
equipped.
7. Displace the oil rings axially away from the
bottom half of the sleeve bearing.
8. Raise the shaft slightly and support it in that
position.
9. Rotate the lower bearing half 180° and remove
the lower half of the bearing.
10. Reassemble, reversing the steps above. Apply
RTV silicon rubber or Permatex #2 sealant.
Sleeve Bearing Replacement
The replacement of sleeve bearings can often be
accomplished without uncoupling the load or
otherwise disturbing the installation.
500 Frame (See Figure 7)
1. Check replacement bearings for nicks or
shipping damage. Do not scrape.
2. Remove the upper half of the bearing bracket.
3. Carefully remove the top half of the bearing
capsule by first lifting straight up, then pulling
away from the bearing area.
- 24 -
Maintenance
flange and the bearing bracket. The shims permit
the bearing
11. Lubricate. Turn motor by hand to be sure of
proper fit and oil ring operation.
12. Start motor without load and check oil ring
operation.
to be adjusted axially to maintain coincidence of
electrical and mechanical center. Any adjustment of
the axial position of one bearing should be
accompanied by the same axial adjustment of the
opposite end bearing.
The coupling should limit the end float of the shaft to
±0.18 inch from the mechanical center. The limited
end float coupling prevents the rotor from rubbing
against the bearing shoulders during operation.
Figure 8. Sleeve bearing construction with
labyrinth-type oil seals-580 Frame.
880, SH400, SH450, and SH560 Frames (See
Figure 9)
1. Check replacement bearings for nicks or
shipping damage. Do not scrape.
2. Carefully remove the bearing housing cap by
first lifting straight up, then pulling away from the
bearing area.
3. Remove top half of bearing liner.
4. Remove the bolts at the split line of the oil ring.
5. Remove bearing temperature probes if so
equipped.
6. Raise the shaft slightly and support it.
7. Rotate the lower bearing half 180° and remove
the lower half of the bearing.
8. Reassemble, reversing the steps above. Apply
sealant. The side faces of the labyrinth seals
must be sealed with CURIL-T or equivalent nonhardening sealing compound. Be careful not to
disturb or jam the seals when replacing the
upper half of the bearing capsule.
9. Lubricate. Turn motor by hand to be sure of
proper fit and oil ring operation.
10. Start motor without load and check oil ring
operation.
Figure 9. Sleeve Bearing
Construction 880, SH400, SH450,
and SH560 Frames.
End Float – Sleeve Bearings
Control of rotor end float in sleeve bearing motors is
maintained in the drive end bearing. The total end
float is 0.5 inch. On the 500 and 580 frames the
bearings are located axially by shims between the
bearing bushing and the housing shoulders in the
lower half of the housing. On the 880, SH400,
SH450, and SH560 frames the shims are located
between the bearing housing mounting
- 25 -
Spare Parts
Identification
All units have an identification nameplate affixed to the
frame (Figure 10 & 11). All the necessary information
pertaining to the motor can be found on this plate
including;
1. Serial Number
2. Type and Frame Size
3. Horsepower and Speed
4. Bearing Designations
It is important when ordering spare parts or discussing
service to have as much data from this plate as
possible.
Parts Identification
Figures 12 through 20, are of a standard design. Your
motor may differ slightly.
A recommended list of spare parts is available upon
request.
Figure 10. Identification Plate – Non-Hazardous Location
Figure 11. Identification Plate – Hazardous Location
- 26 -
Spare Parts
Figure 12. Type CZ, 509 / 5011 / 5013 Frames
Figure 12a. Type CMZ/NCMZ, 509 / 5011 / 5013 Frames
Item
1
2
3
4
5
6
Description
Stator Core
Stator Yoke
Stator Coils
Bearing Housing
Rotor Shaft
Inner End Cap
Item
7
8
10
11
12
13
Description
Ball Bearing
Shaft Seal
Grid Cover
Rotor Core
External Fan (4 pole & slower)
Fan Housing
- 27 -
Item
14
15
16
17
18
19
Description
Inboard Seal
Oil Seal
Bearing Capsule
Sleeve Bearing Bushing
Shims (in bottom half)
Oil Rings
Spare Parts
Item
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Description
Fan Cone
External Fan
(2pole)
Inside Oil Seal
Bearing Cap.
Housing
Sleeve
Bearing
Bushing
Shims
Outside Oil
Seal
Oil Rings
Machine Seal
Figure 13. External Fan
Arrangement for 2 Pole Types
CZ.
Item
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Description
Stator Core
Stator Yoke
Stator Coils
Bearing Housing
Rotor Shaft
Inner End Cap
Ball Bearing
Figure 14. Sleeve Bearing
Arrangement 580 Frame
Item
8
10
11
12
13
14
15
Description
Shaft Seal
Grid Cover
Rotor Core
External Fan (4 Pole or Slower)
Fan Housing
Internal Fan
Rotor Air Duct
Figure 15. Type CZ, 588 / 5810 / 5812 Frames
- 28 -
Spare Parts
Item
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Description
Stator Core
Stator Yoke
Stator Coils
Bearing Housing
Rotor Shaft
Inner End Cap
Ball Bearing
Item
8
10
11
12
13
14
15
Description
Shaft seal
Grid Cover
Rotor Core
External Fan (Non-Directional)
Fan Housing
Internal Fan
Rotor Air Duct
Figure 16. Sleeve Bearing
Arrangement for Type CGZ
880, SH400, SH450, Type 1LA4
SH560 Frames
Item
18
19
20
21
22
23
Description
Oil Seal
Bearing Cap.
Housing
Sleeve Bearing
Bushing
Shims
Machine Seal
Oil Ring
Figure. 17. Type CGZ, SH400 Frame
Item
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Description
Stator Core
Stator Yoke
Stator Coils
Bearing Housing
Rotor Shaft
Inner End Cap
Ball Bearing
Shaft seal
Item
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Description
Outer End Cap
Grid Cover
Rotor Core
External Fan
(Directional)
Fan Housing
Internal Fan
Rotor Air Duct
Figure. 18. Type CGZ, 880 & SH450 Frame
- 29 -
Spare Parts
Item
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Description
Stator Core
Stator Yoke
Stator Coils
Bearing Housing
Rotor Shaft
Inner End Cap
Ball Bearing
Shaft seal
Item
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Description
Outer End Cap
Grid Cover
Rotor Core
External Fan
(Directional)
Fan Housing
Internal Fan
Roller Bearing
Figure. 20. Type 1LA4, SH560 Frame
- 30 -
Motor Service Record
______________________ Horsepower ______________ Type
___________
Serial No
_____________ Amperes _____________ Hertz _______
Speed ________ Volts
Insulation Class
_______
Temperature Rise _______
Owner Order No
_________________
Item No
MACHINE TYPE





Horizontal
Vertical
Open Drip-Proof
Totally-Enclosed
Weather Protected
(1)
Name of Part
 Roller
 Sleeve
Location
Length ___________________
Diameter _________________
Internal Thread ____________
External Thread ____________
Keyway __________________
Application
Repairs or Parts Replaced
Siemens No.
_________
SHAFT EXTENSION
Size:
Drive End (DE) _____________________
Opposite Drive End (ODE) ____________
Lubrication ___________________________
No. Per
Motor
Frame Size ____________
Date Of Manufacture
BEARINGS
 Ball
Date
Installed
Date Repaired
or Replaced
_____
°C
(1)
Repaired
by
Fault
Date
Qty
Repl.
Rotor
Stator Coils
Bearing, DE
Bearing, ODE
Other
INSPECTION
Date Checked
Bearings
Lubrication
Excess Heat
Excess Noise
Speed
Voltage
Amps
Insulation
Clean
Alignment
Vibration
Temperature
- 31 -
Cost
Date
Qty
Repl.
Total
Cost
Cost
Vibration Analysis Sheet
Pick-Up
Point
Position
Horizontal
Vertical
Axial
Horizontal
Vertical
Axial
Horizontal
Vertical
Axial
Horizontal
Vertical
Axial
Horizontal
Vertical
Axial
Horizontal
Vertical
Axial
Horizontal
Vertical
Axial
Horizontal
Vertical
Axial
Horizontal
Vertical
Axial
Horizontal
Vertical
Axial
Horizontal
Vertical
Axial
Disp.
Mils
Filter-Out Coupled
Freq*
Vel.
Freq.*
CPM
In/Sec
CPM
Vel.
Mils
Freq.
CPM
Vel.
Mils
Filter-In Coupled
Freq.
Vel.
Freq.
CPM
Mils
CPM
Vel.
Mils
Freq.
CPM
*Dominant Frequency
Before vibration difficulties are reported, accurate vibration readings should be taken and consideration given to the following:
1) How does vibration level at center line of motor
5) Does vibration level change when mounting bolts are loosened
compare to that at motor feet and foundation?
one at a time? Do feet distort when bolts are loosened?
2) Is motor on a fabricated base or grouted in concrete?
6) Is motor for coupled or belt-drive use? Is a coupling used on a
3) When power is cut, does the vibration decay
long shaft motor? If so, how long is the key and what is the
immediately or does it gradually die away?
length of the coupling?
7) Is there a resonant condition in the system which can be
4) Is there a large shim pack under motor feet?
checked by a hammer test?
- 32 -
Notes
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- 33 -
Siemens Industry, Inc.
Norwood Motor Plant
4620 Forest Avenue
Norwood, OH 45212-3396
(513) 841-3100
ANIM-03522-0814
( Supercedes all previous issues of ANIM-03522)
©2014 Siemens Industry, Inc. All rights reserved.