CISCO UCS B230 M2 BLADE SERVER:
UNCOMPROMISED VIRTUAL DESKTOP PERFORMANCE
u
When deploying your virtual desktop solution, choosing hardware powerful
enough to support a large number of virtual desktops is crucial. The more virtual
desktops your server can support, the fewer servers you need to buy to provide virtual
desktops to your desired number of users.
To find the virtual desktop capacity of a single Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server,
we used the Login Consultants Virtual Session Indexer (Login VSI) 3.0 benchmark. The
Login VSI workload we used performs a range of tasks to simulate a typical knowledge
worker. The benchmark results show the maximum number of virtual desktops that a
server can support by measuring response times throughout the test.
Testing we conducted in the Principled Technologies lab revealed that a single
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server running VMware vSphere 5 could support up to 175
concurrent VMware View 5 virtual desktops while still providing an excellent desktop
experience for the end-user. This workload only used 5 percent of the available UCS
bandwidth, leaving significant headroom for additional blades in the chassis for
scalability, demonstrating the extensive bandwidth capacity afforded by the Cisco UCS
architecture.
DECEMBER 2011
A PRINCIPLED TECHNOLOGIES TEST REPORT
Commissioned by Cisco Systems, Inc.
MORE VDI SESSIONS ARE BETTER
Choosing the right combination of hardware and software for your virtual desktop
solution can significantly affect your bottom line. A robust hypervisor, top-of-the-line virtual
desktop software, and a server built on powerful processors with an expansive memory
footprint all work together to ensure you can meet the needs of your employees without your
spending money, space, and time on additional hardware. The greater your virtual desktop
density, the fewer physical servers you need. This reduces your electricity usage and power
costs, and results in a greener datacenter.
We set out to examine such a virtual desktop solution, one that consisted of the
following components:





Cisco Unified Computing System™ (UCS) B230 M2 Blade Server with Intel®
Xeon® processor E7-4870s (Note: In our testing, we used the E7-4870
processors, the functional and performance equivalent of the E7-2870. Cisco
officially supports the 2800 series of Intel Xeon processors for the B230 M2
blade.)1
vSphere 5
A VMware View 5 virtual desktop linked clone pool consisting of 175 Microsoft®
Windows® 7 x64 VMs
175 virtual desktops, all provisioned with 1 vCPU and 2 GB of reserved memory2
EMC® VNX 5500 storage array
RESPONSE TIME MATTERS
Login VSI measures the total response times of seven typical office operations and from
that calculates the VSI Index and average response times. Completion of these tasks within
4,000 milliseconds makes for an acceptable user experience. Figure 1 shows the VSI index
average and average response times for all active sessions recorded during the test. The Cisco
UCS B230 M2 Blade Server was able to support 175 concurrent virtual desktops without crossing
the response-time threshold. User response time degraded only when all 20 processor cores
were nearly saturated. For details, see Appendix D.
To initiate our test, we enabled our VMware View 5 pool of 175 Windows 7 VMs to start
up and reach a ready state. We monitored our test bed and perceived no bottlenecks in server
CPU, network, or storage I/O at the VMware View default startup rate of five VMs at a time.
1
See http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/processors/xeon/xeon-e7-8800-4800-2800-families-vol-1-datasheet.html.
We used 2 GB of RAM because Microsoft Windows 7 64-bit requires it. See http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/systemrequirements.
2
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server:
Uncompromised virtual desktop performance
A Principled Technologies test report 2
Response time for virtual desktops on a single
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server
5,000
Milliseconds
4,000
Average
Response
3,000
VSI Index
average
2,000
1,000
6
14
20
27
34
40
47
54
61
68
74
80
87
94
100
106
112
119
125
132
138
144
150
157
163
169
175
0
Number of virtual desktop sessions
Figure 1: Average virtual desktop response times at various numbers of virtual desktops on the Cisco UCS B230 M2
Blade Server.
GREATER BANDWIDTH HEADROOM PROVIDES EXCELLENT SCALABILITY
Although the Cisco UCS offers scalable bandwidth to each Cisco UCS 5108 Chassis, up to
a fully redundant 40 Gb/s, in our testing we used a single redundant pair of 10Gb connections to
the fabric interconnect. Figure 2 shows that the peak bandwidth usage of the 175 concurrent
virtual desktop sessions never exceeded 450 megabits per second, or roughly 5 percent of the
bandwidth available. Note that this includes all storage and virtual desktop traffic. This shows
that the chassis capacity far exceeds the required bandwidth for virtual desktop users based on
our Login VSI test results. The bandwidth afforded by the Cisco UCS architecture provides
sufficient headroom for excellent scalability as your IT staff adds more Cisco UCS B230 M2
server blades to support larger user populations.
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server:
Uncompromised virtual desktop performance
A Principled Technologies test report 3
Figure 2: Bandwidth usage for 175 virtual desktop sessions over the hour-long test. Lower numbers are better. In our testing,
the aggregate workload never exceeded 5 percent of available compute fabric bandwidth.
For information about Login VSI and the pieces of the solution we tested, see the What
we tested section below. For server and storage configuration information, see Appendix A. To
see the step-by-step process we used for testing, see Appendix B.
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Uncompromised virtual desktop performance
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WHAT WE TESTED
About the Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server
We used a VDI-optimized, dual-socket Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server with a pair of
Intel 10-core, 2.4 GHz Xeon (2800/4800 series) processors, two 32GB Intel X-25E SATA SSDs, and
512 GB of system memory. We installed a Cisco M81KR Virtual Interface Card (VIC) into the
server, which is a dual-port 10Gb Converged Network Adapter (CNA) optimized for
virtualization. The M81KR supports up to 128 PCIe-compliant virtual interfaces and Cisco VNLink technology. The VIC ensures reliable 10Gb, low-latency connectivity to SAN and LAN, while
allowing for greater flexibility and ease of management. Additionally, the Cisco UCS B230 M2
blade server provides support for two hot-swappable SSD drives that are accessible from the
front of the server, and for an LSI SAS2108 RAID controller. The UCS B230 server also comes
with one dual-port mezzanine card that can provide up to 20 Gbps I/O per blade.
To learn more, see Appendix A for more detailed hardware specifications, or visit
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps11583/index.html.
About the Cisco UCS Manager
The Cisco UCS Manager enables unified, embedded management that integrates the
management of both software and hardware on the Cisco UCS solution. The UCS Manager
centralizes server management, making it easier in several key ways. First, role-based
management makes it easy to assign unique management roles to different administrators (i.e.,
server, network, or storage admins) so that each can be assigned his or her own unique policies
and permissions, while still being part of an integrated management environment. Policy-based
provisioning provides managers with the ability to create service profile templates that they
apply to one or 100 servers, making it easy to apply consistent policies. The Cisco USC Manager
makes server management less about managing isolated, single hardware components and
more about managing many hardware components (up to 40 chassis and 320 blades) as a single
management domain. The use of service profiles allows managers to allocate and reallocate
server resources, which the UCS Manager views as “raw computing capacity.” This way, server
capacity allocation becomes more dynamic and efficient, with managers able to deploy and
reallocate server resources in a matter of minutes.
To learn more about the Cisco UCS Manager, visit
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps10281/index.html.
About VMware View 5
VMware designed its View 5 desktop virtualization software to simplify IT management
of virtual desktops from within the cloud. A centralized interface allows administrators to
manage upwards of tens of thousands of end-users. An administrator can easily manage settings
such as policy enforcement, performance monitoring, connection brokering, and provisioning,
to name a few. The result includes improved security, less costly management, and faster
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server:
Uncompromised virtual desktop performance
A Principled Technologies test report 5
provisioning and maintenance of desktop images and applications. The end-user enjoys easier
access to his or her View desktop from a variety of locations, less downtime, a customizable
desktop, and robust multimedia capabilities. In our tests, we implemented a new feature of
View 5, that of PCoIP Optimization Controls. This feature helps IT administrators better
configure bandwidth settings (by user, use case, or network requirements), which can reduce
bandwidth by up to 75 percent and improve protocol efficiency.
To learn more about VMware View 5, visit
http://www.vmware.com/products/view/overview.html.
About VMware vSphere 5
vSphere 5 is the latest virtualization operating system from VMware. vSphere 5 allows
companies to virtualize their server, storage, and networking resources, achieving a
consolidation ratio greater than 15:1. Features such as automated management and dynamic
resource allocation improve efficiency. The services that vSphere 5 provides fall into two
categories: Infrastructure services or application services. The former handle the virtualization
of resources and their allocation to application when most needed, while the latter provide
service-level controls to applications running on vSphere 5.
To learn more about VMware vSphere 5, visit
http://www.vmware.com/products/vsphere/overview.html.
About the Intel Xeon Processor E7-2800 series
The Intel Xeon processor E7-2800 series—the next generation of Intel Xeon multi-core
processors—is optimized for MP configurations in enterprise application servers. These
processors use Intel QuickPath Interconnect Technology to enable up to 30 MB of shared cache.
The Intel Xeon processorE7 family also support advanced Intel features like Intel 64 technology,
Enhanced Intel SpeedStep®, and Intel Virtualization technology. The E7-2800 series is available
with 6, 8, or 10 cores per socket.
To learn more about the Intel Xeon processor E7-2800 series, visit
http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/processors/xeon/xeon-e7-8800-4800-2800families-vol-1-datasheet.html
About Login VSI
Login VSI benchmarks virtual desktop sessions to determine how scalable a particular
virtualized system is. Specifically, it benchmarks a virtual desktop solution by simulating
Windows-based Office user workloads. The Medium workload of Login VSI, which we tested as
indicative of a typical “knowledge worker,” opens and closes the following applications and runs
their respective tasks:



Microsoft Outlook®: Browsing a message
Microsoft Word® (TimerDoc): Initiating response timer to see how the program
responds throughout the workload
Microsoft Internet Explorer® instance one: Maximizing, scrolling, and minimizing
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






Microsoft Internet Explorer instance two: Navigating a Web site, maximizing,
and scrolling
Microsoft Word (UserRead): Reading and typing text, and printing to PDF
Bullzip: Generating a PDF
Adobe® Reader®: Reading a PDF
Microsoft PowerPoint®: Watching a presentation and adding a slide
Microsoft Excel®: Reading and minimizing
7-Zip: Saving a ZIP file
Login VSI Version 3.0 (Release 6) benchmarks user experience more effectively than
previous versions of Login VSI because its workloads and what the VSI Index measures more
accurately reflect the tasks actual users perform on their virtual desktops. Reported response
times are higher in Login VSI 3.0 than in Login VSI 2.0 and other previous versions because the
benchmark uses this heavier workload. The Login VSI benchmark mandates the minimum
acceptable response time for the testing.
The Login VSI 3.0 benchmark uses seven operations to determine the VSImax, the
maximum number of users the system can handle before suffering serious degradation in
performance. By using seven operations instead of only two, as earlier versions of Login VSI did,
Login VSI 3.0 better reflects what a user actually experiences. The seven operations are as
follows:







Copying a new document from the document pool in the home drive
Starting Microsoft Word
Starting the File Open dialogue
Starting the Search and Replace dialogue
Starting the Print dialogue
Starting Notepad
Compressing the document into a ZIP file with 7-zip command line
Login VSI reports minimum, average, and maximum response times, as well as the VSI
Index average while performing the workload. The Login VSI Index average is similar to the
average response time, as it averages the maximum and minimum response times, but it
removes 2 percent from the maximum and minimum response time before calculating the
average. The response times are reported in time in milliseconds to perform the workload tasks.
The Login VSImax is the total number of virtual desktops the server can support while still
maintaining a response time of 4,000 milliseconds (4 seconds) or below, and is based on the VSI
Index average. In our testing at 175 sessions, the server still did not reach Login VSImax,
indicating that the server could handle the load with processor and storage resources to spare.
For more information on Login VSI 3.0, see
http://www.loginconsultants.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=390.
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Uncompromised virtual desktop performance
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SUMMARY
A server that will support greater density of hosted virtual desktops without sacrificing
performance will minimize the cost of your infrastructure and improve ROI. In our tests, the
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server running VMware View 5 with VMware vSphere 5 provided
impressive virtual desktop hosting density. The Cisco UCS solution delivered 175 concurrent
VMware View 5 virtual desktops with acceptable user response times and minimal bandwidth
usage.
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A Principled Technologies test report 8
APPENDIX A – SERVER AND STORAGE CONFIGURATION INFORMATION
Figure 3 provides detailed configuration information about the test servers. Note that we used the Cisco UCS
B230 M2 Blade Server for the systems under test and used the Cisco UCS B200 M2 Blade Server for our testbed
infrastructure. Figure 4 details the storage we used in our tests.
System
Enclosure
Blade enclosure
Power supplies
Total number
Wattage of each (W)
Cooling fans
Total number
Dimensions (h x w) of each
General
Number of processor packages
Number of cores per processor
Number of hardware threads per
core
CPU
Vendor
Name
Model number
Stepping
Socket type
Core frequency (GHz)
Bus frequency (GT/s)
L1 cache
L2 cache
L3 cache (MB)
Platform
Vendor and model number
Motherboard model number
Motherboard chipset
BIOS name and version
BIOS settings
Memory module(s)
Total RAM in system (GB)
Vendor and model number
Type
Speed (MHz)
Speed running in the system
(MHz)
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server
Cisco UCS B200 M2 Blade Server
Cisco UCS 5108
Cisco UCS 5108
4
2,500
4
2,500
8
3-5/8" x 5-1/2"
8
3-5/8" x 5-1/2"
2
10
2
6
2
2
Intel
Xeon
E7-4870 (functionally the same as the
E7-2870 in a two-socket configuration)
A2 (SLC3T)
LGA 1567
2.40
6.4
32 KB+ 32 KB (per core)
256 KB (per core)
30
Intel
Xeon
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server
B230-Base-M2
Intel 7500
B230.2.0.1c.100520111716
Default
Cisco UCS B200 M2 Blade Server
N20-B6625-1
Intel 5520
Cisco S5500.2.0.1d.093030111102
Default
512
Samsung M393B2K70CMB-YF8
DDR3 PC3-8500
1,067
96
Samsung M393B5170FH0-YH9
DDR3 PC3-10600
1,333
1,067
1,333
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server:
Uncompromised virtual desktop performance
X5670
CO
LGA 1366
2.93
6.4
32 KB+ 32 KB (per core)
256 KB (per core)
12
A Principled Technologies test report 9
System
Size (GB)
Number of RAM module(s)
Chip organization
Hard disk
Vendor and model number
Number of disks in system
Size (GB)
RPM
Type
Controller
Operating system
Name
File system
Kernel
Language
Network adapter (mezzanine card)
Vendor and model number
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server
Cisco UCS B200 M2 Blade Server
16
32
Double-sided
8
12
Double-sided
Intel X-25E SATA SSD
2
32
N/A
SATA
LSI™ MegaRAID® 9240
Seagate ST9146803SS
2
146
10,000
SAS
LSI Logic® SAS 1064E
VMware vSphere 5 (504890)
VMFS
5.0.0
English
VMware vSphere 5 (504890)
VMFS
5.0.0
English
1 x Cisco UCS M81KR Virtual Interface
Card
1 x Cisco UCS M71KR-Q QLogic®
Converged Network Adapter
Figure 3: Detailed configuration information for the servers.
System
Storage
Number of 15-disk processor enclosures
Power supplies
Total number
Disk array enclosures
Number of 25-disk array enclosures
Number of 15-disk array enclosures
Data movers
Number of VNX 5500 data movers
Disks
Number of 100GB SSDs
Number of 300GB SAS drives
Number of 2TB NL SAS drives
Operating system
Name
Network
Vendor and model number
EMC VNX 5500 storage array
1
2
1
1
1
8
20
10
Unisphere
10 Gb NFS
Figure 4: Detailed configuration information for the storage.
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Uncompromised virtual desktop performance
A Principled Technologies test report 10
APPENDIX B - HOW WE TESTED
To determine the number of virtual desktops the server could support, we ran incremental tests increasing the
virtual desktop load until the processors on the Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server were nearly saturated. We ensured that
the total response time for the seven office tasks never achieved a Login VSI Index average of 4,000 ms (VSI Max). We
confirmed there were no other factors such as storage bottlenecks or memory constraints that could contribute to a loss
of performance or response time.
Figure 5 illustrates our test environment: one Cisco UCS 5108 Blade Chassis with one Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade
Server and one Cisco UCS B200 M2 blade server. The Cisco UCS B200 M2 blade server with VMware vSphere 5 hosted all
VMware View 5 and Login VSI Infrastructure VMs and the Cisco B230 M2 blade server with VMware vSphere 5 hosted all
the VMware View 5 virtual desktops. We connected the Cisco UCS 5108 Blade Chassis to redundant pair of Cisco UCS
6120XP Fabric Interconnects. We connected the Fabric Interconnects to a Cisco Nexus™ 5010 switch. We deployed the
two Cisco blade servers via the Cisco UCS Manager. Using Cisco Service Profiles, we assigned a Base firmware level of
2.0(1s) for all server components. We assigned each server two redundant 10Gb vNICs that had access to our data, and
NFS networks. We hosted all VM storage on a NFS export hosted on an EMC VNX 5500. We set up our VMware View
virtual desktops via a linked clone pool. Our master image, a Microsoft Windows 7 x 64 Enterprise VM, has one vCPU
and 2 GB of reserved memory. We chose 2 GB of memory because Microsoft requires that amount for x64 editions of
Windows 7. See http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/system-requirements.
Note that, for its UCS blade servers, Cisco recommends a stateless boot from SAN configuration to ensure
portability. However, for simplicity we installed our vSphere operating system on local disks because it did not impact
the performance testing.
Figure 6 illustrates our logical network layout. We created a vSwitch on each vSphere server and created a single
port group, tagged as vlan100. We connected all virtual desktops, Login VSI launchers, and VMware view infrastructure
to these two vSwitches.
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server:
Uncompromised virtual desktop performance
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Figure 5: Our test environment.
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server:
Uncompromised virtual desktop performance
A Principled Technologies test report 12
Figure 6: Our logical network layout.
Setting up the infrastructure server (infra), and server under test (SUT)
BIOS settings
We used Cisco UCS firmware manager to set all UCS firmware to version 2.0(1s).
Installing VMware vSphere 5 (ESXi) on the Cisco UCS B200 M2 (infra)
1. Insert the ESXi 5.0 disk, and select Boot from disk.
2. On the Welcome screen, press Enter.
3. On the End User License Agreement (EULA) screen, press F11.
4. On the Select a Disk to install or Upgrade screen, select the relevant volume to install ESXi on, and press Enter.
5. On the Please Select a Keyboard Layout screen, press Enter.
6. On the Enter a Root Password screen, assign a root password, and confirm it by entering it again. Press Enter to
continue.
7. On the Confirm Install screen, press F11 to install.
8. On the Installation Complete screen, press Enter to reboot.
Configuring ESXi after installation (network)
1. On the ESXi 5.0 screen, press F2, enter the root password, and press Enter.
2. On the System Customization screen, select Troubleshooting Options, and press Enter.
3. On the Troubleshooting Mode Options screen, select Enable ESXi Shell, and press Enter.
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server:
Uncompromised virtual desktop performance
A Principled Technologies test report 13
4.
5.
6.
7.
Select Enable SSH, press Enter, and press Esc.
On the System Customization screen, select Configure Management Network.
On the Configure Management Network screen, select IP Configuration.
On the IP Configuration screen, select Set static IP; enter an IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway; and
press Enter.
8. On the Configure Management Network screen, press Esc. When asked if you want to apply the changes, press
Y.
9. Log into infra as root with the vSphere client.
10. Select the Configuration tab, and click Networking.
11. Configure vSwitch0 by clicking Add Networking…
12. Click the Network Adaptors tab.
13. Click Add…
14. Select vmnic1, and click Next.
15. Position vmnic0 as active and vmnic1 as a standby, and click OK.
16. Click the Ports tab, and edit the vSwitch.
17. Change the MTU of vSwitch0 to 9,000, and click OK.
18. In the vSwitch0 properties, Click Add…
19. Create a virtual machine network called VDI, with a VLAN ID of 100, click Next, and click Finish.
20. In the vSwitch0 properties, Click Add…
21. Create a VMkernel network called NFS with VLAN a ID of 222 select the checkbox next to Use this port group
for management traffic. Click Next twice.
22. Address the VMkernel as 192.168.22.101 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 click Next, and click
Finish.
23. In the vSwitch0 properties, select NFS, and click Edit.
24. Change the NFS MTU from 1,500 to 9,000, and click OK.
Configuring ESXi after installation (storage)
1. Select the Configuration tab, and click Storage.
2. Select Network File System, and click Next.
3. In the locate NFS properties enter Server= 192.168.22.22 folder=/NFS/infra Data store name=NFSInfra click Next.
Configuring ESXi after installation (DNS, and NTP)
1. Select the Configuration tab, and click Time configuration.
2. Select Properties, and click Options.
3. In the General settings, select Start automatically if any ports are open, and Stop when all ports are closed.
4. In the NTP settings, add a reliable NTP server, or use DC1.view5.com.
5. Close NTP settings.
6. Select the Configuration tab, and click DNS and routing.
7. Type infra for name, and view5.com for domain.
8. Enter 172.0.0.10 for preferred DNS.
9. Close DNS.
Installing VMware vSphere 5 (ESXi) on the Cisco UCS B230 M2 (SUT)
1. Insert the ESXi 5.0 disk, and select Boot from disk.
2. On the Welcome screen, press Enter.
3. On the End User License Agreement (EULA) screen, press F11.
4. On the Select a Disk to install or Upgrade screen, select the relevant volume to install ESXi on, and press Enter.
5. On the Please Select a Keyboard Layout screen, press Enter.
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server:
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6. On the Enter a Root Password screen, assign a root password, and confirm it by entering it again. Press Enter to
continue.
7. On the Confirm Install screen, press F11 to install.
8. On the Installation Complete screen, press Enter to reboot.
Configuring ESXi after installation (network)
1. On the ESXi 5.0 screen, press F2, enter the root password, and press Enter.
2. On the System Customization screen, select Troubleshooting Options, and press Enter.
3. On the Troubleshooting Mode Options screen, select Enable ESXi Shell, and press Enter.
4. Select Enable SSH, press Enter, and press Esc.
5. On the System Customization screen, select Configure Management Network.
6. On the Configure Management Network screen, select IP Configuration.
7. On the IP Configuration screen, select Set static IP; enter an IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway; and
press Enter.
8. On the Configure Management Network screen, press Esc. When asked if you want to apply the changes, press
Y.
9. Log into infra as root with the vSphere client.
10. Select the Configuration tab, and click Networking.
11. Configure vSwitch0 by clicking Add Networking…
12. Click the Network Adaptors tab.
13. Click Add…
14. Select vmnic1, and click Next.
15. Position vmnic0 as active and vmnic1 as a standby, and click OK.
16. Click the Ports tab and edit the vSwitch.
17. Change the number of ports to 512.
18. Change the MTU of vSwitch0 to 9,000, and click OK.
19. In the vSwitch0 properties, click Add…
20. Create a virtual machine network called VDI with a VLAN ID of 100 click Next, and click Finish.
21. In the vSwitch0 properties, click Add…
22. Create a VMkernel network called NFS with a VLAN ID of 222 and select the checkbox next to Use this port
group for management traffic. Click Next twice.
23. Address the VMKernel as 192.168.22.102 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 click Next, and click
Finish.
24. In the vSwitch0 properties, select NFS and click Edit.
25. Change the NFS MTU from 1,500 to 9,000, and click OK.
Configuring ESXi after installation (storage)
1. Select the Configuration tab, and click Storage.
2. Select Network File System, and click Next.
3. In the locate NFS properties enter Server= 192.168.22.22 folder=/NFS/infra Data store name=NFSVDT and click Next.
Configuring ESXi after installation (DNS, and NTP)
1. Select the Configuration tab, and click Time configuration.
2. Select Properties, and click Options.
3. In the General settings, select Start automatically if any ports are open, and Stop when all ports are closed.
4. In the NTP settings, add a reliable NTP server, or use DC1.view5.com.
5. Close NTP settings.
6. Select the Configuration tab, and click DNS and routing.
Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server:
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A Principled Technologies test report 15
7. Type infra for name, and view5.com for domain.
8. Enter 172.0.0.10 for preferred DNS.
9. Close DNS.
Setting up a VM to host Microsoft Windows Active Directory® server (DC1)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
From a Microsoft Windows server or workstation, connect to the infra server via the VMware vSphere client.
Log in as root to the infra server.
In the vSphere client, connect to the vCenter Server, and browse to the ESXi host.
Click the Virtual Machines tab.
Right-click, and choose New Virtual Machine.
Choose Custom, and click Next.
Assign the name DC1 to the virtual machine, and click Next.
Select NFS-infra data store, and click Next.
Choose Virtual Machine Version 8, and click Next.
Choose Windows, choose Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 (64-bit), and click Next.
Choose two virtual processors, and click Next.
Choose 4GB RAM, and click Next.
Click 1 for the number of NICs, select E1000, connect to the data network, and click Next.
Leave the default virtual storage controller, and click Next.
Choose to create a new virtual disk, and click Next.
Make the OS virtual disk size 20 GB, choose thick-provisioned lazy zeroed, specify the OS datastore on the
external storage, and click Next.
17. Keep the default virtual device node (0:0), and click Next.
18. Click Finish.
19. Right-click the VM, and choose Edit Settings.
20. On the Hardware tab, click Add…
21. Click Hard Disk, and click Next.
22. Click Create a new virtual disk, and click Next.
23. Specify 20GB for the virtual disk size, choose thick-provisioned lazy zeroed, and specify datastore1.
24. Choose SCSI (1:2) for the device node, and click Next.
25. On the Hardware tab, click Add…
26. Click Finish, and click OK.
27. Click the Resources tab, and click Memory.
28. Connect the VM virtual CD-ROM to the Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 installation disk.
29. Start the VM.
Installing the Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 operating system on the VM
1. Choose the language, time and currency, and keyboard input. Click Next.
2. Click Install Now.
3. Choose Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise (Full Installation), and click Next.
4. Accept the license terms, and click Next.
5. Click Custom.
6. Click the Disk, and click Drive options (advanced).
7. Click NewApplyFormat, and click Next.
8. After the installation completes, click OK to set the Administrator password.
9. Enter the administrator password twice, and click OK.
10. Connect the machine to the Internet, and install all available Windows updates. Restart as necessary.
11. Enable remote desktop access.
12. Change the hostname to DC1 and reboot when prompted.
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13. Run diskmgmt.msc.
14. Select the 20 GB secondary volume, format it NTFS, and assign it drive letter E
15. Set up networking for the data network:
a. Click StartControl Panel, right-click Network Connections, and choose Open.
b. Right-click the VM traffic NIC, and choose Properties.
c. Uncheck TCP/IP (v6).
d. Select TCP/IP (v4), and choose Properties.
e. Set the IP address, subnet, gateway, and DNS server.
Installing Active Directory and DNS services on DC1
1. Click StartRun, type dcpromo and click OK.
2. At the Active Directory Domain Services Installation Wizard welcome screen, check the Use advanced mode
installation option, and click Next.
3. In the Choose a Deployment Configuration dialog box, select Create a new domain in a new forest, and click
Next.
4. At the FQDN page, type View5.com and click Next.
5. At the NetBIOS name prompt, leave the name View5, and click Next.
6. At the Forest Functionality level, select Windows Server 2008 R2, and click Next.
7. At the additional Domain Controller Options, leave DNS server selected, and click Next.
8. At the System Folder Location screen, change to E:\ leave the default options, and click Next.
9. Assign a Directory Services Restore Mode Administrator account password, and click Next.
10. At the Summary screen, review your selections, and click Next.
11. Once Active Directory Domain Services finishes installing, click Finish, and restart the system.
12. Run dnsmgmt.msc.
13. Create a reverse lookup zone for DC1.
14. Create static entries for infra and SUT.
15. Open Windows Explorer and create a file called e:\profiles
16. Assign permissions of read/write to the view5\everyone group.
Configuring the Windows time service on DC1
To ensure reliable time, we pointed our Active Directory server to a physical NTP server.
1. Open a command prompt.
2. Type the following:
32tm /config /syncfromflags:manual /manualpeerlist:"<ip address of a NTP
server>"
W32tm /config /reliable:yes
W32tm /config /update
W32tm /resync
Net stop w32time
Net start w32time
Configuring PCoIP GPO for performance
We turned off Build to lossless, and adjusted maximum frame rate for more information. To learn more, please
see: http://www.vmware.com/files/pdf/view/VMware-View-5-PCoIP-Network-Optimization-Guide.pdf.
1. Log into DC1 as administrator
2. Open the Group Policy editor.
3. Edit the default domain policy.
4. Click Administrative templates, and click Add/remove templates…
5. Browse to the pcoip.adm on the View 5 install DVD, and click Open.
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6. In the GPO, browse to Computer ConfigurationAdministrative TemplateClassic Administrative Template
(ADM)PCoIP Session Variables Not Overridable Administrative settings, and click Turn off Build-to-lossless
feature. Right click, and click Edit.
7. Select the radio button for Enabled, and tick the box next to I accept to turn off the Build-to-lossless feature.
8. In the GPO, browse to Computer ConfigurationAdministrative TemplateClassic Administrative Template
(ADM)PCoIP Session Variables Not Overridable Administrative settings, and click Configure PCoIP image
quality levels. Right click, and click Edit.
9. Set the Minimum Image Quality value to 50, Maximum Image Quality to 90, and the Maximum Frame Rate to
15.
10. Click OK.
11. Close the Group Policy editor.
Setting up the Login VSI share and Active Directory users
For Login VSI we configured a CIFS share, Active Directory OU, and Active directory. All user profiles will be AD
roaming. For more information on Login VSI, see http://www.loginvsi.com/en/admin-guide/installation.html.
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Open Windows Explorer and create a file called share
Assign permissions of read/write to the view5/everyone group.
Copy the Login VSI install media and a valid Login VSI license file into the share.
From the Login VSI 3.0 Release 6 media, run the Login VSI AD Setup.
Keep the defaults, and click Start.
Open Active Directory users and computers, and verify the Login VSI users.
Select all Login VSI users and change the users profile to be //dc1/share/%username%
Setting up a VM to host the vCenter server
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From a Microsoft Windows server or workstation, connect to the infra server via the vSphere client.
Log into infra with the VMware vSphere client.
In the vSphere client, connect to the vCenter Server, and browse to the ESXi host.
Click the Virtual Machines tab.
Right-click, and choose New Virtual Machine.
Choose Custom, and click Next.
Assign the name vCenter5 to the virtual machine, and click Next.
Select the NFS-infra datastore, and click Next.
Choose Virtual Machine Version 8, and click Next.
Choose Windows, choose Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 (64-bit), and click Next.
Choose two virtual processors, and click Next.
Choose 4GB RAM, and click Next.
Click 1 for the number of NICs, select E1000, connect to the data network, and click Next.
Leave the default virtual storage controller, and click Next.
Choose to create a new virtual disk, and click Next.
Make the OS virtual disk size 40 GB, choose thick-provisioned lazy zeroed, specify the OS datastore on the
external storage, and click Next.
17. Keep the default virtual device node (0:0), and click Next.
18. Connect the VM virtual CD-ROM to the Microsoft Windows 2008 R2 installation disk.
19. Click Finish.
20. Start the VM.
Installing the Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 operating system on the VM
1. Choose the language, time and currency, and keyboard input. Click Next.
2. Click Install Now.
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Choose Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise (Full Installation), and click Next.
Accept the license terms, and click Next.
Click Custom.
Click the Disk, and click Drive options (advanced).
Click NewApplyFormat, and click Next.
After the installation completes, click OK to set the Administrator password.
Enter the administrator password twice, and click OK.
Connect the machine to the Internet, and install all available Windows updates. Restart as necessary.
Enable remote desktop access.
Change the hostname to vCenter and reboot when prompted.
Set up networking for the data network:
a. Click StartControl Panel, right-click Network Connections, and choose Open.
b. Right-click the VM traffic NIC, and choose Properties.
c. Uncheck TCP/IP (v6).
d. Select TCP/IP (v4), and choose Properties.
e. Set the IP address, subnet, gateway, and DNS server.
14. Join the View5 domain.
15. Reboot the system.
Installing vCenter 5
1. Log onto the vCenter 5 as View5\administrator
2. From the VMware vCenter5 install media, click Autorun.
3. Click Run to start the install wizard.
4. Click the install button on the VMware vSphere 5.0 wizard.
5. Select the install wizard language as English, and click OK.
6. At the install wizard welcome screen, click Next.
7. Agree to the license agreement, and click Next.
8. Enter user information and a license key, and click Next.
9. Select Install the SQL express instance, and click Next.
10. Select the system account for the vCenter Server service account, and click Next.
11. Keep the installation directory as C:\Program Files\VMware\Infrastructure\, and click Next.
12. Select Create a standalone VMware vCenter Server instance, and click Next.
13. Keep the vCenter default ports, and click Next.
14. Select ,1024 MB for the JVM memory, and click Next.
15. Click Install to finish the vCenter server installation.
16. When the installation completes, restart the server.
17. Using the vSphere client, log into vCenter5 as view5\administrator
18. Right-click the root of vCenter5, and click New Data center.
19. Name the New datacenter datacenter
20. Add the server named infra.view5.com to the datacenter.
21. Add the server named SUT.view5.com to the datacenter.
22. Log out.
Installing VMware Composer
1. Open the ODBC administrator.
2. Add a system DSN named composer, use the VCENTER\VIM_SQLEXP server.
3. Run the vmware composer.exe.
4. Accept the file agreement, and click Next.
5. Accept the destination folder path, and click Next.
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6. Enter composer for the name of the ODBC name with the View5\administrator User id and password, and
click Next.
7. Accept the default SOAP port, and click Next.
8. Click Install.
Setting up a VM to host the VMware View 5 connection server
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Log into vCenter with the VMware vSphere client.
In the vSphere client, browse to the ESXi host named infra.
Click the Virtual Machines tab.
Right-click, and choose New Virtual Machine.
Choose Custom, and click Next.
Assign the name View5 to the virtual machine, and click Next.
Select the Datastore NFS-infra, and click Next.
Choose Virtual Machine Version 8, and click Next.
Choose Windows, choose Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 (64-bit), and click Next.
Choose two virtual processors, and click Next.
Choose 4GB RAM, and click Next.
Click 1 for the number of NICs, select E1000, connect to the data network, and click Next.
Leave the default virtual storage controller, and click Next.
Choose to create a new virtual disk, and click Next.
Make the OS virtual disk size 40 GB, choose thick-provisioned lazy zeroed, specify the OS datastore on the
external storage, and click Next.
16. Keep the default virtual device node (0:0), and click Next.
17. Connect the VM virtual CD-ROM to the Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 installation disk.
18. Click Finish.
19. Start the VM.
Installing the Microsoft Windows Server2008 R2 operating system on the VM
1. Choose the language, time and currency, and keyboard input. Click Next.
2. Click Install Now.
3. Choose Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise (Full Installation), and click Next.
4. Accept the license terms, and click Next.
5. Click Custom.
6. Click the Disk, and click Drive options (advanced).
7. Click NewApplyFormat, and click Next.
8. After the installation completes, click OK to set the Administrator password.
9. Enter the administrator password twice, and click OK.
10. Connect the machine to the Internet, and install all available Windows updates. Restart as necessary.
11. Enable remote desktop access.
12. Change the hostname to view5 and reboot when prompted.
13. Set up networking for the data network:
a. Click StartControl Panel, right-click Network Connections, and choose Open.
b. Right-click the VM traffic NIC, and choose Properties.
c. Uncheck TCP/IP (v6).
d. Select TCP/IP (v4), and choose Properties.
e. Set the IP address, subnet, gateway, and DNS server.
14. Join the View5 domain.
15. Reboot.
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Installing the VMware View 5 server
1. Log into the server named view5.
2. Click Install Media for View Connection Server.
3. To begin the install wizard, click Next.
4. Agree to the license agreement, and click Next.
5. Keep the destination directory as C:\Program Files\VMware View\Server\, and click Next.
6. Select View Standard Server, and click Next.
7. Allow View Server to configure the firewall, and click Next.
8. Click Next.
9. Click Finish.
10. Open a command window, and type gpupdate /force
11. Reboot the View 5 server.
12. Log out of View 5.
Setting up a Windows 7 Enterprise x64 image for VMware View 5 linked clone “gold image”
and VSI Launchers
Using the vSphere client, we created a Windows 7 Enterprise x64 VM with the Login VSI launcher software, and
cloned it to create six Login VSI launchers. We also created a single optimized Windows 7 Enterprise x64 VM on the SUT
server as the gold image for View 5 linked clone deployment.
Installing the Windows 7 Enterprise (x64) Login VSI launcher
1. Log into the appropriate vCenter.
2. In the vSphere client, connect to the vCenter Server, and browse to the ESXi host named infra.
3. Click the Virtual Machines tab.
4. Right-click, and choose New Virtual Machine.
5. Choose Custom, and click Next.
6. Assign the name Launcher to the virtual machine, and click Next.
7. Select NFS-infra, and click Next.
8. Choose Virtual Machine Version 8, and click Next.
9. Choose Windows, choose Microsoft Windows 7 (64-bit), and click Next.
10. Choose two virtual processors, and click Next.
11. Choose 12 GB RAM, and click Next.
12. Click 1 for the number of NICs, select E1000, and click Next.
13. Leave the default virtual storage controller, and click Next.
14. Choose to create a new virtual disk, and click Next.
15. Make the OS virtual disk size 20 GB, choose thick-provisioned lazy zeroed, and click Next.
16. Keep the default virtual device node (0:0), and click Next.
17. Click Finish.
18. Click Finish, and click OK.
19. Click the Resources tab, and click Memory.
20. Connect the VM virtual CD-ROM to the Microsoft Windows 7 x64 installation disk.
21. Start the VM.
22. When the installation prompts you, press any key to begin setup.
23. Enter your language preferences, and click Next.
24. Click Install.
25. Accept the license terms, and click Next.
26. Select Custom, and select the drive that will contain the OS.
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Click Install, and the setup begins.
Type user for the username and change the computer name, and click Next.
Enter no password, and click Next.
For system protection, select Use recommended settings, and click Next.
Enter your time zone, and click Next.
Select the Work Network setting, and click Next.
Use Windows Update to patch the Windows 7 installation.
Install VMware tools. For more information, see
http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=340
35. Reboot.
36. Join the View.com domain, and reboot.
Adjusting page file on the launcher
1. Log in as administrator
2. Right-click ComputerPropertiesChange settingsAdvancedPerformanceSettings.
3. In Performance settings, select the Advanced tab, and select Change for Virtual Memory.
4. Deselect Automatically manage page file.
5. Select Custom size, type 2048 for both values, and select Set.
Disabling Windows Firewall
The domain GPO automatically disables the Windows Firewall.
Installing Microsoft Office 2007 Professional on the launcher
1. From the Office 2007 media, run Setup.
2. Enter the product key for Office 2007, and click Continue.
3. Accept the licensing agreement.
4. Select default installs.
5. Click Install.
6. Download and run Office 2007 Service Pack 2.
7. Reboot the system.
Installing Login VSI target software on the launcher
1. Browse to \\vsi-install\Target setup.
2. Run the setup.exe.
3. In the Target Setup wizard, specify the VSI share (\\dc1\share).
4. Click Start.
5. When prompted with security warnings, click OK.
6. Reboot the system.
Clone the launcher
We created a template from the VM named launcher and deployed six Launchers using the sysprep functionality
built into vCenter. For more information on how to clone virtual machines in VMware vCenter, please read
http://www.vmware.com/support/pubs/vsphere-esxi-vcenter-server-pubs.html.
Installing the Windows 7 Enterprise (x64) VMware View 5 gold image
1. Log into vCenter.
2. In the vSphere client, connect to the vCenter Server, and browse to the ESXi host named SUT.
3. Click the Virtual Machines tab.
4. Right-click, and choose New Virtual Machine.
5. Choose Custom, and click Next.
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Assign the name gold_image to the virtual machine, and click Next.
Select NFS-VDT, and click Next.
Choose Virtual Machine Version 8, and click Next.
Choose Windows, choose Microsoft Windows 7 (64-bit), and click Next.
Choose one virtual processor, and click Next.
Choose 2 GB RAM, and click Next.
Click 1 for the number of NICs, select E1000, and click Next.
Leave the default virtual storage controller, and click Next.
Choose to create a new virtual disk, and click Next.
Make the OS virtual disk size 20 GB, choose thin-provisioned, click Next.
Keep the default virtual device node (0:0), and click Next.
Click Finish, and click OK.
Edit the gold_image VM.
Remove the virtual floppy, and click OK.
In the Options tabGeneral, deselect Enable logging, and click OK.
Click the Resources tab, click Memory, click the box next to Reserve all guest memory, and click OK.
Connect the VM virtual CD-ROM to the Microsoft Windows 7 x64 installation disk.
Start the VM.
When the installation prompts you, press any key to begin setup.
Enter your language preferences, and click Next.
Click Install.
Accept the license terms, and click Next.
Select Custom, and select the drive that will contain the OS.
Click Install, and the setup begins.
Type user for the username and change the computer name, and click Next.
Enter no password, and click Next.
For system protection, select Use recommended settings, and click Next.
Enter your time zone, and click Next.
Select the Work Network setting, and click Next.
Use Windows Update to patch the Windows 7 installation.
Install VMware Tools. For more information, see
http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=340
37. Reboot.
38. Join the View5.com domain, and reboot.
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Installing Windows 7 Enterprise, (x64) optimizing Windows 7
Adjusting page file
1. Log in as administrator
2. Right-click ComputerPropertiesChange settingsAdvancedPerformanceSettings.
3. In Performance settings, select the Advanced tab, and select Change for Virtual Memory.
4. Deselect Automatically manage page file.
5. Select Custom size, type 2048 for both values, and select Set.
Disabling Windows Firewall
The domain GPO automatically disables the Windows Firewall.
Installing the Login VSI Target software on gold_image
1. Log in as View5\administrator
2. Browse to \\dc1\share\vsi_install\setup\target setup\setup-x64.setup
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3. In the target setup wizard, type \\dc1\share
4. Wait for the install to complete.
Installing the VMware View agent on gold_image
1. Log into the gold_image.
2. Browse to the VMware View agent media.
3. At the Welcome screen and License agreement, accept the terms, and click Next.
4. Accept install defaults, and click Next.
5. Select Do not enable the remote desktop capability on this computer, and click Next.
6. Keep default install directory, and click Install.
7. Start the Windows Registry Editor, and navigate to this registry
key:HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\vmware-viewcomposer-ga.
8. Navigate to the SkipLicenseActivation registry value. The default value is 0.
9. Set the value to 1.
10. Reboot the VM gold_image.
Cleaning up the VM on Windows 7 virtual desktop
1. Click StartRunservices.msc.
2. In the Services menu, select Windows Search, and change it from Disabled to Automatic (delayed start).
3. Close the Services menu.
4. Click StartControl PanelView Devices and Printers.
5. In the Services and Printers window, delete the XPS printers and document writers.
Optimizing the Windows 7 virtual desktop, and final preparation of the gold image
For our testing, we optimized the Windows 7 gold image for performance using the commands.bat:
http://www.vmware.com/files/pdf/VMware-View-OptimizationGuideWindows7-EN.pdf.
1. Run commands.bat.
2. Shut down the VM.
3. Log into vCenter with the vSphere client.
4. Take a snapshot of the gold_image VM called view5_ready.
Configuring the View 5 server - creating a pool and adding entitlements for Login VSI users
1. Open the View Administrator.
2. Log in as View5\administrator
3. Click Pools, and in the right window, click Add…
4. Select Automatic pool, and click Next.
5. Select Floating, and click Next.
6. Select View Composer Linked clones, and click Next.
7. Use the vcenter(administrator) as the source, and click Next.
8. Type pool for the pool ID and display name, and click Next.
9. Leave the pool settings as defaults, and click Next.
10. Keep the disposable disk size as 4,096, and click Next.
11. Type a naming pattern of View- and type 175 for both max number of desktops, and number of spares.
12. Enter the virtual machine settings as follows:
 Default image as: gold_image
 VM folder: /Datastore/vm/pool
 Host or cluster: /datastore/host/SUT.view5.com
 Resource pool: /datastore/host/SUT.view5.com/Resources
 Datastore: NFS-SUT
13. Choose the AD container OU=Computers,OU=Login_VSI, and use quickprep.
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14. Click Finish to create the pool.
15. Highlight the pool named Pool, and click Entitlements.
16. Click Add, select login_VSI/view5.com, and click OK.
17. Ensure all 175 desktops have a status of ready.
Running the Login VSI benchmark
We used six launchers configured in parallel to run a medium workload of 175 user sessions on the VMware
View 5 pool. For more information on how to run a Login VSI test see: http://www.loginvsi.com/en/adminguide/performing-tests.
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APPENDIX C - LOGIN VSI INI FILES USED FOR TESTING
VMware View 5 launcher.ini
[Launcher]
Servername=
Username=
Password=
Domain=
ConnectionType="Custom with CSV file"
ConnectionNumber=User
CCL=c:\program files\VMware\VMWare View\Client\bin\wswc.exe -serverURL http://VIEW5 -username %CSV_User% password Password1 -domainname View5 -desktopname pool -Standalone -logInAsCurrentUser False connectUSBOnStartup False
CSV=\\DC1\Share\csv\view5-user.csv
Launchmode=Sequential
ParallelDelay=10
ParallelTimeframe=3600
InitialStartNumber=1
NumberOfSessions=175
SequentialInterval=30
Fancy_number=1
Autologoff=1
LogoffTimeOut=120
CreateProfile=0
UseLocalLauncher=0
View5-user.csv
User
login_vsi1
login_vsi2
login_vsi3
login_vsi4
login_vsi5 (*)
(*) continue until login_vsi175
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APPENDIX D – PROCESSER UTILIZATION DETAILS
Figure 6 shows the processor utilization throughout the 1-hour test. With 175 simultaneous users, nearly all 20processor cores were at 100 percent utilization. The graph line below represents the average utilization across all 20
cores (40 threads).
Average processor utilization
100
90
80
CPU percentage used
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0:00:00
0:01:45
0:03:30
0:05:15
0:07:00
0:08:45
0:10:30
0:12:15
0:14:00
0:15:45
0:17:30
0:19:15
0:21:00
0:22:45
0:24:30
0:26:15
0:28:00
0:29:45
0:31:30
0:33:15
0:35:00
0:36:45
0:38:30
0:40:15
0:42:00
0:43:45
0:45:30
0:47:15
0:49:00
0:50:45
0:52:30
0:54:15
0:56:00
0:57:45
0:59:30
0
Figure 6: Processor utilization throughout the 1-hour test.
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ABOUT PRINCIPLED TECHNOLOGIES
Principled Technologies, Inc.
1007 Slater Road, Suite 300
Durham, NC, 27703
www.principledtechnologies.com
We provide industry-leading technology assessment and fact-based
marketing services. We bring to every assignment extensive experience
with and expertise in all aspects of technology testing and analysis, from
researching new technologies, to developing new methodologies, to
testing with existing and new tools.
When the assessment is complete, we know how to present the results to
a broad range of target audiences. We provide our clients with the
materials they need, from market-focused data to use in their own
collateral to custom sales aids, such as test reports, performance
assessments, and white papers. Every document reflects the results of
our trusted independent analysis.
We provide customized services that focus on our clients’ individual
requirements. Whether the technology involves hardware, software, Web
sites, or services, we offer the experience, expertise, and tools to help our
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market readiness, and its quality and reliability.
Our founders, Mark L. Van Name and Bill Catchings, have worked
together in technology assessment for over 20 years. As journalists, they
published over a thousand articles on a wide array of technology subjects.
They created and led the Ziff-Davis Benchmark Operation, which
developed such industry-standard benchmarks as Ziff Davis Media’s
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Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server:
Uncompromised virtual desktop performance
A Principled Technologies test report 28