Craftsman 315.275061 Owner`s manual

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OWNER'S
MANUAL
MODELNO.
315.275061
CAUTION:
Read Rules for
Safe Operation
and All Instruc-
CRRFTSMRN°
Industrial Electronic
Plunge Router
tions Carefully
Double Insulated
Warranty
Introduction
Unpacking
Features
Thank You for Buying
Craftsman Tools
,
Adjustments
Operation
Maintenance
Repair Parts
Sold only by
SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO., Hoffman Estates, IL 60179
972000-092
3-95
®
Printed In U.S.A.
FULL
ONE
YEAR
If this Craftsman
WARRANTY
ON CRAFTSMAN
This
to state.
rights,
fails due to a defect
and you may
SEARS,
DEPT.
also have
ROEBUCK
in material
ROUTER
is in use
TO THE
legal
Router
PLUNGE
one year
you specific
Plunge
ELECTRONIC
within
gives
Electronic
INDUSTRIAL
from the date of purchase,
Sears will repair it free of charge.
This warranty
applies only while this product
in the United States,
WARRANTY
SERVICE
IS AVAILABLE
BY SIMPLY
RETURNING
THE TOOL
NEAREST
SEARS
STORE OR SERVICE
CENTER THROUGHOUT
THE UNITED STATES,
warranty
Industrial
other
or workmanship
rights
which
vary
from
state
AND CO.
817 WA
HQFFMAN
ESTATES,
IL
60179
INTRODUCTION
DOUBLE
power
wire
INSULATION
tools,
which
grounded
Wherever
complete
is a concept
eliminates
power
cord
there is electric
sets of insulation
metal
parts are isolated
nents
with
pretecting
in safety,
the need
and
for the
grounded
in electric
usual
supply
three
system,
current in the tool there are two
to protect the user. All exposed
from
internal
metal
motor
compo-
IMPORTANT
requires
should
-
extreme
Servicing
care
be performed
of a tool with
double
and knowledge
of the
only by a qualified
service
insulation
system
and
technician.
For service we suggest you return the tool to your nearest
Sears Store for repair.
Always use original factory replacement
parts when
servicing.
insulation.
RULES FOR SAFE OPERATION
READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS
1.
KNOW YOUR POWER TOOL - Read owner's manual carefully. Learn its applications and limitations as well as the
specific potential hazards related to this tool.
2.
GUARD AGAINST ELECTRICAL
For example:
SHOCK BY PREVENTING BODY CONTACT WITH GROUNDED SURFACES.
P!pes, radiators, ranges, refrigerator enclosures.
3.
KEEP GUARDS IN PLACE and in working order.
4.
KEEP WORK AREA CLEAN. Cluttered areas and benches invite accidents.
5.
AVOID DANGEROUS
area well lit.
6.
KEEP CHILDREN AND VISITORS AWAY. All visitors should wear safety glasses and be kept a safe distance
from work area. Do not let visitors contact tool or extension cord.
7.
STOREIDLETOOLS.
children.
ENVIRONMENT.
Don't use power tool in damp or wet locations or expose to rain. Keep work
When not in use tools shouid be stored in a dry, high or locked-up place - out of the reach of
8.
DON'T FORCE TOOL.
9.
USE RIGHT TOOL. Don't force small tool or attachment to do the job of a heavy duty tool. Don't use tool for purpose
not intended - for example - Don't use a circular saw for cutting tree limbs or logs.
Itwilldothejobbetterandsaferattherateforwhichitwasdesigned.
10.
WEAR PROPER APPAREL. No loose clothing or jewelry to get caught in moving parts. Rubber gloves and nonskid footwear are recommended when working outdoors. Also, wear protective hair covering to contain longhair and
keep it from being drawn into air vents.
lt.
ALWAYS WEAR SAFETY GLASSES.
safety glasses.
12.
PROTECT YOUR LUNGS. Wear a face or dust mask if operation is dusty.
13.
PROTECT YOUR HEARING. Wear hearing protection during extended periods of operation.
14,
DON'T ABUSE CORD. Never carry tool by cord or yank it to disconnect from receptacle.
and sharp edges,
Page 2
Everyday eyeglasses have only impact-resistant
lenses; they are NOT
Keep cord from heat, oil
RULES FOR SAFE OPERATION (Continued)
15.
SECURE WORK. Use clamps or a vise to hold work. Both hands are needed to operate the tool,
16.
DON'T OVERREACH.
17.
MAINTAIN TOOLS WITH CARE. Keep tools sharp at all times, and clean for best and safest performance. Follow
instructions for lubricating and changing accessories.
i! 18.
DISCONNECT TOOLS. When not in use, before servicing, or when changing attachments, blades, bits, cutters,
etc,, all tools should be disconnected from power supply.
Keep proper footing and balance at all times, Do not use on a ladder or unstable support
19.
REMOVE ADJUSTING KEYS AND WRENCHES.
are removed from tool before turning it on.
20.
AVOID ACCIDENTAL
plugging in.
21.
MAKE SURE YOUR EXTENSION CORD 13IN GOOD CONDITION. When using an extension cord, be sure to use
one heavy enough to carry the current your product will draw. An undersized cord will cause a drop in line voltage
resulting in loss of power and overheating. A wire gauge size (A.W,G.) of at least 14 is recommended for an
extension cord 25 feet or less in length, A cord exceeding 25 feet is not recommended. If in doubt, use th next
heavier gage. The smaller the gage number, the heavier the cord.
22.
OUTDOOR USE EXTENSION CORDS. When tool is used outdoors, use only extension cords suitable for use
outdoors. Outdoor approved cords are marked with the suffix W-A, for example - SJTW-A or SJOW-A.
23,
KEEP CUTTERS CLEAN AND SHARP.
24.
KEEP HANDS AWAY FROM CUTTING AREA. Keep hands away from cutters.
while cutter is rotating, Do not attempt to remove material while cutter is rotating.
25,
NEVER USE IN AN EXPLOSIVE ATMOSPHERE.
26.
INSPECT TOOL CORDS PERIODICALLY
Stay constantly aware of cord location,
27.
INSPECT EXTENSION CORDS PERIODICALLY
28,
KEEP HANDLES DRY, CLEAN, AND FREE FROM OIL AND GREASE. Always use a clean cloth when cleaning,
Never use brake fluids, gasoline, petroleum-based products or any strong solvents to clean your tool.
29.
STAY ALERT. Watch what you are doing and use common sense. Do not operate tool when you are tired. Do not
rush.
30.
CHECK DAMAGED PARTS. Before further use of the tool, a guard or other part that is damaged should be carefully
checked to determine that it will operate properly and perform its intended function. Check for alignment of moving
parts, binding of moving parts, breakage of parts, mounting, and any other conditions that may affect its operation. A
guard or other part that is damaged should be properly repaired or replaced by an authorized service center unless
indicated elsewhere in this instruction manual.
31.
DO NOT USE TOOL IF SWITCH DOES NOT TURN IT ON AND OFF. Have defective switches replaced by an
authorized service center.
32.
Inspect for and remove all nails from lumber before routing.
33.
DRUGS, ALCOHOL,
medication.
34.
When servicing use only identicat Craftsman
35.
POLARIZED PLUGS. To reduce the risk of electric shock, this tool has a polarized plug (one blade is wider than the
other). This plug will fit in a polarized outlet only one way. If the plug does not fit fully in the outlet, reverse the plug.
If it still does not fit, contact a qualified electrician to install the proper outlet. Do not change the plug in any way.
36.
DO NOT USE TOOL UNDER "BROWN-OUT"
OR OTHER LOW VOLTAGE
any device that could cause the power supply voltage to change.
37.
WHEN USING THIS ROUTER WITH A ROUTER TABLE, HELP PREVENT POSSIBLE SERIOUS INJURY BY
KEEPING THE CUTTER GUARDED AT ALL TIMES. Use only router tables, with guards, that have been designed
for use on reuters that are of this type, size, and weight.
38,
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS. Review them frequently and use them to instruct others who may use this tool. If
you loan someone this tool, loan them these instructions also.
STARTING.
MEDICATION.
Form habit of checking to see that keys and adjusting wrenches
Don't carry plugged-in tools with finger on switch, Be sure switch is off when
Sharp cutters minimize stalling and kickback,
Do not reach underneath work
Normal sparking of the motor could ignite fumes.
and if damaged, have repaired at your nearest Sears Repair Center.
and replace if damaged,
Do not operate tool while under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or any
replacement parts.
Page 3
CONDITIONS. Also, do not use with
UNPACKING
Your new plunge router comes fully assembled. After removing it from the box, inspect it carefully to make sure that it is not
damaged and that no parts are missing. See Figure 1. The following accessories should also be included in the box:
1_ Combination Wrench (3/8"- 7/8")
4,
Roller(Contour) Guide
2.
1/4"Adapter
5.
Guide Bushing
3.
Edge Guide
FEATURES
Your electronic router is a versatile woodworking toot which will give you years of trouble-free performance. It is engineered
with the professional in mind, but its ease of operation allows the amateur to produce work which is beautiful and precise.
3.5 HORSEPOWER
MOTOR
LARGE
Your router has a powerful 3.5 horsepower motor with sufficient power to handle the toughest routing jobs. The motor
also has externally accessible brushes for ease of servicing.
HANDLES
The soft start feature builds motor RPM gradually to minimize
start-up torque. Pressing or releasing the "on-oft" trigger will
turn your router on or off.
Your router has large oversized handles for easy handling and
maintaining proper control when routing. The left handle
allows you to set cutter depth of cut when making plunge
cuts, while the right handle provides easy access to the "onoff" trigger, "lock-on" button, and variable speed control selector. The handles have also been designed so that they
are comfortable and easy to grasp when operating in different positions or at different angles.
DEPTH
VARIABLE
SOFT
START
CONTROL
KNOB
A large depth control knob makes precise depth of cut changes
possible. It also is very helpful when making depth of cut
changes with your router mounted upside down on a router
table.
DEPTH
STOP
SYSTEM
The depth stop block located on the base of your router
provides three adjustable stops and three fixed stops for
quick depth of cut changes. A depth adjustment scale makes
quick adjustments to depth of cut changes possible. The
spring loaded adjustment knob quick releases stop bar by
depressing center of knob.
1/4" AND
1/2"
SHANK
CAPACITY
Your router has a 1/2" diameter collet that accepts cutters
with 1/2" shanks. An adapter has been provided so that
cutters with 1/4" shank bits can also be used,
CHIP
SHIELD
A clear plastic see-through chip shield has been provided on
the base of your router for protection against flying dust and
chips. It is designed to fit the front opening of the router base,
POSiLOCK
SPINDLE
LOCK
A posilock spindle lock secures the spindle so that only one
wrench is needed to loosen collet nut and change cutters. A
spindle lock indicator light alerts you that spindle is locked if
you connect router to power supply before unlocking spindle.
NOTE: Your router wilt not run if spindle is locked.
"LOCK-ON"
FEATURE"
Your router is equipped with a "lock-on" feature that is convenient when continous operation for extended periods of time
is required.
TRONIC
SPEED
SPEED
SWITCH
CONTROL
WITH
(Feedback
ELECSwitch)
Your router has advanced electronic features, designed to
assist you in getting the maximum use from your router. By
making proper speed selections, your router+can be adjusted to specfic routing needs. This eliminates much of the
guess work previously needed to perform a given job. Both
the experienced and inexperienced router users benefit,
obtaining professional like results with fewer job errors.
The variable speed control allows the router speed to be
adjusted from 10,000 to 25,000 rpm+ The variable speed
control selelctor is conveniently located inside the right handle
near the operator's thumb or hand.
The electronic feature of your router introduces the flexibility
of adjusting the motor speed to required job conditions. An
electronic speed control module senses the load applied to
the motor, and increases or decreases motor voltage to
compensate for and maintain desired RPM.
Speed can be set according to the approximate cutter diameter you will be using and to the hardness of the material
being cut. The best cuts are made when the cutter is fed
through material at the proper rate of feed.
ROUTER
ACCESSORIES
Your router comes equipped with several accessories. The
edge guide keeps the cutter parallel with an eclge of the
workpiece when cutting grooves and rabbets. The roller
(contour) guide allows the router to be used to trim laminates
and make cuts parallel with an irregularly shaped edge. The
template guide bushing enables the router to follow a template for making duplicate shapes.
Page 4
FEATURES
KNOW
YOUR
ELECTRONIC
ROUTER
Before attempting to use your router, familiarize yourself with all operating features and safety requirements.
and2.
DEPTH
CONTROL
KNOB
FRONT
VIEW
See Figures 1
OF ROUTER
SPINDLE LOCK
INDICATOR LIGHT
POSILOCK
SPINDLE
LOCK
LOCK
HANDLE
SWITCH
PLUNGE
RELEASE
ACTUATOR
HANDLE
VARIABLE
SPEED
CONTROLSELECTOR
SCALE
(INCH AND METRIC)
INDICATOR
KNOB
ADJUSTMENT
KNOB
(DEPRESSING
CENTER
OF KNOB
QUICK RELEASES
STOP BAR)
STOP
_16-18
BAR
STOP
SCREW
]EX NUT
ADAPTER
DEPTH
STOP
BLOCK
COMBINATION
WRENCH
(3/8" - 7/8")
DEPTH STOP BLOCK
FOR DEPTH OF CUT
ROTATES
CHANGES
Fig, 1
Page
5
FEATURES
REAR
VIEW
OF ROUTER
DEPTH CONTROL KNOB
VARIABLE
SPEED
CONTROL
SELECTOR
POWER
CORD
\
LOCK
HANDLE
"LOCK-ON"
BUTTON
"ON-(3
TRIGGER
SWITCH
HANDLE
PLUNGE
SPEED
SELECTION
CHART
5/16-18
ACTUATOR
UNC-2B
HEX NUT
ROUTER
FLANGE
SUBBASE
COLLET
NUT
Fig. 2
ELECTRICAL CONNECTION
Your
router
(normal
has a precision
household
built electric
current).
cause a loss of power
supply.
motor.
Do not operate
and overheating.
It should
be connected
to a power
this tool on direct current
If your tool does
not operate
(DC).
when
supply
A voltage
plugged
that is 120 volts,
drop of more
into an outlet,
than
60 Hz, AC only
10 percent
double-check
The operation
of any router can result
in foreign
objects being thrown into your eyes, which can
result in severe eye damage.
Before beginning
power tool operation,
always wear safety goggles
or safety
glasses
with
side shields
and
a full
Vision Safety Maskfor
use over eyeglasses
at Sears Retail Stores.
Page
face
shield
or standard
6
when
safety
needed.
glasses
We recommend
with side shields,
will
the power
Wide
available
ADJUSTMENTS
INSTALLING/REMOVING
cUTrERS
See Figures 3, 4. and 5.
1. UNPLUG YOUR ROUTER.
SPINDLE
INDICATOR
LOCK
LIGHT POSILOCK
SPINDLE
LOCK
TO LOCK
Place the posileck spindle lock into lock posttion. See
Figure 3. NOTE: If spindle does not lock, turn caller nut
with wrench, applying pressure at the same time to the
spindle lock with your thumb or finger. When lock
mechanism engages with notch in spindle, spindle lock
will slide into lock position.
CuI-rER
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
COMBINATION
WRENCH
Place router upside down on workbench or lay it face
down on its side in order to gain easy access to collet
nut.
Place 7/8 = end of the combination wrench provided
through back of router base onto collet nut and turn
counterclockwise to loosen. See Figure 4.
If installing cutter for the first time, it can be installed
once ooUet nut is loose. If changing cutters, cutter will
easily slip from oollet after loosening collet nut.
The collet is machined to precision tolerances to fit
cutters with 1/2" diameter shanks. If using a cutter with
a 1/4" diameter shank, place the 1/4" adapter provided
in the oollet. See Figure 5.
Insert shank of cutter into collet until shank bottoms out,
then pull it out 1/16" to allow for expansion when the bit
gets hot.
-righten the collet nut securely by turning clockwise with
the wrench provided. See Figure 4.
COLLET
NUT
TO TIGHTEN
COLLET
NUT,
TO LOOSEN
COLLETNUT
Fig. 4
CU'I-rER WITH 1/4"
SHANK DIAMETER
1/4" ADAPTER
1/2" COLLET NUT
9.
Place posileck spindle lock back in unlock position.
Otherwise, intedocking mechanism of spindle lock will
not let you turn your router on. If you forget, the
spindle lock Indicator light will alert you that spindle
Is stlU locked when you connect router to power
supply,
Page 7
Fig. 5
ADJUSTMENTS
DEPTH OF CUT ADJUSTMENTS
See Figures 6, 7 and 8.
When routing a groove that is too deep to safely cut in one
pass, it is best to make the cut in several passes. We
recommend that cuts be made at a depth not exceeding 1/8"
and that several passes be made to reach deeper cuts.
PLUNGE
RELEASE
ACTUATOR
Proper depth of cut depends on several factors: horsepower
of router motor, type of cutter being used, and type of wood
being routed. A lightweight, low horsepower router is designed for making shallow cuts. A router with high horsepower rating can safely cut deeper. Small bits, such as 1/4"
shank veining bits with 1/16" cuttingdiameters, are designed
to remove only small amounts of wood. Large bits, such as
1/2" shank straight-flute bits, are made to remove larger
amounts ofwood in a single pass, Cuts can be made deeper
in soft woods, such as white pine, than in tough hardwoods,
like oak or maple. Based upon these considerations, choose
a depth of cut that will not place excessive strain on router
motor. If you find that extra force is needed or that the motor
speed slows down considerably, turn off router and raise the
bit. Then, make the cut in two or more passes.
TO SET
DEPTH
OF CUT
1, UNPLUG YOUR ROUTER.
2. Raise cutter by depressing plunge release actuator.
See Figure 6.
3. Adjust depth control knob until cutter is inside router
subbase. See Figure 7.
4. Place router on a flat surface.
5. Lower router until tip of cutter barely touches flat surface. See Figure 8,
6. Squeeze plunge lock actuator to lock cutter at "zero"
depth of cut. NOTE: If desired, adjust depth control
knob until hex nut comes in contact with stop flange.
This will provide a positive stop at "zero" depth of cut.
7. Rotate depth stop block to desired position, loosen
lock knob, then turn adjustment knob until stop bar
touches stop screw on depth stop block.
8. Slide zero-reset indicator up or down the scale on stop
bar until white line on zero-reset indicator aligns with a
desired reference point, For example, align white line
with 1" mark on the scale.
9. Next, turn adjustment knob in the opposite direction,
lifting stop bar to obtain desired depth of cut. See
Figure 8. For example, if setting 1/8" depth of cut, the
zero-reset indicator will move 1/8" from the 1" reference point.
10. Tighten lock knob securely.
11. Position your router so that the cutter can extend below the subbase for desired depth setting.
12. Depress plunge release actuator.
13, Grasp handles and lower router until stop bar contacts
stop screw. Squeeze plunge lock actuator, locking
cutter at desired depth of cut. See Figure 9.
Page 8
INSIDE
SUBBASE
Rg. 7
KNOB
(TURRET)
Fig. 8
ADJUSTMENTS
DEPTH CONTROL
See Figure 9.
KNOB
DEPTH
CONTROL
KNOB
Fine adjustments can be made to the depth of cut by use of
the depth control knob. Another primary use of the depth
control knob is setting depth of cut when router is mounted
upside down on a router table. NOTE: The weight of the
router plus the awkward position it is in when mounted to a
router table make it necessary to use depth control knob.
TO SET DEPTH
TROL KNOB
OF CUT
WITH
DEPTH
CON-
1. UNPLUG YOUR ROUTER.
2.
3,
4.
5.
6.
7.
8,
9.
Loosen lock knob and turn adjustment knob so that
stop bar is not touching stop screws or fixed stops.
Depress plunge release actuator and allow router to
return to it's uppermost position against hex nut.
Plunge router until cutter reaches the approximate desired depth of cut. Then squeeze plunge lock actuator,
temporarily locking cutter at desired depth of cut.
Turn depth control knob clockwise until hex nut seats
against stop flange. Do not overtlghten hex nut
agalnst stop flange.
Depress plunge release actuator and turn depth control knob until cutter reaches desired depth of cut.
Always make sure plunge lock Is released and
router Is free before setting depth of cut with depth
control knob.
Squeeze plunge lock actuator, locking cutter at desired depth of cut.
Tum adjustment knoband adjust stopbar untilit touches
the desired stop screw or fixed stop.
Tighten lock knob securely.
Depth control knob is spring loaded against hex nut. If you
adjust it too far and it pops off threaded rod, refer to DEPTH
CONTROL KNOB ADJUSTMENTS in maintenance section for proper reassembly.
DEPTH STOP
See Figure 10.
___,__I
HEX NUT
I
i_
I
I
K
Fig. 9
swrrcR
O
I _2STOP
BAR
I
I
-i
ADJUSTABLE
_I_I_K.IF_HEX NUT
_'_,..._
_" FIXED STOP
_EPTH
_.
--
STOP
SCREW
'
STOP BLOCK (TURRET)
_
ROUTER BASE
Fig. 10
SYSTEM
The depth stop block located on the base of your router
makes it possible to make deep or heavy cuts in successive
passes by usa of preset depth of cut changes, Both fixed and
adjustabte stops are provided, making depth of cut changes
quick and easy. The depth stop block, also known as a
revolvingturret, rotates on a ball detent design in the router
base.
A preset cutting depth is achieved by plunging router until
stop bar comes in contact with the stop screw or fixed stop
on depth stop block.
The fixed stops are approximately 1/8" apart. The adjustable
stops have screws that may be adjusted approximately 1/2".
TO SET DEPTH
CUTFER EXTENDED
BELOW SUBBASE
STOP
BLOCK
1, UNPLUG YOUR ROUTER.
SETTINGS
2.
Loosen lock knob and turn adjustment knob clockwise,
raising stop bar to it's highest position.
Determine which stop, adjustable or fixed, to use for
the desired depth of cut. A combination of the two stop
types can be used if required for a specific job. If using
the adjustable steps, the stop screw on each stop can
be adjusted to the desired height by loosening hex nut
with the 3/8" end of combination wrench supplied, and
turning it in or out with your fingers. Secure stop screw
in position by retightening hex nut with wrench, Do
not overtlghten hex nut. Set stops to desired heights,
spreading the entire depth of cut over the number of
stops used.
4. Rotate depth stop block until the highest depth stop is
aligned with the stop bar.
3.
Page 9
ADJUSTMENTS
DEPTH
STOP
SYSTEM
(Continued)
5. Raise cutter by depressing plunge release actuator.
6. Place router on fiat surface, and _ower router unti_ tip of
cutter barely touches flat surface.
7. Squeeze plunge lock actuator to lock cutter at "zero"
depth of cut.
8. Turn adjustment knob counterclockwise to lower stop
bar against the stop, then tighten lock knob securely.
The highest stop now becomes the "zero" depth of cut
setting.
9. Depress plunge release actuator and raise router. Rotate stop block so that next highest depth stop aligns
with stop bar. This locates cutter for the initial pass,
10, Rotate depth stop block after each pass. Make as
many suceSsive passes as needed to obtain desired
depth of cut, progressively Iowedng router to next depth
of cut setting with each pass.
ZERO RESET
See Figure 11.
SCALE
'_REFERENCE
POINT
LOCK KNOB
ADJUSTMENT KNOB
Fig. 11
INDICATOR
The zero reset indicator allows you to use the scale provided
on the housing to make quick depth of cutchanges to existing
depth of cut settings. Simply choose a reference point on the
scale and slide zero reset indicator up or down scale the
distance required for new depth ofcut. Then change stop bar
position by loosening lock knob and tumtng adjustment knob
until white line on zero reset indicator moves back to reference point. 13ghten lock knob securely tolock stop bar in new
position. The cutter position will now increase or decrease
the exact distance the stop bar was adjusted.
Remember: Each mark on the inch scale indicates a 1/32
inch change in depth setting while each mark on the metric
scale equals a 1ram change in depth setting.; depth control
knob shouldbe used for making precise adjustments todepth
ofcut; and depressing center ofdepth adjustment knob quick
releases stop bar.
VARIABLE
._._
SPEED
CONTROL
I
t
I
SPEED SELECTION CHART
CUTTER SIZE
"'MAT'L_IL 114 rl 3/'8 n 1/2
_SOF'r
:1[
F
I _-e J C-_ "lJ--'_:E_-_
M EDIUM
HARD
VeRY
t L
I
I
HARD
|,
E
D-E
D
I
E
I
C
I
A-B
TOINCREASE
C
I J B-C
I
C
I
A
I
s-
I
C
I
-
TO DECREASE
SELECTOR
See Figure 12.
Your muter has a variable speed control selector designed to
allow operator control of speed and torque limits. You can
make speed selections best suited to the type of cut, the
material being cut, and the size of bit being used. The
variable speed control selector allows you to adjust muter
speed from 10,000 to 25,000 rpm. There is a six step scale
lettered A to F on the variable speed control selector. To
increase the speed and torqueof yourrouter, turnthe variable
speed control selector to a higher setting. Turn to a lower
setting to decrease speed and torque. NOTE: If you do not
want to use the variable speed control selector, turn to the
highest possible setting, and the feature will not be active.
The speed selection chart shown gives suggested speed
settings based on the diameter of the cutter and the type of
material being routed.
WARIABLESPEED
CONTROLSELECTOR
Fig, 12
PRACTICE
BEFORE
ACTUAL
USE
See Figure 12.
We suggest that you practice with the variable speed feature
of your router before installing a cutter and making cuts in
wood.
Page 10
OPERATION
"LOCK-ON"
BUTTON
See Figure 13.
The "on-off" trigger of your router is equipped with a "lockon" feature which is convenient when operating for extended periods of time. The "lock-on" button is located in
the upper portion of the "on-off" trigger. It works similar to a
rocker switch. To lock on, fully depress "on-off" trigger, then
depress "lock-on" button in top of "on-off" trigger and release. You will feel the "lock-on" button as it snaps "on-off"
trigger into lock position. To release the lock, depress =onoff" trigger at any point along trigger body, or depress protruding portion of the "lock-on" button.
SWITCH
HANDLE
TO
TO RELEASE
LOCK-ON
ON-OFF
ROUTING
See Figure
14.
For ease of operation
and maintaining
proper control, your
router has two handles,
one on each side of the router base.
When
using
shown
in figure
Before
starting
in collet
Turn
your
router
hold
router,
router
allowing
on
and
plunge
the cutter
with
both
hands
make sure cutter is securely
nut and that depth
gradually
it firmly
as
14.
let motor
or feed
contact
of cut is properly
build
cutter
to its full
speed,
into workpiece.
workpiece
it to develop
before
tightened
set.
then
DO NOT let
turning
on
router
and
full speed,
Remain alert and watch what you are doing.
router when fatigued.
DO NOT operate
FEED DIRECTION
When
routing,
the cutter
rotates
clockwise.
Therefore,
you
should feed the router into the workpiece
from left to right.
When fed from left to right, the rotation of the cutter pulls the
router against
the rotation
the workpiece.
forces
If fed in the opposite
of the spinning
router away from the workpiece.
control of your router.
RATE
OF
The whole "secret"
edge shaping
The
lies in making
and in selecting
proper
hardness
rate
could
cause
the
loss of
in soft woods
set-up
routing
on several
of the wood,
of the bit.
When
such as pine, a faster
factors:
the depth
cutting
Fig. 1
and
for the cut to be
rate of feed.
depends
content
diameter
of professional
a careful
the proper
of feed
and moisture
and the cutting
grooves
This
direction,
to throw
FEED
IMPORTANT:
made
bit will tend
the
of cut,
shallow
rate of feed can
Page
be used.
a slower
When making deep cuts in hardwoods
rate of feed will be required.
such as oak,
The best rate of feed is one that does not slow down
motor
more than
one-third
of its noqoad
speed.
the router
If the router
is fed too fast, it will take large chips out of the wood and leave
gouge marks. If the router is fed too slow, it will scorch or burn
the wood.
11
OPERATION
PROPER
FEEDING
The right feed is neither too fast nortoo slow. It is the rate at
which the bit is being advanced firmly and surely to produce
a continuous spiral of uniform chips -- without hogging into
the wood to make large individualchips or,on the other hand,
to create only sawdust. If you are making a small diameter,
shallow groove in soft, dry wood, the proper feed may be
about as fast as you can travel your router along your guide
line. On the other hand, if the bit isa large one, the cut is deep
or the wood is hard tocut, the proper feed may be a very slow
one. Then, again, a cross-grain cut may require a slower
pace than an identical with grain cut in the same workpiece.
There is no fixed rule. You will learn by experience from
practice and use. The best rate of feed is determined by
listening to the sound of the router motor and by feeling the
progress of each cut. If at all possible, always test a cut on
a scrap piece of the workpiece wood, beforehand.
SPEED
TOO
SELECTION
In general, if the material being cut is hard, the cutter size is
large, or the depth of cut is deep (maximum 1/8"), then your
router shouldbe runat slowerspeeds. When these si!uations
exist, turnthe variable speed controlselector until the desired
speed is reached. NOTE: Carbide cutters cut at higher
speeds than steel cutters and should be used when cutting
very hard materials.
FORCE
FAST
TOO SLOW
TOO
FEEDING
Clean, smooth routing and edge shaping can be done only
when the bit is revolving at a relatively high speed and is
takingvery small bites toproduce tiny, cleanly severed chips.
If your router is forced to move forward too fast, the RPM of
the bit becomes slower than normal in relation to its forward
movement. As a result, the bit must take bigger bites as it
revolves. "Bigger bites" mean bigger chips, and a rougher
finish. Bigger chips also require more power, which could
result in the router motor becoming overloaded.
Under extreme force-feeding conditions the relative RPM of
the bit can become so slow -- and the bites it has to take so
large -- that chips will be partially knocked off (rather than
fully cut off), with resulting splintering and gouging of the
workpiece. See Figure 15.
Your Craftsman router isan extremely high-speed tool(25,000
RPM no-load speed), and will make clean, smooth cuts if
allowed torun freely without the overload of a forced (too fast)
feed. Three things that cause "force feeding" are bit size,
depth-of-cut, and workpiece characteristics. The larger the
bit or the deeper the cut, the more slowly the router shouldbe
moved forward. If the wood is very hard, knotty, gummy or
damp, the operation must be slowed still more,
SLOW
Fig. 15
FEEDING
It is also possible to spoil a cut by moving the router forward
too slowly. When it is advanced into the work too slowly, a
revolvingbit does not dig into new wood fast enough to take
a bite; instead, it simplyscrapes away sawdust-like particles.
Scraping produces heat, which can glaze, bum, or mar the
cut -- in extreme cases, can even overheat the bit so as to
destroy its hardness,
In addition, it is more difficultto control a router when the bit
is scraping instead of cutting. With practicallyno load on the
motor the bit will be revolving at close to top RPM, and will
have a much greater than normal tendency to bounce off the
sides of the cut (especially, if the wood has a pronounced
grain with hard and soft areas), As a result, the cut produced
may have rippled, instead of straight sides. See Figure 15.
"Too-slow feeding" can also cause your router to take off in a
wrong direction from the intended line of cut. Always grasp
and hold your router firmly with both hands when routIng.
You can detect "too-slow feeding" by the runaway too-highly
pitched sound of the motor;or by feeling the "wiggle" of the bit
in the cut.
You can always detect "force feeding" by the sound of the
motor. Its high-pitched whine will sound lower and stronger
as it loses speed. Also, the strain of holding the tool will be
noticeably increased.
Page12
OPERATION
DEPTH
OF CUT
As previously mentioned, the depth of cut is important because it affects the rate of feed which, in turn, affects the
quality of a cut (and, also, the possibilityof damage to your
router motor and bit). A deep cut requires a slower feed than
a shallow one, and a too deep cut willcause you toslow the
feed so much that the bit is no longer cutting, it is scraping,
instead.
DEPTH
_UT
Making a deep cut is never advisable. The smaller bits-especially those only 1/16 inch in diameter -- are easily
broken off when subjected to too much side thrust. A large
enough bit may not be broken off, but if the cut is too deep a
roughcut willresult-- and it may be very difficulttoguide and
controlthe bit as desired, For these reasons, we recommend
that you do not exceed 1/8 inch depth of cut in a single pass,
regardless of the bit size or the softness or condition of the
workpiece. See Figure 16.
OF FEED
AND
CUT
Fig,16
2ND. PASS
°
To make deeper cuts it is therefore necessary to make as
many successive passes as required, lowering the bit 1/8
inch for each new pass. In order to save time, do all the cutting
necessary at one depth setting, before loweringthe bit for the
next pass. This will also assure a uniform depth when the final
pass is completed, See Figure 17.
DIRECTION
_OF
V/////A,,I
ROUTER FEED
DIRECTION
"
I.U
THRUST
I
See Figure 18.
The router motor and bit revolve in a clockwise direction. This
gives the tool a slight tendency to twist (in your hands) in a
counterclockwise direction, especially when the motor revs
up (as at starting).
Because of the extremely high speed of bit rotation during a
"proper feeding" operation, there is very little kickback to
contend with under normal conditions. However, shouldthe
bit strike a knot, hard grain, foreign object, etc. that would
affect the normal progress of the cutting action, there will be
a slightkickback-- sufficientto spoilthe trueness of your cut
if you are not prepared. Such a kickback is always in the
direction opposite to the direction of bit rotation,
/T
ROUT
I H.B_tA_'_TJUO.
] __ | o ==GRAINS
FIRST
END
__
_
ROUTER FEED
DIRECTION
BIT
ROTATION
Fig. 18
GUIDE OUTSIDE
To guard against such a kickback, plan your set-up and
direction of feed so that you will always be thrustingthe tool
to hold it against whatever you are using to guide the cut
-- in the same direction that the leading edge of the bit is
moving. In short, the thrustshould be in a directionthat keeps
the sharp edges ofthe bit continuously biting straightintonew
(uncut) wood.
GUIDE FEED
ROUTING
Whenever you are routing a groove, your travel should be in
a direction that places whatever guide you are using at the
dght-hand side. In short, when the guide is positioned as
shown in the first part of Figure 19, tool travel should be left
to right and counterclockwise around cu ryes. When the guide
is positioned as shown in the second part of Figure 19 tool
travel should be right to left and c{ockwise around curves. If
there is a choice, the first set-up is generally the easiest to
usa. In either case. the sideways thrust you use is against the
guide.
Page 13
ROTA__
THRUST'J_=_FEED
GUIDEINSIDE
Fig. 19
OPERATION
EDGE
ROUTING
Place router on workplace, making sure the router bit does
not contact workpieea. Turn router on and let motor build to
its full speed. Begin your cut, gradually feeding cutter into
workpiece.
ROUTER
_LOT
Upon completion of cut, turn motor off and let it come to a
complete stop before removing router from work surface.
EDGING
WITH
See Figure 20.
PILOT
TOP EDGE SHAPING
BITS
Rabbets and molded edges can be cut using piloted cutters.
The pilot extends below the cutter. Some pilots are solid
extensions of the cutter. Others are ball bearing guides that
are fastened to the and of the cutter. The pilots allow the
cutters to turn while the pilot follows the edge of the workpiece.
Arbor-type bits with pilots are excellent for quick, easy,, edge
shaping. They will follow workpieca edges that are either
straight or curved. The pilot prevents the bit from making too
deep a cut; and holding the pilot firmly in contact with the
workpiece edge throughout prevents the cut from becoming
too shallow.
WHOLE EDGE SHAPING
Whenever the workpieca thickness together with the desired
depth of cut (as adjusted by router depth setting) are such that
only the top part of the edge is to be shaped (leaving at least
a 1/16 inch thick uncut portion at bottom), the pilot can ride
against the uncut portion, which will serve to guide it. See
Figure 20. However, if the workplace is too thin or the bit set
too low so that there will be no uncut edge to ride the pilot
against, an extra board to act as a guide must be placed under
the workpiece. This "guide" board must have exactly the
same contour--straight
or curved--as the workpieea edge.
If it is positioned so that its edge is flush with the workpieee
edge, the bit will make a full cut (in as far as the bit radius). On
the other hand, if the guide is positioned as shown in Figure
20 (out from the workpieee edge), the bit will make less than
a full cut -- which will alter the shape of the finished edge.
NOTE: If desired, any of the piloted bits can be used without
a pilo t for edge shaping with guides, as preceding. Also, the
size (diameter) of the pilot that is used determines the
maximum cut width that can be made with the pilot against the
workpiece edge (the small pilot exposes all of the bit; the large
one reduces this amount by 1/16 inch).
When routing aII the edges of a panel or board, rout the end
grain first. Any splintering that occurs at the corners will then
be removed when routing the edge. Start each side 1/4" away
I"
_
6
Fig,20
I_
_-1/4"TO1"
Fig. 21
#
from the end. Feed the cutter into the wood until the pilot
contacts the uncut edge. Then, slowly back the router to
shape the corner. Next, move the router forward to shape the
rest of the edge. Be careful to keep the pilot pressed against
the uncut edge. Repeat this procedure on each side of the
panel. Figure 21 shows the proper sequence of cuts to make
when edge routing four sides of a panel.
Page 14
OPERATION
ROUTING
GROOVES
See Figure 22.
When routingacross the face of boards, set router at desired
depth of cut, place the edge ofrouter base against workpiece,
and turn on your router. Slowly feed the cutter into the
workpiece along desired cutline.
DIRECTION
OF CUT I_
RABBET
When routing straight cuts across stock, cla,mp a straightedge to the workpiece to use as a guide. Position the
straightedge parallel to the cutline and offset the distance
between the cutting edge of the cutter and the edge of the
router base. Hold the router base against the straightedge
and rout the groove,
When routinga groove wider than the diameter of the cutter,
clamp a straightedge on both sides of the cutting line.
Position both guides parallel to the desired cutline and
spaced equal distances from the desired edges ofthe groove.
Routalong one guide; then, reverse direction and routalong
the other guide, Clean out any remaining waste in the center
of the groove freehand.
ROUTING
WITH EDGE
See Figures 23 and 24.
UNCUT EDGE
HOLDER
Fig. 22
llJ "
E
GUIDE BAR_
GUIDE
Straight cuts and grooves can also be routed using an edge
guide attachment on your router. The edge guide attaches to
a guide holder, then the guide bars fit into openings in the
router base. Knob screws in the base secure the guide bars
in position.
-/
WITH
EDGE
',"[_ _--_.._.,
EDGEGUIDE
/
EDGE GUIDE ADJUSTMENT KNOB
Adjustments are made by loosening the wing bolt on guide
holder, placing the edge guide the desired distance from the
cutter, then retighteningwing bolt. Fine adjustments can be
made with edge guide adjustment knob on the end of guide
holder. When routingwith the edge guide attachment, hold
edge guide against the edge of workpiece as shown in figure
24.
ROUTING
CIRCLES
See Figure 25.
BIT PILOT
KNO
DIRECTION
OF CUT
]
_J
IH-_I
Fig. 23
"''''_.
_._
GUIDE
O
The edge guide attachment can be used for routingcircles
when a piloted bit is not available or inadequate for the
required Job. Position the edge guide so that the cutter is in
the center opening of the edge guide. Keep both corners of
edge guide pressed against the edge tomaintain a consistent
shape.
_
_
ROUTING ALONG A STAIGHTEDGE
WITH EDGE GUIDE AI"rACHMENT
_
_
Fig. 24
DIRECTION
OF CUT
When routing the outside edge (perimeter) of a circle, feed
the router counterclockwise. When routing the inside of a
circle feed the router clockwise as shown in figure 25.
Remember that the rotation of the bit must always lead into
the workpiece rather than away from it,
ROUTING
_.
Page
15
WITH
EDGE
INSIDE
OF A CIRCLE
GUIDE
ATTACHMENT
Fig. 25 ,_
OPERATION
ROUTING
WITH A ROLLER
GUIDE
See Figures 26 and 27.
A roller guide has been supplied with your router, It is useful
for routing uneven edges and trimming laminates,
I
/I //fff _
The roller guide attaches to the guide holder as shown in
figure 26, It can be adjusted in and out as well as up and
down. The roller guide rides against the uncut edge of the
workpiece.
When routing a decorative groove along an uneven edge, the
distance from roller guide to cutter should be the same as the
distance from the desired cut and the edge of the workpiece.
Fine adjustments can be made with the edge guide adjustment knob on guide holder. Tighten wing bolts securely.
When routing, keep roller pressed tight against edge of
workpiece, Carefully follow desired line of cut so that the
distance between the cut and the edge does not vary.
When trimming laminates with the roller guide, use a straight
cutting bit or a roundnose bit, Position the roller guide even
with the inside cutting edge of router bit, The roller guide
follows the edge of the workpiece while the bit trims off the
overhanging laminate. See Figure 27.
ROUTING
WITH
GUIDE
_:l_J!
/
ROLLER GUIDE
_(_
_]
KNOB
V
WING BOLTS
GU,DE
HOLDER
Fig. 26
BUSHINGS
See Figures 28 and 29.
You can accurately duplicate curves and complex shapes by
fitting your router with a template guide bushing that extends
below the subbase. The router bit passes through the guide
bushing. The guide bushing then rides against a template.
TO INSTALL TEMPLATE GUIDE BUSHING:
1. UNPLUG YOUR ROUTER.
LAMINATE
ROLLER
2.
Place router upside down on workbench,
3.
Place template guide bushing in recessed portion of
router base as shown in figure 28.
Align the cutouts in guide bushing with threaded holes
in base,
4.
5,
Secure guide bushing to router base with roundhead
screws provided.
6.
Tighten screws securely.
ALIGN
CUTOUTS
WITH F
IN
Page 16
GUIDE
Fig. 27
OPERATION
ROUTING
WITH
GUIDE
BUSHINGS
(Cont'd)
Secure template to the workpiece. Set router to desired
depth of cut and turn it on. Place router base on the template
with the collar of the guide bushing against the edge of the
template. Lower cutter into the workpiece and proceed
around template, keeping guide bushing pressed against
template edge,
ROUTER
BASE
When routingwith template guide bushings itis necessary to
allow for the size difference between the cutting edge of the
cutterand the face of the guide bushing collar, When making
templates, always allow for this size difference. See Figure
29.
FREEHAND
ROUTING
See Figure 30.
WORKPIECE
When used freehand, your plunge muter becomes a flexible
and versatile tool. This flexibility makes it possible to easily
routsigns, relief sculptures, etc.
ROUTER
SIZE
DIFFERENCE
There are two basic techniques for freehand routing:
t. Routing letters, grooves, and patterns intowood.
BIT
Fig. 29
2. Routing out the background, leaving the letters or pattern raised above the surface as shown in figure 30.
When freehand routing, we suggest the folowlng:
1. Draw or layout the pattern on workpiece.
2. Choose the appropriate Cutter. NOTE: A core box or
V-groove bit is often used for routing letters and engraving objects. Straight bits and ball mills are often
used to make relief carvings, Veining bits are used to
carve small, intricate details.
3. Rout the pattern in two or more passes. Make the first
pass at 25% of the desired depth of cut. This will
provide better control as well as being a quide for the
next pass.
4. Do not rout deeper than 1/8" per pass or cut,
Freehand routing Is an excellent example of how to use
the plunge routing feature of your router:
1. Choose the appropriate cutter, set desired depth of
cut, carefully check set-up, and secure workpiece.
2.
Make a test cut in a scrap piece of wood from the same
workpiece if possible.
3.
Depress plunge release actuator and raise cutter from
any preset depth of cut. This also permits raising
cutter inside router subbsse.
4.
Place router on workpiece inside pattern to be routed.
9. Several cuts that require repositioning of muter may
be needed for a particular job. If this situation exists,
depress plunge release actuator and raise cutter inside router subbase after each cut, reposition router
for next cut, gradually plunge cutter into workpiece
until stop bar contacts stop screw, squeeze plunge
lock actuator and continue routing.
5. Grasp handles securely and depress "on-off" trigger to
start your router.
6. Let motor build to full speed, then gradually plunge
cutter into workpiece until stop bar comes into contact
with stop screw on depth stop block.
10
7. Squeeze plunge lock actuator to secure depth of cut
setting.
8. Begin routing out the pattern, continuing until a complete pass at this depth of cut has been made,
Page17
After all cuts have been made, depress plunge release
actuator, raise cutter inside router subbase, remove
router from workpiece, release "on-oft" trigger, and
allow cutter to come to a complete stop.
MAINTENANCE
GENERAL
Only the parts shown on parts list, page 23, are intended to
be repaired or replaced by the customer. All other parts
represent an important part of the double insulation system
and should be serviced only by a qualified Sears service
technician.
Avoid using solvents when cleaning plastic parts. Most
plastics are susceptible to various types of commercial
solvents and may be damaged by their use. Use clean
cloths to remove dirt, carbon dust, etc.
PROPER
CARE
OF CUTTERS
When electric tools are used on fiberglass boats, sports
cars, wallboard, spackling compounds, or plaster, it has
been found that they are subject to accelerated wear and
possible premature failure, as the fiberglass chips and
grindings are highly abrasive to bearings, brushes,
commutator, etc. Consequently, it is not recommended that
this tool be used for extended work on any fiberglass material,
wallboard, spackling compounds, or plaster. During any
use on fiberglass it is extremely important that the tool is
cleaned frequently by blowing with an air jet.
PROPER
Get faster more accurate cutting results by keeping cutters
clean and sharp. Remove all accumulated pitchand gum from
cutters after each use,
When sharpening cutters, sharpen only the inside of the
cutting edge. Never grind the outside diameter, Be surewhen
sharpening the end ofa cutterto grind the clearance angle the
same as originally ground,
CARE
OF COLLET
From time to time, it also becomes necessary to clean your
collet and collet nut.To do so, simply remove collet nut from
toilet and clean the dustand chips that have collected. Then
return collet nut to its original position.
LUBRICATION
All of the bearings in this tool are lubricated with a sufficient
amount of high grade lubricant for the life of the unit under
normal operating conditions. Therefore, no further lubrication is required.
BRUSH REPLACEMENT
See Figure 31.
Your router has externally accessible brush assemblies that
should periodically be checked for wear.
PROCEED AS FOLLOWS WHEN REPLACEMENT IS REQUIRED:
ASSEMBLY
CAP
BRUSH
1. UNPLUG YOUR ROUTER.
2.
BRUSH
BRUSH
CAP
Remove brush cap with a screwdriver. Brush assembly is spring loaded and will pop out when you remove
brush cap.
3. Remove brush assembly (brush and spring).
4. Check for wear. If worn, always replace in pairs.
not replace one side without replacing the other.
Do
5.
Reassemble using new brush assemblies. Make sure
curvature of brush matches curvature of motor and that
brush moves freely in brush tube.
6. Replace brush cap and tighten securely.
Rg. 31
Page18
MAINTENANCE
PLUNGE
LOCK
ACTUATOR
ADJUSTMENTS
COMPRESSION
See Figure 32.
The plunge lock actuator has been properly set at the factory
and no initial adjustments should be required. However,
after extended use slight readjustment may be required. If
this situation occurs, make adjustments as follows:
1. UNPLUG YOUR ROUTER.
RELEASE
CTUATOR
PLUNG_
LOCK /
s
2.
Remove lock handle cover screws and lock handle
cover. See Figure 32.
3. NOTE THE LOCATION OF PLUNGE RELEASE ACTUATOR AND COMPRESSION SPRING IN HANDLE.
Reassembly of all parts removed must be Identical
In order for plunge lock and plunge release actuators to function properly.
4.
5.
Loosen hex nut on bottom of plunge lock actuator with
a 7/16" open end wrench.
Loosen socket head screw with a 1/8" hex key (allen
wrench). This step is needed to make sure screw is
not making contact with red in base assembly.
6. Depress plunge lock actuatoruntil itis flush with handle
as shown in figure 33.
7, Continue to hold plunge lock actuator flush with handle,
then turn hex key clockwise until socket head screw
touches base assembly rod. IMPORTANT:
Do not
overtlghten screw.
8, Make sure hex nut remains loose while tighteningsocket
head screw,
ACTUATOR
SOCKET
HEAD
HANDLE
LOCK
HANDLE
COVER
WRENCH
HEX NUT
1/8"
(ALLEN WRENCH)
PLUNGE
LOCK
ACTUATOR
COMPRESSION
SPRING
Fig. 32
PEG
PLUNGE
RELEASE
ACTUATOR
\
9. Once socket head screw touches base assembly rod,
secure it by tightening hex nut against plunge lock
actuator.
10, Do not let socket head screw slip or turn while tightening hex nut.
11. Slip compression spring over peg on plunge release
actuator. Then locate tabs on actuator in slide grooves.
Make sure that end ofcompression spring rests against
wall of stop pocket.
12. Carefully replace handle cover and handle cover
screws. Make sure plunge release actuator and compression spring are propedy seated.
13. Tighten handle cover screws securely.
When properly adjusted, plunge lock actuator will make
contact with base assembly rod when it is flush with handle.
By squeezing plunge lock actuator past this point, a friction
lock situation occurs. This is what locks your router at
desired depth of cut settings.
The plunge release actuator is spring loaded. When engaged, it pushes the plunge lock actuator past the flush
point in the opposite direction. This loosens socket head
screw, releasing pressure from rod in base assembly.
Page19
1/8" HEX KEY
(ALLEN WRENCH)
DUST BOOT
COVERS
BASE
ASSEMBLY
ROD
Fig. 33
MAINTENANCE
DEPTH
CONTROL
KNOB
ADJUSTMENTS
See Figure 34.
The depth control knob is spring loaded against hex nut to
prevent router motor from accidently separating from muter
base. If depth control knob is turned too far up depth adjustment rod, the spring will cause depth control knob to pop off
before hex nut. Do not remove hex nut. It should remain
on depth adjustment rod at all times. This is especially
important when using muter upside down on a router table.
DEPTH
CONTROL
TO REPLACE DEPTH CONTROL KNOB:
1.
UNPLUG YOUR ROUTER,
2. Turn hex nut counterclockwise until 1/4" of threads are
remaining at the top Of depth adjustment rod.
3. Place compression spring on top of hex nut as shown
in figure 34,
4. Place depth control knob on top of compression spdng
and align tabs on depth control knob with flats on hex
nut,
5. Carefully compress spring by pushing down on top of
depth control knob.
6. With spring compressed, thread depth control knob
clockwise onto depth adjustment rod.
7. Turn depth control knob until desired depth of cut is
reached,
Do not replace depth control knob without compression
spring.
Page 20
HEX NUT
TABS
Fig. 34
EXTENSION
CORDS
Extension
The use of any extension
To keep
cord will cause
the loss to a minimum
and to prevent
Cord
Length
Wire
0-25 Feet
25-50 Feet
some loss of power.
tool overheat-
Size
A.W.G.
14
12
ing, follow the recommended
cord sizes on the chart at the
dghL When tool is used outdoors,
use only extension
cords
suitable for outdoor use and so marked.
Extension cords are
available
at Sears
Retail
Stores.
HELPFUL
_"
Always
clamp
A safe
operator
Always
_'
wear
securely
before
is one who thinks
ahead.
eye protection
Make
set-up
adjustments
Keep
cutters
clean
Don't
let familiarity
Study
all safety
NEVER
,/
workpiece
Make
place
Test
certain
make
difficult set-ups
Plan each operation
Provide
sawdust
_'
THINK
for smoother
Then
double
checF
Measure
twice
and cut once.
sharpened.
you careless.
and do the job safely.
hands
clamps
routing.
routing.
carefully.
and properly
rules
your
when
HINTS
can't
in jeopardy.
loosen
while
on scrap--Don't
before
in use.
waste
lumber.
you begin.
operation
by cleaning
your
router
frequently.
Shake
router
or blow with
an air jet to remove
build-up,
SAFETY
BY THINKING
AHEAD.
ROUTER TABLES
If mounting your router to a router table, use only the three 5/16-18 UNC-2B tapped holes provided in the router base. Use
5/16-18 UNC-2A flat head screws that are 1-1/8" or 1-1/4" long if mounting router to a router table. NOTE: Router subbase
must be removed in order to gain access to the 5/16-18 UNC tapped holes.
The use of Craftsman routers in router tables offered
compliance
with applicable safety standards.
Page
by other
21
manufacturers
has not been investigated for
CRAFTSMAN
ROUTER - MODEL NUMBER 315.275061
SEE NOTE"A"
/
5O
10
47
38
56
24
_---43
_24
55
NOTE:
"A"- The assembly
system,
shown
service
represents
should
an important
be performed
by your
part of the Double
nearest
Sears
Insulated
Repair
Page 22
System.
Center.
To avoid the possibility
Contact
your
nearest
Sears
of alteration
Retail
Store.
or damage
to the
+.
CRAFTSMAN
ROUTER - MODEL NUMBER 315.275061
when ordering
repaironparts.
BACK to PAGE
FOR housing.
PARTS
I ROUTER
he model ornumber
witl be found
a plateSEE
attached
the motor
PARTS
Key
No.
PaN
Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
622167-028
970738-002
970742-001
970709-001
970743-O01
970740-001
931744-006
622171-055
970760-001
970758-001
971094-001
970762-O01
970736-001
617966-030
970764.001
970875-001
972561-001
970752-001
972564-002
970770-001
931744-063
703493-820
970720-202
622931-008
970734-001
970717-002
970715-002
622347-017
622167-070
970718-002
970719-001
989177-000
970866-002
971137-001
607406-005
706382-817
970732-001
970864-001
Description
Logo Plate .................. : ..................................
1/2" Collet Nut ...............................................
Zero Reset Indicator
...................
..................
Washer .......................
: ..................................
Washer ............ :.............................................
Retainer
Plate ...............................................
1.
1
1
3
1
1
* Screw (#6-32 x 3/8" Fil+ Hd.) ........................
Compression
Spring
.....................................
Adjustment
Knob ...........................................
Lock Knob .....................................................
2
1
1
1
Spring Washer ..............................................
Retaining
Ring ...............................................
Depth Stop Bar ..............................................
Stop Bar Pinion .............................................
Retaining
Ring .....; .........................................
Depth Control Knob .......................................
Compression
Spring .....................................
* Hex Nut (#3;'8-16) .........................................
Washer ..........................................................
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
Depth Adjustment
Rod ..................................
Chip Shield ....................................................
1
1
*
Optional
Accessory
Standard
**
(Not
Hardware
Available
Shown)
--
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
Number
614658-010
622183-042
970865-001
970755-203
970772-001
967711--000
970722-005
705404-801
940021-006
706239-830
622347-019
970712-001
970741-001
970754-001
970723-001
969361.001
971121-001
970729-001
971705-001
971706-001
971308-001
969355-001
971311-001
971309-001
606066.006
971306-001
622167-071
060721-630
060721-530
060721-430
060721-030
972160-001
969359-001
969357-002
your
J
I
+ 972421.000
Description
*
***
***
***
***
***
***
***
***
23
For
Use On
Your
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
1
Spring Washer ..............................................
Shoulder
Screw .............................................
Dust Boot ......................................................
Compression
Spring
.....................................
Guide Pin ......................................................
1/4" Adapter
..................................................
Combination
Wrench (3/8" - 7/8") .................
Knob Screw ...................................................
Roller Guide ..................................................
Slide Plate .....................................................
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
Wing Bolt .......................................................
Edge Guide ...................................................
Guide Holder .................................................
Edge Guide Adjustment
Knob .......................
Screw (#10-32 x 3/8" Pan Hd.) .....................
Guide Bushing ..................
, ............................
Retaining
Ring ...............................................
Guide Bushing
w.'Nut (I/4" x 5/16") ..............
Guide Bushing
w/Nut (1/4" x 3/8") ................
Guide Bushing
w/Nut (1/2" x 5/8") ................
Guide Bushing
w/Nut (11/32" x 7/16") ..........
Guide Bushing Adapter .................................
3/8" Adapter
..................................................
Optional
Roller Guide Assembly
(Includes
Key Nos. 21, 57, 58, & 59) ............
Optional
Guide Holder w/Hardware
(Includes
Key Nos. 21, 56, 59, 60, 61 & 62).
Owner's
Manual
2
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
Item-May Be Purchased
Locally
From Div.98 -- Source
980.00
May Be Purchased
Quan.
* Screw (#8-32 x 3/8" Pan Hd.) **STD510803
* Screw (#8-32 x 3/8" Fiat Hd+) **STD510803.4
Subbase
........................................................
Base Assembly .............................................
Compression
Spring .....................................
1/4" Steel Ball ...............................................
Depth Stop Block (Turret) .............................
* Hex Nut (#10-24)
..........................................
* Screw (#10-24 x 1/2" Cap Soc. Hd.) .............
Washer ..........................................................
972000-092
Page
regarding
PaN
Key
No.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
2
2
!
in alt correspondence
LIST
Quan.
Retaining
Ring ...............................................
Torsion Spring ...............................................
Stop Plug .......................................................
Clamp Bolt ....................................................
Keyed Washer
..............................................
* Screw (#1/4-28 x 1-5/8" Hex Soc. Hd.) ........
Washer
**STD551225
...................................
* Hex Nut (#1/4-28)
.........................................
Lock Actuator ................................................
Lock Handle Cover .......................................
Posilock
Label ...............................................
Release
Actuator
..........................................
Compression
Spring .....................................
* Screw (#8-10 x 5/8" Pan Hd.) .......................
Brush Cap .....................................................
Brush Assembly ............................................
Data Plate .....................................................
***
ORDERING
INSTRUCTIONS
Always mention
the model number
New
Plunge
Router
1
1
_A/k&g
Industrial Electronic
OWNER'S
MANUAL
Plunge Router
Double Insulated
SERVICE
Now that you have purchased your router, should a need
ever exist for repair parts or service, simply contact any
Sears Service Center and most Sears, Roebuck and Co.
stores. Be sure to provide all pertinent facts when you
call or visit.
MODELNO.
315.275061
The model number of your router will be found on a plate
attached to the motor housing.
WHEN ORDERING REPAIR PARTS, ALWAYS GIVE
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:
HOW TO ORDER
REPAI R PARTS
• PART NUMBER
• PART DESCRIPTION
• MODEL NUMBER
315.275061
• NAME OF ITEM
Industrial Electronic
Plunge Router
All parts listed may be ordered from any Sears Service
Center and most Sears stores.
If the parts you need are not stocked locally, your order
will be electronically transmitted to a Sears Repair Parts
Distribution Center for handling.
SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO., Hoffman Estates, IL 60179