Motorola MICROTAC DPC 650 Owner`s manual

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Owner’s Manual
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Welcome Thank you for selecting Motorola — a world
leader in communications technology.
All Motorola cellular phones are designed and manufactured
in the United States to meet Motorola’s exacting specifications
and world class quality standards. The MicroTAC cellular
phone is no exception. This personal phone withstands our
rigorous durability tests including temperature, humidity,
shock, dust, vibration, and a drop test.
Product superiority is yours with the MicroTAC cellular phone.
Carrier’s Name
Carrier’s Phone Number
• You will need to have the following information when you
inquire about your phone or service. This information is located
on the back of your phone after you remove the battery.
ESN Number
MSN Number
Model Number
Cellular Phone Number
Unlock Code — The sequential code of 1, 2, 3 is the standard
unlock code programmed into all phones by the factory. It is
often changed to the last three digits of your cellular phone
number by the Carrier. For easy access to this unlock code in
the future, please list it here now:
. (Please contact
your place of purchase if your unlock code has been changed
and you do not have this information.)
Warranty Expiration Date
Date of Purchase
Need
a large print version of this manual?
Call Motorola at 1-800-331-6465 (USA) or
1-800-461-4575 (Canada).
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Introduction
Cellular Operation Safety Information . . . . . . . . . . vi
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Controls and Indicators
Controls and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x
Getting Started
Prepare the Battery for Initial Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Attach the Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Remove the Battery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Standard Method. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Quick-Change Battery Removal/Replacement . . . . 3
Using Plug-In Chargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Basic Operation
About the Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Turning Phone On and Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Start-up Self Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Start-up Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Start-up Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Illuminated Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Placing a Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
To Correct an Error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
If Entering More Than 10 Digits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Unsuccessful Call Attempts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Automatic Redialing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Ending a Call. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Receiving a Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Call In Absence Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Signal Strength Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
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Table of Contents
Volume Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Adjusting Earpiece Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Adjusting Ringer Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Low Battery Warning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Battery Voltage Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Storing Numbers in Memory
About Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storing a Phone Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storing an Area Code and Prefix (Postscripting) . . .
Memory Protect Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting a Memory Entry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing a Memory Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
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14
Placing Calls From Memory
About Recalling from Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Placing Calls by Entering Two-Digit Number . . . . . 15
Placing Calls by Scrolling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Advanced Memory Dialing Features
Last Number Redial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recalling Last Number Called . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recalling Area Code and Prefix (Postscripting) . . . .
One Touch Dialing Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Placing a Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storing a One Touch Dialing Number . . . . . . . .
Displaying One Touch Dialing Numbers . . . . . .
Deleting One Touch Dialing Numbers . . . . . . . .
Turbo Dial Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Priority Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Super Speed Dial Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scratch Pad Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Two-Part Tone Dialing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ii
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Table of Contents
Memory Linking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Example of Memory Linking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Special Call Features
Display Own Phone Number .
Microphone Muting. . . . . . . .
To mute microphone . . . . .
To disable mute. . . . . . . . .
Automatic Answer. . . . . . . . .
One Minute Beep . . . . . . . . .
Multiple Key Answer . . . . . . .
Hands Free Operation . . . . . .
Distinctive Ringer . . . . . . . . .
Multiple Language Display. . .
Extended Talk Time . . . . . . . .
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24
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Special System Features
About Special System Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Calling Line ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Receiving Calls with Calling Line ID . . . . . . . . . 27
Recalling/Viewing Calling Line ID Messages . . . . 28
Placing a Call to a Calling Line ID Number . . . . 28
Storing a Calling Line ID Number in Memory . . . 29
Deleting an Individual Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Deleting All Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Other Messaging Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
VOX Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Reminder Beeps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
PIN Code Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Placing a Call using PIN Operation . . . . . . . . . . 30
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Table of Contents
Using the Feature Menu
About the Feature Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Selecting and Deselecting Features . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Status Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Call Timers
About Timers . . . . . . . . .
Individual Call Timer . . . .
To Display . . . . . . . . .
Resettable Call Timer. . . .
To Display . . . . . . . . .
To Reset . . . . . . . . . . .
Cumulative Call Timer. . .
To Display . . . . . . . . .
Automatic Display Timer .
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37
37
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About Security Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electronic Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Unlock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying the Unlock Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Unlock Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic Lock. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Outgoing Call Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
39
39
39
40
40
40
40
Security Features
Cellular System Information
Cellular System Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Service Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Weak Signal Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Switchhook and Advanced System Services . . . . . .
Roaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Two-System Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iv
42
42
42
43
43
44
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Table of Contents
Programming Scanning Modes
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reviewing / Changing Scanning Mode . . . . . . . . . .
To Review Scanning Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Change Scanning Modes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scanning Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
45
45
45
45
46
Troubleshooting
Before Calling For Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Reference
Regulations and Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Message Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FDA Consumer Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Patent Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50
52
55
59
64
v
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Introduction
Safety Information (US Version)
IMPORTANT:
Read this information before using your wireless handheld phone.
Exposure to Radio Frequency Signals
Your wireless handheld portable telephone is a low power radio transmitter
and receiver. When it is ON, it receives and also sends out radio frequency
(RF) signals.
In August 1996, The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) adopted
RF exposure guidelines with safety levels for handheld wireless phones.
Those guidelines are consistent with safety standards previously set by both
U.S. and international standards bodies:
• American National Standards Institute (ANSI) IEEE. C95. 1-1992
• National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement (NCRP).
Report 86
• International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection
(ICNIRP) 1996
• Ministry of Health (Canada), Safety Code 6
Those standards were based on comprehensive and periodic evaluations
of the relevant scientific literature. For example, over 120 scientists, engineers, and physicians from universities, government health agencies, and
industry reviewed the available body of research to develop the ANSI
Standard (C95.1).
The design of your phone complies with the FCC guidelines (and those
standards). For additional information concerning exposure to radio frequency signals, see the statement by the FDA at the end of this user guide.
To maintain compliance with FCC RF exposure guidelines, if you wear a
handset on your body, use the Motorola-supplied or approved carrying
case, holster, or other body-worn accessory. If you do not use a body-worn
accessory, ensure the antenna is at least one inch (2.5 centimeters) from
your body when transmitting. Use of non-Motorola accessories may
violate FCC RF exposure guidelines.
Antenna Care
Use only the supplied or an approved replacement antenna. Unauthorized
antennas, modifications, or attachments could damage the phone and may
violate FCC regulations.
Phone Operation
Normal Operation
Hold the phone as you would any other telephone, with the antenna
pointed up and over your shoulder.
Tips on Efficient Operation
Observe the following guidelines to operate your phone most efficiently.
• Extend your antenna fully, if applicable.
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Introduction
• Do not touch the antenna unnecessarily when the phone is in use.
Contact with the antenna affects call quality and may cause the phone
to operate at a higher power level than otherwise needed.
Batteries
Caution: All batteries can cause property damage, injury, or burns if a
conductive material, such as jewelry, keys or beaded chains, touches
exposed terminals. The material may complete an electrical circuit and
become quite hot. To protect against such unwanted current drain, exercise
care in handling any charged battery, particularly when placing it inside
your pocket, purse, or other container with metal objects. When the
battery is detached from the phone, your batteries are packed with a
protective battery cover; please use this cover for storing your batteries
when not in use.
Driving
Check the laws and regulations on the use of wireless telephones in the
areas where you drive. Always obey them. Observe the following
guidelines when using your phone while driving.
• Give full attention to driving--driving safely is your first responsibility.
• Use hands-free phone operation, if available.
• Pull off the road and park before making or answering a call if driving
conditions so require.
Electronic Devices
Most modern electronic equipment is shielded from RF signals. However,
certain equipment may not be shielded against the RF signals from your
wireless phone.
Pacemakers
The Health Industry Manufacturers Association recommends that a minimum separation of six inches (6") be maintained between a handheld
wireless phone and a pacemaker to avoid potential interference with the
pacemaker. These recommendations are consistent with the independent
research by and recommendations of Wireless Technology Research.
Persons with pacemakers:
• should ALWAYS keep the phone more than six inches from their
pacemaker when the phone is turned ON
• should not carry the phone in a breast pocket
• should use the ear opposite the pacemaker to minimize the potential for
interference
• should turn the phone OFF immediately if you have any reason to
suspect that interference is taking place
Hearing Aids
Some digital wireless phones may interfere with some hearing aids. In the
event of such interference, you may want to consult your hearing aid
manufacturer to discuss alternatives.
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Introduction
Other Medical Devices
If you use any other personal medical device, consult the manufacturer of
your device to determine if it is adequately shielded from external RF energy. Your physician may be able to assist you in obtaining this information.
Turn your phone OFF in health care facilities when any regulations posted
in these areas instruct you to do so. Hospitals or health care facilities may
be using equipment that could be sensitive to external RF energy.
Vehicles
RF signals may affect improperly installed or inadequately shielded electronic systems in motor vehicles. Check with the manufacturer or its
representative regarding your vehicle. You should also consult the manufacturer of any equipment that has been added to your vehicle.
Posted Facilities
Turn your phone OFF in any facility where posted notices so require.
Aircraft
Switch OFF your phone before boarding an aircraft.
Airline regulations prohibit using your phone while in the air. Check and
comply with the policy of your airline regarding the use of your phone
while the aircraft is on the ground.
Blasting Areas
To avoid interfering with blasting operations, turn your phone OFF when in
a "blasting area" or in areas posted: "Turn off two-way radio." Obey all signs
and instructions.
Potentially Explosive Atmospheres
Turn your phone OFF, do not remove your battery when you are in any
area with a potentially explosive atmosphere, and obey all signs and
instructions. Sparks from your battery in such areas could cause an
explosion or fire resulting in bodily injury or even death.
Areas with a potentially explosive atmosphere are often but not always
clearly marked. They include: fueling areas such as gasoline stations;
below deck on boats; fuel or chemical transfer or storage facilities; areas
where fuel odors are present (for example, if a gas/propane leak occurs in a
car or home); areas where the air contains chemicals or particles, such as
grain, dust, or metal powders; and any other area where you normally
would be advised to turn off your vehicle engine.
For Vehicles Equipped with an Air Bag
An air bag inflates with great force. Do NOT place objects, including both
installed or portable wireless equipment, in the area over the air bag or in
the air bag deployment area. If in-vehicle wireless equipment is improperly
installed and the air bag inflates, serious injury could result.
US021600
viii
MicroTAC_Book Page ix Thursday, October 16, 1997 1:30 PM
Introduction
Introduction
The MicroTAC cellular phone represents the state-of-theart in personal cellular telephones today.
This MicroTAC phone features the
Enhanced Feature
Set, which includes a large display, Extended Talk Time
and Standby Time, and improved charging performance.
In addition, your MicroTAC phone also offers the
following exceptional features.
• Calling Line ID Capable
• Multilingual Prompts
• 9 Selectable Ringer Styles • Two-System Operation
• One Touch Dial Keys
• Turbo Dial Operation
• Priority Call
• Multiple Key Answer
• Super Speed Dialing
• Auto Answer
• Call Timers
• Memory Protect
Remember, these are just a few of the great features that
your MicroTAC cellular phone provides to meet your
business and personal needs. In addition, a number of
optional accessories are available to help you tailor your
phone to your individual preferences. These include a full
range of Batteries, Chargers, Vehicle Adapters, and Data
Products.
To help you become familiar with your telephone’s
features, we suggest that you experiment with them as you
progress through this manual.
Please read General Safety Information before operating
your phone.
ix
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Controls and Indicators
➊ Retractable
Antenna
1
Extend for
optimum
performance.
2
3
➋ Earpiece
4
➌ Status
5
Indicators
Provide a
visual
indication of
conditions
associated
with cellular
telephone
service.
6
7
8
9
10
IU (In Use) — Flashes slowly when call is in progress.
RM(Roam) — Flashes if your phone is accessing
another cellular system other than your home
registered system.
NS (No Service) — Flashes slowly when the phone is
out of service range of a cellular system. Calls cannot
be placed or received when this light is on.
Signal Strength Indicator — Flashes the relative
strength of the signal received by the phone (see
page 9).
Battery Strength Indicator — Lights steadily to
indicate the estimated remaining capacity of the
battery (see page 11).
➍ Number Display
(Be sure to remove the protective label affixed to the display.)
Displays phone number, memory location number, or
message. Some information will require viewing
sequentially displayed messages.
x
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Controls and Indicators
➎ Dedicated One Touch Memory Buttons
Press and hold either of the one-touch buttons to dial
the number stored for that button.
➏ Numeric Keypad
1
, 2 , 3 , etc., are used to enter call information.
scrolls forward.
scrolls backward.
➐ Function Keys
RCL
STO
CLR
SND
PWR
VOL
FCN
END
Recalls and displays telephone numbers stored in
memory.
Stores numbers into any of the memory locations.
Clears last digit when pressed and released. Press
and hold to clear entire display in the event of an
error (does not affect numbers stored in memory).
Initiates a call to the entered telephone number
or answers a call. Sends a switchhook flash when
a call is in progress.
Turns phone on and off.
Adjusts the earpiece and ringer volume.
Used in combination with other buttons for
specific user-programmed functions (e.g., FCN ,
5
activates lock mode).
Terminates a call in progress and exits special
functions.
➑ Headset Jack
Connect an optional accessory headset to this jack to
provide simple hands-free conversations.
➒ Mouthpiece
10
Keypad Cover
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Controls and Indicators
Notes…
xii
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Getting Started
Prepare the Battery for Initial Use
The Nickel Metal Hydride or Nickel-Cadmium battery
supplied with your phone must be fully charged before
placing your phone into service. The batteries are shipped
from the factory in a discharged state in order to extend the
life of the battery. It is recommended that you charge new
batteries for at least 4 hours using the AC Charger/
Transformer, or overnight using the IntelliCharge Desktop
Charger. Do not charge the battery longer than 24 hours.
(Refer to page 3 if you are using a plug-in charger.)
AC Charger/Transformer
IntelliCharge Desktop Charger
Motorola desktop chargers for the MicroTAC line of
products are dual pocket chargers. The charger’s front
pocket can charge a battery while attached to the phone or
by itself. The charger’s rear pocket can charge any
compatible battery (not attached to a phone).
WARNING Battery may explode if exposed to fire.
WARNING To prevent injuries or burns, and to avoid
damage to the battery, do not allow metal objects to
contact or short circuit the battery terminals. Refer to
“Batteries” on page vii for details.
CAUTION Charging your battery in anything other than
a Motorola charger will void your warranty.
CAUTION To avoid damage to the battery, do not place
it anywhere that might cause the battery terminals to short
together.
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Getting Started
Attach the Battery
1. Place the battery on the phone so that its grooves
align. Align the top of the battery with the line on the
back of the phone right below the arrows.
2. Slide upward in the direction of the arrows on the back
of the phone until it clicks into place.
Remove the Battery
Standard Method
1. Turn your phone off.
2. Depress the latch button on the rear of the battery and
slide the battery downward until it stops.
3. Lift the battery off.
2
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Getting Started
Quick-Change Battery Removal/Replacement
The quick-change method allows you to remove your
battery at any time and replace it with a charged spare
battery during a telephone call. This is especially useful if
you receive the low battery message (Lo bAt ) or audible
tone during a call.
Simply remove the battery from the phone and put on the
spare battery. The phone will not go through the normal
power-up cycle described on page 4. You will only have
four seconds to complete this action before your telephone
call is terminated. It is a good idea to practice this
procedure a few times before using it on an actual
telephone call. Advise the party on the other end of the call
before beginning this procedure.
Using Plug-In Chargers
If you are using a charger that plugs into the bottom of the
phone, you must remove the small plastic cover to gain
access to the receptacle, as shown below.
1
Remove
Receptacle
Cover
2
Plug
Connector
into
Receptacle
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Basic Operation
About the Antenna
There are two parts to the handset antenna, one internal
and one retractable. This allows your phone to detect
incoming calls without having the antenna extended. For
optimum performance, fully extend the antenna when in a
call or when placing a call.
Turning Phone On and Off
1. Press
2. Press
PWR
PWR
to turn your phone on.
again to turn your phone off.
Start-up Self Tests
Each time the phone is turned on, it performs a series of
self tests, sounds a tone, and lights all display positions and
status indicators to check their operation. The Signal
Strength and Battery Meters then display and the keypad
lights momentarily, as it will any time a key is pressed or
the keypad cover is opened.
Start-up Messages
Message
A1
A2
b1
Explanation
• If your phone is programmed
for two cellular systems, one of
these messages will appear in
the display upon power up.
b2
• These are reminders as to
which system and phone
number are currently in use.
Loc d
• Indicates that the phone has
been locked and cannot send or
receive calls until unlocked.
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Basic Operation
Start-up Status Indicators
Indicator
Explanation
IU (In Use) Indicator
• Flashes slowly while a call is
in progress
NS (No Service) Indicator
• Flashes slowly if phone is
beyond range of a cellular
service area
• Calls cannot be placed or
received while NS is lit
RM (Roam) Indicator
If flashing, you are accessing a
Cellular System other than your
home system.
Illuminated Keypad
Your keypad lights whenever the phone is turned on, a call
is received, or a key is pressed. To help conserve battery
power and minimize distractions while driving at night, the
display and keypad backlighting will turn off after 16
seconds if no key is pressed. You may reactivate the display
by pressing any key or opening the keypad cover. The
display and keypad backlighting remain lit during menu
use.
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Basic Operation
Placing a Call
1. With power on, enter the number you wish to call.
2. Press SND . diALing and the dialed number will
alternate in the display until the called party answers.
3. Begin the conversation when the called party answers.
To Correct an Error
To correct an error, press and quickly release CLR to delete
the last character. To clear the entire entry, press and hold
CLR for about 1 second. Your entire entry will be deleted,
and you may now re-enter the number you wish to call.
If Entering More Than 10 Digits
You can call a phone number with up to 16 digits, but only
the last 10 digits will appear in the display.
To recall a stored phone number that is longer than 10
digits, press RCL and the memory location number. The
display will flash the memory location number and the last
10 digits of the number. Press RCL again to view the entire
number.
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Basic Operation
Unsuccessful Call Attempts
If you hear one of the following signals, you have not
successfully completed your call.
Tone / Message
Description
Cellular System Busy
fast busy
(reorder signal)
Snd to rEdiAL
Press SND again before ending the
unsuccessful call attempt to
automatically redial the call (refer
to Automatic Redialing below), or
press END and dial the call again.
Cellular System Could Not
Complete the Call
You may have tried to place a call
alternating high/low before the green IU indicator was
tone
flashing to let you know your
(intercept)
phone was fully operative. Either
Snd to rEdiAL press SND again before ending the
unsuccessful call attempt to
automatically redial the call (refer
to Automatic Redialing below), or
press END and dial the call again.
busy signal
The Called Party’s Line is
Busy
Automatic Redialing
Your phone includes a convenient feature that eliminates
the need for you to make repetitive call attempts when a
cellular system is busy.
If you receive an alternating high/low signal (intercept) or
the fast busy tone (reorder signal) when attempting to place
a call and wish to retry the call, press SND before ending
the unsuccessful call attempt. rEdiAL is then displayed.
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Basic Operation
Your phone will make the call attempt continuously over
the next four minutes. Once a connection is made, the
phone will ring once to alert you so that you may lift the
phone to your ear and begin the conversation. You do not
have to press SND to answer the call.
If four minutes is insufficient time, press SND to begin
another cycle. You may terminate Automatic Redial by
turning off the phone, or by pressing END .
NOTE Automatic Redial applies only if the cellular
system is busy, and will not engage when the called party’s
line is busy.
Ending a Call
Press END or close the keypad cover.
The green IU will extinguish.
Receiving a Call
When you hear the ring tone indicating an incoming
call, open the mouthpiece to answer the call. If the
keypad cover is already open, press SND to answer the
call.
NOTE Your phone is equipped with an Automatic
Answer feature that allows you to answer calls without
pressing SND . Refer to “Automatic Answer” on page 24 for
details.
NOTE Opening the keypad cover and pressing SND may
activate call transfer or other optional system features.
Contact your Cellular System Provider for more
information.
NOTE If you have subscribed to Calling Line ID, the
calling party’s phone number (if available) will appear in
the display. Refer to “Calling Line ID” on page 27 for
details on the Calling Line ID feature.
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Basic Operation
Call In Absence Indicator
If your phone is on and an incoming call is unanswered,
CALL is displayed for 16 seconds. The display and keypad
backlight will then extinguish to conserve the battery level.
Pressing any key but CLR or END redisplays CALL to
inform you of the call attempt. You must press CLR or END
to cancel the message and clear the display.
NOTE Unless you have subscribed to Calling Line ID, the
phone will not display or retrieve the phone number of the
calling party.
Signal Strength Meter
The Signal Strength Meter (SSM) indicates the relative
strength of the signal received by your phone. The SSM is
displayed as shown below. The
alone represents the
lowest strength, with each additional representing a
stronger signal.
Weak Signal
Strong Signal
The SSM appears every time you turn your phone on. After
the display blanks out (after about 16 seconds), the SSM
will “strobe” to indicate that the phone is on. To redisplay
the SSM press any key.
To best utilize the SSM, you should familiarize yourself
with the relative signal strength levels and their associated
call placement and call-in-progress qualities.
Any messages, such as Loc d , appearing in the display as
a result of activation of a feature will take priority over
SSM. You will not see the SSM displayed in these cases.
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Basic Operation
Volume Meter
The Volume Meter represents the current volume setting
and is displayed whenever you adjust the earpiece or
ringer volume. The volume level is displayed as a bar graph
following the letter u at the left side of the display. The u
alone represents the lowest volume setting, with each
additional bar representing a higher volume setting.
Lowest Volume
Highest Volume
Adjusting Earpiece Volume
1. Open the keypad cover.
2. Press and hold VOL to raise the volume level. Release
and press VOL again to lower the volume.
Adjusting Ringer Volume
1. Open the keypad cover.
2. Press FCN , then VOL to raise the volume level. Release
and press VOL again to lower volume.
Low Battery Warning
Low battery power is indicated by a short dual-tone alert
repeated periodically, and the displayed message Lo
bAt . As the battery approaches discharge, the unit will
automatically turn itself off.
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Basic Operation
Battery Voltage Meter
Press FCN , 4 .
The Battery Voltage Meter (BVM) represents the current
voltage level of the battery being used. You can use this to
estimate the amount of battery capacity remaining. The
BVM is displayed as a bar graph following the letter b at
the left side of the display. Note that three battery symbols
(
) are also provided to indicate the relative battery
level whenever the display backlighting is on.
Low Battery
Charged Battery
NOTE Variables such as temperature, battery age, and
charging conditions may affect battery voltage.
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Storing Numbers in Memory
About Memory
Your phone provides a numeric memory in which to store
frequently called phone numbers. The memory will accept
entries designated by location numbers 01, 02, etc. Calls
are placed from within memory by pressing SND when the
number is displayed. Each memory location accepts up to
16 phone number digits.
The next two sections describe how to store numbers in
memory and how to place calls from memory. Before
setting up your memory, we suggest you read the rest of
these sections to become familiar with the ways in which
you will access and use it.
NOTE Your phone is equipped with two One Touch
Dialing Keys, each of which capable of storing a phone
number. Refer to “One Touch Dialing Keys” on page 17 for
instructions on storing phone numbers for these special
keys.
Storing a Phone Number
1. Enter the phone number you wish to store (up to 16
digits).
2. Press STO .
1 ,
3. Enter a two-digit location number (e.g., 0
0
2 , etc.).
4. The location entered is displayed to confirm storage.
NOTE If FULL displays, refer to “Memory Protect
Feature” on page 13.
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Storing Numbers in Memory
Storing an Area Code and Prefix
(Postscripting)
1. Enter the area code and prefix you wish to store.
2. Press STO .
1 ,
3. Enter a two-digit location number (e.g., 0
0
2 , etc.).
4. The location entered is displayed to confirm storage.
NOTE If FULL displays, refer to “Memory Protect
Feature” on page 13.
Storing an area code and prefix for a frequently called
location (such as an office) offers a convenient means of
“postscripting” the four-digit extension of the party you
wish to call.
To place a call using postscripting, see “Recalling Area
Code and Prefix (Postscripting)” on page 17.
Memory Protect Feature
The directory has an automatic memory protect feature
which prevents the accidental overwriting and loss of
previously stored numbers in memory. If you attempt to
store an entry to a currently occupied memory location,
the location number and FULL will display. The display
will then alternate between the previously stored number
and ChAngE? .
If you wish to save to that location, thus overwriting and
erasing the old information, press STO .
If you wish to store the entry in an alternate location, press
END , STO and the alternate location number.
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Storing Numbers in Memory
Deleting a Memory Entry
1. Press and hold CLR , then press STO , and enter the
two-digit location number you wish to delete.
2. The phone will display FULL , flash the number in
memory, followed by ChAngE? .
3. Press STO to delete, or press END to exit without
deleting the entry.
Changing a Memory Entry
1. Press RCL and the two-digit location number so that
the number to be changed is displayed.
2. Repeatedly press CLR to “back out” each of the digits
displayed (all the digits, or just the ones you wish to
change).
3. Enter the new digits.
4. Press STO and the same two-digit location number.
5. The location number and FULL will display. The
display will then alternate between the currently
stored number and ChAngE? .
6. Press STO to save the newly entered number in this
memory location, overwriting the currently stored
number.
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Placing Calls From Memory
About Recalling from Memory
Phone numbers stored in memory can be recalled in any
of three ways:
• By entering a two-digit location number
• By scrolling using the Memory Location Numbers
• By pressing any of the One Touch Dialing Keys
(described in “One Touch Dialing Keys” on
page 17)
Using any of these methods, once a phone number is
displayed, you may place a call to that number by pressing
SND .
NOTE You may also scroll through the memory locations
while in a call (for instance, if you want to look up a phone
number to pass along to the other party). When finished,
press END . This will cancel scrolling, but will not end your
current call.
Placing Calls by Entering Two-Digit
Number
1. Press RCL .
2. Enter the desired two-digit location number. The
display shows the location number, then the last 10
digits of the stored phone number. Press RCL again to
view the complete number.
3. Press SND to place a call to the number stored at the
two-digit memory location.
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Placing Calls From Memory
Placing Calls by Scrolling
This method allows you to review your memory locations
by memory number, beginning with the location of your
choice. This is useful when searching for a specific number
in memory when you are not certain of its location.
1. Press RCL , then the two-digit memory location
number where you wish to begin your review. (For
example, to scroll from the beginning, press RCL ,
0 , 1 .)
2. The location number and digits stored will appear in
the display. An apostrophe (‘) following the location
number confirms that you have enabled memory
scrolling.
3. Press
to scroll forward thru the memory locations.
Press
to scroll backwards.
4. At any time while scrolling, you may press SND to
place a call to the displayed number.
NOTE Memory Scrolling may also be performed during a
call. Pressing END while scrolling during a call
extinguishes the apostrophe (‘) and cancels scrolling, but
does not terminate the call.
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Advanced Memory Dialing Features
Last Number Redial
Press SND to place a call to the last number entered.
This feature automatically remembers the last phone
number entered from the keypad or recalled from memory,
but not actually placed (by pressing SND ).
Recalling Last Number Called
1. Press RCL , 0 , 0 . The display will show the last
number called.
2. Press SND to place a call to this number.
Recalling Area Code and Prefix
(Postscripting)
1. Recall two-digit location number where an area code
and prefix is stored.
2. Add additional digits as needed.
3. Press SND .
You can append additional digits to recalled numbers by
entering them before pressing SND . This is particularly useful
if you often place calls to the same area code and prefix.
One Touch Dialing Keys
Your phone has special dialing keys which allow for easy
one touch access to numbers stored in these locations.
These keys function like Turbo Dial keys. When you press
and hold one of these keys, a call is placed to the number
stored in that location.
Placing a Call
Press and hold the desired One Touch Dialing Key
or
( CALL 1 or CALL 2 ) to place a call to
the number stored for that key.
NOTE The keypad cover must be open in order to use the
One Touch Dialing Keys.
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Advanced Memory Dialing Features
Storing a One Touch Dialing Number
1.
2.
3.
4.
Enter the phone number to be stored.
Press STO .
Press the specific One Touch Dialing Key.
The phone will confirm storage by displaying StorEd .
Displaying One Touch Dialing Numbers
Press RCL and the specific One Touch Dialing Key.
The display will show the number associated with the One
Touch Dialing Key,
Deleting One Touch Dialing Numbers
1. Press and hold CLR , then press STO and the specific
One Touch Dial Key.
2. Press STO again. The display will flash FULL , then
alternate between the number stored there and
ChAngE? .
3. Press STO to delete the number.
Turbo Dial Feature
Press and hold either of the Turbo Dial keys 2
through 9 for one second.
Once numbers have been stored in Memory Locations 02
through 09, calls can be placed from these numbers by
pressing and holding the associated key for approximately
one second. A call will be placed to the phone number
stored in that memory location, but the number will not be
displayed. There is no need to press SND .
NOTE Memory Location 01 is reserved for Emergency
Dialing (if the Emergency Dialing feature is enabled; refer
to “Selecting and Deselecting Features” on page 32).
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Advanced Memory Dialing Features
Priority Call
Press 1
and hold to automatically place a call to
the priority number stored in location 01.
When Priority Call is activated on your cellular phone
you can use this feature to call an important number you
have stored in memory location 1
even if the phone
is locked.
At any time if you dial 911 or an emergency number
previously stored by your cellular service provider, the
display will read "dialing Emrgcy." If the unit is
locked and you press and hold the 1
or enter an
emergency number, the phone will still display
"Locked" but will place the emergency call.
If you have stored an alternate non-emergency number
in memory location 01, such as your home phone number, and press and hold 1
the phone will display
"Priority Call."
Please keep in mind:
• Your emergency or priority number must be stored in
memory location 01 to be able to place a call when
the unit is locked. Be careful not to overwrite the number stored in this location.
• Some cellular systems have their own emergency
numbers and do not allow access to numbers such as
911. Check with your cellular service provider for
details about emergency calling in your area.
19
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Advanced Memory Dialing Features
Super Speed Dial Feature
1. Enter the memory location number.
2. Press SND . The number will not appear in the display.
All memory locations are equipped with the Super Speed
Dial feature. Once information is stored in these locations,
the Super Speed Dial feature allows you to place a call
without pressing RCL .
NOTE The sequence 0 , SND will place a call to the
local operator.
Scratch Pad Memory
The scratch pad permits entry of numbers from the keypad
during conversation.
If your party gives you another number to call, simply enter
this from the keypad. If you make an error, press CLR to
erase the last digit entered, or hold CLR to erase the entire
entry.
Advise your party that they will hear tones as you enter the
number. To call the scratch pad number at the end of an
ongoing conversation, press END , SND .
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Advanced Memory Dialing Features
Two-Part Tone Dialing
Your phone provides the standard Dual Tone MultiFrequency (DTMF) signals typically used to access
alternate long distance services, signal pagers, answering
machines, etc. Generally, these services use a two-part
procedure: First, a call is placed from memory or by using
the keypad to a central telephone number. Then, you either
receive a secondary dial tone, or are prompted to enter
additional digits, such as a pager number, calling card
number, etc.
To tone dial from the keypad, make the initial call, either
from memory or by using the keypad. When prompted,
enter additional tone digits using the keypad. The tones are
automatically sent as you press the keys. Do not press
SND .
To tone dial from memory, make the initial call, either
from memory or by using the keypad. When prompted,
recall from memory (using RCL , location number) the
number you wish to send as DTMF digits. Press RCL , SND .
Repeat these steps as required to send additional groups of
numbers.
Memory Linking
The Memory Linking feature provides improved
convenience when dialing constant number sequences,
such as when accessing paging systems, retrieving voice
mail, etc. It allows multiple number groups (e.g., main
number, bank PIN code, and account number) to be stored
in a single memory location, each group separated by a
pause (o ). Pauses are created by pressing FCN , SND . You
may then place a call using this memory location, and
sequentially transmit each number group (by pressing
RCL , SND ) at the appropriate system prompt.
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Advanced Memory Dialing Features
Example of Memory Linking
In the following example, a Memory Linked number is
created to access information for a bank account. The
number consists of the bank’s telephone number (1234567), a bank PIN code (888) and # sign, and an account
number (22) and # sign, as shown below.
NOTE A maximum of 16 digits can be stored in a
memory location. A pause counts as one digit. If your
Memory Linked number requires more than 16 digits, you
can store part of the number in one memory location (e.g.,
the main access number) and the remainder in another
memory location.
Bank's Phone Number
Pause
PIN
Account
Number
Pause
# Sign
# Sign
To construct the Memory Linked number, perform the
following steps.
Instruction and Key Sequence
Display
1 Enter the bank’s telephone number —
1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 ,
1234567
7
or recall it from memory location xx —
RCL , x, x
2 Create a pause —
FCN
,
1
234567 o
SND
3 Enter the bank PIN code and # sign —
345
8
8 , 8 ,
67o888C
4 Create another pause —
22
Black spot 45.0° 169.71 LPI
FCN
,
SND
456
7o888Co
MicroTAC_Book Page 23 Thursday, October 16, 1997 1:30 PM
Advanced Memory Dialing Features
Instruction and Key Sequence
Display
5 Enter the account number and # sign—
7o8
2 , 2 ,
88Co22c
6 To store the number, press STO and
the two-digit location number.
Now that the Memory Linked number has been created
and stored in memory, you may place the call as follows.
1. Press RCL , 2-digit location number, and SND . (Your
phone will send the bank’s phone number, and then
wait at the first pause.)
2. When the system answers and prompts you for your
bank PIN code, simply press RCL , SND to transmit
your bank PIN code and # sign.
3. When the system prompts you for your account
number, press RCL , SND again to transmit your
account number and # sign.
NOTE If the security PIN code feature is activated (see
“PIN Code Operation” on page 30), the security PIN code
will automatically be sent after the first pause by pressing
SND . Do not add your security PIN code to the linked
sequence.
NOTE If you have divided your Memory Linked number
into two memory locations (e.g., 03 and 04), place the
initial call by pressing RCL , 0 , 3 , SND . When the
system answers and prompts you, press RCL , 0 , 4 ,
RCL , SND to send the first number group (up to the pause).
Press RCL , SND to send each remaining number group
stored in location 04.
NOTE Some electronic systems require that DTMF tones
be sent for several seconds by pressing and holding a key.
These signals, known as Long Tone DTMF, cannot be
transmitted using Memory Linking. If Long Tone DTMF
signals are required, you must send them manually.
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Special Call Features
Display Own Phone Number
1. Press RCL ,
.
2. Your phone number will be displayed.
3. When you have finished viewing, press
CLR
.
Microphone Muting
To mute microphone
While in a call, press
FCN
,
6
.
To disable mute
Press FCN , 6 again.
This feature allows you to confer privately with others in
the car during a call. It will disable the microphone and
display M<UtE . The mute feature is canceled when you
end your call.
Automatic Answer
This feature allows you to answer calls without pressing
SND . When your phone receives a call, it will ring twice
and then the In Use indicator will illuminate to let you
know that the call has been automatically answered and is
live. Simply lift the phone to your ear and begin the
conversation. (The keypad cover must be open to receive a
call in Automatic Answer mode.)
To enable/disable the Automatic Answer feature, refer to
“Selecting and Deselecting Features” on page 32.
One Minute Beep
This feature allows your phone to emit an audible tone
(“beep”) ten seconds before the end of each minute during
calls.
To enable/disable the One Minute Beep feature, refer to
“Selecting and Deselecting Features” on page 32.
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Special Call Features
Multiple Key Answer
This feature allows the user to answer an incoming call by
pressing SND , either volume button, or any other digit key
after the first ring has been completed.
To enable/disable the Multiple Key Answer feature, refer to
“Selecting and Deselecting Features” on page 32.
Hands Free Operation
When using a vehicular accessory you can carry on
conversations in Hands Free mode. Hands Free mode
allows your cellular phone to operate like an office
speakerphone. A microphone picks up your voice, while
the called party’s voice is heard through an external
speaker. Your entire conversation can be carried on
without having to take your hands off the wheel. See the
DHFA instructions (supplied with DHFA option) for details.
Distinctive Ringer
This feature allows you to select from any of 9 ringer styles
to help you distinguish your phone’s ringer from those of
other phones. To select a ringer style:
1. Press FCN , 1 .
2. Scroll through the menu (using
or
) until
ringEr and StYLE 1-9 alternate in the display.
3. Press STO . A brief sample of the ringer style currently
selected will be heard, and the display will show
SELECt , then 1 -9 .
4. Press 1 thru 9 , or use
or
to scroll through
the ringer styles. A brief sample of the ringer style will be
heard as you make each selection, and the display will
show the number of the selected ringer style.
5. When you hear the ringer style you wish to select,
press STO . The display will display ringEr and
1-9 SEt .
6. Press END to exit the Feature Menu.
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Special Call Features
Multiple Language Display
This feature allows you to select in which language
(English, French, Spanish, and Portuguese) your phone
will display messages and prompts. To select a language:
1. Press FCN , 1 .
2. Scroll through the menu (using
or
) until
SELEct and LAnguAg alternate in the display.
3. Press STO . The language currently selected will be
displayed (for example, EngLiSh ).
4. Press
or
to scroll through the languages
(EngLiSh , ESPAnoL , FrAnc, Portug).
5. With the language you wish to select displayed, press
STO . SELEct and LAnguAg will alternate in the
display in the language you have selected.
6. Press END to exit the Feature Menu.
Extended Talk Time
The Extended Talk Time feature is useful when operating
your phone in strong signal areas (i.e., not in fringe areas
of cellular coverage). When enabled, this feature minimizes
the signaling communications between your phone and
the cellular system, thus substantially extending your
battery’s charge and providing you with extra talk time.
To enable/disable the Extended Talk Time feature, refer to
“Selecting and Deselecting Features” on page 32.
26
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Special System Features
About Special System Features
Some Cellular Service Providers offer enhanced features
for your cellular phone. Contact your Cellular Service
Provider to see if these features are available in your area,
and to receive any necessary support in using them (such
as assignment of a PIN code).
NOTE If these features are not supported by your Cellular
Service Provider, selecting them will have no effect.
Calling Line ID
Your MicroTAC phone features Calling Line ID, which
allows the phone number of the calling party to be
displayed in the handset (when receiving a call).
The Calling Line ID numbers are stored in the message
center (a special memory in your phone), which can store
up to 20 phone numbers.
NOTE You must subscribe with your Cellular Service
Provider for the Calling Line ID service.
Receiving Calls with Calling Line ID
When receiving a call that includes Calling Line ID
information, the phone number of the calling party will
appear in the display, letting you know who the calling
party is before you answer the call. Open the keypad cover
(or press SND if the keypad cover is already open) to
answer the call. (Note that if you should miss the call,
CALL will remain in the display.
NOTE Not all calls include the Calling Line ID
information. If you receive a call that does not include this
information, PriuAtE or no Id will be displayed.
Each time you receive a call that includes Calling Line ID
information, the information is stored as a message(s) in
the message center. Messages are stored with the most
recent message in location #1 and the oldest message in
the highest occupied location in the message center. When
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Special System Features
a new message is received and the message center is full,
the oldest message is deleted, the rest of the messages are
shifted down one location, and the new message is stored
in location #1.
Recalling/Viewing Calling Line ID Messages
1. Press RCL and release, then press RCL again and hold
until one of the folowing messages appears in the
display:
HH nEQW
(HH is the number of new messages)
OO nEQW
(when there are no new messages)
no M<ESgS (when there are no old or new messages)
2. Scroll through the messages in the message center by
pressing
to move forward and
to move
backward.
3. Press END to exit the message center.
As you scroll through the messages, each Calling Line ID
message will be labeled with either HH nEQW (new
message) or HH Cid (old message), where HH is the
message center location number. As you view each
message, the display will cycle through the Calling Line ID
information (as shown in the following example) until you
scroll to the next message or place a call to the displayed
number.
Example
18475551212
Placing a Call to a Calling Line ID Number
After recalling the desired Calling Line ID number (the
number appearing in the display), press SND to place a
call to this number.
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Special System Features
Storing a Calling Line ID Number in Memory
With a Calling Line ID message displayed, press STO
and select a memory location (as described in “Storing
a Phone Number” on page 12). The Calling Line ID
number will be stored in the selected location.
Deleting an Individual Message
1. While in the message center, scroll through the
messages using
and
until the message you
wish to delete is displayed.
2. Press and hold CLR until dELEtEd appears in the
display.
After deleting a message, the message center will be
automatically renumbered. For example, if message #5 is
deleted, messages #6 through #20 will be moved up one to
become #5 through #19.
Deleting All Messages
1. While in the message center, press and hold CLR until
ErASE and ALL? alternate in the display. (The display
will briefly show dELEtEd before ErASE and ALL?
appear.)
2. Release CLR , then press CLR again to confirm erasing
all of the messages. M<SgS ErASEd will appear in
the display.
Other Messaging Services
In addition to the Calling Line ID feature, some cellular systems
allow other types of messages to be sent to your cellular phone.
One such service is Voice Mail Notification. This service
provides a notification message to the your cellular phone each
time a new message is recorded in the Voice Mail system.
Voice mail notification messages are stored in the same
message center that stores your Calling Line ID numbers.
Contact your Cellular Service Provider for more
information and availability of these messaging services.
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Special System Features
VOX Operation
Voice Operated Transmission (VOX) is a method of
conserving battery power by activating the phone’s
transmitter only while talking. In this manner, your
battery’s charge can be extended.
To enable/disable the VOX feature, refer to “Selecting and
Deselecting Features” on page 32.
Reminder Beeps
If your phone has Calling Line ID or Voice Mail Notification
services, the Reminder Beeps feature is an audible notification
to alert the user that they have received a message. It will beep
every 2 minutes until the new messages have been read.
To enable/disable the Reminder Beeps feature, refer to
“Selecting and Deselecting Features” on page 32.
PIN Code Operation
Overview
Your Cellular Service Provider may require a Personal
Identification Number (PIN) when placing outbound calls.
This PIN assures the cellular system that the person placing
the call is an authorized user.
If PIN operation is required in your system, you must
enable PIN Code operation as described in “Selecting and
Deselecting Features” on page 32.
Placing a Call using PIN Operation
1. Enter the number you wish to call, or recall the
number from memory.
2. Press SND .
3. Wait for the system prompt (usually a “Beep Beep”).
4. Enter your PIN Code number (provided by your
Cellular Service Provider).
5. Press SND .
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Special System Features
NOTE Your phone is designed with a “shortcut” method
for dialing the PIN Code number. Simply store your PIN
Code number (supplied by your Cellular Service Provider)
in memory location 07 (as described in “Storing a Phone
Number” on page 12). Then, you may simply press SND
after hearing the system prompt (for example, some
systems use a double tone) when placing calls; your phone
will automatically send the PIN Code number stored in
memory location 07. Using this shortcut method, you will
not have to enter your PIN Code number each time you
place a call.
A maximum of 7 digits are allowed. (Remember – Do not
store any other number in memory location 07 once you
have stored your PIN number.)
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Using the Feature Menu
About the Feature Menu
The Feature Menu allows you to review and select/deselect
most of your phone’s features through the keypad and
display. The table below shows all features available
through the menu and the pages where detailed
information is found.
Note that telephones ship from the factory with default
settings whereby most features are in the canceled (or OFF)
position.
NOTE There are additional features that may be available
with your phone that are not accessed through the feature
menu. These features are described throughout this
manual.
Selecting and Deselecting Features
1. Press FCN , 1 to enter the Feature Menu.
2. Scroll the menu by pressing
or
until the
desired feature is displayed.
3. Press CLR to turn the feature off, press STO to turn
the feature on.
4. Press END to exit the Feature Menu.
EXAMPLE To activate Automatic Answer, press FCN , 1
and scroll using
or
until Auto and AnSrOFF
alternate in the display.
Press STO to activate this feature. The display will then
alternate between Auto and AnSr_On .
Press END to exit the menu.
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Using the Feature Menu
Alternate in
Display
(as shipped from
factory)
Feature
Page
One Minute Beep
Phone emits a tone ten
seconds before the end of
each minute during a call.
24
indiu and
tM<rOFF
Automatic Display Timer
Displays the accumulated time
in minutes and seconds during
and after a call.
38
ringEr and
StYLE 1-9
Distinctive Ringer
Allows you to select from 9
ringer styles to distinguish
your phone’s ringer from other
phones.
25
Auto and
AnSrOFF
Automatic Answer
Automatic answer allows
phone to answer calls
automatically, without pressing
SND .
24
M< kEY and
AnSrOFF
Multiple Key Answer
Allows you to answer an
incoming call by pressing any
key (keypad cover must be
open).
25
Auto and
LockOFF
Auto Lock
Locks phone each time phone
is turned off.
40
OnEM<in and
tM<rOFF
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Using the Feature Menu
Alternate in
Display
(as shipped from
factory)
Page
Pr
iority and
and
EM<rgCY
Call
CALL On
On
Priority Call
When enabled, you may use
1 to place a one button
call to a Priority number
stored in Memory Location 01,
even when the phone is
locked.
19
vox
and OFF
uoH and
OFF
VOX mode
Conserves battery power by
causing phone to transmit only
while talking.
30
EHtEnd and
Extend
and
tALk On
On
talk
34
Feature
Extended Talk Time
26
remind
and
rEM<ind and
msg
M<Sg On
On
Reminder Beeps
When enabled, audible beeps
alert user that one or more
messages have been
received (available in some
models).
30
SELEct and
select
and
languag
LAnguAg
Language Select
Allows you to select English,
French, Spanish or
Portuguese text for prompts
appearing in the display.
26
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Using the Feature Menu
Alternate in
Display
(as shipped from
factory)
Pin and
inActiu
Feature
Page
PIN Code Operation
When used in a Cellular
System supporting this
feature, requires a Personal
Identification Number to be
dialed when placing outbound
calls (to provide additional
system security).
30
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Using the Feature Menu
Status Review
1. Press FCN , 0 , 9 , RCL .
2. Scroll thru the messages by pressing
or
to
view the features that you have changed from the
factory default settings.
3. Press END to exit the feature status review.
Feature status review allows you to scroll thru the list of
features that you have changed from the factory default
settings (shown in previous table). If no features have been
changed from the factory settings, Std will be displayed.
Alternate in
Display
(if changed from factory
Description
defaults)
Pin and ActiuE
rEM<ind and
M<SgOFF
OnEM<in and
tM<r On
Auto and Lock On
Pri ori ty and
EM<rgCY
CALLOFF
uoH and On
EHtEnd and
tALk On
Auto and AnSr On
M< kEY and
AnSr On
indiu and
tM<r On
ringEr and
StYLE1-9
36
PIN Code operation is enabled
Reminder Beeps is disabled
One Minute Beep is enabled
Auto Lock is enabled
Emergency Dialing is disabled
VOX mode is enabled
Extended Talk Time is enabled
Automatic Answer is enabled
Multiple Key Answer enabled
Automatic Display Timer is enabled
Distinctive Ringer is available
MicroTAC_Book Page 37 Thursday, October 16, 1997 1:30 PM
Call Timers
About Timers
Call timers provide a useful means of monitoring the air-time
spent in conversation. Your phone is equipped with three
timers, resettable, individual, and cumulative. These timers
operate in the background and can be displayed at any time.
Each timer begins counting as a cellular channel is
assigned, or when the phone rings to signal an incoming
call. If an incoming call is not answered, the timers revert
to their previous values.
Individual Call Timer
To Display
Press RCL ,
,
This timer accumulates the air-time of a call in minutes and
seconds. It automatically resets before a new call is placed
and when the phone is turned off.
Resettable Call Timer
To Display
Press RCL ,
display.
,
,
. rESEtbL alternates in
To Reset
Press FCN , 0 , 7 , CLR
This timer accumulates the air-time of all calls in minutes
from the point at which it is reset. This resettable timer is
generally used to track monthly air-time usage and is set in
conjunction with the monthly billing cycle.
Cumulative Call Timer
To Display
Press RCL ,
,
,
,
. CUM<UL alternates
in display.
This non-resettable timer accumulates the phone’s total airtime in minutes, starting with the initial factory setting.
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Call Timers
Automatic Display Timer
This feature allows your phone to display (in minutes and
seconds) the accumulated time during and after each call.
To enable/disable the Automatic Display Timer feature,
refer to “Selecting and Deselecting Features” on page 32.
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Security Features
About Security Codes
Your phone offers several forms of security features against
unauthorized use. Activating these features requires either
your three-digit unlock code, or the six-digit security code.
The factory programmed unlock code is 123 and the
factory programmed security code is 000000.
NOTE It is common for the unlock code to be the last 3
digits of your phone number when it is programmed by
your Service Provider.
Electronic Lock
To Lock
1. Press FCN , and hold 5 .
2. Loc ? will display.
3. Press STO to lock your phone, or press END to exit
without locking your phone.
4. Loc d will display and the green indicator will light
steadily.
NOTE You must press and hold 5 until Loc d
appears in the display. This is a safety feature to prevent
you from accidentally locking your phone.
To Unlock
Enter your three-digit unlock code. If you make an
error, press CLR and start again.
The electronic lock prevents use of the phone by disabling
both incoming and outgoing calls.
If a call is received while your phone is locked, the phone
will ring and you must enter the unlock code before the
call can be answered.
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Security Features
Displaying the Unlock Code
1. Press FCN , 0 .
2. Enter your six-digit security code.
3. Press RCL . The phone will display LocCodE and your
three-digit unlock code.
Changing the Unlock Code
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press FCN , 0 .
Enter your six-digit security code.
Enter the new desired three-digit unlock code.
Press STO . ChAngEd to and the new unlock code
will display to confirm storage.
Automatic Lock
This feature automatically locks your phone each time you
turn your phone off. When locked, your phone still rings
while receiving an incoming call, but you cannot answer
the call until you have entered the unlock code.
To enable/disable the Automatic Lock feature, refer to
“Selecting and Deselecting Features” on page 32.
Setting Outgoing Call Restrictions
1. Press FCN , 0 .
2. Enter your six-digit security code.
3. Enter the number of the service level (1 or 4) you wish
to use.
4. Press STO . The phone will display SEruicE LEuEL
and the number selected.
Your phone can be set to restrict call placement (as when
lending the phone to another person). Using the six-digit
security code, you may select one of the following two
levels of restriction.
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Security Features
Description
No restrictions. (Standard setting)
Display
LEuEL 4
Phone will place calls only from memory locations 1 thru
1 - 1
0 , SND ). If
10 ( RCL , 0
LEuEL 1
locations 1-10 are cleared, no outgoing calls can be
made. No keypad dialing. No directory storage. No Turbo
Dial or Super Speed Dial features.
To change the phone to unrestricted operation, use the
procedure above and enter service level 4.
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Cellular System Information
Cellular System Overview
There are generally two types of cellular systems serving
any metropolitan area. One of these will most likely be
operated by the telephone company that provides
telephone service to your community, generally referred to
as a wireline carrier. The other cellular service provider is a
radio common carrier, referred to as a non-wireline carrier.
Your Cellular Service Operator will provide information
concerning specific features, procedures, and coverage in
your particular area.
Service Area
The area within which the phone operates is defined by
your cellular service provider. Since this is a radio system,
no exact boundaries (as on a map) can be drawn. The red
NS (No Service) flashes if you are beyond range of a
service area. There may be locations within your area, such
as tunnels and underground parking facilities, where the
unit may act as if it were beyond range.
Weak Signal Alert
If you are called in a location the system determines is
inadequate for high quality service, you may hear series of
beeps to inform you of the call attempt. The caller will
receive the recorded “Not In Service” message. CALL will
appear in the display, and the green on indicator will flash
quickly. If this occurs, you must press CLR before the
phone will operate. Most systems do not impose air-time
charges for such call attempts.
NOTE This indicator is controlled through the initial
programming of your phone. Refer to the Programming
Guide for more details.
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Cellular System Information
Switchhook and Advanced System
Services
Press SND .
During a call, pressing SND performs a switchhook
function used to access enhanced Cellular System features
such as call waiting and conference calls. For the
functioning of these features with SND , consult your
Cellular Service Provider.
Roaming
The term “Roaming” applies to the use of cellular
telephones within systems other than those designated as
their “Home” systems. RM (Roam) lights whenever the
phone comes within range of a visited system. As your
phone begins to roam, it seeks service according to the
conditions you have selected (see “Reviewing / Changing
Scanning Mode” on page 45).
Contact your system operator, or that of the visited system,
for information on dialing and billing procedures.
To use alternate long distance services when roaming, be
certain to dial the appropriate area code and local number
to access the alternate carrier in the visited area. Then use
the tone dialing sequence described on page 21. If you
selected Two-System Operation (see “Two-System
Operation” on page 44), enter RCL ,
to verify the
currently active number. This is especially important if your
two home systems have different area codes, or if RM is
flashing within your home service area.
Note that when you roam, the visited system may require
that you enter your security PIN code. Refer to “PIN Code
Operation” on page 30 for details on using PIN operation.
If you have a problem, contact the local system operator or
your home system operator for further information.
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Cellular System Information
Two-System Operation
Your cellular telephone is equipped with a feature that
allows you to maintain two telephone numbers from two
different system operators. Both are designated as your
‘home system’ but are accessed separately. At the time
your phone was programmed, you elected whether to
enable this feature and which two systems would be
treated as your home systems.
While you may switch from one system to the other, only
one of the two can be active at any given time. Calls are
placed and received through the active system only.
To switch from one system to the other:
1. Press RCL ,
, STO .
2. The display will blank to confirm the switch and the
newly activated number will appear.
3. When you have finished viewing, press CLR .
If you have two phone numbers programmed into your
phone, each time the phone is turned on, it displays a
message indicating which home system type and phone
number is currently active. Possible messages are as
follows:
System Type and Phone Number
Display
Non-wireline (A type) with phone number 1
A1
Non-wireline (A type) with phone number 2
A2
Wireline (B type) with phone number 1
b1
Wireline (B type) with phone number 2
b2
If a call is placed to the inactive phone number, the caller
will receive the “Not in Service” message.
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Programming Scanning Modes
Overview
The characteristics that determine the way your phone
operates in the Cellular System are determined by the
Scanning Mode programmed for your phone.
Reviewing / Changing Scanning Mode
Typically, the scanning mode for your phone is
programmed by your Service Provider. However, you may
review the current scanning mode and (if desired) change
it by following these procedures.
To Review Scanning Mode
1. Press RCL ,
. The display will show the current
active system choice.
2. Press END to exit without changing selections.
To Change Scanning Modes
1. Press RCL ,
. The display will show the current
active system choice.
2. Repeatedly press
or
to cycle through the
scanning modes.
3. When the desired scan setting appears in the display,
press STO .
4. Press END to exit to normal operation.
NOTE Constant flashing of RM, or a steadily lit NS while
within your home service area may indicate an
unintentional choice has been made. If this occurs, review
the System Type to see if the unit is operating in Standard
Mode, or if an alternate selection has been made.
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Programming Scanning Modes
Scanning Modes
The following table lists the scanning modes available for
your phone.
Scanning Mode
Standard Mode
Your phone first seeks a home type system,
then a non-home type.
If home system is non-wireline (type A)
If home system is wireline (type B)
Invert Preference Mode
Your phone first seeks a non-home type
system.
(Select this mode if in a fringe area of your
home system or in certain roaming
situations.)
If home system is non-wireline (type A)
Flashing RM = call on B system
Flashing IU= call on home system
If home system is wireline (type B)
Flashing RM = call on A system
Flashing IU= call on home system
Home Only Mode
Phone will not operate outside its home
system.
Scan A Mode
Phone will operate only within nonwireline (A) systems.
Scan B Mode
Phone will operate only within wireline
(B) systems.
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Black spot 45.0° 169.71 LPI
Display
Std Ab
Std bA
SCAn bA
SCAn Ab
HOM<E
SCAn A
SCAn b
MicroTAC_Book Page 47 Thursday, October 16, 1997 1:30 PM
Programming Scanning Modes
Scanning Mode
Display
Preferred SID Mode
Phone will scan for home or programmed
preferred SIDs first. This choice requires
entry of up to 60 System ID numbers for
those systems in which you wish to
operate. Contact your Cellular Service
Provider for SID information.
P SCAn
If you have selected two system operation, the phone seeks
cellular service according to the system type mode
selected for each phone number.
NOTE In order to program Preferred SIDs to be used in
P SCAn mode, press 7 , 9 , 7 , 4 , 3 (spells
SYSID), then press FCN , FCN and enter the appropriate
5-digit SID number (from your Cellular Service Provider),
then press STO . Now press
or
to cycle through
the system type choices (HOM<E , rOAM< , or inhibit ).
With the desired system type displayed, press STO to
select that choice. To program another Preferred SID, press
and repeat the above process, or press END to exit
Preferred SIDs programming.
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Troubleshooting
Before Calling For Service
Is the phone locked?
See Electronic Lock, page 39.
Is NS (No Service) lit?
See “Start-up Status Indicators” on page 5.
Have you charged the battery?
Refer to “Prepare the Battery for Initial Use” on page 1 for
charging instructions.
Have you programmed a unique operating mode?
Constant flashing of RM while in your home service area
may indicate that an incompatible System Type has been
selected. Refer to “Reviewing / Changing Scanning Mode”
on page 45.
Is the phone operating with non-standard
settings?
You may have inadvertently selected improper operating
characteristics. See Feature Menu, page 32.
Have you selected the wrong home system?
If your phone is programmed for Two-System Operation
(see page 44), press RCL ,
to display the active
telephone number.
Are new MicroTAC accessories not working
with older MicroTAC phones?
Because of increased charging capabilities designed into
your new MicroTAC
phone, some accessories that plug
into the data connector will not fit older versions of
MicroTAC phones.
NOTE Older versions of MicroTAC charging accessories
that plug into the data connector may not charge new
MicroTAC
phones.
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Troubleshooting
Notes...
49
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Reference
Regulations and Precautions
The U.S. Federal Communications Commission and the
Canadian Department of Communications regulate
cellular radiotelephone service in their respective
countries. It is important for you, the MicroTAC phone
user, to observe the applicable regulations when operating
your phone in either country. In addition to these U. S. and
Canadian federal regulations, you may also be bound by
certain state, provincial, territorial, and local rules and
regulations, as well as by your cellular carrier’s tariff (the
rates, terms, and conditions of its service). If you wish to
use your phone in both the U.S. and Canada, please
consult with your system operator.
Furthermore, you should remember that your MicroTAC
phone is a radiotelephone system (i.e., it combines both
wireline technology, as used in your home or office
telephone system, and radio technology), and that the
scope of regulations and precautions is therefore broader
than the scope of regulations and precautions relating to
wireline-only telephone usage.
Some of the major points of consideration are set out
below. Please note, however, that this “Rules, Regulations,
and Precautions” section does not constitute legal advice,
and is intended merely for general information purposes. If
you have any specific questions, please contact your
Cellular Carrier (System Operator).
License - If your home system is in the U.S., you do not
require a separate license to operate your MicroTAC
phone; obtaining a cellular telephone access number is
sufficient to register you as a user. If your home system is in
Canada, a separate license is required. Your carrier will
assist you in the licensing process. If you wish to use your
MicroTAC phone in both the U.S. and Canada, please
contact your Cellular Carrier (System Operator). Your base
should operate in only one location.
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Reference
Denial of Service - A cellular carrier may deny service
temporarily or terminate service for violation of any
governmental regulations or of its tariff.
Driving - Your MicroTAC phone is considered a cellular
telephone. Some jurisdictions prohibit your using a
cellular telephone while driving a vehicle. Even if your
jurisdiction does not have such a law, we strongly suggest
that, for safety reasons, the driver use extreme caution
when operating the MicroTAC phone while the vehicle is
in motion (see “Driving” on page vii).
Consumer Responsibilities - Remember that the wireline
and radio regulations with respect to harassing calls, false
distress calls, obscene language, etc., apply to cellular
phone usage.
Privacy - As a telephone user, you have come to assume a
certain standard of privacy when you place or receive a
telephone call via traditional wireline systems. However,
because MicroTAC phones utilize radio transmissions to
effect calls, the same standard cannot always be assured.
While it is unlawful for any unauthorized person to divulge or
use any information obtained from intercepting or ‘listening
in on’ conversations intended for others, you should not
assume that your conversation is completely secure.
Commercially available scanning equipment can permit a
third party to monitor the radio channels used for MicroTAC
phone calls.
Interference - No person shall interfere with or cause
interference to any radio communication or signal.
Equipment Modifications - The U.S. Federal
Communications Commission has type-approved the
model of MicroTAC phone which you have purchased, and
both have allocated a specific frequency range for cellular
service. No changes or adjustments are to be made to your
MicroTAC phone.
51
Black spot 45.0° 169.71 LPI
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Message Glossary
A1
System “A” phone number 1
A2
Auto AnSrOFF
System “A” phone number 2
Automatic Answer feature
disabled
Auto AnSr On
Automatic Answer feature
enabled
Auto LockOFF
Automatic Lock feature disabled
Auto Lock On
Automatic Lock feature enabled
b1
System “B” phone number 1
b2
System “B” phone number 2
b
Battery Meter
CUMUL
Precedes Cumulative Timer
display (also used to display
key)
ChAngE?
Memory Protect is activated to
prevent accidental overwriting of
a memory location
Cid
Calling Line ID number answered
(p/o Messaging Services)
dELEtEd
Message in message stack
deleted (p/o Messaging Services)
EMrgCY
Emergency Dialing in Progress
EngLiSh
English message prompts
selected
ErASE ALL
All messages in message stack
deleted (p/o Messaging Services)
ESPAnoL
Spanish message prompts
selected
FrAnc
French message prompts selected
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FULL
All memory locations are full or
requested block is unavailable
HOME
System Type Selection — Home
Mode
nuALid LocAtn Memory location chosen for
storage of phone number is
invalid
LEUEL 1
Call Restriction selected
LEUEL 4
No Restrictions (standard setting)
Lo bAt
Low Battery
LocCodE
3-digit Unlock Code is displayed
Loc d
Unit is locked
M kEY AnSrOFF Multiple Key Answer is disabled
M kEY AnSr On
Multiple Key Answer is enabled
MSgS ErASEd
All messages in Message Center
erased
MUtE
Microphone muted
nEW
New message(s) received (p/o
Messaging Services)
Pin ActiuE
PIN Code feature enabled
Pin inActiu
PIN Code feature disabled
Pr
ior
ity CALLOn Priority Call enabled
Portug
Portuguese message prompts
selected
P SCAn
System Type Selection —
Preferred SID Mode
rESEtbL
Precedes Resettable Call Timer
Display
rEdiAL
Automatic Redial
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rEMind MSgOFF Reminder Beeps feature disabled
rEMind MSg On Reminder Beeps feature enabled
ringEr StYLE
Select from 9 ringer styles
SCAn A
System Type Selection (scan nonwireline “A” only)
SCAn Ab
System Type Selection (scan “A”
type first, then “B”)
SCAn b
System Type Selection (scan
wireline “B” only)
SCAn bA
System Type Selection (System
Type Selection (scan “B” type
first, then “A”)
SELECt
Ringer style chosen
SELEct LAnguAg Select language chosen
SEt
Ringer style choice confirmed
Snd to rEdiAL
Indicates Cellular System is busy
and unable to place call
Std
Standard setting
Std Ab
System Type Selection (nonwireline standard mode)
Std bA
System Type Selection (wireline
standard mode)
totAL
Number of messages in message
stack (p/o Messaging Services)
V
Volume Meter
uOH OFF
VOX Mode feature disabled
uOH On
VOX Mode feature enabled
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Reference
Index
A
About Special System Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Advanced System Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Antenna Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi
Antenna, extending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Automatic Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Automatic Display Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Automatic Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Automatic Redialing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
B
Battery Voltage Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
C
Call Attempts, unsuccessful . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Call, ending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Call, placing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Call, receiving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Calling Line ID Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Cellular Operation Safety Information . . . . . . . . vi
Changing the Unlock Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Cumulative Call Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
D
Deleting All Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Deleting an Individual Message . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Deselecting Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Display own phone number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Displaying the Unlock Code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Distinctive Ringer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
E
Earpiece . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x
Earpiece Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Electronic Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Ending a Call. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
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Reference
F
Feature Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Function Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
H
Hands Free Operation.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Headset Jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
I
Illuminated Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Individual Call Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
K
Keypad Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
L
Last Number Recall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Last Number Redial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Low Battery Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
M
Memory Entry, changing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Memory Entry, deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Memory Linking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Messages, recalling/viewing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Messaging Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Microphone Muting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Mouthpiece . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Multiple Key Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Multiple Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
N
Number Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x
Numeric Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
O
One Minute Beep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
One Touch Dialing Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
One Touch Memory Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
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P
Patent Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Placing a Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Placing Call to Calling Line ID Number . . . . . . 28
Postscripting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Priority Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
R
Recalling from Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Receiving a Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Receiving Calls with Calling Line ID. . . . . . . . . 27
Reminder Beeps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Resettable Call Timer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Retractable Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x
Review Scanning Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Review System Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Ringer Volume. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Roaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
S
Scratch Pad Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Scrolling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Security Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Selecting Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Service Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Setting Outgoing Call Restrictions. . . . . . . . . . . 40
Signal Strength Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Start-up Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Start-up Self Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Start-up Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Status Indicators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x
Status Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Storing Calling Line ID Number in Memory . . . 29
Storing Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Super Speed Dial Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Switchhook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
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T
Troubleshooting . . . . . .
Turbo Dial Feature . . . .
Two-Part Tone Dialing .
Two-System Operation .
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48
18
21
44
V
Volume Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
VOX Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
W
Weak Signal Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
58
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The U.S. Food and Drug Administrationís Center for
Devices and Radiological Health Consumer
Update on Mobile Phones
FDA has been receiving inquiries about the safety of mobile
phones, including cellular phones and PCS phones. The following summarizes what is known--and what remains unknown-about whether these products can pose a hazard to health, and
what can be done to minimize any potential risk. This information may be used to respond to questions.
Why the concern?
Mobile phones emit low levels of radiofrequency
energy (i.e., radiofrequency radiation) in the microwave range
while being used. They also emit very low levels of radiofrequency energy (RF), considered non-significant, when in the
stand-by mode. It is well known that high levels of RF can produce biological damage through heating effects (this is how your
microwave oven is able to cook food). However, it is not known
whether, to what extent, or through what mechanism, lower
levels of RF might cause adverse health effects as well. Although
some research has been done to address these questions, no
clear picture of the biological effects of this type of radiation has
emerged to date. Thus, the available science does not allow us
to conclude that mobile phones are absolutely safe, or that they
are unsafe. However, the available scientific evidence does not
demonstrate any adverse health effects associated with the use
of mobile phones.
What kinds of phones are in question?
Questions have been raised about hand-held mobile phones, the
kind that have a built-in antenna that is positioned close to the
user's head during normal telephone conversation. These types
of mobile phones are of concern because of the short distance
between the phone's antenna--the primary source of the RF--and
the person's head. The exposure to RF from mobile phones in
which the antenna is located at greater distances from the user
(on the outside of a car, for example) is drastically lower than
that from hand-held phones, because a person's RF exposure
decreases rapidly with distance from the source. The safety of
so-called "cordless phones," which have a base unit connected
to the telephone wiring in a house and which operate at far
lower power levels and frequencies, has not been questioned.
How much evidence is there that hand-held mobile phones
might be harmful?
Briefly, there is not enough evidence to know for sure, either
way; however, research efforts are on-going. The existing scientific evidence is conflicting and many of the studies that
have been done to date have suffered from flaws in their
research methods. Animal experiments investigating the effects
of RF exposures characteristic of mobile phones have yielded
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conflicting results. A few animal studies, however, have suggested that low levels of RF could accelerate the development
of cancer in laboratory animals. In one study, mice genetically
altered to be predisposed to developing one type of cancer
developed more than twice as many such cancers when they
were exposed to RF energy compared to controls. There is
much uncertainty among scientists about whether results
obtained from animal studies apply to the use of mobile
phones. First, it is uncertain how to apply the results obtained
in rats and mice to humans. Second, many of the studies that
showed increased tumor development used animals that had
already been treated with cancer-causing chemicals, and other
studies exposed the animals to the RF virtually continuously-up to 22 hours per day.
For the past five years in the United States, the mobile phone
industry has supported research into the safety of mobile
phones. This research has resulted in two findings in particular
that merit additional study:
1. In a hospital-based, case-control study, researchers looked
for an association between mobile phone use and either
glioma (a type of brain cancer) or acoustic neuroma (a
benign tumor of the nerve sheath). No statistically significant
association was found between mobile phone use and
acoustic neuroma. There was also no association between
mobile phone use and gliomas when all types of types of
gliomas were considered together. It should be noted that
the average length of mobile phone exposure in this study
was less than three years.
When 20 types of glioma were considered separately, however,
an association was found between mobile phone use and one
rare type of glioma, neuroepithelliomatous tumors. It is possible with multiple comparisons of the same sample that this
association occurred by chance. Moreover, the risk did not
increase with how often the mobile phone was used, or the
length of the calls. In fact, the risk actually decreased with
cumulative hours of mobile phone use. Most cancer causing
agents increase risk with increased exposure. An ongoing study
of brain cancers by the National Cancer Institute is expected to
bear on the accuracy and repeatability of these results.
2. Researchers conducted a large battery of laboratory tests to
assess the effects of exposure to mobile phone RF on genetic
material. These included tests for several kinds of abnormalities, including mutations, chromosomal aberrations, DNA
strand breaks, and structural changes in the genetic material
of blood cells called lymphocytes. None of the tests showed
any effect of the RF except for the micronucleus assay,
which detects structural effects on the genetic material. The
cells in this assay showed changes after exposure to simulated cell phone radiation, but only after 24 hours of exposure.
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It is possible that exposing the test cells to radiation for this
long resulted in heating. Since this assay is known to be sensitive to heating, heat alone could have caused the abnormalities to occur. The data already in the literature on the
response of the micronucleus assay to RF are conflicting.
Thus, follow-up research is necessary.
FDA is currently working with government, industry, and academic groups to ensure the proper follow-up to these industryfunded research findings. Collaboration with the Cellular
Telecommunications Industry Association (CTIA) in particular is
expected to lead to FDA providing research recommendations
and scientific oversight of new CTIA-funded research based on
such recommendations.
Two other studies of interest have been reported recently in the
literature:
1. Two groups of 18 people were exposed to simulated mobile
phone signals under laboratory conditions while they performed cognitive function tests. There were no changes in
the subjects' ability to recall words, numbers, or pictures, or
in their spatial memory, but they were able to make choices
more quickly in one visual test when they were exposed to
simulated mobile phone signals. This was the only change
noted among more than 20 variables compared.
2. In a study of 209 brain tumor cases and 425 matched controls, there was no increased risk of brain tumors associated
with mobile phone use. When tumors did exist in certain
locations, however, they were more likely to be on the side
of the head where the mobile phone was used. Because this
occurred in only a small number of cases, the increased
likelihood was too small to be statistically significant.
In summary, we do not have enough information at this point
to assure the public that there are, or are not, any low incident
health problems associated with use of mobile phones. FDA
continues to work with all parties, including other federal
agencies and industry, to assure that research is undertaken to
provide the necessary answers to the outstanding questions
about the safety of mobile phones.
What is known about cases of human cancer that have been
reported in users of hand-held mobile phones?
Some people who have used mobile phones have been diagnosed with brain cancer. But it is important to understand that
this type of cancer also occurs among people who have not
used mobile phones. In fact, brain cancer occurs in the U.S.
population at a rate of about 6 new cases per 100,000 people
each year. At that rate, assuming 80 million users of mobile
phones (a number increasing at a rate of about 1 million per
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month), about 4800 cases of brain cancer would be expected
each year among those 80 million people, whether or not they
used their phones. Thus it is not possible to tell whether any
individual's cancer arose because of the phone, or whether it
would have happened anyway. A key question is whether the
risk of getting a particular form of cancer is greater among
people who use mobile phones than among the rest of the
population. One way to answer that question is to compare the
usage of mobile phones among people with brain cancer with
the use of mobile phones among appropriately matched people without brain cancer. This is called a case-control study.
The current case-control study of brain cancers by the National
Cancer Institute, as well as the follow-up research to be sponsored by industry, will begin to generate this type of information.
What is FDA's role concerning the safety of mobile phones?
Under the law, FDA does not review the safety of radiationemitting consumer products such as mobile phones before
marketing, as it does with new drugs or medical devices.
However, the agency has authority to take action if mobile
phones are shown to emit radiation at a level that is hazardous
to the user. In such a case, FDA could require the manufacturers of mobile phones to notify users of the health hazard and
to repair, replace or recall the phones so that the hazard no
longer exists.
Although the existing scientific data do not justify FDA regulatory actions at this time, FDA has urged the mobile phone
industry to take a number of steps to assure public safety. The
agency has recommended that the industry:
• support needed research into possible biological effects of RF
of the type emitted by mobile phones;
• design mobile phones in a way that minimizes any RF exposure to the user that is not necessary for device function; and
• cooperate in providing mobile phone users with the best
possible information on what is known about possible effects
of mobile phone use on human health.
At the same time, FDA belongs to an interagency working
group of the federal agencies that have responsibility for different aspects of mobile phone safety to ensure a coordinated
effort at the federal level. These agencies are:
• National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
• Environmental Protection Agency
• Federal Communications Commission
• Occupational Health and Safety Administration
• National Telecommunications and Information
Administration
The National Institutes of Health also participates in this group.
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In the absence of conclusive information about any possible
risk, what can concerned individuals do?
If there is a risk from these products--and at this point we do
not know that there is--it is probably very small. But if people
are concerned about avoiding even potential risks, there are
simple steps they can take to do so. For example, time is a key
factor in how much exposure a person receives. Those persons
who spend long periods of time on their hand-held mobile
phones could consider holding lengthy conversations on conventional phones and reserving the hand-held models for
shorter conversations or for situations when other types of
phones are not available.
People who must conduct extended conversations in their cars
every day could switch to a type of mobile phone that places
more distance between their bodies and the source of the RF,
since the exposure level drops off dramatically with distance.
For example, they could switch to
• a mobile phone in which the antenna is located outside the
vehicle,
• a hand-held phone with a built-in antenna connected to a
different antenna mounted on the outside of the car or built
into a separate package, or
• a headset with a remote antenna to a mobile phone carried
at the waist.
Again, the scientific data do not demonstrate that mobile
phones are harmful. But if people are concerned about the
radiofrequency energy from these products, taking the simple
precautions outlined above can reduce any possible risk.
Where can I find additional information?
For additional information, see the following websites:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) RF Safety
Program (select "Information on Human Exposure to RF Fields
from Cellular and PCS Radio Transmitters"):
http://www.fcc.gov/oet/rfsafety
World Health Organization (WHO) International Commission
on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (select Qs & As):
http://www.who.int/emf
United Kingdom, National Radiological Protection Board:
http://www.nrpb.org.uk
Cellular Telecommunications Industry Association (CTIA):
http://www.wow-com.com
U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Devices
and Radiological Health: http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/consumer/
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Patent Information
This phone may be manufactured under one or more of the
following U.S. Patents.
4291475
4302845
4312074
4365221
4369516
4369520
4369522
4374370
4378603
4390963
4398265
4400584
4400585
4434461
4455534
4486624
4491972
4523155
4546329
4574243
4581602
4581749
4585957
4593155
4594657
4602218
4605987
4616314
4617520
4628529
4629829
4633141
4636593
4636741
4648125
4649543
4654655
4680787
4704588
4711361
4715063
4717884
4730195
4731813
4736277
4737976
4741018
4742562
4761621
4764737
4775998
4791527
5630213
5630215
5631538
5633484
5633786
5634202
5640690
5642368
5646576
5649306
64
5649309
5656914
5656917
5657418
5659601
5660945
5661433
5664973
5666429
5668871
5670912
5673001
5673003
5673287
5674326
5675591
5675702
5678201
5678221
5678227
5680063
5684384
5691947
5692046
5692101
5696497
5696821
5699070
5699389
5699408
5701130
5701244
5701589
5703470
5703539
5703909
5706019
5706313
5708445
5710862
5710987
5711001
4794489
4797929
4797947
4798975
4802236
4803726
4809356
4811377
4811404
4817157
4827507
4829543
4831647
4843621
4845772
4851966
4852090
4860336
4860341
4868576
4870686
4872196
4873683
4876552
4876656
4876740
4879533
4885553
4887050
4890199
4896124
4896361
4897873
4903326
4903327
4904549
4904992
4905288
4905301
4912602
4916262
4918431
4918732
4922178
4941203
4942570
4945570
4956854
4959851
4963812
4964121
4970475
5715520
5715524
5717307
5722052
5724004
5726983
5729221
5732350
5737327
5737685
5738954
5739792
5740525
5742894
5745116
5745566
5745848
5747970
5748727
5754141
5754455
5754583
5754645
5754956
5758271
5760714
5761300
5761610
5764100
5764111
5764730
5764743
5766794
5771182
5771471
5777521
5777856
5784368
5784419
5784585
5787128
5787577
5793315
5793866
5796822
5797101
5798716
5799011
5799256
5801513
5801567
5802111
4972355
4972432
4972455
4975808
4977589
4977616
4979207
4984219
4984290
4989230
4992753
4996529
5008925
5010309
5010570
5014294
5014346
5017856
5018188
5020076
5020091
5020092
5020093
5023580
5023866
5023911
5025387
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9046K01-QUARK pgs 3/29/0 3:18 PM Page 28
Reference
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PAT02250
65
MicroTAC_Book Page 69 Thursday, October 16, 1997 1:30 PM
Quick Reference Card
Turn On and Off
Turn On / Turn Off
PWR
Placing / Receiving Calls
Place Call
Enter number, SND
Hold
Clear Entry
CLR to clear all digits. Press and release
CLR to clear one digit.
At system busy signal,
attempt.
Automatic Redial
Receive Call
SND before ending call
SND , or open keypad cover.
End Call
END , or close keypad cover.
Locking / Unlocking
FCN ,
Lock Telephone
(hold
5
5
until Loc? appears, then
press STO )
Enter three-digit unlock code.
If you make an error, END and enter again.
Unlock Telephone
Memory Dialing
Store Number
Phone number, STO , two digit location number.
Recall Number
Press RCL , then two digit location number.
Emergency Dialing
Store emergency number in location 01. Hold
to dial, even on locked unit.
Recall Last Number Called
RCL ,
0
,
1
0
Call Timers
Individual Call Timer
Resettable Call Timer
RCL ,
,
RCL ,
,
To reset FCN ,
Cumulative Call Timer
RCL ,
,
,
,
0
, CLR
7
,
,
Volume Adjustments
Adjust Volume
Earpiece — press VOL to raise. Release and press
VOL again to lower.
Ringer — FCN and use VOL as described above.
Additional Features
Battery Voltage Meter
Display Own Phone Number
Mute
Access Feature Menu
Black spot 45.0° 169.71 LPI
FCN ,
4
RCL ,
While in a call, FCN ,
6 .
FCN ,
1
6
. To unmute, FCN ,
MicroTAC_Book Page 70 Thursday, October 16, 1997 1:30 PM
SM
RB
RBR
C
RC
Ni-Cd
THIS PACKAGE MAY CONTAIN A NICKEL CADMIUM BATTERY
WHICH MUST BE RECYCLED OR DISPOSED OF PROPERLY.
• Refer to the battery label for battery type.
• Recycling facilities may not be available in all areas.
• For additional information regarding disposal or recycling,
call 1-800-331-6456 (in U.S.A.).
Pan American Cellular Subscriber Group
600 North U.S. Highway 45
Libertyville, Illinois 60048
1-800-331-6456 (in U.S.A.)
1-800-461-4575 (in Canada)
Please visit us at:
www.mot.com
,
, E•P, Turbo Dial, Super Speed Dial,
,
Ultra Saver, IntelliCharge, THE Cellular Connection, and
Performance Matched are registered trademarks of
Motorola, Inc.
 1997 Motorola, Inc.
Printed in U.S.A.
Black spot 45.0° 169.71 LPI
98R89046K01
3/00-SGS