book.book Page 1 Tuesday, September 27, 2011 3:13 PM
Dell PowerVault MD3600i and
MD3620i Storage Arrays
Owner’s Manual
Regulatory Model: E03J Series and E04J Series
Regulatory Type: E03J001 and E04J001
book.book Page 2 Tuesday, September 27, 2011 3:13 PM
Notes, Cautions, and Warnings
NOTE: A NOTE indicates important information that helps you make better use of
your computer.
CAUTION: A CAUTION indicates potential damage to hardware or loss of data if
instructions are not followed.
WARNING: A WARNING indicates a potential for property damage, personal
injury, or death.
____________________
Information in this publication is subject to change without notice.
© 2010–2011 Dell Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction of these materials in any manner whatsoever without the written permission of Dell Inc.
is strictly forbidden.
Trademarks used in this text: Dell™, the DELL logo, PowerEdge™, PowerVault™, and
OpenManage™ are trademarks of Dell Inc. Intel® is a registered trademarks of Intel Corporation in
the U.S. and other countries. Microsoft®, Windows®, Windows Server®, MS-DOS®, and Internet
Explorer® are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States
and/or other countries. Red Hat® and Red Hat Enterprise Linux® are registered trademarks of Red
Hat, Inc. in the United States and other countries. SUSE® is a registered trademark of Novell, Inc. in
the United States and other countries.
Other trademarks and trade names may be used in this publication to refer to either the entities claiming
the marks and names or their products. Dell Inc. disclaims any proprietary interest in trademarks and
trade names other than its own.
Regulatory Model: E03J Series and E04J Series
Regulatory Type: E03J001 and E04J001
2011 - 09
Rev. A01
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Contents
1
Introduction .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About This Document
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inside the Box of the Dell PowerVault MD3600i
Series Storage Array. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
. . . .
19
. . . . . . . . . .
20
Dell PowerVault Modular Disk
Storage Manager . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
20
Dell PowerVault Modular Disk
Configuration Utility . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
20
. . . . . . . . . . . .
21
MD3600i Series Storage Array .
Other Information You May Need
2
19
Planning: About Your Storage Array .
Overview .
. . .
23
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
Hardware Features
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Front-Panel Features and Indicators
. . . . . . .
24
Back-Panel Features and Indicators .
. . . . . . .
27
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
28
Hard-Drive Indicator Patterns .
Power Supply and Cooling Fan Features
Power Indicator Codes and Features
. . . . . . . .
29
. . . . . . . . . .
30
Contents
3
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3
Planning: RAID Controller Modules .
RAID Controller Modules
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Controller Module Connectors
and Features . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
34
. . . . . . . . .
34
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
Cache Functions and Features .
Write-Back Cache
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Write-Through Cache .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Planning: MD3600i Series Storage
Array Terms and Concepts . . . . . .
. . . . .
Physical Disks, Virtual Disks, and Disk Groups .
Physical Disks .
36
37
37
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
Self-Monitoring Analysis and
Reporting Technology . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
39
Virtual Disks and Disk Groups
. . . . . . . . . . .
39
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
Virtual Disk States
RAID Levels.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
RAID Level Usage .
Segment Size .
Virtual Disk Operations
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Consistency Check
43
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
44
Virtual Disk Initialization
Contents
35
. . . .
Physical Disk States
4
32
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Password Reset
4
31
34
Storage Array Thermal Shutdown
Cache Mirroring.
31
. . . .
RAID Controller Module—Additional Features .
Battery Backup Unit
. . .
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Media Verification
Cycle Time
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
44
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
44
Virtual Disk Operations Limit
Disk Group Operations.
. . . . . . . . . . . .
45
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
45
RAID Level Migration .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Segment Size Migration
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Virtual Disk Capacity Expansion
Disk Group Expansion
45
46
. . . . . . . . . .
46
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
46
Disk Group Defragmentation .
Disk Group Operations Limit
. . . . . . . . . . .
47
. . . . . . . . . . . .
47
RAID Background Operations Priority
. . . . . . . . .
47
. . . . . . .
48
Disk Migration
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
48
Disk Roaming .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50
Virtual Disk Migration and Disk Roaming.
Host Server-to-Virtual Disk Mapping .
Host Types
. . . . . . .
50
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
Advanced Features
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Snapshot Virtual Disks
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Snapshot Repository Virtual Disk.
Virtual Disk Copy
52
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
52
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Snapshot and Disk Copy Together .
53
. . . . .
54
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
54
Preferred and Alternate Controllers
and Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
54
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
55
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56
Virtual Disk Ownership
Load Balancing
51
. . . . . . . . .
Virtual Disk Recovery .
Multi-Path Software .
51
Monitoring MD3600i Series System
Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
Contents
57
5
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5
Configuration: Overview
User Interface
. . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
62
Array Management Window
. . . . . . . . . . . .
63
Configuration: About Your
Storage Array . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
67
Out-of-Band and In-Band Management .
Storage Arrays
. . . . . . . .
67
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
68
Adding Storage Arrays
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up Your Storage Array
Locating Storage Arrays
Setting a Password .
70
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
72
. . . . . . .
72
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
Viewing Storage Array Connections
. . . . . . . .
75
. . . . . . . . . .
75
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
76
Adding/Editing a Comment to an
Existing Storage Array . . . . .
Removing Storage Arrays .
Enabling Premium Features .
Displaying Failover Alert
. . . . . . . . . . . .
76
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
77
Changing the Cache Settings on
the Storage Array . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
77
Changing Expansion Enclosure
ID Numbers . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
78
Changing the Enclosure Order in the
Physical Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
78
Configuring Alert Notifications
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
79
Configuring E-mail Alerts .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
79
Configuring SNMP Alerts .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
82
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
83
Battery Settings
Contents
68
. . . . . . . . . . .
Naming or Renaming Storage Arrays .
6
61
. . . . . . . . .
Enterprise Management Window
6
61
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Setting the Storage Array RAID Controller
Module Clocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
Configuration: Using iSCSI
. . . .
84
. . . . . . . . . . .
87
Changing the iSCSI Target Authentication
. . . . . . .
. . . . .
88
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
88
Entering Mutual Authentication Permissions .
Creating CHAP Secrets
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
89
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
89
Initiator CHAP Secret .
Target CHAP Secret
Valid Characters for CHAP Secrets
Changing the iSCSI Target Identification
. . . . . . . .
89
. . . . . . . .
90
. . . . .
90
. . . . . . . . . . . .
91
Changing the iSCSI Target Discovery Settings
Configuring the iSCSI Host Ports
Advanced iSCSI Host Ports Settings
. . . . . . . . . .
93
Viewing or Ending an iSCSI Session
. . . . . . . . . .
94
Viewing iSCSI Statistics and Setting
Baseline Statistics . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
95
. . . . . . . .
96
. . . . . . . . .
97
Edit, Remove, or Rename Host Topology
8
87
Configuration: Event Monitor
Enabling or Disabling the Event Monitor
. . . . . . . .
98
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
98
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
98
Windows
Linux
Contents
7
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9
Configuration: About Your Host .
. . . . . .
Configuring Host Access.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Mappings Tab .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
100
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
101
Defining a Host
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
102
Managing Host Groups.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
103
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving a Host to a Different
Host Group . . . . . . . . .
Host Topology .
103
. . . . . . . . . . .
104
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
105
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
105
Removing a Host Group .
Starting or Stopping the Host
Context Agent . . . . . . . . .
I/O Data Path Protection .
. . . . . . . . . .
106
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
107
Managing Host Port Identifiers
. . . . . . . . . . . .
10 Configuration: Disk Groups
and Virtual Disks . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
Creating Disk Groups and Virtual Disks .
Creating Disk Groups
108
111
. . . . . . .
111
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
112
Locating a Disk Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
114
Creating Virtual Disks .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
114
Changing the Virtual Disk
Modification Priority . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Virtual Disk Cache Settings
Changing the I/O Type.
116
. . . .
117
. . . . . . . . .
119
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
120
Changing the Segment Size of a
Virtual Disk . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents
99
Removing Host Access.
Creating a Host Group
8
99
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Choosing an Appropriate Physical Disk Type .
Physical Disk Security with Self
Encrypting Disk . . . . . . . . .
. . . . .
121
. . . . . . . . . . . .
121
Creating a Security Key.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
124
Changing a Security Key
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
126
Saving a Security Key
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
128
Validate Security Key .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
129
Unlocking Secure Physical Disks.
Erasing Secure Physical Disks .
. . . . . . . . .
129
. . . . . . . . . .
130
. . . . . . . . .
130
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
132
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
132
Configuring Hot Spare Physical Disks
Hot Spares and Rebuild.
Global Hot Spares
Hot Spare Operation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hot Spare Drive Protection .
Enclosure Loss Protection .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
133
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
134
Host-to-Virtual Disk Mapping .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Host-to-Virtual Disk Mappings
. . . . . .
Modifying and Removing Host-to-Virtual
Disk Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Controller Ownership of the
Virtual Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the RAID Controller Module
Ownership of a Disk Group . . . . . . .
135
136
. . . . .
137
. . . . . .
138
Removing Host-to-Virtual Disk Mapping .
. . . . .
139
. . . . . .
139
Changing the RAID Level of a Disk Group
. . . . .
Removing a Host-to-Virtual Disk Mapping
Using Linux DMMP . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restricted Mappings.
133
141
. . . .
141
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
143
Changing the RAID Controller Module
Ownership of a Virtual Disk or a Disk Group .
Changing the RAID Level of a Disk Group .
. . .
144
. . . . . . .
146
Contents
9
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Storage Partitioning
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
148
Disk Group Expansion .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
148
Virtual Disk Expansion
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
149
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
149
Disk Group and Virtual Disk Expansion .
Using Free Capacity.
Using Unconfigured Capacity .
Disk Group Migration
. . . . . . . . . .
149
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
150
Export Disk Group .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting a Disk Group
Import Disk Group
151
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
151
Importing a Disk Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
151
Storage Array Media Scan .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
152
Suspending the Media Scan
. . . . . . . . .
153
. . . . . . . . . . .
154
11 Configuration: Premium Feature—
Snapshot Virtual Disks . . . . . . . . .
Scheduling a Snapshot Virtual Disk .
. . . .
155
. . . . . . . . .
157
Common Reasons for Scheduling a
Snapshot Virtual Disk . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
157
Guidelines for Creating Snapshot
Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
158
Enabling and Disabling Snapshot
Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
158
Creating a Snapshot Virtual Disk Using
the Simple Path . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Simple Path
. . . . . . .
159
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
159
Preparing Host Servers to Create the
Snapshot Using the Simple Path . . .
Contents
150
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Media Scan Settings .
10
147
. . . . . .
160
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Creating a Snapshot Virtual Disk Using
the Advanced Path . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Advanced Path
. . . . . . . .
162
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
162
Preparing Host Servers to Create the
Snapshot Using the Advanced Path .
Creating the Snapshot Using the Advanced Path
.
166
. . . . . . .
167
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
169
Specifying Snapshot Virtual Disk Names .
Snapshot Repository Capacity.
Disabling a Snapshot Virtual Disk.
172
. . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing Host Servers to Re-Create a
Snapshot Virtual Disk . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . .
172
. . . . . . . . . .
173
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
174
Re-creating Snapshot Virtual Disks .
Snapshot Rollback .
164
. . . . . . .
Rules and Guidelines for Performing a
Snapshot Rollback . . . . . . . . . . .
Protecting Against a Failed
Snapshot Rollback . . . . .
. . . . . .
174
. . . . . . . . . . . .
176
Previous Versions of the MD
Storage Manager . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
176
Starting a Snapshot Rollback .
. . . . . . . . . . .
176
Resuming a Snapshot Rollback
. . . . . . . . . .
177
Canceling a Snapshot Rollback
. . . . . . . . . .
177
12 Configuration: Premium Feature—
Virtual Disk Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of Virtual Disk Copies .
. . . .
179
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
180
Offline Copy .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
180
Online Copy .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
181
Creating a Virtual Disk Copy for an MSCS
Shared Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
Contents
182
11
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Virtual Disk Read/Write Permissions
. . . . . . . . .
182
. . . . . . . . . . . .
183
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
184
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
184
Virtual Disk Copy Restrictions .
Creating a Virtual Disk Copy .
Before you Begin
Virtual Disk Copy and
Modification Operations
Create Copy Wizard .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
185
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
185
Failed Virtual Disk Copy .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . .
186
. . . . . . . . . . . .
186
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
186
Preferred RAID Controller Module Ownership
Failed RAID Controller Module
Copy Manager
Copying the Virtual Disk .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storage Array Performance During
Virtual Disk Copy . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Copy Priority .
188
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
188
Recopying a Virtual Disk .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
189
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
190
Preparing Host Servers to Recopy a
Virtual Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
190
. . . . . . . . . . .
191
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
192
Re-copying the Virtual Disk .
Removing Copy Pairs.
Contents
186
. . . . . . . . . .
Stopping a Virtual Disk Copy
12
185
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13 Configuration: Premium Feature—
Upgrading to
High-Performance-Tier . . . . . . . . .
14 Configuration: Device Mapper
Multipath for Linux . . . . . . . . .
Overview .
. . . .
193
. . . . . . .
195
195
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
196
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
196
Using DM Multipathing Devices
Prerequisites
Device Mapper Configuration Steps .
. . . . .
202
. . . . . . . . . . .
203
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
204
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
205
Important Information About
Special Partitions . . . . . . .
Limitations and Known Issues.
Troubleshooting
197
. . . . . . .
Linux Host Server Reboot Best Practices
15 Management: Firmware Downloads
Downloading RAID Controller and
NVSRAM Packages . . . . . . . .
. . .
207
. . . . . . . . . . .
207
Downloading Both RAID Controller and
NVSRAM Firmware . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
208
Downloading Only NVSRAM Firmware .
. . . . . . . .
211
. . . . . . . . .
213
Downloading Physical Disk Firmware
Downloading MD1200 Series Expansion
Module EMM Firmware . . . . . . . . .
Self-Monitoring Analysis and
Reporting Technology (SMART) .
. . . . . . . .
215
. . . . . . . . . . . .
216
Contents
13
book.book Page 14 Tuesday, September 27, 2011 3:13 PM
Media Errors and Unreadable Sectors
. . . . . . . .
216
. . . . . . . . . . . .
219
Recommended Tools .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
219
Front Bezel (Optional)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
220
16 Management: Installing
Array Components . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
220
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
220
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
221
Removing the Front Bezel .
Installing the Front Bezel
Hard Drives .
Removing a Hard-Drive Blank
. . . . . . . . . .
221
Installing a Hard-Drive Blank .
. . . . . . . . . .
222
Removing a Hard Drive
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
222
Installing a Hard Drive
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
224
Removing a Hard Drive From a
Hard-Drive Carrier . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
225
. . . . . . . . . . .
227
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
227
Installing a Hard Drive Into a
Hard-Drive Carrier . . . . .
RAID Controller Module
Removing a RAID Controller
Module Blank . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
227
Installing a RAID Controller
Module Blank . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
228
Removing a RAID Controller Module .
Installing a RAID Controller Module
. . . . . .
229
. . . . . . .
230
Opening the RAID Controller Module .
Closing the RAID Controller Module
. . . . . .
230
. . . . . . .
231
RAID Controller Module Backup Battery Unit .
. . . .
232
. . . . .
232
. . . . . .
233
Removing the RAID Controller Module
Backup Battery Unit . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the RAID Controller Module
Backup Battery Unit . . . . . . . . .
14
Contents
book.book Page 15 Tuesday, September 27, 2011 3:13 PM
Power Supply/Cooling Fan Module .
Removing a Power Supply/Cooling
Fan Module . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
234
. . . . . . . . .
236
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
237
Installing a Power Supply/Cooling
Fan Module . . . . . . . . . . . .
Control Panel.
234
. . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Control Panel
. . . . . . . . . . . .
237
Installing the Control Panel .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
238
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
239
Backplane
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
239
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
242
Removing the Backplane .
Installing the Backplane
17 Management: Firmware Inventory
Viewing the Firmware Inventory
243
. . . . .
245
245
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Virtual Disk Service .
245
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Volume Shadow-Copy Service .
245
. . . . . . . . . .
19 Troubleshooting: Your Storage
Array Software . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start-Up Routine .
243
. . . . . . . . . . . .
18 Management: System Interfaces
Microsoft Services.
. . . .
. . . . . . .
247
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Device Health Conditions
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storage Array Support Data .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatically Collect the Support Bundle Data
. . . .
Contents
247
247
251
251
15
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Retrieving Trace Buffers .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
254
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
255
Collecting Physical Disk Data .
Event Log .
Recovery Guru
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storage Array Profile.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
256
256
Viewing the Logical Associations .
. . . . . . . . . .
258
Viewing the Physical Associations
. . . . . . . . . .
258
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
259
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
260
Finding Nodes
Using Go To .
Recovering From an Unresponsive Storage
Array Condition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Locating a Physical Disk .
. . . . .
261
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
264
. . . . . . . . . .
265
. . . . . . . . . . .
266
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
267
Locating an Expansion Enclosure .
Capturing the State Information .
SMrepassist Utility .
Unidentified Devices .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering From an Unidentified
Storage Array. . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
Starting or Restarting the Host Context
Agent Software. . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
252
268
268
. . . . . . . .
271
20 Troubleshooting: Your Array
. . . . . . . . .
273
Safety First—For you and Your Array
. . . . . . . . .
273
Contents
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Troubleshooting Storage Array Startup Failure .
. . . .
273
. . . . . . . .
273
. . . . . . . . .
273
Troubleshooting Loss of Communication
Troubleshooting External Connections
Troubleshooting Power Supply/Cooling
Fan Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Array Cooling Problems .
Troubleshooting Expansion Enclosure
Management Modules . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
275
. . . . . . . . .
275
. . . . . . .
276
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
278
Troubleshooting RAID Controller Modules
Troubleshooting Hard Drives
274
. . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Array and Expansion
Enclosure Connections . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . .
279
Troubleshooting a Wet Storage Array .
. . . . . . . . .
279
. . . . . . . . . . .
280
Troubleshooting a Damaged Array
. . . . . . .
281
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
281
Troubleshooting RAID Controller Modules
Conditions.
Invalid Storage Array .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
281
ECC Errors
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
281
PCI Errors .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
282
Critical Conditions
21 Getting Help .
282
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contacting Dell
282
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Noncritical Conditions
283
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents
283
17
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Index
18
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents
285
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1
Introduction
NOTE: Unless specified, MD3600i Series represents Dell PowerVault MD3600i and
Dell PowerVault MD3620i storage arrays.
WARNING: See the Safety, Environmental, and Regulatory Information document
for important safety information before following any procedures listed in this
document.
About This Document
This document familiarizes you with the functions of the Dell PowerVault
MD3600i Series storage array. The document is organized according to the
tasks that you must complete after receiving your MD3600i Series storage
array. The tasks are:
Planning—Provides information about the storage array and its features.
Configuration—Provides information on tasks you must complete to ensure
that your storage array performs optimally.
Management—Provides information on tasks that you must complete to
ensure the storage array components are up to date and performing properly,
including removal and installation of storage array components.
Troubleshooting—Provides information on tasks you must complete to
resolve problems that may occur with the storage array.
For more information on these and other topics, see Dell PowerVault
MD3600i and MD3620i Storage Array Deployment Guide at
support.dell.com/manuals.
Inside the Box of the Dell PowerVault MD3600i
Series Storage Array
Your MD3600i Series product package includes:
•
MD3600i Series storage array
•
Power cables
•
Front bezel (optional)
Introduction
19
book.book Page 20 Tuesday, September 27, 2011 3:13 PM
•
Mounting rails (2) (optional)
•
MD3600i Series resource media
•
Rack Installation Instructions
•
Getting Started With Your System (provides information on enclosure
features, the procedure to set up your enclosure, and technical
specifications)
MD3600i Series Storage Array
The MD3600i Series is a 2U rack-mounted external redundant array of
independent disks (RAID) storage array capable of accommodating up to
twelve 3.5" or twenty four 2.5" 6.0-Gbps Serial-Attached SCSI (SAS) disks.
The MD3600i Series storage arrays can be daisy-chained with MD1200 Series
expansion enclosures, providing access to a maximum of 120 disks (or 192
disks with Premium Feature activation) in the entire storage system.
Connectivity between the storage array and the host server is provided by a
standard CAT6 or higher Ethernet connection.
Dell PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
Dell PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager (MDSM) is a graphical user
interface (GUI) application, used to configure and manage one or more
MD3600i Series storage arrays. The MDSM software is available on the
MD3600i Series resource media.
Dell PowerVault Modular Disk Configuration Utility
Dell PowerVault Modular Disk Configuration Utility (MDCU) is an iSCSI
Configuration Wizard that can be used in conjunction with MDSM to
simplify the configuration of iSCSI connections. The MDCU software is
available on the MD3600i Series resource media.
20
Introduction
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Other Information You May Need
WARNING: See the safety and regulatory information that shipped with your
system. Warranty information may be included within this document or as a
separate document.
NOTE: All the documents, unless specified otherwise, are available at
support.dell.com/manuals.
•
The Getting Started Guide provides an overview of setting up and cabling
your storage array.
•
The Deployment Guide provides installation and configuration instructions
for both software and hardware.
•
The Storage Manager CLI Guide provides information about using the
command line interface (CLI).
•
The Resource media contains all system management tools.
•
The Systems Support Matrix provides information on supported software
and hardware for MD systems.
•
The Dell PowerEdge Cluster Documentation is available at
support.dell.com/manuals.
•
Release Notes or readme files are included to provide last-minute updates
to the enclosure or documentation or advanced technical reference
material intended for experienced users or technicians.
•
Dell PowerVault MD 1200 Series Installation Guide provides information
for users who incorporate MD1200 expansion enclosures.
•
The Rack Installation Instructions included with your rack solution
describes how to install your enclosure into a rack.
NOTE: Always check for updates on support.dell.com/manuals and read the
updates first because they often supersede information in other documents.
Introduction
21
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22
Introduction
book.book Page 23 Tuesday, September 27, 2011 3:13 PM
2
Planning: About Your Storage Array
Overview
The Dell PowerVault MD3600i Series storage array is designed for high
availability, offering redundant access to data storage. It supports single and
dual RAID controller configuration.
The MD3600i Series storage array provides 1 GBase-T or 10 GBase-T
connectivity to the host server and enables access to 64 physical hosts.
The MD3600i Series storage array includes:
•
RAID controller module(s)
•
PSU/Fan modules
•
Disk drives (also called physical disk drives in this document)
•
A front bezel (optional)
•
A system enclosure, into which, the other components are plugged
Planning: About Your Storage Array
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Hardware Features
Front-Panel Features and Indicators
Figure 2-1. Front-Panel Features and Indicators—Dell PowerVault MD3600i
1
2
3
4
5
6
Figure 2-2. Front-Panel Features and Indicators—Dell PowerVault MD3620i
1
2
3
4
5
6
24
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Figure 2-3. Front-Bezel Features and Indicators
1
2
3
Item Indicator, Button, or
Connector
1
Enclosure status LED
Icon
Description
The enclosure status LED lights when the
enclosure power is on.
Lights blue during normal operation.
Blinks blue when a host server is identifying the
enclosure or when the system identification
button is pressed.
Lights amber as enclosure boots or is reset.
Blinks amber when the enclosure is either in a
fault state or the hosts are not using the preferred
path to a virtual disk.
2
Power LED
The power LED lights green when at least one
power supply is supplying power to
the enclosure.
Planning: About Your Storage Array
25
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Item Indicator, Button, or
Connector
Icon
Description
3
Split mode LED
This LED must be unlit as the split mode
function is not supported by the MD3600i Series
storage arrays.
4
System identification
button
The system identification button on the front
control panel can be used to locate a particular
enclosure within a rack. When the button is
pushed, the system status indicators on the
control panel and the RAID controller module(s)
blink blue until the button is pushed again.
5
Hard drives
MD3600i—Up to twelve 3.5" SAS hot-swappable
hard drives.
MD3620i—Up to twenty four 2.5" SAS hotswappable hard drives.
6
Enclosure mode
switch
The function of this switch is not applicable to
your storage array. However, if MD1200 Series
expansion enclosures are daisy chained to the
storage array, the enclosure mode switches of the
MD1200 Series expansion enclosures must be set
to the Unified-Mode position.
NOTE: This switch must be set before turning on
the MD1200 series expansion enclosure. Changing
the switch setting after the expansion enclosure is
turned on has no effect on the enclosure
configuration until the expansion enclosure goes
through a complete power cycle.
26
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Back-Panel Features and Indicators
Figure 2-4. Back-Panel Features and Indicators—Dell PowerVault MD3600i Series
Storage Array
1
3
2
4
1
600 W power supply/cooling fan
module
2
RAID Controller Module 0
3
RAID Controller Module 1
4
600 W power supply/cooling fan
module
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Hard-Drive Indicator Patterns
Figure 2-5. Hard Drive Indicators
1
28
1
hard-drive activity indicator (green)
2
2
Planning: About Your Storage Array
hard-drive status indicator (green
and amber)
book.book Page 29 Tuesday, September 27, 2011 3:13 PM
Hard-Drive Status Indicator Pattern
Condition
Off
The physical disk:
• is not yet discovered by the host server
• is spun down for removal
• is not supported for the RAID controller
module or is not in the physical disk slot
NOTE: The drive status indicator remains
off until all hard drives are initialized after
system power is turned on. Drives are not
ready for insertion or removal during this
time.
Steady green
Physical disk is online
Green flashing (On 250 ms, Off 250 ms) Physical disk is being identified
Green flashing (On 400 ms, Off 100 ms) Physical disk rebuilding
Amber flashing (On 150 ms, Off 150 ms) Physical disk failed
Flashing green, amber, and Off (green On Physical disk failure predicted (SMART)
500 ms, amber on 500 ms, Off 1000 ms)
Flashing green, amber, and Off (green 3 s, Physical disk rebuild aborted
amber 3 s, and Off 3 s)
Power Supply and Cooling Fan Features
The MD3600i Series storage array includes two integrated, hot-swappable
power supply/cooling fan modules. Both modules must be installed to ensure
proper cooling. The system requires at least one of the cooling fans to
function to avoid overheating.
A power supply/cooling fan module can be replaced without powering down
the system. For information on removing and installing the modules, see
"Power Supply/Cooling Fan Module" on page 234.
CAUTION: A power supply/cooling fan module can be removed from a poweredon system for a maximum period of 5 minutes. Beyond that time, the system
automatically shuts down to prevent damage.
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Power Indicator Codes and Features
Figure 2-6. Power Indicator Codes and Features
1
2
3
4
5
Item LED Type
1
DC power
Icon Description
The LED lights green when the DC output
voltage is within the limit.
If this LED is off, it indicates that the DC output
voltage is not within the limit.
2
Power supply/cooling
fan fault
The LED lights amber when the DC output
voltage is not within the limit or a fault with the
fan is detected.
If this LED is off, it indicates that no fault
condition is present.
3
AC power
The LED lights green when the AC input voltage
is within the limit.
If this LED is off, it indicates either there is no
power or the AC input voltage is not within the
limit.
4
Power connector
Connect the external power supply to this
connector.
5
Power switches (2)
The power switch controls the power supply
output to the enclosure.
30
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3
Planning: RAID Controller Modules
RAID Controller Modules
The RAID controller modules provide high-performance, advanced virtual
disk configuration, and fault-tolerant disk subsystem management. Each
RAID controller module contains 2 GB of cache that is mirrored with the
other controller's cache for high availability and is protected by a batterypowered cache offload mechanism.
RAID controller modules provide the following data path and enclosure
management functions:
•
Monitoring and controlling enclosure environment elements
(temperature, fans, power supplies, and enclosure LEDs)
•
Controlling access to the physical disks
•
Communicating enclosure attributes and states to the host server and
management station
Each RAID controller module has multiple iSCSI IN-ports for host access.
The ports provide redundant host connections and support a high availability
storage environment. Various configurations can be utilized, in both single
controller (simplex) and dual controller (duplex) modes, to connect the
storage enclosure to hosts depending on specific redundancy needs.
For information on cabling, see the MD3600i and MD3620i Series Storage
Array’s Deployment Guide at support.dell.com/manuals.
Planning: RAID Controller Modules
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RAID Controller Module Connectors and Features
Figure 3-1. MD3600i Series iSCSI RAID Controller Module
1
6
3
2
7
8
9
10 11 12 13 14
4
15
16
5
17
Item
Component
Function
1
SAS OUT port
Provides SAS connection for cabling to an expansion
enclosure.
2
iSCSI IN port 0
Provides host-to-controller iSCSI 1/10 Gbps Ethernet
connection.
3
iSCSI IN port 1
Provides host-to-controller iSCSI 1/10 Gbps Ethernet
connection.
4
Management port
Ethernet connector
Provides a 100/1000 Mbps Ethernet connection for
out-of-band management of the enclosure.
5
Debug port
Dell support only.
6
SAS OUT port
link/fault LED
Lights green when all four links are connected.
Lights amber when one to 3 links are disconnected.
Off when all links in the port are disconnected or
cable is disconnected.
7
iSCSI IN port link
LED
Lights green when Ethernet connection at 10Gbps is
established.
Lights amber when Ethernet connection at 1Gbps is
established.
Off when there is no link.
32
Planning: RAID Controller Modules
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Item
Component
Function
8
Controller power LED Lights green when controller is turned on.
Off when controller is not turned on.
9
Controller fault LED
Lights amber when controller fault detected.
Off when controller operating normally.
10
iSCSI IN port activity Lights green when there is no activity on connection.
LED
Blinks green when there is activity on connection.
Off when link is down.
11
System identification
LED
Blinks blue when system identification switch pushbutton on enclosure front panel is pressed.
12
Cache active or cache Lights green when On-board controller memory
offload LED
contains data.
If AC power fails, this LED changes to indicate Cache
Offload status. If the password reset function has
successfully changed the password, this LED flashes
on and off briefly.
13
Battery fault
Lights amber when battery backup unit or battery has
failed.
Off when battery backup unit is operating normally.
14
Password reset switch
Activating this switch deletes the password.
15
MAC address label
Provides MAC addresses of iSCSI host ports and the
management port.
16
Management port
speed LED
Lights green when Ethernet connection is operating at
1000 Mbps.
Lights amber when Ethernet connection is operating
at 100 Mbps.
Off when Ethernet connection is operating at 10
Mbps or is not active.
17
Management port
activity LED
Lights green when Ethernet connection is active.
Off when Ethernet connection is not active.
Planning: RAID Controller Modules
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RAID Controller Module—Additional Features
Battery Backup Unit
Each RAID controller contains a two-cell Lithium ion nanopolymer battery
backup unit (BBU). It provides power to the RAID controller module in the
event of a power outage. For information on removing and installing the BBU,
see "RAID Controller Module Backup Battery Unit" on page 232.
NOTE: For virtual disks, the RAID controller firmware changes the data cache
setting based on the state of the battery. If the battery is missing or does not have
sufficient charge, the controller flushes the cache and sets the write cache
attribute to Write Through for all virtual disks. When the battery is replaced, Write
Back is re-enabled.
Storage Array Thermal Shutdown
The system automatically shuts down when the system temperature exceeds
the safe threshold. The battery backup unit protects against data loss by
providing power to offload to non-volatile memory in the event of power loss.
It is not necessary to shut down any MD1200 Series expansion enclosures
attached to the storage array when thermal shutdown occurs.
Temperature threshold values determine the temperature at which shutdown
occurs. These thresholds cannot be changed.
Table 3-1. Shutdown Threshold Type
Threshold Temperature Exceeding
Event Description
Nominal failure threshold
A critical event is set
Maximum failure threshold
The system power supplies shut down within 3
minutes
Shutdown threshold
The system power supplies shut down within 5
seconds
34
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System Password Reset
To reset a forgotten password, push and hold down the password reset switch
for at least 5 seconds. The password is deleted. See Figure 3-1 to locate the
password reset switch.
The RAID controller module allows you to change the password. For more
information about setting your password, see "Setting a Password" on page 73.
NOTE: The reset switch can be accessed by using a small object, such as the tip of
a pen.
Cache Functions and Features
Cache Mirroring
Cache mirroring copies accepted host-write data from the primary controller
to the partner controller. This action ensures that host-write data is safely
mirrored to the partner controller before successful completion status is
returned to the host. If a controller fails, the surviving controller safely retains
all mirrored data. By default, cache mirroring is enabled in duplex systems
and disabled in simplex systems.
Write-Back Cache
In write-back cache, write operations result in a completion signal being sent
to the host operating system as soon as the cache receives the data to be
written. The target physical disk receives the data at a more appropriate time
in order to increase controller performance. In duplex system configurations
with write-back cache and cache mirroring enabled, the write data is always
mirrored to the cache of the second controller before completion status is
issued to the host initiator. For simplex systems, if cache mirroring is enabled
write-back cache is suspended.
CAUTION: Running a simplex system with write-back cache enabled, carries all
inherent risks associated with a non-redundant system. In case of a catastrophic
controller failure, data loss occurs.
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Write-Through Cache
In write-through cache, data is written to the physical disk before completion
status is returned to the host operating system. Write-through cache is
considered more robust than write-back cache, since a power failure is less
likely to cause loss of data. The RAID controller automatically switches to
write-through if either cache mirroring is disabled or the battery is missing or
there is a fault condition.
36
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4
Planning: MD3600i Series Storage
Array Terms and Concepts
This chapter describes the storage array concepts, which help in configuring
and operating the Dell PowerVault MD3600i Series storage arrays.
Physical Disks, Virtual Disks, and Disk Groups
Physical disks in your storage array provide the physical storage capacity for
your data. Before you can begin writing data to the storage array, you must
configure the physical storage capacity into logical components, called disk
groups and virtual disks.
A disk group is a set of physical disks upon which multiple virtual disks are
created. The maximum number of physical disks supported in a disk group is
120 disks (or 192 disks with Premium Feature activation) for RAID 0, RAID 1,
and RAID 10, and 30 drives for RAID 5 and RAID 6. You can create disk
groups from unconfigured capacity on your storage array.
A virtual disk is a partition in a disk group that is made up of contiguous data
segments of the physical disks in the disk group. A virtual disk consists of data
segments from all physical disks in the disk group.
All virtual disks in a disk group support the same RAID level. The storage
array supports up to 255 virtual disks (minimum size of 10 MB each) that can
be assigned to host servers. Each virtual disk is assigned a Logical Unit
Number (LUN) that is recognized by the host operating system.
Virtual disks and disk groups are set up according to how you plan to organize
your data. For example, you may have one virtual disk for inventory, a second
virtual disk for financial and tax information, and so on.
Planning: MD3600i Series Storage Array Terms and Concepts
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Physical Disks
Only Dell supported 6.0-Gbps SAS physical disks are supported in the storage
array. If the storage array detects unsupported physical disks, it marks the disk
as unsupported and the physical disk becomes unavailable for all operations.
NOTE: The MD3600i Series storage enclosure must contain at least two physical
disks for proper operation. This is necessary because the physical disks are used to
store configuration information.
Physical Disk States
Table 4-1 describes the various states of the physical disk, which are
recognized by the storage array and reported in the MDSM application.
Table 4-1. RAID Controller Physical Disk States
Status
Mode
Description
Optimal
Assigned
The physical disk in the indicated slot Steady green
is configured as part of a disk group.
Optimal
Unassigned
The physical disk in the indicated slot Steady green
is unused and available to be
configured.
Optimal
Hot Spare
Standby
The physical disk in the indicated slot Steady green
is configured as a hot spare.
Optimal
Hot Spare in
use
The physical disk in the indicated slot Steady green
is in use as a hot spare within a disk
group.
Failed
Assigned,
Unassigned,
Hot Spare in
use, or Hot
Spare Standby
The physical disk in the indicated slot Amber flashing
has failed because of an unrecoverable (150 ms)
error, an incorrect drive type or drive
size, or by its operational state being
set to failed.
Replaced Assigned
38
Physical Disk
Status LED
The physical disk in the indicated slot Green flashing
is replaced and is ready to be, or is
(on 400 ms, Off
actively being configured into a disk 100 ms)
group.
Planning: MD3600i Series Storage Array Terms and Concepts
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Table 4-1. RAID Controller Physical Disk States (continued)
Status
Mode
Description
Physical Disk
Status LED
Pending
Failure
Assigned,
Unassigned,
Hot Spare in
use, or Hot
Spare Standby
A Self-Monitoring Analysis and
Reporting Technology (SMART) error
is detected on the physical disk in the
indicated slot.
Green flashing
(500 ms), amber
(500 ms), and Off
(1000 ms)
Offline
Not applicable The physical disk has either been spun Green flashing
down or had a rebuild aborted by user (3000 ms), amber
request.
(3000 ms), and
Off (3000 ms)
Identify
Assigned,
The physical disk is being identified.
Unassigned,
Hot Spare in
use, or Hot
Spare Standby
N/A
N/A
Green flashing
(250 ms)
The indicated slot is empty, or the
array cannot detect the physical disk.
If a disk drive rebuild fails because of a source drive failure or because the
drive is too small, the MDSM reports a failure of the physical disk even
though the LED state on the drive indicates that the rebuild was aborted
(green for 3 seconds, amber for 3 seconds, then off for 3 seconds).
Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology
SMART monitors the internal performance of all physical disk components to
detect faults indicating the potential for physical disk failure. SMART uses
this information to report whether failure is imminent so that a physical disk
can be replaced before failure occurs. The storage array monitors all attached
drives and notifies you when a predicted failure is reported by a physical disk.
Virtual Disks and Disk Groups
When configuring a storage array, you must:
1 Organize the physical disks into disk groups.
2 Create virtual disks within these disk groups.
Planning: MD3600i Series Storage Array Terms and Concepts
39
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3 Provide host server access.
4 Create mappings to associate the virtual disks with the host servers.
NOTE: Host server access must be created before mapping virtual disks.
Disk groups are always created in the unconfigured capacity of a storage array.
Unconfigured capacity is the available physical disk space not already
assigned in the storage array.
Virtual disks are created within the free capacity of a disk group. Free capacity
is the space in a disk group that has not been assigned to a virtual disk.
Virtual Disk States
Table 4-2 describes the various states of the virtual disk, recognized by the
storage array.
Table 4-2. RAID Controller Virtual Disk States
State
Description
Optimal
The virtual disk contains physical disks that are online.
Degraded
The virtual disk with a redundant RAID level contains an inaccessible
physical disk. The system can still function properly, but performance
may be affected and additional disk failures may result in data loss.
Offline
A virtual disk with one or more member disks is in an inaccessible
(failed, missing, or offline) state. Data on the virtual disk is no longer
accessible.
Force online
The storage array forces a virtual disk that is in an Offline state to an
Optimal state. If all the member physical disks are not available, the
storage array forces the virtual disk to a Degraded state. The storage
array can force a virtual disk to an Online state only when a sufficient
number of physical disks are available to support the virtual disk.
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RAID Levels
RAID levels determine the way in which data is written to physical disks.
Different RAID levels provide different levels of accessibility, redundancy, and
capacity.
Using multiple physical disks has the following advantages over using a single
physical disk:
•
Placing data on multiple physical disks (striping) allows input/output (I/O)
operations to occur simultaneously and improve performance.
•
Storing redundant data on multiple physical disks using mirroring or parity
supports reconstruction of lost data if an error occurs, even if that error is
the failure of a physical disk.
Each RAID level provides different performance and protection. You must
select a RAID level based on the type of application, access, fault tolerance,
and data you are storing.
The storage array supports RAID levels 0, 1, 5, 6, and 10. The maximum
number of physical disks that can be used in a disk group depends on the
RAID level:
•
192 for RAID levels 0, 1, and 10
•
30 for RAID levels 5 and 6.
RAID Level Usage
To ensure best performance, you must select an optimal RAID level when you
create a system physical disk. The optimal RAID level for your disk array
depends on:
•
Number of physical disks in the disk array
•
Capacity of the physical disks in the disk array
•
Need for redundant access to the data (fault tolerance)
•
Disk performance requirements
RAID 0
RAID 0 uses disk striping to provide high data throughput, especially for large
files in an environment that requires no data redundancy. RAID 0 breaks the
data down into segments and writes each segment to a separate physical disk.
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I/O performance is greatly improved by spreading the I/O load across many
physical disks. Although it offers the best performance of any RAID level,
RAID 0 lacks data redundancy. Select this option only for non-critical data,
because failure of one physical disk results in the loss of all data. Examples of
RAID 0 applications include video editing, image editing, prepress
applications, or any application that requires high bandwidth.
RAID 1
RAID 1 uses disk mirroring so that data written to one physical disk is
simultaneously written to another physical disk. This RAID level offers fast
performance, the best data availability, and the highest disk overhead. RAID 1
is recommended for small databases or other applications that do not require
large capacity. RAID 1 provides full data redundancy. For example,
accounting, payroll, or financial applications.
RAID 5
RAID 5 uses parity and striping data across all physical disks (distributed
parity) to provide high data throughput and data redundancy, especially for
small random access. This is a versatile RAID level and is suited for multi-user
environments where typical I/O size is small and there is a high proportion of
read activity such as file, application, database, web, e-mail, news, and
intranet servers.
RAID 6
RAID 6 is similar to RAID 5 but provides an additional parity disk for better
redundancy. This is the most versatile RAID level and is suited for multi-user
environments where typical I/O size is small and there is a high proportion of
read activity. RAID 6 is recommended when large size physical disks are used
or large number of physical disks are used in a disk group.
RAID 10
RAID 10, a combination of RAID 1 and RAID 0, uses disk striping across
mirrored disks. It provides high data throughput and complete data
redundancy. Utilizing an even number of physical disks (four or more) creates
a RAID level 10 disk group and/or virtual disk. Because RAID levels 1 and 10
use disk mirroring, half of the capacity of the physical disks is utilized for
mirroring. This leaves the remaining half of the physical disk capacity for
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actual storage. RAID 10 is automatically used when a RAID level of 1 is
chosen with four or more physical disks. RAID 10 works well for mediumsized databases or any environment that requires high performance and fault
tolerance and moderate-to-medium capacity.
Segment Size
Disk striping enables data to be written across multiple physical disks. Disk
striping enhances performance because striped disks are accessed
simultaneously.
The segment size or stripe element size specifies the size of data in a stripe
written to a single disk. The storage array supports stripe element sizes of 8
KB, 16 KB, 32 KB, 64 KB, 128 KB, 256 KB, and 512 KB. The default stripe
element size is 128 KB.
Stripe width, or depth, refers to the number of disks involved in an array
where striping is implemented. For example, a four-disk group with disk
striping has a stripe width of four.
NOTE: Although disk striping delivers excellent performance, striping alone does
not provide data redundancy.
Virtual Disk Operations
Virtual Disk Initialization
Every virtual disk must be initialized. Initialization can be done in the
foreground or the background. A maximum of four virtual disks can be
initialized concurrently on each RAID controller module.
Background Initialization
The storage array executes a background initialization when the virtual disk is
created to establish parity, while allowing full host server access to the virtual
disks. Background initialization does not run on RAID 0 virtual disks. The
background initialization rate is controlled by MDSM. To change the rate of
background initialization, you must stop any existing background
initialization. The rate change is implemented when the background
initialization restarts automatically.
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Foreground Initialization
The storage array supports foreground initialization for virtual disks. All
access to the virtual disk is blocked during foreground initialization. During
foreground initialization, zeros (0x00) are written to every sector of the virtual
disk. The virtual disk is available after foreground initialization is completed.
Consistency Check
A consistency check verifies the correctness of data in a redundant array
(RAID levels 1, 5, 6, and 10). For example, in a system with parity, checking
consistency involves computing the data on one physical disk and comparing
the results to the contents of the parity physical disk.
A consistency check is similar to a background initialization. The difference is
that background initialization cannot be started or stopped manually, while
consistency check can.
NOTE: It is recommended that you run data consistency checks on a redundant
array at least once a month. This allows detection and automatic replacement of
unreadable sectors. Finding an unreadable sector during a rebuild of a failed
physical disk is a serious problem, because the system does not have the
redundancy to recover the data.
Media Verification
Another background task performed by the storage array is media verification
of all configured physical disks in a disk group. The storage array uses the
Read operation to perform verification on the space configured in virtual
disks and the space reserved for the metadata.
Cycle Time
The media verification operation runs only on selected disk groups,
independent of other disk groups. Cycle time is the time taken to complete
verification of the metadata region of the disk group and all virtual disks in
the disk group for which media verification is configured. The next cycle for a
disk group starts automatically when the current cycle completes. You can set
the cycle time for a media verification operation between 1 and 30 days. The
storage controller throttles the media verification I/O accesses to disks based
on the cycle time.
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The storage array tracks the cycle for each disk group independent of other
disk groups on the controller and creates a checkpoint. If the media
verification operation on a disk group is preempted or blocked by another
operation on the disk group, the storage array resumes after the current cycle.
If the media verification process on a disk group is stopped due to a RAID
controller module restart, the storage array resumes the process from the last
checkpoint.
Virtual Disk Operations Limit
The maximum number of active, concurrent virtual disk processes per RAID
controller module installed in the storage array is four. This limit is applied to
the following virtual disk processes:
•
Background initialization
•
Foreground initialization
•
Consistency check
•
Rebuild
•
Copy back
If a redundant RAID controller module fails with existing virtual disk
processes, the processes on the failed controller are transferred to the peer
controller. A transferred process is placed in a suspended state if there are four
active processes on the peer controller. The suspended processes are resumed
on the peer controller when the number of active processes falls below 4.
Disk Group Operations
RAID Level Migration
You can migrate from one RAID level to another depending on your
requirements. For example, fault-tolerant characteristics can be added to a
stripe set (RAID 0) by converting it to a RAID 5 set. MDSM provides
information about RAID attributes to assist you in selecting the appropriate
RAID level. You can perform a RAID level migration while the system is still
running and without rebooting, which maintains data availability.
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Segment Size Migration
Segment size refers to the amount of data (in KB) that the storage array
writes on a physical disk in a virtual disk before writing data on the next
physical disk. Valid values for the segment size are 8 KB, 16 KB, 32 KB, 64 KB,
128 KB, 256 KB, and 512 KB.
Dynamic segment size migration enables the segment size of a given virtual
disk to be changed. A default segment size is set when the virtual disk is
created, based on such factors as the RAID level and expected usage. You can
change the default value if segment size usage does not match your needs.
When considering a segment size change, two scenarios illustrate different
approaches to the limitations:
•
If I/O activity stretches beyond the segment size, you can increase it to
reduce the number of disks required for a single I/O. Using a single physical
disk for a single request frees disks to service other requests, especially
when you have multiple users accessing a database or storage environment.
•
If you use the virtual disk in a single-user, large I/O environment (such as
for multimedia application storage), performance can be optimized when
a single I/O request is serviced with a single data stripe (the segment size
multiplied by the number of physical disks in the disk group used for data
storage). In this case, multiple disks are used for the same request, but
each disk is only accessed once.
Virtual Disk Capacity Expansion
When you configure a virtual disk, you select a capacity based on the amount
of data you expect to store. However, you may need to increase the virtual disk
capacity for a standard virtual disk by adding free capacity to the disk group.
This creates more unused space for new virtual disks or to expand existing
virtual disks.
Disk Group Expansion
Because the storage array supports hot-swappable physical disks, you can add
two physical disks at a time for each disk group while the storage array
remains online. Data remains accessible on virtual disk groups, virtual disks,
and physical disks throughout the operation. The data and increased unused
free space are dynamically redistributed across the disk group. RAID
characteristics are also reapplied to the disk group as a whole.
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Disk Group Defragmentation
Defragmenting consolidates the free capacity in the disk group into one
contiguous area. Defragmentation does not change the way in which the data
is stored on the virtual disks.
Disk Group Operations Limit
The maximum number of active, concurrent disk group processes per
installed RAID controller module is one. This limit is applied to the following
disk group processes:
•
Virtual disk RAID level migration
•
Segment size migration
•
Virtual disk capacity expansion
•
Disk group expansion
•
Disk group defragmentation
If a redundant RAID controller module fails with an existing disk group
process, the process on the failed controller is transferred to the peer
controller. A transferred process is placed in a suspended state if there is an
active disk group process on the peer controller. The suspended processes are
resumed when the active process on the peer controller completes or is
stopped.
NOTE: If you try to start a disk group process on a controller that does not have an
existing active process, the start attempt fails if the first virtual disk in the disk group
is owned by the other controller and there is an active process on the other
controller.
RAID Background Operations Priority
The storage array supports a common configurable priority for the following
RAID operations:
•
Background initialization
•
Rebuild
•
Copy back
•
Virtual disk capacity expansion
•
Raid level migration
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•
Segment size migration
•
Disk group expansion
•
Disk group defragmentation
The priority of each of these operations can be changed to address
performance requirements of the environment in which the operations are to
be executed.
NOTE: Setting a high priority level impacts storage array performance. It is not
advisable to set priority levels at the maximum level. Priority must also be assessed
in terms of impact to host server access and time to complete an operation. For
example, the longer a rebuild of a degraded virtual disk takes, the greater the risk
for secondary disk failure.
Virtual Disk Migration and Disk Roaming
Virtual disk migration is moving a virtual disk or a hot spare from one array to
another by detaching the physical disks and re-attaching them to the new
array. Disk roaming is moving a physical disk from one slot to another on the
same array.
Disk Migration
You can move virtual disks from one array to another without taking the
target array offline. However, the disk group being migrated must be offline
before your perform disk migration. If the disk group is not offline prior to
migration, the source array holding the physical and virtual disks within the
disk group marks them as missing. However, the disk groups themselves
migrate to the target array.
An array can import a virtual disk only if it is in an optimal state. You can
move virtual disks that are part of a disk group only if all members of the disk
group are being migrated. The virtual disks automatically become available
after the target array has finished importing all the disks in the disk group.
When you migrate a physical disk or a disk group from one MD3600i Series
storage array to another, the MD3600i storage array you migrate to, recognizes
any data structures and/or metadata you had in place on the migrating
MD3600i storage array. However, if you are migrating from any device other
than a MD3600i Series storage array, the MD3600i storage array does not
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recognize the migrating metadata and that data is lost. In this case, MD3600i
storage array initializes the physical disks and marks them as unconfigured
capacity.
NOTE: Only disk groups and associated virtual disks with all member physical disks
present can be migrated from one storage array to another. It is recommended that
you only migrate disk groups that have all their associated member virtual disks in
an optimal state.
NOTE: The number of physical disks and virtual disks that a storage array supports
limits the scope of the migration.
Use either of the following methods to move disk groups and virtual disks:
•
Hot virtual disk migration—Disk migration with the destination storage
array power turned on.
•
Cold virtual disk migration—Disk migration with the destination storage
array power turned off.
NOTE: To ensure that the migrating disk groups and virtual disks are correctly
recognized when the target storage array has an existing physical disk, use hot
virtual disk migration.
When attempting virtual disk migration, follow these recommendations:
•
Moving physical disks to the destination array for migration—When
inserting drives into the destination storage array during hot virtual disk
migration, wait for the inserted physical disk to be displayed in MDSM, or
wait for 30 seconds (whichever occurs first), before inserting the next
physical disk.
WARNING: Without the interval between drive insertions, the storage array
may become unstable and manageability may be temporarily lost.
•
Migrating virtual disks from multiple storage arrays into a single storage
array—When migrating virtual disks from multiple or different storage
arrays into a single destination storage array, move all of the physical disks
from the same storage array as a set into the new destination storage array.
Ensure that all of the physical disks from a storage array are migrated to
the destination storage array before starting migration from the next
storage array.
NOTE: If the drive modules are not moved as a set to the destination storage
array, the newly relocated disk groups may not be accessible.
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•
Migrating virtual disks to a storage array with no existing physical disks—
Turn off the destination storage array, when migrating disk groups or a
complete set of physical disks from a storage array to another storage array
that has no existing physical disks. After the destination storage array is
turned on and has successfully recognized the newly migrated physical
disks, migration operations can continue.
NOTE: Disk groups from multiple storage arrays must not be migrated at the
same time to a storage array that has no existing physical disks. Use cold
virtual disk migration for the disk groups from one storage array.
•
Enabling premium features before migration—Before migrating disk
groups and virtual disks, enable the required premium features on the
destination storage array. If a disk group is migrated from an MD3600i
storage array that has a premium feature enabled and the destination array
does not have this feature enabled, an Out of Compliance error message
may be generated.
Disk Roaming
You can move physical disks within an array. The RAID controller module
automatically recognizes the relocated physical disks and logically places
them in the proper virtual disks that are part of the disk group. Disk roaming
is permitted when the RAID controller module is either online or powered
off.
NOTE: The disk group must be exported before moving the physical disks.
Host Server-to-Virtual Disk Mapping
The host server attached to a storage array accesses various virtual disks on the
storage array through its host ports. Specific virtual disk-to-LUN mappings to an
individual host server can be defined. In addition, the host server can be part of a
host group that shares access to one or more virtual disks. You can manually
configure a host server-to-virtual disk mapping. When you configure host serverto-virtual disk mapping, consider these guidelines:
50
•
You can define one host server-to-virtual disk mapping for each virtual disk in
the storage array.
•
Host server-to-virtual disk mappings are shared between RAID controller
modules in the storage array.
•
A unique LUN must be used by a host group or host server to access a virtual
disk.
•
Not every operating system has the same number of LUNs available for use.
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Host Types
A host server is a server that accesses a storage array. Host servers are mapped
to the virtual disks and use one or more iSCSI initiator ports. Host servers
have the following attributes:
•
Host name—A name that uniquely identifies the host server.
•
Host group (used in Cluster solutions only)—Two or more host servers
associated together to share access to the same virtual disks.
This host group is a logical entity you can create in MDSM. All host servers
in a host group must be running the same operating system.
•
Host type—The operating system running on the host server.
Advanced Features
The RAID enclosure supports several advanced features:
•
Virtual Disk Snapshots
•
Virtual Disk Copy
•
High Performance Tier
NOTE: Virtual Disk Snapshot, Virtual Disk Copy, and High Performance Tier are
premium features that must be activated separately. If you have purchased these
features, an activation card is supplied that contains instructions for enabling this
functionality.
Snapshot Virtual Disks
A snapshot is a point-in-time image of a virtual disk. The snapshot provides
an image of the virtual disk at the time the snapshot was created. You create a
snapshot so that an application (for example, a backup application) can
access the snapshot and read the data while the source virtual disk remains
online and user-accessible. When the backup is completed, the snapshot
virtual disk is no longer needed. You can create up to four snapshots per
virtual disk.
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Snapshots are used to recover previous versions of files that have changed
since the snapshot was taken. Snapshots are implemented using a copy on
write algorithm, which makes a backup copy of data the instant a write occurs
to the virtual disk. Data on a virtual disk is copied to the snapshot repository
before it is modified. Snapshots can be created instantaneously or can be
scheduled and take up less overhead than a full physical copy process.
Snapshot Repository Virtual Disk
When you create a snapshot virtual disk, it automatically creates a snapshot
repository virtual disk. A snapshot repository is a virtual disk created in the
storage array as a resource for a snapshot virtual disk. A snapshot repository
virtual disk contains snapshot virtual disk metadata and copy-on-write data
for a particular snapshot virtual disk. The repository supports one snapshot
only.
You cannot select a snapshot repository virtual disk as a source virtual disk or
as a target virtual disk in a virtual disk copy. If you select a snapshot source
virtual disk as the target virtual disk of a virtual disk copy, you must disable all
snapshot virtual disks associated with the source virtual disk.
CAUTION: Before using the Snapshot Virtual Disks Premium Feature in a
Windows Clustered configuration, you must map the snapshot virtual disk to the
cluster node that owns the source virtual disk. This ensures that the cluster nodes
correctly recognize the snapshot virtual disk.
CAUTION: Mapping the snapshot virtual disk to the node that does not own the
source virtual disk before the snapshot enabling process is completed can result
in the operating system misidentifying the snapshot virtual disk. This can result in
data loss or an inaccessible snapshot.
For more information on mapping the snapshot virtual disk to the secondary
node, see the Dell PowerVault MD3600i and MD3620i Storage Arrays With
Microsoft Windows Server Failover Clusters on support.dell.com/manuals.
Virtual Disk Copy
Virtual disk copy is a premium feature to:
52
•
Back up data
•
Copy data from disk groups that use smaller-capacity physical disks to disk
groups using greater capacity physical disks
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•
Restore snapshot virtual disk data to the source virtual disk.
Virtual disk copy generates a full copy of data from the source virtual disk to
the target virtual disk in a storage array and can be performed either online or
offline.
Source Virtual Disk
When you create a virtual disk copy, a copy pair consisting of a source virtual
disk and a target virtual disk is created on the same storage array. When a
virtual disk copy is started, data from the source virtual disk is copied
completely to the target virtual disk.
Target Virtual Disk
When you start a virtual disk copy, the target virtual disk maintains a copy of
the data from the source virtual disk. You can choose whether to use an
existing virtual disk or create a new virtual disk as the target virtual disk. If
you choose an existing virtual disk as the target, all data on the target is
overwritten. A target virtual disk can be a standard virtual disk or the source
virtual disk of a failed or disabled snapshot virtual disk.
NOTE: The target virtual disk capacity must be equal to or greater than the source
virtual disk capacity.
When you begin the disk copy process, you must define the rate at which the
copy is completed. Giving the copy process top priority slightly impacts I/O
performance, while giving it lowest priority makes the copy process longer to
complete. You can modify the copy priority while the disk copy is in progress.
For more information, see the online help topics.
Virtual Disk Recovery
You can use the Edit host server-to-virtual disk mappings feature to recover
data from the backup virtual disk. This functionality enables you to unmap
the original source virtual disk from its host server, then map the backup
virtual disk to the same host server.
Ensure that you record the LUN used to provide access to the source virtual
disk. You need this information when you define a host server-to-virtual disk
mapping for the target (backup) virtual disk. Also, be sure to stop all I/O
activity to the source virtual disk before beginning the virtual disk recovery
procedure.
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Using Snapshot and Disk Copy Together
You can use the Snapshot Virtual Disk and Virtual Disk Copy premium
features together to back up data on the same storage array, or to restore the
data on the snapshot virtual disk to its original source virtual disk.
You can copy data from a virtual disk by:
•
Taking a point-in-time snapshot of the data (online)
•
Copying the data to another virtual disk using a virtual disk copy (offline)
You can select a snapshot virtual disk as the source virtual disk for a virtual
disk copy. This configuration is one of the best ways you can apply the
snapshot virtual disk feature, since it enables complete backups without any
impact on the storage array I/O.
You cannot use a snapshot repository virtual disk as a source virtual disk or as
a target virtual disk in a virtual disk copy. If you select the source virtual disk
as the target virtual disk of a virtual disk copy, you must disable all snapshot
virtual disks associated with the source virtual disk.
Multi-Path Software
Multi-path software (also referred to as the failover driver) is a software
resident on the host server that provides management of the redundant data
path between the host server and the storage array. For the multi-path
software to correctly manage a redundant path, the configuration must have
redundant iSCSI connections and cabling.
The multi-path software identifies the existence of multiple paths to a virtual
disk and establishes a preferred path to that disk. If any component in the
preferred path fails, the multi-path software automatically re-routes I/O
requests to the alternate path so that the storage array continues to operate
without interruption.
NOTE: Multi-path software is available on the MD3600i Series resource media.
Preferred and Alternate Controllers and Paths
A preferred controller is a RAID controller module designated as the owner of
a virtual disk or disk group. The preferred controller is automatically selected
by MDSM when a virtual disk is created. You can change the preferred RAID
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controller module owner of a virtual disk after it is created. If a host is
connected to only one RAID controller module, the preferred owner must
manually be assigned to the RAID controller module that the host can access.
Ownership of a virtual disk is moved from the preferred controller to the
secondary controller (also called the alternate controller) when the preferred
controller is:
•
Physically removed
•
Updating firmware
•
Involved in an event that caused failover to the alternate controller
Paths used by the preferred RAID controller module to access either the disks
or the host server are called the preferred paths; redundant paths are called
the alternate paths. If a failure causes the preferred path to become
inaccessible, the storage array automatically uses the alternate path to access
data, and the enclosure status LED blinks amber.
Virtual Disk Ownership
MDSM can be used to automatically build and view virtual disks. It uses
optimal settings to stripe the disk group. Virtual disks are assigned to
alternating RAID controller modules when they are created. This default
assignation provides a simple means for load balancing the workload of the
RAID controller modules.
Ownership can later be modified to balance workload according to actual
usage. If virtual disk ownership is not manually balanced, it is possible for one
controller to have the majority of the work, while the other controller is idle.
Limit the number of virtual disks in a disk group. If multiple virtual disks are
in a disk group, consider:
•
The impact each virtual disk has on other virtual disks in the same disk
group.
•
The patterns of usage for each virtual disk.
•
Different virtual disks have higher usage at different times of day.
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Load Balancing
A load balance policy is used to determine which path is used to process I/O.
Multiple options for setting the load balance policies let you optimize I/O
performance when mixed host interfaces are configured.
You can choose one of these load balance policies to optimize I/O
performance:
56
•
Round-robin with subset—The round-robin with subset I/O load balance
policy routes I/O requests, in rotation, to each available data path to the
RAID controller module that owns the virtual disks. This policy treats all
paths to the RAID controller module that owns the virtual disk equally for
I/O activity. Paths to the secondary RAID controller module are ignored
until ownership changes. The basic assumption for the round-robin policy
is that the data paths are equal. With mixed host support, the data paths
may have different bandwidths or different data transfer speeds.
•
Least queue depth with subset—The least queue depth with subset policy
is also known as the least I/Os or least requests policy. This policy routes
the next I/O request to a data path that has the least outstanding I/O
requests queued. For this policy, an I/O request is simply a command in
the queue. The type of command or the number of blocks that are
associated with the command are not considered. The least queue depth
with subset policy treats large block requests and small block requests
equally. The data path selected is one of the paths in the path group of the
RAID controller module that owns the virtual disk.
•
Least path weight with subset (Windows operating systems only)—The
least queue depth with subset policy is also known as the least I/Os or least
requests policy. This policy routes the next I/O request to a data path that
has the least outstanding I/O requests queued. For this policy, an I/O
request is simply a command in the queue. The type of command or the
number of blocks that are associated with the command are not
considered. The least queue depth with subset policy treats large block
requests and small block requests equally. The data path selected is one of
the paths in the path group of the RAID controller module that owns the
virtual disk.
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Monitoring MD3600i Series System Performance
You can use the Performance Monitor to select virtual disks and RAID
controller modules to monitor or to change the polling interval.
Keep the following guidelines in mind when using the Performance Monitor:
•
The Performance Monitor does not dynamically update its display if any
configuration changes occur while the window is open. You must close the
Performance Monitor window and reopen it for the changes to be
displayed.
•
Using the Performance Monitor to retrieve performance data can affect
the normal storage array performance depending on the polling interval
that you set.
•
If the storage array you are monitoring begins in or transitions to an
unresponsive state, an informational dialog is displayed. The dialog
informs you that the Performance Monitor cannot poll the storage array
for performance data.
To monitor the performance of the arrays:
1 Open MDSM and select the appropriate storage array.
2 Open the Array Management Window (AMW) for the selected storage
array.
3 In the AMW, select Storage Array Monitor Performance.
4 Click Settings.
a
Select the items that you want to monitor.
You can monitor:
•
RAID Controller modules
•
Virtual disks
•
Storage array totals
NOTE: By default, all items are selected.
b
In Polling interval, select how often you want to update the
performance statistics.
NOTE: For an accurate elapsed time, do not use the Set RAID Controller
Module Clocks option while using the Performance Monitor.
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Each time the polling interval elapses, the Performance Monitor queries
the storage array again and updates the statistics in the table.
5 Click Start.
Values are displayed for the selected storage arrays in the Performance
Monitor data table. The table is updated at the interval specified in the
Polling Interval setting.
6 Click Update to force an immediate poll of the storage array.
7 Click Stop to stop monitoring the storage array.
8 Click Save As on the Performance Monitor main dialog to save the
currently displayed performance statistics.
9 Select an appropriate directory.
10 Type a file name in the File name text box.
NOTE: The .perf extension is the default.
11 Select a file type from the Files of type list.
•
Use the Report format (ASCII text) file type if you want to save the
data to a report form for viewing or printing.
•
Use the Comma Delimited Format file type if you want to save the
data in a form that can be imported into a commercial spreadsheet
application for further analysis. Most leading commercial spreadsheet
applications recognize a comma delimiter. These applications use the
delimiter to import the data into spreadsheet cells.
12 Click Save.
The Performance Monitor data provides information about how your storage
array is performing. The data is presented in eight columns, which are
described in this table. Use this data to make performance tuning decisions
for your storage array.
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Table 4-3. Performance Monitor Table Description
Column Headings
Description
Devices
Controller, virtual disk or storage array total
Total IOs
Cumulative IO’s per second from last start time
Read Percentage
Percentage of cumulative IO’s that are READs
Cache Hit Percentage
Percentage of cumulative IO’s that are in-cache
Current KB/second
Snapshot of throughput value per second (1 KB
= 1024 bytes)
Maximum KB/second
Maximum recorded throughput value from last
start time
Current IO/second
Snapshot of IO’s per second (IOP =
Input/output per second or one completed I/O
transaction)
Maximum IO/second
Maximum recorded IOP from last start time
For more information, see the online help topics.
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Configuration: Overview
5
Dell PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager (MDSM) online help
contains information on how to use the MDSM application to perform the
configuration and management tasks described in this document. You can
access online help by clicking Help located at the top right corner of MDSM
interface. For information on installing the MDSM, see the MD3600i and
MD3620i Storage Array’s Deployment Guide at support.dell.com/manuals.
NOTE: MDSM supports MD3000i, MD32xxi, and MD36xxi storage arrays and can
automatically detect these storage arrays.
User Interface
The Storage Manager screen is divided into two primary windows:
•
Enterprise Management Window (EMW)—The EMW provides highlevel management of the storage arrays. You can launch the Array
Management Window from the EMW.
•
Array Management Window (AMW)—The AMW provides management
functions for a single storage array. You can launch more than one AMW at
the same time to manage different storage arrays.
The EMW and the AMW consist of the following:
•
The title bar at the top of the window—Shows the name of the
application.
•
The menu bar, beneath the title bar—You can select menu options from
the menu bar to perform tasks on a storage array.
•
The toolbar, beneath the title bar—You can select options in the toolbar to
perform tasks on a storage array.
•
The tabs, beneath the title bar—Tabs are used to group the tasks that you
can perform on a storage array.
•
The status bar, beneath the title bar—The status bar shows status
messages and status icons related to the storage array.
NOTE: The toolbar and status bar are not displayed by default. To view the toolbar
or the status bar, select ViewToolbar or View Status Bar, respectively.
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Enterprise Management Window
The EMW provides high-level management of storage arrays. When you start
MDSM, the EMW is displayed. The EMW has the:
•
Devices tab—Provides information about the storage arrays.
•
Setup tab—Presents the initial setup tasks that guide you through adding
storage arrays and configuring alerts.
The Devices tab has a Tree view on the left side of the window that shows
discovered storage arrays, unidentified storage arrays, and the status
conditions for the storage arrays. Discovered storage arrays are managed by
MDSM. Unidentified storage arrays are available to MDSM but not
configured for management. The right side of the Devices tab has a Table
view that shows detailed information for each storage array.
In the EMW, you can:
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•
Discover hosts and managed storage arrays on the local sub-network.
•
Manually add and remove hosts and storage arrays.
•
Blink or locate the storage arrays.
•
Name or rename discovered storage arrays.
•
Add storage array comments to the Table view.
•
Sort rows in the Table view according to different criteria.
•
Store your EMW view preferences and configuration data in local
configuration files. The next time you open the EMW, data from the local
configuration files is used to show customized view and preferences.
•
Monitor the status of managed storage arrays and indicate status using
appropriate icons.
•
Add or remove management connections.
•
Configure alert notifications for all selected storage arrays through e-mail
or SNMP traps.
•
Report critical events to the configured alert destinations.
•
Launch the AMW for a selected storage array.
•
Run a script to perform batch management tasks on specific storage arrays.
•
Import the operating system theme settings into the MDSM.
•
Upgrade firmware on multiple storage arrays concurrently.
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•
Obtain information about the firmware inventory including the version of
the RAID controller modules, physical disks, and the enclosure
management modules (EMMs) in the storage array.
Inheriting the System Settings
Use the Inherit System Settings option to import the operating system theme
settings into the MDSM. Importing system theme settings affects features
like font type, font size, color, and contrast in the MDSM.
1 From the EMW, open the Inherit System Settings window in one of these
ways:
•
Select Tools Inherit System Settings.
•
Select the Setup tab and click Inherit System Settings.
2 Select Inherit system settings for color and font.
3 Click OK.
Array Management Window
You can launch the AMW from the EMW. The AMW provides management
functions for a single storage array. You can have multiple AMWs open
simultaneously to manage different storage arrays.
To launch the AMW:
1 In the EMW, on the Devices tab, double-click the relevant storage array.
The context menu for the selected storage is displayed.
2 In the context menu, select Manage Storage Array.
The AMW for the selected storage is displayed.
The AMW has the following tabs:
•
Summary tab—You can view the following information about the storage
array:
•
Status
•
Hardware components
•
Capacity
•
Hosts and mappings
•
Storage partitions
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•
Disk groups and virtual disks
•
Logical tab—You can view the organization of the storage array by virtual
disks, disk groups, free capacity nodes, and any unconfigured capacity for
the storage array.
•
Physical tab—You can view the organization of the storage array by RAID
controller modules, physical disks, and other hardware components.
•
Mappings tab—You can define the hosts, host groups, and host ports. You
can change the mappings to grant virtual disk access to host groups and
hosts and create storage partitions.
•
Setup tab—You can complete the initial setup tasks to configure the
storage array.
•
Support tab—You can complete common support tasks like downloading
RAID controller module firmware, viewing the online help, and so on.
In the AMW, you can:
64
•
Provide storage array options. For example, renaming a storage array,
changing a password, or enabling a background media scan.
•
Provide the ability to configure virtual disks from the storage array
capacity, define hosts and host groups, and grant host or host group access
to sets of virtual disks called storage partitions.
•
Monitor the health of storage array components and report detailed status
using applicable icons.
•
Provide applicable recovery procedures for a failed logical component or a
failed hardware component.
•
Present a view of the Event Log for the storage array.
•
Present profile information about hardware components, such as RAID
controller modules and physical disks.
•
Provide RAID controller module management options, such as changing
ownership of virtual disks or placing a RAID controller module online or
offline.
•
Provide physical disk management options, such as assignment of hot
spares and locating the physical disk.
•
Monitor storage array performance.
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6
Configuration: About Your Storage
Array
Out-of-Band and In-Band Management
You can manage a storage array in two ways:
•
Out-of-band management
•
In-band management
Out-of-Band Management
In the out-of-band management method, data is separate from commands
and events. Data travels through the host-to-controller interface, while
commands and events travel through the management port Ethernet cables.
This management method lets you configure the maximum number of
virtual disks that are supported by your operating system and host adapters.
A maximum of eight storage management stations can concurrently monitor
an out-of-band managed storage array. This limit does not apply to systems
that manage the storage array through the in-band management method.
When you use out-of-band management, you must set the network
configuration for each RAID controller module’s management Ethernet port.
This includes the Internet Protocol (IP) address, subnetwork mask (subnet
mask), and gateway. If you are using a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
(DHCP) server, you can enable automatic network configuration, but if you
are not using a DHCP server, you must enter the network configuration
manually.
NOTE: RAID controller module network configurations can be assigned using a
DHCP server (the default setting). However, if a DHCP server is not available for 150
seconds, the RAID controller modules assign static IP addresses. The addresses
assigned are 192.168.128.101 for controller 0 and 192.168.128.102 for controller 1.
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In-Band Management
Using in-band management, commands, events, and data travel through the
host-to-controller interface. Unlike out-of-band management, commands and
events are mixed with data.
NOTE: For detailed information on setting up in-band and out-of-band management
see the Deployment Guide.
When you add storage arrays by using this management method, you need to
specify only the host name or IP address of the host. After you add the
specific host name or IP address, the host-agent software automatically
detects any storage arrays that are connected to that host.
CAUTION: Some operating systems can be used only as storage management
stations. For more information about the operating system that you are using, see
the MD PowerVault Support Matrix at support.dell.com/manuals.
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
Access Virtual Disk
Each RAID controller module in an MD3600i Series storage array maintains a
special virtual disk, called the access virtual disk. The host-agent software uses
the access virtual disk to communicate management requests and event
information between the storage management station and the RAID
controller module in an in-band–managed storage array. The access virtual
disk is not available for application data storage. The default LUN is 31.
Storage Arrays
You must add the storage arrays to MDSM before you can set up the storage
array for optimal use.
Adding Storage Arrays
You can add storage arrays only in the EMW.
You can:
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•
Automatically discover storage arrays.
•
Manually add storage arrays.
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NOTE: Verify that your host or management station network configuration—
including station IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway—is correct before
adding a new storage array using the Automatic option.
NOTE: For Linux, set the default gateway so that broadcast packets are sent to
255.255.255.0. For Red Hat Enterprise Linux, if no gateway exists on the network, set
the default gateway to the IP address of the NIC.
NOTE: MDSM uses TCP/UDP port 2463 for communication to the MD storage array.
Automatic Discovery of Storage Arrays
The Automatic Discovery process sends out a broadcast message across the
local subnet and adds any storage array that responds to the message. The
Automatic Discovery process finds both in-band and out-of-band storage
arrays.
NOTE: The Automatic Discovery option and the Re-scan Hosts option in the
Enterprise Management Window provide automatic methods to discover managed
storage arrays.
Manual Addition of a Storage Array
Use Manual Addition if the storage array resides outside of the local subnet.
This process requires specific identification information to manually add a
storage array.
To add a storage array that uses out-of-band management, specify the host
name or management port IP address of each controller in the storage array.
Before using this option, verify that the applicable network configuration
tasks are performed.
To add an in-band storage array, add the host through which the storage array
is attached to the network.
NOTE: It can take several minutes for MDSM to connect to the specified storage
array.
To add a storage array manually:
1 Select Edit Add Storage Array.
2 Select the relevant management method:
•
Out-of-band management—Enter a host name or an IP address for
the RAID controller Modules in the storage array.
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•
In-band management—Enter a name or an IP address for the Host
through which the storage array is attached to the network.
NOTE: When adding a storage array using in-band management with iSCSI, a
session must first be established between the initiator on the host server and
the storage array. For more information, see "Configuration: Using iSCSI" on
page 87.
NOTE: The host agent must be restarted before in-band management
communication can be established. See "Starting or Restarting the Host
Context Agent Software" on page 271.
3 Click Add.
4 Use one of these methods to name a storage array:
•
In the EMW, select the Setup tab, and select Name/Rename Storage
Arrays.
•
In the AMW, select the Setup tab, and select Rename Storage Array.
•
In the EMW, right-click the icon corresponding to the array and select
Rename.
Setting Up Your Storage Array
A list of initial setup tasks is displayed on the Setup tab in the AMW. The list
of initial setup tasks shows you how to set up a storage array. Using the steps
outlined in the Initial Setup Tasks Area, ensures that the basic setup steps are
completed properly.
Use the Initial Setup Tasks list the first time that you set up a storage array to
perform these tasks:
70
•
Locate the storage array—Find the physical location of the storage array on
your network by turning on the unit identify LEDs. The storage array can
be identified with a label.
•
Give a new name to the storage array—Use a unique name that identifies
each storage array.
•
Set a storage array password—Configure the storage array with a password
to protect it from unauthorized access. MDSM prompts for the password
when an attempt is made to change the storage array configuration, such
as, when a virtual disk is created or deleted.
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•
Configure iSCSI host ports—Configure network parameters for each
iSCSI host port automatically or specify the configuration information for
each iSCSI host port.
•
Configure the storage array—Create disk groups, virtual disks, and hot
spare physical disks by using the Automatic configuration method or the
Manual configuration method. For more information, see the PowerVault
Modular Disk Storage Manager online help topics.
•
Map virtual disks—Map virtual disks to hosts or host groups.
•
Save configuration—Save the configuration parameters in a file that you
can use to restore the configuration, or reuse the configuration on another
storage array. For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk
Storage Manager online help topics.
After you complete the basic steps for configuring the storage array, you can
perform these optional tasks:
•
Manually define hosts—Define the hosts and the host port identifiers that
are connected to the storage array. Use this option only if the host is not
automatically recognized and shown in the Mappings tab.
•
Configure Ethernet management ports—Configure the network
parameters for the Ethernet management ports on the RAID controller
modules if you are managing the storage array by using the out-of-band
management connections.
•
View and enable premium features—Your MDSM may include premium
features. View the premium features that are available and the premium
features that are already started. You can start available premium features
that are currently stopped.
•
Manage iSCSI settings—You can configure iSCSI settings for
authentication, identification, and discovery.
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Locating Storage Arrays
You can use the Blink option to physically locate and identify a storage array.
NOTE: If the LEDs from the Blink Storage Array operation do not stop blinking,
select Stop All Indications to stop the process manually.
To locate the storage array:
1 Select the relevant storage array and:
•
In the EMW, right-click the appropriate storage array, and select Blink
Storage Array.
•
In the AMW, select the Setup tab, click Blink Storage Array.
•
In the AMW, select Storage ArrayBlinkStorage Array.
The LEDs on the physical disks in the storage array blink.
2 After locating the storage array, click OK.
The LEDs stop blinking.
3 If the LEDs do not stop blinking, select Storage ArrayBlink Stop All
Indications.
A confirmation message is displayed.
4 Click OK.
Naming or Renaming Storage Arrays
You can name, rename, and add comments to a storage array to facilitate
identification of the storage array. Each storage array must be assigned a
unique alphanumeric name up to 30 characters long. A name can consist of
letters, numbers, and the special characters underscore (_), dash (–), and
pound sign (#). No other special characters are allowed.
To rename a selected storage array:
1 Perform one of these actions:
72
•
In the AMW Setup tab, select Rename Storage Array.
•
In the EMW Devices tab Tree view, select Edit Rename.
•
In the EMW Devices tab Table view, select Edit Rename.
•
In the EMW Devices tab Tree view, right-click the desired array icon
and select Rename.
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The Name/Rename Storage Arrays dialog is displayed.
2 Select the relevant storage array from the Select storage array table.
If you do not know the name or physical location of the storage array, click
Blink. After locating the storage array, click OK to turn off the LEDs.
The name of the storage array is displayed in the Storage array name.
3 In Storage array name, type the new name of the storage array. If
applicable, add a comment for the storage array in Additional comment.
4 Click Apply.
A message is displayed warning you about the implications of changing the
storage array name.
5 Click Yes.
The new storage array name is displayed in the Select storage array table.
6 Repeat step 2 through step 4 to name or rename additional storage arrays.
NOTE: Avoid arbitrary names or names that may lose meaning in the future.
Setting a Password
You can configure each storage array with a password to protect it from
unauthorized access. MDSM prompts for the password when an attempt is
made to change the storage array configuration, such as, when a virtual disk is
created or deleted. View operations do not change the storage array
configuration and do not require a password. You can create a new password
or change an existing password.
NOTE: It is recommended that you use a long password with at least 15
alphanumeric characters to increase security.
To set a new password or change an existing password:
1 Select the relevant storage array and navigate to the AMW for that storage
array. See "Array Management Window" on page 63.
The AMW for the selected storage array is displayed.
2 In the AMW, perform one of these actions:
•
Select the storage array in the Logical pane, and then select Storage
Array Set Password.
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•
Select the Setup tab, and then click Set a Storage Array Password.
•
In the AMW, select the Logical tab, right-click and select Set
Password.
The Set Password dialog is displayed.
3 If you are resetting the password, type the Current password.
NOTE: If you are setting the password for the first time, leave the Current
password blank.
4 Type the New password.
5 Re-type the new password in Confirm new password.
NOTE: The password in Confirm new password and New password must be
exactly the same.
6 Click OK.
NOTE: You are not prompted for a password when you attempt to change the
storage array configuration in the current management session.
Password Guidelines
Follow these guidelines when you create a password:
•
Use secure passwords for your storage array. A password must be easy for
you to remember but difficult for others to determine. Consider using
numbers or special characters in the place of letters, such as a 1 in the
place of the letter I, or the at sign (@) in the place of the letter a.
•
For increased protection, use a long password with at least 15
alphanumeric characters. The maximum password length is 30 characters.
•
Passwords are case sensitive.
NOTE: You can attempt to enter a password up to ten times before the storage
array enters a lockout state. Before you can try to enter a password again, you must
wait 10 minutes for the storage array to reset. To reset the password, press the
password reset switch on your RAID controller module, see Figure 3-1.
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Viewing Storage Array Connections
You can use the View Connections option to view the expansion enclosures
connected to the RAID controller module.
To view the storage array connections:
1 From the toolbar in AMW, select Storage Array View Connections.
The <Storage Array>:Connections dialog is displayed.
2 Click the column name to sort the connections according to your
preference.
3 Click Close.
If you receive an error message for a port, you can use this dialog to identify
the components on the port that may have caused the error. By isolating these
components, you prevent accidentally disconnecting components that are
still in operation, which could cause an interruption in data flow.
Adding/Editing a Comment to an Existing Storage Array
A descriptive comment, with an applicable storage array name, is a helpful
identification tool. You can add or edit a comment for a storage array in the
EMW only.
To add or edit a comment:
1 In the EMW, select the Devices tab and select the relevant managed
storage array.
2 Select Edit Comment.
The Edit Comment dialog is displayed.
3 Type a 60-character comment.
4 Click OK.
This option updates the comment in the table view and saves it in your local
storage management station file system. The comment is not displayed to
administrators who are using other storage management stations.
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Removing Storage Arrays
You can remove a storage array from the list of managed arrays if you no
longer want to manage it from a specific storage management station.
Removing a storage array does not affect the storage array or its data in any
way. Removing a storage array simply removes it from the list of storage arrays
that are displayed in the drop-down list in the Array Selector. If a storage array
is accidentally removed, it can be added again. See "Adding Storage Arrays"
on page 68.
You can remove the storage array only from the EMW.
To remove the storage array:
1 In the EMW, select the Devices tab and select the relevant managed
storage array.
2 Select Edit Remove Storage Array.
A message prompts you for a confirmation for the removal of the selected
storage array.
3 To remove the storage array, click Yes.
Enabling Premium Features
You can enable premium features on the storage array. To enable the premium
features, you must obtain a feature key file specific to the premium feature
that you want to enable from your storage supplier.
To enable premium features:
1 From the toolbar in AMW, select Storage Array Premium Features.
The Premium Features and Feature Pack Information window is
displayed.
2 Select the relevant premium feature, and click Enable.
The Select Feature Key File dialog is displayed.
3 Navigate to the relevant folder, select the appropriate key file, and click
OK.
4 Click Close.
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
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Displaying Failover Alert
You can change the failover alert delay for a storage array. The failover alert
delay lets you delay the logging of a critical event if the multi-path driver
transfers virtual disks to the non-preferred controller. If the multi-path driver
transfers the virtual disks back to the preferred controller within the specified
delay period, a critical event is not logged. If the transfer exceeds this delay
period, then a virtual disk-not-on-preferred-path alert is issued as a critical
event. You can also use this option to minimize multiple alerts when more
than one virtual disk fails over because of a system error, such as a failed host
adapter.
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
Changing the Cache Settings on the Storage Array
To change the storage array cache settings:
1 In the AMW, select Storage Array Change Cache Settings.
The Change Cache Settings window is displayed.
2 Select or enter the percentage of unwritten data in the cache to trigger a
cache flush in Start flushing.
3 Select or enter the percentage of unwritten data in the cache to stop a
cache flush in progress in Stop flushing.
4 Select the appropriate Cache block size.
A smaller cache size is a good choice for file-system use or databaseapplication use. A larger cache size is a good choice for applications that
generate sequential I/O, such as multimedia.
5 In the Enter Password dialog, type the current password for the storage
array, and click OK.
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Changing Expansion Enclosure ID Numbers
When an MD1200 series expansion enclosure is connected to an MD3600i
Series storage array for the first time, an enclosure ID number is assigned and
maintained by the expansion enclosure. This enclosure ID number is also
shown in the MDSM and can be changed if required.
To change the enclosure ID numbers:
1 In the AMW, select the storage array, and select Storage Array
Change Enclosure ID.
2 Select a new enclosure ID number from the Change Enclosure ID list.
The enclosure ID must be between 0 and 99 (inclusive).
3 To save the changed enclosure ID, click Change.
Changing the Enclosure Order in the Physical Pane
You can change the order of the RAID controller modules and the expansion
enclosures in the Physical pane to match the hardware configuration in your
storage array. The Physical pane that initially is displayed is a default view
that may not match your storage array. The enclosure order change remains in
effect until it is modified again.
To change the enclosure order in the Physical pane:
1 In the AMW, select Storage Array Change Enclosure Order.
2 From the enclosures list, select the enclosure you want to move and click
either Up or Down to move the enclosure to the new position.
3 Click OK.
If you have set a password for the selected storage array, the Enter
Password dialog is displayed.
4 Type the current password for the storage array.
5 Click OK.
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Configuring Alert Notifications
MDSM can send an alert for any condition on the storage array that requires
your attention. Alerts can be sent as e-mail messages or as Simple Network
Management Protocol (SNMP) trap messages.
You can configure alert notifications either for all the storage arrays or a single
storage array.
To configure alert notifications for all storage arrays:
1 In the EMW, select the Setup tab.
2 Select Configure Alerts.
The Configure Alerts dialog is displayed.
3 Select All storage arrays.
4 Click OK.
The Configure Alerts dialog is displayed. To configure e-mail alerts, see
"Configuring E-mail Alerts" on page 79. To configure SNMP alerts, see
"Configuring SNMP Alerts" on page 82.
To configure alert notifications for a single storage array:
1 In the EMW, select the Devices tab.
2 Select the relevant storage array, then select EditConfigure Alerts.
The Configure Alerts dialog is displayed. To configure e-mail alerts, see
"Configuring E-mail Alerts" on page 79. To configure SNMP alerts, see
"Configuring SNMP Alerts" on page 82.
Configuring E-mail Alerts
For more information on configuring alert notifications, see "Configuring
Alert Notifications" on page 79.
To configure e-mail alerts:
1 Open the Configure Alerts dialog by performing one of these actions:
•
In the tree view or the table view on the Devices tab in the EMW,
select a node, and then select Edit Configure Alerts. Go to step 3.
•
In the Setup tab in the EMW, select Configure Alerts. Go to step 2.
2 Select one of the following radio buttons to specify an alert level:
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•
All storage arrays—Select this option to send an e-mail alert about
events on all storage arrays.
•
An individual storage array—Select this option to send an e-mail alert
about events that occur on only a specified storage array.
These results occur, depending on your selection:
•
If you selected all storage arrays, the Configure Alerts dialog is
displayed.
•
If you selected an individual storage array, the Select Storage Array
dialog is displayed. Select the storage array for which you want to
receive e-mail alerts and click OK. The Configure Alerts dialog is
displayed.
•
If you do not know which storage array to select, click Blink to turn on
the LEDs of the storage array.
3 In the Configure Alerts dialog, select the Mail Server tab.
4 In Mail Server, type the name of the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
(SMTP) mail server.
The SMTP mail server is the name of the mail server that forwards the email alert to the configured e-mail addresses.
5 In Email sender address, type the valid sender e-mail address.
The e-mail address of the sender (the network administrator) is displayed
on each e-mail alert sent to the destination.
6 To include the contact information of the sender in the e-mail alert, select
Include contact information with the alerts, and type the contact
information.
NOTE: Including the contact information in the e-mail alert is optional.
7 Select the E-mail tab to configure the e-mail destinations.
80
•
Adding an e-mail address—In Email address, type the e-mail address,
and click Add.
•
Replacing an e-mail address—In the Configured email addresses area,
select the e-mail address to be replaced, type the replacement e-mail
address in Email address, and click Replace.
•
Deleting an e-mail address—In the Configured email addresses area,
select the e-mail address, and click Delete.
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•
Validating an e-mail address—Type the e-mail address in Email
address or select the e-mail address in the Configured email addresses
area, and click Test. A test e-mail is sent to the selected e-mail address.
A dialog with the results of the test and any error is displayed.
8 For the selected e-mail address, in Information To Send, select:
•
Event Only—The e-mail alert contains only the event information.
This alert type is the default.
•
Event + Profile—The e-mail alert contains the event information and
the storage array profile.
•
Event + Support—The e-mail alert contains the event information
and a compressed file that contains complete support information for
the storage array that has generated the alert.
9 For the selected e-mail address, in Frequency, select:
•
Every event—Sends an e-mail alert whenever an event occurs. This is
the default option.
•
Every x hours—Sends an e-mail alert after the specified time interval
if an event has occurred during that time interval. You can select this
option only if you have selected either Event + Profile or Event +
Support in the Information To Send drop down list.
10 Click OK.
An alert icon is displayed next to each node in the Tree view where an alert
is set.
To ensure that the e-mail is sent successfully:
•
Provide an SMTP mail server name and an e-mail sender address for the email addresses to work.
•
Ensure that the e-mail addresses that you had previously configured are
displayed in the Configured e-mail addresses area.
•
Use fully qualified e-mail addresses; for example, name@mycompany.com.
•
Configure multiple e-mail addresses before you click OK.
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Configuring SNMP Alerts
To add a management console to the list of addresses configured to receive
SNMP alerts:
1 Open the Configure Alerts dialog by performing one of these actions:
•
In the Tree view or the Table view on the Devices tab in the EMW,
select a node, and select Edit Configure Alerts. Go to step 3.
•
In the Setup tab in the EMW, select Configure Alerts. Go to step 2.
2 Select one of the following radio buttons to specify an alert level:
•
All storage arrays—Select this option to send an alert notification
about events on all storage arrays.
•
An individual storage array—Select this option to send an alert
notification about events that occur in only a specified storage array.
These results occur, depending on your selection:
•
If you selected All storage arrays, the Configure Alerts dialog is
displayed.
•
If you selected An individual storage array, the Select Storage Array
dialog is displayed. Select the storage array for which you want to
receive alert notifications and click OK. The Configure Alerts dialog is
displayed.
NOTE: If you do not know which storage array to select, click Blink to turn on
the LEDs of the storage array.
3 Select the SNMP tab to configure the SNMP alert destinations.
•
Adding an SNMP address—In Community name, type the
community name. In Trap destination, type the trap destination, and
click Add.
NOTE: The community name is an American Standard Code for Information
Interchange (ASCII) string that identifies a known set of network management
stations and is set by the network administrator. The default community name
is the string “public”. The trap destination is the IP address or the host name
of a computer running an SNMP management application. An example of an
SNMP enabled management application is the Dell Management Console. For
more information on Dell Management Console, see dell.com.
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•
Replacing an SNMP address—Select the SNMP address in the
Configured SNMP addresses area, type the replacement community
name in Community name and the trap destination in Trap
destination, and click Replace.
•
Deleting an SNMP address—Select the SNMP address in the
Configured SNMP addresses area, and click Delete.
•
Validating an SNMP address—Select the SNMP address in the
Configured SNMP addresses area, and click Test. A test message is
sent to the SNMP address. A message box with the results of the
validation and any error information is displayed.
4 Click OK.
An alert icon is displayed next to each node in the Tree view for which an
alert is set.
Follow these guideline for SNMP alerts:
•
Any SNMP addresses that you had previously configured are displayed in
the Configured SNMP addresses area.
•
The SNMP Community Name is determined by the system administrator
and configured within the management application, such as the Dell
Management Console. More information about the Dell Management
Console is available at dell.com.
•
You can configure multiple SNMP addresses before you click OK.
Battery Settings
A smart battery backup unit (BBU) can perform a learn cycle. The smart BBU
module includes the battery, a battery gas gauge, and a battery charger. The
learn cycle calibrates the smart battery gas gauge so that it provides a
measurement of the charge of the battery module. A learn cycle can only start
when the battery is fully charged.
The learn cycle completes the following operations:
•
Discharges the battery to a predetermined threshold
•
Charges the battery back to full capacity
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A learn cycle starts automatically when you install a new battery module.
Learn cycles for batteries in both RAID controller modules in a duplex system
occur simultaneously.
Learn cycles are scheduled to start automatically at regular intervals, at the
same time and on the same day of the week. The interval between cycles is
described in weeks.
Use the following guidelines to adjust the interval:
•
You can use the default interval.
•
You can run a learn cycle at any time.
•
You can set the learn cycle earlier than the currently scheduled time.
•
You cannot set the learn cycle to start more than seven days later than the
currently scheduled time.
To change the battery settings perform these steps:
1 In the AMW, select Storage ArrayChange Battery Settings.
The Battery Settings dialog is displayed.
2 In Battery location, select a battery.
3 Check these details about the battery:
•
Battery status
•
Battery age
•
Days until replacement
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
Setting the Storage Array RAID Controller Module Clocks
You can use the Synchronize RAID Controller Module Clocks option to
synchronize the storage array RAID controller module clocks with the storage
management station. This option makes sure that the event timestamps
written by the RAID controller modules to the Event Log match the event
timestamps written to host log files. The RAID controller modules remain
available during synchronization.
To synchronize the RAID controller module clocks with the storage
management station:
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1 In the AMW, select Storage Array Synchronize RAID Controller
Module Clocks.
2 If a password is set, in the Enter Password dialog, type the current
password for the storage array, and click Synchronize.
The RAID controller module clocks are synchronized with the storage
management station.
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Configuration: Using iSCSI
7
Changing the iSCSI Target Authentication
1 In the AMW, select the Setup tab.
2 Select Manage iSCSI Settings.
The Manage iSCSI Settings window is displayed and by default, the
Target Authentication tab is selected. To change the authentication
settings, select:
•
None—If you do not require initiator authentication. If you select
None, any initiator can access the target.
•
CHAP—To enable an initiator that tries to authenticate the target
using Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP). Define
the CHAP secret only if you want to use mutual CHAP
authentication. If you select CHAP, but no CHAP target secret is
defined, an error message is displayed. See "Creating CHAP Secrets"
on page 88.
3 To enter the CHAP secret, click CHAP secret.
The Enter Target CHAP Secret dialog is displayed.
4 Enter the Target CHAP secret.
NOTE: The Target CHAP secret must be between 12 and 57 characters.
5 Enter the exact target CHAP secret in Confirm target CHAP secret.
NOTE: If you do not want to create a CHAP secret, you can generate a
random CHAP secret automatically. To generate a random CHAP secret, click
Generate Random CHAP Secret.
6 Click OK.
NOTE: You can select the None and CHAP at the same time, for example,
when one initiator may not have CHAP and the other initiator has only CHAP
selected.
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Entering Mutual Authentication Permissions
Mutual authentication or two-way authentication enables a client or a user to
verify themselves to a host server and for the host server to validate itself to
the user. This validation is accomplished in such a way that both parties are
sure of the other’s identity.
To add mutual authentication permissions:
1 In the AMW, select the Setup tab.
2 Select Manage iSCSI Settings.
The Manage iSCSI Settings window is displayed.
3 Select the Mutual Authentication tab.
4 Select an initiator in the Select an Initiator area.
The initiator details are displayed.
5 Click CHAP Secret to enter the initiator CHAP permissions in the dialog
that is displayed.
6 Click OK.
7 Click OK in the Manage iSCSI Settings window.
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
Creating CHAP Secrets
When you set up an authentication method, you can choose to create a
CHAP secret. The CHAP secret is a password that is recognized by the
initiator and the target. If you are using mutual authentication to configure
the storage array, you must enter the same CHAP secret that is defined in the
host server iSCSI initiator, and you must define a CHAP secret on the target
(the storage array) that must be configured in every iSCSI initiator that
connects to the target storage array. For more information on CHAP, see
“Understanding CHAP Authentication” in the Deployment Guide.
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Initiator CHAP Secret
The initiator CHAP secret is set on the host using the iSCSI initiator
configuration program provided with the host operating system. If you are
using the mutual authentication method, you must define the initiator
CHAP secret when you set up the host. This must be the same CHAP secret
that is defined for the target when defining mutual authentication settings.
Target CHAP Secret
If you are using CHAP secrets, you must define the CHAP secret for the
target.
Valid Characters for CHAP Secrets
The CHAP secret must be between 12 and 57 characters. The CHAP secret
supports characters with ASCII values of 32 to 126 decimal. See Table 7-1 for
a list of valid ASCII characters.
Table 7-1. Valid ASCII Characters for CHAP Secrets
Space !
"
# $ %
&
’
(
)
* +
,
-
.
/
0 1
2
3
4
5
6 7
8
9
:
;
< =
> ?
@ A
B C
D
E
F
G H I
J
K
L
M
N O
P
Q R
S
T U
V
W X
Y
Z [
\
]
^ _
a
b
c
d
e
f
g h
i
j
k
l
m n
o
p
q
r
s
u
v
w
x
y
{
|
}
~
z
t
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Changing the iSCSI Target Identification
You cannot change the iSCSI target name, but you can associate an alias with
the target for simpler identification. Aliases are useful because the iSCSI
target names are not intuitive. Provide an iSCSI target alias that is
meaningful and easy to remember.
To change the iSCSI target identification:
1 In the AMW, select the Setup tab.
2 Select Manage iSCSI Settings.
The Manage iSCSI Settings window is displayed.
3 Select the Target Identification tab.
4 Type the alias in iSCSI target alias.
5 Click OK.
NOTE: Aliases can contain up to 30 characters. Aliases can include letters,
numbers, and the special characters underscore (_), minus (-), and pound sign (#).
No other special characters are permitted.
NOTE: Open iSCSI (which is used by Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and SUSE Linux
Enterprise Server 10 with SP1) does not support using target alias.
Changing the iSCSI Target Discovery Settings
To change the iSCSI target discovery settings:
1 In the AMW, select the Setup tab.
2 Select Manage iSCSI Settings.
The Manage iSCSI Settings window is displayed.
3 Select the Target Discovery tab.
4 Select Use iSNS to activate iSCSI target discovery.
To activate iSCSI target discovery, you can use one of the following
methods:
•
90
Select Obtain configuration automatically from DHCP server to
automatically activate target discovery for IPv4 settings using the
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP). You can also refresh
the DHCP.
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•
Select Specify Configuration, and type the IPv4 address to activate
the target discovery.
•
Type the iSNS server IP address in the IPv6 settings area to activate
the target discovery.
After you manually enter an IP address, you can also click Advanced to
configure the customized TCP listening ports.
If you do not want to allow discovery sessions that are not named, select
the Disallow un-named discovery sessions.
NOTE: Un-named discovery sessions are discovery sessions that are
permitted to run without a target name. With an un-named discovery session,
the target name or the target portal group tag is not available to enforce the
iSCSI session identifier (ISID) rule.
5 Click OK.
Configuring the iSCSI Host Ports
The default method for configuring the iSCSI host ports, for IPv4 addressing,
is DHCP. Always use this method unless your network does not have a DHCP
server. It is advisable to assign static DHCP addresses to the iSCSI ports to
ensure continuous connectivity. For IPv6 addressing, the default method is
Stateless auto-configuration. Always use this method for IPv6.
To configure the iSCSI host ports:
1 In the AMW, select the Setup tab.
2 Select Configure iSCSI Host Ports.
The Configure iSCSI Host Ports window is displayed.
3 In the iSCSI host port list, select an appropriate RAID controller module
and an iSCSI host port.
The connection status between the storage array and the host is displayed
in the Status area when you select an iSCSI host port. The connection
status is either connected or disconnected. Additionally, the media access
control (MAC) address of the selected iSCSI host port is displayed in the
MAC address area.
NOTE: For each iSCSI host port, you can use either IPv4 settings, IPv6
settings, or both.
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4 In the Configured Ethernet port speed list, select a network speed for the
iSCSI host port.
The network speed values in the Configured Ethernet port speed list
depend on the maximum speed that the network can support. Only the
network speeds that are supported are displayed.
All of the host ports on a single controller operate at the same speed. An
error is displayed if different speeds are selected for the host ports on the
same controller.
5 To use the IPv4 settings for the iSCSI host port, select Enable IPv4 and
select the IPv4 Settings tab.
6 To use the IPv6 settings for the iSCSI host port, select Enable IPv6 and
select the IPv6 Settings tab.
7 To configure the IPv4 and IPv6 settings:
•
To automatically configure the settings, select Obtain configuration
automatically. This option is selected by default.
•
To manually configure the settings, select Specify configuration.
NOTE: If you select the automatic configuration method, the configuration is
obtained automatically using the DHCP for IPv4 settings. Similarly for IPv6
settings, the configuration is obtained automatically based on the MAC
address and the IPv6 routers present on the subnetwork.
NOTE: Click Advanced IPv4 Settings and Advanced IPv6 Settings to
configure the Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN) support and Ethernet
priority. Click the Advanced Host Port Settings to configure the TCP listening
port settings and Jumbo frame settings.
8 To enable the Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP), select Enable
ICMP PING responses.
The ICMP setting applies to all the iSCSI host ports in the storage array
configured for IPv4 addressing.
NOTE: The ICMP is one of the core protocols of the Internet Protocol suite.
The ICMP messages determine whether a host is reachable and how long it
takes to get packets to and from that host.
9 Click OK.
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Advanced iSCSI Host Ports Settings
NOTE: Configuring the advanced iSCSI host ports settings is optional.
Use the advanced settings for the individual iSCSI host ports to specify the
TCP frame size, the virtual LAN, and the network priority.
Table 7-2. Advanced iSCSI Host Port Settings
Setting
Description
Virtual LAN (VLAN)
A method of creating independent logical networks within a
physical network. Several VLANs can exist within a network.
VLAN 1 is the default VLAN.
NOTE: For more information on creating and configuring a
VLAN with MD Support Manager, in the AMW, click the Support
tab, then click View Online Help.
Ethernet Priority
The network priority can be set from lowest to highest.
Although network managers must determine these mappings,
the IEEE has made broad recommendations:
• 0—lowest priority (default).
• 1 to 4—ranges from “loss eligible” traffic to controlled-load
applications, such as streaming multimedia and businesscritical traffic.
• 5 and 6—delay-sensitive applications such as interactive
video and voice.
• 7—highest priority reserved for network-critical traffic (do
not use with the MD3600i).
TCP Listening Port
The default Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) listening
port is 3260.
Jumbo Frames
The maximum transmission units (MTUs). It can be set
between 1501 and 9000 Bytes per frame. If the Jumbo Frames
are disabled, the default MTU is 1500 Bytes per frame.
NOTE: Changing any of these settings resets the iSCSI port. I/O is interrupted to
any host accessing that port. You can access the I/O automatically after the port
restarts and the host logs in again.
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Viewing or Ending an iSCSI Session
You may want to end an iSCSI session for the following reasons:
•
Unauthorized access—If an initiator whom you consider to not have
access is logged on, you can end the iSCSI session. Ending the iSCSI
session forces the initiator to log off the storage array. The initiator can log
on if None authentication method is available.
•
System downtime—If you need to turn off a storage array and initiators are
logged on, you can end the iSCSI session to log off the initiators from the
storage array.
To view or end an iSCSI session:
1 In the AMW toolbar, select Storage Array iSCSI End Sessions.
2 Select the iSCSI session that you want to view in the Current sessions
area.
The details are shown below in the Details area. Click Save As to save the
entire iSCSI sessions topology as a text file.
3 To end the session:
a
Select the session that you want to end, and then click End Session.
The End Session confirmation window is displayed.
b
Type yes to confirm that you want to end the iSCSI session.
c
Click OK.
NOTE: If you end a session, any corresponding connections terminate the link
between the host and the storage array, and the data on the storage array is no
longer available.
NOTE: When a session is manually terminated using the MDSM, the iSCSI initiator
software automatically attempts to re-establish the terminated connection to the
storage array. This may cause an error message.
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Viewing iSCSI Statistics and Setting Baseline
Statistics
To view iSCSI statistics and set baseline statistics:
1 In the AMW toolbar, select Storage Array iSCSI Statistics.
The View iSCSI Statistics window is displayed.
2 Select the iSCSI statistic type you want to view in the iSCSI Statistics
Type area. You can select:
•
Ethernet MAC statistics
•
Ethernet TCP/IP statistics
•
Target (protocol) statistics
3 In the Options area, select:
•
Raw statistics—To view the raw statistics. Raw statistics are all the
statistics that are gathered since the RAID controller modules were
powered on.
•
Baseline statistics—To view the baseline statistics. Baseline statistics
are point-in-time statistics that are gathered since you set the baseline
time.
After you select the statistics type and either raw or baseline statistics, the
details of the statistics are displayed in the statistics tables.
NOTE: You can click Save As to save the statistics that you are viewing in a
text file.
4 To set the baseline for the statistics:
a
Select Baseline statistics.
b
Click Set Baseline.
c
Confirm that you want to set the baseline statistics in the dialog that
is displayed.
The baseline time shows the latest time you set the baseline. The sampling
interval is the difference in time from when you set the baseline until you
launch the dialog or click Refresh.
NOTE: You must first set a baseline before you can compare baseline
statistics.
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Edit, Remove, or Rename Host Topology
If you give access to the wrong host or the wrong host group, you can remove
or edit the host topology. Follow the appropriate procedures given in
Table 7-3 to correct the host topology:
Table 7-3. Host Topology Actions
Desired Action
Steps
Move a host
1 Click the Mappings tab.
Move a host group
2 Select the Host that you want to move, and then click
Mappings Move.
3 Select a host group to move the host to and click OK.
Manually delete the
host and the host group
1 Click the Mappings tab.
2 Select the item that you want to remove and select
Mappings Remove.
Rename the host, the
host group
1 Click the Mappings tab.
2 Select the item that you want to rename and select
Mappings Rename.
3 Type a new label for the host and click OK.
For more information about Host, Host Groups, and Host Topology, see
"Configuration: About Your Host" on page 99.
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Configuration: Event Monitor
8
An event monitor is provided with Dell PowerVault Modular Disk Storage
Manager (MDSM). The event monitor runs continuously in the background
and monitors activity on the managed storage arrays. If the event monitor
detects any critical problems, it can notify a host or remote system using email, Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) trap messages, or both.
For the most timely and continuous notification of events, enable the event
monitor on a management station that runs 24 hours a day. Enabling the
event monitor on multiple systems or having a combination of an event
monitor and MDSM active can result in duplicate events, but this does not
indicate multiple failures on the array.
To use the Event Monitor:
•
Set up alert destinations for the managed device that you want to monitor.
A possible alert destination would be the Dell Management Console. For
more information on the Dell Management Console, see dell.com.
•
Replicate the alert settings from a particular managed device by copying
the emwdata.bin file to every storage management station from which you
want to receive alerts.
Each managed device shows a check mark that indicates that alerts are set.
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Enabling or Disabling the Event Monitor
You can enable or disable the event monitor at any time.
Disable the event monitor if you do not want the system to send alert
notifications. If you are running the event monitor on multiple systems,
disabling the event monitor on all but one system prevents the sending of
duplicate messages.
NOTE: It is recommended that you configure the event monitor to start by default
on a management station that runs 24 hours a day.
Windows
To enable or disable the event monitor:
1 Click Start Administrative Tools Services.
or
Click Start Settings Control Panel Administrative Tools
Services.
2 From the list of services, select Modular Disk Storage Manager Event
Monitor.
3 Select Action Properties.
4 To enable the event monitor, in the Service Status area, click Start.
5 To disable the event monitor, in the Service Status area, click Stop.
Linux
To enable the event monitor, at the command prompt, type SMmonitor
start and press <Enter>. When the program startup begins, the system
displays the following message:
SMmonitor started.
To disable the event monitor, start terminal emulation application (console
ox xterm) and at the command prompt, type SMmonitor stop and press
<Enter>. When the program shutdown is complete, the following message
is displayed:
Stopping Monitor process.
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Configuration: About Your Host
9
Configuring Host Access
Dell PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager (MDSM) software is
comprised of multiple modules. One of these modules is the Host Context
Agent, which is installed as part of the MDSM installation and runs
continuously in the background.
If the Host Context Agent is running on a host, the host and the host ports
connected from it to the storage array are automatically detected by MDSM.
The host ports are displayed in the Mappings tab in the Array Management
Windoe (AMW). The host must be manually added under the Default Host
Group in the Mappings tab.
For more information on the Mappings tab, see "Using the Mappings Tab" on
page 100.
NOTE: The Host Context Agent is not dynamic and must be restarted after
establishing iSCSI sessions for MD3600i Series storage arrays to automatically
detect them.
Use the Define Host Wizard to define the hosts that access the virtual disks
in the storage array. Defining a host is one of the steps required to let the
storage array know which hosts are attached to it and to allow access to the
virtual disks. For more information on defining the hosts, see "Defining a
Host" on page 101.
To enable the host to write to the storage array, you must map the host to the
virtual disk. This mapping grants a host or a host group access to a particular
virtual disk or to a number of virtual disks in a storage array. You can define
the mappings on the Mappings tab in the AMW.
On the Summary tab in the AMW, the Hosts & Mappings area indicates how
many hosts are configured to access the storage array. Click Configured Hosts
in the Hosts & Mappings area to see the names of the hosts.
A collection of elements, such as default host groups, hosts, and host ports,
are displayed as nodes in the Topology pane of the Mappings tab in the
AMW.
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The host topology is reconfigurable. You can perform the following tasks:
•
Create a host and assign an alias or user label.
•
Add or associate a new host port identifier to a particular host.
•
Change the host port identifier alias or user label.
•
Move or associate a host port identifier to a different host.
•
Replace a host port identifier with a new host port identifier.
•
Manually activate an inactive host port so that the port can gain access to
host specific or host group specific LUN mappings.
•
Change the host port type to another type.
•
Move a host from one host group to another host group.
•
Remove a host group, a host, or a host port identifier.
•
Rename a host group or a host.
Using the Mappings Tab
In the Mappings tab, you can:
•
Define hosts and hosts groups
•
Add mappings to the selected host groups
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
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Defining a Host
You can use the Define Host Wizard in the AMW to define a host for a
storage array. Either a known unassociated host port identifier or a new host
port identifier can be added.
NOTE: A user label must be specified before the host port identifier may be added
(the add button is disabled until one is entered).
To define a host:
1 In the AMW, select the Mappings tab and select the appropriate storage
array.
2 Perform one of the actions:
•
Select Mappings Define Host.
•
Select the Setup tab, and click Manually Define Hosts.
•
Select the Mappings tab. Right-click the root node (storage array
name), Default Group node, or Host Group node in the Topology
pane to which you want to add the host, and select Define Host
from the pop-up menu.
The Specify Host Name window is displayed.
3 In Host name, enter an alphanumeric name of up to 30 characters.
4 Select the relevant option in Do you plan to use the storage partitions in
this storage array? and click Next.
The Specify Host Port Identifiers window is displayed.
5 Select the relevant option to add a host port identifier to the host, you can
select:
•
Add by selecting a known unassociated host port identifier—In
Known unassociated host port identifiers, select the relevant host
port identifier.
•
Add by creating a new host port identifier—In New host port
identifier, enter a 16 hexadecimal character name and an Alias of up
to 30 characters for the host port identifier, and click Add.
NOTE: The host port identifier name is in hexadecimal and must contain the letters A
through F and numbers 0 through 9.
6 Click Next.
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The Specify Host Type window is displayed.
7 In Host type, select the relevant operating system for the host.
The Host Group Question window is displayed.
8 In this window, you can select:
•
Yes—this host shares access to the same virtual disks with other hosts.
•
No—this host does NOT share access to the same virtual disks with
other hosts.
9 Click Next.
If you select Yes, the Specify Host Group window is displayed. If you
select No, see step 11.
10 Enter the name of the host group or select an existing host group and click
Next.
The Preview window is displayed.
11 Click Finish.
Removing Host Access
To remove host access:
1 In the AMW, select the Mappings tab, select the host node in the
Topology pane.
2 Perform one of these actions:
•
Select Mappings Remove.
•
Right-click the host node and select Remove from the pop-up menu.
The Remove confirmation dialog is displayed.
3 Type yes.
4 Click OK.
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
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Managing Host Groups
A host group is a logical entity of two or more hosts that share access to
specific virtual disks on the storage array. You create host groups with MDSM.
All hosts in a host group must have the same host type (operating system). In
addition, all hosts in the host group must have special software, such as
clustering software, to manage virtual disk sharing and accessibility.
If a host is part of a cluster, every host in the cluster must be connected to the
storage array, and every host in the cluster must be added to the host group.
Creating a Host Group
To create host groups:
1 In the AMW, select the Mappings tab.
2 In the Topology pane, select the storage array or the Default Group.
3 Perform one of the following actions:
•
Select Mappings Define Host Group.
•
Right-click the storage array or the Default Group, and select
Define Host Group from the pop-up menu.
4 Type the name of the new host group in Enter new host group name.
5 Select the appropriate hosts in the Select hosts to add area.
6 Click Add.
NOTE: To remove hosts, select the hosts in the Hosts in group area, and click
Remove.
7 Click OK.
The host group is added to the storage array.
Adding a Host to a Host Group
You can add a host to an existing host group or a new host group using the
Define Host Wizard. For more information, see "Defining a Host" on
page 101.
You can also move a host to a different host group. For more information, see
"Moving a Host to a Different Host Group" on page 104.
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Removing a Host From a Host Group
You can remove a host from the Topology pane on the Mappings tab of the
Array Management Window. For more information, see "Removing a Host
Group" on page 105.
Moving a Host to a Different Host Group
To move a host to a different host group:
1 In the AMW, select the Mappings tab, select the host node in the
Topology pane.
2 Perform one of these actions:
•
Select Mappings Move.
•
Right-click the host node, and select Move from the pop-up menu.
The Move Host dialog is displayed.
3 In the Select host group, select the host group to which you want to move
the host.
The Move Host Confirmation dialog is displayed.
4 Click Yes.
The host is moved to the selected host group with the following mappings:
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•
The host retains the specific virtual disk mappings assigned to it.
•
The host inherits the virtual disk mappings assigned to the host group
to which it is moved.
•
The host loses the virtual disk mappings assigned to the host group
from which it was moved.
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Removing a Host Group
To remove a host group:
1 In the AMW, select the Mappings tab, select the host node in the
Topology pane.
2 Perform one of these actions:
•
Select Mappings Remove.
•
Right-click the host node, and select Remove from the pop-up menu.
The Remove dialog is displayed.
3 Click Yes.
The selected host group is removed.
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
Host Topology
Host topology is the organization of hosts, host groups, and host interfaces
configured for a storage array. You can view the host topology in the
Mappings tab of the AMW. For more information, see "Using the Mappings
Tab" on page 100.
The following tasks change the host topology:
•
Moving a host or a host connection
•
Renaming a host group, a host, or a host connection
•
Adding a host connection
•
Replacing a host connection
•
Changing a host type
MDSM automatically detects these changes for any host running the host
agent software.
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Starting or Stopping the Host Context Agent
The host context agent discovers the host topology and starts and stops with
the host. The topology discovered by the Host Context Agent can be viewed
by clicking Configure Host Access (Automatic) in the Configure tab in the
MDSM.
You must stop and restart the Host Context Agent to see the changes to the
host topology if:
•
A new storage array is attached to the host server.
•
A host is added while turning on power to the RAID controller modules.
Linux
To start or stop the Host Context Agent, enter the following commands at
the prompt:
SMagent start
SMagent stop
You stop and then restart SMagent after:
•
Moving a controller offline or replacing a controller.
•
Removing host-to-array connections from or attaching host-to-array
connections to a Linux host server.
Windows
To start or stop the Host Context Agent:
1 Click Start Settings Control Panel Administrative Tools
Services.
or
Click Start Administrative Tools Services.
2 From the list of services, select Modular Disk Storage Manager Agent.
3 If the Host Context Agent is running, click Action Stop, then wait
approximately 5 seconds.
4 Click Action Start.
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I/O Data Path Protection
You can have multiple host-to-array connections for a host. Ensure that you
select all the connections to the array when configuring host access to the
storage array.
NOTE: See the Deployment Guide for more information on cabling configurations.
NOTE: For more information on configuring hosts see "Configuration: About Your
Host" on page 99.
If a component such as a RAID controller module or a cable fails, or an error
occurs on the data path to the preferred RAID controller module, the virtual
disk ownership is moved to the alternate non preferred RAID controller
module for processing. This failure or error is called failover.
Drivers for multi-path frameworks such as Microsoft Multi-Path IO (MPIO)
and Linux Device Mapper (DM) are installed on host systems that access the
storage array and provide I/O path failover.
For more information on Linux DM, see "Configuration: Device Mapper
Multipath for Linux" on page 195. For more information on MPIO, see
microsoft.com.
NOTE: You must have the multi-path driver installed on the hosts at all times, even
in a configuration where there is only one path to the storage system, such as a
single port cluster configuration.
During a failover, the virtual disk transfer is logged as a critical event, and an
alert notification is sent automatically if you have configured alert
destinations for the storage array.
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Managing Host Port Identifiers
You can manage the host port identifiers that are added to the storage array.
You can:
•
Add—Add or associate a new host port identifier to a particular host.
•
Edit—Change the host port identifier alias or user label. You can move
(associate) the host port identifier to a new host.
•
Replace—Replace a particular host port identifier with another host port
identifier.
•
Remove—Remove the association between a particular host port identifier
and the associated host.
To manage a host port identifier:
1 Perform one of these actions:
•
Right-click the host in the Topology pane, and select Manage Host
Port Identifiers in the pop-up menu.
•
From the menu bar, select Mappings Manage Host Port
Identifiers.
The Manage Host Port Identifiers dialog is displayed. You can choose to
manage the host port identifiers for a specific host or all of the host port
identifiers for all of the hosts in Show host port identifiers associated
with.
2 If you want to manage the host port identifiers for a specific host, select
the host from the list of hosts that are associated with the storage array. If
you want to manage the host port identifiers for all hosts, select All hosts
from the list of hosts that are associated with the storage array.
3 If you are adding a new host port identifier, go to step 4. If you are
managing an existing host port identifier, go to step 8.
4 Click Add.
The Add Host Port Identifier dialog is displayed.
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5 Select the method to add a host port identifier to the host. You can select:
•
Add by selecting a known unassociated host port identifier—Select
the appropriate host port identifier from the existing list of Known
unassociated host port identifiers.
•
Add by creating a new host port identifier—In New host port
identifier, enter the name of the new host port identifier.
6 In User label, enter an alphanumeric name of up to 30 character.
7 In Associated with host, select the appropriate host or host group.
8 Select the host port identifier that you would like to manage from the list
of host port identifiers in the Host port identifier information area.
9 Perform one of these actions for the selected host port identifier:
•
To edit the host port identifier—Select the appropriate host port
identifier and click Edit, the Edit Host Port Identifier dialog is
displayed, update User label and Associated with host and click Save.
•
To replace the host port identifier—Select the appropriate host port
identifier and click Replace, the Replace Host Port Identifier dialog is
displayed, replace the current host port identifier with a known
unassociated host port identifier or create a new host port identifier,
update User label and click Replace.
•
To remove the host port identifier—Select the appropriate host port
identifier and click Edit, the Remove Host Port Identifier dialog is
displayed, type yes and click OK.
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
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10
Configuration: Disk Groups and
Virtual Disks
Creating Disk Groups and Virtual Disks
Disk groups are created in the unconfigured capacity of a storage array, and
virtual disks are created in the free capacity of a disk group. The maximum
number of physical disks supported in a disk group is 30. The hosts attached
to the storage array read and write data to the virtual disks.
NOTE: Before you can create virtual disks, you must first organize the physical
disks into disk groups and configure host access. Then you can create virtual disks
within a disk group.
To create a virtual disk, use one of the following methods:
•
Create a new disk group from unconfigured capacity. First define the RAID
level and free capacity (available storage space) for the disk group, and
then define the parameters for the first virtual disk in the new disk group.
•
Create a new virtual disk in the free capacity of an existing disk group. You
only need to specify the parameters for the new virtual disk.
A disk group has a set amount of free capacity that is configured when the
disk group is created. You can use that free capacity to subdivide the disk
group into one or more virtual disks.
You can create disk groups and virtual disks using:
•
Automatic configuration—Provides the fastest method, but with limited
configuration options.
•
Manual configuration—Provides more configuration options.
When creating a virtual disk, consider the uses for that virtual disk, and select
an appropriate capacity for those uses. For example, if a disk group has a
virtual disk that stores multimedia files (which tend to be large) and another
virtual disk that stores text files (which tend to be small), the multimedia file
virtual disk requires more capacity than the text file virtual disk.
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A disk group must be organized according to its related tasks and subtasks.
For example, if you create a disk group for the Accounting Department, you
can create virtual disks that match the different types of accounting
transactions performed in the department: Accounts Receivable (AR),
Accounts Payable (AP), internal billing, and so forth. In this scenario, the AR
and AP virtual disks probably need more capacity than the internal billing
virtual disk.
NOTE: In Linux, the host must be rebooted after deleting virtual disks to reset the
/dev entries.
NOTE: Before you can use a virtual disk, you must register the disk with the host
systems. See "Host-to-Virtual Disk Mapping" on page 135.
Creating Disk Groups
You can create disk groups either using Automatic configuration or Manual
configuration.
To create disk groups using automatic configuration:
1 To start the Create Disk Group Wizard, perform one of these actions:
•
To create a disk group from unconfigured capacity in the storage
array—On the Logical tab, select an Unconfigured Capacity node,
and select Disk Group Create. Alternatively, you can right-click the
Unconfigured Capacity node, and select Create Disk Group from the
pop-up menu.
•
To create a disk group from unassigned physical disks in the storage
array—On the Physical tab, select one or more unassigned physical
disks of the same physical disk type, and select Disk Group Create.
Alternatively, right-click the unassigned physical disks, and select
Create Disk Group from the pop-up menu.
•
To create a secure disk group—On the Physical tab, select one or more
unassigned security capable physical disks of the same physical disk
type, and select Disk Group Create. Alternatively, right-click the
unassigned security capable physical disks, and select Create Disk
Group from the pop-up menu.
The Introduction (Create Disk Group) window is displayed.
2 Click Next.
The Disk Group Name and Physical Disk Selection window is displayed.
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3 Type the name of the disk group (up to 30 characters) in Disk group name.
4 Select the appropriate Physical Disk selection choices, you can select:
•
Automatic, see step
•
Manual, see step
5 Click Next.
For automatic configuration, the RAID Level and Capacity window is
displayed.
6 Select the appropriate RAID level in Select RAID level. You can select
RAID levels 0, 1/10, 6, and 5.
Depending on your RAID level selection, the physical disks available for
the selected RAID level are displayed in Select capacity table.
7 In the Select Capacity table, select the relevant disk group capacity, and
click Finish.
For manual configuration, the Manual Physical Disk Selection window is
displayed.
8 Select the appropriate RAID level in Select RAID level. You can select
RAID levels 0, 1/10, 6, and 5.
Depending on your RAID level selection, the physical disks available for
the selected RAID level are displayed in Unselected physical disks table.
9 In the Unselected physical disks table, select the appropriate physical
disks and click Add.
NOTE: You can select multiple physical disks at the same time by holding
<Ctrl> or <Shift> and selecting additional physical disks.
10 To view the capacity of the new disk group, click Calculate Capacity.
11 Click Finish.
A message prompts you that the disk group is successfully created and that
you must create at least one virtual disk before you can use the capacity of
the new disk group. For more information on creating virtual disks, see
"Creating Virtual Disks" on page 114.
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Locating a Disk Group
You can physically locate and identify all of the physical disks that comprise a
selected disk group. An LED blinks on each physical disk in the disk group.
To locate a disk group:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab.
2 Select the appropriate disk group and from the toolbar select Disk
Group Blink.
The LEDs for the selected disk group blink.
3 After locating the disk group, click OK.
The LEDs stop blinking.
4 If the LEDs for the disk group do not stop blinking, from the toolbar in
AMW, select Storage Array Blink Stop All Indications.
If the LEDs successfully stop blinking, a confirmation message is
displayed.
5 Click OK.
Creating Virtual Disks
Keep these important guidelines in mind when you create a virtual disk:
114
•
Many hosts can have 256 logical unit numbers (LUNs) mapped per storage
partition, but the number varies per operating system.
•
After you create one or more virtual disks and assign a mapping, you must
register the virtual disk with the operating system. In addition, you must
make sure that the host recognizes the mapping between the physical
storage array name and the virtual disk name. Depending on the operating
system, run the host-based utilities, hot_add and SMdevices.
•
If the storage array contains physical disks with different media types or
different interface types, multiple Unconfigured Capacity nodes may be
displayed in the Logical pane of the Logical tab. Each physical disk type
has an associated Unconfigured Capacity node if unassigned physical disks
are available in the expansion enclosure.
•
You cannot create a disk group and subsequent virtual disk from different
physical disk technology types. Each physical disk that comprises the disk
group must be of the same physical disk type.
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NOTE: Ensure that you create disk groups before creating virtual disks.
To create virtual disks:
1 Choose one of these methods to start the Create Virtual Disk Wizard:
•
To create a virtual disk from unconfigured capacity in the storage
array—On the Logical tab, select an Unconfigured Capacity node,
and select Virtual Disk Create. Alternatively, you can right-click the
Unconfigured Capacity node, and select Create Virtual Disk from
the pop-up menu.
•
To create a virtual disk from free capacity on a disk group—On the
Logical tab, select a Free Capacity node, and select Virtual Disk
Create. Alternatively, you can right-click the Free Capacity node, and
select Create Virtual Disk from the pop-up menu.
•
To create a virtual disk from unassigned physical disks in the storage
array—On the Physical tab, select one or more unassigned physical
disks of the same physical disk type, and select Virtual Disk Create.
Alternatively, you can right-click the unassigned physical disks, and
select Create Virtual Disk from the pop-up menu.
•
To create a secure virtual disk—On the Physical tab, select one or
more unassigned security capable physical disks of the same physical
disk type, and select Virtual Disk Create. Alternatively, you can
right-click the unassigned security capable physical disks, and select
Create Virtual Disk from the pop-up menu.
If you chose an Unconfigured Capacity node or unassigned physical disks
to create a virtual disk, the Disk Group Required dialog is displayed. Click
Yes and create a disk group by using the Create Disk Group Wizard. The
Create Virtual Disk Wizard is displayed after you create the disk group.
If you chose a Free Capacity node, the Introduction (Create Virtual Disk)
window is displayed.
2 Click Next.
The Specify Capacity/Name window is displayed.
3 Select the appropriate unit for memory in Units and enter the capacity of
the virtual disk in New virtual disk capacity.
4 In Virtual disk name, enter a virtual disk name of up to 30 characters.
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5 In Advanced virtual disk parameters, you can select:
•
Use recommended settings.
•
Customize settings.
6 If you select Use recommended settings in Advanced virtual disk
parameters, click Finish. Otherwise, click Next.
7 In the Customize Advanced Virtual Disk Parameters window, select the
appropriate Virtual Disk I/O characteristics type. You can select:
•
File system (typical)
•
Database
•
Multimedia
•
Custom
NOTE: If you select Custom, you must select an appropriate segment size.
8 Select the appropriate Preferred RAID controller module ownership.
9 Click Finish.
The virtual disks are created.
Changing the Virtual Disk Modification Priority
You can specify the modification priority setting for a single virtual disk or
multiple virtual disks on a storage array.
Guidelines to change the modification priority of a virtual disk:
•
If more than one virtual disk is selected, the modification priority defaults
to the lowest priority. The current priority is shown only if a single virtual
disk is selected.
•
Changing the modification priority by using this option modifies the
priority for the selected virtual disks.
To change the virtual disk modification priority:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab.
2 Select a virtual disk.
3 In the toolbar, select Virtual Disk Change Modification Priority.
The Change Modification Priority window is displayed.
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4 Select one or more virtual disks. Move the Select modification priority
slider bar to the desired priority.
NOTE: To select nonadjacent virtual disks, press <Ctrl> click. To select
adjacent virtual disks, press <Shift> click. To select all of the available virtual
disks, click Select All.
5 Click OK.
A message prompts you to confirm the change in the virtual disk
modification priority.
6 Click Yes.
7 Click OK.
Changing the Virtual Disk Cache Settings
You can specify the cache memory settings for a single virtual disk or for
multiple virtual disks in a storage array.
Guidelines to change cache settings for a virtual disk:
•
After opening the Change Cache Settings dialog, the system may display a
window indicating that the RAID controller module has temporarily
suspended caching operations. This action may occur when a new battery
is charging, when a RAID controller module is removed, or if a mismatch
in cache sizes is detected by the RAID controller module. After the
condition is cleared, the cache properties selected in the dialog become
active. If the selected cache properties do not become active, contact your
Technical Support representative.
•
If you select more than one virtual disk, the cache settings default to no
settings selected. The current cache settings are displayed only if you select
a single virtual disk.
•
If you change the cache settings by using this option, the priority of all of
the virtual disks that you selected is modified.
To change the virtual disk cache settings:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab and select a virtual disk.
2 In the toolbar, select Virtual Disk Change Cache Settings.
The Change Cache Settings window is displayed.
3 Select one or more virtual disks.
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To select nonadjacent virtual disks, press <Ctrl> click. To select adjacent
virtual disks, press <Shift> click. To select all of the available virtual disks,
click Select All.
4 In the Select cache properties area, you can select:
•
Enable read caching—to enable read caching.
•
Enable dynamic cache read prefetch—to enable dynamic cache read
prefetch.
•
Enable write caching—to enable write caching.
•
Enable write caching with mirroring—to mirror cached data
across two redundant RAID controller modules that have the
same cache size.
•
Enable write caching without batteries—to permit write caching
to continue even if the RAID controller module batteries are
discharged completely, not fully charged, or are not present.
CAUTION: Possible loss of data—Selecting the Enable write caching without
batteries option allows write caching to continue even when the batteries are
discharged completely or are not fully charged. Typically, write caching is turned
off temporarily by the RAID controller module until the batteries are charged. If you
select this option and do not have a universal power supply for protection, you
could lose data. In addition, you could lose data if you do not have RAID controller
module batteries and you select the Enable write caching without batteries
option.
NOTE: When the Optional RAID controller module batteries option is enabled,
the Enable write caching is not displayed. The Enable write caching without
batteries is still available, but it is not checked by default.
NOTE: Cache is automatically flushed after the Enable write caching check
box is disabled.
5 Click OK.
A message prompts you to confirm the change in the virtual disk
modification priority.
6 Click Yes.
7 Click OK.
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Changing the Segment Size of a Virtual Disk
You can change the segment size on a selected virtual disk. During this
operation, I/O performance is affected, but your data remains available.
Guidelines to proceed with changing the segment size:
•
You cannot cancel this operation after it starts.
•
Do not start this operation unless the disk group is in Optimal status.
•
MDSM determines the segment size transitions that are allowed. Segment
sizes that are inappropriate transitions from the current segment size are
unavailable on the menu. Allowed transitions usually are double or half of
current segment size. For example, if the current virtual disk segment size
is 32 KB, a new virtual disk segment size of either 16 KB or 64 KB is
allowed.
NOTE: The operation to change the segment size is slower than other modification
operations (for example, changing RAID levels or adding free capacity to a disk
group). This slowness is the result of how the data is reorganized and the temporary
internal backup procedures that occur during the operation.
The amount of time that a change segment size operation takes depends on:
•
The I/O load from the host
•
The modification priority of the virtual disk
•
The number of physical disks in the disk group
•
The number of physical disk ports
•
The processing power of the storage array RAID controller modules
If you want this operation to complete faster, you can change the
modification priority, although this may decrease system I/O performance.
To change the segment size of a virtual disk:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab and select a virtual disk.
2 Select Virtual Disk Change Segment Size.
3 Select the required segment size.
A message prompts you to confirm the selected segment size.
4 Click Yes.
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The segment size modification operation begins. The virtual disk icon in the
Logical pane shows an Operation in Progress status while the operation is
taking place.
NOTE: To view the progress or change the priority of the modification operation,
select a virtual disk in the disk group, and select Virtual Disk Change
Modification Priority.
Changing the I/O Type
You can specify the virtual disk I/O characteristics for the virtual disks that
you are defining as part of the storage array configuration. The expected I/O
characteristics of the virtual disk is used by the system to indicate an
applicable default virtual disk segment size and dynamic cache read prefetch
setting. For more information about the Automatic Configuration Wizard,
see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager online help topics.
NOTE: The dynamic cache read prefetch setting can be changed later by selecting
Virtual Disk Change Cache Settings. You can change the segment size later by
selecting Virtual Disk Change Segment Size.
The I/O characteristic types shown below are only presented during the create
virtual disk process.
When you choose one of the virtual disk I/O characteristics, the
corresponding dynamic cache prefetch setting and segment size that are
typically well suited for expected I/O patterns are populated in the Dynamic
cache read prefetch field and the Segment size field.
To change the I/O type:
1 Select from these virtual disk I/O characteristic types, based on your
application needs:
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•
File system (typical)
•
Database
•
Multimedia
•
Custom
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The corresponding dynamic cache read prefetch setting and segment size
values that are typically well suited for the selected virtual disk I/O
characteristic type are populated in the Dynamic cache read prefetch
field and the Segment size field.
NOTE: If you selected the Custom option, select your preferred dynamic
cache read prefetch setting (enabled/disabled) and segment size (8 KB to
512 KB).
2 Click OK.
Choosing an Appropriate Physical Disk Type
You can create disk groups and virtual disks in the storage array. You must
select the capacity that you want to allocate for the virtual disk from either
unconfigured capacity or free capacity available in the storage array. Then you
define basic and optional advanced parameters for the virtual disk.
With the advent of different physical disk technologies, it is now possible to
mix physical disks with different media types and different interface types
within a single storage array. In this release of MDSM, the following media
types are supported:
•
Hard physical disk
•
Solid State Disk (SSD)
Physical Disk Security with Self Encrypting Disk
Self Encrypting Disk (SED) technology prevents unauthorized access to the
data on a physical disk that is physically removed from the storage array. The
storage array has a security key. Self encrypting disks provide access to data
only through an array that has the correct security key.
The self encrypting disk or a security capable physical disk encrypts data
during writes and decrypts data during reads. For more information, see the
PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager online help topics.
You can create a secure disk group from security capable physical disks. When
you create a secure disk group from security capable physical disks, the
physical disks in that disk group become security enabled. When a security
capable physical disk is security enabled, the physical disk requires the correct
security key from a RAID controller module to read or write the data. All of
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the physical disks and RAID controller modules in a storage array share the
same security key. The shared security key provides read and write access to
the physical disks, while the physical disk encryption key on each physical disk
is used to encrypt the data. A security capable physical disk works like any
other physical disk until it is security enabled.
Whenever the power is turned off and turned on again, all of the security
enabled physical disks change to a security locked state. In this state, the data
is inaccessible until the correct security key is provided by a RAID controller
module.
You can view the self encrypting disk status of any physical disk in the storage
array from the Physical Disk Properties dialog. The status information
reports whether the physical disk is:
•
Security Capable
•
Secure—Security enabled or disabled
•
Read/Write Accessible—Security locked or unlocked
You can view the self encrypting disk status of any disk group in the storage
array. The status information reports whether the storage array is:
•
Security Capable
•
Secure
Table 10-1 shows how to interpret the security status of a disk group.
Table 10-1. Interpreting Security Status of a Disk Group
Secure
Security Capable - Yes
Security Capable - No
Yes
The disk group is composed of all Not applicable. Only SED
SED physical disks and is in a
physical disks can be in a Secure
Secure state.
state.
No
The disk group is composed of all The disk group is not entirely
SED physical disks and is in a
composed of SED physical disks.
Non-Secure state.
The Physical Disk Security menu is displayed in the Storage Array menu.
The Physical Disk Security menu has the following options:
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•
Create Security Key
•
Change Security Key
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•
Save Security Key File
•
Validate Security Key
•
Unlock Drives
NOTE: If you have not created a security key for the storage array, the Create
Security Key option is active. If you have created a security key for the storage
array, the Create Security Key option is inactive with a check mark to the left. The
Change Security Key option, the Save Security Key option, and the Validate
Security Key option are now active.
The Secure Physical Disks option is displayed in the Disk Group menu. The
Secure Physical Disks option is active if these conditions are true:
•
The selected storage array is not security enabled but is comprised entirely
of security capable physical disks.
•
The storage array contains no snapshot source virtual disks or snapshot
repository virtual disks.
•
The disk group is in an Optimal state.
•
A security key is set up for the storage array.
NOTE: The Secure Physical Disks option is inactive if these conditions are not true.
The Secure Physical Disks option is inactive with a check mark on the left if
the disk group is already security enabled.
The Create a secure disk group option is displayed in the Create Disk Group
Wizard–Disk Group Name and Physical Disk Selection dialog. The Create a
secure disk group option is active only when these conditions are met:
•
A security key is installed in the storage array.
•
At least one security capable physical disk is installed in the storage array.
•
All of the physical disks that you selected on the Physical tab are security
capable physical disks.
You can erase security enabled physical disks so that you can reuse the drives
in another disk group or in another storage array. When you erase security
enabled physical disks, ensure that the data cannot be read. When all of the
physical disks that you have selected in the Physical tab are security enabled,
and none of the selected physical disks is part of a disk group, the Secure
Erase option is displayed in the Physical Disk menu.
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The storage array password protects a storage array from potentially
destructive operations by unauthorized users. The storage array password is
independent from self encrypting disk and must not be confused with the
pass phrase that is used to protect copies of a security key. It is recommended
that you set a storage array password.
Creating a Security Key
When you create a security key, it is generated by and securely stored by the
array. You cannot read or view the security key. A copy of the security key must
be kept on some other storage medium for backup in case of system failure or
for transfer to another storage array. A pass phrase that you provide is used to
encrypt and decrypt the security key for storage on other media.
When you create a security key, you also provide information to create a
security key identifier. Unlike the security key, you can read or view the
security key identifier. The security key identifier is also stored on a physical
disk or transportable media. The security key identifier is used to identify
which key the storage array is using.
To create a security key:
1 In the AMW toolbar, select Storage ArrayPhysical Disk Security
Create Security Key.
2 Perform one of these actions:
•
If the Create Security Key dialog is displayed, go to step 6.
•
If the Storage Array Password Not Set or Storage Array Password Too
Weak dialog is displayed, go to step 3.
3 Choose whether to set (or change) the storage array password at this time.
124
•
Click Yes to set or change the storage array password. The Change
Password dialog is displayed. Go to step 4.
•
Click No to continue without setting or changing the storage array
password. The Create Security Key dialog is displayed. Go to step 6.
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4 In New password, enter a string for the storage array password. If you are
creating the storage array password for the first time, leave Current
password blank. Follow these guidelines for cryptographic strength when
you create the storage array password:
•
be between 8 and 32 characters long.
•
contain at least 1 uppercase letter.
•
contain at least 1 lowercase letter.
•
contain at least 1 number.
•
contain at least 1 non-alphanumeric character, for example, < > @
+.
5 In Confirm new password, re-enter the exact string that you entered in
New password.
6 In Security key identifier, enter a string that becomes part of the secure
key identifier.
You can enter up to 189 alphanumeric characters without spaces,
punctuation, or symbols. Additional characters are generated
automatically and is appended to the end of the string that you enter. The
generated characters help to ensure that the secure key identifier is
unique.
7 Enter a path and file name to save the security key file by doing one of the
following:
•
Edit the default path by adding a file name to the end of the path.
•
Click Browse to navigate to the required folder, then add a file name
to the end of the path.
8 In Pass phrase dialog box, enter a string for the pass phrase.
The pass phrase must:
•
be between 8 and 32 characters long.
•
contain at least 1 uppercase letter.
•
contain at least 1 lowercase letter.
•
contain at least 1 number.
•
contain at least 1 non-alphanumeric character, for example, < > @
+.
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The pass phrase that you enter is masked.
NOTE: Create Key is active only if the pass phrase meets the above
mentioned criterion.
9 In the Confirm pass phrase dialog box, re-enter the exact string that you
entered in the Pass phrase dialog box.
Make a record of the pass phrase that you entered and the security key
identifier that is associated with the pass phrase. You need this
information for later secure operations.
10 Click Create Key.
11 If the Invalid Text Entry dialog is displayed, select:
•
Yes—There are errors in the strings that were entered. The Invalid
Text Entry dialog is displayed. Read the error message in the dialog,
and click OK. Go to step 6.
•
No—There are no errors in the strings that were entered. Go to
step 12.
12 Make a record of the security key identifier and the file name from the
Create Security Key Complete dialog, and click OK.
After you have created a security key, you can create secure disk groups from
security capable physical disks. Creating a secure disk group makes the
physical disks in the disk group security enabled. Security enabled physical
disks enter Security Locked status whenever power is re-applied. They can be
unlocked only by a RAID controller module that supplies the correct key
during physical disk initialization. Otherwise, the physical disks remain
locked, and the data is inaccessible. The Security Locked status prevents any
unauthorized person from accessing data on a security enabled physical disk
by physically removing the physical disk and installing the physical disk in
another computer or storage array.
Changing a Security Key
When you change a security key, a new security key is generated by the
system. The new key replaces the previous key. You cannot view or read the
key. However, a copy of the security key must be kept on some other storage
medium for backup in case of system failure or for transfer to another storage
array. A pass phrase that you provide encrypts and decrypts the security key
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for storage on other media. When you change a security key, you also provide
information to create a security key identifier. Changing the security key does
not destroy any data. You can change the security key at any time.
Before you change the security key, ensure that:
•
All virtual disks in the storage array are in Optimal status.
•
In storage arrays with two RAID controller modules, both are present and
working normally.
To change the security key:
1 In the AMW toolbar, select Storage ArrayPhysical Disk Security
Change Security Key.
The Confirm Change Security Key window is displayed.
2 Type yes in the text field, and click OK.
The Change Security Key window is displayed.
3 In Secure key identifier, enter a string that becomes part of the secure key
identifier.
You may leave the text box blank, or enter up to 189 alphanumeric
characters without white space, punctuation, or symbols. Additional
characters are generated automatically.
4 Edit the default path by adding a file name to the end of the path or click
Browse, navigate to the required folder and enter the name of the file.
5 In Pass phrase, enter a string for the pass phrase.
The pass phrase must:
•
be between 8 and 32 characters long.
•
contain at least 1 uppercase letter.
•
contain at least 1 lowercase letter.
•
contain at least 1 number.
•
contain at least 1 non-alphanumeric character, for example, < > @
+.
The pass phrase that you enter is masked.
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6 In Confirm pass phrase, re-enter the exact string you entered in Pass
phrase.
Make a record of the pass phrase you entered and the security key
identifier it is associated with. You need this information for later secure
operations.
7 Click Change Key.
8 Make a record of the security key identifier and the file name from the
Change Security Key Complete dialog, and click OK.
Saving a Security Key
You save an externally storable copy of the security key when the security key
is first created and each time it is changed. You can create additional storable
copies at any time. To save a new copy of the security key, you must provide a
pass phrase. The pass phrase you choose does not need to match the pass
phrase used when the security key was created or last changed. The pass
phrase is applied to the particular copy of the security key you are saving.
To save the security key for the storage array:
1 In the AMW toolbar, select Storage ArrayPhysical Disk Security Save
Security Key File.
The Save Security Key File - Enter Pass Phrase window is displayed.
2 Edit the default path by adding a file name to the end of the path or click
Browse, navigate to the required folder and enter the name of the file.
3 In Pass phrase, enter a string for the pass phrase.
The pass phrase must:
•
be between 8 and 32 characters long.
•
contain at least 1 uppercase letter.
•
contain at least 1 lowercase letter.
•
contain at least 1 number.
•
contain at least 1 non-alphanumeric character, for example, < > @
+.
The pass phrase that you enter is masked.
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4 In Confirm pass phrase, re-enter the exact string you entered in Pass
phrase.
Make a record of the pass phrase you entered. You need it for later secure
operations.
5 Click Save.
6 Make a record of the security key identifier and the file name from the
Save Security Key Complete dialog and click OK.
Validate Security Key
A file in which a security key is stored is validated through the Validate
Security Key dialog. To transfer, archive, or back up the security key, the RAID
controller module firmware encrypts (or wraps) the security key and stores it
in a file. You must provide a pass phrase and identify the corresponding file to
decrypt the file and recover the security key.
Data can be read from a security enabled physical disk only if a RAID
controller module in the storage array provides the correct security key. If
security enabled physical disks are moved from one storage array to another,
the appropriate security key must also be imported to the new storage array.
Otherwise, the data on the security enabled physical disks that were moved is
inaccessible.
For more information on validating the security key, see the PowerVault
Modular Disk Storage Manager online help topics.
Unlocking Secure Physical Disks
You can export a security enabled disk group to move the associated physical
disks to a different storage array. After you install those physical disks in the
new storage array, you must unlock the physical disks before data can be read
from or written to the physical disks. To unlock the physical disks, you must
supply the security key from the original storage array. The security key on the
new storage array is different and cannot unlock the physical disks.
You must supply the security key from a security key file that was saved on the
original storage array. You must provide the pass phrase that was used to
encrypt the security key file to extract the security key from this file.
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
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Erasing Secure Physical Disks
In the AMW, when you select a security enabled physical disk that is not part
of a disk group, the Secure Erase menu item is enabled on the Physical Disk
menu. You can use the secure erase procedure to re-provision a physical disk.
You can use the Secure Erase option if you want to remove all of the data on
the physical disk and reset the physical disk security attributes.
CAUTION: Possible loss of data access—The Secure Erase option removes all of
the data that is currently on the physical disk. This action cannot be undone.
Before you complete this option, make sure that the physical disk that you
have selected is the correct physical disk. You cannot recover any of the data
that is currently on the physical disk.
After you complete the secure erase procedure, the physical disk is available
for use in another disk group or in another storage array. For more information
on the secure erase procedure, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage
Manager online help topics.
Configuring Hot Spare Physical Disks
Guidelines to configure host spare physical disks:
130
•
You can use only unassigned physical disks with Optimal status as hot
spare physical disks.
•
You can unassign only hot spare physical disks with Optimal, or Standby
status. You cannot unassign a hot spare physical disk that has the In Use
status. A hot spare physical disk has the In Use status when it is in the
process of taking over for a failed physical disk.
•
If a hot spare physical disk does not have Optimal status, follow the
Recovery Guru procedures displayed by the MDSM application to correct
any problem before trying to unassign the physical disk.
•
Hot spare physical disks must be of the same media type and interface type
as the physical disks that they are protecting.
•
If there are secure disk groups and security capable disk groups in the
storage array, the hot spare physical disk must match the security
capability of the disk group.
•
Hot spare physical disks must have capacities equal to or larger than the
used capacity on the physical disks that they are protecting.
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•
The availability of enclosure loss protection for a disk group depends on
the location of the physical disks that comprise the disk group. To make
sure that enclosure loss protection is not affected, you must replace a failed
physical disk to initiate the copyback process. See "Enclosure Loss
Protection" on page 134.
CAUTION: If a hot spare physical disk does not have Optimal status, follow the
Recovery Guru procedures to correct the problem before you try to unassign the
physical disk. You cannot assign a hot spare physical disk if it is in use (taking
over for a failed physical disk).
To assign or unassign hot spare physical disks:
1 In the AMW, select the Physical tab.
2 Select one or more physical disks.
3 Perform one of these actions:
•
Select Physical disk Hot Spare Coverage.
•
Right-click the physical disk and select Hot Spare Coverage from the
pop-up menu.
The Hot Spare Physical Disk Options window is displayed.
4 Select the appropriate option, you can select:
•
View/change current hot spare coverage—to review hot spare coverage
and to assign or unassign hot spare physical disks, if necessary. See
step 5.
•
Automatically assign physical disks— to create hot spare physical disks
automatically for the best hot spare coverage using available physical
disks.
•
Manually assign individual physical disks—to create hot spare physical
disks out of the selected physical disks on the Physical tab.
•
Manually unassign individual physical disks—to unassign the selected
hot spare physical disks on the Physical tab. See step 12.
5 To assign hot spares, in the Hot Spare Coverage window, select a disk
group in the Hot spare coverage area.
6 Review the information about the hot spare coverage in the Details area.
7 Click Assign.
The Assign Hot Spare window is displayed.
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8 Select the relevant physical disks in the Unassigned physical disks area, as
hot spares for the selected disk and click OK.
9 To unassign hot spares, in the Hot Spare Coverage window, select the
physical disks in the Hot spare physical disks area.
10 Review the information about the hot spare coverage in the Details area.
11 Click Unassign.
A message prompts you to confirm the operation.
12 Type yes and click OK.
Hot Spares and Rebuild
A valuable strategy to protect data is to assign available physical disks in the
storage array as hot spares. A hot spare adds another level of fault tolerance to
the storage array.
A hot spare is an idle, powered-on, stand-by physical disk ready for immediate
use in case of disk failure. If a hot spare is defined in an enclosure in which a
redundant virtual disk experiences a physical disk failure, a rebuild of the
degraded virtual disk is automatically initiated by the RAID controller
modules. If no hot spares are defined, the rebuild process is initiated by the
RAID controller modules when a replacement physical disk is inserted into
the storage array.
Global Hot Spares
The MD3600i Series supports global hot spares. A global hot spare can
replace a failed physical disk in any virtual disk with a redundant RAID level
as long as the capacity of the hot spare is equal to or larger than the size of the
configured capacity on the physical disk it replaces, including its metadata.
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Hot Spare Operation
When a physical disk fails, the virtual disk automatically rebuilds using an
available hot spare. When a replacement physical disk is installed, data from
the hot spare is copied back to the replacement physical disk. This function is
called copy back. By default, the RAID controller module automatically
configures the number and type of hot spares based on the number and
capacity of the physical disks in your system.
A hot spare may have the following states:
•
Standby hot spare—is a physical disk that is assigned as a hot spare and is
available to take over for any failed physical disk.
•
In-use hot spare—is a physical disk that is assigned as a hot spare and is
currently replacing a failed physical disk.
Hot Spare Drive Protection
You can use a hot spare physical disk for additional data protection from
physical disk failures that occur in a RAID level 1, or RAID level 5 disk group.
If the hot spare physical disk is available when a physical disk fails, the RAID
controller module uses redundancy data to reconstruct the data from the
failed physical disk to the hot spare physical disk. When you have physically
replaced the failed physical disk, a copyback operation occurs from the hot
spare physical disk to the replaced physical disk.
If there are secure disk groups and security capable disk groups in the storage
array, the hot spare physical disk must match the security capability of the
disk group. For example, a non-security capable physical disk cannot be used
as a hot spare for a secure disk group.
NOTE: For a security capable disk group, security capable hot spare physical disks
are preferred. If security capable physical disks are not available, non-security
capable physical disks may be used as hot spare physical disks. To ensure that the
disk group is retained as security capable, the non-security capable hot spare
physical disk must be replaced with a security capable physical disk.
If you select a security capable physical disk as hot spare for a non-secure disk
group, a dialog box is displayed indicating that a security capable physical disk
is being used as a hot spare for a non-secure disk group.
The availability of enclosure loss protection for a disk group depends on the
location of the physical disks that comprise the disk group. The enclosure loss
protection may be lost because of a failed physical disk and location of the hot
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spare physical disk. To make sure that enclosure loss protection is not
affected, you must replace a failed physical disk to initiate the copyback
process.
The virtual disk remains online and accessible while you are replacing the
failed physical disk, because the hot spare physical disk is automatically
substituted for the failed physical disk.
Enclosure Loss Protection
Enclosure loss protection is an attribute of a disk group. Enclosure loss
protection guarantees accessibility to the data on the virtual disks in a disk
group if a total loss of communication occurs with a single expansion
enclosure. An example of total loss of communication may be loss of power to
the expansion enclosure or failure of both RAID controller modules.
CAUTION: Enclosure loss protection is not guaranteed if a physical disk has
already failed in the disk group. In this situation, losing access to an expansion
enclosure and consequently another physical disk in the disk group causes a
double physical disk failure and loss of data.
Enclosure loss protection is achieved when you create a disk group where all
of the physical disks that comprise the disk group are located in different
expansion enclosures. This distinction depends on the RAID level. If you
choose to create a disk group by using the Automatic method, the software
attempts to choose physical disks that provide enclosure loss protection. If
you choose to create a disk group by using the Manual method, you must use
the criteria specified in Table 10-2.
Table 10-2. Criteria for Enclosure Loss Protection
RAID Level
Criteria for Enclosure Loss Protection
RAID level 5 Ensure that all the physical disks in the disk group are located in
or RAID level different expansion enclosures.
6
Because a RAID level 5 requires a minimum of 3 physical disks,
enclosure loss protection cannot be achieved if your storage array has
less than 3 expansion enclosures.
Because a RAID level 6 requires a minimum of 5 physical disks,
enclosure loss protections cannot be achieved if your storage array has
less than 5 expansion enclosures.
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Table 10-2.
RAID Level
Criteria for Enclosure Loss Protection (continued)
Criteria for Enclosure Loss Protection
RAID level 1 Ensure that each physical disk in a mirrored pair is located in a
different expansion enclosure. This enables you to have more than
two physical disks in the disk group within the same expansion
enclosure.
For example, if you are creating a six physical disk, disk group (3mirrored pairs), you can achieve enclosure loss protection with only
two expansion enclosures by specifying that the physical disk in each
mirrored pair are located in separate expansion enclosures. For
example:
• Mirror pair 1—Physical disk in enclosure 1, slot 1 and physical disk in
enclosure 2, slot 1.
• Mirror pair 2—Physical disk in enclosure 1, slot 2 and physical disk in
enclosure 2, slot 2.
• Mirror pair 3—Physical disk in enclosure 1, slot 3 and physical disk in
enclosure 2,slot 3.
Because a RAID level 1 disk group requires a minimum of two physical
disks, enclosure loss protections cannot be achieved if your storage
array has less than two expansion enclosures.
RAID level 0 Because RAID level 0 does not have consistency, you cannot achieve
enclosure loss protection.
Host-to-Virtual Disk Mapping
After you create virtual disks, you must map them to the host(s) connected to
the array.
Guidelines to configure host-to-virtual disk mapping:
•
Each virtual disk in the storage array can be mapped to only one host or
host group.
•
Host-to-virtual disk mappings are shared between controllers in the storage
array.
•
A unique LUN must be used by a host group or host to access a virtual
disk.
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•
Each host has its own LUN address space. MDSM permits the same LUN
to be used by different hosts or host groups to access virtual disks in a
storage array.
•
Not every operating system has the same number of LUNs available.
•
You can define the mappings on the Mappings tab in the AMW. See
"Using the Mappings Tab" on page 100.
Creating Host-to-Virtual Disk Mappings
Guidelines to define the mappings:
•
An access virtual disk mapping is not required for an out-of-band storage
array. If your storage array is managed using an out-of-band connection,
and an access virtual disk mapping is assigned to the Default Group, an
access virtual disk mapping is assigned to every host created from the
Default Group. To prevent this action from occurring, remove the access
virtual disk mapping from the Default Group.
•
Most hosts have 256 LUNs mapped per storage partition. The LUN
numbering is from 0 through 255. If your operating system restricts LUNs
to 127, and you try to map a virtual disk to a LUN that is greater than or
equal to 127, the host cannot access it.
•
An initial mapping of the host group or host must be created using the
Storage Partitioning Wizard before defining additional mappings. See
"Storage Partitioning" on page 147.
To create host to virtual disk mappings:
1 In the AMW, select the Mappings tab.
2 In the Topology pane, select:
•
Default Group
•
Undefined mappings node
•
Individual defined mapping
•
Host group
•
Host
3 In the toolbar, select Mappings Define Additional Mapping.
The Define Additional Mapping window is displayed.
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4 In Host group or host, select the appropriate host group or host.
All defined hosts, host groups, and the default group are displayed in the
list.
NOTE: When configuring an iSCSI storage array, including the MD3600i or
MD3620i, if a host or a host group is selected that does not have a SAS host
bus adapter (SAS HBA) host port defined, a warning dialog is displayed.
5 In Logical unit number, select a LUN. The supported LUNs are 0 through
255.
6 Select the virtual disk to be mapped in the Virtual Disk area.
The Virtual Disk area lists the names and capacity of the virtual disks that
are available for mapping based on the selected host group or selected
host.
7 Click Add.
NOTE: The Add button is inactive until a host group or host, LUN, and virtual
disk are selected.
8 To define additional mappings, repeat step 4 through step 7.
NOTE: After a virtual disk is mapped, it is no longer available in the Virtual
Disk area.
9 Click Close.
The mappings are saved. The Topology pane and the Defined Mappings
pane in the Mappings tab are updated to reflect the mappings.
Modifying and Removing Host-to-Virtual Disk Mapping
You can modify or remove a host-to-virtual disk mapping for several reasons,
such as an incorrect mapping or reconfiguration of the storage array.
Modifying or removing a host-to-virtual disk mapping applies to both hosts
and host groups.
To modify or remove host to virtual disk mapping:
NOTE: Before you modify or remove a host-to-virtual disk mapping, stop any data
access (I/O) to the virtual disks to prevent data loss.
1 In the AMW, select the Mappings tab.
2 In the Defined Mappings pane, perform one of these actions:
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•
Select a single virtual disk, and select Mappings Change
Mapping.
•
Right-click the virtual disk, and select Change Mapping from the
pop-up menu.
3 In Host group or host, select the appropriate host group or host.
By default, the drop-down list shows the current host group or the host
associated with the selected virtual disk.
4 In Logical unit number, select the appropriate LUN.
The drop down list shows only the currently available LUNs that are
associated with the selected virtual disk.
5 Click OK.
Stop any host applications associated with this virtual disk, and unmount
the virtual disk, if applicable, from your operating system.
6 In the Change Mapping dialog, click Yes to confirm the changes.
The mapping is checked for validity and is saved. The Defined Mappings
pane is updated to display the new mapping. The Topology pane is also
updated to reflect any movement of host groups or hosts.
NOTE: If a password is set on the storage array, the Enter Password dialog is
displayed. Type the current password for the storage array, and click OK.
7 If configuring a Linux host, run the rescan_dm_devs utility on the host,
and remount the virtual disk if required. This utility is installed on the host
as part of the MDSM install process.
8 Restart the host applications.
Changing Controller Ownership of the Virtual Disk
If the host has a single data-path to the MD storage array, the virtual disk
must be owned by the controller to which the host is connected. You must
configure this storage array before you start I/O operations and after the
virtual disk is created.
You can change the RAID controller module ownership of a standard virtual
disk or a snapshot repository virtual disk. You cannot directly change the
RAID controller module ownership of a snapshot virtual disk because the
snapshot virtual disk inherits the RAID controller module owner of its
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associated source virtual disk. Changing the RAID controller module
ownership of a virtual disk changes the preferred RAID controller module
ownership of the virtual disk.
During a virtual disk copy, the same RAID controller module must own both
the source virtual disk and the target virtual disk. Sometimes both virtual
disks do not have the same preferred RAID controller module when the
virtual disk copy starts. Therefore, the ownership of the target virtual disk is
automatically transferred to the preferred RAID controller module of the
source virtual disk. When the virtual disk copy is completed or is stopped,
ownership of the target virtual disk is restored to its preferred RAID controller
module. If ownership of the source virtual disk is changed during the virtual
disk copy, ownership of the target virtual disk is also changed. Under certain
operating system environments, it may be necessary to reconfigure the multipath driver before an I/O path can be used.
To change the ownership of the virtual disk to the connected controller:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab and select a virtual disk.
2 Select Virtual Disk Change Ownership/Preferred Path.
3 Select the appropriate RAID controller module slot and click Yes to
confirm the selection.
Removing Host-to-Virtual Disk Mapping
To remove the host to virtual disk mapping:
1 In the AMW, select the Mapping tab.
2 Select a virtual disk from the Defined Mappings pane.
3 Perform one of these actions:
•
Select Mappings Remove.
•
Right-click the virtual disk, and select Remove Mapping from the
pop-up menu.
4 Click Yes to remove the mapping.
Changing the RAID Controller Module Ownership of a Disk Group
You can change the RAID controller module ownership of a disk group.
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You can change the RAID controller module ownership of a standard virtual
disk or a snapshot repository virtual disk. You cannot directly change the
RAID controller module ownership of a snapshot virtual disk because the
snapshot virtual disk inherits the RAID controller module owner of its
associated source virtual disk. Changing the RAID controller module
ownership of a virtual disk changes the preferred RAID controller module
ownership of the virtual disk.
During a virtual disk copy, the same RAID controller module must own both
the source virtual disk and the target virtual disk. Sometimes both virtual
disks do not have the same preferred RAID controller module when the
virtual disk copy starts. Therefore, the ownership of the target virtual disk is
automatically transferred to the preferred RAID controller module of the
source virtual disk. When the virtual disk copy is completed or is stopped,
ownership of the target virtual disk is restored to its preferred RAID controller
module. If ownership of the source virtual disk is changed during the virtual
disk copy, ownership of the target virtual disk is also changed. Under certain
operating system environments, it may be necessary to reconfigure the multipath driver before an I/O path can be used.
To change the RAID controller module ownership of a disk group:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab and select a disk group.
2 Select Disk Group Change Ownership/Preferred Path.
3 Select the appropriate RAID controller module slot and click Yes to
confirm the selection.
CAUTION: Possible loss of data access—Changing ownership at the disk group
level causes every virtual disk in that disk group to transfer to the other RAID
controller module and use the new I/O path. If you do not want to set every virtual
disk to the new path, change ownership at the virtual disk level instead.
The ownership of the disk group is changed. I/O to the disk group is now
directed through this I/O path.
NOTE: The disk group may not use the new I/O path until the multi-path driver
reconfigures and recognizes the new path. This action usually takes less than 5
minutes.
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Changing the RAID Level of a Disk Group
Changing the RAID level of a disk group changes the RAID levels of every
virtual disk that comprises the disk group. Performance may be slightly
affected during the operation.
Guidelines to change the RAID level of a disk group:
•
You cannot cancel this operation after it begins.
•
The disk group must be in Optimal status before you can perform this
operation.
•
Your data remains available during this operation.
•
If you do not have enough capacity in the disk group to convert to the new
RAID level, an error message is displayed, and the operation does not
continue. If you have unassigned physical disks, use the Disk Group
Add Free Capacity (Physical Disks) option to add additional capacity to
the disk group. Then retry the operation.
To change the RAID level of a disk group:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab and select a disk group.
2 Select Disk Group Change RAID Level.
3 Select the appropriate RAID level and click Yes to confirm the selection.
The RAID level operation begins.
Removing a Host-to-Virtual Disk Mapping Using Linux DMMP
To remove a host-to-virtual disk mapping using Linux DMMP, follow these
steps:
1 Unmount the filesystem containing the virtual disk:
# umount filesystemDirectory
2 Run the following command to display multi-pathing topology:
# multipath -ll
Note the virtual disk that you want to delete from the mapping. For
example, the following information may be displayed:
mpath6 (3600a0b80000fb6e50000000e487b02f5) dm-10
DELL, MD32xx
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[size=1.6T][features=3 queue_if_no_path
pg_init_retries 50][hwhandler=1 rdac]
\_ round-robin 0 [prio=6][active]
\_ 1:0:0:2 sdf 8:80 [active][ready]
\_ round-robin 0 [prio=1][enabled]
\_ 0:0:0:2 sde 8:64 [active][ghost]
In this example, the mpath6 device contains two paths:
-- /dev/sdf at Host 1, Channel 0, Target 0, LUN 2
--/dev/sde at Host 0, Channel 0, Target 0, LUN 2
3 Flush the multi-pathing device mapping using the following command
# multipath -f /dev/mapper/mapth_x
where mapth_x is the device you want to delete.
4 Delete the paths related with this device using the following command:
# echo 1 > /sys/block/sd_x/device/delete
where sd_x is the SD node (disk device) returned by the multipath
command. Repeat this command for all paths related to this device.
For example:
#echo 1 > /sys/block/sdf/device/delete
#echo 1 > /sys/block/sde/device/delete
5 Remove mapping from MDSM, or delete the LUN if necessary.
6 If you want to map another LUN or increase volume capacity, perform this
action from MDSM.
NOTE: If you are only testing LUN removal, you can stop at this step.
7 If a new LUN is mapped or volume capacity is changed, run the following
command:
# rescan_dm_devs
8 Use the multipath -ll command to verify that:
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•
If a new LUN is mapped, the new LUN is detected and given a multipathing device node
•
If you increased volume capacity, the new capacity is displayed.
Restricted Mappings
Many hosts are able to map up to 256 LUNs (0 to 255) per storage partition.
However, the maximum number of mappings differs because of operating
system variables, failover driver issues, and potential data problems. The hosts
listed in the table have these mapping restrictions.
If you try to map a virtual disk to a LUN that exceeds the restriction on these
operating systems, the host is unable to access the virtual disk.
Operating System
Highest LUN
Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008
255
Linux
255
Guidelines when you work with host types with LUN mapping restrictions:
•
You cannot change a host adapter port to a restricted host type if there are
already mappings in the storage partition that would exceed the limit
imposed by the restricted host type.
•
Consider the case of the Default Group that has access to LUNs up to 256
(0 to 255) and a restricted host type is added to the Default Group. In this
case, the host that is associated with the restricted host type is able to
access virtual disks in the Default Group with LUNs within its limits. For
example, if the Default Group had two virtual disks mapped to LUNs 254
and 255, the host with the restricted host type would not be able to access
those two virtual disks.
•
If the Default Group has a restricted host type assigned and the storage
partitions are disabled, you can map only a total of 32 LUNs. Any
additional virtual disks that are created are put in the Unidentified
Mappings area. If additional mappings are defined for one of these
Unidentified Mappings, the Define Additional Mapping dialog shows the
LUN list, and the Add button is unavailable.
•
Do not configure dual mappings on a Windows host.
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•
If there is a host with a restricted host type that is part of a specific storage
partition, all of the hosts in that storage partition are limited to the
maximum number of LUNs allowed by the restricted host type.
•
You cannot move a host with a restricted host type into a storage partition
that already has LUNs mapped that are greater than what is allowed by the
restricted host type. For example, if you have a restricted host type that
allows only LUNs up to 31, you cannot move that restricted host type into
a storage partition that has LUNs greater than 31 already mapped.
The Default Group on the Mappings tab has a default host type. You can
change this type by selecting Storage Array Change Default Host Type.
If you set the default host type to a host type that is restricted, the maximum
number of LUNs allowed in the Default Group for any host is restricted to
the limit imposed by the restricted host type. If a particular host with a nonrestricted host type becomes part of a specific storage partition, you can
change the mapping to a higher LUN.
Changing the RAID Controller Module Ownership of a Virtual Disk or a
Disk Group
You can change the RAID controller module ownership of a virtual disk or a
disk group.
You can change the RAID controller module ownership of a standard virtual
disk or a snapshot repository virtual disk. You cannot directly change the
RAID controller module ownership of a snapshot virtual disk because the
snapshot virtual disk inherits the RAID controller module owner of its
associated source virtual disk. Changing the RAID controller module
ownership of a virtual disk changes the preferred RAID controller module
ownership of the virtual disk.
During a virtual disk copy, the same RAID controller module must own both
the source virtual disk and the target virtual disk. Sometimes both virtual
disks do not have the same preferred RAID controller module when the
virtual disk copy starts. Therefore, the ownership of the target virtual disk is
automatically transferred to the preferred RAID controller module of the
source virtual disk. When the virtual disk copy is completed or is stopped,
ownership of the target virtual disk is restored to its preferred RAID controller
module. If ownership of the source virtual disk is changed during the virtual
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disk copy, ownership of the target virtual disk is also changed. Under certain
operating system environments, it may be necessary to reconfigure the multipath driver before an I/O path can be used.
1 To change:
a
The RAID controller module ownership of a virtual disk—Go to
step 2.
b
The RAID controller module ownership of a disk group—Go to step 3.
2 To change the RAID controller module ownership of a virtual disk,
perform these steps:
a
Select the Logical tab.
b
Select the virtual disk.
c
Select Virtual Disk Change Ownership/Preferred Path.
Alternatively, you can right-click the virtual disk and select Change
Ownership/Preferred Path from the pop-up menu.
d
Select the RAID controller module.
CAUTION: Possible loss of data access—If you do not use a multi-path driver,
shut down any host applications that are currently using the virtual disk. This
action prevents application errors when the I/O path changes.
e
Click Yes.
The ownership of the virtual disk is changed. I/O to the virtual disk is now
directed through this I/O path. You are finished with this procedure.
NOTE: The virtual disk may not use the new I/O path until the multi-path driver
reconfigures and recognizes the new path. This action usually takes less than 5
minutes.
3 To change the RAID controller module ownership of a disk group, perform
these steps:
a
Select the Logical tab.
b
Select the disk group.
c
Select Disk Group Change Ownership/Preferred Path.
Alternatively, you can right-click the disk group and select Change
Ownership/Preferred Path from the pop-up menu.
d
Select the RAID controller module.
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CAUTION: Possible loss of data access—Changing ownership at the disk group
level causes every virtual disk in that disk group to transfer to the other RAID
controller module and use the new I/O path. If you do not want to set every virtual
disk to the new path, change ownership at the virtual disk level instead.
e
Click Yes.
The ownership of the disk group is changed. I/O to the disk group is now
directed through this I/O path.
NOTE: The disk group may not use the new I/O path until the multi-path driver
reconfigures and recognizes the new path. This action usually takes less than 5
minutes.
Changing the RAID Level of a Disk Group
Use the Change RAID Level option to change the RAID level on a selected
disk group. Using this option changes the RAID levels of every virtual disk
that comprises the disk group. Performance may be slightly affected during
the operation. Keep these guidelines in mind when you change the RAID
level of a disk group:
•
You cannot cancel this operation after it begins.
•
The disk group must be in Optimal status before you can perform this
operation. Your data remains available during this operation.
•
If you do not have enough capacity in the disk group to convert to the new
RAID level, an error message is displayed, and the operation does not
continue. If you have unassigned physical disks, use the Disk Group
Add Free Capacity (Physical Disks) option to add additional capacity to
the disk group. Then retry the operation.
To change the RAID level of a disk group:
1 Select the Logical tab.
2 Select the disk group.
3 Select Disk Group Change RAID Level.
4 Select the RAID level (RAID level 0, RAID level 1, RAID level 5, or RAID
level 6). The currently selected option is designated with a dot.
5 Click Yes.
The RAID level operation begins.
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Storage Partitioning
A storage partition is a logical entity consisting of one or more virtual disks
that can be accessed by a single host or shared among hosts that are part of a
host group. The first time you map a virtual disk to a specific host or host
group, a storage partition is created. Subsequent virtual disk mappings to that
host or host group do not create another storage partition.
One storage partition is sufficient if:
•
Only one attached host accesses all of the virtual disks in the storage array.
•
All attached hosts share access to all of the virtual disks in the storage array.
When you choose this type of configuration, all of the hosts must have the
same operating system and special software (such as clustering software) to
manage virtual disk sharing and accessibility.
More than one storage partition is required if:
•
Specific hosts must access specific virtual disks in the storage array.
•
Hosts with different operating systems are attached to the same storage
array. In this case, a storage partition is created for each host type.
You can use the Storage Partitioning Wizard to define a single storage
partition. The Storage Partitioning Wizard guides you through the major
steps required to specify which host groups, hosts, virtual disks, and
associated logical unit numbers (LUNs) are to be included in the storage
partition.
Storage partitioning fails when:
•
All mappings are defined.
•
You create a mapping for a host group that conflicts with an established
mapping for a host in the host group.
•
You create a mapping for a host in a host group that conflicts with an
established mapping for the host group.
Storage partitioning is unavailable when:
•
No valid host groups or hosts exist in the Topology pane on the Mappings
tab.
•
No host ports are defined for the host being included in the storage
partition.
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•
All mappings are defined.
NOTE: You can include a secondary virtual disk in a storage partition.
However, any hosts that are mapped to the secondary virtual disk has readonly access until the virtual disk is promoted to a primary virtual disk, or the
mirror relationship is removed.
Storage partitioning topology is the collection of elements, such as Default
Group, host groups, hosts, and host ports shown as nodes in the Topology
pane of the Mappings tab in the AMW. For more information, see "Using the
Mappings Tab" on page 100.
If a storage partitioning topology is not defined, an informational dialog is
displayed each time you select the Mappings tab. You must define the storage
partitioning topology before you define the actual storage partition.
Disk Group and Virtual Disk Expansion
Adding free capacity to a disk group is achieved by adding unconfigured
capacity on the array to the disk group. Data is accessible on disk groups,
virtual disks, and physical disks throughout the entire modification operation.
The additional free capacity can then be used to perform a virtual disk
expansion on a standard or snapshot repository virtual disk.
Disk Group Expansion
To add free capacity to a disk group:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab.
2 Select a disk group.
3 Select Disk Group Add Free Capacity (Physical Disks).
The Add Free Capacity window is displayed. Based on the RAID level, and
the enclosure loss protection of the current disk group, a list of unassigned
physical disks is displayed.
NOTE: If the RAID level of the disk group is RAID level 5, or RAID level 6, and
the expansion enclosure has enclosure loss protection, Display only physical disks
that ensures enclosure loss protection is displayed and is selected by default.
4 In the Available physical disks area, select physical disks up to the allowed
maximum number of physical disks.
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NOTE: You cannot mix different media types or different interface types
within a single disk group or virtual disk.
5 Click Add.
A message prompts you to confirm your selection.
6 To add the capacity to the disk group, click Yes.
You can also use the Command Line Interface (CLI) on both Windows and
Linux hosts to add free capacity to a disk group.
After the capacity expansion is completed, additional free capacity is available
in the disk group for creation of new virtual disks or expansion of existing
virtual disks.
Virtual Disk Expansion
Virtual disk expansion is a dynamic modification operation that increases the
capacity of standard virtual disks.
NOTE: Snapshot repository virtual disks can be expanded from the CLI or from
MDSM. All other virtual disk types are expandable only from the CLI.
If you receive a warning that the snapshot repository virtual disk is becoming
full, you may expand the snapshot repository virtual disk from MDSM. See
"Snapshot Repository Capacity" on page 169 for step-by-step instructions.
Using Free Capacity
You can increase the capacity of a virtual disk using the free capacity on the
disk group of the standard virtual disk or the snapshot repository virtual disk.
The Free Capacity node, shown in the Logical pane, is a contiguous region of
unassigned capacity on a defined disk group. When increasing virtual disk
capacity, some or all of the free capacity may be used to achieve the required
final capacity. Data on the selected virtual disk remains accessible while the
process for increasing virtual disk capacity is in progress.
Using Unconfigured Capacity
You can increase the capacity of a standard virtual disk or a snapshot
repository virtual disk using the unconfigured capacity when no free capacity
exists on a disk group. An increase is achieved by adding unconfigured
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capacity, in the form of unassigned physical disks to the disk group of the
standard virtual disk or the snapshot repository virtual disk. See "Disk Group
Expansion" on page 148.
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
Disk Group Migration
Disk group migration allows to you export a disk group so that you can import
the disk group to a different storage array. You can also export a disk group so
that you can store the data offline.
NOTE: During the export process (before the disk group is imported) you lose
access to the data on the exported disk group.
NOTE: You must export a disk group before you move the disk group or import the
disk group.
Export Disk Group
The export disk group operation prepares the physical disks in the disk group
for removal. You can remove the physical disks for offline storage, or you can
import the disk group to a different storage array. After you complete the
export disk group operation, all of the physical disks are offline. Any
associated virtual disks or free capacity nodes are no longer shown in MDSM.
Non-Exportable Components
You must remove or clear any non-exportable settings before you can
complete the export disk group procedure. Remove or clear the following
settings:
150
•
Persistent reservations
•
Host-to-virtual disk mappings
•
Virtual disk copy pairs
•
Snapshot virtual disks and snapshot repository virtual disks
•
Remote mirror pairs
•
Mirror repositories
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Exporting a Disk Group
On the source storage array:
1 Save the storage array configuration.
2 Stop all I/O and unmount or disconnect the file systems on the virtual
disks in the disk group.
3 Back up the data on the virtual disks in the disk group.
4 Locate the disk group and label the physical disks.
5 Place the disk group offline.
6 Obtain blank physical disk modules or new physical disks.
On the target storage array:
1 Verify that the target storage array has available physical disk slots.
2 Verify that the target storage array supports the physical disks that you
import.
3 Verify that the target storage array can support the new virtual disks.
4 Verify that the latest version of firmware is installed on the RAID
controller module.
Import Disk Group
The import disk group operation adds the imported disk group to the target
storage array. After you complete the import disk group operation, all of the
physical disks have Optimal status. Any associated virtual disks or free
capacity nodes are now shown in MDSM installed on the target storage array.
NOTE: You lose access to your data during the export/import process.
NOTE: You must export a disk group before you move the disk group or import the
disk group.
Importing a Disk Group
NOTE: You must insert all of the physical disks that are part of the disk group into
the enclosure before the disk group can be imported.
On the target storage array:
1 Insert the exported physical disks into the available physical disk slots.
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2 Review the Import Report for an overview of the disk group that you are
importing.
3 Check for non-importable components.
4 Confirm that you want to proceed with the import procedure.
NOTE: Some settings cannot be imported during the import disk group
procedure.
The following settings are removed/cleared during the procedure:
•
Persistent reservations
•
Host-to-virtual disk mappings
•
Virtual disk copy pairs
•
Snapshot virtual disks and snapshot repository virtual disks
•
Remote mirror pairs
•
Mirror repositories
Non-Importable Components
Some components cannot be imported during the import disk group
procedure. These components are removed during the procedure:
•
Persistent reservations
•
Mappings
•
Virtual disk copy pairs
•
Snapshot virtual disks and snapshot repository virtual disks
Storage Array Media Scan
The media scan is a background operation that examines virtual disks to
verify that data is accessible. The process finds media errors before normal
read and write activity is disrupted and reports errors to the event log.
NOTE: You cannot enable background media scans on a virtual disk comprised of
Solid State Disks (SSDs).
Errors discovered by the media scan include:
•
152
Unrecovered media error—Data could not be read on the first attempt or
on any subsequent attempts. For virtual disks with redundancy protection,
data is reconstructed, rewritten to the physical disk, and verified and the
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error is reported to the event log. For virtual disks without redundancy
protection (RAID level 1, RAID level 5, and RAID level 6 virtual disks), the
error is not corrected but is reported to the event log.
•
Recovered media error—Data could not be read by the physical disk on the
first attempt but was successfully read on a subsequent attempt. Data is
rewritten to the physical disk and verified and the error is reported to the
event log.
•
Redundancy mismatches error—The first 10 redundancy mismatches that
are found on the virtual disk are reported to the event log.
•
Unfixable error—Data could not be read and parity or redundancy
information could not be used to regenerate the data. For example,
redundancy information cannot be used to reconstruct the data on a
degraded virtual disk. The error is reported to the event log.
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
Changing Media Scan Settings
To change the media scan settings:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab and select any virtual disk.
2 Select Virtual Disk Change Media Scan Settings.
The Change Media Scan Settings window is displayed.
3 Deselect Suspend media scan if selected.
4 In Scan duration, enter or select the duration (in days) for the media scan.
The media scan duration specifies the number of days for which the media
scan runs on the selected virtual disks.
5 To disable media scans on an individual virtual disk, select the virtual disk
in the Select virtual disks to scan area, and deselect Scan selected virtual
disks.
6 To enable media scans on an individual virtual disk, select the virtual disk
in the Select virtual disks to scan area, and select Scan selected virtual
disks.
7 To enable or disable the consistency check, select either With consistency
check or Without consistency check.
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NOTE: A consistency check scans the data blocks in a RAID level 5 virtual
disk, or a RAID level 6 virtual disk and checks the consistency information for
each block. A consistency check compares data blocks on RAID level 1
mirrored physical disks. RAID level 0 virtual disks have no data consistency.
8 Click OK.
Suspending the Media Scan
You cannot perform a media scan while performing another long-running
operation on the disk drive such as reconstruction, copy-back,
reconfiguration, virtual disk initialization, or immediate availability
formatting. If you want to perform another long-running operation, you must
suspend the media scan.
NOTE: A background media scan is the lowest priority of the long-running
operations.
To suspend a media scan:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab and select any virtual disk.
2 Select Virtual Disk Change Media Scan Settings.
The Change Media Scan Settings window is displayed.
3 Select Suspend media scan.
NOTE: This applies to all the virtual disks on the disk group.
4 Click OK.
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11
Configuration: Premium Feature—
Snapshot Virtual Disks
NOTE: If you ordered this feature, you received a Premium Feature Activation card
shipped in the same box as your Dell PowerVault MD storage array. Follow the
directions on the card to obtain a key file and to enable the feature.
NOTE: The snapshot feature allows up to 16 snapshots per LUN and 256 per array
to be present at the same time.
A snapshot virtual disk is a point-in-time image of a virtual disk in a storage
array. It is not an actual virtual disk containing a copy of the original data; it is
a reference to the data that was contained on a virtual disk at a specific time.
A snapshot virtual disk is the logical equivalent of a complete physical copy.
However, you can create a snapshot virtual disk much faster than a physical
copy, using less disk space.
The virtual disk on which the snapshot is based, called the source virtual disk,
must be a standard virtual disk in your storage array. Typically, you create a
snapshot so that an application, such as a backup application, can access the
snapshot and read the data while the source virtual disk remains online and
accessible.
NOTE: No I/O requests are permitted on the source virtual disk while the virtual
disk snapshot is being created.
A snapshot repository virtual disk containing metadata and copy-on-write
data is automatically created when a snapshot virtual disk is created. The only
data stored in the snapshot repository virtual disk is that which has changed
since the time of the snapshot.
After the snapshot repository virtual disk is created, I/O write requests to the
source virtual disk resume. Before a data block on the source virtual disk is
modified, the contents of the block to be modified are copied to the snapshot
repository virtual disk for safekeeping. Because the snapshot repository virtual
disk stores copies of the original data in those data blocks, further changes to
those data blocks write only to the source virtual disk. The snapshot
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repository uses less disk space than a full physical copy, because the only data
blocks that are stored in the snapshot repository virtual disk are those that
have changed since the time of the snapshot.
Source
Virtual Disk
Initial Snapshot copies
pointers to snapshot
repositories
New writes come and
original blocks are
moved to the Snapshot
Repository
Snapshot
Repository
Snapshot
Reference
Image
When you create a snapshot virtual disk, specify its location, capacity,
schedule, and other parameters. You can disable or delete the snapshot virtual
disk when it is not required. If you disable a snapshot virtual disk, you can recreate and reuse it the next time you perform a backup. For more
information, see "Re-creating Snapshot Virtual Disks" on page 173. If you
delete a snapshot virtual disk, you also delete the associated snapshot
repository virtual disk.
NOTE: If the Source Virtual Disk is in the offline state, the corresponding
Snapshot(s) Repository(ies) and Snapshot(s) Virtual Disk(s) is in Failed state.
NOTE: Deleting a snapshot does not affect data on the source virtual disk.
NOTE: The following host preparation sections also apply when using the snapshot
feature through the CLI interface.
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Scheduling a Snapshot Virtual Disk
When you create a snapshot virtual disk, you can choose whether the
snapshot is created immediately or is created according to a schedule that you
determine. This schedule can be a one-time snapshot creation or an ongoing
snapshot creation that occurs at regularly occurring intervals. If a schedule is
not specified, the snapshot virtual disk creation happens immediately upon
execution of the command.
A schedule can be specified when a snapshot virtual disk is first created, or it
can be added to an existing snapshot virtual disk at any time. One schedule
per snapshot virtual disk is supported.
Common Reasons for Scheduling a Snapshot Virtual Disk
Scheduling a snapshot virtual disk can serve multiple purposes across a data
storage environment. Most common uses of a snapshot scheduler are:
•
Data backups
•
Rapid recovery from a data loss event
A scheduled data backup can protect against data loss on a regular,
unmonitored basis. For example, if an application stores business-critical data
on two virtual disks in the storage array, you may choose to perform an
automatic backup every day. To implement this backup, select the first virtual
disk and create a backup schedule that runs once a day, Monday through
Friday, at a time between the end of the work day and 11PM. Do not select an
end date. Apply the same schedule to the second virtual disk, then map the
two snapshot virtual disks to your backup host server and perform your
regular backup procedures. Remember to unmap the two resulting snapshot
virtual disks before the next scheduled snapshot begins. If the snapshot
virtual disks are not unmapped, the storage array does not perform the next
scheduled snapshot operation in order to avoid data corruption.
Scheduled snapshots are also valuable in the event of a data loss. For example,
if you back up your data at the end of every work day and keep hourly
snapshots from 8AM to 5PM, data can be recovered from the snapshots in
windows smaller than one hour. To accomplish this type of rapid recovery,
create a schedule that contains a start time of 8AM and an end time of 5PM,
then select 10 snapshots per day on Monday through Friday with no end date.
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For more information on creating snapshot virtual disk schedules, see the
following sections on creating snapshots.
Guidelines for Creating Snapshot Schedules
Certain guidelines apply when creating snapshot virtual disk schedules:
•
Scheduled virtual disk snapshot operations do not occur if:
–
The snapshot virtual disk is mapped
–
The storage array is offline or powered off
–
The snapshot virtual disk is in use as a source virtual disk during a
Virtual Disk Copy operation
–
A copy operation is Pending or In progress
•
Deleting a snapshot virtual disk that contains a schedule also deletes the
schedule
•
Snapshot schedules are stored in the configuration database on the storage
array. The Management Station does not need to be running for scheduled
snapshot operations to occur.
•
Snapshot schedules can be created when the snapshot virtual disk is
initially created or can be added to existing snapshot virtual disks.
Enabling and Disabling Snapshot Schedules
A scheduled snapshot operation can be temporarily suspended by disabling
the schedule. When a schedule is disabled, the schedule timer continues to
run but any scheduled snapshot operation do not occur.
Scheduled Snapshot Icons
Scheduled snapshots are displayed in the AMW using the following icons.
Icon
Description
The schedule is enabled. Scheduled snapshots occurs.
The schedule is disabled. Scheduled snapshots do not occur.
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For more information on scheduling snapshots virtual disks, see the
PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager online help topics and the CLI
Guide.
Creating a Snapshot Virtual Disk Using the
Simple Path
You can choose the simple path to create a snapshot virtual disk if the disk
group of the source virtual disk has the required amount of free space. A
snapshot repository virtual disk requires a minimum of 8 MB free capacity.
The destination of a snapshot repository virtual disk is determined based on
the free capacity available in the disk group.
If 8 MB of free capacity is not available in the disk group of the source virtual
disk, the Create Snapshot Virtual Disks feature defaults to the advanced path.
For more information, see "Creating a Snapshot Virtual Disk Using the
Advanced Path" on page 162.
In the advanced path option, you can choose to place the snapshot repository
virtual disk in another disk group or you can use unconfigured capacity on the
storage array to create a new disk group.
About the Simple Path
Using the simple path, you can specify:
•
Snapshot Virtual Disk Name—A user-specified name that helps you
associate the snapshot virtual disk to its corresponding snapshot repository
virtual disk and source virtual disk.
•
Snapshot Repository Virtual Disk Name—A user-specified name that
helps you associate the snapshot repository virtual disk to its corresponding
snapshot virtual disk and source virtual disk.
•
Snapshot Repository Virtual Disk Capacity—The snapshot repository
virtual disk capacity is expressed as a percentage of the source virtual disk
capacity (maximum 220 percent).
•
Schedule—Creates the snapshot virtual disk at a specified time, or
according to a regularly occurring interval. If no schedule is specified, the
snapshot operation begins immediately. This parameter can also be used to
apply a schedule to an existing snapshot virtual disk.
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Using the simple path, the following defaults are used for the other
parameters of a snapshot virtual disk:
•
Capacity Allocation—The snapshot repository virtual disk is created using
free capacity on the same disk group where the source virtual disk resides.
•
Host-to-Virtual Disk Mapping—The default setting is Map now.
•
Percent Full—When the snapshot repository virtual disk reaches the
specified repository full percentage level, the event is logged in the Major
Event Log (MEL). The default snapshot repository full percentage level is
50% of the source virtual disk.
•
Snapshot Repository Virtual Disk Full Conditions—When the snapshot
repository virtual disk is full, you are given a choice of failing write activity
to the source virtual disk or failing the snapshot virtual disk.
Preparing Host Servers to Create the Snapshot Using the Simple Path
NOTE: Before using the Snapshot Virtual Disks Premium Feature in a Microsoft
Windows clustered configuration, you must first map the snapshot virtual disk to
the cluster node that owns the source virtual disk. This ensures that the cluster
nodes correctly recognize the snapshot virtual disk.
NOTE: Mapping the snapshot virtual disk to the node that does not own the source
virtual disk before the Snapshot enabling process is completed can result in the
operating system mis-identifying the snapshot virtual disk. This, in turn, can result in
data loss on the source virtual disk or an inaccessible snapshot.
NOTE: For more information on mapping the snapshot virtual disk to the secondary
node, see the Dell PowerVault MD3600i and MD3620i Storage Arrays With
Microsoft Windows Server Failover Clusters at support.dell.com/manuals.
NOTE: You can create concurrent snapshots of a source virtual disk on both the
source disk group and on another disk group.
Before creating a Snapshot Virtual Disk:
•
The following types of virtual disks are not valid source virtual disks:
•
Snapshot repository virtual disks
•
Snapshot virtual disks
•
Target virtual disks that are participating in a virtual disk copy
NOTE: Virtual Disk Copy is an Advanced (Premium) feature.
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•
You cannot create a snapshot of a virtual disk that contains unreadable
sectors.
•
You must satisfy the requirements of your host operating system for
creating snapshot virtual disks. Failure to meet the requirements of your
host operating system results in an inaccurate snapshot of the source
virtual disk or the target virtual disk in a virtual disk copy.
NOTE: Before you create a new snapshot of a source virtual disk, stop any data
access (I/O) activity or suspend data transfer to the source virtual disk to ensure
that you capture an accurate snapshot of the source virtual disk. Close all
applications, including Windows Internet Explorer, to make sure all I/O activity has
stopped.
NOTE: Removing the drive letter of the associated virtual disk(s) in Windows or
unmounting the virtual drive in Linux helps to guarantee a stable copy of the drive
for the Snapshot.
Before creating a snapshot virtual disk, the host server has to be in the proper
state. To ensure that the host server is properly prepared to create a snapshot
virtual disk, you can either use an application to carry out this task, or you can
perform the following steps:
1 Stop all I/O activity to the source.
2 In the AMW, select the Logical tab and select a valid source virtual disk.
3 Select Virtual Disk Snapshot Create. Alternatively, you can rightclick the source virtual disk and select Create Snapshot Virtual Disk from
the pop-up menu.
The Create Snapshot Virtual Disk Wizard - Introduction dialog is
displayed.
4 Select Simple (Recommended) and click Next.
The Specify Snapshot Schedule window is displayed.
5 Select Yes to set up a schedule for the new snapshot virtual disk creation.
To skip this option and create the snapshot immediately, select No.
6 If you specified a snapshot schedule, define the schedule details in the
Create Snapshot Schedule window and click Next.
7 Enter the Snapshot virtual disk name and the Snapshot repository virtual
disk name and click Next.
The Specify Snapshot Repository Capacity window is displayed.
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8 Enter the snapshot repository virtual disks capacity as a percentage of the
source virtual disks capacity and click Next.
The Preview window containing the summary of the snapshot virtual disk
is displayed.
9 Click Finish.
The Completed window is displayed.
10 Click OK.
After creating one or more snapshot virtual disks, mount the source virtual
disk, and restart the host application using that source virtual disk.
11 In the AMW, select the Mappings tab, assign mappings between the
snapshot virtual disk and the host that accesses the snapshot virtual disk.
NOTE: In some cases, conflicts may result from mapping the same host to
both a source virtual disk and its associated snapshot virtual disk. This
conflict depends on the host operating system and any virtual disk manager
software in use.
12 To register the snapshot virtual disk with the host operating system, run
the host-based hot_add utility.
13 To associate the mapping between the storage array name and the virtual
disk name, run the host-based SMdevices utility.
NOTE: If your operating system requires additional instructions, you can find those
instructions in your operating system documentation.
Creating a Snapshot Virtual Disk Using the
Advanced Path
About the Advanced Path
Use the advanced path to choose whether to place the snapshot repository
virtual disk on free capacity or unconfigured capacity and to change the
snapshot repository virtual disk parameters. You can select the advanced path
regardless of whether you use free capacity or unconfigured capacity for the
snapshot virtual disk.
Using the advanced path, you can specify the following parameters for your
snapshot virtual disk:
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•
Snapshot Virtual Disk Name—A user-specified name that helps you
associate the snapshot virtual disk to its corresponding snapshot repository
virtual disk and source virtual disk.
•
Snapshot Repository Virtual Disk Name—A user-specified name that
helps you associate the snapshot repository virtual disk to its corresponding
snapshot virtual disk and source virtual disk.
•
Capacity Allocation—This parameter allows you to choose where to create
the snapshot repository virtual disk. You can allocate capacity by using one
of the following methods:
–
Use free capacity on the same disk group where the source virtual disk
resides.
–
Use free capacity on another disk group.
–
Use unconfigured capacity and create a new disk group for the
snapshot repository virtual disk.
–
It is recommended placing the snapshot repository virtual disk within
the disk group of the source virtual disk. This ensures that if drives
associated with the disk group are moved to another storage array, all
the virtual disks associated with the snapshot virtual disk remain in
the same group.
•
Snapshot Repository Virtual Disk Capacity—The snapshot repository
virtual disk capacity is expressed as a percentage of the source virtual disk
capacity (maximum 220 percent).
•
Percent Full—When the snapshot repository virtual disk reaches the userspecified repository full percentage level, the event is logged in the Major
Event Log (MEL). The default snapshot repository full percentage level is
50% of the source virtual disk.
•
Snapshot Repository Virtual Disk Full Conditions—Choose whether to
fail writes to the source virtual disk or fail the snapshot virtual disk when
the snapshot repository virtual disk becomes full.
•
Host-to-Virtual Disk Mapping—Choose whether to map the snapshot
virtual disk to a host or host group now or to map the snapshot virtual disk
later. The default setting is Map later.
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•
Schedule—Creates the snapshot virtual disk at a specified time, or
according to a regularly occurring interval. If no schedule is specified, the
snapshot operation begins immediately. This parameter can also be used to
apply a schedule to an existing snapshot virtual disk.
Preparing Host Servers to Create the Snapshot Using the Advanced Path
NOTE: Before using the Snapshot Virtual Disks Premium Feature in a Microsoft
Windows clustered configuration, you must first map the snapshot virtual disk to
the cluster node that owns the source virtual disk. This ensures that the cluster
nodes correctly recognize the snapshot virtual disk.
NOTE: Mapping the snapshot virtual disk to the node that does not own the source
virtual disk before the Snapshot enabling process is completed can result in the
operating system mis-identifying the snapshot virtual disk. This, in turn, can result in
data loss on the source virtual disk or an inaccessible snapshot.
NOTE: For more information on mapping the snapshot virtual disk to the secondary
node, see the Dell PowerVault MD3600i and MD3620i Storage Arrays With
Microsoft Windows Server Failover Clusters at support.dell.com/manuals.
The destination of a snapshot repository virtual disk is determined based on
the free capacity available in the disk group. A snapshot repository virtual disk
requires a minimum of 8 MB free capacity. You can choose your preferred
creation path—simple or advanced—if the disk group of the source virtual
disk has the required amount of free space.
If 8 MB of free capacity is not available in the disk group of the source virtual
disk, the Create Snapshot Virtual Disks feature defaults to the advanced path
(see "Creating a Snapshot Virtual Disk Using the Advanced Path" on
page 162). In the advanced path option, you can choose to place the snapshot
repository virtual disk in another disk group or you can use unconfigured
capacity on the storage array to create a new disk group.
NOTE: You can create concurrent snapshots of a source virtual disk on both the
source disk group and on another disk group.
Before creating a Snapshot Virtual Disk:
•
The following types of virtual disks are not valid source virtual disks:
snapshot repository virtual disks, snapshot virtual disks, target virtual disks
that are participating in a virtual disk copy.
NOTE: Virtual Disk Copy is an Advanced (Premium) feature.
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•
You cannot create a snapshot of a virtual disk that contains unreadable
sectors.
•
You must satisfy the requirements of your host operating system for
creating snapshot virtual disks. Failure to meet the requirements of your
host operating system results in an inaccurate snapshot of the source
virtual disk or the target virtual disk in a virtual disk copy.
NOTE: Before you create a new snapshot of a source virtual disk, stop any data
access (I/O) activity or suspend data transfer to the source virtual disk to ensure
that you capture an accurate snapshot of the source virtual disk. Close all
applications, including Windows Internet Explorer, to make sure all I/O activity has
stopped.
NOTE: Removing the drive letter of the associated virtual disk(s) in Windows or
unmounting the virtual drive in Linux helps to guarantee a stable copy of the drive
for the Snapshot.
Before creating a snapshot virtual disk, the host server must be in the proper
state. To prepare your host server:
1 Stop all I/O activity to the source.
2 Using your Windows system, flush the cache to the source. At the host
prompt, type SMrepassist -f <filename-identifier> and
press <Enter>. For more information, see "SMrepassist Utility" on
page 267.
3 Remove the drive letter(s) of the source in Windows or unmount the
virtual drive(s) in Linux to help guarantee a stable copy of the drive for the
Snapshot. If this is not done, the snapshot operation reports that it has
completed successfully, but the snapshot data is not updated properly.
NOTE: To verify that the virtual disk is in Optimal or Disabled state, select the
Summary tab and then click Disk Groups & Virtual Disks.
4 Follow any additional instructions for your operating system. Failure to
follow these additional instructions can create unusable snapshot virtual
disks.
NOTE: If your operating system requires additional instructions, you can find those
instructions in your operating system documentation.
After your host server is prepared, see "Creating a Snapshot Virtual Disk
Using the Advanced Path" on page 162, to create the snapshot using the
advanced path.
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If you want to use a snapshot regularly, such as for backups, use the Disable
Snapshot and Re-create Snapshot options to reuse the snapshot. Disabling
and re-creating snapshots preserves the existing virtual disk-to-host mappings
to the snapshot virtual disk.
Creating the Snapshot Using the Advanced Path
NOTE: Removing the drive letter of the associated virtual disk in Windows or
unmounting the virtual drive in Linux helps to guarantee a stable copy of the drive
for the Snapshot.
After first preparing the host server(s) as specified in the preceding procedure,
complete the following steps to create a virtual disk snapshot using the
advanced path:
1 Stop the host application accessing the source virtual disk, and unmount
the source virtual disk.
2 In the AMW, select the Logical tab, select a valid source virtual disk.
3 Select Virtual Disk Snapshot Create. Alternatively, right-click the
source virtual disk and select Create Snapshot Virtual Disk from the popup menu.
The Create Snapshot Virtual Disk Wizard - Introduction dialog is
displayed.
4 Select Advanced, and click Next.
The Specify Names window is displayed.
5 Enter the Snapshot visual disk name and the Snapshot repository virtual
disk name and click Next.
The Allocate Capacity window is displayed.
6 In the Capacity allocation area, select:
•
Free capacity on same disk group as base (recommended)
•
Free capacity on different disk group
•
Unconfigured capacity (create new disk group)
7 Enter the snapshot repository virtual disks capacity as a percentage of the
source virtual disks capacity and click Next.
The Specify Virtual Disk Parameters window is displayed.
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8 In the Snapshot virtual disk parameters area, select the relevant mapping
option, you can select:
•
Automatic
•
Map later
9 In the Snapshot repository virtual disk parameters area, enter the system
behavior when:
•
The snapshot repository virtual disk is full to the selected percentage
level.
•
The snapshot repository virtual disk is full.
10 Click Next.
The Preview window containing the summary of the snapshot virtual disk
is displayed.
11 Click Finish.
The Completed window is displayed.
12 Click OK.
13 In the Mappings tab, assign mappings between the snapshot virtual disk
and the host that accesses the snapshot virtual disk.
14 To register the snapshot virtual disk with the host operating system, run
the host-based hot_add utility.
15 To associate the mapping between the storage array name and the virtual
disk name, run the host-based SMdevices utility.
Specifying Snapshot Virtual Disk Names
Choose a name that helps you associate the snapshot virtual disk and
snapshot repository virtual disk with its corresponding source virtual disk. The
following information is useful when naming virtual disks:
By default, the snapshot name is shown in the Snapshot virtual disk name
field as:
<source-virtual disk-name>—<sequence-number>
where sequence-number is the chronological number of the snapshot
relative to the source virtual disk.
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The default name for the associated snapshot repository virtual disk that is
shown in the Snapshot repository virtual disk field is:
<source-virtual disk-name>—R<sequence-number>
For example, if you are creating the first snapshot virtual disk for a source
virtual disk called Accounting, the default snapshot virtual disk is
Accounting-1, and the associated snapshot repository virtual disk default
name is Accounting-R1. The default name of the next snapshot virtual disk
you create based on Accounting is Accounting-2, with the corresponding
snapshot repository virtual disk named as Accounting-R2 by default.
168
•
Whether you use the software-supplied sequence number that (by
default) populates the Snapshot virtual disk name or the Snapshot
repository virtual disk name field, the next default name for a snapshot or
snapshot repository virtual disk still uses the sequence number determined
by the software. For example, if you give the first snapshot of source virtual
disk Accounting the name Accounting-8, and do not use the softwaresupplied sequence number of 1, the default name for the next snapshot of
Accounting is still Accounting-2.
•
The next available sequence number is based on the number of existing
snapshots of a source virtual disk. If you delete a snapshot virtual disk, its
sequence number becomes available again.
•
You must choose a unique name for the snapshot virtual disk and the
snapshot repository virtual disks, or an error message is displayed.
•
Names are limited to 30 characters. After you reach this limit in either the
snapshot virtual disk name or the Snapshot repository virtual disk name
fields, you can no longer type in the field. If the source virtual disk is 30
characters, the default names for the snapshot and its associated snapshot
repository virtual disk use the source virtual disk name truncated enough
to add the sequence string. For example, for Host Software Engineering
Group GR-1, the default snapshot name is Host Software Engineering GR1, and the default repository name would be Host Software Engineering
GR-R1.
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Snapshot Repository Capacity
If you receive a warning that the capacity for the snapshot repository virtual
disk is approaching its threshold, you can increase the capacity of a snapshot
repository virtual disk by using one of the following methods:
•
Use the free capacity available on the disk group of the snapshot repository
virtual disk.
•
Add unconfigured capacity to the disk group of the snapshot repository
virtual disk. Use this option when no free capacity exists on the disk group.
You cannot increase the storage capacity of a snapshot repository virtual disk
if the snapshot repository virtual disk has any one of the following conditions:
•
The virtual disk has one or more hot spare drives in use.
•
The virtual disk has a status other than Optimal.
•
Any virtual disk in the disk group is in any state of modification.
•
The controller that has ownership of this virtual disk is currently adding
capacity to another virtual disk. Each controller can add capacity to only
one virtual disk at a time.
•
No free capacity exists in the disk group.
•
No unconfigured capacity is available to add to the disk group.
NOTE: You can add a maximum of two physical disks at one time to increase
snapshot repository virtual disk capacity.
To expand the snapshot repository virtual disk from MDSM:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab.
2 Select the snapshot repository virtual disk for which you want to increase
the capacity.
3 Select Virtual Disk Increase Capacity.
NOTE: If no free capacity or unconfigured capacity is available, the Increase
Capacity option is disabled.
The Increase Snapshot Repository Capacity window displays the Virtual
disk attributes. The snapshot repository virtual disk name, the associated
snapshot virtual disk name, the associated source virtual disk capacity and
name, the current capacity, and the amount of free capacity that is
available for the selected snapshot repository virtual disk are displayed. If
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free capacity is available, the maximum free space is displayed in the
Increase capacity by field.
If free capacity does not exist on the disk group, the free space that is
displayed in the Increase capacity by spinner box is 0. You must add
physical disks to create free capacity on the disk group.
4 To increase capacity of the snapshot repository virtual disk, use one of
these methods:
•
Use the free capacity on the disk group of the snapshot repository
virtual disk—Go to step 5.
•
Add unconfigured capacity, or physical disks to the disk group of the
snapshot repository virtual disk—Go to step 7.
5 In Increase capacity by, enter or select the appropriate capacity.
6 Click OK.
The Logical tab is updated. The snapshot repository virtual disk having its
capacity increased shows a status of Operation in Progress. In addition, the
snapshot repository virtual disk shows its original capacity and the total
capacity being added. The virtual disk involved shows a reduction in
capacity. If all of the free capacity is used to increase the size of the virtual
disk, the Free Capacity node involved is removed from the Logical tab.
7 If unassigned physical disks are not available, do you have empty slots in
the expansion enclosures?
•
Yes, there are empty slots—Insert new physical disks by using the
information in the initial setup guide for your expansion enclosure. Go
to step 9.
•
No, there are no empty slots—Install another expansion enclosure and
additional physical disks. Use the information in the initial setup
guides for your RAID controller module and your expansion enclosure.
Go to step 9.
NOTE: The physical disks that you add must be of the same media type and
interface type as the physical disks that already make up the disk group of the
snapshot repository virtual disk.
8 Click Add Physical Disks.
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NOTE: The physical disks that are displayed have a capacity that is either the
same size or larger than the capacity of the physical disks already being used
by the disk group.
9 Select either a single physical disk to add or two physical disks to add.
10 Click Add.
The Add Physical Disks window closes.
11 Check the Physical Disks to add [enclosure, slot] area to make sure that
the correct physical disks are added.
12 Either accept the final capacity, or enter or select the appropriate capacity
in Increase capacity by field.
13 Click OK.
The Logical tab is updated. The snapshot repository virtual disk that is
having its capacity increased shows a status of Operation in Progress. In
addition, the snapshot repository virtual disk shows its original capacity
and the total capacity being added. The Free Capacity node involved in
the increase shows a reduction in capacity. If all of the free capacity is used
to increase the size of the virtual disk, the Free Capacity node involved is
removed from the Logical tab.
A new Free Capacity node is created and shown in the Logical tab if these
conditions exist:
•
A Free Capacity node did not exist prior to the addition of capacity.
•
Not all of the capacity that is added is used to increase the capacity of
the snapshot repository virtual disk.
On the Physical tab, the unassigned physical disks or unconfigured
capacity that you added to increase the capacity of the snapshot repository
virtual disk change to assigned physical disks. The new assigned physical
disks are associated with the disk group of the snapshot repository virtual
disk.
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Disabling a Snapshot Virtual Disk
Disable a snapshot virtual disk if one of the following conditions exists:
•
You do not need the snapshot now.
•
You intend to re-create the snapshot at a later time and want to retain the
associated snapshot repository virtual disk so that you do not need to
create it again.
•
You want to maximize storage array performance by stopping copy-onwrite activity to the snapshot repository virtual disk.
NOTE: If you do not intend to re-create the snapshot virtual disk at a later time, in
the Logical pane, select the snapshot virtual disk, and select Virtual DiskDelete
to remove it. The associated snapshot repository virtual disk is also removed. For
more information on removing a snapshot virtual disk, see the PowerVault Modular
Disk Storage Manager online help topics.
NOTE: The SMdevices utility displays the snapshot virtual disk in its output, even
after the snapshot virtual disk is disabled.
To disable a snapshot virtual disk:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab, select the snapshot virtual disk, and
select Virtual Disk Snapshot Disable.
2 In the text box, type yes and click OK.
The snapshot virtual disk is disabled. The associated snapshot repository
virtual disk does not change status. The copy-on-write activity to the
snapshot repository virtual disk stops until the snapshot virtual disk is recreated.
Preparing Host Servers to Re-Create a Snapshot Virtual Disk
NOTE: Before you create a new snapshot of a source virtual disk, stop any data
access (I/O) activity or suspend data transfer to the source virtual disk and
snapshot virtual disk to ensure that you capture an accurate snapshot of the source
virtual disk. Close all applications, including Windows Internet Explorer, to make
sure all I/O activity has stopped.
NOTE: Removing the drive letter of the associated virtual disk in Windows or
unmounting the virtual drive in Linux helps to guarantee a stable copy of the drive
for the Snapshot.
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Before re-creating a snapshot virtual disk, both the host server and the
associated virtual disk you are re-creating have to be in the proper state.
To prepare your host server and virtual disk:
1 Stop all I/O activity to the source and snapshot virtual disk (if mounted).
2 Using your Windows system, flush the cache to both the source and the
snapshot virtual disk (if mounted). At the host prompt, type
SMrepassist -f <filename-identifier>
and press <Enter>. For more information, see "SMrepassist Utility" on
page 267.
3 Click the Summary tab, then click Disk Groups & Virtual Disks to ensure
that the snapshot virtual disk is in Optimal or Disabled status.
4 Remove the drive letter(s) of the source and (if mounted) snapshot virtual
disk in Windows or unmount the virtual drive(s) in Linux to help
guarantee a stable copy of the drive for the Snapshot. If this is not done,
the snapshot operation reports that it has completed successfully, but the
snapshot data is not updated properly.
5 Follow any additional instructions for your operating system. Failure to
follow these additional instructions can create unusable snapshot virtual
disks.
NOTE: If your operating system requires additional instructions, you can find those
instructions in your operating system documentation.
Re-creating Snapshot Virtual Disks
You can re-create a snapshot virtual disk that you have previously disabled.
CAUTION: Possible loss of data redundancy – If the snapshot virtual disk is in
Optimal status, it is first disabled prior to being re-created. This action invalidates
the current snapshot.
Keep these important guidelines in mind when you re-create a snapshot
virtual disk:
•
To re-create the snapshot virtual disks correctly, follow the instructions for
your operating system.
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NOTE: Failing to follow these additional instructions could create unusable
snapshot virtual disks. For more information, see the PowerVault Modular
Disk Storage Manager online help topics.
•
To use this option, the snapshot virtual disk must be either in an Optimal
status or Disabled status.
•
When using this option, the previously configured snapshot name
parameters and snapshot repository virtual disk are used.
To recreate the snapshot virtual disk:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab, select a snapshot virtual disk.
2 Select Virtual Disk Snapshot Re-create.
3 Type yes, and click OK.
Snapshot Rollback
The snapshot rollback feature allows you to revert the contents of a virtual
disk to match a point-in-time image existing on a snapshot virtual disk.
During a rollback, the host server can still write data to the base virtual disk.
However, the snapshot virtual disk is set as read-only during the rollback
operation and becomes available for write operations immediately after the
rollback is complete. The snapshot virtual disk cannot be restarted, deleted,
or disabled during the rollback operation.
The associated snapshot repository virtual disk must have sufficient capacity
to process the rollback operation and the write operations from the host. At
most, the snapshot repository virtual disk may need twice the size of the base
disk, plus additional metadata space equaling approximately 1/1000th (that
is, 0.1%) of the Base volume capacity.
NOTE: Due to host server write operations, the content in the snapshot virtual disk
may have changed since creation of the snapshot. The rollback operation includes
any changes made to the snapshot after it was created.
You can set priority for a rollback operation. Higher priority allocates more
system resources for the rollback operation and affects overall system
performance.
Rules and Guidelines for Performing a Snapshot Rollback
The following rules and guidelines apply to performing a snapshot rollback:
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•
Rolling back a base virtual disk to a snapshot virtual disk does not affect
the contents of the snapshot virtual disks.
•
Only one snapshot rollback operation can be performed at a time.
•
While a base virtual disk that is undergoing a rollback, you cannot create a
new snapshot virtual disks from that base virtual disk.
•
A snapshot rollback cannot be started while any of these operations are
underway:
–
Virtual Disk Capacity Expansion
–
Virtual Disk Expansion (VDE)
–
RAID Level Migration
–
Segment Size Migration
–
Virtual Disk Copy
–
Role Reversal (in remote replication)
•
If the base virtual disk is a secondary virtual disk in a remote replication,
you cannot perform a snapshot rollback.
•
If any capacity used in the associated snapshot repository virtual disk
contains unreadable sectors, the snapshot rollback fails.
If an error occurs during the rollback, the operation is paused and the base
virtual disk and snapshot virtual disk displays Needs Attention icons. The
RAID controller module also logs the event to the Major Event Log (MEL).
Follow the Recovery Guru procedure to correct the error and repeat the
rollback operation.
WARNING: Risk of data loss: If you cancel a snapshot rollback in progress, the
base virtual disk may remain in an unusable state and the snapshot virtual disk
displays as failed in the MD storage management software. Therefore, do not
cancel a snapshot rollback unless reliable recovery options exist for restoring the
content of the base virtual disk.
Command Line Options
Optionally, you also can use the command line interface (CLI) to start,
cancel, resume or modify priority of a snapshot rollback. For more
information, see the CLI Guide.
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Protecting Against a Failed Snapshot Rollback
To protect your base virtual disk data, it is recommended that you create a
new snapshot virtual disk from the base virtual disk before beginning a
rollback operation. If the snapshot rollback fails, use this new snapshot virtual
disk to restore your base virtual disk.
Previous Versions of the MD Storage Manager
Snapshot virtual disks created using previous versions of MD Storage
Manager that did not support snapshot rollback do not have to be recreated
or changed to be used in a subsequent rollback operation. Once the latest
versions of the MD storage management software and RAID controller
module firmware are installed, snapshot virtual disks created under previous
versions support the snapshot rollback feature. However, if you revert to an
older version of the MD storage management software after you have
performed a snapshot rollback, the older MD storage management software
does not support the snapshot virtual disk.
Starting a Snapshot Rollback
To start a snapshot rollback:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab.
2 Choose one:
•
Select the snapshot virtual disk, and select Virtual Disk Snapshot
Rollback.
•
Right-click the snapshot virtual disk and select Rollback.
The Confirm Rollback Snapshot Virtual Disk dialog is displayed.
3 In the Select rollback priority area, use the slider bar to set rollback priority.
NOTE: If priority is set at the lowest rate, normal data write activity is highest
priority and the rollback operation takes longer to complete. If the priority is at
the highest rate, the rollback operation is highest priority and data write
activity is reduced.
4 To start the snapshot rollback, type yes in the confirmation box and click
OK.
Rollback status is shown in the Properties pane for the base virtual disk
and snapshot virtual disk.
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Resuming a Snapshot Rollback
If an error occurs during the snapshot rollback and the operation is paused,
you can resume the rollback using the following steps:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab.
2 Choose one:
•
Select the snapshot virtual disk, and select Virtual Disk Snapshot
Resume Rollback.
•
Right-click the snapshot virtual disk and select Resume Rollback.
The Resume Rollback dialog is displayed.
3 Click OK.
If the snapshot rollback resumed successfully, status is displayed in Properties
pane of the base virtual disk or snapshot virtual disk.
If the snapshot rollback did not resume successfully, the rollback operation
pauses again and both virtual disks display Needs Attention icons. Check the
Major Event Log (MEL) for details and follow the Recovery Guru procedure
to correct the issue.
Canceling a Snapshot Rollback
WARNING: Risk of data loss: If you cancel a snapshot rollback in progress, the
base virtual disk may remain in an unusable state and the snapshot virtual disk
displays as failed in the MD storage management software. Therefore, do not
cancel a snapshot rollback unless reliable recovery options exist for restoring the
content of the base virtual disk.
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab.
2 Choose one:
•
Select the snapshot virtual disk, and select Virtual Disk Snapshot
Cancel Rollback.
•
Right-click the snapshot virtual disk and select Cancel Rollback.
The Confirm Cancel Rollback dialog is displayed.
3 To cancel the snapshot rollback, type yes in the confirmation box and
click OK.
4 Click Yes to cancel the rollback operation.
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12
Configuration: Premium Feature—
Virtual Disk Copy
NOTE: A virtual disk copy overwrites data on the target virtual disk. Before starting
a virtual disk copy, ensure that you no longer need the data or back up the data on
the target virtual disk.
NOTE: If you ordered this feature, you received a Premium Feature Activation card
that shipped in the same box as your Dell PowerVault MD storage array. Follow the
directions on the card to obtain a key file and to enable the feature.
NOTE: The preferred method for creating a virtual disk copy is to copy from a
snapshot virtual disk. This allows the original virtual disk used in the snapshot
operation to remain fully available for read/write activity while the snapshot is used
as the source for the virtual disk copy operation.
When you create a virtual disk copy, you create a copy pair that has a source
virtual disk and a target virtual disk on the same storage array.
The source virtual disk is the virtual disk that contains the data you want to
copy. The source virtual disk accepts the host I/O read activity and stores the
data until it is copied to the target virtual disk. The source virtual disk can be
a standard virtual disk, a snapshot virtual disk, or the source virtual disk of a
snapshot virtual disk. When you start a virtual disk copy, all data is copied to
the target virtual disk, and the source virtual disk permissions are set to readonly until the virtual disk copy is complete.
The target virtual disk is a virtual disk to which you copy data from the source
virtual disk. The target virtual disk can be a standard virtual disk, or the
source virtual disk of a failed or disabled snapshot virtual disk.
After the virtual disk copy is complete, the source virtual disk becomes
available to host applications for write requests. To prevent error messages, do
not attempt to access a source virtual disk that is participating in a virtual disk
copy while the virtual disk copy is in progress.
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Reasons to use virtual disk copy include:
•
Copying data for improved access—As your storage requirements for a
virtual disk change, you can use a virtual disk copy to copy data to a virtual
disk in a disk group that uses drives with larger capacity within the same
storage array. Copying data for larger access capacity enables you to move
data to greater capacity physical disks (for example, 61 GB to 146 GB).
•
Restoring snapshot virtual disk data to the source virtual disk—The Virtual
Disk Copy feature enables you first to restore the data from a snapshot
virtual disk and then to copy the data from the snapshot virtual disk to the
original source virtual disk.
•
Creating a backup copy—The Virtual Disk Copy feature enables you to
create a backup of a virtual disk by copying data from one virtual disk (the
source virtual disk) to another virtual disk (the target virtual disk) in the
same storage array, minimizing the time that the source virtual disk is
unavailable to host write activity. You can then use the target virtual disk as
a backup for the source virtual disk, as a resource for system testing, or to
copy data to another device, such as a tape drive or other media.
NOTE: Recovering from a backup copy — You can use the Edit Host-to-Virtual Disk
Mappings feature to recover data from the backup virtual disk you created in the
previous procedure. The Mappings option enables you to unmap the source virtual
disk from its host and then to map the backup virtual disk to the same host.
Types of Virtual Disk Copies
You can perform either offline or online virtual disk copies. To ensure data
integrity, all I/O to the target virtual disk is suspended during either type of
virtual disk copy operation. After the virtual disk copy is complete, the target
virtual disk automatically becomes read-only to the hosts.
Offline Copy
An offline copy reads data from the source virtual disk and copies it to a target
virtual disk, while suspending all updates to the source virtual disk when the
copy is in progress. In an offline virtual disk copy, the relationship is between a
source virtual disk and a target virtual disk. Source virtual disks that are
participating in an offline copy are available for read requests, while the
virtual disk copy displays the In Progress or Pending status. Write requests
are allowed only after the offline copy is complete. If the source virtual disk is
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formatted with a journaling file system, any attempt to issue a read request to
the source virtual disk may be rejected by the storage array RAID controller
modules and result in an error message. Make sure that the Read-Only
attribute for the target virtual disk is disabled after the virtual disk copy is
complete to prevent error messages from being displayed.
Online Copy
An online copy creates a point-in-time snapshot copy of any virtual disk
within a storage array, while still allowing writes to the virtual disk when the
copy is in progress. This is achieved by creating a snapshot of the virtual disk
and using that snapshot as the actual source virtual disk for the copy. In an
online virtual disk copy, the relationship is between a snapshot virtual disk
and a target virtual disk. The virtual disk for which the point-in-time image is
created (the source virtual disk) must be a standard virtual disk in the storage
array.
A snapshot virtual disk and a snapshot repository virtual disk are created
during the online copy operation. The snapshot virtual disk is not an actual
virtual disk containing data; instead, it is a reference to the data contained on
the virtual disk at a specific time. For each snapshot taken, a snapshot
repository virtual disk is created to hold the copy-on-write data for the
snapshot. The snapshot repository virtual disk is used only to manage the
snapshot image.
Before a data block on the source virtual disk is modified, the contents of the
block to be modified are copied to the snapshot repository virtual disk.
Because the snapshot repository virtual disk stores copies of the original data
in those data blocks, further changes to those data blocks write only to the
source virtual disk.
NOTE: If the snapshot virtual disk that is used as the copy source is active, the
source virtual disk performance degrades due to copy-on-write operations. When
the copy is complete, the snapshot is disabled and the source virtual disk
performance is restored. Although the snapshot is disabled, the repository
infrastructure and copy relationship remain intact.
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Creating a Virtual Disk Copy for an MSCS Shared
Disk
To create a virtual disk copy for a Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS) shared
disk, create a snapshot of the virtual disk, and then use the snapshot virtual
disk as the source for the virtual disk copy.
NOTE: An attempt to directly create a virtual disk copy for an MSCS shared disk,
rather than using a snapshot virtual disk, fails with the following error: The
operation cannot complete because the selected virtual disk is not a source virtual
disk candidate.
NOTE: When creating a snapshot virtual disk, map the snapshot virtual disk to only
one node in the cluster. Mapping the snapshot virtual disk to the host group or both
nodes in the cluster may cause data corruption by allowing both nodes to
concurrently access data.
Virtual Disk Read/Write Permissions
After the virtual disk copy is complete, the target virtual disk automatically
becomes read-only to the hosts. The target virtual disk rejects read and write
requests while the virtual disk copy operation has a status of Pending or In
Progress or if the operation fails before completing the copy. Keep the target
virtual disk Read-Only enabled if you want to preserve the data on the target
virtual disk for reasons such as the following:
•
If you are using the target virtual disk for backup purposes.
•
If you are using the data on the target virtual disk to copy back to the
source virtual disk of a disabled or failed snapshot virtual disk.
If you decide not to preserve the data on the target virtual disk after the
virtual disk copy is complete, change the write protection setting for the
target virtual disk to Read/Write.
To set the target virtual disk read/write permissions:
1 In the AMW, select Virtual Disk Copy Manager.
The Copy Manager window is displayed.
2 Select one or more copy pairs in the table.
3 Perform one of these actions:
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•
To enable Read-Only permission, select Change Target Virtual Disk
Permissions Enable Read-Only.
NOTE: Write requests to the target virtual disk are rejected when the ReadOnly permission is enabled on the target virtual disk.
•
To disable Read-Only permission, select Change Target Virtual
Disk Permissions Disable Read-Only.
Virtual Disk Copy Restrictions
Before you perform any virtual disk copy tasks, understand and adhere to the
restrictions listed in this section. The restrictions apply to the source virtual
disk, the target virtual disk, and the storage array.
•
While a virtual disk copy has a status of In Progress, Pending, or Failed, the
source virtual disk is available for read I/O activity only. After the virtual
disk copy is complete, read and write I/O activity to the source virtual disk
are permitted.
•
A virtual disk can be selected as a target virtual disk for only one virtual
disk copy at a time.
•
A virtual disk copy for any virtual disk cannot be mounted on the same
host as the source virtual disk.
•
Windows does not allow a drive letter to be assigned to a virtual disk copy.
•
A virtual disk with a Failed status cannot be used as a source virtual disk or
target virtual disk.
•
A virtual disk with a Degraded status cannot be used as a target virtual
disk.
•
A virtual disk participating in a modification operation cannot be selected
as a source virtual disk or target virtual disk. Modification operations
include the following:
–
Capacity expansion
–
RAID-level migration
–
Segment sizing
–
Virtual disk expansion
–
Defragmenting a virtual disk
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NOTE: The following host preparation sections also apply when using the virtual
disk copy feature through the CLI interface.
Creating a Virtual Disk Copy
CAUTION: Possible loss of data—Source virtual disks that are participating in a
virtual disk copy are available for read I/O activity only while a virtual disk copy
has a status of In Progress or Pending. Write requests are allowed after the virtual
disk copy has completed. If the source virtual disk is formatted with a journaling
file system, any attempt to issue a read request to the source virtual disk may be
rejected by the storage array, and an error message may be displayed. The
journaling file system driver issues a write request before it attempts to issue the
read request. The storage array rejects the write request, and the read request
may not be issued due to the rejected write request. This condition may result in
an error message to be displayed, which indicates that the source virtual disk is
write protected. To prevent this issue from occurring, do not attempt to access a
source virtual disk that is participating in a virtual disk copy while the virtual disk
copy has a status of In Progress. Also, make sure that the Read-Only attribute for
the target virtual disk is disabled after the virtual disk copy has completed to
prevent error messages from being displayed.
The Virtual Disk Copy premium feature includes:
•
The Create Copy Wizard, which assists in creating a virtual disk copy
•
The Copy Manager, which monitors virtual disk copies after they are
created
Before you Begin
A virtual disk copy fails all snapshot virtual disks that are associated with the
target virtual disk, if any exist. If you select a source virtual disk of a snapshot
virtual disk, you must disable all of the snapshot virtual disks that are
associated with the source virtual disk before you can select it as a target
virtual disk. Otherwise, the source virtual disk cannot be used as a target
virtual disk.
A virtual disk copy overwrites data on the target virtual disk and automatically
makes the target virtual disk read-only to hosts
If 16 virtual disk copies with the status of In Progress exist, any subsequent
virtual disk copy has the status Pending, which stays until one of the 16
virtual disk copies complete.
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Virtual Disk Copy and Modification Operations
If a modification operation is running on a source virtual disk or a target
virtual disk, and the virtual disk copy has a status of In Progress, Pending, or
Failed, the virtual disk copy does not take place. If a modification operation is
running on a source virtual disk or a target virtual disk after a virtual disk copy
is created, the modification operation must complete before the virtual disk
copy can start. If a virtual disk copy has a status of In Progress, any
modification operation does not take place.
Create Copy Wizard
The Create Copy Wizard guides you through:
•
Selecting a source virtual disk from a list of available virtual disks.
•
Selecting a target virtual disk from a list of available virtual disks.
•
Setting the copy priority for the virtual disk copy.
When you have completed the wizard dialogs, the virtual disk copy starts, and
data is read from the source virtual disk and written to the target virtual disk.
Operation in Progress icons are displayed on the source virtual disk and the
target virtual disk while the virtual disk copy has a status of In Progress or
Pending.
Failed Virtual Disk Copy
A virtual disk copy can fail due to:
•
A read error from the source virtual disk.
•
A write error to the target virtual disk.
•
A failure in the storage array that affects the source virtual disk or the
target virtual disk.
When the virtual disk copy fails, a critical event is logged in the Event Log, and a
Needs Attention icon is displayed in the AMW. While a virtual disk copy has this
status, the host has read-only access to the source virtual disk. Read requests from
and write requests to the target virtual disk do not take place until the failure is
corrected by using the Recovery Guru.
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Preferred RAID Controller Module Ownership
During a virtual disk copy, the same RAID controller module must own both
the source virtual disk and the target virtual disk. If both virtual disks do not
have the same preferred RAID controller module when the virtual disk copy
starts, the ownership of the target virtual disk is automatically transferred to
the preferred RAID controller module of the source virtual disk. When the
virtual disk copy is completed or is stopped, ownership of the target virtual
disk is restored to its preferred RAID controller module. If ownership of the
source virtual disk is changed during the virtual disk copy, ownership of the
target virtual disk is also changed.
Failed RAID Controller Module
You must manually change RAID controller module ownership to the
alternate RAID controller module to allow the virtual disk copy to complete
under all of these conditions:
•
A virtual disk copy has a status of In Progress.
•
The preferred RAID controller module of the source virtual disk fails.
•
The ownership transfer does not occur automatically in the failover.
Copy Manager
After you create a virtual disk copy by using the Create Copy Wizard, you can
monitor the virtual disk copy through the Copy Manager. From the Copy
Manager, a virtual disk copy may be re-copied, stopped, or removed. You can
also modify the attributes, such as the copy priority and the target virtual disk
Read-Only attribute. You can view the status of a virtual disk copy in the
Copy Manager. Also, if you need to determine which virtual disks are
involved in a virtual disk copy, you can use the Copy Manager or the storage
array profile.
Copying the Virtual Disk
You can create a virtual disk copy by using the Create Copy Wizard.
CAUTION: Possible loss of data access—A virtual disk copy overwrites data on
the target virtual disk.
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A virtual disk copy automatically makes the target virtual disk read-only to
hosts. You may want to keep this attribute enabled to preserve the data on the
target virtual disk.
CAUTION: If you decide not to preserve the data on the target virtual disk after the
virtual disk copy has completed, disable the Read-Only attribute for the target
virtual disk. For more information on enabling and disabling the Read-Only
attribute for the target virtual disk, see "Virtual Disk Read/Write Permissions" on
page 182.
To prevent write-protected error messages from being displayed, do not try to
access a source virtual disk that is participating in a virtual disk copy while the
virtual disk copy has a status of In Progress. Also, make sure that the ReadOnly attribute for the target virtual disk is disabled after the virtual disk copy
has completed to prevent error messages from being displayed.
To copy the virtual disk:
1 Stop all I/O activity to the source virtual disk and the target virtual disk.
2 Unmount any file systems on the source virtual disk and the target virtual
disk.
3 In the AMW, select the Logical tab and select the source virtual disk.
4 Select Virtual Disk Create Copy.
The Select Source Virtual Disk and Copy Type window is displayed.
5 In the Select source virtual disk area, select the appropriate virtual disk.
6 In the Select Copy Type area, select either Offline or Online Copy Type.
NOTE: An online virtual disk copy overwrites data on the target virtual disk and
automatically makes the target virtual disk read-only to hosts. After the online
virtual disk copy completes, use Copy Manager to disable the Read-Only
attribute for the target virtual disk. If you have used the target virtual disk in a
virtual disk copy before, make sure that you no longer need that data or have
backed it up in an accessible location.
The Select Target Virtual Disk window is displayed.
7 In the Select target virtual disk area, select the appropriate virtual disk
8 In the Select copy priority area, select the relevant copy priority and click
Next.
The Confirmation window displays the summary of your selections.
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9 Type yes and click Finish.
NOTE: Operation in Progress icons are displayed on the source virtual disk and the
target virtual disk while the virtual disk copy has a status of In Progress or Pending.
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
Storage Array Performance During Virtual Disk
Copy
The following factors contribute to the overall performance of the storage
array:
•
I/O activity
•
Virtual disk RAID level
•
Virtual disk configuration—Number of drives in the virtual disk groups
•
Virtual disk type—Snapshot virtual disks may take more time to copy than
standard virtual disks
During a virtual disk copy, resources for the storage array are diverted from
processing I/O activity to completing a virtual disk copy. This affects the
overall performance of the storage array. When you create a new virtual disk
copy, you define the copy priority to determine how much controller
processing time is diverted from I/O activity to a virtual disk copy operation.
Setting Copy Priority
You can use the Copy Manager to select the rate at which a virtual disk copy
completes for a selected copy pair. You can change the copy priority for a copy
pair at any of these times:
•
Before the virtual disk copy begins
•
While the virtual disk copy has a status of In Progress
•
When you re-create a virtual disk copy
To set copy priority:
1 In the AMW, select Virtual Disk Copy Manager.
The Copy Manager window is displayed.
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2 In the table, select one or more copy pairs.
3 Select Change Copy Priority.
The Change Copy Priority window is displayed.
4 In the Copy Priority area, select the appropriate copy priority, depending
on your system performance needs.
NOTE: There are 5 copy priority rates available: lowest, low, medium, high,
and highest. If the copy priority is set at the lowest rate, I/O activity is
prioritized and the virtual disk copy takes longer.
Stopping a Virtual Disk Copy
You can stop a virtual disk copy operation that has an In Progress status, a
Pending status, or a Failed status. Stopping a virtual disk copy that has a
Failed status clears the Needs Attention status displayed for the storage array.
Keep these guidelines in mind when you stop a virtual disk copy:
•
To use this option, select only one copy pair in the Copy Manager.
•
When the virtual disk copy is stopped, all of the mapped hosts have write
access to the source virtual disk. If data is written to the source virtual disk,
the data on the target virtual disk no longer matches the data on the
source virtual disk.
To stop a virtual disk copy, complete the following steps:
1 In the AMW, select Virtual Disk Copy Manager.
The Copy Manager window is displayed.
2 Select the copy pair in the table.
3 Select Copy Stop.
4 Click Yes.
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Recopying a Virtual Disk
You can recopy a virtual disk when you have stopped a virtual disk copy and
you want to start it again or when a virtual disk copy has failed.
The Recopy option overwrites existing data on the target virtual disk and
makes the target virtual disk read-only to hosts. This option fails all snapshot
virtual disks associated with the target virtual disk, if any exist.
Preparing Host Servers to Recopy a Virtual Disk
NOTE: Before you create a new copy of a source virtual disk, stop any data access
(I/O) activity or suspend data transfer to the source virtual disk (and, if applicable,
the target disk) to ensure that you capture an accurate point-in-time image of the
source virtual disk. Close all applications, including Windows Internet Explorer, to
make sure all I/O activity has stopped.
NOTE: Removing the drive letter of the associated virtual disk(s) in Windows or
unmounting the virtual drive in Linux helps to guarantee a stable copy of the drive
for the virtual disk copy.
Before creating a new virtual disk copy for an existing copy pair, both the host
server and the associated virtual disk you are recopying must be in the proper
state. Perform the following steps to prepare your host server and virtual disk:
1 Stop all I/O activity to the source and target virtual disk.
2 Using your Windows system, flush the cache to both the source and the
target virtual disk (if mounted). At the host prompt, type
SMrepassist -f <filename-identifier>
and press <Enter>. For more information, see "SMrepassist Utility" on
page 267.
3 To ensure that the virtual disk is in Optimal or Disabled status, select the
Summary tab, then click Disk Groups & Virtual Disks .
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4 Remove the drive letter(s) of the source and (if mounted) virtual disk in
Windows or unmount the virtual drive(s) in Linux to help guarantee a
stable copy of the drive for the virtual disk. If this is not done, the copy
operation reports that it has completed successfully, but the copied data is
not updated properly.
5 Follow any additional instructions for your operating system. Failure to
follow these additional instructions can create unusable virtual disk copies.
NOTE: If your operating system requires additional instructions, you can find
those instructions in your operating system documentation.
Re-Copying the Virtual Disk
You can use the Copy Manager to create a new virtual disk copy for a selected
source virtual disk and a target virtual disk. Use this option when you have
stopped a virtual disk copy and want to start it again or when a virtual disk
copy has failed or completed. The virtual disk copy starts over from the
beginning.
•
Possible loss of data—The re-copying operation overwrites existing data on
the target virtual disk.
•
Possible loss of data access—While a virtual disk copy has a status of In
Progress or Pending, source virtual disks are available for read I/O activity
only. Write requests are allowed after the virtual disk copy has completed.
Keep these guidelines in mind when re-copying a virtual disk:
•
If hosts are mapped to the source virtual disk, the data that is copied to the
target virtual disk when you perform the re-copy operation may have
changed since the previous virtual disk copy was created.
•
Select only one virtual disk copy in the Copy Manager dialog.
To re-copy the virtual disk:
1 Stop all I/O to the source virtual disk and the target virtual disk.
2 Unmount any file systems on the source virtual disk and the target virtual
disk.
3 In the AMW, select Virtual Disk Copy Manager.
The Copy Manager window is displayed.
4 Select the copy pair in the table.
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5 Select Copy Re-Copy.
The Re-Copy window is displayed.
6 Set the copy priority.
NOTE: There are 5 copy priority rates available: lowest, low, medium, high, and
highest. If the copy priority is set at the lowest rate, I/O activity is prioritized, and the
virtual disk copy takes longer. If the copy priority is set to the highest priority rate,
the virtual disk copy is prioritized, but I/O activity for the storage array may be
affected.
Removing Copy Pairs
You can remove one or more virtual disk copies by using the Copy Manager.
Any virtual disk copy-related information for the source virtual disk and the
target virtual disk is removed from the Virtual Disk Properties and the
Storage Array Profile dialogs. When you remove a virtual disk copy from the
storage array, the Read-Only attribute for the target virtual disk is also
removed. After the virtual disk copy is removed from the Copy Manager, you
can either select the target virtual disk as a source virtual disk or the target
virtual disk for a new virtual disk copy.
If you remove a virtual disk copy, the source virtual disk and the target virtual
disk are no longer displayed in the Copy Manager.
Keep these guidelines in mind when you remove copy pairs:
•
Removing copy pairs does not delete the data on the source virtual disk or
target virtual disk.
•
If the virtual disk copy has a status of In Progress, you must stop the virtual
disk copy before you can remove the copy pair.
To remove copy pairs:
1 In the AMW, select Virtual Disk Copy Manager.
The Copy Manager window is displayed.
2 In the table, select one or more copy pairs.
3 Select Copy Remove Copy Pairs.
The Remove Copy Pairs dialog is displayed.
4 Click Yes.
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13
Configuration: Premium Feature—
Upgrading to High-PerformanceTier
The High Performance Tier premium feature on an MD3600i Series storage
array increases the performance of the system beyond that of a MD3600i
Series storage array operating at the standard performance level.
If this feature is ordered, a Premium Feature Activation card is placed in the
box with the storage array. After reading the information below, follow the
instructions on the card to obtain a key file and enable the feature.
CAUTION: Loss of data access—The storage array automatically restarts when
the High-Performance-Tier feature is enabled or disabled. During the restart, data
is unavailable. Data availability is restored when the array restarts.
To upgrade from a standard-performance-tier storage array to a highperformance-tier storage array, you enable the high-performance-tier
premium feature, using the Dell PowerVault Modular Disk Storage
Management (MDSM) software.
When the high performance tier feature is enabled or disabled the array
restarts. During this time, data access and management access to the
controller is temporarily lost.
It is recommended that all I/O to the array be stopped before this feature is
enabled or disabled.
While the array is restarting the state of the array in the MDSM application
may change from Optimal to Unresponsive. When the restart completes, the
status returns to Optimal.
When the array status returns to Optimal, verify that all communication
sessions are reestablished. If any sessions are not automatically reestablished
you must reestablished the sessions manually.
When all communication sessions to the array are ready, I/O to the array can
be restarted.
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14
Configuration: Device Mapper
Multipath for Linux
Overview
The MD3600i Series storage array uses a Linux operating system software
framework, known as Device Mapper (DM), to enable multipath capabilities
on Linux Host Servers. The DM multipath functionality is provided by a
combination of drivers and utilities. This chapter describes how to use those
utilities to complete the process of enabling MD3600i Series storage array on
a Linux system.
NOTE: The Device Mapper technology replaces an earlier, proprietary technology,
known as MPP. MPP was used to enable multipathing for the previous MD
generation MD3000 Series storage arrays.
NOTE: The required Device Mapper software components are installed on a Linux
host server by running the MD3600i Series resource media installation program on
the server, and selecting either the Full or Host install option. For detailed
installation procedures, see the Dell PowerVault MD3600i and MD3620i storage
arrays Deployment Guide at support.dell.com/manuals.
Benefits of using DM Multipath include:
•
Detects path failure and re-routes I/O to other available paths
•
Revalidates failed paths after path restoration
•
Utilizes multiple available paths to maximize performance
•
Reconfigures path usage based on path states and error conditions
•
Unifies multiple device nodes into a single logical multipath device node
•
Indentifies a new multipathed LU and automatically configures a new
multipath node
•
Provides device name persistency for DM devices under /dev/mapper/
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Using DM Multipathing Devices
NOTE: Using or modifying any nodes other than the multipathing device nodes can
result in array or file system problems, including loss of communication with the
array and corruption of the file system. Avoid accessing any device other than the
multipathing device.
NOTE: After creating a partition on a multipathing device, all I/O operations,
including file system creation, raw I/O and file system I/O, must be done through the
partition node and not through the multipathing device nodes.
Prerequisites
The following tasks must be completed before proceeding. For more
information about steps 1–3, see the MD3600i and MD3620i Storage Arrays
Deployment Guide at support.dell.com/manuals. For more information about
step 4, see "Creating Virtual Disks" on page 114.
1 Install the host software from the MD3600i Series resource media—
Insert the Resource media in the system to start the installation of
Modular Disk Storage Manager (MDSM) and Modular Disk
Configuration Utility (MDCU).
NOTE: Red Hat install of 5.x requires a remount of the DVD media to make
contents executable.
2 Reboot when prompted by the install program—The installation program
prompts for and needs a reboot at completion of the installation.
3 Configure using MDCU—After the host server has rebooted, the MDCU
automatically starts and is present on the desktop. This utility allows for
quick and easy configuration of new and or existing MD3600i Series
storage arrays present on your network. It also provides a GUI Wizard for
establishing the iSCSI sessions to the array.
4 Create and map virtual disks using MDSM—After configuring the arrays
using the MDCU, run the MDSM to create and map virtual disks.
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Using the MDSM software:
1 Map the host server to the MD3600i Series storage array.
2 Create the Virtual Disks.
3 Map newly created arrays to your host server.
NOTE: Any arrays configured with MDCU automatically get added to the list of
Devices in the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager Enterprise Management
Window (EMW).
Device Mapper Configuration Steps
To complete the DM multipathing configuration and make storage available
to the Linux host server:
1 Scan for virtual disks. See "Scan for Newly Added Virtual Disks" on
page 198.
2 Display the multipath device topology. See "Display the Multipath Device
Topology Using the Multipath Command" on page 198.
3 Create a partition on a multipath device node. See "Create a New fdisk
Partition on a Multipath Device Node" on page 199.
4 Add a partition to DM. See "Add a New Partition to Device Mapper" on
page 200.
5 Create a file system on a DM partition. See "Create a File System on a
Device Mapper Partition" on page 201.
6 Mount a DM partition. See "Mount a Device Mapper Partition" on
page 201.
The following instructions show how to complete each of these steps.
In the following command descriptions <x> is used to indicate where a
substitution must be made. On Red Hat Enterprise Linux systems <x> is
the number assigned to the device. On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server
systems <x> is the letter(s) assigned to the device.
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Scan for Newly Added Virtual Disks
The rescan_dm_devs command scans the host server system looking for
existing and newly added virtual disks mapped to the host server.
# rescan_dm_devs
If an array virtual disk (VD) is mapped to the host server at a later time, the
rescan_dm_devices command must be run again to make the VD a
visible LUN to the operating system.
Display the Multipath Device Topology Using the Multipath Command
The multipath command adds newly scanned and mapped virtual disks to the
Device Mapper tables and creates entries for them in the /dev/mapper
directory on the host server. These devices are the same as any other block
devices in the host.
To list all the multipath devices, run the following command:
# multipath –ll
The output must be similar to this example, which shows the output for one
mapped virtual disk.
mpath1 (3600a0b80005ab177000017544a8d6b92) dm-0 DELL,
MD32xxi
[size=5.0G][features=3 queue_if_no_path
pg_init_retries 50][hwhandler=1 rdac][rw]
\_ round-robin 0 [prio=6][active]
\_ 5:0:0:0
sdc
8:32
[active][ready]
\_ round-robin 0 [prio=1][enabled]
\_ 4:0:0:0
sdb
8:16
[active][ghost]
where:
mpath1 is the name of the virtual device created by device mapper. It is
located in the /dev/mapper directory.
DELL is the vendor of the device.
MD3600i is the model of the device.
Sdc is the physical path to the owning controller for the device.
Sdb is the physical path to the non-owning controller for the device.
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The following is an example of SLES output:
mpathb(360080e500017b2f80000c6ca4a1d4ab8) dm-21
DELL,MD32xxi
[size=1.0G][features=3 queue_if_no_path
pg_init_retries 50][hwhandler=1 rdac][rw]
\_ round-robin 0 [prio=6][active]
\_ 4:0:0:22 sdx
65:112 [active][ready]
\_ round-robin 0 [prio=1][enabled]
\_ 6:0:0:22 sdcl 69:144 [active][ghost]
where:
mpathb is the name of the virtual device created by device mapper. It is
located in the /dev/mapper directory.
DELL is the vendor of the device.
MD3600i is the model of the device.
Sdx is the physical path to the owning controller for the device.
Sdcl is the physical path to the non-owning controller for the device.
Create a New fdisk Partition on a Multipath Device Node
The fdisk command allows creation of a partition space for a file system on
the newly scanned and mapped virtual disks that are presented to Device
Mapper.
To create a partition with the multipathing device nodes
/dev/mapper/mpath<x>, for example, use the following command:
# fdisk /dev/mapper/mpath<x>
where mpath<x> is the multipathing device node on which you want to
create the partition.
NOTE: The <x> value is an alphanumeric operating system dependent format. The
corresponding value for mapped virtual disks can be seen using the previously run
multipath command. See your operating system documentation for additional
information on fdisk.
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Add a New Partition to Device Mapper
The kpartx command adds the new fdisk partition to the Device Mapper
list of usable partitions. See examples below, where mpath<x> is the device
node on which the partition was created.
# kpartx –a /dev/mapper/mpath<x>
If successful, the command does not display an output. To verify success and
view exact partition naming, you can use these commands to see the full
partition names assigned.
# cd /dev/mapper
# ls
The following are some examples of the general mapping formats:
On Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) hosts, a partition node has the format:
/dev/mapper/mpath<x>p<y>
Where <x> is the alphabetic number for the multipathing device, <y> is
the partition number for this device.
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 11.x hosts, a partition node has the
format:
/dev/mapper/mpath<x>-part<y>
Where <x> is letter(s) assigned to the multipathing device and <y> is the
partition number.
On SLES 10.3 hosts, a partition node has the format:
/dev/mapper/mpath<x>_part<y>
Where <x> is the letter(s) assigned to the multipathing device and <y> is
the partition number.
NOTE: After creating a partition on a device capable of multipathing, all I/O
operations, including file system creation, raw I/O and file system I/O, must be done
through the partition node, and not through the multipathing device nodes.
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Create a File System on a Device Mapper Partition
Use the standard mkfs command to create the file system on the newly
created Device Mapper partition.
For example:
# mkfs –t <filesystem type> /dev/mapper/<partition
node>
where <partition node> is the partition on which the file system is
created.
Mount a Device Mapper Partition
Use the standard mount command to mount the Device Mapper partition:
# mount /dev/mapper/<partition_node> <mounting_point>
Ready For Use
The newly created virtual disks created on the MD3600i Series array are now
setup and ready to be used. Future reboots automatically find multipathing
devices along with their partitions.
NOTE: To ensure data integrity protection, reboot a Linux host server attached to
an MD3600i Series storage array using the procedure given below.
Blacklist Local Drive in Multi-path Driver
If your multipath drivers are connecting to storage area networks (SANs), it
may be useful to be able to exclude or "blacklist" certain devices in your
/etc/multipath.conf file. Blacklisting prevents the multipath driver from
attempting to use those local devices.
To blacklist a local drive or device:
1 Run the multipath -l command to determine the local drive or
device WWID (World-Wide Identifier) or vendor/model string.
2 Edit the /etc/multipath.conf file as follows:
blacklist {
wwid
drive_wwid
…
}
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or
blacklist {
device {
vendor
vendor_string
model model_string
};
NOTE: RedHat version 6.0 and 6.1 users must rebuild the initramfs root file
image to include the updated configuration file by running the #dracut -force
command.
3 Reboot the host.
Linux Host Server Reboot Best Practices
It is recommended that you follow the procedures given below while
rebooting your Linux host server using Device Mapper multipathing with an
MD3600i Series storage array.
1 Unmount all Device Mapper multipath device nodes mounted on the
server:
# umount <mounted_multipath_device_node>
2 Stop the Device Mapper multipath service:
# /etc/init.d/multipathd stop
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3 Flush the Device Mapper multipath maps list to remove any old or
modified mappings:
# multipath –F
NOTE: The boot operating system drive may have an entry with the Device
Mapper multipathing table. This is not affected by the multipath –F
command. However, using #multipath –ll must not show any
multipathing devices with model “MD3600i” or “MD3600i”.
4 Log out of all iSCSI sessions from the host server to the storage array:
# iscsiadm –m node --logout
Important Information About Special Partitions
When using Device Mapper with the MD3600i Series array, all physical disks
are assigned a disk device node. This includes a special device type used for
in-band management of the MD3600i Series array, known as the Access Disk
or Universal Xport device.
CAUTION: Certain commands, such as lsscsi, displays one or more instances of
Universal Xport devices. These device nodes must never be accessed, mounted, or
used in any way. Doing so could cause loss of communication to the storage array
and possibly cause serious damage to the storage array, potential making data
stored on the array inaccessible.
Only multipathing device nodes and partition nodes created using the
directions provided above must be mounted or in any way accessed by the
host system or its users.
Table 14-1.
Useful Device Mapper Commands
Command
Description
multipath –h
Prints usage information.
multipath –ll
Displays the current multipath topology using all available
information (sysfs, the device mapper, path checkers, and
so on).
multipath
Re-aggregates multipathing device with simplified output.
multipath –f
Flushes out Device Mapper for the specified multipathing
<multipath_dev_node> device. Used if the underlying physical devices are
deleted/unmapped.
multipath –F
Flushes out all unused multipathing device maps.
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Table 14-1. Useful Device Mapper Commands (continued)
Command
Description
rescan_dm_devs
Dell provided script. Forces a rescan of the host SCSI bus
and aggregates multipathing devices as needed. For use
when:
• LUNs are dynamically mapped to the hosts.
• New targets are added to the host.
• Failback of the storage array is required.
• For MD3600i Series arrays, iSCSI sessions have to be
established for rescan to take effect.
Limitations and Known Issues
•
In certain error conditions with the no_path_retry or the
queue_if_no_path feature is set, applications may hang. To overcome
these conditions, enter the following command for each affected
multipath device:
dmsetup message [device] 0 "fail_if_no_path"
where [device] is the multipath device name (for example, mpath2;
do not specify the path)
204
•
I/O may hang when a Device Mapper device is deleted before the volume
is unmounted.
•
If the scsi_dh_rdac module is not included in initrd, slower device
discovery may be seen and the syslog may become populated with buffer
I/O error messages.
•
I/O may hang if the host server or storage array is rebooted while I/O is
active. All I/O to the storage array must be stopped before shutting down
or rebooting the host server or storage array.
•
After a failed path is restored on an MD3600i Series array, failback does not
occur automatically because the driver cannot auto-detect devices without
a forced rescan. Run the command rescan_dm_devs to force a rescan
of the host server. This restores the failed paths enabling failback to occur.
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•
Failback can be slow when the host system is experiencing heavy I/O. The
problem is exacerbated if the host server is also experiencing very high
processor utilization.
•
The Device Mapper Multipath service can be slow when the host system is
experiencing heavy I/O. The problem is exacerbated if the host server is
also experiencing very high processor utilization.
•
If the root disk is not blacklisted in the multipath.conf file, a multipathing
node may be created for the root disk. The command multipath –ll
lists vendor/product ID, which can help identify this issue.
Troubleshooting
Question
Answer
How can I check if multipathd is
running?
Run the following command.
Why does the multipath –ll
command output not show any
devices?
First verify if the devices are discovered or not.
The command #cat /proc/scsi/scsi
displays all the devices that are already
discovered. Then verify the multipath.conf to
ensure that it is updated with proper settings.
After this, run multipath. Then run
multipath –ll, the new devices must show
up.
/etc/init.d/multipathd status
Why is a newly-mapped LUN not Run rescan_dm_devs in any directory. This
assigned a multipathing device
must bring up the devices.
node?
I have no LUNs mapped before. Run rescan_dm_devs instead of rescanThen I map some LUNs. After
scsi-bus for LUN 0 reconfiguration.
running rescan-scsi-bus.sh, LUN 0
doesn’t show up.
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Question
Answer
I removed a LUN. But the
multipathing mapping is still
available.
The multipathing device is still available after you
remove the LUNs. Run multipath –f
<device node for the deleted LUN>
to remove the multipathing mapping. For
example, if a device related with /dev/dm-1 is
deleted, you must run multipath –f
/dev/dm-1 to remove /dev/dm-1 from DM
mapping table. If multipathing daemon is
stopped/restarted, run multipath –F to
flush out all stale mappings.
Failback does not happen as
expected with the array.
Sometimes the low level driver cannot autodetect devices coming back with the array. Run
rescan_dm_devs to rescan host server SCSI
bus and re-aggregate devices at multipathing
layer.
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15
Management: Firmware Downloads
Downloading RAID Controller and NVSRAM
Packages
A version number exists for each firmware file. The version number indicates
whether the firmware is a major version or a minor version. You can use the
Enterprise Management Window (EMW) to download and activate both the
major firmware versions and the minor firmware versions. You can use the
Array Management Window (AMW) to download and activate only the
minor firmware versions.
NOTE: Firmware versions are of the format aa.bb.cc.dd.
Where, aa is the major firmware version and bb.cc.dd is the minor firmware
version. Depending on which one changes, firmware can be updated from EMW
and AMW or only EMW.
You can activate the files immediately or wait until a more convenient time.
You may want to activate the firmware or NVSRAM files at a later time
because of these reasons:
•
Time of day—Activating the firmware and the NVSRAM can take a long
time, so you can wait until I/O loads are lighter. The RAID controller
modules are offline briefly to load the new firmware.
•
Type of package—You may want to test the new firmware on one storage
array before loading the files onto other storage arrays.
The ability to download both files and activate them later depends on the
type of RAID controller module in the storage array.
NOTE: You can use the command line interface to download and activate the
firmware to several storage arrays by using a script. For more information on the
command line interface, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager online
help topics.
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Downloading Both RAID Controller and NVSRAM
Firmware
NOTE: I/O to the array can continue while you are upgrading RAID controller and
NVSRAM firmware.
NOTE: It is recommended that the firmware and NVSRAM be upgraded during a
maintenance period when the array is not being used for I/O.
NOTE: The RAID enclosure must contain at least two disk drives in order to update
the firmware on the controller.
To download RAID controller and NVSRAM firmware in a single operation:
1 If you are using the EMW, go to step 9. If you are using the AMW, go to
step 2.
2 Perform one of these actions:
•
Select Advanced Maintenance Download RAID Controller
Module Firmware.
•
Select the Support tab, and click Download Firmware. In Select
download task, select the Download RAID controller module
firmware and click OK.
NOTE: The RAID Controller Module Firmware area and the NVSRAM area list
the current firmware and the current NVSRAM versions respectively.
3 To locate the directory in which the file to download resides, click Select
File next to the Selected RAID controller module firmware file text box.
4 In the File Selection area, select the file to download.
By default, only the downloadable files that are compatible with the
current storage array configuration are displayed.
When you select a file in the File Selection area of the dialog, applicable
attributes (if any) of the file are displayed in the File Information area.
The attributes indicate the version of the file.
5 If you want to download an NVSRAM file with the firmware, select
Transfer NVSRAM file with RAID controller module firmware, and click
Select File next to Selected NVSRAM file.
6 To transfer the files to the RAID controller module without activating
them, click Transfer files but don't activate them (activate later).
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7 Click Transfer.
Keep these guidelines in mind:
–
If the Transfer button is inactive, ensure that you either select an
NVSRAM file or clear the Transfer NVSRAM file with RAID controller
module firmware.
–
If the file selected is not valid or is not compatible with the current
storage array configuration, the File Selection Error dialog is
displayed. Click OK to close it, and choose a compatible firmware or
NVSRAM file.
8 In the Confirm Download dialog, click Yes.
The download starts.
9 Perform one of these actions:
•
Select Tools Upgrade RAID Controller Module Firmware.
•
Select the Setup tab, and click Upgrade RAID Controller Module
Firmware.
10 In the Storage array pane, select the storage array for which you want to
upgrade the RAID controller module firmware or the NVSRAM.
You can select more than one storage array.
NOTE: The Details pane shows the details of only one storage array at a time.
If you select more than one storage array in the Storage Array pane, the
details of the storage arrays are not shown in the Details pane.
11 Click Firmware in the Download area.
If you select a storage array that cannot be upgraded, the Firmware button
is disabled. The Download Firmware dialog is displayed. The current
firmware version and the NVSRAM version of the selected storage arrays is
displayed.
NOTE: If you select the storage arrays with different RAID controller module
types that cannot be updated with the same firmware or NVSRAM file and
click Firmware, the Incompatible RAID Controller Modules dialog is displayed.
Click OK to close the dialog and select the storage arrays with similar RAID
controller module types.
12 To locate the directory in which the file to download resides, click Browse
in the Select files area.
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The Select File dialog is displayed.
13 Select the file to download.
14 Click OK.
15 If you want to download the NVSRAM file with the RAID controller
module firmware, select Download NVSRAM file with firmware in the
Select files area.
Attributes of the firmware file are displayed in the Firmware file
information area. The attributes indicate the version of the firmware file.
Attributes of the NVSRAM file are displayed in the NVSRAM file
information area. The attributes indicate the version of the NVSRAM file.
16 If you want to download the file and activate the firmware and NVSRAM
later, select the Transfer files but don’t activate them (activate later)
check box.
NOTE: If any of the selected storage arrays do not support downloading the
files and activating the firmware or NVSRAM later, the Transfer files but don’t
activate them (activate later) check box is disabled.
17 Click OK.
The Confirm Download dialog is displayed.
18 Click Yes.
The download starts and a progress indicator is displayed in the Status
column of the Upgrade RAID Controller Module Firmware window.
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Downloading Only NVSRAM Firmware
Use the command line interface (CLI) to download and activate NVSRAM to
several storage arrays. For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk
Storage Manager online help topics.
To download only NVSRAM firmware:
1 To download the NVSRAM firmware from:
•
EMW—Go to step 7.
•
AMW—Go to step 2.
2 Select Advanced Maintenance Download RAID Controller
Module NVSRAM
or
Select the Support tab, and click Download Firmware. In Select download
task, select Download RAID controller module NVSRAM and click OK.
An error message is displayed. Click OK to close it and select a compatible
file.
3 To locate the directory in which the file to download resides, click Select
File.
4 Select the file to download in the File selection area and click OK.
By default, only downloadable files that are compatible with the current
storage array configuration are displayed.
When you select a file in the File selection area, applicable attributes (if
any) of the file are displayed in the NVSRAM File information area. The
attributes indicate the version of the NVSRAM file.
5 Click Transfer.
NOTE: If the file selected is not valid or is not compatible with the current
storage array configuration, the File Selection Error dialog is displayed. Click
OK to close it, and choose a compatible NVSRAM file.
6 Click Yes in the Confirm Download dialog.
The download starts.
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7 Perform one of these actions:
•
Select Tools Upgrade RAID Controller Module Firmware.
•
Select the Setup tab, and click Upgrade RAID Controller Module
Firmware.
The Upgrade RAID Controller Module Firmware window is displayed.
The Storage array pane lists the storage arrays. The Details pane shows the
details of the storage array that is selected in the Storage array pane.
8 In the Storage array pane, select the storage array for which you want to
download the NVSRAM firmware.
You can select more than one storage array.
NOTE: The Details pane shows the details of only one storage array at a time.
If you select more than one storage array in the Storage array pane, the
details of the storage arrays are not shown in the Details pane.
9 Click NVSRAM in the Download area.
NOTE: If you select a storage array that cannot be upgraded, the NVSRAM
button is disabled.
The Download NVSRAM dialog is displayed. The current firmware
version and the NVSRAM version of the selected storage arrays is
displayed.
NOTE: If you select the storage arrays with different RAID controller module
types that cannot be updated with the same NVSRAM file and click NVSRAM,
the Incompatible RAID Controller Modules dialog is displayed. Click OK to
close the dialog and select the storage arrays with similar RAID controller
module types.
10 To locate the directory in which the NVSRAM file to download resides,
click Browse in the Select file area.
The Select File dialog is displayed.
11 Select the file to download and click OK.
Any attributes of the NVSRAM file is displayed in the NVSRAM file
information area. The attributes indicate the version of the NVSRAM file.
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12 Click OK.
The Confirm Download dialog is displayed.
13 Click Yes.
The download starts and a progress indicator is displayed in the Status
column of the Upgrade RAID Controller Module Firmware window.
Downloading Physical Disk Firmware
CAUTION: When updating physical disk firmware, you must stop all I/O activity to
the array to prevent data loss.
The physical disk firmware controls various features of the physical disk. The
disk array controller (DAC) uses this type of firmware. Physical disk firmware
stores information about the system configuration on an area of the physical
disk called DACstore. DACstore and the physical disk firmware enable easier
reconfiguration and migration of the physical disks. The physical disk
firmware performs these functions:
•
The physical disk firmware records the location of the physical disk in an
expansion enclosure. If you take a physical disk out of an expansion
enclosure, you must insert it back into the same physical disk slot, or the
physical disk firmware cannot communicate with the RAID controller
module or other storage array components.
•
RAID configuration information is stored in the physical disk firmware and
is used to communicate with other RAID components.
CAUTION: Risk of application errors—Downloading the firmware could cause
application errors.
Keep these important guidelines in mind when you download firmware to
avoid the risk of application errors:
•
Downloading firmware incorrectly could result in damage to the physical
disks or loss of data. Perform downloads only under the guidance of your
Technical Support representative.
•
Stop all I/O to the storage array before the download.
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•
Make sure that the firmware that you download to the physical disks are
compatible with the physical disks that you select.
•
Do not make any configuration changes to the storage array while
downloading the firmware.
NOTE: Downloads can take several minutes to complete. During a download, the
Download Physical Disk - Progress dialog is displayed. Do not attempt another
operation when the Download Physical Disk - Progress dialog is displayed.
To download Physical Disk Firmware:
1 From the AMW, select Advanced Maintenance Download
Physical Disk.
The Download Physical Disk - Introduction window is displayed.
2 Click Next.
The Download Physical Disk Firmware - Add Packages window is
displayed.
3 In the Selected Packages area, click Add.
4 Navigate to the location of the packages and click OK.
The selected package is added to the Packages to be transferred area.
5 Click Next.
The Download Physical Disk Firmware - Select Physical Disks window is
displayed.
6 In the Compatible Physical Disks tab, select the appropriate physical
disks or Select all the physical disks.
The Confirm Download dialog is displayed.
7 Type yes and click OK.
The Download Physical Disk Firmware - Progress window displays the
progress of physical disk firmware download.
8 After the firmware download is complete, click Close.
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
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Downloading MD1200 Series Expansion Module
EMM Firmware
NOTE: Due to a limitation with Linux, expansion enclosure EMM firmware updates
must be performed using out-of-band management only. Failure to do so may result
in the host server becoming unresponsive, and it may require a reboot.
You can transfer a downloadable firmware file to the expansion enclosure
EMM in the expansion enclosures attached to the storage array.
CAUTION: Risk of possible loss of data or risk of damage to the storage array—
Downloading the expansion enclosure EMM firmware incorrectly could result in
loss of data or damage to the storage array. Perform downloads only under the
guidance of your Technical Support representative.
CAUTION: Risk of making expansion enclosure EMM unusable—Do not make
any configuration changes to the storage array while downloading expansion
enclosure EMM firmware. Doing so could cause the firmware download to fail
and make the selected expansion enclosure unusable.
1 Perform one of these actions:
•
In the AMW, select Advanced Maintenance Download EMM
Firmware.
•
Select the Support tab, and click Download Firmware. In the dialog
that is displayed, select the EMM firmware, and click OK.
The Download Environmental (EMM) Firmware dialog is displayed.
2 In the Select enclosures area, either select each expansion enclosure to
which you want to download firmware, or select Select All to select all of
the expansion enclosures in the storage array.
Each selected expansion enclosure must have the same product ID.
3 Click Select File.
The Select Environmental (EMM) Card Firmware File dialog is
displayed.
4 Select the file to download and click OK.
5 Click Start.
6 Click Yes to continue with the firmware download.
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NOTE: If you click Stop while a firmware download is in progress, the
download-in-progress finishes before the operation stops. The status for the
remaining expansion enclosures changes to Canceled.
7 Monitor the progress and completion status of the download to the
expansion enclosures. The progress and status of each expansion enclosure
that is participating in the download is displayed in the Status column of
the Select enclosures table.
NOTE: Each firmware download can take several minutes to complete.
8 Perform one of these actions depending on whether the download
succeeded:
•
The download succeeded—The statuses of all the expansion
enclosures show Complete. You can close the Download
environmental (EMM) Card Firmware dialog by clicking Close. The
expansion enclosure EMM cards are now operating with the new
firmware.
•
The download failed—The status of one expansion enclosure shows
Failed and the remainder of the expansion enclosures show Canceled.
Make sure that the new firmware file is compatible before attempting
another firmware download.
Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting
Technology (SMART)
Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology (SMART) monitors the
internal performance of all physical disk components to detect faults
indicating the potential for physical disk failure. SMART uses this
information to report whether failure is imminent so that a physical disk can
be replaced before failure occurs. The RAID controller monitors all attached
drives and notifies users when a predicted failure is reported by a physical
disk.
Media Errors and Unreadable Sectors
If the RAID controller detects a media error while accessing data from a
physical disk that is a member of a disk group with a redundant RAID level
(RAID 1, RAID 5 or RAID 10), the controller tries to recover the data from
peer disks in the disk group and uses recovered data to correct the error. If the
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controller encounters an error while accessing a peer disk, it is unable to
recover the data and affected sectors are added to the unreadable sector log
maintained by the controller. Other conditions under which sectors are added
to the unreadable sector log include:
•
A media error is encountered when trying to access a physical disk that is a
member of a non-redundant disk group (RAID 0 or degraded RAID 1,
RAID 5 or RAID 10).
•
An error is encountered on source disks during rebuild.
NOTE: Data on an unreadable sector is no longer accessible.
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16
Management: Installing Array
Components
Recommended Tools
You may need the following items to perform the procedures in this section:
•
Key to the system keylock
•
#2 Phillips screwdriver
•
Wrist grounding strap
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Front Bezel (Optional)
Removing the Front Bezel
1 Using the system key, unlock the front bezel (if locked).
2 Lift up the release latch next to the keylock.
3 Rotate the left end of the bezel away from the front panel.
4 Unhook the right end of the bezel and pull the bezel away from
the system.
Figure 16-1. Removing and Installing the Front Bezel
1
2
3
4
1
bezel
2
keylock
3
release latch
4
hinge tab
Installing the Front Bezel
1 Hook the right end of the bezel onto the chassis.
2 Fit the free end of the bezel onto the system.
3 Secure the bezel with the keylock. See Figure 16-1.
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Hard Drives
SAFETY: Models AMT, E03J, and E04J
Models AMT, E03J, and E04J are intended for installation only in restricted
access locations as defined in cl 1.2.7.3 of IEC 60950-1:2005.
Depending on your configuration, your array either supports up to twenty
four 2.5" SAS hard drives or up to twelve 3.5" SAS hard drives in internal drive
bays. Hard drives are connected to a backplane through hard-drive carriers
and can be configured as hot-swappable.
Removing a Hard-Drive Blank
CAUTION: To maintain proper system cooling, all empty hard-drive bays must
have drive blanks installed.
1 If installed, remove the front bezel. See "Removing the Front Bezel" on
page 220.
2 Press the release tab and slide the hard-drive blank out until it is free of
the drive bay. See Figure 16-2 for PowerVault MD3600i and Figure 16-3 for
PowerVault MD3620i.
Figure 16-2. Removing and Installing a 3.5" Hard-Drive Blank (MD3600i Only)
1
1
hard-drive blank
2
2
release tab
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Figure 16-3. Removing and Installing a 2.5" Hard-Drive Blank (MD3620i Only)
1
1
2
hard-drive blank
2
release tab
Installing a Hard-Drive Blank
1 If installed, remove the front bezel. See "Removing the Front Bezel" on
page 220.
2 Insert the drive blank into the drive bay until the blank is fully seated.
3 Close the handle to lock the blank in place.
4 If applicable, replace the front bezel. See "Installing the Front Bezel" on
page 220.
Removing a Hard Drive
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician.
You must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in
your product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service
and support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not
covered by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came with
the product.
1 If installed, remove the front bezel. See "Removing the Front Bezel" on
page 220.
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2 From the Modular Disk Storage Manager (MDSM) software, prepare the
drive for removal. Wait until the hard-drive indicators on the drive
carrier signal that the drive can be removed safely. For more information,
see your controller documentation for information about hot-swap drive
removal.
If the drive is online, the green activity/fault indicator flashes as the drive
is powered down. When the drive indicators are off, the drive is ready for
removal.
3 Press the release button to open the drive carrier release handle. See
Figure 16-4.
4 Slide the hard drive out until it is free of the drive bay.
CAUTION: To maintain proper system cooling, all empty hard-drive bays must
have drive blanks installed.
5 Insert a drive blank in the empty drive bay. See "Installing a Hard-Drive
Blank" on page 222.
6 If applicable, replace the front bezel. See "Installing the Front Bezel" on
page 220.
Figure 16-4. Removing and Installing a Hard Drive
1
2
1
release button
2
hard-drive carrier handle
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Installing a Hard Drive
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician.
You must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in
your product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service
and support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is
not covered by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came
with the product.
CAUTION: Use only hard drives that are tested and approved for use with the
MD3600i Series.
CAUTION: When installing a hard drive, ensure that the adjacent drives are fully
installed. Inserting a hard-drive carrier and attempting to lock its handle next to a
partially installed carrier can damage the partially installed carrier's shield spring
and make it unusable.
1 If applicable, remove the front bezel. See "Removing the Front Bezel" on
page 220.
2 If applicable, remove the drive blank from the bay. See "Removing a HardDrive Blank" on page 221.
3 Press the release button to open the drive carrier release handle.
4 Insert the hard-drive carrier into the drive bay until the carrier contacts the
backplane.
5 Close the handle to lock the drive in place.
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Removing a Hard Drive From a Hard-Drive Carrier
Remove the screws from the slide rails on the hard-drive carrier and separate
the hard drive from the carrier. See Figure 16-5 for PowerVault MD3600i and
Figure 16-6 for PowerVault MD3620i.
Figure 16-5. Removing and Installing a Hard Drive Into a 3.5" Hard-Drive Carrier
2
1
3
4
1
screws (4)
2
hard drive
3
SAS screw hole
4
hard-drive carrier
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Figure 16-6. Removing and Installing a Hard Drive Into a 2.5" Hard-Drive Carrier
2
1
3
4
226
1
screws (4)
2
hard-drive carrier
3
SAS screw hole
4
hard drive
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Installing a Hard Drive Into a Hard-Drive Carrier
1 Insert the hard drive into the hard-drive carrier with the connector end
of the drive at the back. See Figure 16-5.
2 Align the screw holes on the hard drive with the back set of holes on the
hard-drive carrier.
When aligned correctly, the back of the hard drive is flush with the back of
the hard-drive carrier.
3 Attach the four screws to secure the hard drive to the hard-drive carrier.
RAID Controller Module
An MD3600i Series storage array supports single as well as dual RAID
controller configurations. If only one RAID controller module is installed in
your array, it must be installed in slot 0. You must install the RAID controller
module blank in slot 1.
CAUTION: RAID controller modules can be removed and installed without turning
off the array. It is recommended that you do not remove the RAID controller module
while data is being transferred. Replacing or installing a RAID controller module
that is connected to a host server causes it to loose communication with the array
and may require a reboot of the host server.
Removing a RAID Controller Module Blank
CAUTION: To maintain proper system cooling, you must install a RAID controller
module blank in the empty slot.
1 Turn off the array and host server.
2 Disconnect all the power cables connected to the array.
3 To remove the RAID controller module blank, press down on the release
latch and pull the blank away from the array. See Figure 16-7.
4 Install RAID controller modules in slots 0 and 1. See "Installing a RAID
Controller Module" on page 230.
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5 Connect all the power cables to the array.
6 Turn on the array and the host server.
Figure 16-7. Removing and Installing a RAID Controller Module Blank
1
1
release latch
2
RAID controller module blank
Installing a RAID Controller Module Blank
To install a RAID controller module blank:
1 Align the blank with the RAID controller module bay
2 Insert the blank into the chassis until it clicks into place.
228
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Removing a RAID Controller Module
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician.
You must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in
your product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service
and support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not
covered by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came
with the product.
1 Disconnect the cables connected to the RAID controller module.
2 Push down on the release tab and pull the release lever away from the
chassis. See Figure 16-8.
3 Grasp the release lever and pull the module away from the chassis.
NOTE: To avoid damage to the sensitive EMI contacts on the RAID controller
module, do not stack RAID controller modules.
Figure 16-8. Removing and Installing a RAID Controller Module
3
2
1
1
RAID controller module
3
release lever
2
release tab
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Installing a RAID Controller Module
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician. You
must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in your
product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service and
support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not covered
by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came with the
product.
1 Insert the RAID controller module into the RAID controller module bay
until it seats into place.
2 Push the release lever toward the chassis until it clicks into place.
3 Connect all the cables to the RAID controller module.
4 If applicable, update the firmware for the RAID controller module. For
information about the latest firmware, see support.dell.com.
Opening the RAID Controller Module
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician. You
must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in your
product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service and
support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not covered
by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came with the
product.
1 Turn off the array and host server.
2 Disconnect all the power cables connected to the array.
3 Remove the RAID controller module. See "Removing a RAID Controller
Module Blank" on page 227.
4 Remove the screws from the sides of the RAID controller module. See
Figure 16-9.
5 While pressing the indent, slide the cover in the direction of the arrow and
lift it away from the RAID controller module. See Figure 16-9.
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Figure 16-9. Opening and Closing the RAID Controller Module
1
1
screws (2)
3
indent
2
3
2
RAID controller module
Closing the RAID Controller Module
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician. You
must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in your
product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service and
support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not covered
by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came with the
product.
1 Place the cover onto the RAID controller module and offset it slightly
toward the back, so that the hooks on the cover fit over the corresponding
slots on the RAID controller module.
2 Slide the cover toward the front till it snaps into place. See Figure 16-9.
3 Replace the screws on the RAID controller module. See Figure 16-9.
4 Connect all the cables to the array.
5 Turn on the array and the host server.
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RAID Controller Module Backup Battery Unit
Removing the RAID Controller Module Backup Battery Unit
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician. You
must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in your
product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service and
support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not covered
by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came with the
product.
1 Turn off the array and host server.
2 Disconnect all the cables connected to the array.
3 Remove the RAID controller module. See "Removing a RAID Controller
Module" on page 229.
4 Open the RAID controller module. See "Opening the RAID Controller
Module" on page 230.
5 Loosen the screw that secures the backup battery unit to the RAID
controller module. See Figure 16-10.
6 Slide the backup battery unit in the direction of the arrow and lift it out of
the RAID controller module. See Figure 16-10.
Figure 16-10. Removing and Installing the RAID Controller Module Backup Battery Unit
1
2
1
232
backup battery unit
2
screw
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Installing the RAID Controller Module Backup Battery Unit
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician. You
must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in your
product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service and
support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not covered
by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came with the
product.
1 Align the backup battery unit with the slots on the RAID controller
module.
2 Slide the backup battery unit toward the connector on the RAID controller
module.
3 Tighten the screw that secures the backup battery unit to the RAID
controller module.
4 Close the RAID controller module. See "Closing the RAID Controller
Module" on page 231.
5 Replace the RAID controller module. See "Installing a RAID Controller
Module" on page 230.
6 Connect all the cables to the array.
7 Turn on the array and the host server.
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Power Supply/Cooling Fan Module
NOTE: Your storage array includes two integrated, hot-swappable power
supply/cooling fan modules.
The array supports two hot-swappable power supply/cooling fan modules.
While the array can operate temporarily with one module, both the modules
must be present for proper system cooling.
CAUTION: A single power supply/cooling fan module can be removed from a
powered-on array for a maximum period of 5 minutes. Beyond that time, the array
may automatically shut down to prevent damage.
Removing a Power Supply/Cooling Fan Module
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician. You
must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in your
product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service and
support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not covered
by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came with the
product.
NOTE: If you remove a fully functioning power supply/cooling fan module, the fan
speed in the remaining module increases significantly to provide adequate cooling.
The fan speed decreases gradually when a new power supply/cooling fan module
is installed.
1 Turn off the power supply/cooling fan module.
2 Disconnect the power cable from the power source.
3 Remove the straps that secure the power cable and then disconnect the
power cable from the power supply/cooling fan module.
WARNING: The power supply/cooling fan modules are heavy. Use both hands
while removing the module.
4 Press the release tab and pull the power supply out of the chassis.
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Figure 16-11. Removing and Installing a Power Supply/Cooling Fan Module
1
2
3
1
release tab
3
power supply handle
2
power supply
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Installing a Power Supply/Cooling Fan Module
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician. You
must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in your
product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service and
support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not covered
by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came with the
product.
1 Slide the power supply/cooling fan module into the chassis until it is fully
seated and the release tab clicks into place. See Figure 16-11.
2 Connect the power cable to the power supply/cooling fan module and plug
the cable into a power outlet.
3 Secure the power cable using the strap. See Figure 16-12.
Figure 16-12. Securing the Power Cable
1
1
strap
CAUTION: When connecting the power cable, secure the cable with the strap.
NOTE: If the array is powered on, all the power supply LEDs remain off until the AC
power cable is connected to the power supply/cooling fan module and the power
switch is turned on.
4 Turn on the power supply/cooling fan module.
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Control Panel
Removing the Control Panel
1 Turn off the array and host server.
2 Disconnect all the power cables connected to the array.
3 Remove the hard drives from:
–
slots 0 to 2 in PowerVault MD3600i
–
slots 0 to 5 in PowerVault MD3620i
See "Removing a Hard Drive" on page 222.
NOTE: Mark each hard drive with it’s slot position as you remove it.
4 Slide the control panel out of the chassis after:
–
Pushing the release tab toward the front of the array in PowerVault
MD3600i. See Figure 16-13.
–
Pulling the release pin toward the front of the array in PowerVault
MD3620i. See Figure 16-14.
Figure 16-13. Removing and Installing the Control Panel-PowerVault MD3600i
1
1
control panel
2
2
release tab
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Figure 16-14. Removing and Installing the Control Panel-PowerVault MD3620i
1
2
1
release pin
2
control panel
Installing the Control Panel
1 Align the control panel with the slot on the array.
2 Slide the control panel into the array until:
–
The release tab clicks into place in PowerVault MD3600i.
See Figure 16-13.
–
The release pin clicks into place in PowerVault MD3620i.
See Figure 16-14.
3 Replace the hard drives in their respective slots. See "Installing a Hard
Drive" on page 224.
4 Connect all the power cables to the array.
5 Turn on the array and the host server.
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Backplane
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician.
You must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in
your product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service
and support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not
covered by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came
with the product.
Removing the Backplane
1 Turn off the array and disconnect it from the electrical outlet.
2 Disconnect all the cables connected to the array.
3 Remove the hard drives. See "Removing a Hard Drive" on page 222.
4 Remove the RAID controller modules. See "Removing a RAID Controller
Module" on page 229.
5 Remove the power supply/cooling fan modules. See "Removing a Power
Supply/Cooling Fan Module" on page 234.
6 Remove the control panel. See "Removing the Control Panel" on page 237.
7 Remove the screws that secure the RAID controller module/power supply
cage to the chassis.
8 Grasp the cage removal ring at the bottom center of the array and pull the
RAID controller module/power supply cage toward the back of the chassis.
See Figure 16-15.
9 Lift the RAID controller module/power supply cage away from the chassis.
See Figure 16-15.
10 Loosen the captive screw that secures the backplane to the chassis. See
Figure 16-16 for PowerVault MD3600i or Figure 16-17 for PowerVault
MD3620i.
11 Remove the screws that secure the backplane and pull the backplane out
of the array. See Figure 16-16 for PowerVault MD3600i or Figure 16-17 for
PowerVault MD3620i.
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Figure 16-15. Removing and Installing the RAID Controller Module/Power Supply Cage
1
1
240
2
screws (6)
2
RAID controller module/power
supply cage
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Figure 16-16. Removing and Installing the Backplane-PowerVault MD3600i
1
2
3
1
screws (5)
3
captive screw
2
backplane
Figure 16-17. Removing and Installing the Backplane-PowerVault MD3620i
1
2
3
1
screws (4)
3
captive screw
2
backplane
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Installing the Backplane
1 Align the holes on the backplane with the holes on the array.
2 Tighten the captive screw to secure the backplane to the chassis.
See Figure 16-16 for PowerVault MD3600i or Figure 16-17 for
PowerVault MD3620i.
3 Replace the screws that secure the backplane to the chassis.
See Figure 16-16 for PowerVault MD3600i or Figure 16-17 for
PowerVault MD3620i.
4 Align the slots on the RAID controller module/power supply cage with the
tabs on the chassis. See Figure 16-15.
5 Push the RAID controller module/power supply cage toward the front of
the array.
6 Replace the screws that secure the RAID controller module/power supply
cage to the chassis.
7 Replace the control panel. See "Installing the Control Panel" on page 238.
8 Replace the power supply/cooling fan modules. See "Installing a Power
Supply/Cooling Fan Module" on page 236.
9 Replace the hard drives. See "Installing a Hard Drive" on page 224.
10 Connect all the cables to the array.
11 Turn on the array and the host server.
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17
Management: Firmware Inventory
A storage array is made up of many components, which may include RAID
controller modules, physical disks, and enclosure management modules
(EMMs). Each of these components contains firmware. Some versions of the
firmware are dependent on other versions of firmware. To capture
information about all of the firmware versions in the storage array, view the
firmware inventory.
If the firmware inventory does not contain information for a particular
storage array, the firmware inventory service is not available on that storage
array.
You can also save the firmware inventory to a text file. You can then send the
file to your Technical Support representative to detect any firmware
mismatches.
Viewing the Firmware Inventory
To view the firmware inventory:
1 Perform one of these actions based on whether you want to view the
firmware information for one storage array or all storage arrays:
•
One storage array—From the Array Management Window, select
AdvancedMaintenance Firmware Inventory.
•
All storage arrays—From the Enterprise Management Window, select
Tools Firmware Inventory.
2 To save the firmware inventory to a text file, click Save As.
3 In File name dialog box, enter a name for the file to be saved. You may also
specify another physical disk and directory if you want to save the file in a
location other than the default.
NOTE: The suffix *.txt is added to the file name automatically if you do not
specify a suffix for the file name.
4 Click Save.
An ASCII text file that contains the firmware inventory is saved to the
designated directory.
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18
Management: System Interfaces
Microsoft Services
Virtual Disk Service
The Microsoft Virtual Disk Service (VDS) is a component of the Windows
operating system. The VDS component utilizes third-party vendor specific
software modules, known as providers, to access and configure third-party
storage resources, such as MD3600i Series storage arrays. The VDS
component exposes a set of application programming interfaces (APIs) that
provides a single interface for managing disks and other storage hardware.
The MD3600i Series VDS Provider enables Windows tools, including the
Disk Manager, to access and configure storage array virtual disks.
The VDS Provider for the MD3600i Series storage arrays is available on the
MD3600i Series resource media. For more information on VDS, see
microsoft.com.
Volume Shadow-Copy Service
The Microsoft Volume Shadow-copy Service (VSS) is a component of the
Microsoft Windows operating system. The VSS component utilizes thirdparty vendor specific software modules, known as providers, to access and
utilize snapshot and disk copy functionality provided by third-party storage
resources, such as MD3600i Series storage arrays. The combination of the
VSS component and the VSS Provider, included on the MD3600i Resource
media, enables the MD3600i Series storage arrays to be utilized by third-party
and Windows backup and snapshot applications.
NOTE: Virtual disks used as source virtual disks for VSS snapshots must have
names no longer than 16 characters.
The VSS hardware provider uses the source virtual disk name as a prefix for
the snapshot and repository virtual disk names. The resulting snapshot and
repository names are too long if the source virtual disk name exceeds 16
characters.
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VSS attaches to the service and uses it to coordinate the creation of snapshot
virtual disks on the storage array. VSS-initiated snapshot virtual disks can be
triggered through backup tools, known as requestors. The VSS Provider
Configuration Tool offers the following configuration options:
•
Snapshot Repository Virtual Disk Properties—This section contains a
drop-down list for the RAID level and a field for entering source virtual
disk capacity percentage for snapshot repositories.
•
Snapshot Repository Virtual Disk Location—This section contains a list
of preferences for the location of the snapshot repository virtual disk.
These preferences are honored whenever conditions permit.
The Microsoft VSS installer service for storage provisioning is available on the
MD3600i resource media in the \windows\VDS_VSS directory.
NOTE: When registering VSS during your Windows setup, the registration
graphical user interface (GUI) prompts you to provide the name of your array
because settings in the GUI are array-specific, not host-specific.
Storage Management VSS Hardware Provider Tips:
•
The number of snapshot virtual disks that can be created using a single
snapshot set varies with the I/O load on the RAID controller modules.
Under little or no I/O load, the number of virtual disks in a snapshot set
must be limited to 16. Under high I/O loads, the limit is 3.
•
The snapshot virtual disks created in the storage management software are
differential snapshots. Plex snapshots are not supported.
•
Virtual disks to be used as source virtual disks for VSS snapshots must have
names no longer than 16 characters. The VSS hardware provider uses the
source virtual disk name as a prefix for the snapshot and repository virtual
disk names. The resulting snapshot and repository names are too long if
the source virtual disk name exceeds 16 characters.
NOTE: A volume is another term for virtual disk.
For more information on VDS and VSS, see microsoft.com.
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19
Troubleshooting: Your Storage
Array Software
Start-Up Routine
Look and listen during the array’s start-up routine for the indications
described in Table 19-1. For a description of the front- and back-panel
indicators, see "Planning: About Your Storage Array" on page 23.
Table 19-1.
Start-Up Routine Indications
Look/listen for
Action
Alert messages.
See your storage management
documentation.
An unfamiliar constant scraping or grinding
sound when you access a physical disk.
See "Getting Help" on page 283.
NOTE: At least two physical disks must be installed in the array.
Device Health Conditions
When you open the Enterprise Management Window (EMW), the Dell
PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Management software (MDSM)
establishes communication with each managed storage array and determines
the current storage array status. The current status is represented by icons
next to the managed storage array.
The status icons shown in the Tree view in the EMW represent a summary
status for each storage array. If a storage array has a status of Needs Attention
or a status of Fixing, determine the condition that is causing this status
before attempting any management actions. You can determine the condition
causing the Needs Attention status or the Fixing status by selecting the
storage array and launching its Array Management Window (AMW).
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To launch the AMW, perform one of these actions:
•
On the Devices tab, in either the Tree view or the Table view, double-click
a storage array. Alternatively, you can right-click a storage array and select
Manage Storage Array from the pop-up menu.
•
On the Setup tab, select Manage a Storage Array.
After the AMW is displayed, select the Physical tab to see the components in
the storage array. A component that has a problem is indicated by a status
icon.
The status icons indicate the status of the components that comprise the
storage array. Also, the Recovery Guru option provides a detailed explanation
of the conditions and the applicable steps to remedy any Needs Attention
status. For more information, see "Recovery Guru" on page 256.
For the status of a storage array, the icons shown in the following table are
used in the Tree view, the Table view, and both the EMW Status Bar and the
AMW Status Bar.
Table 19-2. Status Icon
Status
Icon
Description
Optimal
Each component in the managed storage array is in
the desired working condition.
Needs Attention
There is a problem with the managed storage array
that requires your intervention to correct it.
Unresponsive
The storage management station cannot
communicate with the storage array or one RAID
controller module or both RAID controller modules
in the storage array.
Fixing Status
A Needs Attention status is corrected and the
managed storage array is currently transitioning to an
Optimal state.
Unsupported
The node is currently not supported by this version of
MDSM.
Software
Unsupported
The storage array is running a level of software that is
no longer supported by MDSM.
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In the Table view, every managed storage array is listed once, regardless of the
number of attachments it has in the Tree view. After the storage array is
contacted by MDSM, an icon representing its hardware status is displayed.
Hardware status can be Optimal, Needs Attention, or Fixing. If, however, all
of the network management connections from the storage management
station to the storage array shown in the Tree view are Unresponsive, the
storage array status is represented as Unresponsive.
In the EMW Status Bar and the AMW Status Bar, the icons also have these
behaviors:
•
Hold the mouse over the icon in the EMW Status Bar and the AMW
Status Bar to display a tooltip with a brief description of the status.
•
The icons for the Needs Attention status and Unresponsive status are
displayed in EMW Status Bar and the AMW Status Bar if there are
discovered storage arrays with either condition.
The EMW Tree view has additional status icons that are shown in the
following table.
Table 19-3.
Additional Status Icons
Status
Icon
Description
Unsupported Alerts
with a Needs
Upgrade Status
Setting an alert on a storage array with a Needs
Upgrade status is not supported. In this case, the
storage array shows both a Needs Upgrade status
and an Unsupported Alerts icon in the Tree view.
The Unsupported Alerts icon indicates that the
storage array cannot be monitored.
Alert Set
If you installed the Event Monitor with MDSM,
and if you have set alerts, the Alert Set icon is
displayed next to the storage array status in the
Tree view for which the alerts are set.
Setting an Alert at
the Parent Node
Level
You can set alerts at any of the nodes in the Tree
view. Setting an alert at a parent node level, such
as at a host level, sets alert for any child nodes. If
you set an alert at a parent node level and any of
the in-band storage array child nodes have a
Needs Upgrade status, the Alert Disables status
icon is displayed next to the parent node in the
tree view.
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Table 19-3. Additional Status Icons
Status
Icon
Adding a Storage
Array
Description
The Contacting Storage Array icon is shown in
the Tree view and Table view until the current
status of each managed storage array is known.
The Contacting Storage Array icon is shown in
the EMW Status Bar and the AMW Status Bar
and the tooltip shows Contacting Storage arrays.
As each storage array is contacted, its current
status is obtained and shown in the Tree view and
Table view. The applicable statuses are the
Optimal, Needs Attention, Fixing, or
Unresponsive.
Adding a Storage
Array OK
No problems were encountered while adding the
storage array.
MDSM software continues to check for any
status change events.
Adding a Storage
Array Error
Displayed only when an error occurs.
In the Tree view, icons can are displayed in a string to convey more
information. For example, the following string means that the storage array is
optimal, an alert is set for the storage array, and firmware is available for
download.
NOTE: MDSM may take a few minutes to update a status change to Unresponsive
or from Unresponsive. A status change from or to Unresponsive depends on the
network link to the storage array. All other status change updates faster.
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Storage Array Support Data
You can gather various types of inventory, status, and performance data that
can help troubleshoot any problem with the storage array. All the files are
compressed into a single archive in a zipped-file format. You can forward the
archive file to your Technical Support representative for troubleshooting and
further analysis.
To generate the support data report:
1 In the AMW, perform one of these actions:
•
Select Advanced Troubleshooting  Support Data  Collect.
•
Select the Support tab, and click Gather Support Information.
The Collect All Support Data window is displayed.
2 Enter a name for the support data file in Specify filename or click Browse
to navigate to a previously saved file to overwrite an existing file.
The suffix .zip is added automatically to the file if you do not specify a
suffix for the file.
3 Enter the Execution summary.
4 Click Start.
After all of the support files are gathered, they are archived using the file
name that you specified.
5 Click OK.
NOTE: If a support data operation is running, it must complete before another
support data operation can begin. Concurrent collections are not supported and
results in an error message.
Automatically Collect the Support Bundle Data
You can use the Collect Support Bundle option to automatically save a copy
of the support bundle when the client monitor process detects a critical
event. You can enable or disable this feature and save the location of the
support bundle.
During a critical event, the support bundle is saved to the local physical disk
of the client system in the same area that is used for other recovery
information. This information is not overwritten for at least 72 hours.
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WARNING: Use this option only under the guidance of your Technical Support
representative.
NOTE: Enable only one collect support bundle data to a single client system.
Setting multiple systems to collect data may potentially affect the storage array
performance.
To automatically collect the support bundle data:
1 In the AMW, select Advanced Troubleshooting Support Data
Automatic Settings.
2 Select Automatically collect support data for critical events.
3 To change the location of the saved support bundle, click Change.
The Change Folder Location window is displayed, navigate to the relevant
folder and click OK.
4 To reset the default location, click Reset.
5 Click OK.
Retrieving Trace Buffers
Trace information can be saved to a compressed file. The firmware uses the
trace buffers to record processing activity, including exception conditions,
that may be useful for debugging. Trace information is stored in the current
buffer and can be moved to the flushed buffer after being retrieved. Because
each RAID controller module has its own buffer; there may be more than one
flushed buffer. The trace buffers can be retrieved without interrupting the
operation of the storage array and with minimal effect on performance.
NOTE: Use this option only under the guidance of a Technical Support
representative.
A zip-compressed archive file is stored at the location you specify on the host.
The archive contains trace files from one or both of the RAID controller
modules in the storage array along with a descriptor file named
trace_description.xml. Each trace file includes a header that identifies the
file format to the analysis software used by the Technical Support
representative. The descriptor file contains:
252
•
The WWN for the storage array.
•
The serial number of each RAID controller module.
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•
A time stamp.
•
The version number for the RAID controller module firmware.
•
The version number for the management application programming
interface (API).
•
The model ID for the RAID controller module board.
•
The collection status for each RAID controller module. If the status is
Failed, the reason for failure is noted, and there is no trace file for the
failed RAID controller module.
To retrieve the trace buffers:
1 From the AMW, select Advanced Troubleshooting Support Data
Retrieve Trace Buffers.
The Retrieve Trace Buffers dialog is displayed.
2 Select either the RAID controller module 0, RAID controller module 1,
or both.
If the RAID controller module status message to the right of a check box
indicates that the RAID controller module is offline, the check box is
disabled.
3 From the Trace buffers list, select the relevant option.
4 To move the buffer, select Move current trace buffer to the flushed buffer
after retrieval.
Move current trace buffer to the flushed buffer after retrieval is not
available if the Flushed buffer option is selected in step 3.
5 Enter a name for the physical disk data filename in Specify filename or
click Browse to navigate to a previously saved file to overwrite an existing
file.
6 Click Start.
The trace buffer information is archived to the file specified.
7 After the retrieval process is completed:
•
To retrieve trace buffers again using different parameters, repeat
step 2 through step 6.
•
To close the dialog, click Close.
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Collecting Physical Disk Data
You can use the Collect Physical Disk Data option to collect log sense data
from all the physical disks on your storage array.
Log sense data consists of statistical information that is maintained by each
of the physical disks in your storage array. Your Technical Support
representative can use this information to analyze the performance of your
physical disks and for troubleshooting problems that may exist.
WARNING: Use this option only under the guidance of your Technical Support
representative.
To collect physical disk data:
1 In the AMW, perform one of these actions:
•
To collect data from all of the physical disks in the storage array, select
Advanced Troubleshooting Collect Physical Disk Data
Collect All Physical Disk Data.
•
To collect data from a single physical disk that is selected in the
Physical tab, select Advanced Troubleshooting Collect Physical
Disk Data Collect Single Physical Disk Data.
The Collect Physical Disk Data window is displayed.
2 Enter a name for the physical disk data filename in Specify filename or
click Browse to navigate to a previously saved file to overwrite an existing
file.
The suffix *.bin is added to the file automatically if you do not specify a
suffix for the file.
3 Click Start.
The physical disk data collection is completed and saved at the location
that you entered.
4 Click OK.
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Event Log
You can use the Event Log Viewer to view a detailed list of events that occur
in a storage array. The event log is stored on reserved areas on the storage array
disks. It records configuration events and storage array component failures.
WARNING: Use this option only under the guidance of your Technical Support
representative.
The event log stores approximately 8000 events before it replaces an event
with a new event. If you want to keep the events, you may save them, and
clear them from the event log.
The event log shows two types of event views:
•
Summary view—Shows an event summary in a tabular format.
•
Detail view—Shows details about a selected event.
To view the event log:
1 In the AMW, select Advanced Troubleshooting View Event Log.
The Event Log is displayed. By default, the summary view is displayed.
2 To view the details of each selected log entry, select View details.
A detail pane is added to the event log that contains detailed information
about the log item. You can view the details about a single log entry at a
time.
3 To save the event log, click Save As.
The Save Events dialog is displayed.
4 Navigate to the relevant folder, enter the relevant file name, and click
Save.
5 To erase all log entries from the event log, click Clear All.
6 To exit the event log, click Close.
For more information, see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager
online help topics.
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Recovery Guru
The Recovery Guru is a component of MDSM that diagnoses critical events
on the storage array and recommends step-by-step recovery procedures to
resolve the problems.
In the AMW, to display the Recovery Guru, perform one of these actions:
•
Click Recovery Guru
•
In the Support tab, click the Recover from Failure link.
•
From the Status pane on the Summary tab, click the Storage Array Needs
Attention link.
.
You can detect a problem using the following indicators:
•
Non-Optimal status icons
•
Alert notification messages that are sent to the appropriate destinations
•
Hardware indicator lights
The status icons return to Optimal status as problems are resolved.
Storage Array Profile
The storage array profile provides a description of all of the components and
properties of the storage array. The storage array profile also provides the
option to save the storage array profile information to a text file. You may
want to use the storage array profile as an aid during recovery or as an
overview of the current configuration of the storage array. Create a new copy
of the storage array profile if your configuration changes.
1 To open the storage array profile, in the AMW, perform one of the
following actions:
•
Select Storage Array View Profile.
•
Select the Summary tab, and click Storage Array Profile in the Status
area.
•
Select the Support tab, and click View Storage Array Profile.
The Storage Array Profile dialog is displayed. The Storage Array Profile
dialog contains several tabs, and the title of each tab corresponds to the
subject of the information contained.
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2 Perform one of these actions in the Storage Array Profile dialog:
•
View detailed information—Go to step 3.
•
Search the storage array profile—Go to step 4.
•
Save the storage array profile—Go to step 5.
•
Close the storage array profile—Go to step 6.
3 Select one of the tabs, and use the horizontal scroll bar and the vertical
scroll bar to view the storage array profile information.
You can use the other steps in this procedure to search the storage array
profile, to save the storage array profile, or to close the storage array profile.
4 To search the storage array profile:
a
Click
.
b
Type the term that you want to search for in the Find text box.
If the term is located on the current tab, the term is highlighted in the
storage array profile information.
NOTE: The search is limited to the current tab. If you want to search for the
term in other tabs, select the tab and click the Find button again.
c
Click the Find button again to search for additional occurrences of the
term.
5 To save the storage array profile:
a
Click Save As.
b
To save all sections of the storage array profile, select All sections.
c
To save information from particular sections of the storage array
profile, select the Select sections, and select the check boxes
corresponding to the sections that you want to save.
d
Select an appropriate directory.
e
In File Name, type the file name of your choice. To associate the file
with a particular software application that is displayed it, specify a file
extension, such as .txt.
f
Click Save.
NOTE: The file is saved as ASCII text.
6 To exit the storage array profile, click Close.
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Viewing the Logical Associations
You can use the Associated Logical Elements option to view the logical
associations among different virtual disks in a storage array.
To view the associations for source virtual disks, snapshot virtual disks, and
snapshot repository virtual disks:
1 In the AMW, select the Logical tab.
2 Select View Associated Logical Elements. Alternatively, right-click the
virtual disk to open a pop-up menu and select View Associated Logical
Elements.
If you select a virtual disk that does not have logical associations with other
virtual disks, the Associated Logical Elements option is disabled.
NOTE: The View Associated Logical Elements dialog is displayed, which
indicates the logical associations for the selected virtual disk.
3 To close the View Associated Logical Elements dialog, click Close.
Viewing the Physical Associations
You can use the Associated Physical Components option to view the physical
components that are associated with source virtual disks, snapshot virtual
disks, snapshot repository virtual disks, disk groups, unconfigured capacity,
and free capacity in a storage array.
To view the physical associations:
1 In the AMW, select a node in the Logical pane of the Logical tab or in the
Topology pane of the Mappings tab.
2 Select View Associated Physical Components. Alternatively, if the
selected node is a virtual disk, right-click the node to open a pop-up menu
and select View Associated Physical Components. If the selected node
is a disk group, unconfigured capacity, or free capacity, right-click the node
to open a pop-up menu and select View Associated Physical
Components.
The View Associated Physical Components dialog is displayed with green
triangles next to the physical components that are associated with the
selected node.
3 To close the View Associated Physical Components dialog, click Close.
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Finding Nodes
You can use the Find option to search for a particular node on the Logical
tab, the Physical tab, or the Mappings tab of the AMW. The search may be
based on a particular node name, the RAID level, virtual disk capacity, or
specific free capacity nodes. The search may be based also on one of these
combinations:
•
The node name and the RAID level
•
The node name and the virtual disk capacity
To find nodes:
1 In the AMW, select View Find.
2 Based on the type of search, select one of these options, and go to the
indicated step:
•
Search by name—see step 3.
•
Search by special criteria—see step 4.
3 Type the name of the node to be found in Find Node. See step 8.
4 Based on the search criteria, select one of these options, and go to the
indicated step:
•
Find all virtual disks with RAID level—Go to step 5.
•
Find all virtual disks with capacity—Go to step 6.
•
Find all free capacity nodes—Go to step 7.
5 To search for all nodes based on their RAID level, perform these steps:
a
Select Find all virtual disks with RAID level.
b
Select the RAID level from the list.
c
Go to step 8.
6 To search for all nodes based on their virtual disk capacity, perform these
steps:
a
Select Find all virtual disks with capacity.
b
Type the capacity in the GB box.
c
Specify that the capacity to be matched is less than, equal to, or
greater than the capacity entered in the GB box.
d
Go to step 8.
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7 To search for all Free Capacity nodes with a particular capacity, perform
these steps:
NOTE: This option is not available when the Search by name option is
selected or from the Mappings tab. You must cancel the selection of the
Search by name option to use this option.
a
Select Find all free capacity nodes.
b
Type the capacity in the GB box.
c
Specify that the free capacity to be matched is less than, equal to, or
greater than the capacity entered in the GB box.
d
Go to step 8.
8 Click Find Next.
To see every node that matches the criteria, click Find Next repeatedly. If
no matches are found, the Search Failed dialog is displayed. Click OK, and
re-enter the search criteria.
9 To close the dialog, click Cancel.
To continue searching for nodes with the same criteria after the Find
dialog is closed, press F3.
Using Go To
Use the Go To option to quickly jump to an associated snapshot repository
virtual disk, snapshot virtual disk, source virtual disk, or target virtual disk.
These virtual disks are displayed in the Logical pane of the Logical tab.
The Go To option is available only if the Snapshot premium feature or the
Virtual Disk Copy premium feature is enabled or if snapshot virtual disks or
virtual disk copies currently exist on the storage array. The Go To option is
not accessible from the Mappings tab of the AMW.
1 On the Logical tab of the AMW, select one of these virtual disks, and go to
the indicated step:
260
•
Snapshot virtual disk—Go to step 2.
•
Snapshot repository virtual disk—Go to step 3.
•
Source virtual disk—Go to step 4.
•
Target virtual disk—Go to step 5.
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2 Select View Go To Snapshot Virtual Disk.
The selection jumps to the associated snapshot virtual disk in the Logical
pane.
3 Select View Go To Snapshot Repository Virtual Disk.
The selection jumps to the associated snapshot repository virtual disk in
the Logical pane.
4 Select View Go To Source Virtual Disk.
The selection jumps to the associated source virtual disk in the Logical
pane.
5 Select View Go To Target Virtual Disk.
NOTE: If the source virtual disk has more than one associated target virtual
disk, select the target virtual disk that you want from the list, and click OK.
The selection jumps to the associated target virtual disk in the Logical pane.
Recovering From an Unresponsive Storage Array
Condition
A storage array can have an Unresponsive status for several reasons. Use the
procedure in this topic to determine a possible cause and solution.
MDSM can take up to 5 minutes to detect that a storage array has become
unresponsive or becomes responsive again. Before completing this procedure,
make sure that you wait for some time before you decide that the storage
array is still unresponsive.
To recover from an unresponsive storage array:
1 Check the Tree view in the EMW to see if all storage arrays are
unresponsive.
2 If any storage arrays are unresponsive, check the storage management
station network connection to make sure that it can reach the network.
3 Ensure that the RAID controller modules are installed and that there is
power to the storage array.
4 If there a problem with the storage array, correct the problem.
5 Perform one of these actions, depending on how your storage array is
managed:
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•
Out-of-band managed storage array—Go to step 6.
•
In-band managed storage array—Go to step 12.
6 For an out-of-band managed storage array, ensure that the RAID controller
modules are network accessible by using the ping command to make sure
that the RAID controller module can be reached. Type one of these
commands, and press <Enter>.
•
ping <host-name>
•
ping <RAID controller module-IP-address>
7 If the verification is successful, see step 8, if not, see step 9.
8 Remove the storage array with the Unresponsive status from the EMW,
and select Add Storage Array to add the storage array again.
9 If the storage array does not return to Optimal status, check the Ethernet
cables to make sure that there is no visible damage and that they are
securely connected.
10 Make sure the appropriate network configuration tasks are performed. For
example, make sure that IP addresses are assigned to each RAID controller
module.
11 If there is a cable or network accessibility problem, see step 20, if not
step 12.
12 For an in-band managed storage array, make sure that the host is network
accessible by using the ping command to verify that the host can be
reached. Type one of these commands, and press <Enter>.
•
ping <host-name>
•
ping <RAID controller module-IP-address>
13 If the verification is successful, see step 14, if not, step 15.
14 Remove the host with the Unresponsive status from the EMW, and select
Add Storage Array to add the host again.
15 If the host does not return to Optimal status, go to step 16.
16 Ensure that the host is turned on and operational and that the host
adapters are installed.
17 Check all external cables and switches or hubs to make sure that no visible
damage exists and that they are securely connected.
18 Make sure the Host Context Agent software is installed and running.
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If you started the host system before you were connected to the RAID
controller module in the storage array, the Host Context Agent software is
not able to detect the RAID controller modules. If this is the case, make
sure that the connections are secure, and restart the Host Context Agent
software.
19 If you have recently replaced or added the RAID controller module, restart
the Host Context Agent software so that the new RAID controller module
is recognized.
20 If the problem still exists, make the appropriate host modifications, check
with other administrators to see if a firmware upgrade was performed on
the RAID controller module from another storage management station.
If a firmware upgrade was performed, the EMW on your management
station may not be able to locate the new AMW software needed to
manage the storage array with the new version of the firmware.
21 If the problem persists contact your Technical Support representative.
22 Determine if there is an excessive amount of network traffic to one or
more RAID controller modules.
This problem is self-correcting because the EMW software periodically
retries to establish communication with the RAID controller modules in
the storage array. If the storage array was unresponsive and a subsequent
attempt to connect to the storage array succeeds, the storage array
becomes responsive.
For an out-of-band managed storage array, determine if management
operations are taking place on the storage array from other storage
management stations. A RAID controller module-determined limit exists
to the number of Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
(TCP/IP) connections that can be made to the RAID controller module
before it stops responding to subsequent connection attempts. The type of
management operations being performed and the number of management
sessions taking place together determine the number of TCP/IP
connections made to a RAID controller module. This problem is selfcorrecting because, after some TCP/IP connections terminate, the RAID
controller module then becomes responsive to other connection attempts.
23 If the storage array is still unresponsive, a problem may exist with the
RAID controller modules. Contact your Technical Support representative.
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Locating a Physical Disk
You can use the Locate Physical Disk option to physically locate and identify
one or more of the physical disks in an expansion enclosure by activating
physical disk LEDs.
To locate the physical disk:
1 Select the Physical tab.
2 Select the physical disks that you want to locate.
3 Select Physical Disk Blink Physical Disk.
The LEDs on the selected physical disks blink.
4 When you have located the physical disks, click OK.
The LEDs stop blinking. If any other blink operations (Blink Disk Group,
Blink Storage Array, Blink Physical Disk Ports, or Blink Expansion
Enclosure) are currently being invoked from another storage management
station, these LEDs also stop blinking.
5 In the rare case that the LEDs on the physical disks do not stop blinking,
in the AMW, select Storage Array Blink Stop All Indications.
If the LEDs successfully stop blinking, a confirmation message is
displayed.
6 Click OK.
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Locating an Expansion Enclosure
You can use the Blink option to physically locate and identify an expansion
enclosure in the storage array.
The LED activation varies according to the type of expansion enclosure that
you have.
•
If you have an expansion enclosure with a white LED, the Blink Expansion
Enclosure operation causes the white LED on the expansion enclosure to
come on. The LED does not blink.
•
If you have any other types of expansion enclosures, this operation causes
the appropriate LED on all of the physical disks in the expansion enclosure
to blink.
To locate the expansion enclosure:
1 Select the Physical tab.
2 Select a physical disk in the expansion enclosure that you want to locate.
3 Select Physical Disk Blink Expansion Enclosure.
The LED or LEDs on the expansion enclosure or physical disks come on.
4 When you have located the expansion enclosure, click OK.
The LEDs stop blinking. (If you have an expansion enclosure with a blue
LED, the LED goes off). If any other blink operations (Blink Storage Array,
Blink Disk Group, Blink Physical Disk Ports, Blink Expansion Enclosure, or
Blink Physical Disk) are currently being invoked from another storage
management station, these LEDs also stop blinking.
5 In the rare case that the LEDs on the expansion enclosure do not stop
blinking, from the AMW, select Storage Array Blink Stop All
Indications.
If the LEDs successfully stop blinking, a confirmation message is
displayed.
6 Click OK.
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Capturing the State Information
Use the Troubleshooting Capture State Information option to capture
information about the current state of your storage array and save the
captured information to a text file. You can then send the captured
information to your Technical Support representative for analysis.
Potential to cause an unresponsive storage array – The State Capture option
can cause a storage array to become unresponsive to both the host and the
storage management station. Use this option only under the guidance of your
Technical Support representative.
1 From the AMW, select Advanced Troubleshooting  Capture State
Information.
2 Read the information in the Confirm State Capture dialog, and type yes
to continue.
3 In the Specify filename text box, enter a name for the file to be saved, or
browse to a previously saved file if you want to overwrite an existing file.
Use the convention filename.dmp for the name of the file. The suffix
.dmp is added to the file automatically if you do not specify a suffix for the
file.
4 Click Start.
NOTE: Each test shows a status of Executing while it is in progress. The test
then shows Completed when it successfully finishes. If any of the tests cannot
be completed, a status of Failed is displayed in the Execution summary
window.
5 Monitor the progress and completion status of all of the tests. When they
finish, click OK to close the State Capture dialog.
Clicking Cancel stops the state capture process, and any remaining tests
do not complete. Any test information that is generated to that point is
saved to the state capture file.
NOTE: see the PowerVault Modular Disk Storage Manager online help topics
for more information on troubleshooting, and recovering from failures.
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SMrepassist Utility
SMrepassist (replication assistance) is a host-based utility for Windows
platforms. This utility is installed with MDSM. Use this utility before and
after you create a virtual disk copy on a Windows operating system to ensure
that all the memory-resident data for file systems on the target virtual disk is
flushed and that the driver recognizes signatures and file system partitions.
You can also use this utility to resolve duplicate signature problems for
snapshot virtual disks.
From a command prompt window on a host running Windows, navigate to:
C:\Program Files\Dell\MD Storage Manager\util and run the following
command:
SMrepassist -f <filesystem-identifier>
where, -f flushes all the memory-resident data for the file system indicated by
<filesystem-identifier>, and <filesystem-identifier> specifies a unique file
system in the following syntax:
drive-letter: <mount-point-path>
The file system identifier may consist of only a drive letter, as in the following
example:
SMrepassist -f E:
NOTE: In Windows, the mount point path is a drive letter.
An error message is displayed in the command line when the utility cannot
distinguish between the following:
•
Source virtual disk and snapshot virtual disk (for example, if the snapshot
virtual disk is removed).
•
Standard virtual disk and virtual disk copy (for example, if the virtual disk
copy is removed).
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Unidentified Devices
An unidentified node or device occurs when MDSM cannot access a new
storage array. Causes for this error include network connection problems, the
storage array is turned off, or the storage array does not exist.
NOTE: Before beginning any recovery procedure, make sure that the Host Context
Agent software is installed and running. If you started the host before the host was
connected to the storage array, the Host Context Agent software is not able to find
the storage array. If so, make sure that the connections are tight, and restart the
Host Context Agent software.
•
If a storage array is managed by using both out-of-band management and
in-band management using the same host, a management network
connection problem may prevent direct communication with the storage
array. However, you may still be able to manage the storage array over the
in-band connections. The opposite situation can also occur.
•
If a storage array is managed through more than one host, it is possible
that the storage array may become unresponsive to communication over
the connections given by one host. However, you may still be able to
manage the storage array over the connections provided by another host.
Recovering From an Unidentified Storage Array
To recover from an unidentified storage array:
1 Make sure that the network connection to the storage management station
is functional.
2 Make sure that the controllers are installed and that the power to the
storage array is turned on. Correct any existing problems before
continuing.
3 If you have an in-band storage array, use the following procedure. Click
Refresh after each step to check the results:
a
268
Make sure that the Host Context Agent software is installed and
running. If you started the host before the host was connected to the
controllers in the storage array, the Host Context Agent software is not
able to find the controllers. If so, make sure that the connections are
tight, and restart the Host Context Agent software.
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b
Make sure that the network can access the host by using the ping
command in the following syntax:
ping <host-name-or-IP-address-of-the-host>.
If the network can access the host, continue to step c. If the network
cannot access the host, go to step d.
c
Remove the host with the unresponsive status from the MDSM, and
add that host again.
If the host returns to optimal status, you have completed this
procedure.
d
Make sure that the power to the host is turned on and that the host is
operational.
e
If applicable, make sure that the host bus adapters are installed in the
host.
f
Examine all external cables and switches or hubs to make sure that
you cannot see any damage and that they are tightly connected.
g
If you have recently replaced or added the controller, restart the Host
Context Agent software so that the new controller is found.
If a problem exists, make the appropriate modifications to the host.
4 If you have an out-of-band storage array, use the following procedure. Click
Refresh after each step to make sure of the results:
a
Make sure that the network can access the controllers by using the
ping command. Use the following syntax:
ping <controller-IP-address>
If the network can access the controllers, continue to step b. If the
network cannot access the controllers, go to step c.
b
Remove the storage array with the unresponsive status from MDSM,
and add that storage array again.
If the storage array returns to optimal status, you have completed this
procedure.
c
Examine the Ethernet cables to make sure that you cannot see any
damage and that they are tightly connected.
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d
Make sure that the applicable network configuration tasks are done
(for example, the IP addresses are assigned to each controller).
5 Make sure that the controller firmware is compatible with MDSM on your
management station. If the controller firmware was upgraded, the MDSM
may not have access to the storage array. A new version of MDSM may be
needed to manage the storage array with the new version of the controller
firmware.
If this problem exists, see support.dell.com.
6 Look to see if there is too much network traffic to one or more controllers.
This problem corrects itself because the MDSM tries to re-establish
communication with the controllers in the storage array at regular times. If
the storage array was unresponsive and a subsequent attempt to connect to
the storage array succeeds, the storage array becomes responsive.
7 For an out-of-band storage array, look to see if management operations are
taking place on the storage array from other storage management stations.
The type of management operations being done and the number of
management sessions taking place together establish the number of
TCP/IP connections made to a controller. When the maximum number of
TCP/IP connections are made, the controller stops responding. This
problem corrects itself because after some TCP/IP connections are
complete, the controller becomes responsive to other connection tries.
8 If the storage array is still unresponsive, problems may exist with the
controllers.
If these problems persist, see support.dell.com.
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Starting or Restarting the Host Context Agent
Software
The Host Context Agent software module is the software component that
resides on the server or management station that communicates with the
MD3600i Series storage arrays. The SMagent software automatically starts
after you reboot the host.
Windows
To restart the SMagent software in Windows:
1 Click Start Settings Control Panel Administrative Tools
Services.
or
Click Start Administrative Tools Services.
2 In the Services dialog, select Modular Disk Storage Manager Agent.
3 If the modular disk storage manager agent is running, click Action Stop
then wait approximately 5 seconds.
4 Click Action Start.
Linux
To start or restart the Host Context Agent software in Linux, enter the
following command at the prompt:
SMagent start
The SMagent software may take a little time to initialize. The cursor is
shown, but the terminal window does not respond. When the program starts,
the following message is displayed:
SMagent started.
After the program completes the startup process, text similar to the following
messages is displayed:
Modular Disk Storage Manager Agent, Version 90.02.A6.14
Built Wed Feb 03 06:17:50 CST 2010
Copyright (C) 2009-2010 Dell, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Troubleshooting: Your Array
20
Safety First—For you and Your Array
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician.
You must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in
your product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service
and support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not
covered by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came
with the product.
Troubleshooting Storage Array Startup Failure
If your system halts during startup, check if:
•
The array emits a series of beeps.
•
The array fault LEDs are lit. See "RAID Controller Modules" on page 31.
•
There is a constant scraping or grinding sound when you access the hard
drive. See "Getting Help" on page 283.
Troubleshooting Loss of Communication
For information about troubleshooting loss of communication, see
"Troubleshooting Array and Expansion Enclosure Connections" on page 279.
Troubleshooting External Connections
•
Verify that the cables are connected to the correct ports before
troubleshooting any external devices. To locate the back-panel connectors
on your array, see Figure 3-1.
•
Ensure that all the cables are securely attached to the external connectors
on your array.
•
For information on cabling, see the Dell PowerVault MD3600i Deployment
Guide at support.dell.com/manuals.
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Troubleshooting Power Supply/Cooling Fan
Module
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician.
You must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in
your product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service
and support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not
covered by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came
with the product.
CAUTION: It is recommended that you turn off the host server before turning off
the array to prevent loss of data.
1 Locate the faulty power supply and determine the status of the LEDs.
•
If the AC power LED is not lit, check the power cord and power source
into which the power supply is plugged.
•
Connect another device to the power source to verify if it is
working.
•
Connect the cable to a different power source.
•
Replace the power cable.
If the problem is not resolved, see "Getting Help" on page 283.
•
If the DC power LED is not lit, verify that the power switch is turned
on. If the power switch is turned on, see step 2.
•
If the power supply’s fault indicator is lit, see "Getting Help" on
page 283.
CAUTION: Power supply/cooling fan modules are hot-swappable. The array can
operate on a single power supply; however both modules must be installed to
ensure proper cooling. A single power supply/cooling fan module can be removed
from a powered-on array for a maximum period of 5 minutes. Beyond that time, the
array may automatically shut down to prevent damage.
2 Reseat the power supply by removing and reinstalling it. See "Power Supply
and Cooling Fan Features" on page 29.
NOTE: After installing a power supply, allow several seconds for the array to
recognize the power supply and to determine if it is working properly.
If the problem is not resolved, see "Getting Help" on page 283.
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Troubleshooting Array Cooling Problems
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician.
You must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in
your product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service
and support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not
covered by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came
with the product.
Ensure that none of the following conditions exist:
•
Array cover or drive blank is removed.
•
Ambient temperature is too high. See “Technical Specifications” in the
Getting Started Guide.
•
External airflow is obstructed.
•
The power supply/cooling fan module is removed or has failed. See
"Troubleshooting Power Supply/Cooling Fan Module" on page 274.
If the problem is not resolved, see "Getting Help" on page 283.
Troubleshooting Expansion Enclosure
Management Modules
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician.
You must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in
your product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service
and support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not
covered by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came
with the product.
CAUTION: It is recommended that you turn off the host server before turning off
the expansion enclosure to prevent loss of data.
•
If the EMM status LED is solid or blinking amber (2 or 4 times per
sequence):
a
Turn off the server.
b
Remove the EMM and verify that the pins on the backplane and
EMM are not bent. See "Removing an EMM" in the MD1200 and
MD1220 Storage Enclosures Hardware Owner's Manual.
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c
Reseat the EMM module and wait for 30 seconds. See "Removing an
EMM" in the MD1200 and MD1220 Storage Enclosures Hardware
Owner's Manual.
d
Turn on the server.
e
Check the EMM status LED.
f
If the LED does not turn green, replace the EMM.
If the problem is not resolved, see "Getting Help" on page 283.
•
If EMM status LED is blinking amber (5 times per sequence), update the
firmware to the latest supported firmware on both the EMMs. For more
information about downloading the latest firmware, see "Management:
Firmware Downloads" on page 207.
•
If the link status LEDs are not green:
a
Turn off the server.
b
Reseat the cables on the expansion enclosure and the server.
c
Turn on the expansion enclosures and then the storage array and wait
until the system is fully booted.
d
Turn on the server.
e
Check the link status LED. If the link status LED is not green, replace
the cables.
If the problem is not resolved, see "Getting Help" on page 283.
Troubleshooting RAID Controller Modules
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician.
You must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in
your product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service
and support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not
covered by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came
with the product.
CAUTION: In the case of non-redundant configurations, it is recommended that
you turn off the host server before turning off the array to prevent loss of data.
•
If the array status LED is solid or blinking amber:
a
276
In the AMW, select the Summary tab, and click Storage Array needs
attention. Follow the listed procedures in the Recovery Guru(s) and
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wait for up to 5 minutes to check if the LED has turned blue. See
"Recovery Guru" on page 256.
b
If following the recovery guru procedures does not solve the problem,
complete the following procedure to further troubleshoot the array.
c
Turn off the host server as appropriate.
d
Remove the RAID controller module and verify that the pins on the
backplane and the RAID controller module are not bent. See
"Removing a RAID Controller Module Blank" on page 227.
e
Reinstall the RAID controller module and wait for 30 seconds. See
"Installing a RAID Controller Module" on page 230.
f
Check the RAID controller module status LED.
g
Replace the RAID controller module.
h
Turn on the host server.
If the problem is not resolved, see "Getting Help" on page 283.
•
If the link status LEDs are not green, see "Troubleshooting Array and
Expansion Enclosure Connections" on page 279.
a
Turn off the server, storage array, and expansion enclosures.
b
Reseat the RAID controller module and reconnect the cables on the
storage array and the server.
c
Restart the storage array and wait until the array is fully booted.
d
Turn on the server.
e
Check the link status LED. If the link status LED is not green, replace
the cables.
If the problem is not resolved, see "Getting Help" on page 283.
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Troubleshooting Hard Drives
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician.
You must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in
your product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service
and support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not
covered by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came
with the product.
1 Check the storage array profile to ensure that the most current version of
the firmware is installed. For more information, see the Support Matrix at
support.dell.com/manuals.
2 Remove the hard drive from the system. See "Removing a Hard Drive" on
page 222.
NOTE: You must ensure that you check the hard drive indicators before
removing the faulty hard drive from the system.
3 Check the hard drives and the backplane to ensure that the connectors are
not damaged.
4 Reinstall the hard drive.
5 Reboot the host server.
If the problem is not resolved, proceed to step 6.
6 Verify that the RAID controller module port link status LED and the
RAID controller module status LED are solid green for each port that is
connected to a cable.
7 Replace the failed physical disk.
If the problem persists, see "Troubleshooting Loss of Communication" on
page 273 or see "Getting Help" on page 283.
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Troubleshooting Array and Expansion Enclosure
Connections
1 Verify that the RAID controller module port link status LED and the
RAID controller module status LED are solid green for each port that is
connected to a cable. If the LEDs are not solid green, see "Planning: RAID
Controller Modules" on page 31.
2 Ensure that all the cables are attached correctly according to expansion
enclosure mode you selected.
3 Turn off the server, storage array, and expansion enclosures.
4 Reseat the RAID controller module and reconnect cables on the storage
array and the server.
5 Turn on the expansion arrays and then the storage array and wait until the
system is fully booted.
6 Turn on the server.
7 Check the link status LED. If the link status LED is not green, replace the
cables.
If the problem is not resolved, see "Getting Help" on page 283.
8 Reboot the host server.
NOTE: You must turn off the host server before resetting the cables on
the storage array or expansion enclosure.
If the problem is not resolved, see "Getting Help" on page 283.
Troubleshooting a Wet Storage Array
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician.
You must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in
your product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service
and support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not
covered by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came
with the product.
1 Turn off the array and disconnect all the cables.
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2 Remove the following components from the array. See "Management:
Installing Array Components" on page 219.
•
Hard drives
•
RAID controller modules
•
Power supply/cooling fan modules
•
Control panel
•
Backplane
3 Let the system dry thoroughly for at least 24 hours.
4 Reinstall the components you removed in step 2.
5 Connect all the cables and turn on the array.
If the array does not start properly, see "Getting Help" on page 283.
Troubleshooting a Damaged Array
CAUTION: Many repairs may only be done by a certified service technician.
You must only perform troubleshooting and simple repairs as authorized in
your product documentation, or as directed by the online or telephone service
and support team. Damage due to servicing that is not authorized by Dell is not
covered by your warranty. Read and follow the safety instructions that came
with the product.
1 Ensure that the following components are properly installed:
•
Hard drives
•
RAID controller modules
•
Power supply/cooling fan modules
•
Control panel
•
Backplane
2 Ensure that all the cables are properly connected and that there are no
damaged pins in the connectors.
3 Run diagnostics available in Dell PowerVault Modular Disk Storage
Manager (MDSM) software. In the AMW, select a component in the
Physical pane of the Physical tab. Select Advanced Troubleshooting
Run Diagnostics.
If the test fails, see "Getting Help" on page 283.
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Troubleshooting RAID Controller Modules
Conditions
Certain events can cause a RAID controller module to fail and/or shut down.
Unrecoverable ECC memory or PCI errors, or critical physical conditions can
cause lockdown. If your RAID storage array is configured for redundant access
and cache mirroring, the surviving controller can normally recover without
data loss or shutdown.
Typical hard controller failures are detailed in the following sections.
Invalid Storage Array
The RAID controller module is supported only in a Dell-supported storage
array. Upon installation in the storage array, the controller performs a set of
validation checks. The array status LED is lit with a steady amber color while
the RAID controller module completes these initial tests and the controllers
are booted successfully. If the RAID controller module detects a non-Dell
supported storage array, the controller aborts startup. The RAID controller
module does not generate any events to alert you in the event of an invalid
array, but the array status LED is lit with a flashing amber color to indicate a
fault state.
For full details on the LEDs and their interpretation, see "Back-Panel Features
and Indicators" on page 27.
ECC Errors
RAID controller firmware can detect ECC errors and can recover from a
single-bit ECC error irrespective of the RAID controller module
configuration. A storage array with redundant controllers can recover from
multi-bit ECC errors as well because the peer RAID controller module can
take over, if necessary.
The RAID controller module failsover if it experiences up to 10 single-bit
errors, or up to 3 multi-bit errors.
Troubleshooting: Your Array
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PCI Errors
The storage array firmware can detect and only recover from PCI errors when
the RAID controller modules are configured for redundancy. If a virtual disk
uses cache mirroring, it fails over to its peer RAID controller module, which
initiates a flush of the dirty cache.
Critical Conditions
The storage array generates a critical event if the RAID controller module
detects a critical condition that could cause immediate failure of the array
and/or loss of data. The storage array is in a critical condition if one of the
following occurs:
•
More than one fan has failed
•
Any backplane temperature sensors is in the critical range
•
Backplane/power supply has failed
•
Two or more temperature sensors are unreadable
•
Failure to detect or unable to communicate with peer port
NOTE: If both RAID controller modules fail simultaneously, the array cannot issue
critical or noncritical event alarms for any array component.
When the array is under critical condition, its array status LED blinks amber.
Noncritical Conditions
A noncritical condition is an event or status that does not cause immediate
failure, but must be corrected to ensure continued reliability of the storage
array. Examples of noncritical events include the following:
•
One power supply has failed
•
One cooling fan has failed
•
One RAID controller module in a redundant configuration has failed
•
A battery has failed or is removed
•
A physical disk in a redundant virtual disk has failed
When the array is under noncritical condition, its array status LED blinks
amber.
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Getting Help
21
Contacting Dell
For customers in the United States, call 800-WWW-DELL (800-999-3355).
NOTE: If you do not have an active Internet connection, you can find contact
information on your purchase invoice, packing slip, bill, or Dell product catalog.
Dell provides several online and telephone-based support and service options.
Availability varies by country and product, and some services may not be
available in your area. To contact Dell for sales, technical support, or
customer service issues:
1 Visit support.dell.com.
2 Click your country/region at the bottom of the page. For a full listing of
country/region click All.
3 Click All Support from Support menu.
4 Select the appropriate service or support link based on your need.
5 Choose the method of contacting Dell that is convenient for you.
Getting Help
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284
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Index
A
Access Virtual Disk, 68
Advanced Feature
Using Snapshot and Disk Copy
Together, 54
Advanced Features, 51
Snapshot Repository Virtual
Disk, 52
Snapshot Virtual Disks, 51
Advanced iSCSI Host Ports
Settings, 93
Advanced Path, 162
Array Management Types
In-Band Management, 68
Out-of-Band Management, 67
B
backplane
installing, 242
removing, 239
Battery Settings, 83
C
Change
Controller Ownership of the
Virtual Disk, 138
I/O Type, 120
iSCSI Target Authentication, 87
iSCSI Target Identification, 90
RAID Controller Module
Ownership of a Disk
Group, 139
RAID Controller Module
Ownership of a Virtual Disk or
a Disk Group, 144
RAID Level of a Disk Group, 141,
146
Segment Size of a Virtual
Disk, 119
Virtual Disk Cache Settings, 117
Virtual Disk Modification
Priority, 116
CHAP Secrets
Creating, 88
Initiator CHAP Secret, 89
Target CHAP Secret, 89
Valid Characters, 89
Choosing an Appropriate
Physical Disk Type, 121
Configuring
Host Access, 99
Hot Spare Physical Disks, 130
the iSCSI Host Ports, 91
Configuring Alert Notifications
SNMP, 82
Contacting Dell, 283
Index
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Physical Disk Firmware, 213
RAID Controller and NVSRAM
Firmware, 208
RAID Controller and NVSRAM
Packages, 207
RAID controller module
Firmware, 215
contacting Dell, 283
control panel
installing, 238
removing, 237
Copy Manager, 186
D
drive carrier
hard drive, 225
Defining a Host, 101
Dell
contacting, 283
Disk Group
Creating, 112
Expansion, 148
Export, 150
Exporting, 151
Import, 151
Locating, 114
Migration, 150
Disk Group and Virtual Disk
Expansion, 148
Disk Group Operations, 45
Defragmentation, 47
Expansion, 46
Limit, 47
RAID Level Migration, 45
Segment Size Migration, 46
Virtual Disk Capacity
Expansion, 46
Disk Groups and Virtual Disks
Creating, 111
Download
NVSRAM Firmware, 211
E
Edit, Remove, or Rename Host
Topology, 96
Enclosure Loss Protection, 134
Entering Mutual Authentication
Permissions, 88
Enterprise Management
Window, 62
Event Monitor, 97
Enabling or Disabling, 98
Linux, 98
Windows, 98
F
Failed RAID Controller
Module, 186
Features and Indicators
Front Panel, 24
Firmware Downloads, 207
Firmware Inventory, 243
View, 243
Index
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Free Capacity, 149
front bezel
installing, 220
removing, 220
Hot Spare
Drive Protection, 133
Global Hot Spares, 132
Operation, 133
Hot Spares and Rebuild, 132
H
hard drive
drive carrier, 225
installing, 224
removing, 222
Hard-Drive Indicator
Patterns, 28
Hardware Features
Back panel features, 27
Front panel features, 24
Hard drive indicator patterns, 28
Power indicator codes, 30
Power supply and cooling fan
features, 29
Host Group
Adding, 103
Create, 103
Moving a Host, 104
Removing a host, 104
Removing a Host Group, 105
I
I/O Data Path Protection, 107
Inside the box, 19
installing
backplane, 242
control panel MD1200, 238
EMM, 230
EMM blank, 228
front bezel, 220
hard drive, 224
hard drives, 224
power supply/cooling fan
module, 236
L
Load Balancing, 56
Locating a Physical Disk, 264
Host Topology, 105
Host-to-Virtual Disk
Mapping, 135
Host-to-Virtual Disk Mappings
Creating, 136
Modifying and Removing, 137
Removing, 139
M
Managing Host Groups, 103
Managing Host Port
Identifiers, 108
MDSM, 20
Index
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Media Errors and Unreadable
Sectors, 216
Media Scan
Changing settings, 153
Suspending, 154
Microsoft
Virtual Disk Service, 245
Volume Shadow-Copy
Service, 245
Microsoft Services
Virtual Disk Copy, 52
Physical Disks, 38
Erasing Secure, 130
Unlocking Secure, 129
Physical Disks, Virtual Disks,
and Disk Groups, 37
Power Indicator Codes, 30
Power Supply and Cooling Fan
Features, 29
Preferred RAID Controller
Module Ownership, 186
Monitoring Performance, 57
Preparing Host Servers
Simple path, 160
Multi-Path
Preferred and Alternate
Controllers and Paths, 54
R
Multi-Path Software, 54
N
Non-Exportable
Components, 150
O
Other Information, 21
RAID, 41
Changing Level of disk
group, 146
RAID 0, 41
RAID 1, 42
RAID 10, 42
RAID 5, 42
RAID 6, 42
Usage, 41
RAID Background Operations
Priority, 47
recommended tools, 219
P
phone numbers, 283
Physical Disk Security with Self
Encrypting Disk, 121
Physical Disk States, 38
removing
backplane, 239
control panel MD1200, 237
drive blank, 221
EMM, 229
EMM blank, 227
Index
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front bezel, 220
hard drive, 222
hard drive from a drive carrier, 225
power supply/cooling fan
module, 234
Re-create, 173
Re-creating, 173
Starting or Stopping the Host
Context Agent, 106
Removing Host Access, 102
Storage Array
RAID Controller Module
Clocks, 84
Restricted Mappings, 143
Storage Array Media Scan, 152
S
Storage Arrays, 68
Automatic Discovery, 69
Manual Addition, 69
Safety, 19
Storage Partitioning, 147
safety, 273
support
contacting Dell, 283
Removing Copy Pairs, 192
Security Key
Changing, 126
Creating, 124
Saving, 128
T
Segment Size, 43
telephone numbers, 283
Setting a Password, 73
Troubleshooting
Automatically Collect the Support
Bundle Data, 251
Capturing the State
Information, 266
Collecting the Physical Disk
Data, 254
Device Health Conditions, 247
Event Log, 255
Finding Nodes, 259
Locating an Expansion
Enclosure, 265
Recovering from an Unidentified
Storage Array, 268
Recovering from an Unresponsive
Storage Array Condition, 261
Setting Copy Priority, 188
Simple Path, 159
SMART, 39
SMrepassist Utility, 267
Snapshot Repository
Capacity, 169
Snapshot Virtual Disk
Creating using advanced
path, 160
Creating using simple path, 159
Snapshot Virtual Disks
Disabling, 172
Index
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Recovery Guru, 256
Starting or Restarting the
Host-Agent Software, 271
Start-Up Routine, 247
Storage Array Profile, 256
Storage Array Support Data, 251
Unidentified Devices, 268
Viewing the Logical
Associations, 258
Viewing the Physical
Associations, 258
troubleshooting, 273
connections, 279
cooling problems, 275
damaged enclosure, 280
external connections, 273
hard drives, 278
loss of communication, 273
power supply/cooling fan
module, 274
startup failure, 273
wet enclosure, 279
U
Unconfigured Capacity, 149
User Interface
AMW, 63
EMW, 62
Overview, 61
Using Go To, 260
V
Viewing iSCSI Statistics and
Setting Baseline
Statistics, 95
Viewing or Ending an iSCSI
Session, 94
Virtual Disk
Background Initialization, 43
Consistency Check, 44
Copy and Modification
Operations, 185
Copy Restrictions, 183
Copying, 186
Creating, 184
Creating a Copy for an MSCS
Shared Disk, 182
Cycle Time, 44
Failed Copy, 185
Foreground Initialization, 44
Media Verification, 44
Read/Write Permissions, 182
Recopying, 190
Recovery, 53
Stopping copy, 189
Storage Array Performance, 188
Virtual Disk Copy
Source, 53
Virtual Disk Expansion, 149
Virtual Disk Initialization, 43
Virtual Disk Migration and Disk
Roaming
Disk Migration, 48
Disk Roaming, 50
Virtual Disk Operations, 43
Index
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Virtual Disk Operations
Limit, 45
Virtual Disk Ownership, 55
Virtual Disk States, 40
Virtual DiskCopy
Target, 53
Virtual Disks and Disk
Groups, 39
Index
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292
Index