Yamaha CBX-D5 Owner`s manual

DIGITAL RECORDING PROCESSOR
CBX-D5
Owner's Manual 2
OPERATING MANUAL
FCC INFORMATION (U.S.A.)
1. IMPORTANT NOTICE: DO NOT MODIFY THIS UNIT!
This product, when installed as indicated in the instructions contained in this manual, meets FCC requirements. Modifications not expressly approved by
Yamaha may void your authority, granted by the FCC, to use the product.
2. IMPORTANT: When connecting this product to accessories and/or another product use only high quality shielded cables. Cable/s supplied with this product
MUST be used. Follow all installation instructions. Failure to follow instructions could void your FCC authorization to use this product in the USA.
3. NOTE: This product has been tested and found to comply with the requirements listed in FCC Regulations, Part 15 for Class “B” digital devices. Compliance
with these requirements provides a reasonable level of assurance that your use of this product in a residential environment will not result in harmful interference with other electronic devices. This equipment generates/uses radio frequencies and, if not installed and used according to the instructions found in the
users manual, may cause interference harmful to the operation of other electronic devices. Compliance with FCC regulations does not guarantee that interference will not occur in all installations. If this product is found to be the source of interference, which can be determined by turning the unit “OFF” and “ON”,
please try to eliminate the problem by using one of the following measures:
Relocate either this product or the device that is being affected by the interference.
Utilize power outlets that are on different branch (circuit breaker or fuse) circuits or install AC line filter/s.
In the case of radio or TV interference, relocate/reorient the antenna. If the antenna lead-in is 300 ohm ribbon lead, change the lead-in to co-axial type cable.
If these corrective measures do not produce satisfactory results, please contact the local retailer authorized to distribute this type of product. If you can not
locate the appropriate retailer, please contact Yamaha Corporation of America, Electronic Service Division, 6600 Orangethorpe Ave, Buena Park, CA 90620
* This applies only to products distributed by YAMAHA CORPORATION OF AMERICA
Dette apparat overholder det gaeldende EF-direktiv vedrørende
radiostøj.
Cet appareil est conforme aux prescriptions de la directive communautaire 87/308/CEE.
Diese Geräte entsprechen der EG-Richtlinie 82/499/EWG und/
oder 87/308/EWG.
This product complies with the radio frequency interference
requirements of the Council Directive 82/499/EEC and/or 87/
308/EEC.
Questo apparecchio è conforme al D.M.13 aprile 1989 (Direttiva
CEE/87/308) sulla soppressione dei radiodisturbi.
Este producto está de acuerdo con los requisitos sobre interferencias de radio frequencia fijados por el Consejo Directivo 87/308/
CEE.
YAMAHA CORPORATION
IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Connecting the Plug and Cord
IMPORTANT: The wires in this mains lead are coloured in accordance
with the following code:
GREEN-AND-YELLOW : EARTH
BLUE
: NEUTRAL
BROWN
: LIVE
As the colours of the wires in the mains lead of this apparatus may not
correspond with the coloured markings identifying the terminals in your
plug, proceed as follows:
The wire which is coloured GREEN and YELLOW must be connected to
the terminal in the plug which is marked by the letter E or by the safety
earth symbol or coloured GREEN and YELLOW.
The wire which is coloured BLUE must be connected to the terminal
which is marked with the letter N or coloured BLACK.
The wire which is coloured BROWN must be connected to the terminal
which is marked with the letter L or coloured RED.
SPECIAL MESSAGE SECTION
PRODUCT SAFETY MARKINGS: Yamaha electronic products may have either labels similar to the graphics shown
below or molded/stamped facsimiles of these graphics on the
enclosure. The explanation of these graphics appears on this
page. Please observe all cautions indicated on this page and
those indicated in the safety instruction section.
CAUTION: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT REMOVE COVER (OR
BACK). NO USER-SERVICEABLE PARTS
INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED
SERVICE PERSONNEL.
●
Explanation of Graphical Symbols
The exclamation point within the equilateral triangle is intended to alert the user to
the presence of important operating and
maintenance (servicing) instructions in the
literature accompanying the product.
The lightning flash with arrowhead symbol
within the equilateral triangle is intended to
alert the user to the presence of uninsulated
“dangerous voltage” within the product’s
enclosure that may be of sufficient magnitude to constitute a risk of electrical shock.
IMPORTANT NOTICE: All Yamaha electronic products are
tested and approved by an independent safety testing laboratory in order that you may be sure that when it is properly
installed and used in its normal and customary manner, all
foreseeable risks have been eliminated. DO NOT modify this
unit or commission others to do so unless specifically authorized by Yamaha. Product performance and/or safety standards may be diminished. Claims filed under the expressed
warranty may be denied if the unit is/has been modified.
Implied warranties may also be affected.
SPECIFICATIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE: The information contained in this manual is believed to be correct at the
time of printing. However, Yamaha reserves the right to
change or modify any of the specifications without notice or
obligation to update existing units.
92-469 1
ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES: Yamaha strives to produce
products that are both user safe and environmentally friendly.
We sincerely believe that our products and the production
methods used to produce them, meet these goals. In keeping
with both the letter and the spirit of the law, we want you to
be aware of the following:
Battery Notice: This product MAY contain a small nonrechargeable battery which (if applicable) is soldered in place.
The average life span of this type of battery is approximately
five years. When replacement becomes neccessary, contact a
qualified service representative to perform the replacement.
Warning: Do not attempt to recharge, disassemble, or incinerate this type of battery. Keep all batteries away from children.
Dispose of used batteries promptly and as regulated by applicable laws. Note: In some areas, the servicer is required by
law to return the defective parts. However, you do have the
option of having the servicer dispose of these parts for you.
Disposal Notice: Should this product become damaged
beyond repair, or for some reason its useful life is considered
to be at an end, please observe all local, state, and federal regulations that relate to the disposal of products that contain
lead, batteries, plastics, etc.
NOTICE: Service charges incurred due to lack of knowledge
relating to how a function or effect works (when the unit is
operating as designed) are not covered by the manufacturer’s
warranty, and are therefore the owners responsibility. Please
study this manual carefully and consult your dealer before
requesting service.
NAME PLATE LOCATION: The graphic below indicates the
location of the name plate. The model number, serial number,
power requirements, etc., are located on this plate. You
should record the model number, serial number, and the date
of purchase in the spaces provided below and retain this manual as a permanent record of your purchase.
Model
Serial No.
Purchase Date
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
INFORMATION RELATING TO PERSONAL INJURY, ELECTRICAL SHOCK,
AND FIRE HAZARD POSSIBILITIES HAS BEEN INCLUDED IN THIS LIST.
WARNING — When using any electrical or electronic product, basic precautions should always be followed. These precautions include, but are not limited to, the following:
Read all Safety Instructions, Installation Instructions,
Special Message Section items, and any Assembly
Instructions found in this manual BEFORE making any connections, including connection to the main supply.
1.
Main Power Supply Verification: Yamaha products are
manufactured specifically for the supply voltage in the
area where they are to be sold. If you should move, or if any
doubt exists about the supply voltage in your area, please
contact your dealer for supply voltage verification and (if
applicable) instructions. The required supply voltage is
printed on the name plate. For name plate location, please
refer to the graphic found in the Special Message Section of
this manual.
2.
This product may be equipped with a polarized plug
(one blade wider than the other). If you are unable to
insert the plug into the outlet, turn the plug over and try again.
If the problem persists, contact an electrician to have the
obsolete outlet replaced. DO NOT defeat the safety purpose
of the plug.
3.
This product was NOT designed for use in wet/damp
locations and should not be used near water or exposed
to rain. Examples of wet/damp locations are; near a swimming pool, spa, tub, sink, or wet basement.
8.
This product should be used only with the components
supplied or; a cart, rack, or stand that is recommended
by the manufacturer. If a cart, rack, or stand is used, please
observe all safety markings and instructions that accompany
the accessory product.
9.
The power supply cord (plug) should be disconnected
from the outlet when electronic products are to be left
unused for extended periods of time. Cords should also be
disconnected when there is a high probability of lightening
and/or electrical storm activity.
10.
Care should be taken that objects do not fall and liquids
are not spilled into the enclosure through any openings
that may exist.
11.
12.
a. The power supply cord has been damaged; or
b. Objects have fallen, been inserted, or liquids have
been spilled into the enclosure through openings; or
c. The product has been exposed to rain; or
d. The product does not operate, exhibits a marked
change in performance; or
e. The product has been dropped, or the enclosure of
the product has been damaged.
Some electronic products utilize external power
supplies or adapters. DO NOT connect this type of
product to any power supply or adapter other than one
described in the owners manual, on the name plate, or specifically recommended by Yamaha.
4.
WARNING: Do not place this product or any other
objects on the power cord or place it in a position where
anyone could walk on, trip over, or roll anything over power
or connecting cords of any kind. The use of an extension cord
is not recommended! If you must use an extension cord, the
minimum wire size for a 25’ cord (or less) is 18 AWG.
NOTE: The smaller the AWG number, the larger the current
handling capacity. For longer extension cords, consult a local
electrician.
5.
Ventilation: Electronic products, unless specifically
designed for enclosed installations, should be placed in
locations that do not interfere with proper ventilation. If
instructions for enclosed installations are not provided, it
must be assumed that unobstructed ventilation is required.
6.
Temperature considerations: Electronic products
should be installed in locations that do not significantly
contribute to their operating temperature. Placement of this
product close to heat sources such as; radiators, heat registers
and other devices that produce heat should be avoided.
7.
Electrical/electronic products should be serviced by a
qualified service person when:
Do not attempt to service this product beyond that
described in the user-maintenance instructions. All
other servicing should be referred to qualified service personnel.
13.
This product, either alone or in combination with an
amplifier and headphones or speaker/s, may be capable
of producing sound levels that could cause permanent hearing
loss. DO NOT operate for a long period of time at a high volume level or at a level that is uncomfortable. If you experience any hearing loss or ringing in the ears, you should
consult an audiologist. IMPORTANT: The louder the sound,
the shorter the time period before damage occurs.
14.
Some Yamaha products may have benches and/or
accessory mounting fixtures that are either supplied as a
part of the product or as optional accessories. Some of these
items are designed to be dealer assembled or installed. Please
make sure that benches are stable and any optional fixtures
(where applicable) are well secured BEFORE using. Benches
supplied by Yamaha are designed for seating only. No other
uses are recommended.
15.
PLEASE KEEP THIS MANUAL
This information on safety is provided to comply with U.S.A. laws, but should be observed by users in all countiries.
92-469 2
1
Chapter :
Table of Contents
1 Introduction ..............................................1
Welcome to the CBX-D5...............................1
CBX-D5 features............................................1
Operating manual organization......................1
Important Notice ............................................1
Unpacking .....................................................2
Installation......................................................2
Trademarks.....................................................2
Powering up a CBX-D5 System ....................2
2 CBX-D5 Terminology ..........................3
3 What is the CBX-D5? ...........................5
Inside the CBX-D5.........................................6
The CBX-D5 in a MIDI recording system.....7
4 Controls & Connections ...................8
Front panel .....................................................8
Rear panel ....................................................10
5 Connecting Hard Disk Drives ......13
8 Playback
.................................................. 23
Playback frequency (PB FREQ) ................. 23
Output level meters ..................................... 23
Sound file playback compatibility............... 23
Sound file regions........................................ 24
9 Converting the Sampling
Frequency & Digital Audio
Format in Real Time ...................... 25
10 Inputs & Outputs Explained ..... 26
ANALOG IN............................................... 26
ANALOG OUT........................................... 26
AES/EBU IN 1/2......................................... 27
AES/EBU OUT 1/2, 3/4.............................. 27
CD/DAT IN................................................. 27
CD/DAT OUT............................................. 27
Y2 IN........................................................... 28
Y2 OUT....................................................... 28
WORD CLK IN/OUT ................................. 28
What type of hard disk? ...............................13
Hard disk size...............................................13
Choosing a hard disk....................................14
SCSI ............................................................14
SCSI cables ..................................................15
Computer connection ...................................15
SCSI ID setting ............................................16
SCSI termination..........................................17
11 TO HOST connection .................... 30
6 Working with Hard Disks ...............18
13 Recording setup table .................. 36
Formatting....................................................18
Sound file management................................18
Sound file backup.........................................18
Computer utilities.........................................18
Hard disk fragmentation...............................19
Hard disk partitioning ..................................19
7 Recording
................................................20
Sampling frequency (REC FREQ)...............20
Digital input levels .......................................21
Setting the analog input level.......................21
Input level meters.........................................21
Headphone monitoring.................................21
Digital audio data containing SCMS ...........22
Digital audio data with emphasis .................22
20-bit digital audio .......................................22
MIDI ........................................................... 30
Mac ............................................................. 31
PC-1 ............................................................ 32
PC-2 ............................................................ 32
TO HOST computer connecting cables ...... 33
12 Glossary
............................................... 34
14 CBX-D5 Specifications ................ 37
Index ............................................................... 38
Appendix .............................................. Add-1
Preset Effects ................................. Add-1
DSP/DEQ/DMIX Block Diagram .. Add-2
Preset effects parameter values ..... Add-3
Data-Value Assign Table ............... Add-5
Effect parameters............................ Add-8
MIDI Parameter............................ Add-24
MIDI Data Format........................ Add-28
MIDI Implementation chart.......... Add-32
Introduction
Introduction 1
1
1 Introduction
Welcome to the CBX-D5
Thank you for purchasing a CBX-D5 Digital Recording Processor. Connecting the
CBX-D5 to a controlling computer with supporting software and an external hard disk will
provide up to four channels of CD quality audio recording, processing, and playback.
CBX-D5 features
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
4-channel system: 2-channel simultaneous recording, 4-channel playback.
A/D conversion: 16-bit linear ∆ Σ modulation.
D/A conversion: 18-bit with 8-times oversampling digital filter.
Multi-band parametric DEQ for each channel.
DSP provides 82 different reverb and modulation type effects.
4-input, 4-bus, 2-send digital mixer.
Sampling frequencies: 48kHz, 44.1kHz, 32kHz, (22.05kHz analog input only).
Analog inputs and outputs use professional style XLR type connectors.
Digital I/O includes AES/EBU, CD/DAT & Y2 Yamaha format.
10 minutes of stereo audio requires approximately 100MB hard disk (fs=44.1kHz).
Total recording time can be increased by adding more SCSI hard disks.
All audio data processing is carried out within the CBX-D5, so much less is demanded
of the computer, eliminating data bottlenecks and slow screen redraws.
• Host computer connection allows direct connection to a computer without a MIDI
interface.
Operating manual organization
The CBX-D5 is supplied with three manuals: this Operating Manual, the System Setup
Guide, and a Test Program manual.
This Operating Manual contains full details about the CBX-D5 Digital Recording
Processor: what it is, how it works, and how to use it. It also contains an index that will
allow you to locate information quickly, and also a glossary of CBX-D5 terminology.
The System Setup Guide describes how to set up a recording system using the current
supporting computers and music programs. From time to time this guide will be updated
using single sheet supplements. Please see your Yamaha dealer for the latest supplement.
The Test Program manual should be used in conjunction with the Hardware Test Program
Disk for testing the CBX-D5 hardware.
Important Notice
YAMAHA AND THE SOFTWARE COMPANIES THAT PRODUCE CBX-D5
CONTROLLING SOFTWARE CANNOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY LOSS
OF DATA OR FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL INCIDENTAL,
CONSEQUENTIAL OR OTHER DAMAGES SUFFERED BY THE USER OR OTHERS
RESULTING FROM THE USE OR PURCHASE OF THE CBX-D5, ITS
DOCUMENTATION, OR SUPPORTING SOFTWARE.
2 2 Chapter
Chapter
1 : Introduction
1 : Introduction
Unpacking
The CBX-D5 packaging should contain the following items.
1
CBX-D5
1
Power cable
1
8-pin mini DIN cable
1
MIDI cable
1
SCSI cable (50 to 50 Amphenol)
1
SCSI terminator
1
Rack-mount kit (L & R set)
1
Hardware Test Program Disk
1
Test Program Manual
1
This Operating Manual
1
System Setup Guide
1
User Registration Card
Serial No:
Store the packaging materials for future use.
Installation
The cosmetic appearance of the CBX-D5 has been designed to match typical computer
hardware. Its “footprint” size matches that of many computers so that it can easily be
installed with your other computer equipment.
The CBX-D5 should be placed on a flat, stable surface.
The CBX-D5 can also be rack mounted using the supplied rack-mount kit. When installed
in the rack-mount kit the CBX-D5 requires 3U of rack space.
Trademarks
IBM, PC-AT, PS/1, and PS/2 are registered trademarks of International Business
Machines Corporation.
Appleand Macintosh are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.
Atari, ST, TT, and STE are registered trademarks of Atari Corporation.
Mark of the Unicorn is a registered trademark of Mark of the Unicorn, Inc.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective holders.
Powering up a CBX-D5 System
Some computer systems are a little bit fussy about which devices are switched on first,
especially when a SCSI daisy chain is introduced into the system. As a good rule of
thumb, switch on all connected SCSI devices first, then the computer.
NOTE: While using your CBX-D5 computer music system, do not switch off or
disconnect any device connected in the SCSI chain. Doing so will probably
lead to a system crash and you could loose valuable data.
CBX-D5
CBX-D5
Terminology
Terminology 3
3
2 CBX-D5 Terminology
SCSI
Pronounced scuzzy, the Small Computer System Interface is a connection format used for
connecting peripheral devices such as hard disks, printers, scanners, etc., to a computer.
Up to eight SCSI devices can be connected together in a daisy chain including the
controlling computer. Each device is given its own identity number from 0 to 7, this is
called the SCSI ID number.
The CBX-D5, a computer, and a hard disk are all connected as part of a SCSI daisy chain.
The SCSI connection carries audio data between the CBX-D5 and hard disk for recording
and playback, and also control data from the computer to the CBX-D5. The controlling
computer can also access the hard disk to perform basic sound file copy, delete, and backup
type functions. With the necessary software, digital audio data could be transferred
directly to the computer for on-screen waveform editing, etc.
The SCSI standard is quite a robust format, although, some care must be taken when
connecting and setting up SCSI devices. For full details about connecting SCSI hard disk
drives to the CBX-D5 see “Connecting Hard Disk Drives” on page 13.
Sound files
Just like other types of computer data, digital audio data is stored in files – sound files.
When recording starts, a sound file is created on the hard disk. This sound file can be given
a name, copied, and deleted just like any other computer file.
AES/EBU format
AES/EBU is a digital interface format established by the AES (Audio Engineering
Society) and EBU (European Broadcasting Union). It is used to transfer digital audio data
between professional digital audio equipment. Usually, two channels of digital audio (left
& right) are carried in one XLR type connection.
Although similar to the CD/DAT format, it is primarily intended for professional usage.
AES/EBU format connections can be found on most professional digital audio equipment
including hard disk recorders, digital mixers, professional DAT recorders, and many
digital VTRs.
CD/DAT format
Similar to the professional AES/EBU format, CD/DAT, or S/PDIF (Sony/Philips Digital
Interface Format) as it is otherwise known, is a digital interface format that is used to
transfer digital audio data between consumer type digital audio equipment such as CD
players, consumer DAT recorders, and the new DCC recorders.
Like the AES/EBU format, two channels of digital audio (left & right) are carried in one
connection, usually a phono/RCA jack type connection. Some MIDI samplers are fitted
with a CD/DAT connection so that sample data can be transferred directly to a DAT
recorder for storage.
Y2 format
Y2 Yamaha format is a digital interface format developed by Yamaha that is used to
transfer digital audio data between Yamaha’s professional digital audio equipment. Two
channels of digital audio (left & right) are carried in one connection, usually an 8-pin DIN
type connection.
Yamaha’s professional digital audio products usually include the AES/EBU and CD/DAT
type formats as well as Y2, and the Y2 format can also be found on some other
manufacturers’ digital audio products. Yamaha’s professional digital audio products that
use Y2 include the DMR8 Digital Mixer/Recorder, DMC1000 Digital Mixing Console,
DRU8 Digital Recorder, and the DMP series of Digital Mixers.
4 4 Chapter
Chapter
2 : CBX-D5
2 : CBX-D5
Terminology
Terminology
Sampling frequency (REC FREQ)
During the analog to digital conversion process, the level of the analog audio signal is
sampled (measured) many times per second. Each of these sample measurements is then
stored as a 16-bit binary value. For digital to analog conversion (playback), these 16-bit
binary values are used to reconstruct the analog audio signal. The rate at which these
sample measurements take place is called the sampling frequency and you may already
know that the sampling frequency used by CD players is 44.1kHz.
The CBX-D5 can record audio using any one of four sampling frequencies: 48kHz,
44.1kHz, 32kHz, and 22.05kHz. The audio quality (bandwidth) of a digital system is
directly affected by the sampling frequency. Essentially, the audio bandwidth will be
roughly half the chosen sampling frequency. See “Sampling frequency (REC FREQ)” on
page 20 for more details.
Word clock
When a number of digital audio devices are connected together and data is digitally
transferred between them, it is essential that the data processing circuits of all devices are
synchronized. To achieve this, one device operates as a word clock master and all other
devices operate as word clock slaves. The frequency of the word clock corresponds
directly to the digital audio data’s sampling frequency.
If you only connect two digital audio devices, say the CBX-D5 to a DAT recorder, word
clock setup is quite straight forward and no word clock connections will be required.
However, when three devices are connected, serious thought will need to be given as to
which device is word clock master and how to make the word clock connections. See
“WORD CLK IN/OUT” on page 28 for more details.
NOTE:
Word clock signals should not be confused with other synchronizing signals
such as SMPTE timecode and MTC (MIDI Timecode). Although both may
be used in a digital audio system, word clocks are for synchronizing digital
audio data processing circuits such as CPUs, D/A, A/D converters, etc., while
SMPTE and MTC timecodes are for synchronizing audio and video tape
machines, MIDI sequencers, etc., relative to time – hours, minutes, seconds,
and frames.
To Host
An 8-pin mini DIN connector that allows direct connection to a computer that is running
CBX-D5 supporting software. This can be used when your computer does not have a
MIDI interface, i.e. MIDI input and output connections. See “TO HOST connection” on
page 30 for more details.
NOTE: Not all CBX-D5 supporting music software can use this type of connection,
so please consult your Yamaha dealer before making a purchase.
What
What
is the
is the
CBX-D5?
CBX-D5? 5
5
3 What is the CBX-D5?
The CBX-D5 is a Digital Recording Processor that, when connected to a controlling
computer with supporting software and an external hard disk, provides up to four channels
of CD quality audio recording, processing, and playback.
Computer based
The CBX-D5 is controlled by a computer that is running CBX-D5 supporting software.
All audio data processing takes place inside the CBX-D5, so there is very little demand on
the controlling computer. For this reason the CBX-D5 can be used with some of the less
powerful, less expensive computers such as the Apple Macintosh SE/30, Classic II, and
LC; and the Atari ST/STE. It also leaves the computer free to get on with other jobs such
as processing MIDI sequence data and screen updates.
The CBX-D5, computer, and hard disk are all connected as part of a SCSI daisy chain. The
SCSI connection carries audio data between the CBX-D5 and hard disk for recording and
playback, and also control data from the computer to the CBX-D5. A MIDI connection
between the CBX-D5 and computer carries continuous controller information for
real-time volume, EQ, and pan control of the CBX-D5’s digital mixer.
Four-channel system
The CBX-D5 is a 4-channel system, i.e., 2-channel simultaneous recording and
4-channel playback. Channels can be recorded while other channels playback.
The CBX-D5 needs about 100Mbytes of hard disk space to record 10 minutes of stereo
digital audio (fs = 44.1kHz). The available recording time can be increased by simply
adding more, or larger hard disk drives to the SCSI daisy chain.
CD quality & editing
The CBX-D5 records audio data at a 16-bit resolution, and with 44.1kHz and 48kHz
sampling frequencies it provides all the sound quality benefits of the Compact Disc format
such as faithful reproduction, low noise, minimal distortion, etc.
Analog input and output signals are processed by 16-bit linear ∆ Σ modulation A/D and
18-bit 8-times oversampling D/A converters. Analog connections use balanced XLR type
connectors. Digital I/O consists of AES/EBU, CD/DAT, and Y2. Allowing digital audio
data transfer between the CBX-D5 and other digital audio equipment.
As well as the A/D, D/A converters, the CBX-D5 also contains a 4-input, 4-bus, 2-send
digital mixer; a DSP for digital effects; DEQ for real-time EQ control; and sampling
frequency converters that allow recording and playback at differing sampling frequencies.
As well as the sound quality, two other benefits of recording with a CBX-D5 system as
opposed to analog tape are, the ability to nondestructively edit recordings and being able
to move audio data relative to time, a feature often referred to as audio time slip.
For a listing of some other CBX-D5 features, see “CBX-D5 features” on page 1.
The future
The CBX-D5 is a software dependent device, so with future supporting software it may be
possible to use the CBX-D5 for digital mixing with digital EQ and effects, sampling,
2-track mastering, waveform editing, and multimedia type applications.
HOST COMPUTER
SCSI
HARD
DISK 1
SCSI
HARD
DISK 2
MIDI
MIDI
AUDIO
WORDCLOCK
Fs
CONVERTER
MIDI IN, or
TO HOST
EQ
DEQ
DEQ
DEQ
DEQ
RECORD
WORDCLOCK
INPUT MONITOR
SIGNAL PATH
CONTROLLER
VOLUME, PITCH
SYNC
PLAY
CONTROL
PLAY
CONTROL
PLAY
CONTROL
Fs
CONVERTER
Fs
CONVERTER
PLAY
CONTROL
Fs
CONVERTER
Fs = Sampling Frequency
PLAY BUFFER
(RAM)
CBX-D5
SCSI
CONTROLLER
MIDI OUT, or
Serial port
SCSI
RECORD
BUFFER
(RAM)
INPUT LEVEL
METERS
OUTPUT
LEVEL
METERS
DSP
EFFECTS
4 INPUT
4 BUS
2 SEND
DIGITAL
MIXER
Fs
CONVERTER
Fs
CONVERTER
Fs
CONVERTER
Fs
CONVERTER
Fs
CONVERTER
Fs
CONVERTER
A/D
CONVERTER
A/D
CONVERTER
Y2
INTERFACE
S/PDIF
INTERFACE
AES/EBU
INTERFACE
AES/EBU
INTERFACE
D/A
CONVERTER
D/A
CONVERTER
D/A
CONVERTER
D/A
CONVERTER
PLAYBACK
WORDCLOCK
DIGITAL
INTERFACE
Y2 OUT 1/2
CD/DAT
OUT 1/2
AES/EBU
OUT 3/4
AES/EBU
OUT 1/2
ANALOG
OUT 4
ANALOG
OUT 3
ANALOG
OUT 2
ANALOG
OUT 1
WORD
CLK OUT
WORD
CLK IN
Y2 IN 1/2
CD/DAT
IN 1/2
AES/EBU
IN 1/2
ANALOG IN 2
ANALOG IN 1
6 6 Chapter
Chapter
3 : What
3 : What
is the
is the
CBX-D5?
CBX-D5?
Inside the CBX-D5
The following block diagram shows how the CBX-D5 processes audio data as it travels
from input to output and to the external SCSI hard disks.
TheThe
CBX-D5
CBX-D5
in ainMIDI
a MIDI
recording
recording
system
system 7
7
The CBX-D5 in a MIDI recording system
The following diagram shows how the CBX-D5 can be integrated into a MIDI sequencer
based music production system.
MONITOR AMP
MIDI
MULTI-EFFECTOR
MIDI TONE
GENERATOR
MASTER
RECORDER
MIDI DRUM MODULE
MIDI SOUND
SAMPLER
GROUP
OUT x2
LINE IN x4
MIDI
OUT
YAMAHA
CBX-D5
SERIAL PORT
TO HOST
SCSI
MIDI IN
DIGITAL
TRANSFER
MIDI OUT
CD/DAT
MIDI CABLE
AUDIO CABLE
HOST CABLE
HARD
DISK
SCSI
8 8 Chapter
Chapter
4 : Controls
4 : Controls
& Connections
& Connections
4 Controls & Connections
Front panel
1
POWER switch
Used to turn the power on and off. Press once to switch on, press again to switch off.
2
SOURCE indicators
Indicates the input selected for recording: AES/EBU, Y2, CD/DAT, or ANALOG. The
source input selection is made by the controlling software.
3
REC FREQ indicators
Indicates the selected sampling frequency for recording: 48kHz, 44.1kHz, 32kHz, and
22.05kHz (analog inputs only). The sampling frequency selection is made by the
controlling software.
4
PB FREQ indicators
Indicates the sampling frequency of the digital audio data that is being output by the
CBX-D5: 48kHz, or 44.1kHz. The playback sampling frequency setting is made by the
controlling software.
When the CBX-D5 is used with an external word clock, the digital outputs will operate at
the same frequency as the external word clock and that frequency will not be indicated by
the “PB FREQ” indicators.
Front
Front
panel
panel 9
5
9
INPUT LEVEL meters
Two 12-segment LED bargraphs indicate the level of the incoming digital audio when the
input source is set to AES/EBU, CD/DAT, or Y2 (not affected by the level controls), or the
level of the analog input signals when the input source is set to ANALOG (controlled by
the “ANALOG IN” level controls).
NOTE:
6
Unlike peak meters on analog equipment that light up approximately 3 ~ 6dB
before signal clipping, CLIP LEDs on digital equipment light up when the
signal has actually clipped. Digital audio signal clipping normally produces
unpleasant distortion, pops, and clicks, so care must be taken when setting
the recording level for analog input signals. See “Recording” on page 20 for
more details.
OUTPUT LEVEL meters
Four 12-segment LED bargraphs that indicate the output level of channels 1 ~ 4. The
“CLIP” LED indicates an output level of +17dBm.
NOTE:
7
Just like the input level meters, lighting an output level meter’s “CLIP” LED
should be avoided to prevent signal distortion. This situation may occur when
two or more CBX-D5 audio channels are mixed, or if excessive EQ is
applied. The CBX-D5 does not have any output level controls, the output
level is set by the controlling software.
ANALOG IN LEVEL control
Independent level controls for analog input channels 1 and 2. As well as independent level
control, these controls can also be used to balance the left and right channels of a stereo
source connected to the analog inputs.
NOTE:
8
These controls have no effect on the AES/EBU, CD/DAT, and Y2 digital
inputs and outputs.
PHONES VOL
Adjusts the volume level of the headphones.
9
PHONES connection
A stereo 6.35 mm (1/4 inch) phone jack used for connecting a pair of stereo headphones.
All four CBX-D5 audio channels can be monitored – channels 1 and 3 appear in the left
speaker and channels 2 and 4 in the right.
10 10 Chapter
Chapter
4 : Controls
4 : Controls
& Connections
& Connections
Rear panel
The explanations below are only brief introductions to the CBX-D5’s rear panel
connections. For full details about the inputs and outputs, see “Inputs & Outputs
Explained” on page 26.
1
ANALOG IN 1&2
A pair of female XLR 3-31 type connectors used for inputting analog audio signals. These
are balanced inputs with a nominal input level of +4dBm and a maximum input level of
+22dBm. These could be connected to the outputs of a mixer, synthesizer, drum machine,
etc. Microphones, guitars, and equipment with an output level less than –20dBm must first
be connected to a preamplifier, then to the CBX-D5.
NOTE:
2
When the Analog inputs are used unbalanced, the maximum input level is
reduced to +16dBm.
ANALOG OUT 1 ~ 4
Four male XLR 3-32 type connectors used for outputting channels 1 ~ 4 as analog audio
signals. These are balanced outputs with a nominal output level of 0dBm and a maximum
output level of +17dBm. These could be connected to the inputs of a mixer, amplifier, tape
recorder, or DAT recorder.
3
AES/EBU IN 1/2
A female XLR 3-31 type connector for inputting AES/EBU format digital audio. Only one
input connection is required for channels 1 and 2 because the AES/EBU format carries two
signals in one connection. These could be used when recording digital audio data from
professional digital audio equipment such as another hard disk recorder, a digital mixer,
digital recorder, or digital VTR.
RearRear
panel
panel 11 11
4
AES/EBU OUT 1/2 & 3/4
Two male XLR 3-32 type connectors for outputting AES/EBU format digital audio.
Channels 1 and 2 are output via “OUT 1/2”, and channels 3 and 4 via “OUT 3/4”. These
could be used to transfer digital audio data from the CBX-D5 to professional digital audio
equipment.
5
CD/DAT IN 1/2
A Phono/RCA jack for inputting CD/DAT format digital audio. Channels 1 and 2 are
carried in the same connection. This connection could be connected to the digital output
of a CD player or DAT recorder and allows digital audio recording without multiple D/A,
A/D audio data conversions. Some MIDI samplers are fitted with this type of connection.
In this case your sound samples could be recorded directly to your CBX-D5 system.
6
CD/DAT OUT 1/2
A Phono/RCA jack for outputting CD/DAT format digital audio. Channels 1 and 2 are
carried in the same connection. This could be connected to the digital input of a DAT
recorder or DCC recorder, and allows digital audio recording without multiple D/A, A/D
audio data conversions.
NOTE:
7
It is widely known that the weakest links in a digital audio system are the A/D
and D/A converters. For once the audio has been converted into a digital
form, it is immune from all the problems usually associated with analog
equipment such as distortions and noise. Although the effects of multiple
conversions will be hard to spot, even for the best trained ears, it makes sense
that once converted, we try and keep the audio in a digital form by using these
digital I/O connections wherever possible.
Y2 IN 1/2
An 8-pin DIN socket for inputting Y2 Yamaha format digital audio. As with the AES/EBU
and CD/DAT formats, two audio channels are carried in the same connection. This could
be connected to one of Yamaha’s digital audio products such as a DMR8 Digital
Mixer/Recorder, DMC1000 Digital Mixing Console, DRU8 Digital Recorder, SPX1000
Effect Processor, or the DMP series of Digital Mixers.
8
Y2 OUT 1/2
An 8-pin DIN socket for outputting Y2 Yamaha format digital audio. This could be used
to transfer digital audio data from the CBX-D5 to one of the Yamaha professional digital
audio products listed above. You might not own one of these products yourself, but you
may need to transfer some of your audio data to a recording studio that does.
9
WORD CLK IN/OUT
Two BNC type connectors for inputting and outputting word clock signals. A common
word clock signal is used to synchronize data processing circuits when a number of digital
audio devices are connected together. For a full description of how and when to use these
connections, see “WORD CLK IN/OUT” on page 28.
12 12 Chapter
Chapter
4 : Controls
4 : Controls
& Connections
& Connections
0 MIDI IN
The CBX-D5 receives MIDI control data from the computer via this connection. To
prevent the CBX-D5’s control data being delayed by other MIDI devices, the CBX-D5
should be the first device connected to your computer. Other MIDI devices should then be
connected to the CBX-D5’s MIDI THRU connection.
If your computer’s MIDI interface has two or three MIDI outputs, dedicate one for use
with the CBX-D5.
NOTE:
Although not usually a problem on a small MIDI system, when more than
three MIDI devices are daisy chained together using MIDI IN and THRU
connections, MIDI data can sometimes be delayed, especially if you transmit
a lot of continuous controller data such as pitch bend or modulation wheel. If
MIDI delays do become a problem, use a MIDI THRU Box to distribute the
MIDI signal to each MIDI device.
A MIDI OUT
When the CBX-D5 is being used as a MIDI interface, that is, a direct connection to a
computer via the To Host connection, MIDI data from the computer is output to other
MIDI devices from this connection. Also used for MIDI bulk dump.
NOTE:
The operation of the MIDI IN and MIDI OUT connections varies depending
on the position of the CBX-D5’s Host select switch. See “TO HOST
connection” on page 30 for full details.
B MIDI THRU
MIDI data appearing at the MIDI IN connection is buffered, then output from this
connection. In other words, all MIDI data appearing at the MIDI IN connector is output to
the MIDI THRU connector unaffected by the CBX-D5.
C TO HOST connector
An 8-pin mini DIN connector that allows direct connection to a computer that is running
CBX-D5 supporting software. This can be used when your computer does not have a
MIDI interface, i.e., MIDI input and output connections. See “TO HOST connection” on
page 30 for more details.
D TO HOST select switch
This switch setting depends on the type of computer connected to the “TO HOST”
connector. See “TO HOST connection” on page 30 for full details.
E SCSI connectors
Two 50-way Amphenol type connectors used to connect the CBX-D5 into the SCSI daisy
chain.
F SCSI ID selector
A thumb wheel type switch used to set the SCSI ID number of the CBX-D5. See “SCSI
ID setting” on page 16 for more details.
G Power inlet
A 3-pin power inlet socket. Connect the supplied power cable to this socket, then plug the
other end of the cable into an AC receptacle of the correct type.
Connecting
Connecting
Hard
Hard
DiskDisk
Drives
Drives 13 13
5 Connecting Hard Disk Drives
Before connecting a hard disk drive, read through this chapter to familiarize yourself with
SCSI and how a SCSI daisy chain should be setup.
What type of hard disk?
If you don’t already have a hard disk or are thinking of buying a larger one, see the supplied
card for a listing of recommended disk drives.
Hard disk size
The following table shows approximate available recording times for various sizes of hard
disk. Available recording times are shown for all of the CBX-D5’s sampling frequencies,
and as you can see, with a higher sampling frequency – less time is available. This is
because using a high sampling frequency produces much more digital data, which means
a bigger sound file. See “Sampling frequency (REC FREQ)” on page 20 for more details
about selecting a sampling frequency.
Hard disk / Max.
Sound File Size
Stereo Recording (minutes)
Mono Recording (minutes)
22.05
kHz
32
kHz
44.1
kHz
48
kHz
22.05
kHz
32
kHz
44.1
kHz
48
kHz
2000MB (2GB)
380
260
190
174
760
760
380
348
1000MB (1GB)
190
130
95
87
380
380
190
174
660MB
124
85
62
57
248
248
124
114
330MB
62
42
31
28
124
124
62
56
200MB
40
25
20
17
80
50
40
34
100MB
20
13
10
8
40
26
20
16
40MB
8
5
4
3.30
16
10
8
7
20MB
4
3
2
1.42
8
6
4
3.24
10MB
2
1.18
1
51
secs
4
2.36
2
1.42
5MB
1
38
secs
30
secs
26
secs
2
1.16
1
52
secs
1MB
12
secs
7 secs
6 secs
5 secs
24
secs
24
secs
12
secs
10
secs
Although it is doubtful that you will ever buy a hard disk smaller than 40MB for use with
the CBX-D5, the values below 40MB will be useful for checking the remaining record
time that is available on a hard disk that already contains some sound files.
14 14 Chapter
Chapter
5 : Connecting
5 : Connecting
Hard
Hard
DiskDisk
Drives
Drives
Choosing a hard disk
If you plan to buy a hard disk that is not listed on the supplied card, the following
specifications should be checked first.
Specification
Check
Is it compatible with your computer?
Notes
Maybe it is advertised as compatible, or your
dealer recommends it.
Does it have two SCSI connectors?
You need two to continue the SCSI daisy chain.
Are the SCSI connectors 25-pin
D-SUB, or 50-way Amphenol?
Macintosh computers are fitted with a 25-pin
D-SUB connector, while most other SCSI devices
have a 50-way Amphenol connector.
Are the SCSI cables supplied?
If not, you will need to purchase them separately.
Can the SCSI ID be set from 0 ~ 7? (for
Macintosh you only need 0 ~ 6)
If not, it might clash with another device’s ID, in
which case you may have to rearrange the ID
numbers of some other SCSI devices in the
chain.
Does it have internal or external
termination?
External terminators are normally connected to
the rear of the SCSI device. If the device has an
internal terminator, make sure it can be switched
off so that any device can be positioned at the
end of the SCSI daisy chain.
Access Time?
Measured in milliseconds, this is an indication of
how fast data from different areas of the disk can
be retrieved. The maximum we recommend is
30ms. An access time slower than this may affect
the performance of the CBX-D5.
Data Transfer Rate?
Usually measured in Megabits per second
(Mbit/s), this shows how fast data can be written
to and read from the hard disk. The minimum we
recommend is 16Mbits/s. A transfer rate less than
this may affect the performance of the CBX-D5.
SCSI
For an general introduction to SCSI, see “SCSI” on page 3.
Setting up a SCSI daisy chain requires a little more than just making connections. SCSI
devices require ID numbers and the daisy chain must be terminated correctly. These are
explained in the following three sections, “SCSI cables”, “SCSI ID setting”, and “SCSI
termination”.
When using a SCSI daisy chain, the following points should be borne in mind.
• Allocate each device its own SCSI ID number.
• Terminate the SCSI bus correctly.
• Use quality cables and keep the length down.
• Use the little wire clips (or screws) on a SCSI connector to fasten the cable plugs
securely.
• All devices connected in the daisy chain must be switched on to use the system.
• Never switch off, or disconnect a device once the system has been switched on.
NOTE:
Switch off all your equipment before making any SCSI connections.
SCSI
SCSI
cables
cables 15 15
SCSI cables
Most SCSI devices are supplied with a SCSI cable, but if you need to buy one, make sure
that it is designed for SCSI usage and that the connecters on either end of the cable are
correct for your application.
Cable length is an important issue, but it’s not the length of each individual SCSI cable,
it’s the total length of the SCSI daisy chain that must not exceed 6m (20ft).
SCSI
HARD
DISK 1
SCSI
HARD
DISK 2
SCSI
CBX-D5
Total length of SCSI daisy chain must not exceed 6m (20ft)
Computer connection
Apple Macintosh
Apple Macintosh computers use a 25-pin D-SUB connector for the SCSI port, so use a
25-pin D-SUB to 50-way Amphenol type SCSI cable, usually supplied with an external
Macintosh hard disk drive.
Atari ST/STE
For Atari ST/STE computers, a Steinberg SCSI adaptor is required. This should be
connected to the Atari ST/STE’s “HARD DISK” port (DMA) using a 19-pin DSUB to
19-pin DSUB cable. An external hard disk drive can then be connected to the SCSI
adaptor’s SCSI connector using a 50-way to 25-pin SCSI cable.
NOTE:
Some Atari ST/STE hard disk drives already contain a SCSI adaptor,
however, they cannot be used as a substitute for the Steinberg adaptor.
Although it is possible to use just one external hard disk, it is highly recommended, for the
sake of data integrity, that you use at least two external hard disks: one disk for your
computer software and data such as Cubase Audio, MIDI song files, etc., and the other disk
purely for recording CBX-D5 sound files.
Atari TT
The Atari TT has a SCSI connection built-in, so a SCSI hard disk drive can be connected
directly.
Atari TT computers are fitted with an internal hard disk as standard. The internal disk
should be used for your computer software and data such as Cubase Audio, MIDI song
files, etc., and an external hard disk should be used purely for recording CBX-D5 sound
files. An external hard disk must be used with an Atari TT, because it supplies the
termination power that is required by the SCSI bus.
IBM PC/AT compatible
For an IBM PC/AT compatible computer, a SCSI adaptor card is required. This should be
installed into one of the computer’s internal expansion slots.
16 16 Chapter
Chapter
5 : Connecting
5 : Connecting
Hard
Hard
DiskDisk
Drives
Drives
SCSI ID setting
The SCSI bus is a parallel type connection, and data on the bus is available to all devices.
However, communication will usually be between two devices only, so each device is
allocated an ID number, like an address number. In this way, only the device with the ID
number that is specified in the data will actually read and respond to the data.
If two devices share the same ID number, the system will probably crash, so make sure that
each device has its own ID number. SCSI devices usually have a DIP switch or, like the
CBX-D5, a thumb wheel switch for ID setting. Refer to the instructions supplied with your
particular SCSI device.
ID No. 1
SCSI
HARD
DISK 1
ID No. 2
SCSI
HARD
DISK 2
ID No. 3
SCSI
CBX-D5
SCSI
ID No. 5
ID No. 6
SCSI
DEVICE
SCSI
SCSI
DEVICE
ID No. 4
SCSI
HARD
DISK 3
This device is
terminated
The Apple Macintosh example above shows six devices connected in a SCSI daisy chain
(seven including the computer). Each device has its own ID number. Note that the last
device in the chain is terminated. On a Apple Macintosh computer, SCSI ID 7 is reserved
for use by the computer, and ID 0 for the internal hard disk. Do not use either of these
IDs for any other SCSI device.
ID No. 0
ATARI
ST/STE
19-pin
DSUB
SCSI
Adaptor
SCSI
HARD
DISK 1
ID No. 1
SCSI
HARD
DISK 2
SCSI
ID No. 6
CBX-D5
ID No. 3
SCSI
HARD
DISK 4
ID No. 2
SCSI
HARD
DISK 3
This device is
terminated
In the Atari ST/STE system shown above, five SCSI devices are connected in a daisy
chain. Hard disks must be set with continuous SCSI IDs starting from 0 (0, 1, 2, 3…).
However, the CBX-D5 can be set to SCSI ID 5 or 6. Do not set any device to SCSI ID 7.
ID No. 1
ATARI
TT
SCSI
HARD
DISK 1
ID No. 2
SCSI
HARD
DISK 1
ID No. 3
SCSI
HARD
DISK 2
SCSI
ID No. 5
ID No. 6
(internal hard disk
set to SCSI ID 0)
CBX-D5
SCSI
HARD
DISK 4
ID No. 4
SCSI
HARD
DISK 3
This device is
terminated
In the Atari TT system shown above, six SCSI devices are connected in a daisy chain. Hard
disks must be set with continuous SCSI IDs starting from 1 (1, 2, 3, 4…). However, the
CBX-D5 can be set to SCSI ID 5 or 6. Do not set any device to SCSI ID 7.
SCSI
SCSI
termination
termination 17 17
SCSI termination
Unlike audio signals, digital signals only have two values: high and low (+5V and 0V).
When no data is being transmitted, it is important that SCSI bus lines are kept in the high
state (+5V), so that when data is transmitted there is a clear distinction between high and
low pulses and the data is transferred without error. To achieve this, a device known as a
SCSI terminator is connected in the SCSI daisy chain. A terminator is usually fitted to the
last device in the chain.
Terminate
this device
HARD
DISK 1
SCSI
SCSI
HARD
DISK 2
SCSI
CBX-D5
Some SCSI devices have a terminator built-in. In this case that device should be connected
at the end of the daisy chain. Other devices, like the CBX-D5, are supplied with an in-line
type terminator and this can be connected as shown below.
CBX-D5 (Top view)
HARD DISK 2
(In this case the CBX-D5 is the last device
connected in the daisy chain, so the SCSI
terminator is connected as shown)
SCSI PLUG
To the next
SCSI device
NOTE:
SCSI PLUG
SCSI PLUG
SCSI
TERMINATOR
SCSI CABLE
If the SCSI daisy chain is not terminated correctly, numerous problems
including data corruption, system crashes, and intermittent glitches can
occur. If you have just set up your SCSI daisy chain or have added a new
SCSI device to it and it is not working as it should, check that the SCSI daisy
chain is terminated correctly. If the problem persists, try connecting the SCSI
devices in a different order.
18 18 Chapter
Chapter
6 : Working
6 : Working
withwith
Hard
Hard
Disks
Disks
6 Working with Hard Disks
After connecting your hard disk, setting the SCSI ID, and installing the SCSI terminator,
you will need to format the hard disk before it can be used. If you have already powered
up your system you will notice that there isn’t a disk icon representing the new disk drive
on the desktop. This is because your computer could not mount the hard disk during
boot-up, due to it not being formatted.
Formatting
Most SCSI hard disks are supplied with their own disk formatting software, so please refer
to the hard disk’s Manual, and format the disk as specified.
Before disk formatting begins you will probably be asked to supply the SCSI ID of the
hard disk and maybe the required interleave value. The SCSI ID will be the number that
you set on that hard disk using its SCSI ID DIP switch or thumb wheel switch. If you have
to specify an interleave value, check the hard disk’s Manual. Also see the “Adding SCSI
disk drives” section of your computer manual.
When the disk has been formatted correctly and any supplied hard disk driver software has
been installed, a disk icon should appear on your computer’s desktop.
Sound file management
By double clicking on the disk’s icon you will be able to access sound files stored on the
disk. Sound files can be copied, deleted, size checked, etc., using the same menu
commands that you would use for your other computer files.
Sound file backup
Because the CBX-D5’s sound files can be managed just like your other computer files,
sound files can be backed up in much the same way using data compression and backup
utilities. However, due to the relatively large size of sound files, floppy disks are not the
most effective backup media. Removable hard disks and magneto optical disks are well
suited to this task and commonly available sizes include 44MB, 88MB, 128MB, and
650MB.
Another backup option is to digitally transfer your sound files to a DAT recorder. Then, if
you want them again in the future, just record them back to the CBX-D5.
Computer utilities
There are many computer utilities and desk accessories available for managing files and
hard disks such as a “file squashers”, “auto savers”, “hard disk size doublers”, etc. If you
choose to use a utility to work along side the CBX-D5, YOU DO SO AT YOUR OWN
RISK and no responsibility can be claimed for lost data, system crashes, and hardware
damage.
The CBX-D5 is designed to work with the software described in the System Setup Guide,
why risk losing your valuable audio data by using a “super disk space doubler”, or
“real-time data compressor”?
Hard
Hard
diskdisk
fragmentation
fragmentation 19 19
Hard disk fragmentation
Hard disks record data into pre-formatted concentric tracks on a number of magnetic disks
that are mounted around a common spindle. Tracks are further divided into sectors, and
each sector can store 512bytes of data. On a newly formatted disk, files are recorded into
a continuous series of sectors as shown below.
TRACK
6
SECTORS
10
SECTORS
8
SECTORS
FILE 1
FILE 2
FILE 3
SECTOR
As files are deleted and new files saved, files may be split (fragmented) over different areas
of the disk, losing the continuity of sectors. In this case, reading one file may cause the disk
drive to read sectors from many different parts of the disk, thus slowing down the overall
data read rate and making the disk drive work harder.
Space previously
occupied by file 2
FILE 1
FILE 4
FILE 5a
FILE 3
FILE 5b
FILE 5 has been
split – fragmented.
Disk defragmentation is quite important for hard disk audio recording, as it is better to
record data into a continuous series of empty hard disk sectors. If recording starts in an
empty sector, but then subsequent sectors in the series are used by another file, because
there is so much data being recorded, the disk drive does not have time to find, then move
to another area on the disk, so recording may stop.
This is not a problem with a completely empty disk, but if a sound file is deleted, the next
recording might start in the deleted space, and recording might stop because there is not
enough continuous empty sectors available. This will be more noticeable on a smaller hard
disk where you have to keep deleting unwanted sound files to make way for new
recordings.
The answer is to use a good hard disk defragmentation utility when a sound file has been
deleted. By defragmenting the disk, all sound files will be moved up to the front end of the
disk, leaving the available disk space as a series of continuous sectors at the end of the disk.
Hard disk partitioning
Because the CBX-D5 can read and write to any hard disk drive connected in the SCSI
chain, it is able to use individual partitions of a hard disk drive that has been partitioned.
However, the CBX-D5 cannot record across hard disks or partitions, so the available
recording time will be limited to the size of the partition.
NOTE:
The time available for all recordings is not limited by the size of a hard disk
partition, it is the time available for one continuous recording, or one take
that is limited.
20 20 Chapter
Chapter
7 : Recording
7 : Recording
7 Recording
Sampling frequency (REC FREQ)
The CBX-D5 can record at any one of four sampling frequencies: 48kHz, 44.1kHz, 32kHz
(as specified by the AES), or 22.05kHz (analog input only). These sampling frequencies
are commonly used for digital audio, and each has its own specific applications.
The sampling frequency is set by the controlling software and the CBX-D5’s front panel
REC FREQ indicators show the selected frequency. The selected REC FREQ also
determines the clock rate for all internal processing, i.e., DSP, digital mixer, DEQ, etc.,
except for the output Fs converters, whose clock rate is determined by the PB FREQ.
NOTE:
When using the digital inputs, you should set the CBX-D5’s REC FREQ to
match the digital input signal’s sampling frequency. It is not essential, but we
recommend it.
48kHz
At 48kHz an audio bandwidth of about 22kHz is possible. Consumer DAT and DCC
recorders can record at 48kHz only. Professional equipment also supports this frequency.
44.1kHz
With this sampling frequency an audio bandwidth of about 20kHz is possible. This
frequency is used for all prerecorded CDs, DATs (if there are any), and DCC cassettes.
Although a higher audio bandwidth is possible using 48kHz, 44.1kHz is considered to be
good enough for most applications, and most professional digital audio engineers use this
sampling frequency.
32kHz
At this sampling frequency an audio bandwidth of about 15kHz is possible. This frequency
is widely used for broadcast applications where a 15kHz audio bandwidth, roughly that of
FM radio, is acceptable. Many DSB (Direct Satellite Broadcasting) transmissions use this
frequency, although, some may also use 48kHz.
22.05kHz
At this frequency an audio bandwidth of about 10kHz is available. This frequency is
widely used in multimedia applications. It might not seem very useful for your audio
applications, but if you are limited by hard disk space or the audio material you are
recording already has a limited bandwidth it may be useful.
Which sampling frequency?
Since the CBX-D5 contains a sampling frequency converter, digital audio can be output at
a different sampling frequency to that which was used during recording. However, playing
back a sound file at a higher sampling frequency will not improve the audio quality, as the
audio frequency bandwidth of a sound file is determined by the record sampling frequency,
not the playback frequency.
This leaves you with two deciding factors for choosing a sampling frequency. Firstly, what
audio bandwidth (audio quality) do you want to use, and secondly, how much free disk
space is available? See “Hard disk size” on page 13 for a listing of recording times that are
available at each sampling frequency for a given size of hard disk (free disk space).
Varispeed
With some tape based digital recorders it is possible to vary the speed of playback and
recording. When varispeed is used the sampling frequency of the digital audio is changed.
Since the CBX-D5 can playback digital audio at a sampling frequency different to that
used for recording, varispeed digital audio can be recorded.
Digital
Digital
input
input
levels
levels 21 21
Digital input levels
Digital input signals entering the CBX-D5 cannot be level adjusted. This is the same for
most digital audio equipment, the idea being that once the level has been set during the
original A/D conversion it should not need readjustment. It also simplifies the interfacing
of digital audio signals between equipment.
The level of the audio signal output via the CBX-D5’s digital outputs, however, can be
level adjusted, and this is set by the controlling software.
Setting the analog input level
The recording level for analog input signals can be set using the CBX-D5’s ANALOG IN
LEVEL controls. These controls allows independent level setting for channels 1 and 2 and
they can also be used to balance the left and right channels of a stereo source connected to
the analog inputs. The maximum analog input level is +22dBm.
These controls should be used in conjunction with the input level meters, which are
described below.
Input level meters
Unlike analog tape recorders, digital audio recorders are very unforgiving when it comes
to excessive signal levels. Digital audio signal clipping normally produces unpleasant
distortion, pops, and clicks, and unless you have some very sophisticated editing
equipment it is impossible to remove it after the event. So great care must be taken when
setting the recording level.
With a digital audio recorder such as the CBX-D5, noise and hiss produced by setting the
recording level too low is not a problem. However, setting the recording level too low will
reduce the effective dynamic range of the recording and with a dynamic range of 96dB*
available it makes sense to use as much of it as possible.
Basically, the recording level should set so that the loudest signals light the –3, –6, –9
LEDs, but never light the CLIP LEDs. When recording with microphones, where sudden
signal increases are possible, it may be worth having a “dry run” before you hit the record
button. A compressor is a useful tool when recording vocals and acoustic instruments.
Headphone monitoring
During recording and playback, the four audio channels can be monitored using a pair of
stereo headphones. Headphones should be connected to the PHONES jack on the front
panel. The volume can be adjusted using the PHONES VOLUME control.
As you can see from the diagram below, channels 1 and 3 appear in the left speaker and
channels 2 and 4 in the right speaker.
Channel 1
L
R
Channel 3
* 96dB is the dynamic range available with a 16-bit digital system (6dB per bit).
Channel 2
Channel 4
22 22 Chapter
Chapter
7 : Recording
7 : Recording
Digital audio data containing SCMS
SCMS (Serial Copy Management System) is a protection system designed to stop illegal
digital copying of audio material. When a SCMS DAT recorder (most consumer DAT
recorders) receives a digital input signal with the copy protect flag set to “protect”, it
cannot enter record mode, making digital tape duplication impossible.
NOTE:
SCMS does not affect recordings made using analog connections, and it is only
second generation digital copying (copy of a copy) that is prohibited.
If a digital signal that contains SCMS is input to the CBX-D5 it will not prevent the
CBX-D5 from recording. The digital audio will be recorded in a sound file without SCMS.
When digital audio data containing SCMS is input into the CBX-D5, and the output format
(set from the host computer) is set to Professional, output from the digital output jacks may
be muted. When the output format is set to Consumer however, the digital and analog
outputs will be unaffected.
It is possible to record a copyrighted musical composition, edit it and replay it with the
CBX-D5. However, the user will be held responsible for its use.
Digital audio data with emphasis
For some recordings, emphasis is applied to a digital audio signal. During playback, this
emphasis is automatically detected by the replay device and de-emphasis applied. You
may have seen the word EMPHASIS appear on a CD player or DAT recorder when a
prerecorded disc or tape with emphasis was played back.
The CBX-D5 has no emphasis functions, so if a digital signal that has been emphasized
is input to the CBX-D5 it will not automatically be de-emphasized and the CBX-D5 will
record the signal with the emphasis. During playback, a slight boosting of frequencies
above 3.5kHz will be noticeable.
20-bit digital audio
Some CD players are now 20-bit and there is a small but growing selection of 20-bit CD
recordings available. Some 20-bit recorders are already being used for professional
applications including Yamaha’s DMR8 and DRU8 recorders, which have always offered
20-bit recording.
If a 20-bit digital signal is input to the CBX-D5, it will be converted to a 16-bit signal
before recording. For the technically minded, 4-bits, starting from the LSB (Least
Significant Bit) will be chopped off.
Playback
Playback 23 23
8 Playback
Playback frequency (PB FREQ)
During playback, sound files are read from disk, processed in the CBX-D5, then output.
The CBX-D5 can read sound files that were recorded at sampling frequencies between
11.025kHz and 48kHz. Once inside the CBX-D5, the data is processed at the currently set
REC FREQ. Then it is output to the digital outputs at a rate determined by the PB FREQ,
and to the analog outputs after analog to digital conversion.
The CBX-D5 can output digital audio at one of two sampling frequencies: 44.1kHz and
48kHz. The playback frequency is set by the controlling software and the CBX-D5’s PB
FREQ indicators show the selection.
NOTE:
When the CBX-D5 is used with an external word clock, the digital outputs will
operate at the same frequency as the external word clock and that frequency
will not be indicated by the “PB FREQ” indicators.
The choice of playback frequency will usually be determined by the sampling frequency
of the device to which the digital audio is being sent, i.e., a DAT recorder, DCC recorder,
digital mixer, etc. There is nothing to be gained by playing a 44.1kHz recorded sound file
at 48kHz, and little to be lost by playing a 48kHz recorded sound file at 44.1kHz.
Output level meters
The four output level meters show the output level of each channel. The output level of
each channel can be controlled by the controlling software. The maximum output level is
+18dBm. So an analog output signal of about +18dBm will light the CLIP LED.
Sound file playback compatibility
As well as its own sound files, the CBX-D5 can also playback the following sound file
formats. These sound file formats are often used with the Apple Macintosh computer.
Sound Designer
Sound Designer II (mono and stereo)
Audio IFF (Interchange File Format)
The CBX-D5 can record and playback mono and stereo 2-channel interleave files.
4-channel interleave files can be played back only.
MONO FILE
DATA
1
1
1
STEREO 2-CHANNEL
INTERLEAVE FILE DATA
1
1
2
1
2
4-CHANNEL INTERLEAVE
FILE DATA
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
24 24 Chapter
Chapter
8 : Playback
8 : Playback
Sound file regions
Your controlling software may allow you to select a section of a sound file so that it can
effectively be handled as an independent piece of sound data. Using different channels, the
CBX-D5 can playback two overlapping sections from the same sound file simultaneously.
REGION B
SOUND FILE
REGION A
REGIONS A & B CAN BE
PLAYED SIMULTANEOUSLY
Converting
Converting
the the
Sampling
Sampling
Frequency
Frequency
& Digital
& Digital
Audio
Audio
Format
Format
in Real
in Real
Time
Time 25 25
9 Converting the Sampling Frequency & Digital
Audio Format in Real Time
When transferring digital audio data between equipment, it is sometimes necessary to
convert from one digital audio format to another, say from CD/DAT to AES/EBU, or Y2
to CD/DAT. The CBX-D5 allows you to convert the digital audio format between
CD/DAT, AES/EBU, and Y2 in real time.
Real time means that you don’t actually have to record the digital audio, you just input it
to the CBX-D5, the CBX-D5 converts it, then outputs it for record monitoring.
As well as the digital audio format, the CBX-D5 also allows you to convert from one
sampling frequency to another, say from 44.1kHz to 48kHz or vice versa. Sampling
frequency conversion is useful if you have some DAT tapes, maybe masters, recorded at
48kHz and you want to transfer them directly to a CD disc recorder that will only accept
digital audio data at 44.1kHz.
Digital input and output source, record and playback sampling frequency settings are all
made via the controlling software, so you will need to refer to your Software Manuals. The
diagram below shows the conversion possibilities.
AES/EBU
48, 44.1, 32kHz
AES/EBU
48, 44.1kHz
Y2
48, 44.1, 32kHz
Y2
48, 44.1kHz
CBX-D5
CD/DAT (SPDIF)
48, 44.1, 32kHz
NOTE:
CD/DAT (SPDIF)
48, 44.1kHz
In this configuration, SCMS and emphasis information will pass through the
CBX-D5 and will be output unchanged.
In the system shown below, 48kHz data from DAT recorder No. 1 is fed to the CBX-D5
using the CD/DAT connections. The CBX-D5 converts the sampling frequency to
44.1kHz, then outputs the data to DAT recorder No. 2 via the AES/EBU connections.
DAT
RECORDER
No.1 (48kHz)
S/PDIF OUT
CD/DAT IN
CBX-D5
(48 to 44.1kHz)
REC FREQ = 48kHz
PB FREQ = 44.1kHz
AES/EBU OUT
AES/EBU IN
DAT
RECORDER
No.2 (44.1kHz)
26 26 Chapter
Chapter
10 :10
Inputs
: Inputs
& Outputs
& Outputs
Explained
Explained
10 Inputs & Outputs Explained
ANALOG IN
A pair of female XLR 3-31 type connectors used for inputting analog audio signals. These
are balanced inputs with a nominal input level of +4dBm and a maximum input level of
+22dBm. These inputs are intended for use with balanced line level signals, i.e., from a
mixer, synthesizer, drum machine, etc. Microphones, guitars, and equipment with an
output level less than –20dBm must first be connected to a preamplifier, then to the
CBX-D5.
The illustration below shows how an XLR to XLR type cable is wired.
XLR to XLR cable
2
2
3
3
1
1
3-PIN MALE
XLR PLUG
PIN 2
PIN 2
PIN 3
PIN 3
PIN 1
PIN 1
3-PIN FEMALE
XLR LINE
SOCKET
XLR to phone jack cable
Although balanced, these inputs can be used with unbalanced signals. The diagram below
shows how a balanced XLR to unbalanced phone jack connecting cable should be wired.
2
3
1
3-PIN MALE
XLR PLUG
1/4" PHONE JACK (mono)
PIN 2
TIP
PIN 3
PIN 1
SLEEVE
ANALOG OUT
Four male XLR 3-32 type connectors used for outputting channels 1 ~ 4 as analog audio.
These are balanced outputs with a nominal output level of 0dBm and a maximum output
level of +17dBm. These could be connected to the inputs of a mixer, amplifier, tape
recorder, DAT recorder, etc.
Cable wiring is the same as the “XLR to XLR cable” shown above. Connection to
unbalanced inputs is also possible by using an XLR to phone jack cable like the one shown
above. Note, however, that a 3-pin female XLR line socket would be used, not a 3-pin male
XLR plug as shown in the illustration.
NOTE:
You may buy your XLR connecting cables or you may decide to make your
own, either way always use good quality connectors and cable.
AES/EBU
AES/EBU
IN 1/2
IN 1/2 27 27
AES/EBU IN 1/2
A female XLR 3-31 type connector for inputting AES/EBU format digital audio. This is a
balanced type connection and two channels, 1 and 2, are carried in the same connection.
This connection could be used when recording digital audio data from another hard disk
recorder, a digital mixer, DAT recorder, or digital VTR. The AES/EBU format is used
mainly on professional digital audio equipment.
Although an XLR to XLR type connecting cable is required, the recommended cable
impedance is different to that of typical audio XLR type connecting cables. You may find
that typical audio XLR type cables work successfully, but to eliminate any risk of data
corruption it is best to use a cable that is specifically made for use with the AES/EBU
format. The recommended cable impedance for AES/EBU is 110Ω.
AES/EBU OUT 1/2, 3/4
Two male XLR 3-32 type connectors for outputting AES/EBU format digital audio.
Channels 1 and 2 are output via OUT 1/2, and channels 3 and 4 through OUT 3/4. These
connections could be used to transfer digital audio data from the CBX-D5 to professional
digital audio equipment.
Here again, it is best to use a cable that is specifically made for use with the AES/EBU
format. Follow the same recommendations given above for the AES/EBU IN connection.
CD/DAT IN
A Phono/RCA jack for inputting CD/DAT format digital audio. Two channels, 1 and 2
(left, right), are carried in the same connection. This connection could be connected to the
digital output of a CD player or DAT recorder and allows digital audio recording without
multiple D/A, A/D audio data conversions. Some MIDI samplers are fitted with this type
of connection. In this case, sound samples could be transferred digitally between a sampler
and the CBX-D5. The CD/DAT format is found mainly on consumer type digital audio
equipment, although, most professional digital audio equipment supports it, too.
Phono/RCA type cables and connectors are commonly used for hi-fi equipment, however,
there are connecting cables designed specifically for use with the CD/DAT format and
wherever possible they should be used.
CD/DAT OUT
A Phono/RCA jack for outputting CD/DAT format digital audio. Two channels, 1 and 2
(left/right), are carried in the same connection. This could be connected to the digital input
of a DAT recorder or DCC recorder, and it allows digital audio recording without multiple
D/A, A/D audio data conversions.
Like the CD/DAT IN connection, it’s best to use cables specifically made for the job.
NOTE:
You might have heard or read that AES/EBU type connections can be
connected directly to CD/DAT connections and vice versa. In some cases this
may work, but it is not recommended. To ensure data integrity, connect
AES/EBU outputs to AES/EBU inputs, and CD/DAT inputs to CD/DAT
outputs.
28 28 Chapter
Chapter
10 :10
Inputs
: Inputs
& Outputs
& Outputs
Explained
Explained
Y2 IN
An 8-pin DIN socket for inputting Y2 Yamaha format digital audio. Two channels, 1 and
2 (left/right), are carried in the same connection. This could be connected to one of
Yamaha’s digital audio products including the DMR8 Digital Mixer/Recorder, DMC1000
Digital Mixing Console, DRU8 Digital Recorder, SPX1000 Effect Processor, and the
DMP series of Digital Mixers.
Special cables are available for use with this format. See your Yamaha dealer for details.
Y2 OUT
An 8-pin DIN socket for outputting Y2 Yamaha format digital audio. Two channels, 1 and
2 (left/right), are carried in the same connection. This could be used to transfer digital
audio data from the CBX-D5 to one of the Yamaha professional digital audio products
listed above.
Again, use the cables specifically recommended for use with the Y2 format.
WORD CLK IN/OUT
NOTE:
If all your audio connections are analog, no word clock connections are
required.
As we explained on page 4, when a number of digital audio devices are connected together
and data is digitally transferred between them, it is essential that the data processing
circuits of all devices are synchronized. To achieve this, one device operates as a word
clock master and all other devices operate as word clock slaves.
If you connect only two digital audio devices, say the CBX-D5 to a DAT recorder, word
clock setup is quite straight forward and no external word clock connections will be
required. This is because the AES/EBU, CD/DAT, and Y2 formats carry word clock
information within the digital audio data. However, when three or more devices are
connected in a digital system, word clock connections will be required.
NOTE:
Although we have said that a word clock connection is not required when
only two devices are used, some devices may require a BNC word clock
connection as well as the digital audio connection. Making a separate
connection using the CBX-D5’s BNC connectors may also improve data
transfer and eliminate any chance of data errors.
The CBX-D5 can operate as either word clock master, using its own internal clock, or as
a slave sourcing its word clock from one of the digital inputs or from the WORD CLK IN
connection. This setting is made via the controlling software. The CBX-D5’s word clock
output signal is always at the same frequency as the digital outputs.
NOTE:
Because the CBX-D5 can convert the sampling frequency of incoming
digital audio signals, the word clock output signal will not necessarily match
the recording sampling frequency.
WORD
WORD
CLK
CLK
IN/OUT
IN/OUT 29 29
The following table shows how the WORD CLK IN/OUT connections work with each
word clock source. Word clock connections use coaxial BNC to BNC type cables.
WORD CLOCK
SOURCE
CBX-D5 WORD CLK OUT
CBX-D5 WORD CLK IN
Outputs a word clock signal at the internal clock rate
(REC FREQ).
Outputs a word clock signal at the internal clock rate
(REC FREQ).
Outputs a word clock signal at the internal clock rate
(REC FREQ).
Outputs a word clock signal at the internal clock rate
(REC FREQ).
Outputs a word clock signal at the same rate as the
word clock at the WORD CLK IN.
AES/EBU Input
CD/DAT Input
Y2 Input
Internal Clock
WORD CLK IN
N/C
N/C
N/C
N/C
Receives the external word
clock
If, for some reason the external word clock source should become disconnected or the
CBX-D5 cannot synchronize to it, the CBX-D5 will automatically switch to internal clock.
When the digital output signal is synced to an external word clock, the exact sampling
frequency cannot be guaranteed. So the sampling frequency specified in the digital
output’s channel status bits may be different to the actual output sampling frequency.
In the following example, data from the four CBX-D5 channels are being transferred to a
digital mixer, which is also connected to a Yamaha DRU8 8-Track Digital Recorder. The
DRU8 is word clock master supplying both the CBX-D5 and the DMC1000 Digital Mixer.
In this system, the external word clock connections are essential.
WORD
CLK OUT
WORD
CLK IN
WORD CLK IN
CBX-D5
AES/EBU 1/2 OUT
AES/EBU IN
AES/EBU 3/4 OUT
AES/EBU IN
WORDCLOCK SLAVE
(WORD CLK IN)
DRU8 DIGITAL
RECORDER
DMC1000
DIGITAL MIXER
A Yamaha format connection
that can carry up to 8 digital
signals
WORDCLOCK SLAVE
(wordclock sourced from
the WORD CLK IN
connectionl)
WORDCLOCK MASTER
(Internal clock source)
In this example, audio data from two DAT recorders is being mixed via a digital mixer.
DAT No. 1 does not have any word clock connections, so the digital audio is fed to the
CBX-D5 first, then to the digital mixer. The CBX-D5 generates a word clock signal based
on the data from DAT No. 1 and feeds this signal to DAT No. 2, which syncs to the external
wordclock. The digital mixer derives its word clock from the AES/EBU inputs.
DAT No. 1
(no wordclock
connections)
AES/EBU
CBX-D5
AES/EBU
(synced to
AES/EBU input)
(synced to
AES/EBU inputs)
WORD CLOCK
DAT No. 2
(synced to external
wordclock)
DIGITAL MIXER
AES/EBU
30 30 Chapter
Chapter
11 :11
TO: TO
HOST
HOST
connection
connection
11 TO HOST connection
As well as the standard MIDI IN, OUT, and THRU connections, the CBX-D5 also has a
“TO HOST” connection. This allows direct connection to computers that do not have a
built-in or external MIDI interface.
The CBX-D5 has four interface modes for connecting to a controlling computer: MIDI,
Mac, PC-1, and PC-2. These interface modes are explained below.
MIDI
This mode is for use with a computer that has a MIDI interface. That is, a computer with
a built-in MIDI interface, such as the Atari ST, STE, and TT range of computers, an Apple
Macintosh computer with an external MIDI interface unit, or a PC-9801 or IBM PC/AT
compatible type computer fitted with a MIDI interface. Most MIDI music software can be
used with this type of connection.
The “HOST SELECT” switch should be set to MIDI.
The connecting MIDI cable should be of the type described in the “TO HOST computer
connecting cables” on page 33.
HARD
DISK
SCSI
SCSI
OTHER MIDI
DEVICES
MIDI IN
CBX-D5
MIDI OUT
MIDI THRU
MIDI IN
MIDI IN
MIDI OUT
The table below explains how the MIDI signals are handled in MIDI mode.
Connection
TO HOST
Function
RECEIVE No function.
SEND
No function.
MIDI IN
MIDI data is input and processed.
MIDI OUT
System Exclusive data is output.
MIDI THRU
Data appearing at the MIDI IN port is fed directly to the MIDI THRU port.
NOTE: Depending on the application software used, it is possible that the HOST
function on the CBX-D5 (the function that allows you to make a MIDI
connection to a host computer without a MIDI interface) may not work.
MacMac 31 31
Mac
This mode is for use with an Apple Macintosh computer that is not connected to an
external MIDI interface unit. The CBX-D5 can be connected directly to one of the Apple
Mac's serial (RS-422) ports.
1) Connect the CBX-D5’s “TO HOST” connector to one of the Apple Mac’s serial ports
using the “Mac” connecting cable shown on page 33.
2) Set the CBX-D5’s “HOST SELECT” switch to Mac.
3) Switch on the Apple Mac and the CBX-D5.
4) Start the Apple Mac music software.
Your music software will probably require you to specify the type of MIDI interface you
are using. You should specify “Standard MIDI interface”. If it has a “MIDI Time Piece
option”, turn it off. If your software also requires you to specify the data rate, select 1MHz.
HARD
DISK
MIDI
THRU ON
SCSI
SCSI
OTHER MIDI
DEVICES
MIDI IN
CBX-D5
TO HOST
MIDI OUT
SERIAL
PORT
MIDI IN
MIDI OUT
The table below explains how MIDI signals are handled in “Mac” mode. MIDI data is
carried to and from the computer via the “TO HOST” connection.
Connection
Function
Details
Synchronized. Data format: 8 bit, 1 stop
MIDI data is input, processed, then fed to
RECEIVE
bit, no parity. 1MHz clock from CBX-D5 to
the MIDI OUT port.
serial ports' HSKi data pin.
MIDI data received at the MIDI IN port is
output.
When the CBX-D5 is transmitting its Bulk
Dump data to the host computer, data
from the MIDI IN port is not sent to the host
computer. Any MIDI data received while a
Bulk Dump is in progress will be ignored.
MIDI IN
MIDI data received is output to the TO
HOST SEND.
The CBX-D5 does not respond to the MIDI
data appearing at the MIDI IN port, but to
the MIDI data from TO HOST RECEIVE.
MIDI OUT
MIDI data received at the TO HOST
RECEIVE is output.
MIDI THRU
MIDI data appearing at the MIDI IN port is
fed directly to the MIDI THRU.
TO HOST
SEND
32 32 Chapter
Chapter
11 :11
TO: TO
HOST
HOST
connection
connection
PC-1
This mode is for use with an NEC PC-9801 type computer. The PC-9801 is a very popular
computer in Japan. The specifications are the same as those for “PC-2” mode except for
the baud rate. See “CBX-D5 Specifications” on page 37.
PC-2
This mode is for use with an IBM PC/AT compatible, PS/1, or PS/2 type computer that
does not have a MIDI interface card installed. The CBX-D5 can be connected directly to
the computers serial (RS-232C) port.
The music software used must be able support the CBX-D5’s “TO HOST” connection.
Please consult your Yamaha dealer for more details. If your software does not support the
“TO HOST” connection, the CBX-D5 can still be connected to this type of computer by
installing a MIDI interface card in the computer or by using an external MIDI interface.
1) Connect the CBX-D5’s “TO HOST” connector to one of the computer’s serial ports
using the “PC-2” connecting cable shown on page 33.
2) Set the CBX-D5’s “HOST SELECT” switch to PC-2.
3) Switch on the computer and the CBX-D5.
4) Start the computer music software.
HARD
DISK
MIDI
THRU
ON
SCSI
SCSI
OTHER MIDI
DEVICES
MIDI IN
SCSI
CARD
CBX-D5
TO HOST
MIDI OUT
SERIAL
PORT
MIDI IN
MIDI OUT
The table below explains how the MIDI signals are handled in PC-2 mode. MIDI data is
carried to and from the computer via the “TO HOST” connection.
Connection
Function
Details
MIDI data is input, processed, then fed to Synchronized. Data format: 8 bit, 1 stop
RECEIVE
the MIDI OUT port.
bit, no parity.
MIDI data received at the MIDI IN port is
output.
When the CBX-D5 is transmitting its Bulk
Dump data to the host computer, data
from the MIDI IN port is not sent to the host
computer. Any MIDI data received while a
Bulk Dump is in progress will be ignored.
MIDI IN
MIDI data received is output to the TO
HOST SEND.
The CBX-D5 does not respond to the MIDI
data appearing at the MIDI IN port, but to
the MIDI data from TO HOST RECEIVE.
MIDI OUT
MIDI data received at the TO HOST
RECEIVE is output.
MIDI THRU
MIDI data appearing at the MIDI IN port is
fed directly to the MIDI THRU.
TO HOST
SEND
TO TO
HOST
HOST
computer
computer
connecting
connecting
cables
cables 33 33
TO HOST computer connecting cables
MIDI
Standard MIDI cable. Maximum length 15 meters.
DIN 5-PIN
4
4
2
2
5
5
DIN 5-PIN
(GND)
Mac
Apple Macintosh Peripheral cable “M0197”). Maximum length 2 meters.
MINI DIN
8-PIN
1
2 (HSK i)
2
1 (HSK o)
3
5 (RxD -)
4
4 (GND)
5
3 (TxD -)
6
8 RxD +)
7
7 (GP i)
8
6 (TxD +)
MINI DIN
8-PIN
PC-1
8-pin MINI DIN to D-SUB 25-pin cable. If your PC-1 type computer has a 9-pin serial
port, use the PC-2 type cable. Maximum length 1.8 meters.
MINI DIN
8-PIN
1
5 (CTS)
2
4 (RTS)
3
3 (RxD)
4
7 (GND)
D-SUB
25-PIN
8
5
2 (TxD)
PC-2
8-pin MINI DIN to D-SUB 9-pin cable. Maximum length 1.8 meters.
MINI DIN
8-PIN
1
8 (CTS)
2
7 (RTS)
3
2 (RxD)
4
5 (GND)
8
5
3 (TxD)
D-SUB
9-PIN
34 34 Chapter
Chapter
12 :12
Glossary
: Glossary
12 Glossary
A/D Converter: (Analog to Digital converter) A device
used to convert analog audio signals into PCM (Pulse Code
Modulated) digital audio. The CBX-D5 uses 16-bit linear ∆
Σ modulation A/D converters.
Access time: Measured in milliseconds, this is an
indication of how fast data from different areas of a hard disk
can be accessed.
AES/EBU: A digital interface format established by the
AES (Audio Engineering Society) and EBU (European
Broadcasting Union) that is used to transfer digital audio
data between professional digital audio equipment. Two
channels of digital audio (left & right) are carried in one
connection, usually an XLR type connection.
Audio IFF: (Audio Interchange File Format) A type of
sound file that is used by various Apple Macintosh based
digital audio devices. It is recommended by Apple
Computer, Inc.
Byte: A digital “word” containing 8 bits. A CBX-D5 digital
the SPX900 Multi-effect Processor and the DMR8 Digital
Mixer/Recorder.
Emphasis: Before A/D conversion a 6dB/octave boost
starting at 3.5kHz is applied to the audio signal. During D/A
conversion the emphasis is automatically detected by the
replay device and de-emphasis is applied.
Fragmentation: When a file is split into sections and
stored in different areas of a hard disk, i.e., in an
uncontinuous series of sectors.
Host connection: Used to connect the CBX-D5 to a
computer that does not have a MIDI interface. Connection
is made directly to one of the computer’s serial ports.
Mark of the Unicorn Digital Performer: A program
that integrates MIDI sequencing, digital audio recording and
editing and can be used to control the CBX-D5 via an Apple
Macintosh computer.
MIDI: (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) MIDI
audio word contains 16 bits.
allows electronic musical instruments to communicate with
each other.
CD/DAT: See S/PDIF.
Cubase Audio: An integrated MIDI sequencer, digital
MTC: (MIDI Timecode) The transmission of SMPTE
audio recording and editing program that can be used to
control the CBX-D5 via an Atari ST/STE or TT computer.
Nondestructive editing: As opposed to editing analog
D/A converter: (Digital to Analog converter) The opposite
of an A/D converter, this device is used to convert PCM
digital audio data into an analog audio signal. The CBX-D5
uses 18-bit 8-times oversampling D/A converters.
Delta Sigma coding (∆ Σ): A digital audio coding format
that greatly improves a digital audio system’s performance
by using a very high sampling frequency and a 1-bit
resolution.
DEQ: (Digital Equalizer) An IC (Integrated Circuit)
designed specifically for equalizing digital audio data. The
CBX-D5’s DEQ IC is made by Yamaha.
Destructive editing: Editing an original recording that
cannot be recovered if you make a bad edit. For example,
razor blade editing a tape.
Digital Performer: An integrated MIDI sequencer, digital
audio recording and editing program that can be used to
control the CBX-D5 via an Apple Macintosh computer.
DMA: (Direct Memory Access) The ability to transfer data
to and from a system’s RAM without involving the CPU.
The Atari ST/STE computer has a DMA port.
timecode via MIDI.
tape, which is a once only – get it right first time or else
procedure, hard disk recording allows nondestructive
editing. This means when you edit, you don’t actually edit
the sound file, you edit information that tells the CBX-D5
how to play the sound file. So if you make an accidental cut
or split, all is not lost because you still have the original
sound file.
Nyquist frequency: The audio frequency at which very
sharp low pass filtering is applied to an analog signal before
A/D conversion. The nyquist theorem states that the
sampling frequency of a digital audio system must be at least
twice that of the highest audio frequency, otherwise severe
distortion called aliasing will occur.
Oversampling: A technique used to improve the noise and
distortion performance of a digital audio system by
increasing the effective sampling frequency so that the
nyquist frequency is set much higher than the highest audio
frequency.
PCM: (Pulse code modulation) The type of coding used to
represent analog audio as a series of pulses. The amplitude
of each pulse is stored as a binary word. The CBX-D5 uses
16-bit binary words.
DMA to SCSI Controller II: A hardware device made
by Steinberg that allows the connection of SCSI devices to
the DMA port of an Atari ST or STE.
Region: A section of a sound file that can be handled as an
DSP: (Digital Signal Processor) An IC (Integrated Circuit)
RS-232C: A serial communication protocol used on PC
designed specifically for digital audio data processing. The
CBX-D5 uses the same Yamaha DSP IC as those used in
compatible and Atari ST/STE computers, usually a 9- or
25-pin D-SUB type connector.
independent piece of sound data, but is in fact identified
using start and end pointers to a region of a sound file
Glossary
Glossary 35 35
RS-422: A balanced serial communication protocol used on
Macintosh computers, usually an 8-pin mini DIN connector.
Sampling frequency: The number of times per second
Transfer rate: Usually measured in Megabits per second
(Mbit/s), this shows how fast data can be written to and read
from a hard disk.
that sample measurements of an analog audio signal are
taken during A/D conversion. Typical sampling frequencies
are 32kHz, 44.1kHz, and 48kHz.
Word clock: A clock signal that is used to synchronize the
SCMS: (Serial Copy Management System) A protection
code designed to stop illegal digital copying of audio
material. When a consumer type DAT recorder receives a
digital input signal that contains SCMS, it cannot enter
record mode, so digital copying is impossible.
Y2: A digital interface format developed by Yamaha that is
Serial port: A computer connection that can receive and
data processing circuits of all devices connected in a digital
audio system. See “Word clock” on page 4.
used to transfer digital audio data between Yamaha’s
professional digital audio equipment. Two channels of
digital audio (left & right) are carried in one connection,
usually an 8-pin DIN type connection. See “Y2 format” on
page 3.
transmit computer data serially (RS-232C or RS-422).
SCSI: (Small Computer Systems Interface) Pronounced
Scuzzy, it is a connection format used for connecting
peripheral devices such as hard disks, printers, scanners, etc.,
to a computer. Up to eight SCSI devices can be connected
together in a daisy chain, with the controlling computer
connected at the end of the chain. See “SCSI” on page 3.
Further reading
SCSI ID: The identifying address number allocated to each
1) “Tapeless Sound Recording”, Francis Rumsey, Focal
Press (Butterworth Group), 1990. A good introduction
to tapeless recording including its advantages over tape,
digital audio basics, digital interfaces, synchronization,
and computer storage media.
device in a SCSI daisy chain. IDs from 0 to 7 are available.
See “SCSI ID setting” on page 16.
SCSI terminator: A device connected at the end of a
SCSI daisy chain to stabilize the SCSI bus. See “SCSI
termination” on page 17.
SMPTE timecode: A bi-phase code used to synchronize
audio and video equipment by communicating hours,
minutes, seconds, and frame information.
Sound file: A type of computer file that contains digital
audio data.
Soundbite: A term used by Mark of the Unicorn’s Digital
Performer software to describe a section of a sound file that
can be handled as an independent piece of sound data, but is
in fact identified using start and end pointers to a region of a
sound file.
Sound Designer files: A type of sound file that is used by
various Apple Macintosh and Digi Design digital audio
devices. There are two types of file: I & II.
S/PDIF: (Sony/Philips Digital Interface Format) A digital
interface format established by Sony and Philips that is used
to transfer digital audio data between consumer type digital
audio equipment such as CD players, consumer DAT
recorders, and the new DCC recorders. Two channels of
digital audio (left & right) are carried in one connection,
usually a phono/RCA jack type connection. On the CBX-D5
this format is referred to as CD/DAT.
Steinberg Cubase Audio: A program that integrates
MIDI sequencing, digital audio recording, and editing and
can be used to control the CBX-D5 via an Atari ST/STE or
TT type computer.
Time slip: The ability to move individual segments of
audio data relative to time.
For those users who would like to know more about the
fascinating world of digital audio here are a few suggested
books:
2) “Principles of Digital Audio”, Ken C. Pohlmann,
Howard W.Sams & Co, 1989. Covering all aspects of
digital audio, this book is ideal for the newcomer who
wants to know the basics – plus a bit more.
3) “The Art of digital Audio”, John Watkinson, Focal Press
(Butterworth Group), 1990. An essential read for digital
audio professionals – but only for the serious!
Any books related to the following subjects may also be of
interest: digital audio, hard disk recording, compact disc,
DAT, MIDI, computer music.
36 36 Chapter
Chapter
13 :13
Recording
: Recording
setup
setup
table
table
13 Recording setup table
Recording Project
Date
Notes
Sound files
Sound File
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
Sound File name
Sound File Contents
Sampling
Frequency
Input
Source
Length
(Time)
File Size
(MB)
CBX-D5
CBX-D5
Specifications
Specifications 37 37
14 CBX-D5 Specifications
Data format
Number of channels
Sampling frequency
File format
A/D converter
16-bit PCM
4-channel system:
2-channel simultaneous record, 4-channel playback (combination
of playback and record available)
Sound File Recording
22.05kHz, 32kHz, 44.1kHz, 48kHz
Sound File Playback
11.025 ~ 48kHz
Digital in
32kHz, 44.1kHz, 48kHz
Digital out
44.1kHz, 48kHz, external word clock
For digital I/O, internal sampling frequency conversion is available
Mono, 2-channel interleave, 4-channel interleave
16-bit linear ∆ Σ modulation
D/A converter
DEQ (equalizer)
DSP (effector)
Digital mixer
Connectors
Controls
Indicators
Power requirements
Power consumption
ANALOG IN 1,2
ANALOG OUT 1,2,3,4
AES/EBU IN 1/2
AES/EBU OUT 1/2, 3/4
CD/DAT IN/ OUT 1/2
Y2 IN/OUT 1/2
WORD CLK IN/OUT
MIDI IN, OUT, THRU
TO HOST
MIDI baud rate
Mac baud rate
PC1 baud rate
PC2 baud rate
SCSI
Headphones
ANALOG IN
PHONES VOLUME
Host select
SCSI ID switch
Power switch
Record source
Record Freq
Playback Digital Out Freq
Input level
Output level
U.S. model
General model
U.S. model
General model
(W x H x D)
Dimensions
Weight
A list of supplied accessories is given on page 2.
0dB = 0.775V rms
Specifications subject to change without notice.
18-bit with 8-times oversampling digital filter
4-channels of multi-band parametric equalization
82 reverb & modulation type effects
4-input, 4-bus, 2-send, 4-return
XLR-3-31 type x2, +22dB (max)
XLR-3-32 type x4, +17dB (max)
XLR-3-31 type x1
XLR-3-32 type x2
Phono/RCA jack x2
8-pin DIN x2
BNC x2
5-pin DIN x3
8-pin mini DIN x1
31, 250 bps (bits per second)
31, 250 bps (1MHz clock)
31, 250 bps
38,400 bps
50-way Amphenol x2 (ANSI X3.131-1986)
6.35mm (1/4”) stereo phone jack x1
Independent control for channel 1 & 2
Mac, PC1, PC2, MIDI
0~7
on/off
AES/EBU, CD/DAT, Y2, ANALOG
48k, 44.1k, 32k, 22.05k (22.05k analog inputs only)
48k, 44.1k
12-segment LED level meters x 2 (channels 1 & 2)
12-segment LED level meters x 4 (channels 1,2,3,4)
120V AC, 60Hz
220-240V AC 50Hz
35W
35W
310 x 113.6 x 378.2 mm (12.2˝ x 4.5˝ x 14.9˝)
7.5 kg (16.5 lbs)
38
38
Index Index
Index
A
Access time, hard disk 14
AES/EBU format
1/2 inputs 27
1/2, 3/4 outputs 27
what is it? 3
Amphenol, SCSI connection 12
Analog input level 21
Analog inputs 26
Analog outputs 26
Apple Macintosh
hard disks 15
To Host 31
Atari ST/STE
hard disks 15
Atari TT
hard disks 15
Audio IFF sound files 23
H
Hard disks
access time 14
Apple Macintosh 15
Atari ST/STE 15
Atari TT 15
choosing 14
connecting 13
data transfer rate 14
formatting 18
fragmentation 19
partitioning 19
PC/AT 15
SCSI 14
SCSI ID setting 16
SCSI termination 17
size 13
what type? 13
working with 18
Headphone monitoring 21
I
ID setting 16
termination 17
what is it? 3
Setup table 36
Sound Designer sound files 23
Sound files
backup 18
compatibility 23
fragmentation 19
interleave 23
managing 18
regions 24
what are they? 3
Specifications 37
System example 7
T
Termination, SCSI 17
Terminology 3
To Host
connecting cables 33
Mac 31
MIDI 30
PC-1 (PC-9801) 32
PC-2 (PC/AT) 32
what is it? 4
Trademarks 2
Transfer rate, hard disk 14
Backing up sound files 18
Block diagram 6
ID, SCSI setting 16
Input level meters 21
Installation 2
Introduction 1
C
M
CBX-D5
what is it? 5
CD/DAT format
input 27
output 27
CD/DAT format, what is it? 3
Cleaning 2
Controls & Connections 8
Converting
digital audio format 25
sampling frequency 25
MIDI
IN, OUT, THRU 12
To Host 30
U
O
V
Output level meters 23
Varispeed 20
P
W
Partitioning hard disks 19
PB FREQ 23
PC/AT
hard disks 15
Playback 23
Warnings 2
Welcome 1
Word clock
input and output 28
setup examples 28
R
X
Rear panel, an explanation 10
REC FREQ
choosing 20
what is it? 4
Recording 20
XLR to phone jack cable 26
XLR to XLR input cable 26
B
D
Daisy chain, see SCSI
Digital input level 21
Disk, see Hard disks
E
Emphasis 22
F
Features 1
Formatting hard disks 18
Fragmentation, sound files 19
Front panel, an explanation 8
Further reading 35
G
Glossary 34
S
Safety information 2
Sampling frequency
choosing 20
converting 25
what is it? 4
SCMS 22
SCSI
cables 15
hard disks 14
Unpacking 2
Y
Y2 format
input 28
output 28
Y2 format, what is it? 3
Add-11
Appendix
Preset Effects
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
Effect Name
Orchestra Hall
Concert Hall
Warm Hall
Vocal Hall
Vocal Large Hall
Vocal Small Hall
Large Room
Bright Small Room
Backing Vocal Tight Room
Smooth Room
Small Vocal Room
Slap Room
Vocal Stage
Vocal Club
Female Vocal Club
Sax Stage
Vocal Plate
Percussion Plate
Big Plate
Distant Plate
Stone Room
Cathedral
Dark Church
Tunnel
Cavern
Soft Caynon
Alhambra Guitar
Small Cellar
Drum Room
Bathroom Vocals
Early Ref Vocal
Early Ref Special Effect
Early Ref Hall
Early Ref Slap Plate
Early Ref Spring Vocal
Early Ref Reverse Vocal
Gate Reverb
Reverse Gate
Delay L,R
Vocal Multi Delay
Stereo Echo
Subtle Pitch Change
Wide Guitar
Multi Pitch Delay
Aural Exciter
Rotary Speaker
Ring Modulator
Category
S:Rev Hall
S:Rev Room
S:Rev Stage
S:Rev Plate
S:Rev White Room
S:Rev Tunnel
S:Rev Canyon
S:Rev Basement
S:Early Ref.
S:Gate Reverb
S:Reverse Gate
S:Delay L,R
S:Delay L,C,R
S:Stereo Echo
S:Pitch Change
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
Effect Name
Stadium
Delay L,R->Rev
Flange->Rev
Gtr Cho Reverb
Sympho->Rev
Phaser->Rev
Aural Exc->Rev
Dist->Rev
Dist->Dly L,R
Dist->Echo
High Cut Reverb
EQ Mid Reverb
Sparkling Reverb
Mid Delay
Deep Echo
EQ->Flange
Bass Chorus
Elec Guitar EQ/Sympho
Warm Phase
St.Flange->Dly LR
St.Chorus->Dly LR
Symph->Dly LR
St.Phasing->Dly LR
Hall & Plate
Echo & Rev
Delay & Rev
Flange & Chorus
Flange & Sympho
Sympho & Chorus
Flange & Rev
Chorus & Rev
Sympho & Rev
Flange & Dly LR
Chorus & Dly LR
Sympho & Dly LR
Category
C:Echo->Rev
C:Delay L,R->Rev
C:Flange->Rev
C:Chorus->Rev
C:Sympho->Rev
C:Phaser->Rev
C:Aural Exc->Rev
C:Dist->Rev
C:Dist->Dly L,R
C:Dist->Echo
C:EQ->Rev
C:EQ->Dly L,R
C:EQ->Echo
C:EQ->Flange
C:EQ->Chorus
C:EQ->Symphonic
C:EQ->Phaser
C:St.Flange->Dly LR
C:St.Chorus->Dly LR
C:Symph->Dly LR
C:St.Phasing->Dly LR
D:Hall & Plate
D:Echo & Rev
D:Delay & Rev
D:Flange & Chorus
D:Flange & Sympho
D:Sympho & Chorus
D:Flange & Rev
D:Chorus & Rev
D:Sympho & Rev
D:Flange & Dly LR
D:Chorus & Dly LR
D:Sympho & Dly LR
The letter at the beginning of the "Category"
indicates the Effect Mode.
S:Single
C:Cascade
D:Dual
S:Aural Exciter
S:Rotary Speaker
S:Ring Modulator
* Aural Exciter is a registered trademark and manufactured
under license from Aphex Systems Ltd.
Add-2
2
Chapter :
DSP/DEQ/DMIX Block Diagram
Add-33
Preset effects parameter values
No.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
Effect Name
1
Orchestra Hall
19
Concert Hall
23
Warm Hall
17
Vocal Hall
21
Vocal Large Hall
34
Vocal Small Hall
19
Large Room
11
Bright Small Room
9
Backing Vocal Tight Room
9
Smooth Room
5
Small Vocal Room
9
Slap Room
3
Vocal Stage
13
Vocal Club
15
Female Vocal Club
13
Sax Stage
13
Vocal Plate
15
Percussion Plate
11
Big Plate
33
Distant Plate
17
Stone Room
9
Cathedral
33
Dark Church
19
Tunnel
31
Cavern
25
Soft Caynon
24
Alhambra Guitar
21
Small Cellar
9
Drum Room
17
Bathroom Vocals
5
Early Ref Vocal
2
Early Ref Special Effect
3
Early Ref Hall
1
Early Ref Slap Plate
4
Early Ref Spring Vocal
5
Early Ref Reverse Vocal
3
Gate Reverb
0
Reverse Gate
1
Delay L,R
9999
Vocal Multi Delay
8999
Stereo Echo
4998
Subtle Pitch Change
24
Wide Guitar
24
Multi Pitch Delay
24
0
Aural Exciter
Rotary Speaker
74
Ring Modulator
20
Stadium
3199
Delay L,R->Rev
474
Flange->Rev
13
Gtr Cho Reverb
16
Sympho->Rev
13
2
8
8
1
1
4
2
6
7
5
2
3
3
5
3
3
6
5
7
3
3
5
7
3
4
5
4
8
3
4
8
14
159
27
15
15
27
21
21
9999
13499
4998
108
111
92
80
48
28
119
6399
90
56
45
3
10
10
10
10
8
7
9
6
8
6
5
8
10
9
8
8
10
5
7
10
4
10
10
2
10
10
10
5
9
3
10
10
8
10
6
10
5
10
4
319
639
149
99
239
119
159
199
319
319
159
332
479
319
319
79
479
639
101
99
99
639
299
299
639
1109
79
79
79
79
10
10
8
10
8
10
10
10
9999
4499 6749
124 4999
179
108
299
99
359
24
75
579
40
49
100
96
1599 119
107
9
11
75
40
13
Parameter Number
5
6
7
8
9
199
4
60
8
6
479
4
75
8
6
299
4
80
9
3
239
3
75
8
7
319
2
55
8
6
239
4
64
8
6
999
4
52
6
7
249
4
64
6
9
499
4
86
8
8
239
4
72
7
6
249
4
60
8
8
399
3
40
9
4
319
4
72
10
6
179
4
40
9
6
199
4
70
10
5
0
4
65
8
6
199
4
72
8
8
319
4
64
6
9
304
4
33
8
4
913
4
25
8
9
29
15
11
30
7
98
99
93
4
0
84
58
73
20
0
68
9
103
4
0
40
60
66
10
0
74
55
41
20
21
72
79
103
4
0
22
18
38
26
0
18
29
38
28
3
32
15
31
6
6
379
9
2499 111
0
639
18
7999 100
0
199
1
459
108
0
299
6
2399 105
7
239
13
239
123
0
1999
18
3999 119
0
49
12
199
99
0
399
18
3999 109
0
9999 109
4
3
0
8999 124
8
8
0
4999 124
9
9
0
100
24
88
319
100
24
89
399
100
106 3999
24
112 7999
1
5
43
11
17
20
8
8
1
8
7
2
6
10
20
20
17
20
18
18
24
24
22
20
17
18
22
16
22
24
22
23
16
25
20
20
17
22
24
10
23
22
24
22
13
23
22
23
22
23
16
24
22
24
24
100
7
45
78
399
148
499
70
75
20
15
20
0
0
0
0
0
15
22
24
15
22
11
0
0
0
6
0
6
0
12
0
0
0
19
7
0
10
0
0
13
0
0
99
299
199
299
399
399
499
199
199
99
12
13
14
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
60
30
40
10
70
70
70
70
70
70
0
2
0
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
Add-4
4
No.
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
Chapter :
Effect Name
Phaser->Rev
Aural Exc->Rev
Dist->Rev
Dist->Dly L,R
Dist->Echo
High Cut Reverb
EQ Mid Reverb
Sparkling Reverb
Mid Delay
Deep Echo
EQ->Flange
Bass Chorus
Elec Guitar EQ/Sympho
Warm Phase
St.Flange->Dly LR
St.Chorus->Dly LR
Symph->Dly LR
St.Phasing->Dly LR
Hall & Plate
Echo & Rev
Delay & Rev
Flange & Chorus
Flange & Sympho
Sympho & Chorus
Flange & Rev
Chorus & Rev
Sympho & Rev
Flange & Dly LR
Chorus & Dly LR
Sympho & Dly LR
1
2
24
100
1
62
66
6
75
3
80
3
9
8
15
9
11
4
14
8
10
12
11
8
10
9
7
8
11
9
8
86
17
70
15
80
11
100
29
2
3199 2999
4799 4949
6
68
16
45
19
75
7
70
27
80
32
70
15
50
29
60
29
80
3
32
72
9
0
11
9
8
14
5
6
7
8
10
8
11
60
45
7
74
79
18
40
4
9
7
9
8
4
8
7
8
6
5
6
10
3
80
663
19
30
80
85
13
55
90
27
50
80
Parameter Number
6
7
8
9
3
239
24
0
10
219
20
24
1
359
40
0
3008 129
40
0
3199
84
50
0
3
35
796
40
12
6
265
70
9
14
421
26
11
2806 5628 100
6
4799 4999
67
7
11
35
72
7
28
50
30
9
14
69
9
28
100
45
4299 4149 4299 123
4299 4149 4299 126
4299 4299 4149 122
2081 7999 3988 119
9
7
8
897
10
299
78
3
7
599
40
24
18
75
45
19
75
18
75
45
15
3
7
249
6
30
2
6
449
0
10
2
10
726
22
3749 1559 3530 7079 133
4149 4299 4149 4299 113
2499 3749 4999 5099 133
5
9
0
9
9030
2999
11
8
13
9
7
7
8
3
8
4149
4149
3405
3718
15
2
6
10
18
15
19
21
20
40
40
35
40
29
100
100
100
100
100
40
40
40
17
15
15
11
12
13
3
3
3
10
10
8
4
6
9
14
16
20
25
24
24
25
* Aural Exciter is a registered trademark and manufactured
under license from Aphex Systems Ltd.
Add-55
Data-Value Assign Table
Table
1 Rev Time
Data
Value (sec)
Table
Data
Value (sec)
2 LPF
Data
Table
Value (KHz)
3 HPF1
Data
Value (Hz)
0
0.3
40
4.3
0
1.0
0
Thru
1
0.4
41
4.4
1
1.1
1
32
2
0.5
42
4.5
2
1.2
2
35
3
0.6
43
4.6
3
1.4
3
40
4
0.7
44
4.7
4
1.6
4
45
5
0.8
45
4.8
5
1.8
5
50
6
0.9
46
4.9
6
2.0
6
56
7
1.0
47
5.0
7
2.2
7
63
8
1.1
48
5.5
8
2.5
8
70
9
1.2
49
6.0
9
2.8
9
80
10
1.3
50
6.5
10
3.2
10
90
11
1.4
51
7.0
11
3.6
11
100
12
1.5
52
7.5
12
4.0
12
110
13
1.6
53
8.0
13
4.5
13
125
14
1.7
54
8.5
14
5.0
14
140
15
1.8
55
9.0
15
5.6
15
160
16
1.9
56
9.5
16
6.3
16
180
17
2.0
57
10.0
17
7.0
17
200
18
2.1
58
11.0
18
8.0
18
220
19
2.2
59
12.0
19
9.0
19
250
20
2.3
60
13.0
20
10.0
20
280
21
2.4
61
14.0
21
11.0
21
315
22
2.5
62
15.0
22
12.0
22
355
23
2.6
63
16.0
23
14.0
23
400
24
2.7
64
17.0
24
16.0
24
450
25
2.8
65
18.0
25
Thru
25
500
26
2.9
66
19.0
26
560
27
3.0
67
20.0
27
630
28
3.1
68
25.0
28
700
29
3.2
69
30.0
29
800
30
3.3
30
900
31
3.4
31
1000
32
3.5
33
3.6
34
3.7
35
3.8
36
3.9
37
4.0
38
4.1
39
4.2
Add-6
6
Chapter :
Data-Value Assign Table
Table
4 HPF2
Data
Value (Hz)
Table
5 Low Shelving
Data
Value (Hz)
Table
6 Mid Presence
Data
Value (Hz)
Table
7 High Shelving
Data
Value (Hz)
0
500
0
32
0
315
0
500
1
630
1
40
1
400
1
630
2
800
2
50
2
500
2
800
3
1000
3
63
3
630
3
1000
4
1200
4
80
4
800
4
1200
5
1600
5
100
5
900
5
1600
6
2000
6
125
6
1000
6
2000
7
2500
7
160
7
1200
7
2500
8
3200
8
200
8
1600
8
3200
9
4000
9
250
9
2000
9
4000
10
5000
10
315
10
2500
10
5000
11
6300
11
400
11
3200
11
6300
12
8000
12
500
12
4000
12
8000
13
10000
13
630
13
5000
13
10000
14
12000
14
800
14
6300
14
12000
15
16000
15
16000
15
1000
16
1200
17
1600
18
2000
Add-77
Data-Value Assign Table
Table
8 Length
Data
Table
Value (m)
Data
Value (m)
Data
Value (m)
0
0.5
40
11.2
80
22.7
0
1
0.8
41
11.5
81
23.0
1
2
1.0
42
11.8
82
23.3
3
1.3
43
12.1
83
4
1.5
44
12.3
5
1.8
45
12.6
6
2.0
46
7
2.3
8
9
9 Trans Time
Data
Data
Value (ms)
2
40
3100
3
41
3600
2
4
42
4400
23.6
3
5
43
5400
84
23.9
4
6
44
6200
85
24.2
5
7
45
7200
12.9
86
24.5
6
8
46
8700
47
13.1
87
24.9
7
11
47
11000
2.6
48
13.4
88
25.2
8
12
48
12500
2.8
49
13.7
89
25.5
9
14
49
14500
10
3.1
50
14.0
90
25.8
10
17
50
17500
11
3.6
51
14.2
91
26.1
11
21
51
22000
12
3.9
52
14.5
92
26.5
12
24
13
4.1
53
14.8
93
26.8
13
28
14
4.4
54
15.1
94
27.1
14
34
15
4.6
55
15.4
95
27.5
15
43
16
4.9
56
15.6
96
27.8
16
49
17
5.2
57
15.9
97
28.1
17
57
18
5.4
58
16.2
98
28.5
18
68
19
5.7
59
16.5
99
28.8
19
85
20
5.9
60
16.8
100
29.2
20
97
21
6.2
61
17.1
101
29.5
21
114
22
6.5
62
17.3
102
29.9
22
137
23
6.7
63
17.6
103
30.2
23
170
24
7.0
64
17.9
24
195
25
7.2
65
18.2
25
230
26
7.5
66
18.5
26
280
27
7.8
67
18.8
27
340
28
8.0
68
19.1
28
390
29
8.3
69
19.4
29
450
30
8.6
70
19.7
30
550
31
8.8
71
20.0
31
680
32
9.1
72
20.2
32
780
33
9.4
73
20.5
33
910
34
9.6
74
20.8
34
1100
35
9.9
75
21.1
35
1400
36
10.2
76
21.4
36
1600
37
10.4
77
21.7
37
1800
38
10.7
78
22.0
38
2200
39
11.0
79
22.4
39
2700
Value (ms)
Add-8
8
Chapter :
Effect parameters
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
0:Orchestra Hall ~ 19:Distant Plate
(Reverb Type)
Parameter Name
Reverb Time
High
Diffusion
Initial Delay
Reverb Delay
Density
ER/Rev Balance
Low Gain
High Gain
LPF
HPF
Unit
sec
ms
ms
%
dB
dB
KHz
Hz
Minimum
0.3
0.1
0
0.1
0.1
0
0
-12
-12
1
Thru
Maximum
30.0
1.0
10
200.0
200.0
4
100
12
12
Thru
1000
Step/Table
Table #1
0.1
1
0.1
0.1
1
1
2
2
Table #2
Table #3
Max.Int.
69
9
10
1999
1999
4
100
12
12
25
31
Type 20:Stone Room ~ 29:Bathroom Vocal
(Room Simulation Type)
No.
Parameter Name
Unit
Minimum
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Reverb Time
High
Diffusion
Initial Delay
Width
Height
Depth
Wall Vary
HPF
LPF
Reverb Delay
Density
ER/Rev Balance
Listening Position
sec
ms
m
m
m
Hz
KHz
ms
%
-
0.3
0.1
0
0.1
0.5
0.5
0.5
0
Thru
1
0.1
0
0
Front
Maximum Step/Table
30.0
1.0
10
200.0
30.2
30.2
30.2
30
1000
Thru
200.0
4
100
Rear
Table #1
0.1
1
0.1
Table #8
Table #8
Table #8
1
Table #3
Table #2
0.1
1
1
LocalTab 1
Max.Int.
69
9
10
1999
103
103
103
30
31
25
1999
4
100
2
Local
Table 1
Data
Value
0
1
2
Front
Center
Rear
Add-99
Type
No.
30:Early Ref Vocal ~ 35:Early Ref Reverse Vocal
(Early Reflection Type)
Parameter Name
Unit
1
Type
sec
S-Hall
Spring
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Room Size
Liveness
Diffusion
Initial Delay
ER Number
Feedback Delay
Feedback Gain
HPF
LPF
ms
ms
%
Hz
KHz
0.1
0
0
0.1
1
0.1
-99
Thru
1
20.0
10
10
400.0
19
800.0
99
1000
Thru
Type
No.
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
Unit
1
Type
sec
Type-A
Type-B
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Room Size
Liveness
Diffusion
Initial Delay
ER Number
Feedback Delay
Feedback Gain
HPF
LPF
ms
ms
%
Hz
KHz
0.1
0
0
0.1
1
0.1
-99
Thru
1
20.0
10
10
400.0
19
800.0
99
1000
Thru
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
5
199
10
10
3999
18
7999
198
31
25
Local
Table 1
Data
Value
0
1
2
3
4
5
S-Hall
L-Hall
Random
Reverse
Plate
Spring
Local
Table 1
Data
Value
0
1
Type-A
Type-B
36:Gate Reverb ~ 37:Reverse Gate
Parameter Name
Type
LocalTab
1
0.1
1
1
0.1
1
0.1
1
Table #3
Table #2
Max.Int.
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
LocalTab
1
0.1
1
1
0.1
1
0.1
1
Table #3
Table #2
Max.Int.
1
199
10
10
3999
18
7999
198
31
25
38:Delay L,R
Parameter Name
Lch Delay Time
Rch Delay Time
Unit
ms
ms
FB1 Delay Time
FB2 Delay Time
FB Gain
FB1 High Control
FB2 High Control
HPF
LPF
ms
ms
%
Hz
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.1
1360.0
0.1
0.1
1360.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
-99
0.1
0.1
Thru
1
1360.0
1360.0
99
1.0
1.0
1000
Thru
0.1
0.1
1
0.1
0.1
Table #3
Table #2
Max.Int.
13599
13599
13599
13599
198
9
9
31
25
Add-10
10
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Chapter :
39:Vocal Multi Delay
(Delay L,C,R)
Parameter Name
Lch Delay Time
Rch Delay Time
Center Delay Time
FB1 Delay Time
FB2 Delay Time
FB Gain
FB1 High Control
FB2 High Control
HPF
LPF
Unit
ms
ms
ms
ms
ms
%
Hz
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.1
1360.0
0.1
0.1
1360.0
0.1
0.1
1360.0
0.1
0.1
1360.0
0.1
0.1
1360.0
0.1
-99
99
1
0.1
1.0
0.1
0.1
1.0
0.1
Thru
1000
Table #3
1
Thru
Table #2
Max.Int.
13599
13599
13599
13599
13599
198
9
9
31
25
Unit
ms
ms
%
ms
ms
%
Hz
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.1
680.0
0.1
0.1
680.0
0.1
-99
99
1
0.1
680.0
0.1
0.1
680.0
0.1
-99
99
1
0.1
1.0
0.1
0.1
1.0
0.1
Thru
1000
Table #3
1
Thru
Table #2
Max.Int.
6799
6799
198
6799
6799
198
9
9
31
25
Unit
cent
ms
%
%
cent
ms
%
%
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
-24
24
1
-100
100
1
0.1
650.0
0.1
-99
99
1
0
100
1
-24
24
1
-100
100.0
1
0.1
650.0
0.1
-99
99
1
0
100
1
Max.Int.
48
200
6499
198
100
48
200
6499
198
100
40:Stereo Echo
Parameter Name
Lch Init Delay Time
Lch FB Delay Time
Lch FB Gain
Rch Init Delay Time
Rch FB Delay Time
Rch FB Gain
Lch FB High Control
Rch FB High Control
HPF
LPF
41:Subtle Pitch Change
(Pitch Change 1)
Parameter Name
1 Pitch
1 Fine
1 Delay
1 FB Gain
1 Level
2 Pitch
2 Fine
2 Delay
2 FB Gain
2 Level
Add-11
11
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
42:Wide Guitar
(Pitch Change2)
Unit
cent
ms
%
cent
ms
%
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
-24
24
1
-100
100
1
0.1
650.0
0.1
-99
99
1
-24
24
1
-100
100.0
1
0.1
650.0
0.1
-99
99
1
Max.Int.
48
200
6499
198
48
200
6499
198
Unit
cent
ms
cent
ms
cent
ms
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
-24
24
1
-100
100
1
0.1
1300.0
0.1
-24
24
1
-100
100
1
0.1
1300.0
0.1
-24
24.0
1
-100
100
1
0.1
1300.0
0.1
Max.Int.
48
200
12999
48
200
12999
48
200
12999
No.
Parameter Name
Unit
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
1
HPF
Hz
500
16000
Table #4
2
Enhance
%
0
100
1
3
Mix Level
%
0
100
1
4
Delay Time
ms
0.1
650.0
0.1
5
6
7
8
9
10
* Aural Exciter® is a registered trademark and is manufactured under
license from APHEX Systems Ltd.
Max.Int.
15
100
100
6499
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Type
Parameter Name
L Pitch
L Fine
L Delay
L FB Gain
R Pitch
R Fine
R Delay
R FB Gain
43:Multi Pitch Delay
(Pitch Change3)
Parameter Name
1 Pitch
1 Fine
1 Delay
2 Pitch
2 Fine
2 Delay
3 Pitch
3 Fine
3 Delay
44:Aural Exciter® *
Add-12
12
Chapter :
Type
45:Rotary Speaker
No.
Parameter Name
Unit
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Middle Speed
Depth
Transition Time
L/M/H Speed Diff
Switch L/M/H
Low Gain
High Gain
Hz
%
ms
Hz
dB
dB
Type
46:Ring Modulator
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Parameter Name
Wave PM Depth
Wave PM Freq
Wave AM Depth
Wave AM Freq
Low Gain
High Gain
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
0
2
0.05
Low
-12
-12
40.00
100
22000
5.80
High
12
12
0.05
1
Table #9
0.05
LocalTab1
2
2
Max.Int.
799
100
51
115
2
12
12
Unit
%
Hz
%
Hz
dB
dB
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0
100
1
0.05
40
0.05
0
100
1
0.05
40
0.05
-12
12
2
-12
12
2
Max.Int.
100
799
100
799
12
12
Unit
ms
%
ms
%
sec
%
%
Hz
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.1
320.0
0.1
-99
99.0
1
0.1
320
0.1
-99
99.0
1
0.3
30.0
Table #1
0.1
1
0.1
0
100
1
0
100
1
Thru
1000
Table #3
1
Thru
Table #2
Max.Int.
3199
198
3199
198
69
9
100
100
31
25
47:Stadium
(Echo->Reverb)
Parameter Name
Echo Lch Delay
Echo Lch FB Gain
Echo Rch Delay
Echo Rch FB Gain
Reverb Time
Reverb High
ER/Rev Balance
Rev Mix Level
HPF
LPF
Local
Table1
Data
Value
0
1
2
Low
Middle
High
Add-13
13
Type
48: Delay L,R -> Rev
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Parameter Name
Dly Lch Delay
Dly Rch Delay
Dly Lch FB Gain
Dly Rch FB Gain
Reverb Time
Reverb High
ER/Rev Balance
Rev Mix Level
HPF
LPF
Type
49: Flange -> Rev
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Unit
ms
ms
%
%
sec
%
%
Hz
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.1
640.0
0.1
0.1
640.0
0.1
-99
99
1
-99
99
1
0.3
30.0
Table #1
0.1
1
0.1
0
100
1
0
100
1
Thru
1000
Table #3
1
Thru
Table #2
Max.Int.
6399
6399
198
198
69
9
100
100
31
25
Unit
Hz
%
%
%
sec
ms
%
Hz
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.00
0.05
0
100
1
0.1
100.0
0.1
0
99
1
0.3
30.0
Table #1
0.1
1
0.1
0.1
200
0.1
0
100
1
Thru
1000
Table #3
1
Thru
Table #2
Max.Int.
799
100
999
99
69
9
1999
100
31
25
Parameter Name
Chorus Mod Freq
Chorus PM Depth
Chorus AM Depth
Unit
Hz
%
%
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.00
0.05
0
100
1
0
100.0
1
Max.Int.
799
100
100
Reverb Time
Reverb High
Rev Initial Delay
Rev Mix Level
HPF
LPF
sec
ms
%
Hz
KHz
Parameter Name
Modulation Freq
Modulation Depth
Modulation Delay
Modulation FB Gain
Reverb Time
Reverb High
Rev Initial Delay
Rev Mix Level
HPF
LPF
50: Guitar Chorus Reverb
(Chorus->Rev)
0.3
0.1
0.1
0
Thru
1
30.0
1
200
100
1000
Thru
Table #1
0.1
0.1
1
Table #3
Table #2
69
9
1999
100
31
25
Add-14
14
Chapter :
Type
51: Sympho -> Rev
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Parameter Name
Modulation Freq
Modulation Depth
Unit
Hz
%
Reverb Time
Reverb High
Rev Initial Delay
Rev Mix Level
HPF
LPF
sec
ms
%
Hz
KHz
Type
52: Phaser -> Rev
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Parameter Name
Modulation Freq
Modulation Depth
Modulation Delay
Unit
Hz
%
%
Reverb Time
Reverb High
Rev Initial Delay
Rev Mix Level
HPF
LPF
sec
ms
%
Hz
KHz
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.00
0.05
0
100
1
0.3
0.1
0.1
0
Thru
1
30.0
1
200
100
1000
Thru
Table #1
0.1
0.1
1
Table #3
Table #2
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.00
0.05
0
100
1
0.1
5.0
0.1
0.3
0.1
0.1
0
Thru
1
30.0
1
200
100
1000
Thru
Table #1
0.1
0.1
1
Table #3
Table #2
Max.Int.
799
100
69
9
1999
100
31
25
Max.Int.
799
100
49
69
9
1999
100
31
25
53:Aural Exciter*->Rev
Parameter Name
HPF
Enhance
Mix Level
Reverb Time
High
Diffusion
Initial Delay
Rev Mix Level
HPF
LPF
Unit
Hz
%
%
sec
ms
%
Hz
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
500
16000
Table #4
0
100
1
0
100
1
0.3
30.0
Table #1
0.1
1.0
0.1
0
10
1
0.1
200.0
0.1
0
100
1
Thru
1000
Table #3
1
Thru
Table #2
* Aural Exciter® is a registered trademark and is manufactured under
license from APHEX Systems Ltd.
Max.Int.
15
100
100
69
9
10
1999
100
31
25
Add-15
15
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
54: Distortion -> Rev
Parameter Name
Distortion Level
Middle Freq
Middle Gain
Treble Gain
Reverb Time
Reverb High
Rev Initial Delay
Rev Mix Level
HPF
LPF
Unit
%
Hz
dB
dB
sec
ms
%
Hz
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0
100
1
315
6300
Table #6
-12
12
2
-12
12
2
0.3
30.0
Table #1
0.1
1.0
0.1
0.1
200
0.1
0
100
1
Thru
1000
Table #3
1
Thru
Table #2
Max.Int.
100
14
12
12
69
9
1999
100
31
25
Unit
%
Hz
dB
dB
ms
ms
%
%
Hz
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0
100
1
315
6300
Table #6
-12
12
2
-12
12
2
0.1
1360.0
0.1
0.1
1360.0
0.1
-99
99
1
0
100
1
Thru
1000
Table #3
1
Thru
Table #2
Max.Int.
100
14
12
12
13599
13599
198
100
31
25
Unit
%
Hz
dB
dB
ms
ms
%
%
Hz
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0
100
1
315
6300
Table #6
-12
12
2
-12
12
2
0.1
680.0
0.1
0.1
680.0
0.1
-99
99
1
0
100
1
Thru
1000
Table #3
1
Thru
Table #2
Max.Int.
100
14
12
12
6799
6799
198
100
31
25
55: Distortion->Delay L,R
Parameter Name
Distortion Level
Middle Freq
Middle Gain
Treble Gain
Dly Lch Delay
Dly Rch Delay
Dly FB Gain
Delay Mix Level
HPF
LPF
56: Distortion->Echo
Parameter Name
Distortion Level
Middle Freq
Middle Gain
Treble Gain
Echo Lch Delay
Echo Rch Delay
Echo FB Gain
Echo Mix Level
HPF
LPF
Add-16
16
Type
Chapter :
57: HighCut Reverb ~ 59: Sparkling Reverb
(EQ->Rev)
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Parameter Name
Low Freq
Low Gain
Mid Freq
Mid Gain
High Freq
High Gain
Reverb Time
Initial Delay
ER/Rev Balance
Rev Mix Level
Density
Diffusion
High
Type
60: Mid Delay
(EQ->Delay L,R)
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Parameter Name
Low Freq
Low Gain
Mid Freq
Mid Gain
High Freq
High Gain
Dly Lch Delay
Dly Rch Delay
Dly FB Gain
Delay Mix Level
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Unit
Hz
dB
Hz
dB
Hz
dB
sec
ms
%
%
-
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
32
2000
Table #5
-12
12
2
315
6300
Table #6
-12
12
2
500
16000
Table #7
-12
12
2
0.3
30
Table #1
0.1
200.0
0.1
0
100
1
0
100
1
0
3
1
0
10
1
0.1
1.0
0.1
Max.Int.
18
12
14
12
15
12
69
1999
100
100
3
10
9
Unit
Hz
dB
Hz
dB
Hz
dB
ms
ms
%
%
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
32
2000
Table #5
-12
12
2
315
6300
Table #6
-12
12
2
500
16000
Table #7
-12
12
2
0.1
1360.0
0.1
0.1
1360.0
0.1
-99
99
1
0
100
1
Max.Int.
18
12
14
12
15
12
13599
13599
198
100
Unit
Hz
dB
Hz
dB
Hz
dB
ms
ms
%
%
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
32
2000
Table #5
-12
12
2
315
6300
Table #6
-12
12
2
500
16000
Table #7
-12
12
2
0.1
680.0
0.1
0.1
680.0
0.1
-99
99
1
0
100
1
Max.Int.
18
12
14
12
15
12
6799
6799
198
100
61: Deep Echo
(EQ->Echo)
Parameter Name
Low Freq
Low Gain
Mid Freq
Mid Gain
High Freq
High Gain
Echo Lch Delay
Echo Rch Delay
Echo FB Gain
Echo Mix Level
Add-17
17
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
62: EQ->Flange
Parameter Name
Low Freq
Low Gain
Mid Freq
Mid Gain
High Freq
High Gain
Modulation Freq
Modulation Depth
Modulation FB Gain
Flange Mix Level
Unit
Hz
dB
Hz
dB
Hz
dB
Hz
%
%
%
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
32
2000
Table #5
-12
12
2
315
6300
Table #6
-12
12
2
500
16000
Table #7
-12
12
2
0.05
40.0
0.05
0
100
1
0
99
1
0
100
1
Max.Int.
18
12
14
12
15
12
799
100
99
100
Unit
Hz
dB
Hz
dB
Hz
dB
Hz
%
%
%
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
32
2000
Table #5
-12
12
2
315
6300
Table #6
-12
12
2
500
16000
Table #7
-12
12
2
0.05
40.0
0.05
0
100
1
0
100
1
0
100
1
Max.Int.
18
12
14
12
15
12
799
100
100
100
Parameter Name
Low Freq
Low Gain
Mid Freq
Mid Gain
High Freq
High Gain
Modulation Freq
Modulation Depth
Unit
Hz
dB
Hz
dB
Hz
dB
Hz
%
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
32
2000
Table #5
-12
12
2
315
6300
Table #6
-12
12
2
500
16000
Table #7
-12
12
2
0.05
40.0
0.05
0
100
1
Max.Int.
18
12
14
12
15
12
799
100
Sympho Mix Level
%
63: Bass Chorus
(EQ->Chorus)
Parameter Name
Low Freq
Low Gain
Mid Freq
Mid Gain
High Freq
High Gain
Chorus Mod Freq
Chorus PM Depth
Chorus AM Depth
Chorus Mix Level
64: Elec Guitar EQ/Sympho
(EQ->Sympho)
0
100
1
100
Add-18
18
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Chapter :
65: Warm Phase
(EQ->Phaser)
Parameter Name
Low Freq
Low Gain
Mid Freq
Mid Gain
High Freq
High Gain
Modulation Freq
Modulation Depth
Modulation Delay
Phaser Mix Level
Unit
Hz
dB
Hz
dB
Hz
dB
Hz
%
ms
%
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
32
2000
Table #5
-12
12
2
315
6300
Table #6
-12
12
2
500
16000
Table #7
-12
12
2
0.05
40.0
0.05
0
100
1
0.1
5.0
0.1
0
100
1
Max.Int.
18
12
14
12
15
12
799
100
49
100
Unit
Hz
%
%
%
ms
ms
ms
ms
%
%
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.00
0.05
0
100
1
0.1
100.0
0.1
0
99
1
0.1
800.0
0.1
0.1
800.0
0.1
0.1
800.0
0.1
0.1
800.0
0.1
-99
99
1
0
100
1
Max.Int.
799
100
999
99
7999
7999
7999
7999
198
100
Parameter Name
Chorus Mod Freq
Chorus PM Depth
Chorus AM Depth
Unit
Hz
%
%
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.00
0.05
0
100
1
0
100.0
1
Max.Int.
799
100
100
Delay Lch Delay
Delay Rch Delay
Delay FB1 Delay
Delay FB2 Delay
Delay FB Gain
Delay Mix Level
ms
ms
ms
ms
%
%
66: Flange -> Delay L,R
Parameter Name
Modulation Freq
Modulation Depth
Modulation Delay
Modulation FB Gain
Delay Lch Delay
Delay Rch Delay
Delay FB1 Delay
Delay FB2 Delay
Delay FB Gain
Delay Mix Level
67: St.Chorus -> Delay L,R
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
-99
0
800.0
800.0
800.0
800.0
99
100
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
1
1
7999
7999
7999
7999
198
100
Add-19
19
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
68: Sympho -> Delay L,R
Parameter Name
Modulation Freq
Modulation Depth
Unit
Hz
%
Delay Lch Delay
Delay Rch Delay
Delay FB1 Delay
Delay FB2 Delay
Delay FB Gain
Delay Mix Level
ms
ms
ms
ms
%
%
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.00
0.05
0
100
1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
-99
0
800.0
800.0
800.0
800.0
99
100
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
1
1
Max.Int.
799
100
7999
7999
7999
7999
198
100
69: Phaser -> Delay L,R
Parameter Name
Modulation Freq
Modulation Depth
Modulation Delay
Unit
Hz
%
%
Delay Lch Delay
Delay Rch Delay
Delay FB1 Delay
Delay FB2 Delay
Delay FB Gain
Delay Mix Level
ms
ms
ms
ms
%
%
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.00
0.05
0
100
1
0.1
5.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
-99
0
800.0
800.0
800.0
800.0
99
100
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
1
1
Max.Int.
799
100
49
7999
7999
7999
7999
198
100
70: Hall & Plate
Parameter Name
Hall Reverb Time
Hall High
Hall Diffusion
Hall Initial Delay
Hall LPF
Plate Reverb Time
Plate High
Plate Diffusion
Plate Initial Delay
Plate LPF
Unit
sec
ms
KHz
sec
ms
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.3
30.0
Table #1
0.1
1.0
0.1
0
10
1
0.1
200.0
0.1
1
Thru
Table #2
0.3
30
Table #1
0.1
1
0.1
0
10
1
0.1
200
0.1
1
Thru
Table #2
Max.Int.
69
9
10
1999
25
69
9
10
1999
25
Add-20
20
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Type
Chapter :
71: Echo & Reverb
Parameter Name
Echo Lch Delay
Echo Rch Delay
Echo FB Gain
Reverb Time
Rev High
Rev Diffusion
Rev Initial Delay
Rev ER/Rev Balance
Rev HPF
Rev LPF
Unit
ms
ms
%
sec
ms
%
Hz
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.1
320.0
0.1
0.1
320.0
0.1
-99
99
1
0.3
30.0
Table #1
0.1
1.0
0.1
0
10
1
0.1
200.0
0.1
0
100
1
Thru
1000
Table #3
1
Thru
Table #2
Max.Int.
3199
3199
198
69
9
10
1999
100
31
25
Unit
ms
ms
%
sec
ms
%
Hz
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.1
640.0
0.1
0.1
640.0
0.1
-99
99
1
0.3
30.0
Table #1
0.1
1.0
0.1
0
10
1
0.1
200.0
0.1
0
100
1
Thru
1000
Table #3
1
Thru
Table #2
Max.Int.
6399
6399
198
69
9
10
1999
100
31
25
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.0
0.05
0
100.0
1
0.1
100
0.1
0
99.0
1
Max.Int.
799
100
999
99
72: Delay & Reverb
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Parameter Name
Delay Lch Delay
Delay Rch Delay
Delay FB Gain
Reverb Time
Rev High
Rev Diffusion
Rev Initial Delay
Rev ER/Rev Balance
Rev HPF
Rev LPF
Type
73: Flange & Chorus
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Parameter Name
Flange Mod Freq
Flange Mod Depth
Flange Mod Delay
Flange Mod FB Gain
Unit
Hz
%
%
%
Chorus Mod Freq
Chorus PM Depth
Chorus AM Depth
Hz
%
%
0.05
0
0
40
100.0
100
0.05
1
1
799
100
100
Add-21
21
Type
74: Flange & Sympho
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Parameter Name
Flange Mod Freq
Flange Mod Depth
Flange Mod Delay
Flange Mod FB Gain
Unit
Hz
%
%
%
Sympho Mod Freq
Sympho Mod Depth
Hz
%
Type
75:Sympho & Chorus
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Parameter Name
Sympho Mod Freq
Sympho Mod Depth
Unit
Hz
%
Chorus Mod Freq
Chorus PM Depth
Chorus AM Depth
Hz
%
%
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.0
0.05
0
100.0
1
0.1
100
0.1
0
99.0
1
0.05
0
40
100.0
0.05
1
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.0
0.05
0
100.0
1
0.05
0
0
40
100.0
100
0.05
1
1
Max.Int.
799
100
999
99
799
100
Max.Int.
799
100
799
100
100
76: Flange & Rev
Parameter Name
Flange Mod Freq
Flange Mod Depth
Flange Mod Delay
Flange Mod FB Gain
Reverb Time
Reverb High
Rev Diffusion
Rev Initial Delay
HPF
LPF
Unit
Hz
%
%
%
sec
ms
Hz
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.0
0.05
0
100.0
1
0.1
100
0.1
0
99.0
1
0.3
30.0
Table #1
0.1
1
0.1
0
10
1
0.1
200
0.1
Thru
1000
Table #3
1
Thru
Table #2
Max.Int.
799
100
999
99
69
9
10
1999
31
25
Add-22
22
Chapter :
Type
77: Chorus & Rev
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Parameter Name
Chorus Mod Freq
Chorus PM Depth
Chorus AM Depth
Unit
Hz
%
%
Reverb Time
Reverb High
Rev Diffusion
Rev Initial Delay
HPF
LPF
sec
ms
Hz
KHz
Type
78: Sympho & Rev
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Parameter Name
Modulation Freq
Modulation Depth
Unit
Hz
%
Reverb Time
Reverb High
Rev Diffusion
Rev Initial Delay
HPF
LPF
sec
ms
Hz
KHz
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.0
0.05
0
100.0
1
0
100
1
0.3
0.1
0
0.1
Thru
1
30.0
1
10
200
1000
Thru
Table #1
0.1
1
0.1
Table #3
Table #2
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.0
0.05
0
100.0
1
0.3
0.1
0
0.1
Thru
1
30.0
1
10
200
1000
Thru
Table #1
0.1
1
0.1
Table #3
Table #2
Max.Int.
799
100
100
69
9
10
1999
31
25
Max.Int.
799
100
69
9
10
1999
31
25
79: Flange & Delay L,R
Parameter Name
Modulation Freq
Modulation Depth
Modulation Delay
Modulation FB Gain
Delay Lch Delay
Delay Rch Delay
Delay FB1 Delay
Delay FB2 Delay
Delay FB Gain
LPF
Unit
Hz
%
%
%
ms
ms
ms
ms
%
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.00
0.05
0
100
1
0.1
100.0
0.1
0
99
1
0.1
800.0
0.1
0.1
800.0
0.1
0.1
800.0
0.1
0.1
800.0
0.1
-99
99
1
1
Thru
Table #2
Max.Int.
799
100
999
99
7999
7999
7999
7999
198
25
Add-23
23
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Type
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
80: Chorus & Delay L,R
Parameter Name
Chorus Mod Freq
Chorus PM Depth
Chorus AM Depth
Unit
Hz
%
%
Delay Lch Delay
Delay Rch Delay
Delay FB1 Delay
Delay FB2 Delay
Delay FB Gain
LPF
ms
ms
ms
ms
%
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.00
0.05
0
100
1
0
100.0
1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
-99
1
800.0
800.0
800.0
800.0
99
Thru
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
1
Table #2
Max.Int.
799
100
100
7999
7999
7999
7999
198
25
81: Sympho & Delay L,R
Parameter Name
Modulation Freq
Modulation Depth
Unit
Hz
%
Delay Lch Delay
Delay Rch Delay
Delay FB1 Delay
Delay FB2 Delay
Delay FB Gain
LPF
ms
ms
ms
ms
%
KHz
Minimum Maximum Step/Table
0.05
40.00
0.05
0
100
1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
-99
1
800.0
800.0
800.0
800.0
99
Thru
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
1
Table #2
Max.Int.
799
100
7999
7999
7999
7999
198
25
Add-24
24
Chapter :
MIDI Parameter
Common parameter
Channel parameter
System
parameter name
Rec Source
Rec Frequency
Play Back Frequency
Trigger Rec Mode on/off
Trigger Rec Level
Sync Mode Select
MIDI Sync on/off
Channel Status bit0 (out)
Channel Status Sampling Freq
value
*1
*2
*3
*4
*5
*6
*4
*13
*14
Effect Return Sel/Level
parameter name
Effect Return 1 Select 1
Effect Return 1 Select 2
Effect Return 2 Select 1
Effect Return 2 Select 2
Effect Return 3 Select 1
Effect Return 3 Select 2
Effect Return 4 Select 1
Effect Return 4 Select 2
Effect Return 1 Level 1
Effect Return 1 Level 2
Effect Return 2 Level 1
Effect Return 2 Level 2
Effect Return 3 Level 1
Effect Return 3 Level 2
Effect Return 4 Level 1
Effect Return 4 Level 2
value
*7
*7
*7
*7
*7
*7
*7
*7
0~127
0~127
0~127
0~127
0~127
0~127
0~127
0~127
DEQ
parameter name
Mode
value
*8
DSP2
parameter name
Type
Parameter 1
Parameter 2
:
:
Parameter 30
value
0~81
0~? (word)
0~? (word)
:
:
0~? (word)
System (ch 0,1 only)
parameter name
Rec Monitor on/off
value
*4
Volume, Effect Send
parameter name
Channel Volume
Bus 1 Select
Bus 2 Select
Bus 3 Select
Bus 4 Select
Bus 1 Volume
Bus 2 Volume
Bus 3 Volume
Bus 4 Volume
Effect Send 1 Level
Effect Send 2 Level
value
0~127
*7
*7
*7
*7
0~127
0~127
0~127
0~127
0~127
0~127
DEQ
parameter name
IIR1 Parameter
value
**
IIR2 Parameter
**
IIR3 Parameter
**
IIR4 Parameter
**
** IIR n parameter (n=1~4)
parameter name
Type
Frequency
Gain
Q
value
*9
*10
*11
*12
Add-25
25
*1
value
0
1
2
3
source
AES/EBU
Y2
CD/DAT
ANALOG
*2
value
0
1
2
3
Freq (KHz)
48
44.4
32
22.05
*3
Sync mode Select = internal
value
Freq (KHz)
0
48
1
44.1
*4
value
0
1
on/off
off
on
*5
value
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Level (dB)
–9
–15
–18
–24
–30
–36
–42
–48
–∞
*6
value
0
1
2
3
4
Mode
internal
external
AES/EBU
Y2
CD/DAT
*7
value
0
1
2
3
4
Select
OUT1
OUT2
OUT3
OUT4
mute
*8
value
0
1
2
Mode
Reserved
Thru
PEQ
value
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Type
Through
Lo1
Lo2
Hi1
Hi2
LoSh
HISh
Presence
BandE1
BandPass
*9
*10
Software Thru
4IIR/4Ch
Freq
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Gain
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
Q
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
0:invalid
1:valid
value
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
Freq (Hz)
18
20
22
25
28
32
36
40
45
50
56
63
70
80
90
100
110
125
140
160
180
200
220
250
280
315
355
400
450
500
560
630
700
800
900
1000
1100
1200
1400
1600
1800
2000
2200
2500
2800
3200
3600
4000
4500
5000
5600
6300
7000
8000
9000
10000
11000
12000
14000
16000
18000
*11
value
0
:
30
Gain (dB)
–15
:
15
*12
value
0
:
49
Q
0.1
:
5.0
*13
value
0
1
bit0
consumer
professional
*14 Sync mode Select =
Channel status sampling
Freq. other than internal
value
Freq (KHz)
0
48
1
44.1
2
32
When RecFreq=32kHz,
values 59 & 60 are 15000Hz
Add-26
26
Chapter :
MIDI Parameter Map
Common parameter
Common Parameter
(base address=h’2000)
System
Channel 0 Parameter
(base address=h’0)
Channel 1 Parameter
(base address=h’0)
Channel 2 Parameter
(base address=h’0)
Channel 3 Parameter
(base address=h’0)
Efct Rtn
DEQ
DSP2
Rec Source
Rec Frequency
Play Back Frequency
Trigger Rec Mode on/off
Trigger Rec Level
Sync Mode Select
MIDI Sync on/off
Channel Status bit0
Channel Status Sampling Freq
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Effect Return 1 Select 1
Effect Return 1 Select 2
Effect Return 2 Select 1
Effect Return 2 Select 2
Effect Return 3 Select 1
Effect Return 3 Select 2
Effect Return 4 Select 1
Effect Return 4 Select 2
Effect Return 1 Level 1
Effect Return 1 Level 2
Effect Return 2 Level 1
Effect Return 2 Level 2
Effect Return 3 Level 1
Effect Return 3 Level 2
Effect Return 4 Level 1
Effect Return 4 Level 2
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Mode
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Type
Parameter 1 MSB
Parameter 1 LSB
Parameter 2 MSB
Parameter 2 LSB
Parameter 3 MSB
Parameter 3 LSB
Parameter 4 MSB
Parameter 4 LSB
Parameter 5 MSB
Parameter 5 LSB
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
Parameter 6 MSB
Parameter 6 LSB
Parameter 7 MSB
Parameter 7 LSB
Parameter 8 MSB
Parameter 8 LSB
Parameter 9 MSB
Parameter 9 LSB
Parameter 10 MSB
Parameter 10 LSB
Parameter 11 MSB
Parameter 11 LSB
Parameter 12 MSB
Parameter 12 LSB
Parameter 13 MSB
Parameter 13 LSB
Parameter 14 MSB
Parameter 14 LSB
Parameter 15 MSB
Parameter 15 LSB
Parameter 16 MSB
Parameter 16 LSB
Parameter 17 MSB
Parameter 17 LSB
Parameter 18 MSB
Parameter 18 LSB
Parameter 19 MSB
Parameter 19 LSB
Parameter 20 MSB
Parameter 20 LSB
Parameter 21 MSB
Parameter 21 LSB
Parameter 22 MSB
Parameter 22 LSB
Parameter 23 MSB
Parameter 23 LSB
Parameter 24 MSB
Parameter 24 LSB
Parameter 25 MSB
Parameter 25 LSB
Parameter 26 MSB
Parameter 26 LSB
Parameter 27 MSB
Parameter 27 LSB
Parameter 28 MSB
Parameter 28 LSB
Parameter 29 MSB
Parameter 29 LSB
Parameter 30 MSB
Parameter 30 LSB
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
Add-27
27
Channel N parameter
System
Vol,Efct Snd
DEQ
Rec Monitor on/off
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Channel Volume
Reserve
Bus 1 Select
Bus 2 Select
Bus 3 Select
Bus 4 Select
Bus 1 Volume
Bus 2 Volume
Bus 3 Volume
Bus 4 Volume
Effect Send 1 Level
Effect Send 2 Level
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
IIR 1 Parameter *
IIR 2 Parameter *
IIR 3 Parameter *
IIR 4 Parameter *
Reserved
:
Reserved
0 Valid only for ch 0, 1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
* IIR n Parameter
Type
37
Frequency
38
Gain
Q
45
Reserved
46
Reserved
Reserved
53
Reserved
54
61
62
69
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Add-28
28
Chapter :
MIDI Data Format
1. Block Diagram of MIDI Reception/Transmission
<MIDI Reception Conditions>
MIDI IN or
TO HOST
$F0,$43,$78,$41,$[ch#],$[pa/H],$[pa/L],$[bc/H],$[bc/L],$F7
PARAMETER REQUEST
$F0,$43,$78,$41,$[ch#],$[pa/H],$[pa/L],$[bc/H],$[bc/L],{$[d/H],$[d/L]},$F7
PARAMETER DUMP
switch is set to anything other than “MIDI”, the MIDI data are echoed back to HOST IN
* If→theMIDIHostOUTSelector
and MIDI IN → HOST OUT, respectively.
<MIDI Transmission Conditions>
MIDI IN or
TO HOST
$F0,$43,$78,$41,$[ch#],$[pa/H],$[pa/L],$[bc/H],$[bc/L],{$[d/H],$[d/L]},$F7
PARAMETER DUMP
switch is set to anything other than “MIDI”, the MIDI data are echoed back to HOST IN
* If→theMIDIHostOUTSelector
and MIDI IN → HOST OUT, respectively.
2. Channel Messages
Channel messages are not transmitted or received.
If the Host Selector switch is set to anything other than “MIDI”, the MIDI data are echoed back to HOST
IN → MIDI OUT and MIDI IN → HOST OUT, respectively.
3. System Messages
The CBX-D5 handles System Exclusive messages like those below.
Digital Track Message (Note 1)
(Note 1)
The Digital Track Message (hereafter referred to as DT) is comprised of the Yamaha System Exclusive ID and a Digital Track Command, and is a System Exclusive message.
The Digital Track Messages used with this equipment are formatted as shown below.
General format for the Digital Track Message
11110000
01000011
01111000
11110111
F0
43
78
<ab>
*1
data bytes *2
F7
YAMAHA System Exclusive ID
YAMAHA System Exclusive Sub ID
DT command
Add-29
29
*1 <ab>
DT status (MS 3 bits)
Sub status (LS 4 bits)
0-2: Reserved
3: DT status of encapsulated MIDI command
Sub status equals to MIDI status code
4: DT status of device specific messages
Substatus=0 → parameter dump
Substatus=1 → parameter request
5 - 7: Reserved
(See Table 1 for DT command formats.)
*2 data bytes
The format and length vary depending on the DT status byte.
The first byte of the DT message is the channel number (It is usually from 0 to 3).
Several DT commands may be contained in one DT message.
The EOX (F7) command is used at the end of the DT message.
From a standpoint of error correction, we recommend inserting breaks in DT messages at 100 ms intervals.
DT command format (Table 1)
1: Encapsulated MIDI command (for details, see Table 2)
Status
3
Substatus
MIDI status byte
Databyte[0]
channel
Databyte[1...]
MIDI data bytes
2: Device specific messages
2.1 parameter dump
Status
4
Substatus
0
Databyte[0]
channel
Databyte[1 - 2]
parameter address
Databyte[3 - 4]
byte count
Databyte[5...]
data
CAUTION: When recording to a hard disk, one unit is used for multi-channel recording/
playback. For this reason, parameters are separated into Common and
Channel parameters. The parameter addresses used are as follows:
Channel parameter base address = h'0
Common parameter base address = h'2000
Add-30
30
Chapter :
Parameter Dump Format (Appendix 2.1)
11110000
F0
01000011
43
YAMAHA system exclusive ID
01111000
78
YAMAHA system exclusive sub ID
01000000
40
parameter dump status
0ccccccc
nn
channel number
0mmmmmmm
mm
parameter address Most significant 7bits [pa/H]
0I I I I I I I
II
parameter address Least significant 7bits [pa/L]
parameter address = 0×80 *[pa/H] + [pa/L]
0x0000-0xx1FFF: channel parameter 0x0000-0x1FFF
0x2000-0xx3FFF: common parameter 0x0000-0x1FFF
0mmmmmmm*
mm
byte count Most significant 7bits [bc/H]
0I I I I I I I
II
byte count Least significant 7bits [bc/L]
byte count = 0×80 *[bc/H] + [bc/L]
0ddddddd
data
..
..
..
..
.
.
0ddddddd
data
11110111
F7
2.2 parameter dump
Status
4
Substatus
1
Databyte[0]
channel
Databyte[1 - 2]
parameter address
Databyte[3 - 4]
byte count
Parameter Request Format (Appendix 2.2)
11110000
F0
01000011
43
YAMAHA system exclusive ID
01111000
78
YAMAHA system exclusive sub ID
01000001
41
parameter request status
0ccccccc
nn
channel number
0mmmmmmm
mm
parameter address Most significant 7bits [pa/H]
0I I I I I I I
II
parameter address Least significant 7bits [pa/L]
parameter address = 0×80 *[pa/H] + [pa/L]
0x0000-0xx1FFF: channel parameter 0x0000-0x1FFF
0x2000-0xx3FFF: common parameter 0x0000-0x1FFF
0mmmmmmm
mm
byte count Most significant 7bits [bc/H]
0I I I I I I I
II
byte count Least significant 7bits [bc/L]
byte count = 0×80 *[bc/H] + [bc/L]
0ddddddd
data
..
..
..
..
.
.
0ddddddd
data
11110111
F7
Add-31
31
Encapsulated MIDI command (Table 2)
Control changes (Assignable)
00000110
06
data entry for RPN
00000111
07
channel volume
00001011
0B
channel expression
00010000
10
01100000
60
data increment for RPN
01100001
61
data decrement for RPN
01111000
78
All sound off
No control numbers other than these may be used.
Also, control values are not stored in the memory.
RPN
00000000
00
Pitch bend range
79
reset all controllers
Pitch bend
Channel mode message
01111001
Add-32
32
Chapter :
MIDI Implementation chart