[MI IDP10-T] Installation, Operation, Calibration, Configuration, and

MI IDP10-T
Instruction
May 2010
I/A Series® Pressure Transmitters
IDP10 Differential Pressure
with HART Communication
Installation, Operation, Calibration, Configuration, and Maintenance
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Contents
Figures..................................................................................................................................... v
Tables..................................................................................................................................... vi
1. Introduction ......................................................................................................................
General Description ..................................................................................................................
Reference Documents ...............................................................................................................
Transmitter Identification .........................................................................................................
1
1
1
3
Standard Specifications ............................................................................................................. 5
Product Safety Specifications ................................................................................................... 10
ATEX and IECEx Warnings .............................................................................................. 13
ATEX Compliance Documents .......................................................................................... 13
IECEx Compliance Documents ......................................................................................... 14
2. Installation ......................................................................................................................
Transmitter Mounting ............................................................................................................
Process Mounting ...............................................................................................................
Manifold Mounted Transmitter .........................................................................................
Transmitter Mounted on a Coplanar‰ Manifold .............................................................
Pipe or Surface Mounting ..................................................................................................
Standard Mounting Bracket ..........................................................................................
Universal Mounting Bracket ..........................................................................................
Venting and Draining .............................................................................................................
Traditional Structure ..........................................................................................................
LP1 Low Profile Structure ..................................................................................................
LP2 Low Profile Structure ..................................................................................................
Installation of Flow Measurement Piping ................................................................................
Filling System with Seal Liquid ...............................................................................................
Positioning the Housing ..........................................................................................................
Positioning the Display ...........................................................................................................
Setting the Write Protect Jumper ............................................................................................
Cover Locks ............................................................................................................................
Wiring ....................................................................................................................................
Accessing Transmitter Field Terminals ...............................................................................
Wiring the Transmitter to a Control Loop .........................................................................
Multidrop Communication ................................................................................................
Connecting the Transmitter to an I/A Series System ..........................................................
Putting a Differential Pressure Transmitter Into Operation .....................................................
Taking a Differential Pressure Transmitter Out of Operation .................................................
15
15
15
17
18
18
18
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iii
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Contents
3. Operation Via Local Display ...........................................................................................
Entering Numerical Values .....................................................................................................
Reranging ................................................................................................................................
Viewing the Database ..............................................................................................................
Viewing the Pressure Range ....................................................................................................
Testing the Display .................................................................................................................
Error Messages ......................................................................................................................
37
38
39
39
39
39
40
4. Calibration ......................................................................................................................
General Calibration Notes ......................................................................................................
Calibration Setup ....................................................................................................................
Setup of Electronic Equipment ...........................................................................................
Field Calibration Setup ......................................................................................................
Bench Calibration Setup ....................................................................................................
Calibration Using a PC20 .......................................................................................................
Calibration Using a PC50 .......................................................................................................
Calibration Using a HART Communicator ............................................................................
Calibration Using the Optional Local Display ........................................................................
Zero Adjustment Using External Zero Button ....................................................................
Error Messages ......................................................................................................................
41
41
43
44
44
45
46
46
46
46
49
51
5. Configuration..................................................................................................................
Configurable Parameters .........................................................................................................
Configuration Using a PC20 ...................................................................................................
Configuration Using a PC50 ...................................................................................................
Configuration Using a HART Communicator ........................................................................
Configuration Using the Optional Local Display ....................................................................
Character Lists ........................................................................................................................
Error Messages ........................................................................................................................
53
53
54
54
54
54
64
65
6. Maintenance....................................................................................................................
Error Messages ........................................................................................................................
Parts Replacement ...................................................................................................................
Replacing the Terminal Block Assembly .............................................................................
Replacing the Electronics Module Assembly .......................................................................
Removing and Reinstalling a Housing Assembly ................................................................
Adding the Optional Display .............................................................................................
Replacing the Sensor Assembly ...........................................................................................
Rotating Process Covers for Venting .......................................................................................
67
67
67
67
68
69
70
70
72
Index .................................................................................................................................... 75
iv
Figures
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
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23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
Transmitter Identification ............................................................................................
Top Level Structure Diagram .......................................................................................
Minimum Allowable Absolute Pressure vs. Process Temperature
with Fluorinert Fill Fluid .............................................................................................
Typical Mounting of an IDP10 Transmitter Supported by Process Piping ...................
Typical Mounting of an IDP10 Transmitter Supported by a Bypass Manifold ............
Typical Mounting of IDP10 Transmitter on Coplanar Manifold .................................
Pipe or Surface Mounted Transmitter Using a Standard Bracket ..................................
Examples of Mounting With a Standard Bracket .........................................................
Details of a Universal Bracket .......................................................................................
Mounting a Transmitter with Traditional Structure Using a Universal Bracket ...........
Vertical Pipe Mounting a Transmitter with LP2 Structure Using a Universal Bracket ..
Horizontal Mounting a Transmitter with LP2 Structure Using a Universal Bracket .....
Vertical Mounting - Cavity Draining ...........................................................................
Vertical Mounting - Cavity Venting .............................................................................
Horizontal Mounting - Cavity Venting ........................................................................
Vertical Mounting - Cavity Venting .............................................................................
Horizontal Mounting - Cavity Venting and Draining ..................................................
Cavity Venting and Draining .......................................................................................
Example of Horizontal Process Line Installation ..........................................................
Example of Vertical Process Line Installation ...............................................................
Housing Screw or Clip Location ..................................................................................
Cover Lock Location ....................................................................................................
Accessing Field Terminals ............................................................................................
Identification of Field Terminals ..................................................................................
Supply Voltage and Loop Load ....................................................................................
Loop Wiring Transmitters ...........................................................................................
Wiring Several Transmitters to a Common Power Supply ...........................................
Typical Multidrop Network .........................................................................................
Local Display Module ..................................................................................................
Top Level Structure Diagram .......................................................................................
Display Test Segment Patterns .....................................................................................
4 to 20 mA Output Calibration Setup of Electronic Equipment ..................................
Field Calibration Setup ................................................................................................
Bench Calibration Setup ..............................................................................................
Calibration Structure Diagram .....................................................................................
Calibration Structure Diagram (Continued) ................................................................
Configuration Structure Diagram ................................................................................
Configuration Structure Diagram (Continued) ............................................................
Configuration Structure Diagram (Continued) ............................................................
Replacing the Electronics Module Assembly and Display .............................................
Replacing the Sensor Assembly .....................................................................................
Replacing the Sensor Assembly (pvdf Inserts) ...............................................................
Sensor Cavity Venting and Draining ............................................................................
3
4
7
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v
Tables
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Reference Documents ..................................................................................................
Minimum Loop Load and Supply Voltage Requirements .............................................
Electrical Safety Specifications ......................................................................................
Operation Error Messages ............................................................................................
Calibration Menu ........................................................................................................
Calibration Error Messages ..........................................................................................
IDP10-T Configurable Parameters ...............................................................................
Configuration Menu ....................................................................................................
Alphanumeric Character List ........................................................................................
Numeric Character List ................................................................................................
Configuration Error Messages ......................................................................................
1
9
12
40
47
51
53
55
64
64
65
vi
1. Introduction
General Description
The IDP10-T intelligent differential pressure transmitters measure the difference between two
pressures applied to opposite sides of a silicon strain gauge microsensor within the sensor
assembly. This microsensor converts differential pressure to a change in resistance. The resistance
change is then converted to a 4 to 20 mA or digital signal proportional to differential pressure or
to the square root of differential pressure. This measurement signal is transmitted to remote
receivers over the same two wires that supply power to the transmitter electronics. These wires
also carry two-way data signals between the transmitter and remote communication devices.
The transmitter allows direct analog connection to common receivers while still providing full
Intelligent Transmitter Digital Communications using a HART Communicator.
The transmitter is often used for measuring fluid flow rates across a primary device such as an
orifice plate, but can also be used for other types of differential pressure measurements such as
liquid level, interface level, or density measurements. The IDP10 can also be supplied with direct
connected or remote pressure seals to isolate the measuring element from corrosive or viscous
fluids.
For more detailed information on the principle of operation of the transmitter, refer to document
TI 037-096, available from Invensys.
Reference Documents
Table 1. Reference Documents
Document
Description
Dimensional Prints
DP 020-342
Dimensional Print – PSFLT Pressure Seals
DP 020-343
Dimensional Print – PSFPS and PSFES Pressure Seals
DP 020-345
Dimensional Print – PSFAR Pressure Seals
DP 020-347
Dimensional Print – PSTAR Pressure Seals
DP 020-349
Dimensional Print – PSISR Pressure Seals
DP 020-351
Dimensional Print – PSSCR Pressure Seals
DP 020-353
Dimensional Print – PSSCT Pressure Seals
DP 020-354
Dimensional Print – PSSSR Pressure Seals
DP 020-355
Dimensional Print – PSSST Pressure Seals
DP 020-446
Dimensional Print – IDP10, IDP25, and IDP50 Differential Pressure Transmitters
DP 022-335
Dimensional Print – Model CO Compact Orifice
Parts Lists
PL 006-172
Parts List – Model CO Compact Orifice
1
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
1. Introduction
Table 1. Reference Documents (Continued)
Document
PL 009-005
Instructions
MI 020-328
MI 020-329
MI 020-366
Description
Parts List – IDP10 Differential Pressure Transmitter
Instruction – Bubble Type Installation for Liquid Level
Instruction – High Accuracy Flow Measurement
Instruction – I/A Series Intelligent Pressure Transmitters Operation, Configuration,
and Calibration Using a HART Communicator
MI 020-369
Instruction – Pressure Seals
MI 020-427
Instruction – Intrinsic Safety Connection Diagrams and Nonincendive Circuits
MI 020-495
Instruction – PC20 Intelligent Transmitter Configurator
MI 020-501
Instruction – PC50 Intelligent Field Device Tool (Installation and Parts List)
MI 020-505
Instruction – PC50 Intelligent Field Device Tool (Operation Using HART
Protocol)
MI 020-520
Instruction – PC50 Intelligent Field Device Tool with Advanced DTM Library
(Operation Using HART Protocol)
MI 022-138
Instruction – Bypass Manifolds - Installation and Maintenance
MI 022-335
Instruction – Model CO Compact Orifice
Technical Information
TI 1-50a
Technical Information – Liquid Density Measurement
TI 001-051
Technical Information – Liquid Interface Measurement
TI 001-052
Technical Information – Liquid Level Measurement
TI 37-75b
Technical Information – Transmitter Material Selection Guide
TI 037-097
Technical Information – Process Sealing of I/A Series Pressure Transmitters for use
in Class 1, Zone 0, 1, and 2 Hazardous Locations
2
1. Introduction
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Transmitter Identification
See Figure 1 for transmitter data plate contents. For a complete explanation of the Model
Number code, see the parts list. The firmware version is identified on the top line of the display
when VIEW DB (View Database) is selected in the top level structure (see Figure 2).
STYLE
MODEL CODE
SERIAL NUMBER
CALIBRATED RANGE
AUXILIARY SPECIFICATION CODE
PLANT AND DATE OF MANUFACTURE
SUPPLY VOLTAGE
MAXIMUM WORKING PRESSURE
CUSTOMER TAG
MODEL
REFERENCE
AUX. SPEC.
SUPPLY
CUST. TAG
CAL. RANGE
ORIGIN
MWP
ST
Figure 1. Transmitter Identification
3
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
1. Introduction
E
(measurement M1 or M2)
E
(measurement M2 or M1)
N
N
RERANGE
E
LOCAL MODE, GO TO RERANGE MENU
N
E
CONFIG
N
CALIB
E
LOCAL MODE, GO TO CONFIGURATION MENU
OFF-LINE, GO TO CALIBRATION MENU
N
VIEW DB
E
ON-LINE MODE
N
N
E
TST DSP
E
CANCEL
ON-LINE MODE
N
N
E
E
STEP THROUGH DATABASE DISPLAY
STEP THROUGH DISPLAY TEST PATTERN
EXIT MODE SELECT MENU, RETURN TO ON-LINE MODE
N
N = NEXT BUTTON
E = ENTER BUTTON
Figure 2. Top Level Structure Diagram
4
1. Introduction
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Standard Specifications
Operative Limits
Influence
Operative Limits
Sensor Body Temperature(a)
Silicone Fill Fluid
Fluorinert Fill Fluid
pvdf Inserts
Electronics Temperature
With LCD Display
Relative Humidity
Supply Voltage
Output Load(c)
Mounting Position
Vibration
-46 and +121°C (-50 and +250°F)
-29 and +121°C (-20 and +250°F)
-7 and +82°C (20 and 180°F)
-40 and +85°C (-40 and +185°F)
-40 and +85°C (-40 and +185°F)(b)
0 and 100%
11.5 and 42 V dc
0 and 1450 ohms
No Limit
6.3 mm (0.25 in) double amplitude from 5 to 15 Hz with aluminum
housing and from 5 to 9 Hz with 316 ss housing.
0 to 30 m/s (0 to 3 “g”) from 15 to 500 Hz with aluminum housing
and
0 to 10 m/s (0 to 1 “g”) from 9 to 500 Hz with 316 ss housing.
(a) Refer to MI 020-369 for temperature limits with pressure seals.
(b) Display updates are slowed and readability decreased at temperatures below -20°C (-4°F).
(c) 250 Ω minimum load is required for communication with a HART Communicator.
Span and Range Limits
Span Limit
Code
A(b)
B
C
D
E
Span Limits
ΔP
0.12 and 7.5 kPa
0.5 and 30 inH20
12 and 750 mmH20
0.87 and 50 kPa
3.5 and 200 inH20
87 and 5000 mmH20
7.0 and 210 kPa
28 and 840 inH20
2.3 and 69 ftH20
0.07 and 2.1 MPa
10 and 300 psi
23 and 690 ftH20
0.7 and 21 MPa
100 and 3000 psi
Range Limits
ΔP (a)
-7.5 and +7.5 kPa
-30 and +30 inH20
-750 and +750 mmH20
-50 and +50 kPa
-200 and +200 inH20
-5000 and +5000 mmH20
-210 and +210 kPa
-840 and +840 inH20
-69 and +69 ftH20
-0.21 and +2.1 MPa
-30 and +300 psi
-69 and +690 ftH20
-0.21 and +21 MPa
-30 and +3000 psi
(a)Negative values of differential pressure indicate a higher pressure on the low side of the sensor.
Positive values indicate a higher pressure on the high side of the sensor.
(b)Span Limit Code “A” not available with pressure seals.
5
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
1. Introduction
Maximum Static, Overrange, and Proof Pressure
Transmitter Configuration
(Bolting Material)(c)
Standard (B7 steel),
Option “-B2” (17-4 PH ss),
Option “-D3” or “-D7”
Option “B1” (316 ss) or
Option “-D5”
Option “B3” (B7M)
Option “-D1”
Option “-D2”, “-D4”,
“-D6”, or “-D8”(d)
Option “-D9” (17-4 PH ss)
Maximum Static and Overrange
Pressure Rating(a,e,f )
Proof Pressure Rating(b)
MPa
25
Psi
3625
MPa
100
Psi
14500
15
2175
60
8700
20
16
10
2900
2320
1500
70
64
40
11150
9280
6000
40
5800
100
14500
(a)Either side can be at higher pressure during overrange.
(b)Meets ANSI/ISA Standard S82.03-1988.
(c)-D1 = DIN Single ended process cover with M10 B7 bolting.
-D2 = DIN Double ended process cover with M10 B7 bolting
-D3 = DIN Single ended process cover with 7/16 in B7 bolting.
-D4 = DIN Double ended process cover with 7/16 in B7 bolting.
-D5 = DIN Single ended process cover with 7/16 in 316 ss bolting.
-D6 = DIN Double ended process cover with 7/16 in 316 ss bolting.
-D7 = DIN Single ended process cover with 7/16 in 17-4 ss bolting.
-D8 = DIN Double ended process cover with 7/16 in 17-4 ss bolting
-D9 = DIN Single ended process cover with 7/16 in 17-4 ss bolting.
(d)Limited to operating temperatures ranging from 0 to 60 °C (32 to 140°F).
(e)When Structure Codes 78/79 are used (pvdf inserts in the Hi and Lo side process covers), the maximum
overrange is 2.1 MPa (300 psi) and temperature limits are -7 and +82°C (20 and 180°F).
(f )Static pressure rating of 40 MPa (5800 psi) with Option Code -Y.
NOTE
Static pressure zero shift for all calibrated spans can be eliminated by readjusting the
zero output at nominal operating static pressure.
! CAUTION
1. Exceeding the maximum overrange pressure can cause damage to the transmitter
degrading its performance.
2. The transmitter could be nonfunctional after application of the proof pressure.
Elevated Zero and Suppressed Zero
For applications requiring an elevated or suppressed zero, the maximum span and the
upper and lower range limits of the transmitter can not be exceeded.
Sensor Fill Fluid
Silicone Oil (DC 200) or Fluorinert (FC-43)
6
1. Introduction
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Minimum Allowable Absolute Pressure vs. Process Temperature
With Silicone Fill Fluid:
With Fluorinert Fill Fluid:
-80
At full vacuum: Up to 121°C (250°F)
Refer to Figure 3.
0
30
Temperature °C
60
90
120
140
Absolute Pressure, mmHg
120
Fluorinert FC-43 Fluid
(operating area above curve)
100
80
60
40
20
-25
0
50
100
150
200
250
Temperature °F
Figure 3. Minimum Allowable Absolute Pressure vs. Process Temperature
with Fluorinert Fill Fluid
Mounting Position
The transmitter can be mounted in any orientation. It can be supported by the process
piping. It can also be mounted directly to a vertical or horizontal pipe or surface mounted
using an optional mounting bracket. The housing can be rotated up to one full turn to
any desired position for access to adjustments, display, or conduit connections. See
“Positioning the Housing” on page 28. The display (if present) can also be rotated in the
housing to any of four different positions at 90° increments. See “Positioning the
Display” on page 28.
NOTE
Position effect zero shift for all calibrated spans can be eliminated by readjusting
zero output after installation.
Approximate Mass
Without Process Connectors
With Process Connectors
With Optional 316 ss Housing
With Pressure Seals
3.5 kg (7.8 lb)
4.2 kg (9.2 lb)
Add 1.1 kg (2.4 lb)
Varies with seal used
Process Connections
IDP10 transmitters are connected to the process via a 1/4 NPT thread or any one of a
number of optional process connectors.
7
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
1. Introduction
Process Wetted Materials
Diaphragm: 316L ss, Co-Ni-Cr, Hastelloy C, Monel, gold plated 316L ss, or tantalum
Covers and Process Connections: 316 ss, carbon steel, Hastelloy C, Monel, or pvdf inserts
Pressure Seals: Refer to MI 020-369
Process Pressure and Temperature Limits for Pressure Seals
Refer to MI 020-369
Electrical Connections
Field wires enter through 1/2 NPT, PG 13.5, or M20 threaded entrances on either side of
the electronics housing. Leads terminate under screw terminals and washers on the
terminal block in the field terminal compartment. To maintain RFI/EMI, environmental,
and explosionproof ratings, unused conduit connection must be plugged with metal plug
(provided), inserted to five full threads for 1/2 NPT connections; seven full threads for
M20 and PG 13.5 connections.
Field Wiring Reversal
Accidental reversal of field wiring will not damage the transmitter, provided the current is
limited to 1 A or less by active current limiting or loop resistance. Sustained currents of
1 A will not damage the electronics module or sensor but could damage the terminal
block assembly and external instruments in the loop.
Adjustable Damping
The transmitter response time is normally 1.0 second or the electronically adjustable
setting of 0.00 (none), 0.25, 0.50, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, or 32 seconds, whichever is greater, for a
90% recovery from an 80% input step as defined in ANSI/ISA S51.1.
Output Signal
4 to 20 mA dc linear or 4 to 20 mA dc square root; software selectable. The output is
remotely configurable from the HART Communicator and locally configurable with the
pushbuttons on the display.
NOTE
Only 4 to 20 mA linear output on absolute pressure, gauge pressure, and flange
level transmitters.
Zero and Span Adjustments
Zero and span are adjustable from the HART Communicator. They are also adjustable at
the transmitter using the display. An optional external self-contained moisture sealed
pushbutton assembly allows local resetting of zero without removing the housing cover.
Power-up Time
Less than 2.0 seconds for output to reach the first valid measurement, then at the
electronic damping rate to reach the final measured variable value.
8
1. Introduction
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Supply Voltage
Power supply must be capable of providing 22 mA when the transmitter is configured for
4 to 20 mA output. Ripple of up to 2 V pp (50/60/100/120 Hz) is tolerable, but
instantaneous voltage must remain within specified range.
The supply voltage and loop load must be within specified limits. This is explained in
detail in “Wiring” on page 29. A summary of the minimum requirements is listed in
Table 2.
Table 2. Minimum Loop Load and Supply Voltage Requirements
Minimum Resistance
Minimum Supply Voltage
HART
Communication
250 Ω
17 V
No HART
Communication
0
11.5 V
Electrical Ground Connections
The transmitter is equipped with an internal ground connection within the field wiring
compartment and an external ground connection at the base of the electronics housing.
To minimize galvanic corrosion, place the wire lead or contact between the captive washer
and loose washer on the external ground screw. If shielded cable is used, earth (ground)
the shield at the field enclosure only. Do not ground the shield at the transmitter.
HART Communicator Connection Points
The HART Communicator can be connected in the loop as shown in “Wiring” on
page 29. It can also be connected directly to the transmitter at the two upper banana plug
receptacles.
Test Points
The two lower banana plug receptacles (designated CAL) can be used to check transmitter
output when configured for 4 to 20 mA. Measurements should be 100-500 mV dc for
0-100% transmitter output.
Remote Communications
The transmitter communicates bidirectionally over the 2-wire field wiring to a HART
Communicator. The information that can be continuously displayed is:
♦
Process Measurement (expressed in one or two types of units)
♦
Transmitter Temperature (sensor and electronics)
♦
mA Output (equivalent)
The information that can be remotely displayed and reconfigured includes:
♦
Output in Percent Flow (square root) or Pressure Units (linear). Percent Display in
Linear mode on local display is also supported.
♦
Zero and Span, including reranging
♦
Zero Elevation or Suppression
9
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
1. Introduction
♦
Linear Output or Square Root Output (in some models)
♦
Pressure or Flow Units (from list provided)
♦
Temperature Sensor Failure Strategy
♦
Electronic Damping
♦
Poll Address (Multidrop mode)
♦
External Zero (Enable or Disable)
♦
Failsafe Direction
♦
Tag, Description, and Message
♦
Date of Last Calibration
Communications Format
Communication is based upon the FSK (Frequency Shift Keying) technique. The
frequencies are superimposed on the transmitter power/signal leads.
4 to 20 mA Output
The transmitter sends its differential pressure measurement to the loop as a continuous
4 to 20 mA dc signal. It also communicates digitally with the HART Communicator at
distances up to 3000 m (10 000 ft). Communication between the remote configurator
and the transmitter does not disturb the 4 to 20 mA output signal. Other specifications
are:
Data Transmission Rate:
4 - 20 mA Update Rate:
Output when Fail Low:
Output when Fail High:
Output when Underrange
Output when Overrange
Output when Offline:
1200 Baud
30 times/second
3.60 mA
21.00 mA
3.80 mA
20.50 mA
User configurable between
4 and 20 mA
Product Safety Specifications
! DANGER
To prevent possible explosions and to maintain flameproof, explosionproof, and dustignitionproof protection, observe applicable wiring practices. Plug unused conduit
opening with the provided metal pipe plug. Both plug and conduit must engage a
minimum of five full threads for 1/2 NPT connections; seven full threads for M20
and PG 13.5 connections.
10
1. Introduction
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
! WARNING
To maintain IEC IP66 and NEMA Type 4X protection, the unused conduit opening
must be plugged with the metal plug provided. Use a suitable thread sealant on both
conduit connections. In addition, the threaded housing covers must be installed.
Turn covers to seat the O-ring into the housing and then continue to hand tighten
until the cover contacts the housing metal-to-metal.
NOTE
1. These transmitters have been designed to meet the electrical safety description
listed in Table 3. For detailed information or status of testing laboratory
approvals/certifications, contact Invensys.
2. Wiring restrictions required to maintain electrical certification of the transmitter
are provided in “Wiring” on page 29.
11
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
1. Introduction
Table 3. Electrical Safety Specifications
Agency Certification,
Types of Protection,
and Area Classification
Application Conditions
Electrical
Safety Design
Code
ATEX flameproof: II 2 GD EEx d IIC,
Zone 1.
KEMA 00ATEX2019X
Temperature Class T6, T85°C,
Ta = -40 to +80°C
D
ATEX intrinsically safe: II 1 GD EEx ia
IIC, Zone 0.
SIRA 06ATEX2055X
Temperature Class T4,Ta = -40 to
+80°C
E
ATEX protection n: II 3 GD EEx nL IIC, SIRA 06ATEX4056X
Zone 2.
Temperature Class T4, Ta = -40 to
+80°C
N
ATEX multiple certifications, ia & ib and Applies to Codes D, E, and N.(a)
n. Refer to Codes E and N for details.
M
CSA intrinsically safe for Class I,
Division 1, Groups A, B, C, and D;
Class II, Division 1, Groups E, F, and G;
Class III, Division 1.
Connect per MI 020-427. Temperature
Class T4A at 40°C (104°F) and T3C at
85°C (185°F) maximum ambient.
Temperature Class T4 at 40°C (104°F),
Also, Zone certified intrinsically safe Ex ia and T3 at 85°C (185°F) max. ambient.
IIC and energy limited Ex nA II.
Maximum Ambient Temperature 85°C
CSA explosionproof for Class I,
Division 1, Groups B, C, and D; dust(185°F).
ignitionproof for Class II, Division 1,
Groups E, F, and G; Class III, Division 1.
C
CSA for Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, Temperature Class T4A at 40°C
C, and D; Class II, Division 2, Groups F (104°F) and T3C at 85°C (185°F)
and G; Class III, Division 2.
maximum ambient.
CSA field device zone certified flameproof Maximum Ambient Temperature 85°C
Ex d IIC. Also, all certifications of Code C (185°F).
above.
12
B
1. Introduction
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Table 3. Electrical Safety Specifications (Continued)
Agency Certification,
Types of Protection,
and Area Classification
FM intrinsically safe for Class I,
Division 1, Groups A, B, C, and D;
Class II, Division 1, Groups E, F, and G;
Class III, Division 1.
Also, Zone certified intrinsically safe
AEx ia IIC.
Application Conditions
Electrical
Safety Design
Code
Connect per MI 020-427. Temperature
Class T4A at 40°C (104°F) and T4 at
85°C (185°F) maximum ambient.
Temperature Class T4 at 85°C (185°F)
maximum ambient.
FM explosionproof for Class I, Division 1, Temperature Class T6 at 80°C (176°F)
Groups B, C, and D; dust-ignitionproof and T5 at 85°C (185°F) maximum
for Class II, Division 1, Groups E, F, and ambient.
G; Class III, Division 1.
F
FM nonincendive for Class I, Division 2, Temperature Class T4A at 40°C
Groups A, B, C, and D; Class II,
(104°F) and T4 at 85°C (185°F)
Division 2, Groups F and G; Class III,
maximum ambient.
Division 2.
FM field device zone certified flameproof Temperature Class T6 at 75°C (167°F)
AEx d IIC. Also, all certifications of Code maximum ambient.
F above.
IECEx intrinsically safe: Ex ia IIC.
IECEx protection n: Ex nL IIC
IECEx flameproof: Ex d IIC
G
IECEx SIR 06.0010X
Temperature Class T4, Ta = -40 to
+80°C.
T
IECEx SIR 06.0011X
Temperature Class T4, Ta = -40 to
+80°C.
U
IECEx FMG 06.0007X, Ex d IIC
T6 Ta=80°C, T5 Ta=85°C
Ambient Temperature -20 to +85°C
V
(a) User must permanently mark (check off in rectangular block on data plate) one type of protection only (ia and
ib, d, or n). This mark cannot be changed once it is applied.
ATEX and IECEx Warnings
Do not open while circuits are alive.
ATEX Compliance Documents
EN 50014: 1997 (A1 and A2)
EN 50020: 2002
EN 50284: 1999
13
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
EN 50281-1-1: 1998
EN 60079-15: 2004
IECEx Compliance Documents
IEC 60079-0 (Edition 3.1): 2000
IEC 60079-0 (Edition 4): 2000
IEC 60079-1 (Edition 5): 2003
IEC 60079-11 (Edition 4): 1999
14
1. Introduction
2. Installation
! CAUTION
To avoid damage to the transmitter sensor, do not use any impact devices, such as an
impact wrench or stamping device, on the transmitter.
NOTE
1. The transmitter should be mounted so that any moisture condensing or draining
into the field wiring compartment can exit through one of the two threaded
conduit connections.
2. Use a suitable thread sealant on all connections.
Transmitter Mounting
The IDP Series differential pressure transmitter can be supported by the process piping or
mounted to a vertical or horizontal pipe or surface using the optional mounting bracket. See
figures below. For dimensional information, refer to DP 020-446.
NOTE
1. If the transmitter is not installed in the vertical position, readjust the zero output
to eliminate the position zero effect.
2. When structure codes 78/79 are used (pvdf inserts) with the IDP10 transmitters,
the process connection must be made directly to the pvdf inserts in the high and
low side process covers.
Process Mounting
With process mounting, the transmitter mounted to and supported by the process piping.
15
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
2. Installation
TRADITIONAL STRUCTURE
SEE
NOTE
LP1 STRUCTURE
LP2 STRUCTURE
SEE
NOTE
NOTE: MARK INDICATING LOW AND HIGH PRESSURE SIDE OF TRANSMITTER
Figure 4. Typical Mounting of an IDP10 Transmitter Supported by Process Piping
16
SEE
NOTE
2. Installation
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Manifold Mounted Transmitter
With manifold mounting, the transmitter is mounted to and supported by a bypass manifold.
The bypass manifold can be mounted to a DN50 or 2 inch pipe with an optional mounting
bracket. See MI 022-138.
M4A MANIFOLD
MB3 MANIFOLD
Figure 5. Typical Mounting of an IDP10 Transmitter Supported by a Bypass Manifold
17
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
2. Installation
Transmitter Mounted on a Coplanar™ Manifold
ADAPTER PLATE
AND GASKETS
MT3 MANIFOLD
MC3 MANIFOLD
Figure 6. Typical Mounting of IDP10 Transmitter on Coplanar Manifold
Pipe or Surface Mounting
To mount the transmitter to a pipe or surface, use the Standard Mounting Bracket Set (Model
Code Option -M1 or M2) or Universal Bracket Mounting Set (Model Code Option -M3).
Standard Mounting Bracket
The transmitter (with either traditional or LP2 low-profile structures) can be mounted to a
vertical or horizontal, DN 50 or 2-in pipe using a standard bracket. See Figures 7 and 8 for details
of a standard bracket and examples of different mounting situations. Secure the mounting bracket
to the transmitter using the four screws provided. Mount the bracket to the pipe. To mount to a
horizontal pipe, turn the U-bolt 90° from the position shown. The mounting bracket can also be
used for wall mounting by securing the bracket to a wall using the U-bolt mounting holes.
18
2. Installation
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
APPROXIMATELY 3 IN
CLEARANCE REQUIRED
FOR ACCESS TO MOUNTING
BOLTS AND VENT SCREW.
FOR SURFACE MOUNTING,
REPLACE U-BOLT WITH TWO
0.375 IN DIAMETER BOLTS
OF SUFFICIENT LENGTH TO
PASS THROUGH BRACKET
AND SURFACE
OPTIONAL SIDE VENT
BRACKET
VERTICAL DN 50 OR 2 IN PIPE
SHOWN. ROTATE U-BOLT 90 °
FOR MOUNTING TO HORIZONTAL
PIPE
Figure 7. Pipe or Surface Mounted Transmitter Using a Standard Bracket
VERTICAL PIPE
LP2 STRUCTURE
TRADITIONAL STRUCTURE
HORIZONTAL PIPE
LP2 STRUCTURE
TRADITIONAL STRUCTURE
Figure 8. Examples of Mounting With a Standard Bracket
19
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
2. Installation
Universal Mounting Bracket
The transmitter (with either traditional or LP2 low-profile structure) can be mounted in a myriad
of positions to a vertical or horizontal, DN 50 or 2-in pipe using a universal bracket. See the
following figures for details of a universal bracket and examples of different mounting situations.
Secure the mounting bracket to the transmitter using the two long or four short screws provided.
Mount the bracket to the pipe. The mounting bracket can also be used for wall mounting by
securing the bracket to a wall using the U-bolt mounting holes.
U-BOLT ASSEMBLY
FOR DN 50 OR 2 in PIPE
HOLES FOR
U-BOLT AND
SURFACE
MOUNTING
ON FOUR
SIDES OF THIS
BRACKET LEG,
BOLTS TO MOUNT
TRANSMITTER
TO BRACKET
BOLTS TO MOUNT
TRANSMITTER TO
BRACKET
HOLES TO MOUNT TRANSMITTER
TO BRACKET OR FOR SURFACE
MOUNTING ON FOUR SIDES OF
THIS BRACKET LEG
Figure 9. Details of a Universal Bracket
20
2. Installation
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
VERTICAL PIPE
HORIZONTAL PIPE
Figure 10. Mounting a Transmitter with Traditional Structure Using a Universal Bracket
Figure 11. Vertical Pipe Mounting a Transmitter with LP2 Structure Using a Universal Bracket
21
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
2. Installation
Figure 12. Horizontal Mounting a Transmitter with LP2 Structure Using a Universal Bracket
22
2. Installation
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Venting and Draining
Traditional Structure
Sensor cavity venting and draining is provided for both vertical and horizontal mounting. For
vertical mounted units, draining is via a drain screw and venting is possible with side vents
(Option Code -V). For horizontal mounted units, the unit is self draining and venting is via a
vent screw.
PROCESS
COVER
DRAIN SCREW
Figure 13. Vertical Mounting - Cavity Draining
OPTIONAL
SIDE VENT
SHOWN
PLUG
Figure 14. Vertical Mounting - Cavity Venting
VENT SCREW
Figure 15. Horizontal Mounting - Cavity Venting
LP1 Low Profile Structure
Sensor cavity venting and draining is provided for both vertical and horizontal mounting. For
vertical mounted units, the transmitter is self draining and venting is via a vent screw. For
horizontal mounted units, the transmitter can simply be ‘turned over’ (rotated 180 degrees) to
orient the high and low pressure sides in the preferred locations. There is no need to unbolt the
23
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
2. Installation
process covers. If the transmitter is connected with a length of impulse piping, such piping should
slope up to the transmitter for gas applications and down for liquid applications.
VENT
SCREW
IN-LINE
PROCESS
CONNECTION
Figure 16. Vertical Mounting - Cavity Venting
PROCESS
CONNECTION
VENT
SCREW
PROCESS
CONNECTION
DRAIN
SCREW
Figure 17. Horizontal Mounting - Cavity Venting and Draining
LP2 Low Profile Structure
The transmitter with LP2 low profile structure had a full-featured vent and drain design with
separate vent and drain screws positioned in each cover for complete venting and draining from
the sensor cavity.
VENT &
DRAIN
SCREWS
Figure 18. Cavity Venting and Draining
Installation of Flow Measurement Piping
Figures 19 and 20 show typical installations with horizontal and vertical process pipes.
24
2. Installation
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
The transmitters are shown below the level of the pressure connections at the pipe (usual
arrangement, except for gas flow without a seal liquid), and with filling tees in the lines to the
transmitter (for a seal liquid).
If the process fluid being measured must not come in contact with the transmitter, the transmitter
lines must be filled with a suitable seal liquid (see procedure in next section). In such a case, the
transmitter must be mounted below the level of the pressure connections at the pipe. With steam
flow, the lines are filled with water to protect the transmitter from the hot steam. The seal liquid
(or water) is added to the lines through the filling tees. To prevent unequal heads on the
transmitter, the tees must be at the same elevation and the transmitter must be mounted vertically
(as shown). If a seal liquid is not required, elbows can be used in place of the tees.
Tighten drain plugs and optional vent screws to 20 N⋅m (15 lb⋅ft). Tighten the four process
connector bolts to a torque of 61 N⋅m (45 lb⋅ft).
Note that the low and high pressure sides of the transmitter are identified by an L-H marking on
the side of the sensor above the warning label.
With medium viscosity seal liquids and/or long transmitter lines, larger valve sizes should be used.
NOTE
1. With a horizontal line, pressure connections at the pipe should be at the side of
the line. However, with gas flow without a seal liquid, connections should be at
top of line.
2. With a vertical line, flow should be upwards.
3. For liquid or steam flow, the transmitter should be mounted lower than the
pressure connections at the pipe.
4. For gas flow without a seal liquid, the transmitter should be mounted above the
pressure connections at the pipe; for gas flow with a seal liquid, the transmitter
should be mounted below the pressure connections.
5. Invensys recommends the use of snubbers in installations prone to high levels of
fluid pulsations.
25
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
2. Installation
SHUT OFF VALVES
DIRECTION OF
PRESSURE FLOW
TRANSMITTER
HIGH
PRESSURE
SIDE
FILLING TEES
LOW PRESSURE SIDE
PIPE OR TUBING
OPTIONAL
3-VALVE
MANIFOLD
Figure 19. Example of Horizontal Process Line Installation
26
2. Installation
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
PROCESS
SHUT OFF VALVES
FILLING TEES
LOW
PRESSURE
SIDE
DIRECTION OF
PRESSURE FLOW
TRANSMITTER
HIGH
PRESSURE
SIDE
PIPE OR TUBING
OPTIONAL
3-VALVE
MANIFOLD
Figure 20. Example of Vertical Process Line Installation
Filling System with Seal Liquid
If the process fluid being measured must not come in contact with the transmitter, the transmitter
lines must be filled with a suitable seal liquid. The procedure to do this is as follows:
1. If the transmitter is in service, follow the procedure for “Taking a Differential Pressure
Transmitter Out of Operation” on page 35.
2. Close both process shutoff valves.
3. Open all three valves on the 3-valve manifold.
4. Partially open the vent screws on the transmitter until all air has been forced out of the
transmitter body and lines. Close the vent screws.
5. Refill the tee connections. Replace the plugs and close the bypass valve. Check for
leaks.
6. Follow the procedure for “Putting a Differential Pressure Transmitter Into
Operation” on page 35.
27
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
2. Installation
! CAUTION
To prevent loss of seal liquid and contamination of process fluid, never open both
process shutoff valves and manifold shutoff valves if the bypass valve is open.
Positioning the Housing
The transmitter housing (topworks) can be rotated up to one full turn in the counterclockwise
direction when viewed from above for optimum access to adjustments, display, or conduit
connections. Housings have either an anti-rotation screw or a retention clip that prevent the
housing from being rotated beyond a safe depth of housing/sensor thread engagement.
! WARNING
If the electronics housing is removed for maintenance, it must be hand tightened to
the bottom of the threads, but not over-tightened upon reassembly. See “Removing
and Reinstalling a Housing Assembly” on page 69.
RETENTION CLIP
HOUSING
CUP
ANTI-ROTATION SCREW
OR RETENTION CLIP
CLIP
Figure 21. Housing Screw or Clip Location
Positioning the Display
The display (optional in some models) can be rotated within the housing to any of four positions
at 90° increments. To do this, grasp the two tabs on the display and rotate it about 10° in a
counterclockwise direction. Pull out the display. Ensure that the O-ring is fully seated in its
groove in the display housing. Turn the display to the desired position, reinsert it in the
electronics module, aligning the tabs on the sides of the assembly, and twist it in the clockwise
direction.
! CAUTION
Do not turn the display more than 180° in any direction. Doing so could damage its
connecting cable.
28
2. Installation
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Setting the Write Protect Jumper
Your transmitter has write protection capability. This means that the external zero, local display,
and remote communications can be prevented from writing to the electronics. Write protection is
set by moving a jumper that is located in the electronics compartment behind the optional
display. To activate write protection, remove the display as described in the previous section, then
remove the jumper or move it to the lower position as shown on the exposed label. Replace the
display.
Cover Locks
Electronic housing cover locks, shown in Figure 22, are provided as standard with certain agency
certifications and as part of the Custody Transfer Lock and Seal option. To lock the covers,
unscrew the locking pin until approximately 6 mm (0.25 in) shows, lining up the hole in the pin
with the hole in the housing. Insert the seal wire through the two holes, slide the seal onto the
wire ends and crimp the seal
COVER LOCK (2) (IF PRESENT)
Figure 22. Cover Lock Location
Wiring
The installation and wiring of your transmitter must conform to local code requirements.
! WARNING
ATEX requires that when the equipment is intended to be used in an explosive
atmosphere caused by the presence of combustible dust, cable entry devices and
blanking elements shall provide a degree of ingress protection of at least IP6X. They
shall be suitable for the conditions of use and correctly installed.
NOTE
Invensys recommends the use of transient/surge protection in installations prone to
high levels of electrical transients and surges.
29
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
2. Installation
Accessing Transmitter Field Terminals
For access to the field terminals, thread the cover lock (if present) into the housing to clear the
threaded cover and remove the cover from the field terminals compartment as shown in
Figure 23. Note that the embossed letters FIELD TERMINALS identify the proper compartment.
1/2 NPT, PG 13.5 OR M20 CONDUIT CONNECTION FOR
CUSTOMER WIRING. ONE ON OPPOSITE SIDE ALSO.
PLUG UNUSED OPENING WITH PLUG PROVIDED (OR
EQUIVALENT).
REMOVE COVER TO ACCESS
WIRING TERMINALS.
EXTERNAL EARTH
(GROUND)
Figure 23. Accessing Field Terminals
BANANA PLUG RECEPTACLES FOR
HART CONNECTIONS
EARTH (GROUND) SCREW
(+)
TRANSMITTER
SIGNAL
CONNECTIONS
(–)
(+)
(-)
HHT
CAL
BANANA PLUG RECEPTACLES FOR
CALIBRATION CONNECTIONS. TO READ
TRANSMITTER OUTPUT, ATTACH METER
LEADS HERE (100 TO 500 MV REPRESENTING 4 TO 20 mA CURRENT).
OPTIONAL SHORTING BAR (SB-11) TO
REDUCE MINIMUM VOLTAGE FROM
11.5 V dc TO 11 V dc ALSO PLUGS IN HERE.
Figure 24. Identification of Field Terminals
Wiring the Transmitter to a Control Loop
When wiring the transmitter, the supply voltage and loop load must be within specified limits.
The supply output load vs. voltage relationship is:
RMAX = 47.5 (V - 11.5) and is shown in Figure 25.
NOTE
The relationship when the optional shorting bar is used is:
RMAX = 46.8 (V - 11).
30
2. Installation
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Any combination of supply voltage and loop load resistance in the shaded area can be used. To
determine the loop load resistance (transmitter output load), add the series resistance of each
component in the loop, excluding the transmitter. The power supply must be capable of
supplying 22 mA of loop current.
1450
1400
TYPICAL SUPPLY VOLTAGE
AND LOAD LIMITS
1300
1200
V dc
LOAD (OHMS)
1100
24
30
32
250 AND 594
250 AND 880
250 AND 975
1000
NOTES:
1. THE MINIMUM LOAD FOR THE HART COMMUNICATOR
IS 250 Ω.
2. THE TRANSMITTER CAN FUNCTION WITH AN OUTPUT L
LESS THAN THE MINIMUM, PROVIDED THAT A REMOTE
CONFIGURATOR IS NOT CONNECTED TO IT. CONNECTIN
A REMOTE CONFIGURATOR WHILE OPERATING IN THIS
COULD CAUSE OUTPUT DISTURBANCES AND/OR COMM
CATION PROBLEMS.
OUTPUT LOAD, Ω
900
800
700
600
500
MINIMUM LOAD
(SEE NOTE)
OPERATING AREA
400
300
200
100
0
0
10
20
30
11.5
40
42
SUPPLY VOLTAGE, V dc
Figure 25. Supply Voltage and Loop Load
Examples:
1. For a loop load resistance of 880 Ω, the supply voltage can be any value from 30 to
42 V dc.
2. For a supply voltage of 24 V dc, the loop load resistance can be any value from 250 to
594 Ω (zero to 594 Ω without a HART Communicator connected to the transmitter).
To wire one or more transmitters to a power supply, proceed with the following steps.
1. Remove the cover from the transmitter field terminals compartment.
2. Run signal wires (0.50 mm2 or 20 AWG, typical) through one of the transmitter
conduit connections. Use twisted single pair to protect the 4 to 20 mA output and/or
remote communications from electrical noise. Maximum recommended length for
signal wires is:
31
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
2. Installation
♦
3050 m (10,000 ft) using single pair cable and adhering to requirements of HART
physical layer implementation defined in HART Document HCF_SPEC-53. Use
CN=1 when calculating max. lengths.
♦
1525 m (5000 ft) in a multidrop (15 devices maximum) mode.
Screened (shielded) cable could be required in some locations.
NOTE
Do not run transmitter wires in same conduit as mains (ac power) wires.
3. If shielded cable is used, earth (ground) the shield at the power supply only. Do not
ground the shield at the transmitter.
4. Plug unused conduit connection with the 1/2 NPT, PG 13.5 or M20 metal plug
provided (or equivalent). To maintain specified explosionproof and dustignitionproof protection, plug must engage a minimum of five full threads for 1/2
NPT connections; seven full threads for M20 and PG 13.5 connections.
5. Connect an earth (ground) wire to the earth terminal in accordance with local
practice.
! CAUTION
If the signal circuit must be earthed (grounded), it is preferable to do so at the
negative terminal of the dc power supply. To avoid errors resulting from earth loops
or the possibility of short-circuiting groups of instruments in a loop, there should be
only one earth in a loop.
6. Connect the power supply and receiver loop wires to the “+” and “–” terminal
connections.
7. Connect receivers (such as controllers, recorders, indicators) in series with power
supply and transmitter as shown in Figure 26.
8. Reinstall the cover onto the housing by rotating it clockwise to seat the O-ring into
the housing and then continue to hand tighten until the cover contacts the housing
metal-to-metal. If cover locks are present, lock the cover per the procedure described
in “Cover Locks” on page 29.
9. If wiring additional transmitters to the same power supply, repeat Steps 1 through 8
for each additional transmitter. The setup with multiple transmitters connected to a
single power supply is shown in Figure 27.
10. A HART Communicator or PC-Based Configurator can be connected in the loop
between the transmitter and the power supply as shown in Figures 26 and 27. Note
that a minimum of 250 Ω must separate the power supply from the HART
Communicator or PC-Based Configurator.
32
2. Installation
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
AREA CLASSIFICATION NOT TO EXCEED
RATING SPECIFIED ON TRANSMITTER
DATA PLATE OR HART COMMUNICATOR.
EARTH
(GROUND)
SCREW
CONDUIT
NON-HAZARDOUS
LOCATION
INTRINSIC
SAFETY
BARRIER.
FIELD
TERMINALS
(a)
(b)
PC-BASED
CONFIGURATOR
INDICATOR
+
PLUG
UNUSED
CONDUIT
CONNECTION
+
POWER
SUPPLY
_
_
+
_
CONTROLLER
OR RECORDER
HART COMMUNICATOR(b)
(a) RUN CONDUIT DOWN TO AVOID MOISTURE BUILDUP IN TERMINALS COMPARTMENT.
(b) THERE MUST BE AT LEAST 250 Ω TOTAL RESISTANCE BETWEEN THE HART COMMUNICATOR
OR PC-BASED CONFIGURATOR AND THE POWER SUPPLY.
Figure 26. Loop Wiring Transmitters
POWER
SUPPLY
250 Ω
min.(a)
+
–
TRANSMITTER
250 Ω
min.(a)
+
–
TRANSMITTER
250 Ω
min.(a)
+
–
TRANSMITTER
(a) 250 Ω MINIMUM LOAD (INCLUDING RESISTANCE OF OTHER INSTRUMENTS)
IN EACH LOOP IS REQUIRED WHEN USING A HART COMMUNICATOR
OR PC-BASED CONFIGURATOR.
HART COMMUNICATOR(b)
OR PC-BASED
CONFIGURATOR
(b) CONNECT HART COMMUNICATOR OR PC-BASED CONFIGURATOR BETWEEN
TRANSMITTER AND ITS ASSOCIATED INSTRUMENTS AS SHOWN.
Figure 27. Wiring Several Transmitters to a Common Power Supply
Multidrop Communication
“Multidropping” refers to the connection of several transmitters to a single communications
transmission line. Communications between the host computer and the transmitters takes place
digitally with the analog output of the transmitter deactivated. With the HART communications
33
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
2. Installation
protocol, up to 15 transmitters can be connected on a single twisted pair of wires or over leased
telephone lines.
The application of a multidrop installation requires consideration of the update rate necessary
from each transmitter, the combination of transmitter models, and the length of the transmission
line. Multidrop installations are not recommended where Intrinsic Safety is a requirement.
Communication with the transmitters can be accomplished with any HART compatible modem
and a host implementing the HART protocol. Each transmitter is identified by a unique address
(1-15) and responds to the commands defined in the HART protocol.
Figure 28 shows a typical multidrop network. Do not use this figure as an installation diagram.
Contact the HART Communications Foundation, (512) 794-0369, with specific requirements
for multidrop applications.
HOST
MODEM
LOAD
POWER
SUPPLY
IDP10-T
IDP10-T
IDP10-T
Figure 28. Typical Multidrop Network
The HART Communicator can operate, configure, and calibrate IASPT transmitters with HART
communication protocol in the same way as it can in a standard point-to-point installation.
NOTE
IASPT transmitters with HART communication protocol are set to poll address 0
(POLLADR 0) at the factory, allowing them to operate in the standard point-topoint manner with a 4 to 20 mA output signal. To activate multidrop
communication, the transmitter address must be changed to a number from 1 to
15. Each transmitter must be assigned a unique number on each multidrop
network. This change deactivates the 4 to 20 mA analog output.
Connecting the Transmitter to an I/A Series System
The transmitter can also send its measurement to an I/A Series system as a digital signal via an
FBM214/215. Wiring terminations at the transmitter are the same as described above. For other
system wiring details, refer to the installation instructions provided with the I/A Series system.
34
2. Installation
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Putting a Differential Pressure Transmitter Into
Operation
The following procedure explains how to sequence the valves in your flow measurement piping or
optional bypass manifold to ensure that your transmitter is not overranged and that seal liquid is
not lost. Refer to Figures 19 and 20.
NOTE
This procedure assumes that the process shutoff valves are open.
1. Make sure that both upstream and downstream manifold valves are closed.
2. Make sure that the bypass valve is open.
3. Slowly open the upstream manifold valve.
4. Close the bypass valve.
5. Slowly open the downstream manifold valve.
Taking a Differential Pressure Transmitter Out of
Operation
The following procedure explains how to sequence the valves in your flow measurement piping or
optional bypass manifold to ensure that your transmitter is not overranged and that seal liquid is
not lost. Refer to the Figures 19 and 20.
NOTE
This procedure assumes that the process shutoff valves are open.
1. Close the downstream manifold valve.
2. Close the upstream manifold valve.
3. Open the bypass valve.
4. Carefully open the vent screw to release any residual pressure before disconnecting
lines.
! WARNING
When venting pressure from the transmitter, wear suitable protective equipment to
prevent possible injury from process material, temperature, or pressure.
35
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
36
2. Installation
3. Operation Via Local Display
A local display, as shown in Figure 29, has two lines of information. The upper line is a 5-digit
numeric display (4-digit when a minus sign is needed); the lower line is a 7-digit alphanumeric
display. The display provides local indication of measurement information.
The display can be configured to meet your specific needs. If configured Show 1, M1 is
displayed. If configured Show 2, M2 is displayed. To temporarily view the alternate
measurement, press the Enter button. After showing this measurement for a brief period, the
display reverts to the configured display. If configured Toggle, the display toggles between M1
and M2. When M2 is displayed, an M2 message blinks in the lower right of the display.
The display also provides a means for reranging, calibration, and configuration, viewing the
database, testing the display, and reranging the transmitter via the 2-button keypad. You can
access these operations by means of a multi-level menu system. Entry to the Mode Select menu is
made (from normal operating mode) by pressing the Next button. You can exit this menu, restore
your prior calibration or configuration, and return to the normal operating mode at any time by
going to Cancel and pressing the Enter button.
The top level structure diagram is shown in Figure 30.
34.5
INH2O
NEXT
ENTER
NEXT
PUSHBUTTON
ENTER
PUSHBUTTON
EXTERNAL ZERO BUTTON
(LATCHED [NONACTIVATING] POSITION)
Figure 29. Local Display Module
37
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
3. Operation Via Local Display
E
(measurement M1 or M2)
E
(measurement M2 or M1)
N
N
RERANGE
E
LOCAL MODE, GO TO RERANGE MENU
N
E
CONFIG
N
CALIB
E
LOCAL MODE, GO TO CONFIGURATION MENU
OFF-LINE, GO TO CALIBRATION MENU
N
VIEW DB
E
ON-LINE MODE
N
N
E
TST DSP
E
CANCEL
ON-LINE MODE
N
N
E
E
STEP THROUGH DATABASE DISPLAY
STEP THROUGH DISPLAY TEST PATTERN
EXIT MODE SELECT MENU, RETURN TO ON-LINE MODE
N
N = NEXT BUTTON
E = ENTER BUTTON
Figure 30. Top Level Structure Diagram
Entering Numerical Values
The general procedure for entering numerical values in Calibration and Configuration is as
follows:
1. At the appropriate prompt, press the Enter button. The display shows the last (or
default) value with the first digit flashing.
2. Use the Next button to select the desired first digit, then press the Enter button. Your
selection is entered and the second digit flashes.
3. Repeat Step 2 until you have created your new value. If the number has less than five
characters, use leading or trailing zeros for the remaining spaces. When you have
configured the fifth space, the display prompts you to place the decimal point.
4. Move the decimal point with the Next button until it is where you want it and press
the Enter button.
NOTE
1. The decimal point may not be placed directly after the first digit. For example,
you can not enter a value as 1.2300; you must enter it as 01.230.
2. The decimal position is identified by flashing except at the position after the fifth
digit. At that position (representing a whole number), the decimal point is assumed.
5. The display advances to the next menu item.
38
3. Operation Via Local Display
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Reranging
You can access the Rerange mode in the top level menu (see Figure 30). Entry to the Mode Select
menu is made (from normal operating mode) by pressing the Next button. The display reads
RERANGE. You can then adjust M1 URV and/or M1 LRV in the following two submenus.
NOTE
If M1 MODE is in a square root mode, regardless of engineering units selected,
RERANGE is automatically done in the following “default” pressure units:
• inH2O, if M2 MODE is a type of square root.
• M2 EGU units, if M2 MODE is linear.
The bottom line of the display indicates the “default units” during RERANGE.
Following RERANGE, the display automatically switches back to the configured
engineering units.
M1 URV:
To edit the upper range value, press Enter at the prompt M1 URV. Use the procedure
“Entering Numerical Values” on page 38 section to edit this parameter.
M1 LRV:
Similar to M1URV immediately above.
NOTE
M1 LRV is bypassed if M1 MODE is configured as square root since M1 LRV must
be zero.
Viewing the Database
You can access the View Database mode by the multi-level menu system described above. Entry
to the Mode Select menu is made (from normal operating mode) by pressing the Next button.
The display reads RERANGE. Use the Next button to get to VIEW DB. Acknowledge your
choice of this selection by pressing the Enter button. The display shows the first item in the
database. You can step through the database display by repeated use of the Next button. You can
abort this procedure at any time by pressing the Enter button.
Viewing the Pressure Range
The values of M1LRV and M1 URV can be viewed in VIEW DB as described above.
Testing the Display
You can access the Test Display mode by the same multi-level menu system that was used to enter
Reranging, Calibration, Configuration, and View Database mode. Entry to the Mode Select
menu is made (from normal operating mode) by pressing the Next button. The display reads
RERANGE. Use the Next button to get to TST DSP. Acknowledge your choice of this selection
by pressing the Enter button. The display shows the first test segment pattern. You can step
through the five patterns by repeated use of the Next button. You can abort the test at any time
by pressing the Enter button. The five patterns are shown in Figure 31.
39
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
3. Operation Via Local Display
ALL SEGMENTS ON
ALL SEGMENTS OFF
ALL HORIZONTAL SEGMENTS ON
ALL VERTICAL SEGMENTS ON
ALL DIAGONAL SEGMENTS AND DECIMAL POINTS ON
Figure 31. Display Test Segment Patterns
Error Messages
Table 4. Operation Error Messages
Parameter
Normal
Operation
Startup
40
Condition Tested
Write Protection
Enabled
Any non-On-line
Condition
Database OK or
corrupted
Error
Message
WR PROT
OFFLINE
INITERR
Action
Displays periodically to notify user
that unit is in Write Protect.
Notifies user of a non-On-line
condition.
User should perform SET GDB
procedure. See “SET GDB:” on
page 63.
4. Calibration
NOTE
1. For best results in applications where high accuracy is required, rezero the
transmitter output once it has stabilized at the final operating temperature.
2. Zero shifts resulting from position effects and/or static pressure effects can be
eliminated by rezeroing the transmitter output.
3. When checking the zero reading of a transmitter operating in the square root
mode, return the output to the linear mode. This eliminates an apparent
instability in the output signal. Return the transmitter output to the square root
mode after the zero check is complete.
4. After calibrating transmitters operating with a 4 to 20 mA (or 1 to 5 V dc)
output signal, check the underrange and overrange output values to ensure that
they extend beyond 4 and 20 mA (or 1 and 5 V dc) respectively.
General Calibration Notes
1. Each transmitter is factory characterized over its full rated pressure range. One benefit
of this process is that every transmitter can measure any applied differential pressure
within its range limits regardless of the calibrated range. The applied differential
pressure is measured and converted into an internal digital value of differential
pressure. This digital value of differential pressure is always available whether the
transmitter is calibrated or not. Calibration assures that the transmitter rated accuracy
is achieved over the calibrated range.
2. The internal digital value of differential pressure can be displayed on the optional local
display, transmitted digitally, and converted to a 4 to 20 mA analog output signal.
3. Each transmitter is factory calibrated to either a specified or a default calibrated range.
This calibration optimizes the accuracy of the internal digital value of differential
pressure over that range. If no range is specified, the default range is zero to the sensor
upper range limit (URL).
4. The transmitter database has configurable values for both Lower Range Value (LRV)
and upper range value (URV). These values are used for two functions.
a. Defining the Calibrated Range When Using Local Pushbuttons for Calibration:
♦
When either CAL LRV or CAL URV is initiated from the local pushbuttons, the
transmitter expects that the differential pressure applied at the time the button is
pressed is equal to the LRV or URV value respectively.
♦
This function trims the internal digital value of differential pressure; that is, it
performs a calibration based on the application of accurate differential pressures
equal to the values entered for LRV and URV in the transmitter database.
♦
This function also sets the 4 and 20 mA output points; that is, the 4 and 20 mA
points correspond to the values of LRV and URV in the database.
41
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
♦
4. Calibration
The value of LRV can be larger than the value of URV.
b. Reranging Without the Application of Pressure:
♦
Since the transmitter continually determines an internal digital value of the
measured differential pressure from the lower range limit (LRL) to the upper
range limit (URL), the 4 and 20 mA output points can be assigned to any
differential pressure values (within the span and range limits) without application
of pressure.
♦
The reranging function is accomplished by entering new database values for LRV
and URV.
♦
Reranging does not affect the calibration of the transmitter; that is, it does not
affect the optimization of the internal digital value of differential pressure over a
specific calibrated range.
♦
If the reranged LRV and URV are not within the calibrated range, the measured
values may not be as accurate as when they are within the calibrated range.
If the transmitter is in square root mode for flow rate measurement, the URV in the
database is displayed as the flow rate URV when the view database (VIEW DB)
function is used. However, the LRV and URV in pressure units can be displayed by
selecting the reranging (RERANGE) function. LRV is always zero when the
transmitter is configured for square root mode.
5. When the optional local display is used, the internal digital value of differential
pressure is sent directly to the indicator.
♦
The display can show any measured differential pressure in selected units regardless of
the calibrated range and the values of LRV and URV (within the limits of the
transmitter and display).
♦
If the measured differential pressure is outside the range established by the LRV and
URV values in the database, the display shows the measurement but also continually
blinks to indicate that the measurement is out of range. The mA current signal is
saturated at either the low or high overrange limit respectively but the display
continually shows the pressure.
6. When configured for 4 to 20 mA output, the internal digital value of differential
pressure is converted to an analog current signal.
♦
The transmitter sets the output at 4 mA for the LRV and 20 mA for the URV.
♦
There is an independent trim on the digital-to-analog conversion stage. This trim
allows for slight adjustment of the 4 and 20 mA outputs. This compensates for any
slight difference that exists between the transmitter mA output and an external
reference device which is measuring the current.
♦
The mA trim does not affect the calibration or the reranging of the transmitter and
does not affect the internal digital value of differential pressure or the transmission or
display of measured pressure.
♦
The mA trim can be done with or without pressure applied to the transmitter.
7. Zeroing from the local display does not affect the span.
42
4. Calibration
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
When the transmitter is zeroed to compensate for installed position effect, the
transmitter can have either LRV differential pressure applied (CAL LRV) or zero
differential pressure applied (CAL AT0). If using a zero-based range, either method
produces the same result. However, if the range is not zero-based, it is advantageous to
have both methods available.
For example, consider a differential pressure transmitter having a range of 50 to 100
psig. If it is not feasible to vent the transmitter to atmosphere for zeroing (or to bypass
the high and low sides for zeroing), it can be zeroed while the LRV differential
pressure of 50 psi is applied by using the CAL LRV function. On the other hand, if
the transmitter has been installed but there is no pressure in the process line yet (or
the high and low sides can be connected by a bypass valve), it can be zeroed while
open to atmosphere (or bypassed) by using the CAL AT0 function.
a. Zeroing with LRV Pressure Applied (CAL LRV):
♦
Before using this zeroing function, apply a differential pressure to the transmitter
equal to the value of LRV stored in the transmitter database.
♦
When you zero the transmitter, the internal digital value of differential pressure is
trimmed to be equal to the value of LRV stored in the database and the mA
output set to 4 mA.
♦
If zeroing is done when the applied differential pressure is different from the LRV
value in the database, the internal digital value of differential pressure is biased by
the difference in the values but the output is still set at 4 mA.
♦
The CAL LRV and CAL URV function should be used when calibrating a
transmitter for a specific range with known input differential pressures applied for
the LRV and URV.
b. Zeroing with Zero Pressure Applied (CAL AT0):
♦
♦
Make sure that the applied differential pressure is at zero. This means venting the
transmitter to atmosphere or opening a bypass valve to connect high and low
sides.
When you zero the transmitter, the internal digital value of the differential pressure is
trimmed to be equal to zero and the mA output set to an appropriate value such that
the mA output is a nominal 4 mA when the LRV pressure is applied later.
Calibration Setup
The following sections show setups for field or bench calibration. Use test equipment that is at
least three times as accurate as the desired accuracy of the transmitter.
NOTE
It is not necessary to set up calibration equipment to rerange the transmitter to a
different range. The transmitter can be accurately reranged by simply changing the
lower range value and the upper range value, which are stored in the transmitter
database.
43
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
4. Calibration
Setup of Electronic Equipment
VOLTMETER
POWER SUPPLY
(+)
(–)
(–) (+)
(–) (+)
250 Ω PRECISION RESISTOR
Resistor: 250 Ω, ±0.01%, 1 W minimum (Part No. E0309GY)
PC-BASED
CONFIGURATOR,
OR HART
COMMUNICATOR
Power supply: Refer to Figure 25
Digital Voltmeter: readings from 1.000 to 5.000 V dc
Figure 32. 4 to 20 mA Output Calibration Setup of Electronic Equipment
Field Calibration Setup
Field calibration is performed without disconnecting the process piping. In order to do this, you
must have a bypass and shutoff valves between the process and the transmitter and one of the
following:
♦
Access to the process connections on the nonprocess side of the transmitter
♦
The optional vent screw in the side of the process covers.
If the transmitter is to be removed from the process for calibration, refer to “Bench Calibration
Setup”below.
For field calibration, an adjustable air supply and a pressure measuring device are required. For
example, a dead weight tester or an adjustable clean air supply and pressure gauge can be used.
The pressure source can be connected to the transmitter process connection with pipe fittings or
it can be connected to the vent screw assembly using a calibration screw. The calibration screw
has a Polyflo fitting and can be used for pressures up to 700 kPa (100 psi). It is available as
Foxboro Part Number F0101ES.
To set up the equipment, refer to Figure 33 and use the following procedure.
1. If the transmitter is in operation, follow the “Taking a Differential Pressure
Transmitter Out of Operation” on page 35.
! CAUTION
With liquid service, drain both sides of transmitter to avoid calibration errors.
2. If a calibration screw is being used, remove the vent screw and replace it with the
calibration screw. Connect the pressure source to the calibration screw using
6 x 1 mm or 0.250 inch tubing.
If a calibration screw is not being used, remove the entire vent screw assembly or drain
44
4. Calibration
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
plug (as applicable) from the high pressure side of the transmitter. Connect
calibration tubing using a suitable thread sealant.
3. Close the bypass valve opened in Step 1.
4. Complete the setup shown in Figure 33.
NOTE
For vacuum applications, connect the calibrating pressure source to the low pressure
side of the transmitter.
5. If calibrating the output signal, also connect equipment as shown in Figure 32.
BYPASS VALVE
SHUTOFF VALVES
HIGH PRESSURE SIDE
CALIBRATING
PRESSURE
SOURCE
Note: Alternate connection point for calibrating
equipment is optional vent screw (not shown) on
high pressure side cover.
BLEEDER VALVES
(NEEDLE TYPE)
Figure 33. Field Calibration Setup
Bench Calibration Setup
The bench calibration setup requires disconnecting the process piping. For calibration setup
without disconnecting the process piping, refer to “Field Calibration Setup”above.
The bench calibration setup is shown in Figure 34. Connect the input piping to the high pressure
side of the transmitter as shown. Vent the low pressure side of the transmitter.
NOTE
For vacuum applications, connect the calibrating pressure source to the low pressure
side of the transmitter.
If calibrating the output signal, also connect equipment as shown in Figure 32.
45
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
4. Calibration
BYPASS VALVE
HIGH PRESSURE SIDE
SHUTOFF VALVES
CALIBRATING
PRESSURE
SOURCE
BLEEDER VALVES
(NEEDLE TYPE)
Figure 34. Bench Calibration Setup
Calibration Using a PC20
To calibrate the transmitter using a PC20 Configurator, follow the procedure in MI 020-495.
Calibration Using a PC50
To calibrate the transmitter using a PC50 Configurator, follow the procedure in MI 020-501 and
MI 020-520.
Calibration Using a HART Communicator
To calibrate the transmitter using a HART Communicator, follow the procedure in MI 020-366.
Calibration Using the Optional Local Display
To access the Calibration mode (from normal operating mode), press the Next button. The
display reads CALIB, the first item on the menu. Acknowledge your choice of this selection by
pressing the Enter button. The display shows the first item in the Calibration menu.
NOTE
1. During calibration, a single change could affect several parameters. For this
reason, if an entry is entered in error, re-examine the entire database or use the
Cancel feature to restore the transmitter to its starting configuration and begin
again.
46
4. Calibration
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
2. During adjustment of 4 and 20 mA in the Calibration menu, the milliampere
output does not reflect live measurement values.
Table 5. Calibration Menu
Item
CAL AT0
CAL LRV
Description
Calibrate at zero pressure.
Calibrate with pressure at 0% of transmitter range
(LRV).
CAL URV
Calibrate with pressure at 100% of transmitter range
(URV).
ADJ 4mA
Adjust nominal 4 mA output.
ADJ20mA
Adjust nominal 20 mA output.
CALDATE
Enter the calibration date.
ADJ 4mA causes the following four submenus.
A 4mAΔΔ
Increase 4 mA output by large step.
A 4mA∇∇
Decrease 4 mA output by large step.
A 4mAΔ
Increase 4 mA output by small step.
A 4mA∇
Decrease 4 mA output by small step.
ADJ 20mA causes the following four submenus.
Increase 20 mA output by large step.
A 20mAΔΔ
A 20mA∇∇
Decrease 20 mA output by large step.
A 20mAΔ
Increase 20 mA output by small step.
A 20mA∇
Decrease 20 mA output by small step.
NOTE
It is not necessary to use the ADJ4mA or ADJ20mA menu selections (commonly
known as mA Trim) unless there is a plant requirement to make the 4 and 20 mA
output values exactly match readings on certain plant calibration equipment and
the calibration operations done result in a small but unacceptable difference
between the transmitter mA output and the test equipment mA readout values.
Proceed to calibrate your transmitter by using the Next key to select your item and the Enter key
to specify your selection per Figures 35 and 36. At any point in the calibration you can Cancel,
restore your prior calibration and return to the on-line mode or Save your new calibration.
47
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
4. Calibration
E
CAL AT0
N
AT0 DONE
E
CAL AT0: To set or reset the zero point at zero
pressure, apply zero differential pressure to the
transmitter and, at display of CAL AT0, press
Enter. This can be done whether LRV is zero
or not. Completion is indicated by the display
AT0 Done.
N
E
E
CAL LRV
N
LRV DONE
N
E
E
CAL URV
N
URV DONE
N
E = ENTER
N = NEXT
ADJ 4mA
E
A 4mAΔΔ
N
N
A 4mA∇∇
N
N
N
N
N
E
N
A 4mA∇∇
E
A 4mAΔ
E
E
A 4mA∇
A 4mAΔΔ
E
E
A 4mAΔ
N
E
CAL LRV: To set or reset 0% of range input,
apply differential pressure to the transmitter
equal to the lower range value (LRV) in the
transmitter database and, at display of
CAL LRV, press Enter. Completion is
indicated by the display LRV Done.
A 4mA∇
E
CAL URV: To set or reset 100% of range
input, apply differential pressure to the
transmitter equal to the upper range value
(URV) in the transmitter database and, at
display of CAL URV, press Enter.
Completion is indicated by the display URV
Done.
ADJ20mA
E
A 20mAΔΔ
N
N
A 20mA∇∇
N
N
N
A 20mAΔ
N
N
A 20mA∇
N
N
E
A 20mAΔΔ
E
E
A 20mA∇∇
E
E
A 20mAΔ
ADJ4mA: If you configured your transmitter
operating mode as 4 to 20 mA, you can adjust
the 4 mA output by going to ADJ4mA using
the Next button and press Enter. This menu
item is bypassed if you configured your
transmitter for multidrop mode (poll address
other than zero).
E
E
E
A 20mA∇
To increase the 4 mA output by a large
(0.025 mA) step, press Enter at the display
A 4mAΔΔ. To decrease it by a large step, go to
CALDATE
(continued on next
figure)
Figure 35. Calibration Structure Diagram
48
4. Calibration
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
(CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS FIGURE)
CALDATE
E
N
Display Day
Increment Day
E
N
Display Month
N
Increment Month
E
N
Display Year
Increment Year
E
CANCEL
E
Discard all changes, return to ONLINE.
N
SAVE
E
Save database changes, return to ONLINE.
N
*If character is not the last position on the display line, advances to next character.
**If character is the last position on the display line, advances to next menu item.
NOTE: Commentary about this diagram immediately follows.
Figure 36. Calibration Structure Diagram (Continued)
Commentary on Figure 36
CALDATE:
This is not a required entry but can be used for recordkeeping or plant maintenance
purposes. To edit the calibration date, go to CALDATE with the Next button and press
Enter. You then can change the day, month, and year. The display shows the last date
with the day flashing. Use the Next button to step through the menu of digits to select
the desired day, then press Enter. Repeat this process for the month and year.
Zero Adjustment Using External Zero Button
An optional external zero adjustment mechanism in the electronics housing allows calibration at
zero differential pressure (the CAL AT0 function) or at the lower range value differential pressure
(the CAL LRV function) without removing the electronics compartment cover. The mechanism
is magnetically activated through the housing wall to prevent moisture from entering the
enclosure.
NOTE
Do not use CAL AT0 if pressure seals are used that are at different elevations from
the transmitter.
To use this feature:
49
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
4. Calibration
1. Unlatch the external zero button by turning it 90° in a counterclockwise direction so
that the screwdriver slot lines up with the two holes in the face of the adjacent part.
Do not push the button in with the screwdriver while doing this.
2. To set or reset the zero point at zero differential pressure, apply zero differential
pressure to the transmitter or use a bypass valve to equalize pressure on both sides of
the transmitter. Press the external zero button until the display reads CAL AT0.
Release the button. The display reads CAL WAIT and then RESET (calibration is
complete).
To set or reset the 0% of range input, apply the lower range value (LRV) differential
pressure to the transmitter and press and hold the external zero button until the
display reads CAL LRV (it reads CAL AT0 first). Release the button. The display
reads CAL WAIT and then RESET (calibration is complete).
NOTE
If the optional display is not present, the same functions can be accomplished by
depending on the length of time the external zero button is depressed. Press and
hold the button for 1 to 3 seconds for CAL AT0 or for 5 or more seconds for
CAL LRV. Therefore, if your LRV is zero, just depress the button for a few seconds.
However, if your LRV is not zero, use caution when using the external zero button
without the optional display because you must rely strictly on the length of time the
button is depressed to differentiate between CAL AT0 and CAL LRV.
Other possible messages are:
DISABLD if EX ZERO is configured EXZ DIS
IGNORED if the transmitter is not in the on-line mode.
WP ENAB if write protection jumper is in write protect position.
If additional rezeroing is required after Steps 1 and 2 have been accomplished, repeat
Step 2.
3. Relatch the external zero button by turning it 90° in a clockwise direction to prevent
accidental pressing of the button. Do not push the button in with the screwdriver
while doing this.
50
4. Calibration
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Error Messages
Table 6. Calibration Error Messages
Parameter
Password
Protection
Write
Protection
ZERO
SPAN
M1 URV
M1 LRV
Condition Tested
Error
Message
User Action
Password
BAD PWD
Bad password entered, use another.
Write protection
enabled
Internal offset too
large
Slope too large or too
small
M1URV > max
pressure in EGU
REJECT
Displays when user attempts an action that
is write protected.
Check applied pressure, configured
M1 LRV and configured M1 EOFF.
Check applied pressure, configured
M1 LRV and configured M1 EFAC.
Entered pressure is greater than maximum
rated pressure of transmitter. Check entry.
Verify EGUs.
Entered pressure is less than minimum
rated pressure of transmitter. Check entry.
Verify EGUs.
Cannot set span to 0. Check entry. Check
M1 LRV.
Check entry. Check M1 LRV.
BADZERO
BADSPAN
URV>FMX
M1URV < min
pressure in EGU
URV<FMN
M1 URV = M1 LRV
LRV=URV
M1 turndown exceeds
limit
URV < 0 with M1 or
M2 SqRt
M1LRV > max
pressure in EGU
BADTDWN
URV<LRV
LRV>FMX
M1LRV < min
pressure in EGU
LRV<FMN
M1 URV = M1 LRV
LRV=URV
M1 turndown exceeds
limit
BADTDWN
Square root mode with nonzero LRV is
not valid. Change LRV to 0.
Entered pressure is greater than maximum
rated pressure of transmitter. Check entry.
Verify EGUs.
Entered pressure is less than minimum
rated pressure of transmitter. Check entry.
Verify EGUs.
Cannot set span to 0. check entry. Check
M1 URV.
Check entry. Check M1 URV.
51
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
52
4. Calibration
5. Configuration
Configurable Parameters
Table 7 lists all the configurable parameters and the factory default for the IDP10-T
Transmitters. The factory default values have been customized if the transmitter was ordered with
optional feature -C2. The table also shows which parameters are configurable with the integral vs.
remote configurators.
Table 7. IDP10-T Configurable Parameters
Configurable
with
Parameter
Descriptors
Tag Number
Descriptor
Message
Input
Calibrated Range
Capability
Measurement #1 EGUs
Measurement #2 Mode
(SV)
Measurement #2 EGUs
Temp. Sensor Fail Strategy
Fail-safe
External Zero
Damping
Integ. Remote Application
Indic. Config. Requirement
8 characters max
Tag Number
No
Yes
16 characters max
Tag Name
No
Yes
32 characters max
Inst Location
No
Yes
LRV to URV in units
listed in (a) below
See (b) below
Yes
when not
specified per S.O.
Yes
4 to 20 mA
Yes
Yes
Linear
Yes
Yes
Units of
Yes
Calibrated Range
Yes
Linear
Yes
Yes
Units of
Yes
Calibrated Range
Yes
Output
Measurement #1 Output 4 to 20 mA or Fixed
Current. Specify Poll
(PV)
Measurement #1 Mode
Factory
Default
Address (1-15) for Fixed
Current.
Linear or type of square
root in (d) below
If linear, select from
units listed in (a) below;
If Sq.Rt., select from
units listed in (c) below
Linear or type of square
root in (d) below
If linear, select from
units listed in (a) below;
If Sq.Rt., select from
units listed in (c) below
Normal oper. or failsafe
High or Low
Enabled or Disabled
0 to 32 seconds.
Fail-safe
High
Enabled
None
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
53
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
5. Configuration
Table 7. IDP10-T Configurable Parameters (Continued)
Configurable
with
Parameter
Poll Address
LCD Indicator (e)
Capability
Factory
Default
0 - 15
0
Meas #1 EGU or % Lin Meas #1 EGU
Integ. Remote Application
Indic. Config. Requirement
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
(a) psi, inHg, ftH2O, inH2O, atm, bar, mbar, MPa, kPa, Pa, kg/cm2, g/cm2, mmHg, torr, mmH2O.
(b) Span Code A: 0 to 30 inH2O; Span Code B: 0 to 200 inH2O; Span Code C: 0 to 30 psi;
Span Code D: 0 to 300 psi; Span Code E: 0 to 3000 psi.
(c) gal/s, gal/m, gal/h, gal/d, Mgal/d, ft3/s, ft3/m, ft3/h, ft3/d, Igal/s, Igal/m, Igal/h, Igal/d, l/s, l/m, l/h, Ml/d, m3/s,
m3/m,
m3/h, m3/d, bbl/s, bbl/m, bbl/h, bbl/d, %flow.
(d) Square root with cutoff below 1% of calibrated pressure range or with linear below 4% of calibrated pressure
range.
(e) Measurement #2 can be displayed at any time by pressing the Enter button regardless of the local display
configuration. This reverts to Measurement #1 or % Lin (as configured) when power is cycled off and on.
Configuration Using a PC20
To configure the transmitter using a PC20 Configurator, follow the procedure in MI 020-495.
Configuration Using a PC50
To configure the transmitter using a PC50 Configurator, follow the procedure in MI 020-501
and MI 020-520.
Configuration Using a HART Communicator
To configure the transmitter using a HART Communicator, follow the procedure in
MI 020-366.
Configuration Using the Optional Local Display
You can access the Configuration mode by the same multi-level menu system that was used to
enter Calibration mode. Entry to the Mode Select menu is made (from normal operating mode)
by pressing the Next button. The display reads CALIB, the first item on the menu. Press the
Next button again to get to the second item on the menu, CONFIG. Acknowledge your choice of
this selection by pressing the Enter button. The display shows the first item in the Configuration
menu. You can then configure items shown in Table 8. The standard factory default
configuration is also given in this table.
The standard factory default configuration is not used if custom configuration option -C2 has
been specified. Option -C2 is a full factory configuration of all parameters to the user’s
specifications.
54
5. Configuration
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
NOTE
1. You can configure most parameters using the local display. However, for more
complete configuration capability, use a HART Communicator or PC-Based
configurator.
2. During configuration, a single change can affect several parameters. For this
reason, if an entry is entered in error, re-examine the entire database or use the
Cancel feature to restore the transmitter to its starting configuration and begin
again.
Table 8. Configuration Menu
Item
POLLADR
EX ZERO(a)
S2 FAIL
OUT DIR
OUTFAIL
OFFL MA
DAMPING
M1 MODE
M1DISP
M1 EGU
M1 URV
M1 LRV
M2 MODE
M2 EGU
DISPLAY
CALDATE
ENA PWD
CFG PWD
CAL PWD
SET GDB
Description
Poll Address: 0 - 15
External Zero: enable or disable
Temperature Sensor Failure Strategy: S2FATAL or
S2NOFTL
4 to 20 mA Output: forward or reverse
4 to 20 mA Output: fail mode output - low or high
4 to 20 mA Output in offline mode - last or user set
Damping: none, 1/4, 1/2, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, or 32 seconds
Output: linear or type of square root(b)
Local Indicator Display in linear mode: in percent or
engineering units
User-Defined Engineering Units
Primary Upper Range Value
Primary Lower Range Value
Output: linear or type of square root
User-Defined Engineering Units
Display M1, M2, or Toggle between M1 and M2
Calibration Date
Enable password; no password, configuration only, or
configuration and calibration
User set configuration password (six characters)
User set calibration password (six characters)
Rewrite all calibration and configuration values with
default values
Initial Factory
Configuration
0
Enable
S2FATAL
Forward
High
USER MA
None
Linear
M1EGU
inH2O or psi
URL
0
Linear
Same as M1 EGU
M1
--NO PWD
-------
(a) Applies only if transmitter contains External Zero option.
(b) Square root is not applicable to absolute pressure, gauge pressure, and flange level measurement.
55
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
5. Configuration
Proceed to configure your transmitter by using the Next button to select your item and the Enter
button to specify your selection per the following three figures. At any point in the configuration
you can Cancel your changes and return to the on-line mode, or Save your changes.
56
5. Configuration
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
E
POLLADR
N
EX ZERO
N
EXZ DIS
EXZ ENA
N
N
E
N
OUT FWD
N
E
E
OFFL MA
3. LIN PCT provides percent output
on LCD indicator only (linear mode).
Percent flow in square root is selectable
under MI EGU.
E
N
FAIL LO
FAIL HI
E
E
N
2. Square root functions should not
be selected on absolute and gauge
pressure or level transmitters.
OUT REV
E
OUTFAIL
1. OUTFAIL sets mA output to go
either High or Low under certain
failure conditions, such as a sensor
failure.
S2 NOFTL
E
E
NOTES:
E
S2 FATAL
N
LAST MA
USER MA
E
Display
Digit
E
E
N
E
E
E
E
15
2
E
E
S2 FAIL
N
N
1
E
N
OUT DIR(a)
N
0
N
Implement
Digit
N
E
DAMPING
N
NO DAMP
DAMP 1/4
DAMP 1/2
N
E
E
E
N
N
DAMP 32
E
N
E
M1 MODE
N
N
M1SQ<1C
M1 LIN
E
N
E
M1SQ<4L
E
E
Display Digit
**
N
N
M1SQ<nC
E
Increment Digit
*
(a) Linear Mode only.
(continued on next figure)
Figure 37. Configuration Structure Diagram
57
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
5. Configuration
(continued from previous figure)
M1 DISP(a)
E
N
M1 EGU
LIN PCT
E
N
E
N
E
M1 EGU
N
gal/s
N
gal/m
E
E
N
gal/h
E
E
N
N
or
N
inH20
inHg
E
M1EOFF
E
N
M1EFAC
**
E
E
N
atm
E
Increment Digit
*
N
Display Digit
Increment Digit
E
**
N
N
E
Display Digit
N
M1 URV
%flow
E
*
N
Display Digit
**
E
Increment Digit
*
N
M1 LRV
N
M2 MODE
E
E
**
N
Display Digit
E
Increment Digit
*
Similar to M1 MODE
N
M2 EGU
E
N
DISPLAY
(continued on next figure)
Similar to M1 EGU
(a) Linear Mode only.
*If character is not the last position on the display line, advances to next character.
**If character is the last position on the display line, advances to next menu item.
Figure 38. Configuration Structure Diagram (Continued)
58
5. Configuration
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
(continued from previous figure)
E
DISPLAY
N
SHOW M1
SHOW M2
E
CALDATE
N
TOGGLE
E
E
E
N
Increment Day
Display Day
E
N
Display Month
N
Increment Month
E
N
Increment Year
Display Year
E
E
ENA PWD
CFGONLY
NO PWDS
N
E
E
E
CFG PWD
N or E
**
Display
Character
E
*
N
CFG+CAL
CAL PWD
N or E
Increment
Character
N
Increment
Character
Display N
Character
E
**
*
Increment
Character
Display
Character
E
CFG PWD
N or E
E
SET GDB
N
CANCEL
CLEAR DB
N
E
Performs Reset
and returns
to ONLINE
Discard all changes, return to ONLINE
N
SAVE
N
Save database changes, return to ONLINE
*If character is not the last position on the display line, advances to next character.
**If character is the last position on the display line, advances to next menu item.
Figure 39. Configuration Structure Diagram (Continued)
59
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
5. Configuration
Commentary on Configuration Structure Diagram
In general, use the Next button to select your item and the Enter button to specify your
selection.
POLLADR:
To configure the transmitter poll address, press Enter. Use the Next button to select an
address of 0 through 15, then press Enter. An address of 1 through 15 is used for
multidrop mode with a fixed mA output.
EX ZERO:
The External Zero feature allows the optional external zero pushbutton to be disabled for
additional security. To configure this feature, go to EX ZERO with the Next button and
press Enter. Use the Next button to select EXZ DIS or EXZ ENA and press Enter.
S2 FAIL:
The temperature sensor compensates for changes in temperature in the transmitter
electronics. Failure of this sensor can cause a 4 to 20 mA accuracy change of up to 0.25%.
The S2 FAIL feature allows you to specify action (or no action) if such a failure occurs.
To configure this feature, go to S2 FAIL with the Next button and press Enter. Use the
Next button to select S2 FATAL (to have the output go to that configured in OUTFAIL)
or S2 NOFTL (to continue operation with a temperature sensor failure). This parameter
has no effect if POLLADR is configured to any number from 1 through 15 and is
bypassed if M1 MODE or M2 MODE is configured as square root.
OUT DIR:
To configure the Output Direction, go to OUT DIR with the Next button and press
Enter. Use the Next button to select OUT FWD (4 - 20 mA) or OUT REV (20 - 4 mA)
and press Enter. This parameter has no effect if POLLADR is configured to any number
from 1 through 15 and is bypassed if M1 MODE or M2 MODE is configured as square
root.
OUTFAIL:
The Outfail feature provides high or low output with certain malfunctions. To configure
the fail mode output, go to OUTFAIL with the Next button and press Enter. Use the
Next button to select FAIL LO or FAIL HI and press Enter. This parameter has no effect
if POLLADR is configured to any number from 1 through 15.
OFFL MA:
The Off-line mA feature enables you to set the output to a specified value or to the last
value if the transmitter goes off-line. To configure the off-line output, go to OFFL MA
with the Next button and press Enter. Use the Next button to select LAST MA or
USER MA and press Enter. If you selected USER MA, press Enter again at the display of
digits. Then use the Next button to step through the library of digits to select the desired
first digit, then press Enter. Your selection is entered and the second character flashes.
Repeat this procedure until you have entered the last digit. Then use the Next button to
move the decimal point to its desired location and press Enter. The display advances to
the next menu item.
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5. Configuration
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
DAMPING:
To configure additional damping, go to DAMPING with the Next button and press
Enter. Use the NEXT button to select NO DAMP, DAMP 1/4, DAMP 1/2, DAMP 1,
DAMP 2, DAMP 4, DAMP 8, DAMP 16, or DAMP 32 and press Enter.
M1 MODE:
To configure the mode of the primary output (PV), go to M1 MODE with the Next
button and press Enter. Use the Next button to select M1 LIN (linear), M1SQ<1C
(square root with cutoff below 1% dp (M1 URV in linear units of dp), M1SQ<4L (square
root with linear below 4% of dp (M1 URV in linear units of dp), or M1SQ<nC (square
root with user configured cutoff specified between 0 and 20% of the flow upper range
value, M1 EFAC) and press Enter. You cannot configure this parameter as square root if
OUT DIR was configured as OUT REV or if M1LRV is not zero.
NOTE
Cutoff in M1SQ<1C and M1SQ<4L is in percent of differential pressure but cutoff
in M1SQ<nC is in percent of flow rate.
M1 DISP:
To configure the optional local indicator to show engineering units or percent in linear
mode, go to M1 DISP with the Next button and press Enter. Use the Next button to
select M1 EGU or LIN PCT and press Enter. LIN PCT only provides percent readings on
the local display. The M1 engineering unit is used for remote communication of
Measurement #1, even if LIN PCT is selected.
M1 EGU:
To configure pressure or flow engineering units for your display and transmission, go to
M1 EGU with the Next button and press Enter. If M1 MODE is configured as M1 LIN,
you are asked to specify one of the following pressure labels: psi, inHg, ftH2O, inH2O,
atm, bar, mbar, MPa, Pa, kPa, kg/cm2, g/cm2, mmHg, torr, mmH2O, mH2O. or
hW60 (inH2O at 60°F). Your transmitter then automatically adjusts M1EFAC
(engineering factor), M1 URV (upper range value), and M1 LRV (lower range value).
M1EOFF is set to zero.
If M1 MODE is configured as M1 SQ<1C, M1SQ<4L, or M1 SQ<nC, you are asked to
specify one of the following flow labels: %flow, gal/s, gal/m, gal/h, gal/d, Mgal/d, ft3/s,
ft3/m, ft3/h, ft3/d, Igal/s, Igal/m, Igal/h, Igal/d, l/s, l/m, l/h, Ml/d, m3/s, m3/m, m3/h,
m3/d, bbl/s, bbl/m, bbl/h, bbl/d, T/h, lb/h, kg/h, Nm3/h (normal m3/h), Sm3/h
(standard m3/h), Am3/h (actual m3/h), or MMSCFD (million scfd). Check the M1EFAC
(engineering factor) and, if necessary, adjust it as follows:
M1EFAC:
This parameter is used to input the numerical relationship between the measured span in
pressure units and the displayed (and transmitted) span in flow units. It is the displayed
URV in flow units (which is also the span in flow units since flow ranges must be zerobased).
Example:
61
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
5. Configuration
For a 200 inH2O transmitter with a measured range of 0 to 100 inH2O and displayed
range of 0 to 500 gal/m, M1EFAC = 500.
To edit the span in your configured flow units, press Enter at the prompt M1EFAC. Use
the procedure “Entering Numerical Values” on page 38 to edit this parameter.
M1 URV:
To edit the upper range value, press Enter at the prompt M1 URV. Use the procedure
“Entering Numerical Values” on page 38 section to edit this parameter.
M1 LRV:
Similar to M1URV immediately above.
NOTE
M1 LRV is bypassed if M1 MODE is configured as square root since M1 LRV must
be zero.
M2 MODE:
M2 is a secondary measurement (SV) that is read by the HART Communicator and can
be displayed on the optional display. You might use this feature to display M1 in flow
units and M2 in comparable pressure units. To configure this parameter, go to M2
MODE with the Next button and press Enter. Use the Next button to select M2 LIN
(linear), M2SQ<1C (square root with cutoff below 1% dp (M2 URV in linear units of
dp), M2SQ<4L (square root with linear below 4% of dp (M2 URV in linear units of dp),
or M2SQ<nC (square root with cutoff specified between 0 and 20% of the flow upper
range value, M2 EFAC) and press Enter.
M2 EGU:
Similar to M1 EGU.
DISPLAY:
To display M1, M2, or to toggle between M1 and M2, go to DISPLAY with the Next
button and press Enter. Use the Next button to select SHOW M1, SHOW M2, or
TOGGLE and press Enter.
CALDATE:
This is not a required entry but can be used for record-keeping or plant maintenance
purposes. To edit the calibration date, go to CALDATE with the Next button and press
Enter. You then can change the day, month, and year. The display shows the last date
with the day flashing. Use the Next button to step through the library of digits to select
the desired day, then press Enter. Repeat this process for the month and year.
ENA PWD:
To enable or disable the password feature, go to ENA PWD with the Next button and
press Enter. Use the Next button to select NO PWDS (password not required for either
calibration or configuration), CFGONLY (password required to configure but not to
calibrate), or CFG+CAL (passwords required to both configure and calibrate) and press
Enter.
If you selected CFG ONLY, the display changes to CFG PWD. Press either the Next or
Enter button. Use the Next button to step through the library of characters to select the
62
5. Configuration
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
desired first character, then press Enter. Your selection is entered and the second
character flashes. Repeat this procedure until you have created your password. If the
password has less than six characters, use blanks for the remaining spaces. When you have
configured the sixth space, the display advances to the next menu item.
If you selected CFG+CAL, the display changes to CAL PWD. To create the Calibration
password, press either the Next or Enter button. Use the Next button to step through the
library of characters to select the desired first character, then press Enter. Your selection is
entered and the second character flashes. Repeat this procedure until you have created
your password. If the password has less than six characters, use blanks for the remaining
spaces. When you have configured the sixth space, the display advances to CFG PWD.
Use the same procedure to create the configuration password.
NOTE
In normal operation, the CAL PWD allows access to only calibration mode. The
CFG PWD allows access to both configuration and calibration.
! CAUTION
Record your new password before saving changes to the database.
SET GDB:
If your transmitter database becomes corrupted and you receive an INITERR message
upon startup, this function enables you to rewrite all calibration and configuration values
with default values.
! CAUTION
Any calibration and configuration values that you have entered will be lost. Therefore,
SET GDB should not be selected if your transmitter is functioning normally.
63
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
5. Configuration
Character Lists
Table 9. Alphanumeric Character List
Character List*
@
, (comma)
A-Z (uppercase)
[
\
]
^
_ (underscore)
space
!
“
#
$
%
&
‘
(
)
*
+
.
/
0-9
:
;
<
>
=
?
*List only applies to Model 275 HART Communicator not to optional local display.
Table 10. Numeric Character List
Character List
–
. (decimal point)
0 through 9
64
5. Configuration
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Error Messages
Table 11. Configuration Error Messages
Parameter
Password
Protection
Write
Protection
M1 MODE
(being
changed to
square root)
M1EFAC
M1 URV
Condition Tested
Error Message
User Action
Password
BAD PWD
Bad password entered, use another.
Write Protection
Enabled
M1 LRV ≠ 0
REJECT
LRVnot0
M1 URV < 0
URV<LRV
OUT DIR is OUT
REV
URV<LRV
M1EFAC < 0
-M1EFAC
M2EFAC < 0
-M2EFAC
M1EFAC = 0
0M1EFAC
M2EFAC = 0
0M2EFAC
M1EOFF ≠ 0 or
M2EOFF ≠ 0
BADEOFF
M1EFAC < 0
-M1EFAC
M1EFAC = 0
0M1EFAC
M1URV > max
pressure in EGU
URV>FMX
M1URV < min
pressure in EGU
URV<FMN
Displays when user attempts an action that is
write protected.
Square root mode with nonzero LRV is not
valid. Change M1 LRV to 0.
Square root mode with negative URV is not
valid. Change M1 URV to positive value.
Square root mode with URV < LRV is not
valid. Change M1 LRV to 0 and M1 URV to
positive value.
Negative M1 EFAC is not valid. Change
M1 EFAC to positive value.
Negative M2 EFAC is not valid. Change
M2 EFAC to positive value.
M1 EFAC = 0 is not valid. Change
M1 EFAC to positive value.
M2 EFAC = 0 is not valid. Change
M2 EFAC to positive value.
Square root mode with nonzero
M1 EOFF and M2 EOFF is not valid. Change
M1 EOFF and M2 EOFF to 0.
Negative M1 EFAC is not valid. Change
M1 EFAC to positive value.
M1 EFAC = 0 is not valid. Change
M1 EFAC to positive value.
Entered pressure is greater than maximum
rated pressure of transmitter. Check entry.
Verify EGUs.
Entered pressure is less than minimum rated
pressure of transmitter. Check entry. Verify
EGUs.
Cannot set span to 0. Check entry. Check
M1 LRV.
Check entry. Check M1 LRV.
M1 URV = M1 LRV LRV=URV
M1 turndown exceeds BADTDWN
limit
URV <0 with M1 or URV<LRV
M2 SqRt
Square root mode with nonzero LRV is not
valid. Change M1 LRV to 0.
65
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
5. Configuration
Table 11. Configuration Error Messages (Continued)
Parameter
M1 LRV
Condition Tested
Error Message
M1LRV > max
pressure in EGU
LRV>FMX
M1LRV < min
pressure in EGU
LRV<FMN
M1 URV = M1 LRV LRV=URV
M1 turndown exceeds BADTDWN
limit
M2 MODE M1 LRV ≠ 0
LRVnot0
(being
changed to M1 URV < 0
URV<LRV
square root)
M2EFAC
66
OUT DIR is OUT
REV
URV<LRV
M1EFAC < 0
-M1EFAC
M2EFAC < 0
-M2EFAC
M1EFAC = 0
0M1EFAC
M2EFAC = 0
0M2EFAC
M1EOFF ≠ 0 or
M2EOFF ≠ 0
BADEOFF
M2EFAC < 0
-M2EFAC
M2EFAC = 0
0M2EFAC
User Action
Entered pressure is greater than maximum
rated pressure of transmitter. Check entry.
Verify EGUs.
Entered pressure is less than minimum rated
pressure of transmitter. Check entry. Verify
EGUs.
Cannot set span to 0. Check entry. Check
M1 URV.
Check entry. Check M1 URV.
Square root mode with nonzero LRV is not
valid. Change M1 LRV to 0.
Square root mode with negative URV is not
valid. Change M1 URV to positive value.
Square root mode with URV < LRV is not
valid. Change M1 LRV to 0 and M1 URV to
positive value.
Negative M1 EFAC is not valid. Change
M1 EFAC to positive value.
Negative M2 EFAC is not valid. Change
M2 EFAC to positive value.
M1 EFAC = 0 is not valid. Change
M1 EFAC to positive value.
M2 EFAC = 0 is not valid. Change
M2 EFAC to positive value.
Square root mode with nonzero
M1 EOFF and M2 EOFF is not valid. Change
M1 EOFF and M2 EOFF to 0.
Negative M2 EFAC is not valid. Change
M2 EFAC to positive value.
M2 EFAC = 0 is not valid. Change
M2 EFAC to positive value.
6. Maintenance
! DANGER
For nonintrinsically safe installations, to prevent a potential explosion in a Division 1
hazardous area, de-energize transmitters before you remove threaded housing covers.
Failure to comply with this warning could result in an explosion resulting in severe
injury or death.
Error Messages
For error messages displayed on the HART Communicator refer to MI 020-366.
Parts Replacement
Parts replacement is generally limited to the electronics module assembly, housing assembly,
sensor assembly, terminal block assembly, cover O-rings, and optional display. For part numbers
relating to the transmitter and its options, see PL 009-005.
Replacing the Terminal Block Assembly
1. Turn off transmitter power source.
2. Remove the Field Terminals and the Electronics compartment covers by rotating
them counterclockwise. Screw in cover lock if applicable.
3. Remove the digital display (if applicable) as follows: grasp the two tabs on the display
and rotate it about 10° in a counterclockwise direction.
4. Remove the electronics module from the housing by loosening the two captive screws
that secure it to the housing. Then pull the module out of the housing far enough to
gain access to the cable connectors on the rear of the module.
5. Remove the four socket head screws securing the terminal block.
6. Disconnect the terminal block cable connector from the electronics module.
7. Remove the terminal block and the gasket under it.
8. Connect the new terminal block cable connector to the electronics module.
9. Install the new terminal block and new gasket and reinstall the four screws to
0.67 N⋅m (6 in⋅lb) in several even increments.
10. Reinstall the electronics module (and digital display if applicable).
11. Reinstall the covers onto the housing by rotating them clockwise to seat the O-ring
into the housing and then continue to hand tighten until the each cover contacts the
housing metal-to-metal. If cover locks are present, lock the cover per the procedure
described in “Cover Locks” on page 29.
12. Turn on transmitter power source.
67
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
6. Maintenance
Replacing the Electronics Module Assembly
To replace the electronics module assembly, refer to Figure 40 and proceed as follows:
1. Turn off transmitter power source.
2. Remove the electronics compartment cover by rotating it counterclockwise. Screw in
cover lock if applicable.
3. Remove the digital display (if applicable) as follows: grasp the two tabs on the display
and rotate it about 10° in a counterclockwise direction. Pull out the display and
disconnect its cable.
4. Remove the electronics module from the housing by loosening the two captive screws
that secure it to the housing. Then pull the module out of the housing far enough to
gain access to the cable connectors on the rear of the module.
! CAUTION
The electronics module is “one assembly” at this point and is electrically and
mechanically connected to topworks with a flexible ribbon signal cable, a 2-wire
power cable, and in some cases, a cable for an external zero pushbutton. Do not
exceed the slack available in these cables when removing the assembled module.
5. Unplug all cable connectors from the rear of the electronics module and place the
module on a clean surface.
6. Predetermine connector orientation, then insert the cable connectors into the
replacement module. Replace the module in the housing using care not to pinch the
cables between the module and the housing. Tighten the two screws that secure the
module to the housing.
7. Connect the cable from the digital display to the electronics module. Ensure that the
O-ring is fully seated in the display housing. Then, holding the digital display by the
tabs at the sides of the display, insert it into the housing. Secure the display to the
housing by aligning the tabs on the sides of the assembly and rotating it about 10° in
a clockwise direction.
8. Reinstall the cover onto the housing by rotating it clockwise to seat the O-ring into
the housing and then continue to hand tighten until the cover contacts the housing
metal-to-metal. If cover locks are present, lock the cover per the procedure described
in “Cover Locks” on page 29.
9. Turn on transmitter power source.
The module replacement procedure is now complete.
68
6. Maintenance
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
HOUSING ASSEMBLY
TO REMOVE ELECTRONICS
MODULE, REMOVE TWO
CROSS RECESS SCREWS.
TO REMOVE DISPLAY FROM
ELECTRONICS MODULE,
TWIST DISPLAY COUNTERCLOCKWISE TO RELEASE
TABS AND PULL OUT, THEN
UNPLUG CABLE CONNECTOR.
Figure 40. Replacing the Electronics Module Assembly and Display
Removing and Reinstalling a Housing Assembly
To remove and reinstall a housing assembly, refer to Figure 40 and proceed as follows:
1. Remove the electronics module per Steps 1 through 5 in the previous procedure.
2. If your housing has an anti-rotation screw, remove the red lacquer from the screw
recess. Turn the screw three full turns counterclockwise.
3. If your housing has a retention clip, remove the red lacquer from the screw recess.
Remove the screw completely, and slide the clip off the housing. Save the clip and
screw for future use,
4. Remove the housing by rotating it counterclockwise (when viewed from the top). Use
caution to avoid damaging the sensor cable.
5. Inspect the sensor O-ring for damage. If the O-ring is damaged, replace it with the
appropriate O-ring (see parts list for your transmitter). Lubricate the O-ring with
silicone lubricant (Foxboro Part Number 0048130 or equivalent). Verify that the
O-ring is situated in the groove of the neck.
! WARNING
Failure to reuse or install the proper O-ring for a CSA labeled product violates
ANSI / ISA 12.27.01.
6. Feed the sensor cable through the housing neck into the electronics compartment.
7. Screw the housing onto the sensor neck until it bottoms. Do not over tighten. Be
careful not to damage the sensor cable or dislodge the neck O-ring.
69
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
6. Maintenance
8. If your housing has an anti-rotation screw, engage the screw until it touches the sensor
neck and back it off 1/8th turn. It is important that the screw is not touching the
sensor. Fill the screw recess with red lacquer (Foxboro Part Number X0180GS or
equivalent). The housing can then be rotated up to one full turn counterclockwise for
optimum access.
9. If your housing has a retention clip, insert the clip over the boss in the housing neck so
that the hole in the clip is aligned with the hole in the boss. Install the screw but do
not tighten. Rotate the housing up to one full turn counterclockwise for optimum
access. Tighten the retention clip screw and fill the screw recess with red lacquer
(Foxboro Part Number X0180GS or equivalent). The housing can still be rotated for
optimum access.
10. Reinstall the electronics module per Steps 6 through 9 in the previous procedure.
Adding the Optional Display
To add the optional display, refer to Figure 40 and proceed as follows:
1. Turn off transmitter power source.
2. Remove the electronics compartment cover by rotating it counterclockwise. Screw in
cover lock if applicable.
3. Plug the display into the receptacle at the top of the electronics assembly.
4. Ensure that the O-ring is seated in its groove in the display housing. Then insert the
display into the electronics compartment by grasping the two tabs on the display and
rotating it about 10° in a clockwise direction.
5. Install the new cover (with a window) onto the housing by rotating it clockwise to seat
the O-ring into the housing and then continue to hand tighten until the cover
contacts the housing metal-to-metal. If cover locks are present, lock the cover per the
procedure described in “Cover Locks” on page 29.
6. Turn on transmitter power source.
Replacing the Sensor Assembly
To replace the sensor assembly, refer to Figures 41 and 42 and proceed as follows:
1. Remove the electronics module as described above.
2. Remove the housing as described above.
3. Remove the process covers from sensor by removing two hex head bolts.
4. Replace the gaskets in the process covers.
5. Install the process covers and housing on the new sensor. Torque cover bolts to 100
N⋅m (75 lb⋅ft) in several even increments. Torque values are 68 N⋅m (50 lb⋅ft) when
316 ss bolts are specified; 75 N⋅m (55 lb⋅ft) when B7M bolts are specified.
6. Reinstall electronics module.
7. Pressure test the sensor and process cover assembly by applying a hydrostatic pressure
of 150% of the maximum static and overrange pressure rating to both sides of the
process cover/sensor assembly simultaneously through the process connections. Hold
70
6. Maintenance
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
pressure for one minute. There should be no leakage of the test fluid through the
gaskets. If leakage occurs, retighten the cover bolts per Step 5 (or replace the gaskets)
and retest.
! CAUTION
Perform hydrostatic test with a liquid and follow proper hydrostatic test procedures.
PROCESS COVER
SENSOR
PROCESS COVER
GASKETS
HEX HEAD BOLTS
Figure 41. Replacing the Sensor Assembly
71
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
6. Maintenance
BOTTOMWORKS WITH
PROCESS CONNECTOR
CODE 7
PVDF INSERTS
PROCESS CONNECTIONS
Figure 42. Replacing the Sensor Assembly (pvdf Inserts)
Rotating Process Covers for Venting
As received, your IASPT Transmitter provides sensor cavity draining without the need for side
drain connections, regardless of whether the transmitter is mounted vertically or horizontally.
Sensor cavity venting is provided by mounting the transmitter horizontally or with the optional
vent screw (-V). However, if you did not specify this option, you can still achieve venting (instead
of draining) with vertical mounting by rotating the process covers. See Figure 43.
LIQUID PROCESS FLOW
STANDARD
ORIENTATION
PROCESS COVERS
CONDENSED
LIQUID FREELY
DRAINS
GASEOUS PROCESS FLOW
GAS FREELY VENTS
INVERTED
PROCESS
COVERS
Figure 43. Sensor Cavity Venting and Draining
To rotate the process covers, refer to Figure 41 and proceed as follows:
1. Turn off the transmitter power source and remove the transmitter from the process.
2. Remove the process covers from sensor by removing two hex head bolts.
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6. Maintenance
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
3. Replace gaskets in process covers.
4. Rotate the process covers so that the longer tab is at the bottom.
5. Reinstall process covers and bolts. Torque cover bolts to 100 N⋅m (75 lb⋅ft) in several
even increments. Torque values are 68 N⋅m (50 lb⋅ft) when 316 ss bolts are specified;
75 N⋅m (55 lb⋅ft) when B7M bolts are specified.
6. Pressure test the sensor and process cover assembly by applying a hydrostatic pressure
of 150% of the maximum static and overrange pressure (see “Standard Specifications”
on page 5) to both sides of the process cover/sensor assembly simultaneously through
the process connections. Hold pressure for one minute. There should be no leakage of
the test fluid through the gaskets. If leakage occurs, retighten the cover bolts per Step
4 or replace the gaskets and retest.
! CAUTION
Perform hydrostatic test with a liquid and follow proper hydrostatic test procedures.
73
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
74
6. Maintenance
Index
C
Calibration 41
Using a HART Communicator 46
Using a PC20 46
Using a PC50 Configurator 46
Using the Local Display 46
Calibration Notes 41
Calibration Setup 43
Configuration 53
Using a HART Communicator 54
Using a PC20 Configurator 54
Using a PC50 Configurator 54
Using the Local Display 54
Cover Locks 29
D
Display, Positioning the 28
E
Error Messages
Calibration 51
Configuration 65
Operation 40
H
Housing, Positioning the 28
I
Identification 3
Installation 15
M
Maintenance 67
Mounting 15
O
Operation Via Local Display 37
75
MI IDP10-T – May 2010
Index
P
Parts Replacement 67
Piping, Installation of Flow Measurement 24
R
Reference Documents
Reranging 39
1
S
Seal Liquid, Filling the System with 27
Specifications
Product Safety 10
Standard 5
W
Wiring 29
Write Protect Jumper, Setting the 29
Z
Zero Adjustment Using External Zero Button 49
ISSUE DATES
DEC 2001
OCT 2003
APR 2004
FEB 2005
JUN 2005
FEB 2006
AUG 2006
OCT 2007
JUL 2008
MAY 2010
Vertical lines to the right of text or illustrations indicate areas changed at last issue date.
Invensys Operations Management
5601 Granite Parkway Suite 1000
Plano, TX 75024
United States of America
http://www.iom.invensys.com
Global Customer Support
Inside U.S.: 1-866-746-6477
Outside U.S.:1-508-549-2424 or contact
your local Invensys representative.
Email: support@invensys.com
Website: http://support.ips.invensys.com
Invensys, Foxboro, and I/A Series are trademarks of
Invensys plc, its subsidiaries, and affiliates.
All other brand names may be trademarks of their
respective owners.
Copyright 2001-2010 Invensys Systems, Inc.
All rights reserved
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