operation manual - Anacortes Yacht Charters

Lee Tek
Operation Manual
OPERATION MANUAL
Lee Tek
Bayliner 3388
Squalicum Harbor
Bellingham, WA
1
Lee Tek
Operation Manual
Welcom Aboard!
We are happy you have chosen Lee Tek for your vacation. We are sure you
will enjoy cruising the San Juan Islands, the Gulf Islands, Puget Sound,
Desolation Island, or wherever you decide to venture.
Our Bayliner 3388 boat was commissioned at Lake Union in Seattle. The
boat name is derived from our twin daughters’ nicknames, Allie ‘Cat’ and
Sara ‘Bara’. This boat has a rigged length of about 40 feet. The boat’s twin
250 hp engines will get you to your destination quickly.
We hope this manual will help you become familiar with the boat. We ask
that you keep it as clean as possible. If you have any questions about the
boat or about places to visit, please do not hesitate to ask the AYC staff.
Again, thank you for choosing Lee Tek. Pleasant cruising!
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Lee Tek
Operation Manual
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1
BASIC INFORMATION ................................................................7
2
GETTING UNDERWAY...............................................................9
2.1
Important Points.............................................................................................9
2.2
Engine Inspection...........................................................................................9
2.3
Shore Power .................................................................................................10
2.4
Water and Sanitation....................................................................................10
2.5
Flotation Safety Devices................................................................................10
2.6
Dinghy ..........................................................................................................11
2.7
Compartment Stowage .................................................................................11
2.8
Bimini Cover ................................................................................................12
3
BOAT OPERATION....................................................................13
3.1
Engines .........................................................................................................13
3.2
Cruising ........................................................................................................14
3.3
Docking ........................................................................................................14
3.4
Fueling..........................................................................................................15
3.5
Equipment Manuals .....................................................................................16
3.6
Vessel Documents ........................................................................................16
3.7
Navigation Information ................................................................................17
3.8
Portable Lights..............................................................................................17
3.9
VHF Radios .................................................................................................18
3.10
Emergency Devices ......................................................................................18
3.11
Anchors and Windlass .................................................................................19
3.12
Cleaning........................................................................................................20
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Operation Manual
BOAT SYSTEMS..........................................................................21
4.1
Electrical Systems .........................................................................................21
4.2
Marine Electronics .......................................................................................24
4.3
Sanitation System..........................................................................................25
4.4
Water Systems..............................................................................................26
4.5
Propane System............................................................................................27
4.6
Refrigerator...................................................................................................27
4.7
Heating Systems ...........................................................................................28
4.8
Entertainment Systems .................................................................................28
4.9
Maintenance .................................................................................................29
4.10
Barbecue ......................................................................................................29
4.11
Dinghy and Outboard Motor .......................................................................30
4.12
Crabbing Equipment ....................................................................................30
4.13
Downrigger Equipment ................................................................................31
APPENDIX A – CONTACTS .....................................................................33
APPENDIX B – BOAT EQUIPMENT INVENTORY .............................35
APPENDIX C – SPARE PARTS LIST........................................................39
APPENDIX D – TOOL KIT INVENTORY ..............................................41
APPENDIX E – GALLEY INVENTORY...................................................43
APPENDIX F – SPECIAL INFORMATION .............................................45
INDEX ........................................................................................................47
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Lee Tek
1.
Operation Manual
BASIC INFORMATION
Here are some helpful facts for docking, maneuvering, and replenishment:
Item Description
Specification
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Rigged Length (pulpit, hull, transom, dinghy)
Hull Centerline Length
Hull Beam Width
Draft Depth (bottom of rudder)
Bridge Clearance Height (radar dome)
Diesel Engine Size & Make
Diesel Fuel Capacity
Outboard Motor Gasoline Fuel
Fresh Water Tank Capacity
Sanitation Holding Tank Capacity
Hot Water Tank Capacity
Outboard Motor Fuel Tank Capacity
Anchor Rode Length
40 ft.
32 ft. 11 in. (33 ft.)
11 ft. 6 in.
3 ft. 6 in.
15 ft. 6 in.
250 hp Cummins
200 gal (100 each tank)
50:1 mixture
90 gal.
30 gal.
8 gal.
3 gal.
300 ft (100 ft. chain 200 ft. nylon)
14
15
16
17
18
Spare Anchor Rode Length
Barbecue Fuel Type
Toilet paper
Oil Type
Primary Fuel Filter Type
10 ft. chain + 200 ft. nylon
Bottled propane
‘Marine’ dissolving tissue
Heavy duty 15-40W
Racor R120P
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Lee Tek
Operation Manual
GETTING UNDERWAY
Please familiarize yourself with the various systems outlined in this manual. Lee Tek has features
that are designed for comfort, convenience, and safety. Proper use of these features will help
your trip to be safe and relaxing.
2.1 Important Points
Lee Tek has both AC and DC electrical devices. Monitor electricity carefully in order not to
exceed the boat’s capacity for electrical power.
Lee Tek is a redesign of Bayliner’s popular Model 3200 line of motor yachts. This Model 3388
has twin 250-horsepower Cummins diesel engines. The hull design and larger engines make Lee
Tek capable of speed. The helmsperson should be aware of sea conditions, and floating debris;
and operate with care.
Before daily operation, inspect propulsion, electrical, water, sanitation, and safety systems. Any
problem is easier to fix while moored, rather than adrift. Lubricants and other fluids may be
found in the engine compartment port side of on stern shelf above the rudder steerage. Common
spare parts are stowed onboard (see Appendix B).
2.2 Engine Inspection
If necessary, turn on the ENGINE COMPARTMENTS LIGHTS. The rocker switch with blue
lamp is on the DC side of the ELECTRICAL PANEL; also turns on stb. Compartment for
inverter/ holding tank.
Enter the aft stateroom and raise the rear shelf to access the front of the engine compartment.
Check the level of ENGINE COOLANT in the bottles. Engine coolant is a mixture of 50%
antifreeze and water.
Raise the two ENGINE COMPARTMENT HATCHES on the cockpit floor. Before entering,
grab a couple paper towels to clean hands and catch drips.
Check the level of OIL in each engine. The black-knobs are the dipsticks. A pair of etch marks
on top of the housing. Be careful to reinsert the dipsticks all the way down.
Observe the level of TRANSMISSION FLUID in each transfer case. The curve-handle dipsticks
are on top of the housing. Be careful to reinsert the dipsticks all the way down.
Observe the level of STEERING FLUID and the level of TRIM TAB FLUID in their containers
on the stern.
Check the general condition of the HOSES, FUEL LINES, and AIR INTAKES.
Ensure the valve on each RAW WATER SEACOCK is in the ‘open’ position (lever in-line with
valve).
Observe the glass of each RAW WATER STRAINER for debris. If necessary, close the seacock,
loosen the thumbscrews on the strainer clover, clean the strainer, and reassemble. Remember to
‘open’ the seacock.
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Operation Manual
Test the BILGE PUMP next to the stern. Twist the knob where the wires enter the housing until
the bilge pump becomes activated. Take steps necessary to fix this bulge pump. It protects an
area of the boat vulnerable to leakage from hardware failure or accident.
Note – There are 4 bilge pumps on the boat – two in the engine compartment, one beneath the aft
stateroom floor (float-switch activated), and one pump beneath the galley stair. The forward
bilge pump, the engine compartment, and bilge pump beneath the galley are switched manually
from either helm station.
Observe the glass bowl of each PRIMARY FUEL FILTER (adjacent to each fuel tank) for the
presence of water or debris. If water is found, remove all water present from the glass bowl.
Using a paper cup to catch the mixture, rotate thumb-wheel drain valve. Recheck the bowl later
for any additional water.
Spot-check the level of BATTERY FLUID in the batteries. Top off with ‘distilled’ water only –
not bottled water.
Close the HATCHES. Turn ‘off’ the ENGINE COMPARTMENT LIGHTS at the DC electrical
panel.
2.3 Shore Power
The SHORE POWER INLET is located on the starboard side.
To disconnect, first turn off the MAIN POWER CIRCUIT BREAKER on the AC ELECTRICAL
PANEL. Next, check for reading of zero volts on the meter. Next, disconnect the 50 ft. POWER
CORD from the boat inlet. Last, disconnect the shore receptacle.
Stow the POWER CORD and CORD ADAPTER (if used) in the yellow EQUIPMENT BAG.
The bag may be stowed beneath the aft stateroom stairs for easy access. Two cord adapters are
available to connect to the power cord to 20 amp. or 15 amp. shore power receptacles. A 25 ft.
power cord is also available.
To reconnect shore power, do the procedure above in reverse.
2.4 Water and Sanitation
Check the level of the FRESH WATER TANK. The FRESH WATER TANK METER is located
above the AC electrical panel. Press the left rocker switch for an indication. Note-Normally ¼ of
the 90-gallon tank must be consumed before the meter needle begins to decline.
Check the level of the SANITATION HOLDING TANK. A warming lamp located at the top of
the DC electrical panel.
Caution – If the lamp is lit ‘red’, take steps immediately to dispose sewage (see additional
information in the section on Sanitation System).
2.5 Flotation Safety Devices
Ten adult and two child Type II PERSONAL FLOTATION DEVICES (PFDs or lifejackets) are
aboard. Six PFDs are normally stowed beneath the bridge portside seats. The remaining PFDs
are stowed in a red PFD STORAGE BAG in the aft stateroom area.
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Operation Manual
Provide flotation for non-swimmers as conditions warrant and for children as boating law require.
Note – Children 12 years and younger are required to wear U.S. Coast Guard approved life
jackets in Washington State on boats shorter than 19 feet, whenever a vessel is underway, when
on an open deck or open cockpit, and on any waters of the state.
A THROW RING with 50-FT HEAVING LINE is mounted on the bridge.
A RESCUE LIFESLING with 125-ft. line is mounted on the bridge where it can be easily
reached. Instruct the crew on use of the life sling. Instructions about the ‘skier pickup’
maneuver. If the bag had been stowed, attach the Velcro straps to the bridge portside rail.
Remove the ‘free end’ of the line from the bag and tie it securely onto the rail; otherwise, when
the sling is thrown, the ripe would be thrown also.
2.6 Dinghy
To recover the DINGHY, move it alongside the rear transom, and point bow to the port side. Life
the two DAVIT CONNECTORS from their stowed position on the dinghy’s starboard side, and
rotate them outward. Align the connectors to the transom brackets, and snap the connectors into
place.
Remove the GAS CONTAINER, FLOTATION SEATS, and other items. Secure the OARS into
their rubber carriers on the inside of the dinghy. Secure the dinghy ropes to the dinghy cleats.
Caution – Because of obvious safety hazard, never store the gas container inside the engine
compartment, cabin, or any closed place.
A RETRIEVAL LINE (3/8” blue line with snap hook and pulleys) is used to retrieve the dinghy.
Clip the snap hook onto the dinghy’s far side (portside), run the line free-end through the pulley
located on the BRIDGE LADDER and then back through the pulley on the rope. This will
provide adequate leverage. Pull on the line and catch the dinghy in its highest position, being
careful not to drop it onto the stern. Connect the two STANDOFF BARS on the stern to the
dinghy.
Secure CRAB RINGS to the bottom of the dinghy by connecting elastic red-color nylon straps to
small cleats in the dinghy.
2.7 Compartment Stowage
Check the GALLEY, the SALON, and the STATEROOMS for items that may spill while
underway (for example, drink glasses, cups, and bowls). Place loose items into CABINETS and
DRAWERS, and ensure they are properly latched. Latch the SHOWER DOOR.
The two FOLDING DECK CHAIRS and the FOLDING DECK TABLE may be stowed nicely
into the vertical pocket space inside the closet of the aft stateroom.
The SALON TABLE may be disassembled and stowed to increase cabin space. Slap the bottom
of the tabletop upward off the posts. Carry the tabletop carefully to the forward stateroom
(tabletop facing aft, wide end toward ceiling). Avoid damage to walls, woodwork, and ceiling.
Slide the narrow end into the slot between the mattress and the portside bulkhead (it won’t fit any
other way), and secure the straps. Unscrew the two posts and stow them in the pocket space
behind the salon seat, accessed from the galley end.
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Operation Manual
Close the four PORTHOLES, WINDOWS, and FORWARD HATCH.
Secure the salon HELM CHAIR. Note – If you do not use the helm chair while underway, we
recommend that you lay it onto the salon floor or disassembling it and stow it in the aft
stateroom. In rough water, the helm chair could fall, and proper stowage could prevent damage
or personal injury. While driving from the lower helm, you may use the STEPSTOOL.
2.8 Bimini Cover.
The BIMINI COVER may be developed or stowed. To stow, hold each frame bar firmly, and
release the front dashboard/frame pin. Prevent the loose bars from scratching the boat surface.
Replace the pin in the holder. Remove only the dashboard connector pins. Check to see that all
other pins are firmly locked in place. If these are absent, the wind will lift the frame.
Fold the frame to the rear and secure the frame with the straps. Put the BIMINI COVER BOOT
canvas around the bimini. The boot is normally stowed beneath the starboard side seat
compartment.
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Operation Manual
3 Boat Operation
3.1 Engines
Starting:
Before starting the engines, do an inspection (see section 2.2)
The engines may be started from the bridge helm station or salon helm station. Turn ‘on’ the
BLOWERS for a few minutes to clear the air in the engine compartment. Turn off the blowers.
Ensure GREATSHIFTS are in ‘neutral’, or the engines cannot be started because of the safety
feature. Insert both keys into the IGNITION SWITCHES. Normally, plan to start the port side
engine first.
Turn the key clockwise partially until the ENGINE ALARM sounds and the pre-heat light turns
yellow. Observe the yellow lamp, and wait for it to turn ‘off’. Then, turn the key fully clockwise
to engage the ENGINE STARTER. Note – Occasionally, the alarm may not sound. If so,
observe the yellow lamp, and turn the key fully clockwise to start when the yellow light turns ‘off’
or when the panel voltmeter flicks to higher voltage.
If the starter does not engage when the key is turned, move the gearshift level rearward slightly
until the START SAFETY SWITCH (located beneath the throttles) makes contact and permits
starting.
If the engine cranks slowly of fails to turn over, check the condition of the battery on the DC
ELECTRICAL PANEL. If the battery is low, the opposite engine battery can be used to boost
power to the engine battery. Press and hold the BATTERY PARALLEL SWITCH to connect the
other engine battery, while turning the key. Note – this may require a hand from the First Mate.
Move the THROTTLE to raise the engine speed to 1000 rpm on the TACHOMETER. Warm the
engine for about 5 minutes before engaging propellers. Observe the readings of the
VOLTMETER, OIL PRESSURE GAUGE, TEMPERATURE GAUGE, and FUEL GAUGE.
The oil pressure must indicate on the gauge within 15 seconds, and it is normally about 60 SI.
The engine temperature should rise slowly. Note – If oil pressure is low, shut down engine, and
inspect engine compartment and look for possible cause (for example – loss of oil)
Repeat procedure for the opposite engine.
Note: Engines will not charge unless at 1100 RPMs or higher. Check Charge!
Operation.
Monitor oil pressure and coolant temperature gauges frequently. Oil pressure should remain
above 40 PSI. Coolant temperature should be between 140 and 205 degrees Fahrenheit.
Caution – If an engine is overheating or there is lack of raw water expelled in the engine exhaust,
stop the engine immediately. Recheck the raw water-cooling system to ensure the seacock is
‘open’ (handle in-line with valve). Next, check the raw water strainer for debris. Remove the
strainer, clean, re-assemble, and reopen the raw water intake valve (seacock). Restart the engine
and re-check water flow from the exhaust. If water is not flowing properly, the RAW WATER
PUMP may need to be serviced. Please seek assistance.
Look for and listen to changes in engine performance, sound, or appearance that may indicate
need for service.
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Lee Tek
Operation Manual
Shutdown.
Before shutting down, allow the engines ‘idle’ for about 5 minutes to cool the gradually and
uniformly. The time engaged in preparing to dock the boat is usually sufficient.
Ensure the GEARSHIFT is in the ‘neutral’ position and each THROTTLE is in the ‘idle’
position. Turn ‘off’ keys in the IGNITION SWITCHES.
Check INSTRUMENT PANEL switches (upper and lower helms) for any electrical system still
operating.
3.2 Cruising (Cruising RPMs 2500-2700)
Operate the vessel from whichever HELM STATION (bridge or salon) that provides sufficient
visibility for course, speed, weather, and sea conditions.
During limited visibility, turn on the NAVIGATION LIGHTS at either helm.
Before high-speed cruising, press and hold both TRIM TAB switches in the ‘bow down’ position
for about 8 seconds to deflect the trim tabs fully.
Engage the GEARSHIFTS. Note – Ensure the throttles are in the ‘idle’ position before engaging
the gearshifts to avoid transmission damage.
Move both THROTTLES forward slowly until an engine speed of about 2600 rpm is indicated on
each TACHOMETER. Setting the throttle to 2600 rpm should provide a surface speed of up to
20 knots, depending upon the weight and load configuration of the boat. Note – Avoid engine
speeds above 2600 rpm for more than a few minutes. Higher engine speed causes higher engine
temperature, possible damage, and higher fuel consumption.
As the boat speed changes, you may wish to adjust the trim. In ‘following-sea’ conditions or
swells, favor a bow-up position to keep the bow from diving heavily into the waves. Note –
Should trim be adjusted during high-speed cruise, do so carefully – the ‘yaw’ response can be
surprising.
3.2 Docking.
During docking, we recommend using the BRIDGE HELM for great visibility to the stern.
Move the both TRIM TAB switches to the ‘bow up’ position (8 to 10 seconds) to make slowspeed backing and turning easier. While moving slowly to the dock or mooring location, center
the WHEEL (e.g. rudders straight). Use the GEARSHIFTS and THROTTLES to maneuver the
boat at low speed.
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Operation Manual
Listed below is equipment onboard for docking and mooring. Note – Please keep wet equipment
outside the cabin.
Item
Qty
Description
Location(s)
Usage
3 attached on port side
4 attached on starboard
Hang from rail or cleat at
level of float, dock, or raft.
Supplements main fenders
or fends dinghy. With 10 lb.
weight attached, used to tie
alongside long boom.
May be used as fender or
buoy marker.
Fender, primary
6
20-in.length, black
with 8 ft. whip line
Fender,
supplemental
3
16-in. diameter,
white whip line
Aft stateroom equipment
locker
Buoy, Round
1
25-ft. Dock Line
4
35-ft. Dock Line
2
50-ft. General
Purpose Line
2
8-in. diameter, red
with whip line
5/8” black braid,
red-striped line
5/8” black 3-strand
line
½” white 3-strand
line
50-ft. Heaving
Line
2
3/8” white 3-strand
line
Aft stateroom equipment
locker or cockpit.
2 in forward deck locker
2 on bridge ladder
1 in forward deck locker
1 on bridge ladder
Beneath aft stateroom bed
in port side locker.
1 in forward deck locker
1 on bridge attached to
throw ring.
25-ft. Line with
Buoy Mooring
Hook.
1
5/8” white 3-strand
line, with slender
16” stainless steel
mooring hook
attached.
Forward deck locker
200-ft Rode for
Spare Anchor
1
½” white 3-strand
line
Beneath aft stateroom bed
in port side locker.
2-ft Lines.
3
¼” black, 3-strand
with loops
Beneath aft stateroom bed
in port side locker
General purpose.
General purpose. Normally
used as a spring line.
Throwing line. Not suitable
as mooring line.
Throwing line. Not suitable
as mooring line.
Place on the end of the boat
pole with tension on line.
Poke the hook’s tip into the
buoy ring and pull back. To
retrieve, use the boat pole to
pull the loop of the hook
away from the ring.
Anchor rode. Can be used
as a long self-retrieving
stern tie mooring line.
General purpose. Can be
used to connect weight to
fender.
3.4 Fueling
It is always a good idea to refuel before the tanks are less than ¼ full. One reason is to avoid
searching for fuel. Another is to prevent sediments in the fuel tanks from entering fuel lines and
filters.
Each fuel tank holds 100 gallons. Turn the ignition keys ‘on’ momentarily to read the fuel
gauges, which provide good indication of how much fuel will be required (e.g. expect 75 gallon
refill with a ½ tank.).
Open each FILLER CAP with a CAP REMOVER TOOL.
The nastiest problem with fueling is ‘spillage’. It can be difficult to judge when a tank is full,
especially when there are noise distractions. Before pumping, have a couple of oil/fuel napkins
handy to soak up spilled fuel. We recommend you attach the plastic ‘NO SPILL’ bottle (usually
found in the cockpit cabin shelf) over the OVERFLOW VENT on the outside of the hull. Some
fuel dock may require you to take additional steps to avoid spillage. Spillage may result in a
nasty fine from law enforcement.
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Operation Manual
Place the fuel nozzle into the tank opening, pump slowly and evenly, and note the sound of the
fuel flow. Pumping too fast may not allow enough time for air to escape, which may result in
spouting from the tank opening. As the tank fills, the sound will rise in pitch or gurgle. Pay
attention to the TANK OVERFLOW VENT on the outside of the hull opposite the tank opening.
The sound may indicate that the tank is nearly full. Top off carefully, and be prepared to catch
spilled fuel. Replace each tank cap.
Caution – Clean up splatter and spillage immediately for environmental and health reasons.
Wash hands with soap and water thoroughly.
3.5 Equipment Manuals
Accessory Equipment Notebook
The ACCESSORY EQUIPMENT NOTEBOOK (1-1/2 inch white binder) contains operating
instructions for accessory equipment (e.g. outboard motor, microwave, radar, TV). It is found at
the lower shelf in the cabinet next to the lower helm station.
Boat Equipment Notebook
The BOAT EQUIPMENT NOTEBOOK (1/2 inch gray binder) contains administrative
documents for the boat identification, registration, and licensing. It is found at the lower shelf in
the cabinet next to the lower helm station. This contains:
•
•
•
•
•
Coast Guard ‘Documented Ship’ Official Certificate (Official Number)
FCC Ships Radio Station License
Washington State Registration (sticker on hull)
US Customs Annual Registration (sticker on salon aft window)
Washington State Parks Registrations (sticker on salon aft hull)
When cruising into Canada, you are required to clear boat and passengers through a Canadian
Customs ‘Port of Entry’. Upon returning to the US, you are required to clear through a United
States Customs ‘Port of Entry’. The annual US Customs decal is located on the aft salon
window, where it can be easily seen from the rear.
Before meeting or calling Customs officials, find the VESSEL DOCUMENTS NOTEBOOK,
have paper and pencil ready to copy customs clearance information, and be prepared to give the
customs office the following information.
• Name (Lee Tek) and Official Number (1059194) of vessel
• Name of operator
• Names, nationalities, and birth dates of persons aboard
• Supplies and stores aboard
• US Customs decal number (US entry)
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Operation Manual
Note -- Refer to AYC staff is you are unfamiliar with customs procedures, especially with regard
to bringing minors into Canada. Do not hesitate to ask for help.
3.7 Navigation Information
Official Charts.
The BBA CHART BOOK for Puget Sound, the San Juan Islands, and the Gulf Islands has most
of the government official navigation charts used normally. This is normally found on the aft
salon shelf.
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