TM
LC Series
OWNER'S MANUAL
Software Release 2.00
SOUNDTRAXX DCC
DIGITAL SOUND DECODER
LC SERIES
Notice
The information in this document is subject to change without notice.
SoundTraxx (Throttle Up!) shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein;
nor for incidental or consequential damages resulting from the furnishing, performance or use of this material.
This document contains information protected by copyright. No part of this document may be photocopied
or reproduced in any form without the prior written consent of Throttle Up! Corp.
Product names mentioned herein may be trademarks and/or registered trademarks of their respective
companies.
SoundTraxx, SoundTraxx DCC, Digital Sound Decoder, Dynamic Digital Exhaust, Auto-Exhaust and
Hyperlight are trademarks of Throttle Up! Corp.
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
Table of Contents
All Aboard .................................................................................................................................... 4
DSD-LC Features and Specifications ........................................................................................ 5
Pre-Installation Checklist............................................................................................................ 6
Installation.................................................................................................................................... 7
Step 1. Select Your Locomotive ............................................................................................ 7
Step 2. Test the Motor Stall Current ...................................................................................... 7
Step 3. Plan the Installation .................................................................................................. 8
Step 4. Isolate the Motor .................................................................................................... 10
Step 5. Modify the Tender Body or Locomotive Shell ......................................................... 11
Step 6. Fit the Speaker ....................................................................................................... 11
Step 7. Secure the Speaker in Place .................................................................................. 11
Step 8. Install and Wire the Decoder .................................................................................. 12
Step 9. Test the Installation ................................................................................................. 13
Quick Start ................................................................................................................................. 14
Programming the CVs ............................................................................................................... 15
Programming Methods ............................................................................................................. 16
Step 1: Configuring the Address.......................................................................................... 17
Step 2: Configuring the Decoder ......................................................................................... 18
Step 3: Configuring the Throttle ........................................................................................... 19
Step 4: Configuring for Consist Operation ........................................................................... 22
Step 5: Function Mapping.................................................................................................... 24
Step 6: Configuring the Lighting Outputs............................................................................. 25
Step 7: Configuring the Sound Effects ................................................................................ 27
Step 8: Miscellaneous Settings ........................................................................................... 30
Step 9: Resetting the CVs or Starting Over ......................................................................... 31
Troubleshooting......................................................................................................................... 32
Obtaining Technical Support .................................................................................................... 33
Appendix A - Decimal-Hex-Binary Conversion Table ............................................................. 34
Appendix B - CV Usage Summary Table ................................................................................. 35
Service and Warranty Policy ..................................................................................................... 36
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
3
ALL ABOARD!
Congratulations on the purchase of your SoundTraxx™ LC Series Digital Sound Decoder™
(DSD-LC). Properly installed, the DSD-LC will provide all the pleasures of high quality, digital
onboard sound and the benefits of today’s DCC (Digital Command Control) technology. With the
proper tools, basic modeling skills and common sense, equipping a locomotive with sound is not
difficult. It may, however, be a new experience for you, and you will find that successive installations
will go more quickly than the first. Please note that while each decoder is tested thoroughly before
it is shipped, we cannot control the correctness or quality of the installation. It is imperative that you
follow the directions, and never remove the protective heat shrink from the decoder (if applicable);
there are no adjustments or user serviceable parts and this will void your warranty.
This Owner’s Manual covers the features, installation, and operation of the following Digital
Sound Decoder models with Version 2.0 software:
·
DSD-100LC
·
DSD-B280LC
·
DSD-AT100LC
·
DSD-KT100LC
·
DSD-LL100LC
·
DSD-C628LC
If this is your first decoder installation, this Owner’s Manual will provide you with all the information
you need to get started. Also available for purchase is the LC Series Decoder Technical Reference
(PN 140069) written for the experienced user who wishes to have a complete reference for advanced
programming techniques.
Technical bulletins covering various topics are also published from time to time, and these, along
with the Technical Reference may be downloaded free of charge from our website at
www.soundtraxx.com.
CAUTION: The DSD-LC Series of decoders are designed to work at
track voltages between 7.5 and 16 volts maximum. On most command
stations, this corresponds to a track setting of N or HO. Do NOT use
the O or G scale settings!
Operating your DSD-LC at voltages greater than 16 volts will void your
warranty, produce excessive heat and possible permanent damage to
the DSD.
4
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
DSD-LC FEATURES AND SPECIFICATIONS
The Digital Sound Decoder is designed to be installed onboard a locomotive in conjunction with
a miniature speaker to provide the ultimate in realism and control. The DSD-LC integrates a fullfeatured digital sound system, a Hyperlight™ and a DCC decoder into a single miniature electronic
module. The modeler is thus freed of the expense and frustration of trying to fit multiple pieces of
equipment into an often space limited locomotive.
Decoder Features
·
Compatible with NMRA DCC Standards and Recommended Practices as defined by
S-9.1, S-9.2, RP-9.1.1, RP-9.2.1, RP-9.2.2, RP-9.2.3 and RP-9.2.4.
·
Supports short address mode for compatibility with ‘simple’ systems.
·
Supports extended address mode for assigning any locomotive number up to 9,999.
·
Supports advanced consist addressing.
·
Supports ‘Operation Mode Programming’, allowing CVs to be changed on the mainline
without using a programming track.
Throttle Features
·
Supports 14, 28 and 128 speed step modes.
·
Programmable acceleration, deceleration and starting voltage for prototypical starting
and stopping.
·
Use of standard and alternate speed tables
·
The LC-Series Digital Sound Decoders are suitable for engines whose stall current
does not exceed 1-Amp.
Lighting Features
·
Two function outputs for headlight and backup light. (Certain models may have up to
two additional outputs.)
·
Supports ”Rule 17” operation.
·
100mA Current Sink Capacity
·
Each output may be programmed with one of 15 selectable Hyperlight effects to
simulate ditch lights, mars lights, beacons and more (NOTE: DSD-100LC supports
on/off and dimmable light effects only).
Steam Sound Features
·
Steam Exhaust Chuff
·
Three Selectable Whistles, representing Light, Medium and Heavy Steam
·
Bell
·
Air-pump
·
Separate Volume Controls for each sound effect.
·
1-Watt Audio Amplifier
·
Auto-Exhaust™ allows chuff to be synchronized to the locomotive speed without the
complexity of a synchronizing cam.
·
Dynamic Digital Exhaust™ modifies exhaust volume and cutoff as locomotive load
changes.
Diesel Sound Features
·
Engine Exhaust and Turbo Whine (if appropriate)
·
Three Selectable Airhorns, representing popular single-chime, three-chime and 5chime airhorns
·
Bell
·
Dynamic Brakes
·
Separate Volume Controls for each sound effect
·
1-Watt Audio Amplifier
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
5
PRE-INSTALLATION CHECK LIST
It will be a great temptation to begin connecting wires immediately. Before you install your
DSD-LC, there are some simple precautions you should take.
First, read the instruction sheet that came with your decoder carefully! Models do vary
and you should not assume the installation of one DSD-LC is identical to another. Then
finish reading this Owner’s Manual!
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
The DSD-LC should be handled carefully in a static-free environment. To discharge
static electricity, touch a water pipe or grounded, metal surface before handling the
decoder.
Never remove the decoder’s protective shrink tubing. First, you will void your warranty
and second, you will compromise the decoder’s built in thermal management system.
Never make connections to the decoder while it is powered, Doing so makes for an
accident waiting to happen,
Make sure all electrical connections are insulated. Avoid using electrical tape as it
tends to unravel over time. We recommend using heat shrinkable tubing instead.
Never allow the decoder leads to come in contact with any DCC track wiring except
those specifically designed for that purpose.
Never allow speaker outputs to become shorted together,
Never allow motor outputs to become shorted together.
Do not exceed the output ratings for which the decoder is designed.
Take your time and have fun!
Tools and Materials You Will Need
In addition to the common hand tools found on most modeler’s workbenches, you should have at
your disposal:
·
Low wattage (under 25 watts) solder iron
·
Rosin Core Solder
·
Hobby Knife
·
High Speed Motor Tool (such as a Dremel)
·
Miniature Screwdriver Set
·
Diagonal Cutters
·
Multi-meter
·
Double Sided Tape
·
Silicone RTV
·
Heat gun
·
Assorted sizes of heat-shrink tubing (SoundTraxx PN 810037)
·
Insulative Tubing (SoundTraxx PN 810036)
6
O-Scale
810083
3/8" Speaker
�
�
810089
1/2" Speaker
�
�
810053
3/4" Speaker
�
�
810054
1" Speaker
�
�
�
810055
1-1/2" Speaker
�
�
�
810056
2" Speaker
�
�
810087
2-1/2" Speaker
�
�
�
810057
3" Speaker
�
�
�
810112
1.0” X 0.56” Oval
�
�
�
810113
1.38” X 0.63” Oval
�
�
�
810103
1.56” X 0.78” Oval
�
�
�
810078
1.1" X 1.57" Oval
�
�
�
810086
1" X 1" X .38" Edgeport
�
�
�
P.N.
SPEAKER SIZE
�
G-Scale
S-Scale
SoundTraxx offers a variety of high quality,
miniature speakers suitable for use with
the DSD-LC. Choose the largest speaker
that can be fit into the locomotive.
HO-Scale
SoundTraxx offers two sizes of 1.5 Volt
micro-bulbs for use with the DSD-LC’s
lighting effects. PN 810022 is a 1.3mm
diameter bulb and PN 810024 is a 2.5mm
diameter bulb. Bulbs are also available in
economical six-packs.
SUITABLE SCALES
N-Scale
We also recommend the following items
to aid your installation
Microconnectors facilitate easy separation of items like speakers from the locomotive. SoundTraxx offers an economical
2 pin connector (PN 810012) and a 10
pack of mini-micro connector pins and
sockets (PN 810058).
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
INSTALLATION
Step 1. Select your Locomotive
If this is the first time you have installed sound in a locomotive, then we suggest you choose your
locomotive carefully. A few simple precautions will ensure that your first effort produces a great
sounding locomotive instead of an intimidating ball of wires:
-
Don’t pick a locomotive whose stall current draw exceeds the rating of the decoder.
-
Do pick a smooth running locomotive that runs well on straight DC power. A smooth
running mechanism is vital for good throttle control and enhances the realism of the
sound. Dirty, worn out or binding mechanisms not only overload the decoder, but also
will have trouble starting smoothly and will destroy the illusion created by the AutoExhaust feature if they barely lurch along at half throttle.
-
Do start with an engine that is ‘sound-ready’ if possible, such as an engine with
predrilled speaker holes, for example, or diesel with a roomy ‘B’ unit. The simpler you
can make your first installation, the better.
-
Don’t pick a noisy engine, or one, which experiences some arcing or sparking when in
operation. The best sound will come from locomotives powered with can motors. Older,
open-frame motors may produce an offensive, interference sound.
Step 2. Test the Motor Stall Current
Test the locomotive’s stall current to ensure that it is compatible with the DSD-LC you are
planning to install.
1.
Place the locomotive on a section of track powered by a conventional DC power pack
set to 12 volts for N scale, and 14 volts for HO and S scales.
2.
Connect a DC ammeter in series with one of the track feeders as shown in Figure 1. If
your power pack has built in meters, they may be used for this purpose.
3.
While grasping the locomotive to prevent it from taking off, turn the power pack on.
4.
Stop the motor from turning by firmly pushing it down into the track or grabbing hold of
the flywheel or drive shaft.
Ammeter
DC Power Pack set to 14V
(12V for N-Scale)
Figure 1 - Current Draw Test
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
7
5.
To ensure the most accurate measurement, be sure that the power pack voltage
remains at the voltage set in Step 1 of this test.
6.
Measure the current the locomotive is drawing while the motor is stalled. This is the
stall current and must be less than the decoder’s rated capacity.
Step 3. Plan the Installation
You should give some thought to where the installation of the various DSD-LC components will
be within the locomotive before you get started. Figure 2 shows typical installations for a steam
and diesel locomotive.
Speaker (under fan
grill or in cab)
Orange
Motor (+) Lead
Headlight
Blue
Digital Sound Decoder
Yellow
White
Backup
light
Tan or Purple
Blue
Red
Black
JUMPER WIRE BETWEEN TRUCKS
Gray
Motor (-) Lead
Backup Light
Speaker
Headlight
Blue
Blue
White
Motor (+) Lead
Motor (-) Lead
Orange
Gray
Red
Digital
Sound
Decoder
Right Rail Pickup
usually connects
to locomotive frame
Tan or
Purple
Yellow
Black
Left Rail Pickup
usually connects
to tender frame
Figure 2 - Typical Sound Installations
Speaker Considerations
You will want to use the largest speaker possible to get the best volume and bass response.
The decision most critical to the success of your installation will be where to put the speaker.
Obviously, the ‘where’ of speaker installation will depend on the size and type of the locomotive.
But when considering the speaker’s location, remember that the volume of the speaker will be
greatly enhanced when the speaker is fitted into a small airtight enclosure with the front of the
speaker open to surrounding air. The reason for this is simple: in order to generate any appreciable sound, the speaker must develop air pressure. Without an enclosure, an opposite pressure
behind the speaker cancels any pressure developed by the front of the speaker. The enclosure
isolates the front and back surfaces of the speaker, thereby increasing the sound pressure and
hence, the volume.
Additionally, the enclosure must be sized proportionally to the speaker such that the volume of
air enclosed is several times larger than the speaker diameter. If an enclosure is too small, it will
interfere with the speaker operation and although it cannot be made too large, there is a point of
8
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
diminishing return. As a rule of thumb, for small speakers, the minimum for the length, width and
height should be equal to the speaker diameter. Thus the smallest enclosure for a 1" speaker
would be 1" X 1" X 1", while 2" X 2" X 2" would be the smallest size enclosure for a 2" speaker.
As this is only a general guideline, exceptions can and must be made in many circumstances.
HOWEVER, the use of a proper speaker enclosure cannot be over emphasized and
failure to use one is almost always the cause for poor sound quality.
In the case of a steam loco tender or a dummy
diesel unit, the body shell can serve as the
speaker enclosure. In this case, mount the
speaker facing down through an opening in the
floor or up through an opening in the coal load
or perhaps a fan grill.
Figure 3 - (Above) A typical speaker
installation using the tender as the
speaker enclosure.
Figure 4 - (Right) A typical speaker
installation in a powered diesel
locomotive. Note the use of
two speakers.
The speaker enclosure need not be fancy and can be fabricated from sheet styrene, bass wood,
and even cardboard in a pinch! A 35mm film canister usually produces excellent results, as
does a pill bottle or the cardboard tube center of a roll of paper towels. SoundTraxx also offers a
self-enclosed speaker (PN 810086) that is useful in extremely tight quarters. The figures below
show several types of speaker enclosures.
Figure 5 - Speaker Enclosures
Decoder Considerations
It is normal for the DSD-LC to get warm after periods of extended operation and its thermal
overload protection will shut down the audio amplifier if it gets too warm. Therefore, it is
important to install the DSD-LC in a location where it can dissipate the most heat. Avoid placing
the DSD-LC near heat sources such as the motor or lights.
Lighting Considerations
Each DSD-LC is equipped with two to four function outputs that are intended to drive headlight,
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
9
backup light and special effect lights. The outputs
can be independently programmed for a multitude
of Hyperlight effects and may be used in a variety
of ways. See page 25 for more information. Each
output is rated for 100mA.
Do not exceed this rating! Be sure that the
combined current of all lights as well as the
motor stall current measured in Step 2 does
not exceed the decoder’s current rating.
1.3mm
Microbulbs
2.5mm
Microbulbs
Figure 6 - Microbulbs for use with
The DSD-LC lighting outputs may be used with
Hyperlight effects
12-16 volt incandescent lamps or 1.5-volt microbulbs. The DSD-LC is not designed for use with
LEDs as they may glow faintly even when the function is turned off.
Other Considerations
Finally, you will need to
decide whether or not to
hardwire the electrical
connections or use a
plug-able connector. A
connector will allow you
to easily separate the
components for storage,
painting and service
easier but also opens
Figure 7 - Mini-connectors can make installation easier
the possibility of accidentally damaging the
decoder by reversing the connector during reassembly. Hardwiring the decoder will prevent this
possibility at the expense of making separation more difficult.
After you have fully read the installation instructions that came with your decoder, we suggest
you draw yourself a schematic showing all connections between the DSD-LC and various subcomponents. This will help you determine which type of connector is best suited for your needs.
Step 4. Isolate the Motor
The two motor brush connections must be electrically isolated so they are driven exclusively by
the DSD-LC motor outputs. We’re not kidding about this!
Failure to properly isolate the motor will damage your decoder and turn it into an
effective, but short-lived smoke generator!
In the event you do damage your decoder, simply return it to SoundTraxx along with the service
fee (please call for current amount) and we will repair and return it promptly. See our Service
and Warranty Policy, page 36.
Begin motor isolation by removing the body shell from the locomotive and in the case of a steam
locomotive, the tender shell as well.
Before you proceed further, it is important to carefully examine the locomotive wiring and determine where each wire goes and what it does. The manufacturer’s assembly drawings may be
useful here or you may elect to create your own wiring diagram. In particular, you will need to
identify the connections to the left and right power pickups as well as the (+) and (-) motor connections. Note: for N, HO, and S scale locos, the positive motor connection is the one connected
to the right rail (engineer side) power pickup.
10
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
Disconnect all wires leading to both motor terminals. Note that some motor brush connections
are made using a spring contact to the chassis. In such cases, it will be necessary to remove or
modify the spring contact as well. Be aware that some locomotives may make contact between
the motor and frame only when the body is reinstalled.
Next, verify that each motor terminal is electrically isolated from the left and right rail pickups
using an ohm-meter or continuity tester. With your meter set to the ohms scale, touch both meter
probes together and note that the meter indicates 0 ohms (short circuit). You don’t want to see
this indication again! Touch one of the probes to one of the motor brush terminals. Touch the
other probe to the locomotive frame, then the left rail power pickup wire, and finally to the right
rail power pickup wire. Move the first probe to the other motor brush terminal and repeat the
tests. If all tests indicate an open circuit, the motor is properly isolated. Do not proceed further
until this is done.
You will also need to disconnect the wires leading to any lights you wish to use. Using an ohmmeter, check that each lamp lead is electrically isolated from the frame as well as the left and
right rail pickups.
Step 5. Modify the Tender Body or Locomotive Shell
In the case of a steam locomotive, you will probably be mounting the speaker facing down on the
tender floor or facing up in the coalbunker. On a diesel model, the speaker is likely to be mounted facing down inside the fuel tank, under the fan grilles or inside the cab. In any event, a certain
amount of “body work” may be necessary to accommodate the speaker and decoder. This may
include removing weights, mounting brackets, internal bracing and other structural features.
You will probably need to cut an opening in the body shell for the speaker. A series of small holes
can be easily drilled and will work as well as one large hole provided the open area is at least
one half the area of the speaker cone. In either case, there should be no openings outside or
larger than the speaker cone itself.
Step 6. Fit the Speaker
If the speaker is wider than the space
in which you intend to install it, it will be
necessary to reduce the speaker width to
get a proper fit. Determine how much the
speaker must be cut down and remove
half of that amount from each side of the
speaker. If the speaker width must be
substantially reduced (i.e., requires cutting
into the speaker diaphragm), you may
find it easier to simply purchase a smaller
speaker – SoundTraxx has a variety of
speakers available to suit your needs.
Cut equal amounts
from each side.
Figure 8 - Trimming Speaker Cones
Otherwise, speakers with plastic frames may be trimmed down using a sharp flat file. Speakers
with metal frames can be quickly trimmed down using a Dremel or similar tool with an abrasive
cut-off wheel. Be sure to wear safety glasses.
As you file or cut down the speaker sides, work slowly and alternate from side to side until the
speaker just fits within the body shell. Be careful to remove only the speaker frame and avoid
cutting into the diaphragm itself.
Step 7. Secure the Speaker in Place
Once bodywork is complete and the speaker has been fitted in place, it must be secured tightly
to the enclosure. For the best sound, an airtight seal is needed around the speaker edge. We
have found the best way to hold the speaker in place is to use silicone RTV - it provides the
airtight seal needed and unlike epoxy or other hard glues, allows the speaker to be readily
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
11
removed in the future. Be careful that you don’t get any RTV onto the speaker diaphragm as this
will severely distort the sound quality!
Step 8. Install and Wire the Decoder
Note: the following instructions are provided as a general guideline. Refer to the installation and
wiring instructions that came with your decoder for specific information.
Begin by securing the decoder in place using double-sided foam tape. Temporarily refit the body
shell to ensure that adequate clearance still exists.
7
Backup Light
Yellow
Headlight
White
Blue
Speaker -
Motor -
Value varies
with Model
3
Tan or
Purple
+
Gray
Orange
12-16V Lamps
-
Tan or
Purple
Track Connections
Connect the RED wire to
the right(engineer’s side)
track power pickup and
the BLACK wire to the left
track power pickup
Motor +
To ensure long-term reliability, solder all connections and insulate with
heat shrinkable tubing
such as SoundTraxx P.N.
810036.
Speaker +
When wiring the decoder, trim all wires to reduce unnecessary lead length. This will not only
give your installation a neater appearance but also prevent wires from interfering with the drive
mechanism and getting pinched between the frame and body shell.
9
1
4
2
5
6
8
Black
Red
Left-hand Rail Pickup
Right-hand Rail Pickup
Motor Connections
Figure 9 - Wiring Diagram
Connect the ORANGE
wire to the motor’s (+) terminal and the GRAY wire to the motor’s (-) terminal.
Speaker Connections
Important: Some DSD-LCs require a capacitor to be wired
in series with the speaker. Refer to the instruction sheet for
details.
Figure 10 - Soldering to
Speaker pads (SoundTraxx
3/4” speaker shown)
Connect one of the PURPLE wires to the speaker’s (-) terminal. Connect the other PURPLE wire to the speaker’s (+)
terminal. NOTE: Some DSD-LC models may be supplied
with tan-colored speaker leads. Refer to the wiring instructions provided with your decoder for more information.
On smaller speakers, solder the wires to the outside edges of the solder pads as shown in
Figure 10.
1.5V Microbulbs
Lighting Connections
12-16V lamps can be directly wired to the function
outputs as shown in Figure 9.
If you are using the DSD-LC to drive 1.5V microbulbs, it will be necessary to wire a small currentlimiting resistor in series with each of the lamps to
prevent them from burning out (see Figure 11). A
separate resistor must be used for each bulb even
if they are connected to the same output. A 560-ohm,
12
FUNCTION COMMON
BLUE
Forward
Lamp
560 ohm
Resistor
Reverse
Lamp
WHITE
560 ohm
Resistor
YELLOW
Figure 11 - 1.5 Volt Microbulb Lighting
Connections
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
1/4W resistor is recommended for use with SoundTraxx PN 810022 or 810024 microbulbs, however, you may need to adjust the resistance value to get the desired brightness depending on the
output voltage of the command station. Lower resistance will increase the brightness of the lamp.
1.
2.
To wire the Headlight, connect one end of the bulb to the decoder’s WHITE wire. Wire
the other bulb lead to the decoder’s BLUE wire.
To wire the Backup light, connect one end of the bulb to the decoder’s YELLOW wire.
Wire the other bulb lead to the decoder’s BLUE wire.
Any outputs not used can be left disconnected, but you should cut off and insulate the ends of
the wires so they do not come in contact with locomotive or locomotive wiring.
Step 9. Test the Installation
Now you are ready for the test track! We recommend your test track be fused with a fast-blo fuse
appropriately rated for your decoder (i.e. 1 amp decoder, 1 amp fuse). Place the locomotive on
the track, and turn on power to the system. Set your controller for locomotive address 3.
You should be able to run the engine in both directions as well as turn the lights on and off with
the function keys. You should also hear the steam airpumps running or the diesel engine rpms
idling,
If the locomotive does not travel in the appropriate direction, you have reversed the polarity of
the motor brush connection. Turn the power off, switch the ORANGE and GRAY motor leads and
try again. If everything seems OK at this point, it is time to program the decoder’s Configuration
Variables to get the desired sound and lighting effects.
CAUTION: The DSD-LC Series of decoders are designed to work at
track voltages between 7.5 and 16 volts maximum. On most command
stations, this corresponds to a track setting of N or HO. Do NOT use
the O or G scale settings!
Operating your DSD-LC at voltages greater than 16 volts will void your
warranty, produce excessive heat and possible permanent damage to
the DSD.
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
13
Quick Start
Your SoundTraxx DSD-LC has been shipped with all CVs pre-programmed so you can begin
using your locomotive immediately without having to worry about what adjustments to make. The
installation instructions that came with your decoder have a table that summarizes the DSD-LC’s
default operating characteristics as shipped. Let’s try it out!
Simply set your controller to Locomotive 3, place the locomotive on the mainline and away you
go! Be sure to also set your controller for 28 speed step mode or the headlights may not operate
as expected. Now that you have control of your decoder, let’s see what happens!
Ring the Bell
To ring the bell, press F1 on your cab. This is an on/off function, i.e. once on, the bell will
continue to ring until you turn it off. Press F1 again to turn it off.
Blow the Whistle or Airhorn
To activate the Whistle or Airhorn, press F2 on your cab. This function will be activated as long
as you hold down the F2 key, i.e. the longer you press the key, the longer the whistle or horn will
blow. This also allows you to make short or long signals…try a grade crossing whistle!
Turn on the Lights
Press F0 on your cab to turn on the Headlight. Reverse locomotive direction and the headlight
turns off as the backup light turns on.
While waiting on a siding, you can press F7 to dim the headlight for an oncoming train.
Certain DSD-LC models may have one or two additional Hyperlight outputs designated FX1 and
FX2. Press F5 to activate FX1 and F6 to activate FX2. Refer to the instruction sheet that came
with your decoder for more information.
Automatic Sound Functions
Some sound functions happen in response to some action other than pressing a function key.
Steam
If you have steam decoder, you will hear the exhaust chuff automatically in response to the
changes in locomotive speed. The air pumps will pound out a steadily slowing cadence that
simulates the build up of air pressure in the brake lines. Rapid deceleration of the locomotive will
‘release’ air pressure and cause the air pumps to resume pumping.
Diesel
If you have a diesel decoder, you will hear the engine RPMs ramp up through eight distinct
notches as the engine is accelerated and ramp down as the engine is slowed. Pressing
Emergency Stop on your cab will shut the diesel engine sound off altogether. Press F4 to
activate the Dynamic Brakes!
Activating other Functions and Effects
Depending on your decoder and the number of function keys provided on your cab, you might
have additional functions immediately available for you to activate. The default functions for
each decoder are listed on the instruction sheet that came with your decoder. Pressing F8, for
example, will mute all sound effects and is useful for silencing an engine when the telephone
rings.
As you see, no programming is necessary to begin enjoying your DSD! However…
After you have had a chance to play with your DSD-LC for a little while, you may wish to make
some changes such as selecting a new address or altering a sound effect. The following section
will introduce you to CVs and how and why you might wish to change them.
14
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
PROGRAMMING THE CVs
The final installation step (At last!) is programming the DSD-LC’s Configuration Variables or CVs.
What is a CV?
CV stands for Configuration Variable, which is the industry-adopted term for a decoder’s userprogrammable memory locations. CVs allow you to customize individual decoder properties such
as the address, momentum, throttle response, sound volume and much more. Once a CV has
been programmed, the setting will be permanently remembered even after the power has been
turned off. A CV can be modified as often as necessary by simply reprogramming it with a new
value.
With the large number of CVs available, first inspection of the available options may cause
confusion and perhaps a bit of a brain-cramp! Take an aspirin and relax.
As you have already seen the DSD-LC has been shipped with all CVs preprogrammed so you can begin using your locomotive immediately without having
to worry about what adjustments to make.
The following paragraphs break the DSD-LC CVs into various subsystems so it is only necessary
to change a few CV’s at a time. As you become comfortable with the DSD-LC’s operation,
move onto a new section and begin exploring the options and capabilities found there. For
more technically inclined users, detailed information on any CV can be found in the LC Series
Decoder Technical Reference available from your dealer or SoundTraxx for a small charge or
from our website for free.
Bits and Bytes
One of the most confusing aspects of programming a CV is figuring out what all the different bits,
bytes and x’s found on the various decoder manuals (including this one) mean. The problem is
compounded further by differences in each command station manufacturer’s user interface. For
those users unfamiliar with such terms, a short math lesson (ugh!) is in order before proceeding:
Each decoder CV stores a numeric value that can be represented in one of three forms:
Decimal - This is the form everyone is familiar with and we use in our day-to-day
lives. Numbers are represented as a sequence of digits composed of the numerals
0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8, and 9.
Hexadecimal - Also referred to as simply “hex”, this is a more specialized number
representation that, in addition to 0 through 9, also uses the characters A-F. It has the
advantage that a given decimal number can be more compactly represented. For example,
the decimal number 127 converts to a simple 7F in hex (one less digit). This allows user
interfaces with a limited number of digits (i.e., the LCD on your cab) to display a wider range
of numbers.
Binary - Binary numbers get their name from the fact they use only two digits 0 and 1
called ‘bits’ and is the fundamental number system used by all computers including the
ones found inside a digital decoder. Because there are only two bit values, it takes more
digits to represent a number using binary. The decimal number 127, for example, is written
as 01111111 in binary notation. A ‘byte’ is a binary number made up of eight bits. And a
‘nibble’ is half a byte or four bits. Really! We didn’t make that up.
Coincidentally, each CV is made up from one byte or eight bits and can store any number
between 0 and 255. Most of the CVs contain a single piece of data that can be easily
represented in any of the three forms. i.e., CV 3, the acceleration rate, can be loaded with any
value from 0 to 255 and it always affects the same thing - the acceleration rate.
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
15
On the other hand, some CVs use individual bits to control different features. This allows up to
eight individual features to be controlled by a single CV and is done to conserve the number of
CVs. As the bit variables can take on only one of two values 0 and 1 they are usually used for
simple variables that are either On or Off, enabled or disabled or something similar. Unfortunately, bit variables are difficult to represent in any form other than binary and still preserve any
meaning. Because most DCC system user interfaces don’t use binary representation, these
numbers are the most difficult to work with and require a tedious series of additions to convert to
the decimal or hex form used by most systems.
Whenever possible, we have tried to use the decimal number system in this manual when
describing the proper values to program into a given CV. Throughout this manual, a hex number
can be distinguished from a decimal number by noting a 0x prefix. Thus 0x10 is the hex version
of sixteen and not ten as one might guess. Binary numbers are represented using a ‘b’ suffix.
100b is really the number four and not one hundred.
To further assist the math-impaired, we have provided a handy-dandy conversion table in Appendix A that allows one to quickly convert between decimal, hex and binary.
When working with individual bits such as in CV 29, we suggest the following procedure for
determining the correct value to program. Referring to the CV description, write down from left to
right the value desired for each individual bit. Consider for example, the case of CV 29. We would
like to set this CV so that speed tables are enabled and the 28 speed step mode is in effect.
Referring to the LC Series Decoder Technical Reference, we see that bit 4 and bit 1 should be
set to 1 and all other bits are cleared to zero. Starting with bit 7 and working to the right, we write
down the individual bit values and get:
bit 7
bit 6
bit 5
bit 4
bit 3
bit 2
bit 1
bit 0
We then look up the binary value 00010010b in Appendix A and see that it corresponds to the
decimal value 18 (0x12 in hex). This is the value to use when programming the CV.
Programming Methods
There are two methods for changing the DSD-LC’s CVs:
Service Mode Programming - This programming mode usually requires the locomotive to be placed on a special programming track or connected to a dedicated
programmer. The DSD-LC is an advanced decoder and supports four types of service
mode instructions:
Address Mode - Can change CV 1 (Primary Address) only.
Register Mode - Can change CVs 1,2,3,4,7,8 and 29 only.
Paged Mode - Uses a page register to indirectly modify any CV.
Direct Mode - Can directly change any CV.
Operations Mode Programming - Sometimes called ‘Ops Mode’ or ‘Programming on
the Main’, this programming mode allows the CVs to be changed while the locomotive
is operating on the layout even when other locomotives are present. The neat thing
about this mode is that the CVs can be changed in the middle of operation allowing the engineer for example, to increase the momentum rate of a locomotive after it
couples to a train. The main disadvantage of operations mode programming is that the
CV data cannot be read back to verify its value.
Note: The DSD-LC imposes the restriction that CV 1 cannot be changed in this mode
to prevent accidental modification of the locomotive’s address during operation.
16
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
Reading CVs
Certain command stations also allow you to read a CV during Service Mode Programming,
which is useful to verify its current setting. If you have trouble reading or verifying CVs, the
problem may be due to the design of your command station and not the DSD-LC itself. The
DSD-LC and all other decoders communicate back to the command station using what’s called
an acknowledgment pulse, which is defined in NMRA RP-9.2.3 as “an increased load on the programming track of at least 60mA for at least 5ms.” Like most decoders, the DSD-LC generates
the acknowledgment pulse by momentarily applying power to the motor. You can often visually
verify that the DSD-LC is properly responding to your programmer by observing a slight twitch in
the motor shaft when a read or write command is given.
If your DSD-LC is otherwise working properly (i.e., responds properly on the mainline to speed
and direction commands) but your command station is having troubles reading CV data from the
DSD-LC, it may be due to incompatibilities between the electrical requirements of the DSD-LC
(which are different from conventional decoders due to the added audio circuitry) and the electrical characteristics of your programming track. In such an event, we suggest you simply go ahead
and program the data into the CVs anyway. Usually the DSD-LC will accept the data and function
properly when placed back on the main track. You can also try a different programming mode. If
your system supports it, the best way to program the CVs is Operations Mode, as it allows you to
immediately see or hear the results of your changes.
It is important to realize that not all programming modes will program all CVs. Additionally, the
specific programming mode you use will depend upon the type of DCC system you are using.
Some of the newer DCC systems can automatically select the proper programming mode so all
you need to do is specify the CV number and its new value. On the other hand, some systems
support only a few of the programming modes and may restrict which CVs you can program. If
in doubt, refer to your DCC system’s manual or contact the manufacturer to determine which
methods they support.
Programming Procedure
As each DCC system is different, the procedure for programming a CV will vary depending upon
the system. Unfortunately, we cannot provide detailed instructions to cover every command
station and have to assume that you have some level of understanding regarding it’s capabilities and operating procedures. For specific programming procedures, please consult your DCC
system manual.
Step 1: Configuring the Address
The first group of CVs you will want to change are those that set the DSD-LC’s address:
CV 1, Primary Address
CV 17:18, Extended Address
The DSD-LC may be set up to recognize either the primary address (also called the short address), which provides a range of 1 to 127 or the extended (long) address, which has a range
of 1 to 9999! Whether you use the primary or extended address will first depend on whether or
not your DCC system uses extended addressing (not all of them do - if in doubt, see your command station owner’s manual.) Second, it will depend on your preferences and the numbering
scheme you use for setting your decoder addresses. The extended address has the advantage
that you can use all four digits of a locomotive’s road number for the decoder address making it
easy to remember. Be aware that some DCC systems do not support the full range of available
addresses.
Primary Address
To use the primary address, simply set CV 1 to the desired address between 1 and 127. Note:
The primary address can only be set in service mode.
Extended Address
The extended address is actually made up of two CVs, 17 and 18. Unless you are an experienced user, you should not try to program these CVs individually as a specific protocol is
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
17
required in order for the DSD-LC to accept the new data (See the LC Series Decoder Technical
Reference for details). Since most command stations that support extended addressing will automatically generate the correct protocol, simply follow their instructions for setting the extended
address.
Once the extended address is stored in CV 17 and 18, bit 5 of CV 29 must be set to 1 so the
decoder will recognize the extended address format. Otherwise, the decoder will continue to
respond only to its primary address. See the next section, Configuring the Decoder.
Step 2: Configuring the Decoder
The next CV you will want to change is CV 29, Decoder Configuration Byte. CV 29 is one of
those complicated bit variables mentioned earlier and is used in conjunction with other CVs to
set a multitude of decoder characteristics including:
Locomotive Direction - Causes the decoder to invert direction commands so that the locomotive runs in reverse when it receives a command to move forward and vice-versa. This operating
mode is most useful for setting up diesel engines that ran with the long hood section forward.
However, it is also useful for electronically correcting installations where the motor wires were
accidentally reversed and avoids tearing apart the locomotive a second time.
Speed Step Mode Selection - As it is a digital system, the DSD-LC splits the throttle voltage over
its minimum and maximum range into discrete speed steps. The DSD-LC can be configured so
there are 14, 28 or 128 individual speed steps. The largest number of steps will give the smoothest throttle response. Be aware that not all DCC systems have the ability to control 28 or 128
speed steps and your choice will depend upon the capabilities of your command station.
Speed Table - Sets the decoder to use speed tables specified by CV 25 (see “Configuring the
Throttle”, page 19).
Primary or Extended Address - Sets the decoder to recognize its primary address in CV 1 or
extended address in CV 17:18 (see “Configuring the Address”, above).
To assist the novice
user, we have
created Table A
that lists the correct
value for CV 29
to get the desired
operating modes.
Simply find the
row that has the
modes you want
and program CV 29
with the listed value.
The advanced user
should refer to the
DSD-LC Technical
Reference for more
details. Remember,
table values are
in decimal. If your
command station
uses Hexadecimal,
you will need to
convert the value
shown using
Appendix A.
18
Table A. Quick-Reference Table for CV29 Values
Address Type
Use Speed
Tables?
Primary (CV1)
Primary (CV1)
Speed
Steps
Locomotive
Direction
CV 29
Value
No
14
Normal
0
No
14
Reversed
1
Primary (CV1)
No
28/128
Normal
2
Primary (CV1)
No
28/128
Reversed
3
Primary (CV1)
Yes
14
Normal
16
Primary (CV1)
Yes
14
Reversed
17
Primary (CV1)
Yes
28/128
Normal
18
Primary (CV1)
Yes
28/128
Reversed
19
Extended (CV17:18)
No
14
Normal
32
Extended (CV17:18)
No
14
Reversed
33
Extended (CV17:18)
No
28/128
Normal
34
Extended (CV17:18)
No
28/128
Reversed
35
Extended (CV17:18)
Yes
14
Normal
48
Extended (CV17:18)
Yes
14
Reversed
49
Extended (CV17:18)
Yes
28/128
Normal
50
Extended (CV17:18)
Yes
28/128
Reversed
51
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
Step 3: Configuring the Throttle
There are eight CVs that characterize the DSD-LC’s throttle response and 28 more used to
create a custom speed table:
CV 2, VStart
CV 3, Acceleration Rate
CV 4, Braking Rate
CV 9, Motor PWM period
CV 25, Speed Table Select
CV 29, Configuration Data
CV 66, Forward Trim
CV 95, Reverse Trim
CV 67-94, Loadable Speed Table
This may sound like a lot of CVs but don’t worry; it’s not necessary to change all of them if you
don’t want to. We’ve already talked about speed step selection in CV 29 (Step 2).
Set the Start Voltage
The DSD-LC provides CV 2, Vstart, to set the starting voltage that is applied to the motor
at Speed Step 1 and is used to compensate for inefficiencies in the locomotive’s motor and
driveline. CV 2 may be programmed with any value between 0 and 255 with each step in value
being about 0.5% of the maximum available motor voltage. To calculate the value of CV 2, you
can use the formula:
Desired Starting Voltage
CV 2 = 255 X ————————————————
Maximum Motor Voltage
If your DCC system supports Operations Mode Programming, an alternative method for
setting Vstart is to turn your throttle to the first speed step and then use the operations mode
programming feature to increase the value in CV 2 until the locomotive just begins to move.
Set the Acceleration and Braking Rates
The DSD-LC provides two CVs to simulate the momentum due to train weight. CV 3,
Acceleration Rate, controls how fast the locomotive responds to increases in throttle settings and
CV 4, Braking Rate, controls how fast the locomotive will respond to decreases in the throttle
setting.
Both CVs can be programmed with any value between 0 and 255 with 255 corresponding to the
slowest acceleration or braking rate. Lower settings yield a more responsive locomotive, which
is useful for switching. When both CVs are set to 0, the locomotive will respond nearly instantly
to any throttle changes. A setting of 255, on the other hand, will require several minutes for a
locomotive to reach full speed from a standing stop!
The DSD-LC’s Dynamic Digital Exhaust feature (see page 28) will be more dramatic with larger
CV values and we suggest setting CV 3 and CV 4 to a minimum value of 16 or higher.
If you are using 14 or 28 Speed Step mode, setting CV 3 and CV 4 to any value greater than 0
will also improve the DSD-LC’s throttle response. While it is accelerating or braking, the DSD-LC
interpolates between speed steps so in effect, your locomotive will respond as if it were being
controlled with 128 speed steps. No more sudden lurching from one speed step to another!
Select the Speed Table
The DSD-LC provides 14 preset and one loadable speed table that can be used for several
purposes:
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
19
1. Matching the Auto Exhaust chuffing rate to locomotive speed.
2. Speed matching one locomotive to another.
3. Changing the feel of the throttle. For example, you could configure a switching locomotive so
there are more speed steps available at lower speeds for switching and fewer steps at high
speeds where the locomotive is seldom operated.
4. Compensating for an improperly designed driveline so the locomotive will operate within its
prototypical speed range.
Preset Speed Tables
CV 25, Speed Table Select, is used to select which speed curve will be used by the DSD. CV 25
may be programmed with any value between 2 and 15 to select one of the preset speed curves
shown in Table B. The exact throttle response for each curve is shown graphically below.
In order for the speed table selection in CV 25 to take effect, bit 4 of CV 29 must be set to 1.
Refer to the previous section “Configuring the Decoder” or the LC Series Decoder Technical
Reference to determine the correct value for CV 29.
Set the User Loadable Speed Curve
The User Loadable Speed Table allows you to create virtually any throttle response curve you
can imagine. You will first need to design and program the Loadable Speed Table. The Loadable Speed Table consists of 28 data points contained in CVs 67 through 94, each defining the
percentage of motor voltage applied at a give speed step. Each data point can contain a value of
0 to 255 corresponding to 0 to 100% of available motor voltage.
In 28 speed-step mode, each data point directly corresponds to a speed step. In 128 speed-step
mode, each data point corresponds to every four and a half speed steps. The motor voltage for
intermediate steps is interpolated by the DSD-LC to produce a smooth curve. In 14 speed-step
mode, alternate (odd numbered) data points correspond to speed steps 1-14. Important: all
28 data points must be programmed even for 14 speed-step mode or an unpredictable throttle
response may occur while accelerating or braking.
100%
Speed Curve Type
20
8
Logarithmic Curve 6
9
Logarithmic Curve 7
10
Exponential Curve 1
11
Exponential Curve 2
12
Exponential Curve 3
13
Exponential Curve 4
14
Exponential Curve 5
15
Exponential Curve 6
16
User Loadable Speed Table
4
EX
P
6
EX
EX
P
25%
5
EX
P
3
Logarithmic Curve 5
1
Logarithmic Curve 4
7
2
Logarithmic Curve 3
6
EX
P
5
50%
EX
P
Logarithmic Curve 2
LI
N
Logarithmic Curve 1
4
Motor Speed
Straight LIne
3
EA
R
75%
2
P
CV 25
LO
G
LO
7
LO G 6
LO G
LO G 5
LO G 4
3
LO G 2
G
1
Table B. Speed Table Selection
0%
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
Speed Step
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
To create a speed curve, begin by assuming the DSD-LC will be operated in 28-speed step
mode. Don’t worry if you are using another mode - the DSD-LC will automatically take care of the
translation between modes.
1. Start by making a table containing 28 entries - one entry for each speed step.
2. For each entry, record the desired throttle response as a percentage of full speed. i.e., 0 to
100%
3. Compute and record the CV value for each step using the following formula:
Percentage of Full Speed (from Step 2)
CV Value = 255 X ——————————————————————
100
4. Program CV 67 with the value computed in
step 3 for the first data entry (Speed Step 1)
5. Program CV 68 with the value computed in
step 3 for the second data entry (Speed Step
2)
6. Repeat step 5 for each of the remaining 26
CVs from CV 69 to CV 94 until they have
been programmed with their respective
values.
Table C. Calculating the
User Loadable Speed Table
% Full
Speed
CV
Value
CV#
Speed
Step
67
1
4
9
68
2
7
18
69
3
11
27
7. Set CV 25 to 16 to select the user loadable
speed table.
70
4
14
36
71
5
18
45
8. Set bit 4 of CV 29 to 1 to enable speed table
use. Refer to the previous section “Configuring
the Decoder” to determine the correct value for
CV 29.
72
6
22
55
73
7
25
64
74
8
39
73
75
9
32
82
Table C may be followed as an example and lists
the CV values for a straight-line response.
76
10
36
91
77
11
39
100
Adjust the Forward and Reverse Trim
The DSD-LC provides two CVs for adjusting or
‘trimming’ the forward and reverse speeds.
78
12
43
109
79
13
46
118
80
14
50
127
81
15
54
137
82
16
57
146
83
17
61
155
84
18
64
164
85
19
67
173
86
20
71
182
87
21
75
191
88
22
78
200
89
23
82
209
90
24
86
219
91
25
89
228
92
26
93
237
93
27
96
246
94
28
100
255
CV 66, Forward Trim
CV 95, Reverse Trim
These CVs multiply all data points in the speed
tables by a factor of n/128 (n is the CV value)
allowing the overall speed curve to be adjusted
up or down without reloading all 28 data points
again. These CVs will not have any effect when
the speed tables are disabled (i.e., CV 29, bit
4 = 0)
These CVs may contain any value between 0
and 255 Trim values between 129 and 255 will
increase speed curve values between 100% and
200% in approximately 1% steps. Trim values
between 1 and 127 will decrease speed curve
values between 1% and 99%. A value of 128
yields a scaling factor of 1.0 and has no effect on
the speed curve.
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
21
Using different values for the forward and reverse trim will yield different forward and reverse
speeds.
Adjust the Motor Drive Frequency
Virtually all DCC decoders, including the DSD-LC, drive the locomotive motor using a technique
called Pulse-Width-Modulation or PWM. PWM works by alternately switching the motor from full
off to full on. If the motor is switched fast enough, the speed can be controlled by varying the
ratio between the time the motor is on and the time the motor is off. One drawback to PWM is
that it can cause the locomotive to buzz, sometimes quite loudly, at low speeds.
To mitigate some of this noise, the DSD-LC provides CV 9, Motor PWM Period to control the
frequency at which the motor is switched on and off. By adjusting this CV, one can usually find a
drive frequency that is quieter than others.
CV 9 can be programmed with any value between 0 and 230. A CV value between 170 and 190
works well for most locomotives.
Step 4: Configuring for Consist Operation
The DSD-LC supports advanced consist operations which use three related CVs:
CV 19, Consist Address
CV 21, Consist Function Enable
CV 22, Consist F0 Function Enable
Consists Explained
A consist is a group of locomotives that are setup to respond to throttle commands as a single
unit. Consists make it easy for one operator to run a double headed steam train or a multi-unit
diesel lash-up for example. The consist CVs allow the DSD-LC to recognize a new address
assigned to the consist without changing its primary or extended addresses. Additionally,
they allow each locomotive in the consist to be run as a single unit but with different function
properties allowing for example, only the horn to blow on the lead engine.
Consist Address
Each locomotive in the consist is assigned the same consist address by programming CV 19
with the consist address between 1 and 127. If a locomotive is facing backwards in the consist, it
should be programmed with the same consist address plus 128. If the forward facing locomotives
are set to consist address 60 for example, the backwards engine must be set to 60+128 = 188.
Failure to do this will turn the consist into an angry pushme-pullyou as all locomotives will try to
move forward from the perspective of their own cab and a few pulled couplers might result!
To deactivate the consist address and restore normal operation, CV 19 must be reprogrammed
to 0.
Note that when the consist address is set, the DSD-LC will continue to respond to instructions
sent to its primary or extended address except for speed and direction data.
The DSD-LC will not to respond to operations mode programming commands sent to its consist
address. These commands must always be used with the primary or extended address.
Consist Function Enable
CV 21 and 22 allow you to define how each engine individually responds to function commands
sent to the consist address. When the consist is enabled, CV 21 controls which of functions 1-8
are active and CV 22 controls the F0 function for forward (F0 (f)) and reverse (F0 (r)).
CV 21 and 22 take effect only when the consist address is set. When function commands
are used with the DSD-LC’s primary or extended address, all functions will continue to work
regardless of the settings of CV 21 and 22.
22
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
Table D. Consist Function Enable
CV#
F0 (f) F0 (r)
21
22
1
F1)
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
F8
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
2
Use Table D to calculate the correct value for CV 21 and 22. Begin by determining which functions you want active in the consist and circle the number below it. When you are done, add up
all the circled numbers in the first row and program the total into CV 21. Add up all the circled
numbers in the second row and program CV 22 with the sum.
Note that each DSD-LC in the consist will require a different set of values for CV 21 and 22
depending upon your requirements.
Consist Example
Consider a common diesel lash-up consisting of three engines, #4088, #5239 and #6361. Let’s
suppose we wish to operate these three engines as a single unit with consist address 40. The
dynamic brake (F4) and audio mute (F8) functions should work on all engines. However, we
want the headlight (F0(f)), horn (F2) and bell (F1) to only work on the lead unit, #4088, and the
backup light (F0(r) ) to work only on the trailing unit,#6361. Additionally, the trailing unit is reverse
facing.
Lead Unit
Engine Address
Direction
Trailing Unit
4088
Normal
5239
6361
Normal
Reverse
CV 19
40
40
168
CV 21
139
136
136
CV 22
1
0
2
Engine 4088.
This is the lead engine. Because it is facing forward, CV19 is simply programmed with 40, the
new consist address. Using the Consist Function Enable Table, we program CV 21 with the sum
of the values corresponding to F1, F2, F4 and F8 or 1 + 2 + 8 + 128 = 139. Likewise, CV22 is
programmed to 1, the value corresponding to F0(f),
Engine 5239.
This is the middle engine. Because it is also facing forward, CV19 is programmed with the new
consist address or 40. Using the Consist Function Enable Table again, we program CV 21 with
the sum of the values corresponding to F4 and F8 or 8 + 128 = 136. CV22 is programmed to 0
since no lights are needed on this engine.
Engine 6361.
This is the trailing engine. Because it is facing backwards, CV19 is programmed with the new
consist address, 40 + 128 = 168. Using the Consist Function Enable Table, we program CV 21
with the sum of the values corresponding to F4 and F8 or 8 + 128 = 136. CV22 is programmed
to 2, the value corresponding to the backup light, F0(r).
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
23
Step 5: Function Mapping
Function Mapping Explained
Function mapping allows the DSD-LC to be reconfigured so that sound effects and function
outputs can respond to a different function key input. This is especially useful for users who have
throttles with less than eight function keys as now they can pick and choose what effects they
can control instead of being restricted to an arbitrary assignment.
There are 10 function mapping CVs - eight CVs, 35-42 are used to assign output control to function keys 1 through 8 respectively.
The other two CVs, 33 and 34 are both for the F0 function. CV 33 controls which outputs are on
when F0 is on and the locomotive is moving forward. CV 34 controls which outputs are on when
F0 is on and the locomotive is moving in reverse. If the same output is selected in both CV 33
and CV 34, that function will turn on when the F0 function is on regardless of locomotive direction.
Not all keys can control all outputs or effects. The table below shows which functions can be
mapped to which outputs. Note that a function key can be set up to control more than one output
and also an output can be controlled by more than one function key. In the second case, if an
output is mapped to two function keys, either key will turn that output on, however, the output will
not turn off until both function keys have been turned off.
F0 (r) 34
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
F1
35
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
F2
36
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
F3
37
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
F4
38
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
F5
39
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
F6
40
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
F7
41
1
2
4
8
16
32
F8
42
1
2
4
8
16
32
Mute
128
Dimmer
64
RPMs (-)
Dynaimic Brake
32
(Diesel Only)
FX2
16
RPMs (+)
FX1
8
(Diesel Only)
Bell
4
Reserved
Whistle/Airhorn
2
(Diesel Only)
Backup Light
1
Control CV
F0 (f) 33
Function Key
Headlight
Table E. DSD-LC Function Mapping
To determine the correct CV value,
1. Find the column in the function mapping table corresponding to the function or sound
effect output you wish to control.
2. Next locate the row corresponding to the function key you wish to use for controlling
the selected output.
3. Note the number located in the box at the intersection of the row and column you have
selected.
4. Program the CV listed in the row chosen in step 2 with the value found in step 3.
24
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
Example 1:
To change F3 to control the FX1 output, locate the number at the intersection of the FX1 column
and F3 row, which is 2 and program CV 37 with this value.
Example 2:
A single function
key can be used to
simultaneously control
more than one output
or sound effect. Simply
program the corresponding CV with the
sum of the numbers
located under each
output or effect to be
controlled. To use F3
to control both FX1
and FX2 for example,
program CV 37 to 2 +
4 = 6.
Table F. Hyperlight Control Mode Settings
CV Value
Effect Type
Crossing Logic Off
Phase A
Crossing Logic On
Phase B Phase A
Phase B
On-off
0
16
32
48
Dimmable
1
17
33
49
Mars Light
2
18
34
50
Gyralite
3
19
35
51
Oscillating Headlight
4
20
36
52
Single Flash Strobe
5
21
37
53
Double Flash Strobe
6
22
38
54
D312 Rotary Beacon
7
23
39
55
Prime Stratolite
Step 6: Configuring
8
24
40
56
the Lighting Outputs
Type I Ditch Light
9
25
41
57
Depending on the modType
II
Ditch
Light
10
26
42
58
el, the DSD-LC has two
to four function outputs
FRED
11
27
43
59
used for controlling the
Engine Exhaust Flicker
12
28
44
60
locomotive lights. Each
Firebox
Flicker
13
29
45
61
can be set for a variety
of special lighting efSmart Firebox Flicker
14
30
46
62
fects or simple on-off
lights. In addition, you
can use the Grade Crossing Logic to automatically activate the selected lighting effect when the
horn or whistle is blown.
The DSD-LC provides up to five CVs for customizing the light effects:
CV 49, Headlight Control Mode
CV 50, Backup light Control Mode
CV 51, FX1 Control Mode
CV 52, FX2 Control Mode
CV 59, Flash Rate & Hold Time
Setting the Hyperlight Effects
Each lighting output has a corresponding CV that determines its operating characteristics:
Hyperlight Select - Each output can be programmed to one of 15 Hyperlight™ Lighting Effects
as listed in Table F. (NOTE: The DSD-100LC supports only on/off and dimmable light effects.)
Most effects are self-descriptive. A few may need some additional comment:
· The dimmable headlight is normally an on/off output. When the output is on, the power level
will be reduced to 60% whenever the dimmer function (F7) is on.
· Type I and II Ditch lights are identical when operating. However, when the grade crossing logic
is enabled, the Type I ditch will revert to a steady on state when it is not flashing whereas the
Type II lights will turn off.
· The engine exhaust effect produces a random flicker whose intensity is proportional to the
engine RPMs and is useful for imitating unmuffled exhaust gases and sparks.
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
25
Phase Select – Alters the timing of the effect so that the effect is either in sync with the other
effects (phase A) or 180 degrees out of phase (phase B). This allows you to have two lights
that flash back and forth if desired.
Grade Crossing Logic - Causes the lighting effect to become active only when the horn (F2) has
been sounded. A typical use would be to cause the ditch lights to flash at a grade crossing.
The grade crossing logic can be used with almost all the Hyperlight™ effects. The On-Off,
dimmable headlight, FRED and flicker effects will not be affected. When the horn function is
released, the other effects will either turn off (strobes and beacons) or revert to a steady on
state (mars light, ditch lights, etc.) as appropriate to prototype practice.
Rule 17 Mode - Converts the headlight and backup light to independent, non-directional lights.
When this mode is active, the headlight is controlled as if it were FX1, Function 5 and the
backup light as FX2 or Function 6.
To set the effect, use Table F on the previous page to look up the required setting for each output
mode and simply program the corresponding CV with that value. If you wish to use ‘Rule 17’
mode, add 64 to the table value. Use CV 49 to set the headlight, CV 50 for the backup light, CV
51 for FX1 and CV 52 for FX2. Note that not all DSD-LCs will support all lighting outputs or CVs.
Refer to the instruction sheet that came with your decoder for more information.
Setting the Flash Rate and Hold Time
CV 59 is used to adjust the flash rate of the Hyperlight effect and has a range of 0-15 with 15
being the slowest flash rate.
CV 59 is also used to set the Grade Crossing Logic Hold Time, that is, the time an effect will
remain flashing after the horn function is released (if the crossing logic is enabled) and has a
range of 0-15 seconds.
To calculate the value of CV 59, use the formula:
CV 59 = Flash Rate + (Hold Time X 16)
For example, to set a flash rate of 3 and a hold time of 2 seconds, we calculate CV 59 = 3 + (2 X
16) = 3+ 32 = 35.
Configure Lighting Control Mode
The DSD-LC supports two modes of headlight operation:
Automatic Direction Control
Both the headlight and backup lights are turned on and off using the F0 function. The DSD-LC
automatically switches the proper light on depending upon locomotive direction.
For automatic direction control, the headlight is mapped to F0(fwd) by setting CV 33 to 1, and
the backup light is mapped to F0(rev) by setting CV 34 to 2. See Function Mapping on page
24.
“Rule 17” Headlight Operation
This is the more prototypical form of operation and requires the engineer to manually switch
each light on or off individually. Thus, it is possible for both lights to be on at the same time.
For Rule 17 Operation, the headlight is mapped to both F0(fwd) and F0(rev) by setting CV 33
and 34 to 1. The F0 key will now control the headlight in both directions.
The backup light is remapped to Function 6 (FX2) by simply setting CV 50 to 64, which enables
the Rule 17 Mode. The backup light could also be remapped to a different function key by setting
any of CVs 30 through 40 to control FX2.
26
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
Practical Examples:
Headlight and Firebox Flicker
Consider a small steam engine that does not have a backup light, In such a case, the DSD-LC’s
extra backup light output can be used to control some other light such as a cab light, number
boards or firebox light.
To set the backup light as a firebox effect, we refer to Table F and program CV 50 to 13. At this
point the flicker effect is on only when F0 function is on AND the locomotive is reversed, so we
use function mapping to activate the effect in the forward direction by setting CV 34 to 3. Now the
headlight and firebox lights will both be turned on by the F0 key but the headlight will only work
when the engine is moving forward while the firebox light glows in both directions.
Headlight and Mars Light
Early diesel engines like the EMD F-9 had seldom use for a backup light. This is another case
where the DSD-LC’s extra backup light output can be used to control some other lighting effect.
To set the backup light as a Mars Light we refer to Table F and program CV 50 to 2. As before,
the effect is on only when F0 function is on AND the locomotive is reversed, so we use function
mapping to activate the effect in the forward direction by setting CV 33 to 3. Now the headlight
and Mars light will both be turned on by the F0 key but only work when the engine is moving
forward.
Flashing Ditch Lights
This time we will use the headlight and backup light outputs to create a pair of Type I ditch lights
that alternately flash when the horn is sounded. When the horn is off, the lights will change to a
steady ‘on’ state.
Using Table F, the headlight is set to a Type I ditch light, Phase A with Crossing Logic On by setting CV 49 to 41. To get the lights to flash back and forth, the backup light is set to a Type I ditch
light, Phase B with Crossing Logic On by setting CV 50 to 57. Remap both lights to F0(fwd) by
setting CV 33 to 3 and CV 34 to 0. Finally, set the flash rate to 7 and the hold time to 4 seconds
by setting CV 59 = 7+ (4 X 16) = 71.
Step 7: Configuring the Sound Effects
Bell Settings
The DSD-LC provides two CVs for setting the bell sound effect:
CV 114, Bell Ring Rate
CV 114 controls how fast the bell will ring. There are 16 settings, with 0 being the fastest ring
rate and 15 being the slowest rate.
CV 121, Bell Volume
CV 121 can be set to any value between 0 and 255, with the minimum volume being 0 (sound is
off) and the maximum is 255. The default is 128 or 50% volume.
Whistle/Airhorn Settings
The DSD-LC provides two CVs for setting the
whistle or air horn sound effect:
Table G.
CV 115, Whistle/Airhorn Selection
CV 115, Whistle/Airhorn Selection
CV 115 selects a Light, Medium or
Heavy whistle (steam) or a single
chime, three chime or five chime
airhorn (diesels). (See Table G.)
Whistle/Horn
CV Value
Light/Single Chime
0
Medium/3-Chime
1
Heavy/5-Chime
2
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
27
CV 120, Whistle/Horn Volume
CV 120 can be set to any value between 0 and 255, with the minimum volume being 0 (sound is
off) and the maximum is 255. The default is 192 or 75% volume.
Airpump Settings (Steam Only)
The DSD-LC provides two CVs for setting the
airpump effect:
Table H. CV 112, Airpump Selection
CV 112, Airpump Sound Effect Enable
CV 112 is used to enable the automatic sounds
of the airpump. Additionally, it is used to select
whether to use a conventional exhaust chuff
or that of an articulated steam engine. Refer to
Table H for the correct CV value.
Airpump
Exhaust Chuff
Off
Conventional
On
Conventional
Off
Articulated
128
CV 123, Airpump Volume
CV 123 can be set to any value between 0 and
255, with the minimum volume being 0 (sound
is off) and the maximum is 255. The default is
128 or 50% volume.
On
Articulated
129
CV Value
0
1
Dynamic Brake Settings (Diesel Only)
The DSD-LC provides one CV for setting the dynamic brake effect:
CV 123, Dynamic Brake Volume
CV 123 can be set to any value between 0 and 255, with the minimum volume being 0 (sound is
off) and the maximum is 255. The default is 128 or 50% volume.
Steam Exhaust Settings
The DSD-LC provides three CVs for setting the Steam Exhaust Chuff sound effect:
CV 112, Exhaust Cadence Selection
CV 112 is used to select a conventional or articulated exhaust chuff cadence. It is also used to
enable the airpump sounds. Refer to Table H for the correct value to use for this CV.
CV116, Auto Exhaust Chuff Rate
The DSD-LC uses Auto-Exhaust synchronization that automatically generates an exhaust chuff
rate proportional to the throttle setting. Since every locomotive is different, CV 116 is used to
match up the Auto Exhaust rate to the locomotive speed and may be loaded with any value between 0 and 127. Higher values will yield higher chuff rates for a given throttle setting. A typical
synchronization rate may be computed as:
SPD
CV Value = 115.9 X ——— X Gear Ratio
DIA
where SPD is the locomotive’s top speed in scale miles-per-hour at full throttle and DIA is the
locomotive’s driver wheel diameter in scale inches, and Gear Ratio is the gear ratio for shays
and other geared engines. For conventional steam engines, use a Gear Ratio = 1. The driver
diameter can be easily measured with a scale ruler but remember to convert the measurement
to scale inches.
If you don’t know your locomotive’s top speed, you can also estimate it and still get pretty good
results. A good rule of thumb is to use 45 MPH for freight locomotives and 70 MPH for passenger engines.
28
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
CV 122, Exhaust Chuff Volume
CV 122 can be set to any value between 0 and 255, with the minimum volume being 0 (sound is
off) and the maximum is 255. The default is 128 or 50% volume.
Hints for Setting Engine Exhaust Chuff Rate
Because most locomotives do not respond linearly (i.e., straight line) to the throttle settings, it
can sometimes be difficult finding the magic auto-exhaust chuff rate setting that works across
the locomotive’s full speed range. We have two procedures for setting the chuff rate that have
worked well. The first method is easy to implement and produces good results that should satisfy
all but the stodgiest of nitpickers. The second method takes more effort but produces more accurate results.
Method 1
Begin by setting the starting voltage (CV 2) such that the engine begins to barely move at speed step
1. Then increase the throttle setting until the engine is moving at 10-15 scale MPH. Then adjust CV
116 up or down until the chuff rate corresponds to approximately four chuffs per wheel revolution.
Method 2
This procedure uses the loadable speed curve to compensate for the locomotive’s non-linearities. Begin by setting CV 25 = 16, CV 29 = 18 (50 if you are using a long address- see Table A)
and CV 116 to the value calculated from the formula above. Set your command station to use 28
speed step mode. Set the throttle to speed step 1 and adjust the first entry in the speed table,
CV 67 until the locomotive speed matches the chuff rate. Increase the throttle to speed step 2
and adjust the second entry in the speed table, CV 68 until the locomotive speed once again
matches the chuff rate. Repeat this process until you have adjusted the locomotive speed across
all 28 speed steps using CVs 67-94.
Diesel Exhaust Settings
The DSD-LC provides two CVs for setting the Diesel Exhaust sound effect:
CV116, Engine Exhaust Control
CV 116 is used to select between manual or automatic engine notching and in the case of the
latter, the number of speed steps needed to advance the engine rpm notches.
Manual Notching
Manual notching allows the engineer to use the function keys to step the engine rpms up or
down independent of the locomotive speed and is more prototypical than automatic notching.
With manual notching you can for example, simulate the sound of a train crawling up a hill with
diesels running at full power!
Manual notching is selected by setting CV 116 to 0. Additionally, you will have to remap two
function keys to the RPM(+) and RPM(-) functions (see Function Mapping, page 24). We suggest using the F5 key for RPM(+) and the F6 key for RPM(-) which is accomplished by programming CV 39 to 32 and CV 40 to 64. Of course, you can use other function keys as your needs
dictate as well.
Manual Notching with Interlock
This mode interlocks the engine rpms and the throttle setting such that
·
Locomotive cannot be moved unless the diesel engine has been started.
·
Engine cannot be shut off unless locomotive speed is zero.
Besides the fun of forcing the engineer to follow an operating protocol, this mode is also useful in
preventing inadvertent engine shutoff while the engine is moving. Interlocked Manual notching is
selected by setting CV 116 to 16.
Automatic Notching
When automatic notching is enabled, the engine will startup when the throttle is first increased.
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
29
It will increase in proportion to the throttle speed. The engine rpms may be shutoff by pressing
your command station’s emergency stop button once.
Automatic notching is selected by programming CV 116 with any value between 1 and 15 corresponding to the number of speed step changes (in 128 speed step mode) needed to advance
the rpms one notch. Thus, a CV setting of 8, will advance the rpms one notch at speed steps
8,16, 24… etc, until it reaches maximum rpms at speed step 64.
CV 122, Engine Exhaust Volume
CV 122 can be set to any value between 0 and 255, with the minimum volume being 0 (sound is
off) and the maximum is 255. The default is 128 or 50% volume.
Hints for Diesel Engine Sound
If you plan to use automatic notching with 14 or 28 speed step modes, we recommend setting
CV 116 with a minimum value of at least three for 28 speed step mode and at least six for 14
speed step mode.
When using automatic notching mode, you may notice the diesel sound lags the locomotive
speed. This is because it takes a finite and prototypical amount of time for the diesel engine to
spin up and down. Unfortunately, model locomotives accelerate and brake much faster than
their life-size counter-parts and the illusion of realism begins to fade when the engine is pulled
into a siding with the diesel running at full power. The easy solution to this dilemma is to use
the Acceleration (CV 3) and Braking (CV 4) CVs to electronically slow the model locomotive’s
throttle response. A CV setting of 10 or so should do the trick. Of course, you’ll have to learn to
compensate for the added momentum and allow yourself plenty of stopping room but then that’s
half the fun!
Step 8: Miscellaneous Settings
CV 11, Packet Timeout Period
CV 11 is used to insure that the DS-LC receives periodic updates from the command station to
prevent run-away trains. If the timeout period set by CV 11 elapses without receiving any commands, the DSD-LC will shut off the motor and if the Quiet Bit is enabled (see below) also turn
off the sounds effects. CV 11 may be set to any value from 1 to 255 corresponding to a timeout
period of 10 to 2550 seconds (42 minutes). Setting CV 11 to 0 will disable the time out feature.
CV 113, Sound Control Modes
CV 113 set the Dynamic Digital Exhaust
(DDE) as well as the Quiet Bit:
Dynamic Digital Exhaust (steam only) - The
Dynamic Digital Exhaust senses the difference
between the actual locomotive speed and the
throttle setting, using the information to adjust
the volume, cutoff and timbre of the exhaust
chuff (steam decoders only). The Dynamic
Digital Exhaust feature will be more dramatic
when used with some momentum and we
suggest setting CV 3 and CV 4 to a minimum
value of 16 or higher (see page 19).
Table I.
CV 113, Sound Control Modes
DDE
Quiet Bit
CV Value
Off
Off
0
Off
On
1
On
Off
2
On
On
3
Quiet Bit - The Quiet bit allows you to choose whether the sound effects are active all the time,
or only when the decoder is being used. If the Quiet Bit is ON, sound will be activated to the
decoder when it is addressed and will turn off after the packet timeout period has expired (see
CV11 above).
30
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
Use Table I to determine the proper value for CV 113.
Step 9. Resetting CVs or Starting Over
Occasionally, something goes wrong and the DSD-LC will not respond as expected. Usually, this
is caused by one or more CVs being programmed to the wrong value. The CVs can be quickly
reset to their factory default values using the following procedure.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Program CV 30 to 2 using either Service Mode or Operations Mode.
Place locomotive on a powered section of track. If locomotive is already on the mainline, cycle power to the decoder by turning power to the track off and then back on.
You should immediately observe the headlight and backup light flashing together. If
not, repeat step 1 and 2.
After about five seconds, the headlight and backup light will flash back and forth at an
increased rate indicating that the CVs have been reset.
You may wait another 25 seconds for the DSD to resume normal operation or bypass
the waiting period by turning power to the locomotive off and then back on.
The DSD-LC should now respond to short address 3 just as it did when it was first
unpacked.
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
31
Trouble Shooting
If you should have any difficulties with the operation of your DSD-LC, first check this section for
hints on trouble shooting. We have found that most problems are caused by an errant CV value
and are easily corrected. When all else fails, try resetting the CV values back to their defaults
(see Step 9) and try again.
Locomotive doesn’t run but was working
·
Address has been accidentally changed.
·
Consist address (CV 19) was accidentally set.
·
CV29 has been changed to select other address.
·
Acceleration and braking CVs set to very high values.
·
Broken motor wire or track pickup wire.
Locomotive never ran
·
See all the above.
·
Decoder wired incorrectly.
·
Locomotive is not on a DCC powered track. Note: DSD-LC does not work in ‘analog’
mode.
Locomotive runs but makes no sound
·
Mute function (F8) is on.
·
Another function is re-mapped to the Mute function.
·
Sound Volume CVs (120-123) have been set to zero.
·
Speaker wire is broken.
·
Speaker capacitor is broken.
·
Speaker is burned out.
Locomotive runs in a consist but lights and sound effects don’t work
·
Consist functions are disabled. Set CV 21 and 22 to activate desired functions (see
page 22).
Lights flicker on and off
·
Decoder is in 14 speed step mode and command station is set to 28 speed steps.
Lights do not work
·
Decoder is in 28/128 speed step mode and command station is set to 14 speed steps.
·
Function mapping is improperly set.
·
Burned out light bulbs.
·
If using 1.5 volt micro-bulbs, resistor value is too large.
·
Broken lamp wires.
Locomotive just sits and flashes both headlights.
·
CVs are being reset to defaults. Wait 30 seconds and the DSD should respond to address 3.
Sound works for a while then quits
·
Amplifier is overheating, lower sound volume.
·
Amplifier is overheating, lower track voltage.
·
Speaker is damaged. Replace speaker.
Speaker sounds ‘crackly’.
·
Sound volume is too high for speaker.
·
Speaker is not properly baffled.
·
Speaker wire is loose.
·
Speaker is damaged.
32
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
Functions 5, 6, 7 and 8 do not work
·
Program CV 30 to 4.
Command Station cannot program CVs above 99.
·
CVs 112 to 123 may be programmed as if they
were CVs 49 through 60 by setting CV 30 to 1.
When CV 30 = 1, the data in CV49-60 will be
temporarily replaced by data in CV 112-123. The
original data in CV 49-60 remains unchanged
and can be restored by setting CV30 back to
0. Table J shows the relationship between the
two sets of CVs. Example: to program CV 120
(whistle volume), set CV 30 to 1, then program
CV 57 to the new value.The original data in
CV57 will not change but CV120 will. When you
are finished, set CV 30 back to 0.
Table J. Alternate CV Selection
CV Acessed
when CV 30=0
CV Acessed
when CV 30=1
CV 49
CV 112
CV 50
CV 113
CV 51
CV 114
CV 52
CV 115
CV 53
CV 116
CV 54
CV 117
CV 55
CV 118
CV 56
CV 119
CV 57
CV 120
CV 58
CV 121
CV 59
CV 122
CV 60
CV 123
Obtaining Technical Support
We’re here to help! If you have a specific problem or question, please contact our technical support staff. Before calling, please have the following information ready:
·
·
·
·
Land:
Phone:
Fax:
Email:
Website:
Hours:
Model Number
Software Version Number (identified on the product packaging or by reading CV 7)
Hardware Version (identified on product packaging)
Make and Model of your Command Station
SoundTraxx, 210 Rock Point Drive, Durango CO 81301
970-259-0690
970-259-0691
www.soundtraxx.com
support@soundtraxx.com
Monday-Friday, 9:00AM to 5:30PM, Mountain Standard Time
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
33
APPENDIX A
DECIMAL-HEX-BINARY CONVERSION TABLE
DECIMAL HEX
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
34
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0D
0E
0F
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
2A
2B
2C
2D
2E
2F
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
3A
3B
3C
3D
3E
3F
BINARY
(76543210)
00000000
00000001
00000010
00000011
00000100
00000101
00000110
00000111
00001000
00001001
00001010
00001011
00001100
00001101
00001110
00001111
00010000
00010001
00010010
00010011
00010100
00010101
00010110
00010111
00011000
00011001
00011010
00011011
00011100
00011101
00011110
00011111
00100000
00100001
00100010
00100011
00100100
00100101
00100110
00100111
00101000
00101001
00101010
00101011
00101100
00101101
00101110
00101111
00110000
00110001
00110010
00110011
00110100
00110101
00110110
00110111
00111000
00111001
00111010
00111011
00111100
00111101
00111110
00111111
DECIMAL HEX
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
4A
4B
4C
4D
4E
4F
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
5A
5B
5C
5D
5E
5F
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
6A
6B
6C
6D
6E
6F
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
7A
7B
7C
7D
7E
7F
BINARY
(76543210)
01000000
01000001
01000010
01000011
01000100
01000101
01000110
01000111
01001000
01001001
01001010
01001011
01001100
01001101
01001110
01001111
01010000
01010001
01010010
01010011
01010100
01010101
01010110
01010111
01011000
01011001
01011010
01011011
01011100
01011101
01011110
01011111
01100000
01100001
01100010
01100011
01100100
01100101
01100110
01100111
01101000
01101001
01101010
01101011
01101100
01101101
01101110
01101111
01110000
01110001
01110010
01110011
01110100
01110101
01110110
01110111
01111000
01111001
01111010
01111011
01111100
01111101
01111110
01111111
DECIMAL HEX
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
8A
8B
8C
8D
8E
8F
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
9A
9B
9C
9D
9E
9F
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
AA
AB
AC
AD
AE
AF
B0
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
B8
B9
BA
BB
BC
BD
BE
BF
BINARY
(76543210)
10000000
10000001
10000010
10000011
10000100
10000101
10000110
10000111
10001000
10001001
10001010
10001011
10001100
10001101
10001110
10001111
10010000
10010001
10010010
10010011
10010100
10010101
10010110
10010111
10011000
10011001
10011010
10011011
10011100
10011101
10011110
10011111
10100000
10100001
10100010
10100011
10100100
10100101
10100110
10100111
10101000
10101001
10101010
10101011
10101100
10101101
10101110
10101111
10110000
10110001
10110010
10110011
10110100
10110101
10110110
10110111
10111000
10111001
10111010
10111011
10111100
10111101
10111110
10111111
DECIMAL HEX
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
C0
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
C7
C8
C9
CA
CB
CC
CD
CE
CF
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
DA
DB
DC
DD
DE
DF
E0
E1
E2
E3
E4
E5
E6
E7
E8
E9
EA
EB
EC
ED
EE
EF
F0
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
F8
F9
FA
FB
FC
FD
FE
FF
BINARY
(76543210)
11000000
11000001
11000010
11000011
11000100
11000101
11000110
11000111
11001000
11001001
11001010
11001011
11001100
11001101
11001110
11001111
11010000
11010001
11010010
11010011
11010100
11010101
11010110
11010111
11011000
11011001
11011010
11011011
11011100
11011101
11011110
11011111
11100000
11100001
11100010
11100011
11100100
11100101
11100110
11100111
11101000
11101001
11101010
11101011
11101100
11101101
11101110
11101111
11110000
11110001
11110010
11110011
11110100
11110101
11110110
11110111
11111000
11111001
11111010
11111011
11111100
11111101
11111110
11111111
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
APPENDIX B - DSD-LC CV USAGE SUMMARY TABLE
CV #
Description
CV 1
CV 2
CV 3
CV 4
CV 7
CV 8
CV 9
CV 11
CV 17,18
CV 19
CV 21
CV 22
CV 23
CV 24
CV 25
CV 29
CV 30
CV 33
CV 34
CV 35
CV 36
CV 37
CV 38
CV 39
CV 40
CV 41
CV 42
CV 49
CV 50
CV 51
CV 52
CV 59
CV 66
CV 67-94
CV 95
CV 112
CV 113
CV 114
CV 115
CV 116
CV 120
CV 121
CV 122
CV 123
Primary Address
Vstart
Baseline Acceleration Rate
Baseline Braking Rate
Manufacturer Version
Manufacturer ID
PWM Period
Packet time-out value
Extended address
Consist Address
Consist Function Active 1
Consist Function Active 2
Consist acceleration rate
Consist Braking Rate
Speed Table/Mid range speed select
Configuration Data 1
Error information
FL (f) Output location
FL (r) Output location
F1 Output location
F2 Output location
F3 Output location
F4 Output location
F5 Output location
F6 Output location
F7 Output location
F8 Output location
HL Hyperlight Select
BL Hyperlight Select
FX1 Hyperlight Select
FX2 Hyperlight Select
Flash rate/Hold time
Forward Trim
Speed Table
Reverse Trim
Sound Configuration 1 (Auto enable)
Sound Configuration 2 (Control Modes)
Sound Configuration 3 (Bell Ring Rate)
Sound Configuration 4 (Whistle Select)
Sound Configuration 5 (Exhaust Control)
Whistle/Horn Volume
Bell Volume
Exhaust Volume
Background Sound Volume
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
Default Value
3
7
0
0
Varies
141
180
0
0003
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
2
8
4
0
8
2
4
16
32
01
01
01
01
66
128
See Table C
128
1
2
4
1
8 (diesel), 64 (steam)
192
128
128
128
35
SERVICE AND WARRANTY POLICY
SOUNDTRAXX 90-DAY ‘SAFETY NET’ WARRANTY
Each SoundTraxx Digital Sound Decoder is tested thoroughly before it is shipped and warranted to be in good
working order and free of manufacturing defects. However, in the event that a mistake does occur during installation,
SoundTraxx will cover the repair under our ‘Safety-Net’ Service Warranty.
If during the first ninety (90) days you damage your Digital Sound Decoder or it fails to operate, SoundTraxx will
repair or replace the system free of charge if:
1. The original sales receipt showing purchase from an authorized SoundTraxx dealer accompanies
the decoder. Receipt must show purchase date to be within the last 90 days. Your original receipt
will be returned with your repaired unit.
2. There is no damage resulting from unauthorized repairs or modifications. This includes but is not
limited to:
- Removing the shrink tubing from the decoder
- Drilling or enlarging circuit board holes
- Cutting or trimming the circuit board
3. The Digital Sound Decoder is returned properly packaged, postage paid and insured - SoundTraxx
is not responsible for product lost or damaged in transit.
Exclusions
Onboard locomotive speakers are not covered by this warranty. This warranty does not cover damage resulting
from accidents, fire, floods, or other acts of God.
Limits of Liability
The foregoing shall constitute the sole and exclusive remedy of any owner of this product for breach of warranty
including the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness. IN NO EVENT SHALL SOUNDTRAXX BE
LIABLE FOR SPECIAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR FOR THE REPRESENTATIONS OF RETAIL
SELLERS.
Warranty Procedure
1. Return the Digital Sound Decoder with your dated sales receipt, properly packaged, postage paid
and insured. SoundTraxx is not responsible for product lost or damaged in transit.
2. To help expedite your repair, complete a Service Request Form available from our website at www.
soundtraxx.com/support or by contacting our Customer Service Department. This allows our
technicians to more quickly isolate the problem and perform the necessary repairs.
3. Please make sure you include a daytime phone number in case we should need to contact you
regarding your repair. Your repaired decoder will be returned via UPS Ground (no P.O. Boxes please!).
Decoders being shipped to foreign addresses will be shipped via U.S. Airmail.
Important! Return only the Digital Sound Decoder. Under no circumstances should you send your locomotive
(or other model) to us, as we cannot assume any liability for their safe return.
Non-Warranty Repairs
Digital Sound Decoders needing repairs after the ninety (90) day warranty period will be repaired at prevailing service
rates. Rates are published on our website or can be obtained through our Customer Service Department.
Out-of-Warranty Repair Procedure
To obtain service for Digital Sound Decoders which do not qualify as Warranty Repairs:
1. Return the decoder, properly packaged, postage paid and insured. SoundTraxx is not responsible for
product lost or damaged in transit.
2. To help expedite your repair, complete a Service Request Form available from our website at
www.soundtraxx.com/support or by contacting our Customer Service Department. This allows our
technicians to more quickly isolate the problem and perform the necessary repairs.
3. Please make sure you include a daytime phone number in case we should need to contact you
regarding your repair.
4. Please include a check or money order in U.S. dollars drawn on a U.S. bank according to the posted
rates, or provide a credit card number and expiration date (MC or VISA, please!). Posted rates include
shipping via UPS (no P.O. Boxes please!). Decoders being shipped to foreign addresses will be shipped
via U.S. Airmail. If no payment is included with the repair, no work will begin until you have contacted
the Customer Service Department.
5. While a rare occasion, in the instance a decoder is determined to be un-repairable, the system will be
returned to you at no charge, with no repairs made. Optionally, the cost of a standard repair may be applied
36
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
to the purchase of a replacement decoder. Purchase must be made directly through the factory.
6. A large percentage of Digital Sound Decoders that are returned are not defective or damaged at all,
but have been incorrectly programmed or misused. Digital Sound Decoders returned that are found
to be in good working condition will be returned less a $10.00 charge plus the cost of return shipping.
To avoid this, please follow our easy troubleshooting procedures which can be found in this manual
and on our website before returning a sound system for repair.
For prompt factory service, contact:
SoundTraxx Service Department
210 Rock Point Drive
Durango, CO 81301
Telephone (970) 259-0690
Fax (970) 259-0691
Email: support@soundtraxx.com
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
37
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
In the process of recording the many locomotive sounds used in the creation of SoundTraxx Sound Systems,
we'd like to gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the following groups and organizations:
The Age of Steam Railroad Museum
P.O. Box 153259, Dallas, TX 75315
(214) 428-0101
The Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad
Dallas, TX
The Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad
Box 789, Chama, NM 87520
(505) 756-2151
The Durango & Silverton Railroad
Main Street, Durango, CO 81301
(970) 247-2733
The East Broad Top Railroad & Coal Co.
P.O. Box 158, Rt. 994, Rockhill Furnace, PA 17249
(814) 447-3011
The Georgetown Loop Railroad
P.O. Box 27, Georgetown, CO 80444
(303) 569-2403
Harzer Schmalspurbahnen
Wernigerode, Germany
0 39 43/5 58-0
The Leadville, Colorado & Southern
P.O. Box 916, Leadville, CO 80461
(719) 486-3936
The Nevada Northern Railway Museum
P.O. Box 150040, East Ely, NV 89315
(702) 289-2085
The Portola Railroad Museum
P.O. Box 608, Portola, CA 96122
(530) 832-4532
38
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
NOTES
LC SERIES DIGITAL SOUND DECODER OWNER’S MANUAL
39
©2004 Throttle Up! Corp.
All Rights Reserved.
Revision E
DCC
COMPATIBLE WITH
THE NMRA DCC STANDARDS
AND RECOMMENDED
PRACTICES
TM
New Dimensions in Digital Sound Technology
210 Rock Point Drive
Durango, CO 81301
(970) 259-0690 Fax: (970) 259-0691 Email: Sales@soundtraxx.com
140068 Rev. E 0304
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