Building Management
Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Manual
WARNING!!
Wiring of the Communication Module and associated devices may involve working inside of a UL508A
electrical panel. Proper precautions should be taken to reduce potential risk of shock. Wiring should
be performed by qualified personnel only.
Save these instructions. This document is the property of the owner of this equipment and is required
for future maintenance. Leave this document with the owner when installation & setup is complete.
A0023368
December 2016 Rev. 1.05
2
TABLE OF CONTENTS
WARRANTY .................................................................................................................................................. 4
INSTALLATION ............................................................................................................................................. 5
Wiring ........................................................................................................................................................ 5
Field Wiring Equipment to the CASLink Communication Module ............................................................ 5
Remote Wall Mounted CORE & PCU CORE ........................................................................................... 6
PCU Advanced Filter Monitoring Module with ECPM03 .......................................................................... 6
Obtaining a Valid Internet Connection ...................................................................................................... 7
Wiring to the Local Area Network (Direct Internet Connection) ........................................................... 7
Utilizing an Optional Cellular Wireless Bridge (Cradlepoint IBR650E-VZ)........................................... 7
Confirming Internet Connection for CASLink ..................................................................................... 13
Module Activation & Registration ............................................................................................................ 14
Registration ........................................................................................................................................ 14
Initial Settings for a New Module in CASLink ......................................................................................... 17
Defining the Occupancy Schedule ..................................................................................................... 17
Module Editor (Service or Admin Access Only) ...................................................................................... 18
Defining Sensor Areas and Names .................................................................................................... 19
Defining & Customizing Alert Emails & Alarms .................................................................................. 21
Adding Custom Alarms ....................................................................................................................... 22
Adding Custom Email Alert Events .................................................................................................... 24
End User Guide ...................................................................................................................................... 26
Log In .................................................................................................................................................. 26
Main Page Navigation ........................................................................................................................ 26
Monitoring ........................................................................................................................................... 27
CORE Fire Protection ......................................................................................................................... 28
Pollution Control Monitor .................................................................................................................... 29
ECPM03 Hood Control Panel (SC and DCV) .................................................................................... 30
Control ................................................................................................................................................ 31
RTULink .............................................................................................................................................. 31
Navigating Sensor Data .......................................................................................................................... 32
RTULink Control Board ........................................................................................................................... 34
Schedule ............................................................................................................................................. 34
Thermostat ......................................................................................................................................... 36
Settings ............................................................................................................................................... 36
Appendix A - Cradlepoint Cellular GPIO Power Pinout and Wiring Diagram ......................................... 37
Appendix B - Weak Signal Strength (Less than -99 dBm) ..................................................................... 38
MAINTENANCE .......................................................................................................................................... 40
Module Registration Parameter Documentation ................................................................................ 40
3
WARRANTY
This equipment is warranted to be free from defects in materials and workmanship, under normal use and
service, for a period of 12 months from date of shipment. This warranty shall not apply if:
1. The equipment is not installed by a qualified installer per the MANUFACTURER’S installation
instructions shipped with the product.
2. The equipment is not installed in accordance with federal, state and local codes and regulations.
3. The equipment is misused or neglected.
4. The equipment is not operated within its published capacity.
5. The invoice is not paid within the terms of the sales agreement.
The MANUFACTURER shall not be liable for incidental and consequential losses and damages
potentially attributable to malfunctioning equipment. Should any part of the equipment prove to be
defective in material or workmanship within the 12-month warranty period, upon examination by the
MANUFACTURER, such part will be repaired or replaced by MANUFACTURER at no charge. The
BUYER shall pay all labor costs incurred in connection with such repair or replacement. Equipment shall
not be returned without MANUFACTURER’S prior authorization and all returned equipment shall be
shipped by the BUYER, freight prepaid to a destination determined by the MANUFACTURER.
4
INSTALLATION
It is imperative that this unit is installed and operated with the designed electrical supply in accordance
with this manual. If there are any questions about any items, please call the service department at 1-866784-6900 for warranty and technical support issues.
Wiring
WARNING: Wiring should be performed by qualified personnel only. Most wiring related to the
CASLink Building Management System is low voltage signal wiring, however it is typically
installed near high voltage wiring posing risk of shock. Proper precautions must be taken.
Field Wiring Equipment to the CASLink Communication Module
The Communication Module, PN: COMM01, is included in all CASlink equipped panels. It obtains jobsite
data from various jobsite components. Each component is connected on one of two communication lines,
the Modbus Communication Network or the CORE Interlock Network. This Communication wiring is
either RS-485 shielded twisted pair wiring (Figure 1), or RJ45 Cat-5 Ethernet wiring (Figure 2). Some
typical examples are shown.
Figure 1 - RS-485 CORE Interlock Network Wiring (Typical, refer to actual schematic)
Most communication wiring is completed at the factory, with the following instructions provided for those
items which are field wired.
Note: There are only two network lines. All field wiring for the Communication Module will use
one of the two lines.
Figure 2 - Cat-5 Modbus Network Wiring (Typical, refer to actual schematic)
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Remote Wall Mounted CORE & PCU CORE
Remote (Wall Mounted) CORE Hood & PCU CORE Fire Protection circuit boards transfer data to the
Communication Module through the CORE Interlock Network only. This is typically shown as terminal
blocks ILA, ILB, and ILC in each respective panel.
1. Wire ILA, ILB, and ILC of the Master CORE circuit board to ILA, ILB, and ILC of the Hood Control
Panel housing the Communication Module (Figure 1)
2. If additional CORE boards are present (such as PCU CORE, 2nd Remote CORE, etc.) wire ILA,
ILB, ILC of those panels to ILA, ILB, ILC of the Master CORE panel.
NOTE that doing this forces all CORE panels to activate simultaneously if any one panel
activates due to a fire.
3. Confirm DIP Switch Settings on all CORE circuit boards vs. the current CORE Operation &
Installation Manual. See Table 1 for typical arrangements of 1 or 2 CORE panels. NOTE:
Improper DIP Switch settings will result in failed communication with the Communication Module.
Power must be cycled to the CORE circuit board for new dip switch settings to initiate.
4. For ECPM03 based Hood Control Panels with digital LCD Interface, a Cat-5 Ethernet Cable must
be run from J3 of the ECPM03 board to J5 of the Master CORE board. An end of line resistor
plug (PN: EOL120A) must be installed in J6 of the CORE circuit board if it is the final component
in this Modbus Communication Loop.
Table 1 - Typical CORE Dip Switch Arrangement
Only One CORE Panel on the network
CORE Board #
Dip 1
Dip 2
1st (Master)
ON
OFF
Dip 3
OFF
Dip 4
OFF
Dip 5
ON
Dip 6
OFF
Dip 7
OFF
Dip 8
ON
Two CORE Panels on the network
CORE Board #
Dip 1
Dip 2
1st (Master)
OFF
ON
nd
2 (Slave)
ON
OFF
Dip 3
OFF
OFF
Dip 4
OFF
OFF
Dip 5
ON
OFF
Dip 6
OFF
OFF
Dip 7
OFF
OFF
Dip 8
ON
ON
For 3 or more panels, refer to the CORE Operation & Installation Manual.
PCU Advanced Filter Monitoring Module with ECPM03
PCU Advanced Filter Monitoring Modules (AFM) are not fire related, and therefore connect to the
standard Modbus Network for communication. Each PCU AFM comes equipped, within its control panel
internal to the PCU, a pair of RJ45 Cat-5 connection ports. Modbus wiring shall be run from J3 of the
ECPM03 circuit board associated with the Communication Module, to either of these two RJ45 ports
within the PCU AFM cabinet (Figure 2). Additional PCU AFM modules should be wired on this same
daisy chain loop with an end-of-line terminator at the final location. Communication in this arrangement
travels from the PCU AFM, through the ECPM03, and into the Communication Module.
6
Obtaining a Valid Internet Connection
A reliable internet connection is required for proper Communication Module data monitoring. This
connection preferably comes in the form of a hard wired Cat-5 Ethernet connection directly from the
building’s Local Area Network (LAN). Alternatively a wireless cellular gateway can be used to connect
the module in the event that a LAN connection is unavailable (note, cellular data charges will apply).
Wiring to the Local Area Network (Direct Internet Connection)
1. The first step in connecting to the Local Area Network is to identify the closest permanent
Ethernet source location. The best sources are Ethernet Switches or Wireless Routers (Figure
3).
2. Wire from the Ethernet port directly on the Communication Module to a spare port on the Ethernet
Switch or Wireless Router.
Figure 3 - Wireless Router (left) or Ethernet Switch (right) should be used for hard wired connection.
Utilizing an Optional Cellular Wireless Bridge (Cradlepoint IBR650E-VZ)
1. The Cradlepoint device will allow the Communication Module (PN: COMM01) to connect to a
cellular data network (Verizon, ATT or other wireless carriers). In order for the Cradlepoint to
provide a valid data connection, there must be a valid wireless signal at the location of the
installation.
2. The IBR650E will be mounted outside the control box. Confirming cellular connection, installing
the antennas, and ensuring that the device is receiving a proper data signal in its final location are
the last necessary steps.
3. Check to make sure the power cord is connected properly. If the device is wired incorrectly it will
not power up. See Appendix A for GPIO port labels and a wiring diagram. Next, confirm that an
Ethernet cable is connected from the leftmost Ethernet port on the Cradlepoint (labeled
“COMPUTERS or LOCAL DEVICES” in Figure 4) to the Ethernet port on the COMM01.
4. The unit’s default password should have been noted in the QC process. Login to the QC module
and lookup the job you are servicing to obtain the default password. Once you find it, make a
note of it or write it down. If, for some reason, the password was not noted during the QC
process, you will need to remove the device to obtain it. This password is located on the label on
the back of the device (Figure 6). In order to reveal the label, unscrew the device from the
electrical panel to reveal the password. While the device is unscrewed, write down the default
password. If you unscrewed the device to obtain the password, fasten it back to its original
mounted position before moving forward.
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Figure 4 - Bottom View and Labels
Figure 5 - Top View and Labels
Figure 6 - Default Password Located on Back Label
8
5. If present, remove the black hole plugs on from the two leftmost holes on the top of the electrical
enclosure. Connect the two provided modem antennas (shown in Figure 7), which shipped loose
with the electrical panel, to the SMA connectors that are visible through the two leftmost holes on
the top of the control box.
6. Data Connection Confirmation
a. Temporarily remove the Ethernet cable from the leftmost
Figure 7 - Modem Antennas
Ethernet port (“Computers and Local Devices” in Figure 4)
on the IBR650E. Plug one end of your own Ethernet cable
into the leftmost Ethernet port and the other end into an
Ethernet port on your computer.
b. Wait for your computer to recognize the Ethernet connection
(approximately 1 minute).
c. Open an internet browser, type “192.168.0.1” into the address
bar, and press “Enter or Return”. A page similar to the one in
Figure 8 will appear.
d. In the Password field type the default eight character
password, which you wrote down in Step 4 of this section.
When finished, click “Login”.
e. The next page will look like the one in Figure 9 Ensure that the
device has an Internet Connection by the presence of a green
light next to “Internet Connections” on the top of the page
(shown by the yellow circle in Figure 9.
f. Once the device has established a connection or the page has
been loaded for at least one minute, the “Signal Strength”
should be recorded in the SDV notes. Signal Strength is a
negative number with dBm as the unit and can be found at the location of the red box in
Figure 9. The closer the signal strength is to zero, the stronger the signal. If the signal
strength is below -99 dBm (e.g. -115 dBm) then the Cradlepoint device is receiving an
extremely poor signal, see Appendix B for solutions.
g. Next, select “System Settings” in the top menu bar and in the drop down menu click
“Administration”. See Figure 10.
h. On the next page, click “Remote Management” in the menu on the left side of the page.
See Figure 11.
i. On the page that appears, make sure the box next to “Allow Remote Web
Administration:” is checked (if it is not checked, then check it). Once completed, the
page should look like Figure 12. Click “Apply”. The warning box shown in Figure 13 will
appear, click “OK”. Allow the changes to take place, click “OK” if any more warning
boxes appear.
j. Lastly, logout of the Cradlepoint settings page by clicking “Logout” in the upper right
corner, close out of the web browser, and disconnect the Ethernet cable that was
connected to your computer. Plug the Ethernet cable from the communication module
back in as it was previously.
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Figure 8 - Cradlepoint Login Page
Figure 9 - Cradlepoint Internal Settings
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Figure 10 - System Settings --> Administration
Figure 11 - Remote Management Page 1
11
Figure 12 - Remote Management Page 2
Figure 13 - Remote Management Warning
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Confirming Internet Connection for CASLink
The Communication Module conveniently has three LED indicators under the clear cover to help
diagnose a proper internet connection.
The first is the Green LED, which signifies that a proper physical Ethernet connection has been made. It
does not confirm that a valid internet connection has been made.
The second is the Yellow LED, which signifies activity on the Ethernet port. The rate of flashing of the
Yellow LED will vary with activity level. If there is no activity, the connection to the Ethernet Switch or
Wireless Bridge is suspect. The Yellow LED having activity does not confirm that a valid internet
connection has been made.
The third is the Red LED. The table below should be used to diagnose the flashes of the Red LED. One
short flash every 3 seconds is the only method to confirm that a valid connection has been made
to the CASLink servers. The Red LED takes approximately 10 seconds to begin flashing upon powerup. Note that certain configuration changes on the module may take up to 10 minutes to take effect. If a
module local setting is modified, give it 10 minutes to update the red LED.
Table 2 - Flash codes for the On-Module Red LED indicator
Number
of
Flashes
1
Normal operation
2
Waiting for DHCP
3
Configuration mode enabled
4
No CORE interlock network traffic detected
5
Communication with CAS servers not
established
Unspecified fault
6
Description
Notes
13
Normal Operation (1 short flash every 3
seconds)
Check that the Switch or Bridge is
communicating & properly configured.
This mode is enabled via DIP switch 3. In
this mode a web server is enabled for
configuration changes to be made. Turn
off DIP switch 3 to remove this code.
Not present if CORE is not configured on
the Module’s Internal Server. If present,
CORE Interlock Network is miswired or
CORE board dip switch settings are
incorrect.
Typically no internet or CASLink server
down.
Normally a flash CRC error. Contact
Service to order a replacement.
Module Activation & Registration
Once a valid connection to the CASLink server has been established (one short flash on Red LED every
three seconds), proceed to activate the Module through the CASLink Module Registration Wizard.
Registration
Each Module is given a unique MAC Address and Authentication Key. These two items are located on a
label on the door of the Electrical Control Panel housing the module (Figure 14). Obtain this MAC
address along with the Authentication Key, and proceed to the following URL in any standard web
browser on any device:
www.CASLink.com
Figure 14 - The Auth. Key and MAC Address can be found on the panel lid.
The homepage will be shown as below (Figure 15) on a tablet or computer.
Figure 15 - The CASLink Home Screen
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STEP 1
Log in to the website utilizing your NOLA
credentials. If you do not have NOLA credentials,
please contact your local service representative
for additional instructions.
Select “Register New Module” (circled to the
right in two places) to initiate the Module
Registration Wizard.
STEP 2
Enter Authentication Information:
Enter the Authentication Key & MAC
Address: Obtain from label on the
door of the control panel (Figure 14).
Select “NEXT”.
STEP 3
Create New User:
If you are properly logged in using
your NOLA credentials, Step 2 will
be completed already. Simply select
“NEXT”. If you are not logged in, you
will be prompted to enter a username
and password.
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STEP 4
Location Information:
Enter a description of the location. This is
typically the name of the facility. Enter the
address.
NOTE: Address information is used
throughout the website for analytics and
Service linking.
Once complete, select “NEXT”.
STEP 5
Service Region Selection:
Enter the nearest Service Region. They are
sorted by distance using the address entered
in Step 3. The system will automatically select
the nearest location. Only adjust if necessary,
then select “NEXT”.
STEP 6
Confirmation:
Verify all information was entered correctly. Select
“REGISTER”.
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Initial Settings for a New Module in CASLink
Defining the Occupancy Schedule
The range and activation of most email alert events depend specifically on the occupied/unoccupied state
of the building. A simple example of this is the “Fan Run Status” alert. If a fan is running during the
occupied period this is considered normal operation; however, if a fan is running during the unoccupied
period this is considered an alert condition.
As such, a properly defined Building Schedule is an extremely important item in the CASLink
monitoring setup procedure.
NOTE: A schedule must match the end-user’s building occupancy to prevent nuisance alert
emails.
By default, all Modules are preset with a 7:00 AM – 10:00 PM schedule. To modify the
Occupied/Unoccupied schedule follow the steps below:
a) Enter the settings area by selecting the “SETTINGS” icon.
b) Select the “OCCUPANCY” Icon to access the Occupancy Editor (Figure 16)
c) Click or press (touchscreen) and drag over the desired occupancy ranges.
a. If starting on an empty time block, all blocks will be filled when the cursor is released.
b. If starting on a filled time block, all blocks will be emptied when the cursor is released.
c. Each block represents 15 minutes of time.
d) Confirm that the text version of the schedule, shown below the schedule editor itself, matches
what is expected.
e) Select “SAVE” to complete the Occupancy Editor.
f) Select “ROLLBACK” only if trying to revert to the previously saved schedule.
Figure 16 - The Occupancy Editor
17
Module Editor (Service or Admin Access Only)
By default, upon completion of the Module Registration Process, each module is given a standard predefined set of Alert Ranges, Sensor Names, Areas, and Email Events. All of this information should be
tailored to suit the specific needs of the customer.
To access the module editor, login in using Employee Credentials (NOLA credentials). If you are not a
CASLink employee and don’t have NOLA credentials, contact your service or sales region for
documentation. If the Module Registration Process was just completed, you should already be signed in.
Upon logging in, a Select Module pop-up window will be present. Select the specific module by searching
for the name, address, or the MAC address.
Once a specific Module is found, the Module Editor can be accessed by selecting the “Pencil” icon in the
module search results pop-up window, or alternatively by opening the “Location” drop down menu after
loading the module and selecting the module’s Mac Address (Figure 17). Most installations will only
have one MAC Address listed in this drop down menu. If there is more than one module at the location,
each Module has to be edited individually. However, the data from the modules will be presented as one
location to the end-user.
Figure 17 - Accessing the Module Editor via the Location Menu
18
Once in the Module Editor, the following actions can be taken.
Defining Sensor Areas and Names
Specific Sensors are not given an area & name by default, but instead follow the area & naming
convention of the hardware that they originate from. For example, the CORE Fire Protection Fire Active
Sensor is automatically placed into the Kitchen area because the CORE board is located in the Kitchen
Area by default.
Additional sensor areas & names can be defined by the following procedure:
1. Select the sensor (or entire hardware component) that needs a new area defined. Sensor areas
can be defined by their hardware area (if no specific sensor area is defined) or individually. They
are not required to be in the same area as their hardware component.
2. To edit the entire hardware location & name (tag), select the entire hardware component from the
hardware tree, select edit, type in or select the new name and area, and select update to save
your changes (Figure 18).
3. To edit a specific sensor location & name (tag), select the specific sensor under the hardware
tree, select edit, type in or select the new name and area, and select update to save your
changes (Figure 19).
4. After all sensors have been appropriately named and correspond to appropriate areas, proceed
to the home screen and confirm, via the “Sensors” icon, that the areas are defined, sensors are
where expected, and unnecessary areas are not present. Keep in mind that having too many
areas makes the navigation cumbersome. Simple and effective Area naming is the best
approach.
NOTE: Sensors can be placed in areas separate from their hardware location. For example, a
temperature sensor could be mounted in a back kitchen, while the hood control panel is mounted
in the front kitchen. For this reason, it is extremely important during startup to properly label the
sensors so that each can be defined without on-site knowledge.
Figure 18 - Editing a Complete Hardware Name and Area
19
Proper sensor naming convention should indicate the sensor type and the component it is associated with
(hood #1, exhaust fan #4, etc.). Appliance type, if available, can be valuable as well.
An example of a properly named sensor would be “Hood #1 (Fryer) Duct Temp”.
An example of a poorly named sensor would be “Duct Temp #1”.
Figure 19 - Editing a Specific Sensor Name and Area
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Defining & Customizing Alert Emails & Alarms
Alarms are what drive the email and service notification portion of CASLink BMS.
By default, upon completion of the Module Registration Process, each module is given a standard predefined set of Alarms and a pre-made email notification set.
NOTE: Pre-defined Alarm cannot be changed. However, the email functions can be
enabled/disabled.
By default, email notification is added to all sensors for warning conditions for the following users:
 The engineering sales office associated with the original design.
 The service region selected during module registration.
Additional custom alerts (custom AV) or email notifications can be added to individual sensors or
parameters by following the instructions below. Valid reasons for setting up additional alerts would be to:
 Monitor a specific sensor for a suspect component.
 Define AV email activation setpoints that are more reactive than the standard setpoints.
 Monitor activation time by daily email for a component or sensor to watch for trends.
21
Adding Custom Alarms
NOTE: Adding a custom Alarm Variable does NOT automatically add the Email link. See below
section titled “Adding Custom Email Alerts” to link the new alarm variable to email account(s).
To add a Custom Alarm Variable:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Select the specific sensor for the new Alarm in the Module Editor (Figure 20).
Next, select the “Ranges & Alerts” tab in the lower window.
To add a new Alarm, select “Add Sensor Range” to open the Sensor Range Editor
In the Sensor Range Editor (Figure 21), adjust and enter the data as defined below.
Notice that alarms may already exist for that sensor. These are typically the default AV and cannot be
changed. They will show up under the “Default” heading, which can be collapsed via the adjacent arrow.
Figure 20 - Adding Custom Alarms
22
Figure 21 - The Alarm Variable Sensor Range Editor











Sensor: Confirm the appropriate sensor is selected.
Alert Level: This will dictate the alert severity level. Info, OK, Warning, and Alert are the available
options. “Info” should be used for standard data monitoring. “OK” is to confirm proper operational
status. “Warning” is used for moderate failure or data. “Alert” is used for severe failure or critical
data.
Occupancy: This defines when the alert can be sent. Select “Occupied”, “Unoccupied”, or
“Any”. Refer to the Defining Occupancy Schedule portion of this document for further
information.
Comparison: Defines the mathematical function used for the alert variable.
Minimum Value: Enter the minimum value for activating this alarm. NOTE: This does not apply
to binary data such as On/Off variables. If no minimum, select “None”. If no maximum, select
“None”.
Maximum Value: Enter the maximum value for activating this alarm. NOTE: This does not
apply to binary data such as On/Off variables. If no minimum, select “None”. If no maximum,
select “None”.
Hysteresis (min & max): Unless purposely defining for a specific purpose, set the hysteresis to
“1” to prevent cycling of the alert and unnecessary emails.
Delay Count: This determines how many data packets must come through the server
continuously with the fault active before considering it an active alert. A default of 30 is
recommended. Some sensors, such as building pressure, will fluctuate throughout the day and it
is therefore wise to fine tune this number to only activate on a true constant failure mode.
Can Repeat: If checked, the alert can repeat more than once for the same qualifying condition.
This should never be checked unless specifically required.
Can Snooze: If checked, this alert can be delayed by standard users in the “Alert” tabs of the
website. This feature is only available if the “Can Repeat” option is enabled.
Snooze Minutes: This is how long the snooze is effective for before the sensor can create an
alert again.
23
Adding Custom Email Alert Events
To add a custom email alert event, first select the alarm variable in the Module Editor (default or custom
type are allowed) which is being used to activate the email. At the right end of the variable, there is a “b”
button.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Select the “Manage Alerts” button for that Alarm (Figure 20)
Select the “Add Sensor Alert” button in the Sensor Alerts pop-up (Figure 22)
Enter a description of the alert event (Figure 24).
Add the email addresses as necessary.
Select all “Save” buttons when complete.
The new alert event should now be shown in the “Ranges & Alerts” tab (Figure 25). Activation
and deactivation of the email alert event can be done via the checkbox.
Note: This is a permanent deactivation and should not be used when a snooze command
will suffice.
Figure 22 - Adding Email Alerts
Figure 23 – Add Sensor Alert
24
Figure 24 - Alert Editor Window
Figure 25 - Sensor Alerts Window After Email Has Been Added
25
End User Guide
The alerts, zones, and customized events explained in the preceding sections should be set up by a
CASLink service or sales representative. The end-user (i.e. restaurant owner, manager, or employee) can
access CASLink by logging in with the account provided by CASLink service or sales representative. The
following sections describe ways to access and interpret the information gathered through CASLink.
Log In
To log in, go to www.caslink.com, and use the username and password provided by CASLink service or
sales representative.
Figure 26 - CASLink Log-in Page
Main Page Navigation
Immediately after signing in, the main CASLink page will appear. There are multiple sections, each
highlighted either in green (if there are no alerts), yellow (if there are non-critical alerts), red (if there are
critical alerts that need immediate attention), or grey (if section is not available). The primary sections are:
1. Monitoring: Contains sensor values, alerts and graphs
2. Control: Used to control certain functions/scheduling of events
3. Analytics: Contains graphs and interpretations of sensor data
4. Settings: Allows for occupancy schedule setup and location information changes (see Defining
Occupancy Schedule)
26
Figure 27 - CASLink Home Page
Figure 28 - Indication of a Critical Alert in a Sensor Area
Monitoring
The Monitoring section of CASLink shows all sensor areas that were setup for that specific location. To
view current sensor values, click on any of the sensor areas shown.
Figure 29 - Sensor Areas shown in the Monitoring section
27
CORE Fire Protection
If there is one or multiple CORE fire systems (Hood or PCU) connected to a communication module, then
the following conditions can be monitored at all times:
1. Fire Status: Reports Fire Condition.
2. Wash Solenoid Malfunction: Alerts user if plenum and duct water system solenoid is
malfunctioning.
3. Appliance Solenoid Malfunction: Alerts user if appliance protection fire system solenoid is
malfunctioning.
4. Microcontroller Fault: Reports an alert if circuit board is malfunctioning.
5. Surfactant Pump Malfunction: Alerts if there is a problem with the surfactant pump.
6. Supervised Loop Issue: Reports issue with Pull/Push station and/or fire sensor connections.
7. Ground Fault: Reports issue with Pull/Push station and/or fire sensor connections.
8. Surfactant Low: Alerts when surfactant level is below 50%.
9. Battery Voltage Low: Alerts if backup battery voltage is low.
10. AC Power Failure: Alerts if there is a problem with feeding power line.
11. Door Panel Open: Triggers alarm if CORE door panel is opened when the system is armed.
12. Test Mode: Reports if CORE system is currently on Test Mode.
13. Network Communication Error: Reports an issue with the CORE interlock network.
14. Fire Suppression System Activated by Fire Sensor: Alerts user if CORE has activated based
on temperature readings.
15. Fire Suppression System Activated by Button: Alerts user if CORE has activated by push
station.
16. Gas Is On: Reports if the gas line to the appliances is open.
17. Successful Wash Has Not Occurred: Alerts user if a wash has not occurred in 24 hours.
18. Washing: Reports when hot water wash is active.
For further reference to these conditions, please consult the CORE Fire Protection manual.
Figure 30 - CORE Monitoring Parameters and Alert Screen
28
Pollution Control Monitor
The following information can be monitored for a Pollution Control Unit - Advanced Filter Monitoring (PCU
AFM) System:
1. Clogged Filter: One or more filters in the unit need to be replaced
2. Missing Filter: There is one or more filters missing in the unit.
3. Clogged Filter Shutdown: Unit shut down due to clogged filter condition
4. Fully Clogged Unit: Unit is clogged
5. Missing Door: One or more doors in the unit are missing
6. Unit Needs Calibration: Perform calibration on the unit (see PCU AFM manual for reference)
7. 24 Hour Clog: Filters in a module are clogged for 24 hours or the pressure drop across the PCU
exceeds allowable limit for 24 hours.
8. 72 Hour Clog: Filters in a module are clogged for 72 hours or the pressure drop across the PCU
exceeds allowable limit for 72 hours. An access door left open in the duct for 72 hours may also
cause this fault.
9. Individual Pressure and Filter status (analog variables)
Figure 31 - Monitoring Screen for PCU AFM
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ECPM03 Hood Control Panel (SC and DCV)
The following information can be monitored for a Demand Control Ventilation connected to CASLink:
1. Temperature Sensors:
a. All room temperature sensors and duct sensors: Temperature on vertical axis, time
on horizontal axis.
2. Make Up Air Units:
a. Speed: VFD frequency (DCV only).
b. Amperage: Current draw of the unit motor (DCV only).
c. Energy Usage: Power on the vertical axis, time on the horizontal axis (DCV only).
d. Fault State: Alerts if VFD is in fault state (DCV only).
e. Fan Status: Is MUA fan group on (both variants).
f. Fan On Reason: Why are fans on (both variants).
3. Exhaust Fan Units:
a. Speed: VFD frequency.
b. Amperage: Current draw of the unit motor.
c. Energy Usage: Power on the vertical axis, time on the horizontal axis.
d. Fault State: Alerts if VFD is in fault state.
e. Fan Status: Is Exhaust fan group on (both variants).
f. Fan On Reason: Why are fans on (both variants).
4. Hood Lighting State: Shows if hood lights are ON or OFF.
5. Wash Zone Status: Reports if one or more wash zones are currently active.
6. Alarms Active: Reports any active alarms on the ECPM03 system.
Figure 32 - Hood Duct Temperature Obtained from a DCV Panel
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Control
The Control section of CASLink shows all sensor areas that have capability to be controlled through
CASLink UI. To view each piece of hardware that has control capabilities, click on the “Control” icon from
the home page.
RTULink
The following RTU information can be monitored for every RTU that has an RTULink board installed in it.
1. Temperature Sensors:
a. Discharge Temperature
b. Return Temperature
c. Outside Air Temperature
d. Space Temperature (if installed)
2. Unit Activity:
a. Blower Status
b. Individual Cooling Stage Status
c. Individual Heating Stage Status
d. Unit Alarm Status
e. Cooling Setpoint (if in Full Control mode)
f. Heating Setpoint (if in Full Control mode)
3. Faults/Alarms: Reports any fault that is active on the RTULink control board or any fault that is
configured through CASLink.
Figure 33 - Cooling Setpoint Graph Obtained from RTULink Board
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Navigating Sensor Data
All continuous time data (temperatures, fan speeds, energy usage, and amperage) will be shown in
graphs with time on the horizontal axis. The time frame viewable can be modified using the Zoom
functions shown above the graph (Set View Range, Zoom Out, Reset Zoom). Graphs can also be
overlapped by dragging sensors from the menu on the left hand side onto the body of any graph.
Zooming in on a selected area of the graph is accomplished by clicking on a start time and dragging the
mouse to an end time before releasing the click.
Figure 34 - Overlapping Sensor Data on Same Plot
Figure 35 - Set Range and Export Tabs Shown Above Graph
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Any alerts for specific sensors can be viewed by clicking on the “Alerts” tab above the graphs. The data
tab will display the graphs again. The “Play Live” button will let you view data as it comes in (refreshed a
few times every minute). The “Export” button will allow you to download an excel file with sensor values
and times of occurrence.
Figure 36 - Excel Sheet of Temperature Sensor Data Exported from CASLink
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RTULink Control Board
If the RTULink board is in Full Control or External Control Mode, it is capable of being controlled through
CASLink. The Full Control Mode offers the highest level of control, allowing setpoints and settings of each
RTU to be changed and controlled through CASLink. External Control Mode offers limited control of each
RTU, with the majority of the operation still being controlled by an external thermostat. The Passthrough
Control Mode offers no control capability and, as a result, the CASLink Controls interface will not be
accessible.
Each RTULink board will have a dashboard that appears in the Controls Area. The color of each
individual dashboard indicates the current operation of the unit. A dashboard with a blue background
means the unit is cooling and a dashboard with a red background indicates a unit is heating.
In Figure 37:
 The yellow box shows the heating setpoint (to the right of the red bubble), the cooling setpoing (to
the right of the blue bubble), and the blower mode (a rotating fan means the blower is in ON
mode and the absence of a fan means the blower is in AUTO mode).
 The red box indicates the spot on the dashboard where the space, return, outside, and discharge
temperatures are displayed.
 The green box indicates the status of certain unit options. For example, if the emergency heat is
ON or OFF, if the economizer is allowed, if the unit is in an occupied or unoccupied state, etc.
Figure 37 - RTULink Dashboard
The three links at the bottom of the RTULink dashboard are Schedule, Thermostat, and Settings.
Schedule
The scheduling UI is where the 7-day schedule is set for each board. Click and drag over an area of the
schedule and release the click to highlight an area of the scheduler (press, drag and release for a
touchscreen). Once an area has been highlighted, a popup will ask to create a new setpoint or to use an
existing setpoint. An example of this popup can be seen in Figure 38. If no setpoints have ever been
created, it will only give the option to create a new one.
Figure 38 - Setpoint Popup
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The Setpoint Editor has the following information and editable points.
NOTE: The selections that are available in the Setpoint Editor are based on the control mode that
the RTULink is in. As mentioned earlier, full control offers the highest level of control, so all
points listed below will be shown but all of the points may not be shown when in External Control
Mode.
 The time block that is being edited.
 The operational mode (Heat/Cool, Heat only, Cool only, etc).
 Occupied/Unoccupied setting. This controls whether certain features will be enabled;
such as, CO2 based DCV, economizer, discharge tempering, etc.
 Blower mode. This is a separate setting from the Occupied/Unoccupied mode and
controls the status of the blower (AUTO or ON).
 Cooling and heating setpoints.
Figure 39 - RTULink Set Point Editor
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Thermostat
The thermostat UI provides temporary override of the schedule. This is intended to make small
adjustments to the schedule without writing over it. The thermostat editor will look identical to the setpoint
editor except for the addition of the override time. The override time specifies the duration of time, in
minutes, that the schedule override will last for.
Figure 40 - RTULink Thermostat Editor
Settings
The settings UI is where default board settings can be changed.
NOTE: The Selections that are available in the set point editor are based on the control mode that
the RTULink is in. Only settings that apply to the current control mode will be viewable and
editable in this interface.
Figure 41 - RTULink Settings Editor
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Appendix A - Cradlepoint Cellular GPIO Power Pinout and Wiring
Diagram
The Cradlepoint power connection is via a GPIO connector. The connector utilizes 4 pins. Only two of
them (pins 1 and 2 in Figure 42) are used to power the device. The wire with the white stripe should be
connected to the + terminal on the 12 VDC power supply and the black wire should be connected to the terminal on the 12VDC power supply.
Figure 42 - Cradlepoint GPIO Connection
Figure 43 - Cradlepoint Power Connection
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Appendix B - Weak Signal Strength (Less than -99 dBm)
1. Follow the beginning of the manual through Step 6 (“Utilizing a Cellular Wireless Bridge”) in order
to access the Cradlepoint dashboard page, see Figure 9.
2. Adjust the antenna positions. The antennas have the ability to rotate 360 degrees and also have
the ability to bend at right angles. The antennas should not be lying flat on each other or touching
each other. After a small adjustment in antenna position is made, step away from the electrical
box and observe the signal strength to see if it has improved (a 15 second pause must occur
each time in order for the Cradlepoint dashboard to refresh).
3. If no improvement in signal strength results from adjusted antenna positions then an antenna with
a higher gain may be needed.
 Once it is determined that a higher gain antenna will be needed, one can be
ordered with PN: Cellular_Antenna in NOLA or from your local service
representative. Only one will be needed per device as it replaces both regular
modem antennas.
 To install, connect the wire attached to the antenna to the SMA connector
labeled “MAIN” in Figure 5. This will be the antenna hole closest to the back of
the control box. The antenna is magnetic so it will mount on any flat metal
surface (top of control enclosure, metal stud, etc.).
 Mount antenna somewhere within reach of the wire length (20 ft.). Coil the extra
cable up and place neatly inside of the control box out of the way of high voltage
wiring.
4. Take new signal strength measurements. To do this follow Step 6 in the section labeled “Utilizing
a Cellular Wireless Bridge”. If the poor signal strength persists with several different antenna
locations tested, please contact service or your sales representative.
38
39
MAINTENANCE
The CASLink Building Management System and Protocessor/ProtoNode modules, by their very nature,
do not require physical maintenance unless a communication problem occurs.
If changes are made to the jobsite between standard 6 month checkup intervals for other equipment such
as the fans, fire system, etc. CASLink or Building Management Menus should be updated to reflect those
changes.
Please record the Module Mac address, BAUD rates, Authentication Key, End User information and
Module data in the Start-Up table, and present this manual to the end-user upon completion.
Module Registration Parameter Documentation
Record Initial Settings & upload settings to Service Job Notes using System Design Verification
Procedures.
Item
Data
MAC Address
Authentication Key
BAUD Rate
Device ID
End User Email
End User Name
End User Password
CAS Service Region
CAS Technician
Phone
Email
Factory Service Department
Phone: 1-866-784-6900
Fax: 1-919-554-9374
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