Lead Lag
for 2-8 Boilers
Installation and Startup
Operation Reference
Manual Part No. 750-322
2/2011
! WARNING
DANGER
DO NOT OPERATE, SERVICE, OR REPAIR THIS EQUIPMENT UNLESS YOU FULLY UNDERSTAND ALL
APPLICABLE SECTIONS OF THIS MANUAL.
DO NOT ALLOW OTHERS TO OPERATE, SERVICE, OR REPAIR THIS EQUIPMENT UNLESS THEY FULLY
UNDERSTAND ALL APPLICABLE SECTIONS OF THIS MANUAL.
FAILURE TO FOLLOW ALL APPLICABLE WARNINGS AND INSTRUCTIONS MAY RESULT IN SEVERE
PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH.
TO: Owners, Operators and/or Maintenance Personnel
This operating manual presents information that will help to properly operate and care for the equipment. Study its contents
carefully. The unit will provide good service and continued operation if proper operating and maintenance instructions are followed. No attempt should be made to operate the unit until the principles of operation and all of the components are thoroughly
understood. Failure to follow all applicable instructions and warnings may result in severe personal injury or death.
It is the responsibility of the owner to train and advise not only his or her personnel, but the contractors' personnel who are servicing, repairing or operating the equipment, in all safety aspects.
Cleaver-Brooks equipment is designed and engineered to give long life and excellent service on the job. The electrical and
mechanical devices supplied as part of the unit were chosen because of their known ability to perform; however, proper operating techniques and maintenance procedures must be followed at all times. Although these components afford a high degree
of protection and safety, operation of equipment is not to be considered free from all dangers and hazards inherent in handling
and firing of fuel.
Any "automatic" features included in the design do not relieve the attendant of any responsibility. Such features merely free
him of certain repetitive chores and give him more time to devote to the proper upkeep of equipment.
It is solely the operator’s responsibility to properly operate and maintain the equipment. No amount of written instructions can
replace intelligent thinking and reasoning and this manual is not intended to relieve the operating personnel of the responsibility
for proper operation. On the other hand, a thorough understanding of this manual is required before attempting to operate, maintain, service, or repair this equipment.
Because of state, local, or other applicable codes, there are a variety of electric controls and safety devices which vary considerably from one boiler to another. This manual contains information designed to show how a basic burner operates.
Operating controls will normally function for long periods of time and we have found that some operators become lax in their
daily or monthly testing, assuming that normal operation will continue indefinitely. Malfunctions of controls lead to uneconomical operation and damage and, in most cases, these conditions can be traced directly to carelessness and deficiencies in
testing and maintenance.
It is recommended that a boiler room log or record be maintained. Recording of daily, weekly, monthly and yearly maintenance
activities and recording of any unusual operation will serve as a valuable guide to any necessary investigation.
Most instances of major boiler damage are the result of operation with low water. We cannot emphasize too strongly the need
for the operator to periodically check his low water controls and to follow good maintenance and testing practices. Cross-connecting piping to low water devices must be internally inspected periodically to guard against any stoppages which could obstruct the free flow of water to the low water devices. Float bowls of these controls must be inspected frequently to check for
the presence of foreign substances that would impede float ball movement.
The waterside condition of the pressure vessel is of extreme importance. Waterside surfaces should be inspected frequently to
check for the presence of any mud, sludge, scale or corrosion.
The services of a qualified water treating company or a water consultant to recommend the proper boiler water treating practices
are essential.
The operation of this equipment by the owner and his or her operating personnel must comply with all requirements or regulations of his insurance company and/or other authority having jurisdiction. In the event of any conflict or inconsistency between
such requirements and the warnings or instructions contained herein, please contact Cleaver-Brooks before proceeding.
ii
Contents
INSTALLATION AND STARTUP
INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
SPECIFICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
FEATURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
PARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
SYSTEM SETUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
COMMISSIONING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
STARTUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
MONITORING SYSTEM PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
EXAMPLE SYSTEMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
EXAMPLE PIPING DIAGRAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
PUMP CONTROL BLOCK (PCB) EXAMPLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
BOILER WIRING DIAGRAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
OPERATION
GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE LEAD LAG APPLICATION . . . . . . . . . 35
LEAD LAG (LL) MASTER GENERAL OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
SYSTEM WIRING HOOKUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
LEAD-LAG OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
SLAVE OPERATION AND SETUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
SLAVE PARAMETERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
LL MASTER OPERATION AND SETUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
APPENDIX
BUILDING ENERGY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EMS) INTERFACE. . . . . . A1
iii
iv
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Falcon Lead Lag control provides sequencing and staging for up to 8 boilers using Falcon controllers linked
over the Falcon Lead Lag Modbus network. This manual includes:
• Installation and Startup instructions for ClearFire boiler lead lag applications.
• Lead Lag Operation reference manual containing operation details and in-depth descriptions of Falcon
lead lag control algorithms and parameters.
Before a lead lag control network can be established, individual boilers must be properly installed and
commissioned. For information refer to the latest revision of the appropriate boiler manual:
750-263
750-296
750-295
750-269
Model CFC ClearFire Condensing Boiler
Model CFW ClearFire Hydronic Boiler
Model CFH Steam Boiler
Model CFV Vertical Steam Boiler
Review especially the sections pertaining to multiple boiler installations.
See also the latest revisions of:
750-265
750-241
750-308
750-244
Falcon Boiler Control
Falcon Display/Operator Interface
Falcon Modbus
Falcon Program Module (PIM)
INSTALLATION AND STARTUP
1- INTRODUCTION
The Falcon boiler control in conjunction with Cleaver-Brooks’ ClearFire line of commercial boilers provides
a reliable and efficient solution for facilities requiring a modular, multiple-boiler system. The Falcon is
uniquely capable of taking advantage of the ClearFire’s characteristic combustion and thermal performance
profiles, apportioning the load to individual boilers so as to maximize overall system efficiency.
Figure 1 shows efficiency data for the ClearFire CFC condensing boiler. Note that the CFC operates most
efficiently at low fire (20% firing rate). While different model ClearFire boilers will differ somewhat in their
operational characteristics, all share a tendency to reach peak efficiencies at lower firing rates. The Falcon
lead lag routine uses a modulation scheme based on a user-selectable common base load rate, which when
properly configured will provide optimum load response and efficiency for any Model ClearFire lead lag
network.
Single return efficiency as a function of temperature and firing rate
101%
99%
Firing Rate Percentage
97%
20
50
95%
75
100
93%
91%
89%
87%
85%
68°
86°
104°
122°
140°
158°
Return Water Temperature
Figure 1 - CFC Efficiencies
Part No. 750-322
1
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
2- SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS
Hydronic Systems
• 2-8 boilers equipped with 833-03639 Falcon hydronic controls. All Falcon controllers in a Lead/
Lag network must have compatible software versions.* To check the software version on a
particular Falcon controller, use the touchscreen display and go to Configure>System
Identification and Access.
• Modbus network connecting all Falcon boiler controllers in the system.
• System header temperature sensor (required for lead lag operation).
• An outdoor temperature sensor may be connected to an available Falcon sensor input for outdoor
reset control (optional).
• 833-03577 display for each boiler.**
A Falcon lead lag kit 880-3670 is available from Cleaver-Brooks and includes a system header temperature
sensor with thermowell, outdoor air temperature sensor, and Falcon Program Module for copying parameter
settings from one Falcon to another.
* Software version 1987.2432 or later required.
** Software version 1.3.1 or later required (1.4.0 or later for building EMS communication).
Steam Systems
• 2-8 boilers equipped with 833-03578 Falcon steam controls. All Falcon controllers in a Lead/
Lag network must have compatible software versions.* To check the software version on a
particular Falcon controller, use the touchscreen display and go to Configure>System
Identification and Access.
• Modbus network connecting all Falcon boiler controllers in the system.
• System header pressure sensor (required for lead lag operation).
• 833-03577 display for each boiler.**
A Falcon lead lag kit (880-3755 for 15# steam or 880-3756 for 150# steam) is available from CleaverBrooks and includes a system header pressure transmitter and Falcon Program Module for copying
parameter settings from one Falcon to another.
* Software version 3468.2550 or later required.
** Software version 1.4.2 or later required.
3- SPECIFICATIONS
• Maximum length of Modbus network (18 AWG 2-conductor shielded or twisted pair cable):
approx. 600 ft (200 m). NOTE - terminating resistors may be necessary for long cable runs.
• Lead lag Modbus baud rate: 38400
• EMS Modbus baud rate: user selectable (9600, 19200, 38400)
Refer to appropriate manual for control component environmental specifications.
For more on the Modbus protocol, visit www.modbus-ida.org.
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Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
4- FEATURES
Falcon controllers connected in a lead lag network use the Modbus communication bus to communicate in
a ‘Master-Slave’ configuration. The ‘Master’ is a software management service and is ‘hosted’ by one of the
Falcon units in the network. The lead lag Master is not a separate controller and no additional control
panels or devices are required to configure and operate a Falcon lead lag network. The Master is responsible
for all high-level system functions including boiler sequencing and staging, pump/valve control, and system
PID setpoint control.
• PID setpoint control - The lead lag Master uses a proportional-integral-derivative algorithm to maintain
system header temperature at a setpoint. Individual boilers are turned on and off as necessary according
to the configured sequence and add/drop-stage methods. PID gain settings are user-configurable.
• Outdoor reset (hot water systems) - Adjusts the setpoint according to outdoor temperature. Uses an
outdoor temperature sensor wired to one of the lead lag slaves’ sensor inputs.
• Time of day setpoint (night setback).
• Remote enable - system can be enabled from a separate boiler room controller or building energy
management system (EMS).
• Remote setpoint (hot water)
• Warm weather shutdown (hot water) - uses the outdoor temperature and shuts down the lead lag system
at a setpoint (plus a 4 deg F hysteresis). Can be programmed to shut down immediately or when current
demand for central heat ends.
• Frost Protection (hot water) - when an individual slave requires frost protection it notifies the lead lag
Master, which will then activate a pump or if necessary fire a burner.
• Pump control (hot water) - 3 configurable relays on each Falcon controller can be controlled in conjunction
with the lead lag Master.
5- PARTS
Controls
Model CFC
Model CFW
Models CFH/CFV
OW V
LLOW
OLTAGE
VOLTAGE
INE V
LLINE
OLTAGE
VOLTAGE
CFC HYDRONIC CONTROL 833-03639
2
JJ2
DESCRIPTION
FALCON HYDRONIC CONTROL
FALCON HYDRONIC CONTROL
FALCON STEAM CONTROL
1
JJ1
PART NUMBER
833-03639
833-03871
833-03578
CFW HYDRONIC CONTROL
833-03871
(CFW panel interior)
(CFC control panel interior)
Part No. 750-322
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CB Falcon Lead/Lag
JJ2
2
LLOW
OW VOLTAGE
VOLTA
TAGE
CFH STEAM CONTROL 833-03578
(CFH panel interior)
LIIN
INE
NE
N
E VOLTAGE
VOLTA
TAGE
LINE
JJ1
1
CFV STEAM
CONTROL 833-03578
(CFV Panel Interior)
Display
PART NUMBER
833-03577
DESCRIPTION
FALCON SYSTEM DISPLAY / OPERATOR
INTERFACE
Lead Lag Kits
Hydronic (kit number 880-03670):
PART NUMBER
817-04468
817-00405
817-04517
833-03640
4
DESCRIPTION
TEMPERATURE SENSOR, HEADER
SUPPLY, 10K NTC THERMISTOR
THERMOWELL
OUTDOOR TEMP. SENSOR
FALCON PROGRAM MODULE
Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
15# Steam (kit number 880-3755)
PART NUMBER
817-04385
833-03640
854-00011
DESCRIPTION
PRESSURE TRANSMITTER*, HEADER
SUPPLY, 4-20mA, 2-WIRE, 0-15#
FALCON PROGRAM MODULE
SIPHON COIL
PRESSURE TRANSMITTER
817-04385 15 PSI
817-04386 150 PSI
150# Steam (kit number 880-3756)
PART NUMBER
817-04386
833-03640
854-00011
DESCRIPTION
PRESSURE TRANSMITTER*, HEADER
SUPPLY, 4-20mA, 2-WIRE, 0-150#
FALCON PROGRAM MODULE
SIPHON COIL
*1/4” process connection
6- SYSTEM SETUP
Figure 2 shows a basic Falcon lead lag system consisting of a 4-boiler network with remote enable and
outdoor air temperature reset.
Figure 2 - Four Boiler Lead Lag System
Part No. 750-322
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CB Falcon Lead/Lag
6.1 - Lead Lag Modbus Network
Falcon controllers should be connected in a ‘daisy-chain’ manner (see Figure 2) over the MB2 bus using 18
AWG 2-conductor shielded or twisted pair cable. Connections are made at control panel terminals 39 and
40 (see Figure 3) or can be directly landed on the Falcon controller’s MB2 A and B terminals.
J3 COMMS
9
A
B
C
RED
BLK
A
B
1
C
MB2
MB1
WH
DATA-
39
12 VDC +
-
40
LEAD/LAG
MODBUS
DATA+
EMS/GLOBAL MODBUS
CONNECTIONS
41
DATA+
42
DATAb a
JUMPER COM1
a b
COM2
9
1
SYSTEM DISPLAY
Figure 3 - Falcon communication wiring
6.2 - Header Temperature Sensor (Pressure Transmitter)
Determine which boiler will be the lead lag Master host and connect the header temperature sensor
(pressure transmitter) to this boiler at the appropriate control panel terminals.
Temperature sensor (hot water): Terminals 35 and 36 (Falcon terminals J8-11 and J8-12; sensor input S5).
See Figure 4a.
Pressure transmitter (steam) - 2-wire, 4-20mA: Terminals 26 and 28 (Falcon terminals J8-6 and power
supply VDC+; J8-7 is jumpered to VDC- see Figure 4b).
NOTE: refer to specific boiler wiring diagram for proper terminal numbers.
24
FALCON
FALCON
J8
S1
S2
S3
S4
S5
Figure 4a - Header temp. sensor
(hydronic)
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
REM
23
60
58
28
BK
BR
DEMAND
OFF LOC
25
PRESS
- XMTR
+
26
59
27
(18)
FALCON LEAD LAG MASTER ONLY:
L-L HEADER PRESSURE XMTR
28
BR
BK
+
+12VDC
Figure 4b - Header press. transmitter
(steam)
Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
6.3 - Outdoor Temperature Sensor (optional; hot water only)
The outdoor temperature sensor, if used, may be connected to control panel terminals 35 and 36 on any
available boiler in the network (other than the boiler hosting the Master). Once configured, the sensor will
be recognized by the lead lag Master (see section 7.5 - Outdoor Temperature Sensor Configuration).
6.4 - Connecting to a Building Energy Management System (EMS)
A Falcon lead lag network may be connected to a building EMS by several means:
• Discrete contact for remote enable - allows a building EMS to send a remote lead lag system
enable signal to the Falcon lead lag Master. To use, connect the signal source to terminals 24
and 25 on the Master host and remove the jumper there. Jumpers may stay in place on the
remaining slave boilers.
• Analog 4-20mA input for remote setpoint (hot water only) - For remote setpoint operation,
connect a 4-20mA set point signal at terminals 26 and 27 on the Master host. Go to lead lag
configuration parameters (advanced settings) and under Central Heat parameters change
‘Setpoint Source’ to S2. Set the Master host boiler’s demand switch to REMOTE.
• Modbus - The Falcon’s Modbus communication capabilities allow the transfer of information
between the lead lag network and a building EMS for purposes of remote system monitoring or
data acquisition. Connection to the lead lag Modbus network is made at control panel
terminals 41 and 42 on each boiler (connected to the Falcon display’s COM2 terminals). Refer
to specific boiler wiring diagram.
An additional use of Modbus is for remote enable/remote setpoint operation. These features can
be implemented via Modbus as an alternative to using the hard contacts as described above.
See the appendix to this document for Modbus registers and additional information.
Also see manual 750-308 Falcon Modbus Communication (included as an appendix to the
ClearFire boiler manual) for a complete description of Modbus features.
7- COMMISSIONING
Before commissioning the system, ensure all network wiring and sensor connections have been made
according to the above instructions.
Begin with all boilers’ demand switches in the OFF position.
All CC-Blower power switches should be ON.
7.1 - Lead Lag Master Configuration
1. Log in at the Service level on the boiler hosting the lead lag Master (default password is 9220).
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CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Logging in:
2. Go to Lead Lag Master Configuration and make any necessary parameter changes. The first set of parameters shown will be the following:
Master Enable should be left at Disabled for now.
CH (steam) setpoint is the system header temperature (pressure) that the lead lag system will attempt to
maintain.
CH (steam) time of day is the setpoint used by the TOD/Night Setback routine, if utilized.
Modbus port should be set to MB2. This is the port used by the Falcon Lead Lag Modbus network.
Table 1a - Lead Lag Master Configuration Parameters (Hydronic)
Parameter
Master enable
CH setpoint
CH time of day setpoint
Modbus port
Range
Enabled
Disabled
-40 to 266 deg F (-40 to 130
deg C)
-40 to 266 deg F (-40 to 130
deg C)
MB1
MB2
No port
CB Default Setting
Disabled
Installation Setting
150 deg F
120 deg F
MB2
Table 1b - Lead Lag Master Configuration Parameters (Steam)
Parameter
Master enable
Steam setpoint
Steam time of day setpoint
Modbus port
Range
Enabled
Disabled
0-135 psi
0-135 psi
MB1
MB2
No port
CB Default Setting
Disabled
Installation Setting
10 psi
0 psi
MB2
Remaining lead lag Master parameters are accessed by pressing <ADVANCED SETTINGS> and are shown
in Tables 2a (hydronic) and 2b (steam). Use the left and right arrow buttons near the top of the screen to
navigate through the parameter menus. Use the scroll bar on the right hand side of the scren to scroll
through the parameter lists.
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Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Table 2a - Lead Lag Master Configuration Parameters - Advanced Settings, Hydronic
Parameter
Range
Modulation Parameters
CB Default Setting
Modulation backup sensor
Lead outlet sensor
Slave outlet sensor average
Disabled
Slave outlet sensor
average
Off hysteresis
0 deg F to 234 deg F (-17 deg C to 112 deg C)
15
On hysteresis
0 deg F to 234 deg F (-17 deg C to 112 deg C)
5
Hysteresis step time
hr min sec
1 min
P gain
0-400
10
I gain
0-400
25
D gain
0-400
Installation Setting
0
Central Heat Parameters
Demand switch
Stat Terminal
Remote Stat
Disabled
Stat Terminal
Setpoint source
Local
4-20mA
Local
Setpoint
-40 deg F to 266 deg F (-40 deg C to 130 deg C)
150
Time of day setpoint
-40 deg F to 266 deg F (-40 deg C to 130 deg C)
120
4mA water temperature
-40 deg F to 266 deg F (-40 deg C to 130 deg C)
80
20mA water temperature
-40 deg F to 266 deg F (-40 deg C to 130 deg C)
180
Outdoor reset
Enabled
Disabled
Disabled
Frost protection enable
Enabled
Disabled
Frost Protection Parameters
Disabled
Outdoor frost protection setpoint
-40 deg F to 266 deg F (-40 deg C to 130 deg C)
32 deg F
Frost protection rate
%
20%
Warm weather shutdown enable
Warm weather shutdown setpoint
Enabled
-40 deg F to 266 deg F (-40 deg C to 130 deg C)
Lead selection method
Sequence order
Measured run time
Sequence order
Lag selection method
Sequence order
Measured run time
Sequence order
Lead rotation time
day hr min
120 hrs
Force lead rotation time
day hr min
Warm Weather Shutdown Parameters
Disabled
100 deg F
Algorithms Parameters
168 hrs
Rate Allocation Parameters
Base load common
0-100%
45%
Add Stage Parameters
Add stage method
Error threshold
Firing rate threshold
Disabled
Firing rate threshold
Add stage detection time
hr min sec
3 min
Error threshold
0 deg F to 234 deg F (-17 deg C to 112 deg C)
5 deg F
Rate offset
E%
0%
Add Stage interstage delay
hr min sec
10 min
Drop stage method
Error threshold
Firing rate threshold
Drop Stage Parameters
Firing rate threshold
Drop stage detection time
hr min sec
3 min
Error threshold
0 deg F to 234 deg F (-17 deg C to 112 deg C)
10 deg F
Rate offset
E%
-3%
Drop stage interstage delay
hr min sec
10 min
Part No. 750-322
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CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Table 2a - Lead Lag Master Configuration Parameters - Advanced Settings, Hydronic (Continued)
Boiler off options
Disabled
All boilers off threshold
deg F
210
Table 2b - Lead Lag Master Configuration Parameters - Advanced Settings, Steam
Parameter
Range
CB Default Setting
Modulation Parameters
Modulation sensor
S1 (J8-4) Steam Sensor
S2 (J8-6) Steam Sensor
S2 (J8-6) Steam Sensor
Off hysteresis
psi
5
On hysteresis
psi
0
Hysteresis step time
hr min sec
0 sec
P gain
0-400
10
I gain
0-400
25
D gain
0-400
Installation Setting
0
Steam Parameters
Demand switch
Stat Terminal
Mod Sensor
Disabled
Stat Terminal
Setpoint source
Local
Local
4-20mA - Not compatible with Falcon steam lead lag.
Setpoint
0-135 psi
10
Time of day setpoint
0-135 psi
0
Lead selection method
Sequence order
Measured run time
Sequence order
Lag selection method
Sequence order
Measured run time
Sequence order
Lead rotation time
day hr min
120 hrs
Force lead rotation time
day hr min
Algorithms Parameters
168 hrs
Rate Allocation Parameters
Base load common
0-100%
75%
Add Stage Parameters
Add stage method
Error threshold
Firing rate threshold
Disabled
Firing rate threshold
Add stage detection time
hr min sec
3 min
Error threshold
0 deg F to 234 deg F (-17 deg C
to 112 deg C)
5 deg F
Rate offset
E%
0%
Add Stage interstage delay
hr min sec
10 min
Drop Stage Parameters
Drop stage method
Error threshold
Firing rate threshold
Firing rate threshold
Drop stage detection time
hr min sec
2 min
Error threshold
psi
3 psi
Rate offset
E%
-3%
Interstage delay
hr min sec
5 min
Modulation backup sensor (hot water) - this parameter determines the setpoint source (‘backup sensor’) in
the event of a header temperature sensor failure. If Disable is selected then no backup will be used. If Lead
Outlet is selected then the outlet temperature of the lead boiler will be used as the backup during firing. If
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Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Slave Outlet Average is selected then average of the outlet temperatures of all slave boilers that are firing
will be used as a backup.
Modulation sensor (steam) - choices are S1 (J8-4) and S2 (J8-6). Default is S2, the system header
pressure transmitter. In the event of a header pressure transmitter failure, the local transmitter (S1) can be
configured as the lead lag modulation sensor.
Note that in steam systems the modulation backup source must be manually configured. In hydronic
systems this selection will be made automatically based on the settings in Modulation backup sensor
above.
On, Off hysteresis - The LL hysteresis values apply to all setpoint sources. The behavior of the hysteresis
function is identical to the behavior of the stand-alone hysteresis function, except:
• Where stand-alone hysteresis uses the on/off status of a single boiler, the LL hysteresis uses the
on/off status of all slave boilers: this status is true if any slave boiler is on, and false only if all
are off.
• Where stand-alone hysteresis uses time of turn-on and turn-off of a single boiler, the LL hysteresis
uses the turn-on of the first slave boiler and the turn-off of the last slave boiler.
PID gain - The behavior of the lead lag PID function is identical to the behavior of the stand-alone PID
function. The same gain scalers and algorithms are used.
Demand Switch - Selects the input for CH (steam) demand. If set to Disable, the LL master does not
respond to a demand.
Setpoint Source - Selectable between Local and S2 4-20mA for remote setpoint operation (hot water only;
see 6.4 above).
4mA/20mA Water Temperature (hot water only) - Defines the temperature range if S2 4-20mA selected
as setpoint source.
Outdoor Reset (hot water only) if enabled uses the current outdoor temperature to determine setpoint
(outdoor temperature sensor required; see 7.5 and 7.6 below).
Frost Protection (hot water only) is active when enabled and outdoor temperature is below the Outdoor
frost protection setpoint. If any slave indicates frost protection required, the Master will turn on any pumps
that are enabled for frost protection, and may additionally fire the current lead burner at the Frost protection
rate.
Lead lag selection method and rotation time together determine the sequence order of boilers.
Base load common - This is the firing rate threshold used for adding stages. If set to zero, this parameter
is disabled.
As demand increases, until all boilers are firing none will be requested to exceed the base load common
rate. Similarly, as demand decreases no boilers will be dropped until the load can be met by remaining
boilers firing at or below the base load rate.
The staging parameters (Add/Drop stage method, detection time, and interstage delay; error threshold,
rate offset) together determine, based on demand, when a boiler in the sequence will be requested to turn
on or off.
7.2 - Sensor Configuration (steam)
For steam systems the header pressure transmitter input needs to be configured at the Master host. Go to
CONFIGURE>Sensor Configuration and from the pull-down menu select S2 (J8-6). For “Connector type”
select 0-15 psi or 0-150 psi according to the design pressure of your system. Do not use the 4-20mA
selection. The remote 4-20mA input is unavailable on Falcon steam lead lag systems.
Part No. 750-322
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CB Falcon Lead/Lag
7.3 - Lead Lag Slave Configuration
It will be convenient to remain at the Master host boiler to configure the unit as a Slave (recall that the lead
lag Master is a communication function and not a separate controller - the Falcon hosting the Master must
also be configured as a Slave in order to be available to the lead lag network).
1. Go to CONFIGURE>Lead Lag Slave Configuration.
2. Available parameters are shown in Table 3. Make any necessary changes at this time.
Table 3 - Lead Lag Slave Configuration Parameters
Parameter
Slave enable
Slave mode
Base load rate
Slave sequence order
Demand to firing delay
Fan rate during off cycle
Modbus port
Modbus address
Range
Enable slave for built-in Lead
Lag master
Enable slave for third party
Lead Lag master
Disabled
Use first
Use last
Equalize run time
0-8
hr min sec
0-6500 RPM
MB1
MB2
No port
1-8
CB Default Setting
Disabled
Installation Setting
Equalize run time
ignored
0 (= use Modbus address)
3 min
0
MB2
1
Slave enable should be set to ‘Enable slave for built-in Lead Lag master’. The ‘Enable slave for third party’
setting is for use with external (non-Falcon) control.
Some Falcon versions may indicate ‘Slave’ and ‘Modbus Slave’ as the choices for this parameter. In this
case select ‘Slave’ (NOT ‘Modbus Slave’).
Slave mode - If set to Use First, this boiler will be used prior to any with other values. If set to Equalize
Runtime, then this boiler will be staged according to a run time equalization algorithm (any boilers set to
Use First will precede any that are set to Equalize Run Time). If set to Use Last, then this boiler will be
used only after all Use First and Equalize Runtime boilers have been brought online.
Slave sequence order - if set to 0 will use this Slave’s Modbus address.
Demand to firing delay - This delay time is needed by the LL master to determine the length of time to wait
between requesting a Slave to fire and detecting that it has failed to start. It should be set to the total time
normally needed for the burner to transition from Standby to Run, including such timers as transition to
purge rate, prepurge time, transition to lightoff rate, all ignition timings, and some extra margin.
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Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Fan rate during off cycle - This determines if or at what rate the fan is to operate during the standby period.
It may be advisable in some installations to set this parameter so as to prevent flue gas from entering the
boiler room through an idle boiler.
Modbus port is MB2.
Modbus address This will eventually need to be set to a unique address on each slave boiler. This can be
done after copying parameters to all slaves (see 7.4 below).
7.4 - Copying parameters to remaining slaves
The procedure below will copy the first slave’s parameter set to remaining slaves. See also 750-244 PIM
manual.
1. Remove the Program Module slot cover from the Master host controller and insert a Falcon 833-3640
Program Module (‘PIM’ or ‘PM’). See Figure 1.
Figure 1 - Loading a PIM
2. From the Home page go to SETUP> PROGRAM MODULE.
3. Press <Backup Parameters>. The display will indicate when uploading is complete. When finished,
remove the PIM and replace the cover.
4. Insert the PIM in the next boiler to be configured.
5. Go to the boiler’s Program Module Configuration screen (SETUP> PROGRAM MODULE).
6. Press <Restore Parameters>. A warning will be displayed:
WARNING! This operation replaces all
NON-SAFETY configuration parameters
in the control with those from the PM.
SAFETY PARAMETER SETTINGS ARE
NOT CHANGED BY THIS RESTORE.
Are you sure you wish to continue?
7. Press <Yes> to continue. The Status line on the PIM configuration screen will indicate when parameter
writing is complete. If the parameter set being downloaded is from a different Falcon firmware version, it
is possible that not all available parameters will be restored. This is normal. When finished, remove the
PIM and replace the cover.
8. Repeat steps 4-7 with the remaining boilers.
Part No. 750-322
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CB Falcon Lead/Lag
9. IMPORTANT - after parameterizing all boilers, remember to give each one a unique Modbus address.
Each boiler’s MB1 and MB2 addresses must be the same. To change the Modbus address:
Starting from the Home page, go to VIEW INDIVIDUAL>Configure>System Identification and Access.
Scroll down to Modbus addresses. If two addresses are displayed (MB1 and MB2) ensure that BOTH are
set to the desired address for this boiler. If only one Modbus address is shown, set it to the desired
address.
Note: Each boiler in a Falcon lead lag network must have a unique Modbus address.
Note: The MB1 and MB2 addresses for each individual boiler must be the same.
! Caution
After cloning parameters with the
PIM: If using boilers of different
sizes/models, it will be necessary to reset the min/max modulation speed settings.
Once the lead lag Master host has been configured and enabled, an additional pushbutton <VIEW LEAD LAG>/
<VIEW INDIVIDUAL> will appear on the touchscreen home page of the Master and any configured slaves. On the
Master host boiler, this button toggles between two display menu paths: one for the individual boiler and one for the
lead lag system. On remaining slave boilers, <VIEW LEAD LAG> shows that boiler’s lead lag status and the active
service only.
7.5 - Outdoor Temperature Sensor Configuration (hot water only)
The Outdoor Reset, Warm Weather Shutdown, and Frost Protection routines all make use of the outdoor
temperature. To configure the outdoor temperature sensor, go to the boiler that has the sensor connected
(see 6.3 above for sensor connection).
1. Starting from the display home page, go to VIEW INDIVIDUAL>CONFIGURE>Sensor Configuration.
2. Under Outdoor temperature source Select ‘S5 (J8-11) Sensor’.
Once configured, the sensor will be recognized by the lead lag Master over the Modbus network.
7.6 - Enable Master
When all slaves have been enabled and configured, go to the Master host and under Lead Lag Master
Configuration change Master Enable to ‘Enabled’.
7.7 - Outdoor Reset Configuration (hot water only)
Before the Outdoor Reset feature can be used, the outdoor temperature sensor must be connected to a slave
boiler on the lead lag network (see 6.3) and configured (see 7.5).
Outdoor reset parameters are configured on the Master host under its Slave (individual boiler) parameter
g r o u p . S t a r t i n g f r o m t h e H o m e p a g e o n t h e Fa l c o n M a s t e r h o s t , g o t o V I E W
INDIVIDUAL>CONFIGURE>Outdoor Reset Configuration.
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Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
NOTE: There are two screens for outdoor reset configuration - Central Heat and Lead Lag. Make sure you
are on the Lead Lag outdoor reset screen. Use the left and right arrow keys to get to the appropriate screen.
Figure 2 - Lead Lag ODR
The example below shows how a given set of parameter values determines an outdoor reset curve. In the
example:
Minimum outdoor temperature = 0 deg F
CH setpoint = 180 deg F
Maximum outdoor temperature = 80 deg F
Low water temperature = 70 deg F
The end points (x1, y1) and (x2, y2) of the ODR curve are defined by (x1= MIn. OD Temp., y1 = Setpoint)
and (x2 = Max. OD Temp., y2 =Low Water Temp,)
Min. Outdoor Temp.
Setpoint
180
160
Max. Outdoor Temp.
140
Setpoint
120
Deg F
100
80
Low Water Temp.
60
SEE NOTE
40
0
20
40
60
80
Outdoor Temp. Deg F
NOTE: A ‘Minimum boiler water temperature’ parameter is available which sets
an absolute lower limit to the ODR setpoint. The slope of that portion of the ODR
curve above the minimum setpoint is not affected.
Figure 3 - ODR Curve
Part No. 750-322
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CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Additional parameters are available for Time of Day setpoint and boost; see Lead Lag Operation reference
manual for a full description.
8- STARTUP
To start the lead lag system:
1. Turn all boiler demand switches to LOCAL.
2. On the Master host boiler home page press VIEW LEAD LAG>Lead Lag Master to access the Lead Lag
Operation screen. Turn the <Lead Lag Operation> screen switch ON.
The system should now start when a demand is present.
9- MONITORING SYSTEM PERFORMANCE
Press <VIEW LEAD LAG> to view the lead lag Home page.
To access the Lead Lag Operation screen:
Touch this area
OR
Touch <Lead Lag Master> button if visible
Figure 4 - Lead Lag Home Page
This page shows the system setpoint, actual header temperature, and status of each slave boiler.
The possible Slave states are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Available - boiler is ready to use but is not currently firing.
AddStage - stage is getting ready to fire.
SuspendStage - stage was getting ready but is not needed.
Firing - boiler is currently firing.
OnLeave - boiler is operating for some other demand source having higher priority than LL Slave.
Disabled - boiler is locked out or disabled in some way.
Recovering - slave is in time delay before becoming available.
If the state of any slave is Unknown it will be removed from the display.
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Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Note: If during operation an alert ‘NO SLAVES AVAILABLE FOR LEAD LAG’ occurs:
While not a lockout condition, this alert will close the alarm contact in the Master host. The alarm can
only be reset at the Master host controller by opening the panel and pressing the RESET button on the
Falcon controller.
The Falcon has extensive diagnostic features for monitoring individual boiler and system lead lag
performance, including alert/lockout history and real-time data trending. Refer to the boiler manual and to
the Falcon controller and display manuals for additional information.
10-EXAMPLE SYSTEMS
Figure 5 through Figure 9 show piping and network wiring for some typical lead lag network configurations.
Systems shown are examples only. Actual installations may vary.
Figure 5 - Falcon Lead Lag with outdoor reset and EMS for remote comms/monitoring
Part No. 750-322
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CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Figure 6 - Falcon Lead Lag with outdoor reset and EMS for remote enable
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Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Figure 7 - Falcon LL with EMS for remote enable/remote setpoint
Part No. 750-322
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CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Figure 8 - Falcon Lead Lag with EMS for remote comms/monitoring
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Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Figure 9 - Typical Steam System
Part No. 750-322
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CB Falcon Lead/Lag
11-EXAMPLE HYDRONIC PIPING DIAGRAMS
Figure 10 through Figure 13 below show some typical hydronic systems. Examples of Pump Control Block
(PCB) parameters for these and other systems can be found in Figure 14 through Figure 19.
SUPPLY
to system
System pumps controlled by others
System pump
ENABLE signal
RETURN
to boilers
L/L MASTER
Boiler 1
Boiler 2
Boiler isolation valve
Figure 10 - Primary Pumping
Isolation Valve Control
At each Slave use Aux 1 Pump control block for isolation valve control (see Figure 18). Assign to Pump C
relay. Also assign Boiler Pump control block (see Figure 15) to Pump C relay. Wire isolation valve open/
close to Falcon Pump C relay terminals.*
System Pump Enable
At Master, use System Pump enable (Figure 14).** Assign Pump B. Wire pump enable to Falcon Pump B
relay terminals.
*This configuration will ensure that as long as Falcon Lead Lag is enabled, the lead boiler isolation valve will remain
open. When Lead Lag is disabled, any programmed overrun times will continue for their full duration.
**Falcon Lead/Lag control sends only an Enable signal to the system pumps. Any system pump operational control
(pump lead lag, standby, rotation, etc.) is by others.
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Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
SUPPLY
to system
System pumps controlled by others
Boiler
Pump
Boiler 1
Boiler 2
Figure 11 - Primary/Secondary Piping
At each slave:
Use Boiler Pump control block (Figure 15) - assign to Pump B relay.
Use Aux 1 Pump (Figure 18) - assign to Pump C relay.
Part No. 750-322
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CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Supply
Return
from boilers
to boilers
Boiler 1
Boiler 2
Figure 12 - Primary with dedicated system/boiler pumps
PCB configuration - same as Figure 11.
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Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
To system
City water
To boilers
DHW
Tank
System Pumps
(controlled by others)
Aquastat
Sys. pump
ENABLE signal
DHW Pump
Master Host
Slave 2
Slave 1
Boiler 1
Boiler 2
To building
Figure 13 - Domestic Hot Water priority on slave
In this example one boiler (NOT the lead lag Master host) has been enabled for Domestic Hot Water service.
When this boiler receives a DHW demand signal via the connected aquastat, it will be released from the
lead lag network and will operate on its local DHW setpoint. The boiler’s status will show as “On Leave”
on the Master host’s lead lag Home page. When DHW demand is satisfied the boiler will again be available
to the lead lag network.
At each Slave, use Aux 1 Pump (Figure 18) for isolation valve - assign Pump C.
At Master host, use System Pump (Figure 14) for system pump enable - assign Pump B.
At DHW boiler, use DHW Pump (Figure 16) for DHW pump and/or valve - assign pump B.
Part No. 750-322
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CB Falcon Lead/Lag
12-PUMP CONTROL BLOCK (PCB) EXAMPLES
Examples shown are the system defaults and are the settings referred to in figures 10-13 above. For
information on programming the Pump Control Blocks see the Falcon manual 750-265.
Pump Configuration
System pump
SYSTEM
PUMP
Pump control
Pump output
Pump start delay
Overrun time
(L/L
Master)
Logout
Pump C or None
0 sec
15 min
Use for local (Stand-alone) demands
Use for Lead Lag Master demands
Advanced
Settings>>
Pump Configuration
Pump Configuration
System pump
On options
Force on
Central Heat:
DHW:
Local Lead Lag:
Frost Protection:
Aux pump:
Logout
System pump
Force off
Misce
Local burner demand*
Service active*
Demand*
Demand*
Service active*
Pump demand
Service active*
Central Heat
DHW
Y is set
X is set
Z is set
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Control
Settings>>
On options
Force off
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Logout
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Control
Settings>>
Pump Configuration
System pump
Misce
Force pump off when:
DHW priority is active
DHW high limit
CH anti-condensation
DHW anti-condensation
Logout
Misce
System pump
Force on
Force off
Force pump on when:
Local burner demand*
Outlet high limit
Lead Lag slave demand
Pump Configuration
On options
Force on
On options
Force on
Miscellaneous
Pump exercise interval
Pump exercise time
*Inhibit pump for burner fault or disable
Control
Settings>>
Logout
Pump exercise settings apply to all
pumps
Control
Settings>>
Figure 14 - System Pump
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Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Pump Configuration
Boiler pump
BOILER
PUMP
Pump control
Pump output
Pump start delay
Overrun time
(L/L Slave)
Auto
Pump B
10 sec
3 min
Use for local (Stand-alone) demands
Use for Lead Lag Master demands
Advanced
Settings>>
Logout
Pump Configuration
Pump Configuration
Boiler pump
On options
Force on
Central Heat:
DHW:
Local Lead Lag:
Frost Protection:
Aux pump:
Logout
Boiler pump
Force off
Misce
Local burner demand*
Demand*
Service active*
Demand*
Service active*
Pump demand
Service active*
Central Heat
DHW
Y is set
X is set
Z is set
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Control
Settings>>
On options
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Logout
Control
Settings>>
Pump Configuration
Boiler pump
Force off
Misce
Force pump off when:
DHW priority is active
DHW high limit
CH anti-condensation
DHW anti-condensation
Logout
Misce
Boiler pump
Force on
Force off
Force pump on when:
Local burner demand*
Outlet high limit
Lead Lag slave demand
Pump Configuration
On options
Force on
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
On options
Force on
Miscellaneous
Pump exercise interval
Pump exercise time
*Inhibit pump for burner fault or disable
Control
Settings>>
Logout
Pump exercise settings apply to all
pumps
Control
Settings>>
Figure 15 - Boiler Pump
Part No. 750-322
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CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Pump Configuration
DHW pump
DHW
PUMP
Pump control
Pump output
(L/L Slave)
Auto
Pump B or None
Pump start delay
1 min
Overrun time
1 min
Use for local (Stand-alone) demands
Use for Lead Lag Master demands
Advanced
Settings>>
Logout
Pump Configuration
Pump Configuration
DHW pump
On options
Force on
Central Heat:
DHW:
Local Lead Lag:
Frost Protection:
Aux pump:
Logout
DHW pump
Force off
Misce
Local burner demand*
Service active*
Demand*
Demand*
Service active*
Pump demand
Service active*
Central Heat
DHW
Y is set
X is set
Z is set
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Control
Settings>>
On options
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Logout
Control
Settings>>
DHW pump
Force off
Misce
Force pump off when:
DHW priority is active
DHW high limit
CH anti-condensation
DHW anti-condensation
On options
Pump exercise time
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Force on
Miscellaneous
Pump exercise interval
Logout
Misce
Pump Configuration
DHW pump
Force on
Force off
Force pump on when:
Local burner demand*
Outlet high limit
Lead Lag slave demand
Pump Configuration
On options
Force on
0
*Inhibit pump for burner fault or disable
Control
Settings>>
Logout
Pump exercise settings apply to all
pumps
Control
Settings>>
Figure 16 - DHW Pump
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Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Pump Configuration
CH PUMP
CH pump
Pump control
(L/L Slave
or L/L Master)
Pump output
Pump start delay
Overrun time
Logout
Auto
None
10 sec
5 min
Use for local (Stand-alone) demands
Use for Lead Lag Master demands
Advanced
Settings>>
Pump Configuration
Pump Configuration
CH pump
On options
Force on
Central Heat:
DHW:
Local Lead Lag:
Frost Protection:
Aux pump:
Logout
CH pump
Force off
Misce
Local burner demand*
Service active*
Demand*
Demand*
Service active*
Pump demand
Service active*
Central Heat
DHW
Y is set
X is set
Z is set
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Control
Settings>>
Force on
On options
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Logout
Pump Configuration
Force on
Control
Settings>>
CH pump
Force off
Misce
Force pump off when:
DHW priority is active
DHW high limit
CH anti-condensation
DHW anti-condensation
Force on
On options
Miscellaneous
Pump exercise interval
Pump exercise time
Logout
Misce
Pump Configuration
CH pump
On options
Force off
Force pump on when:
Local burner demand*
Outlet high limit
Lead Lag slave demand
0
*Inhibit pump for burner fault or disable
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Control
Settings>>
Logout
Pump exercise settings apply to all
pumps
Control
Settings>>
Figure 17 - Central Heat Pump
Part No. 750-322
29
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Pump Configuration
Auxiliary 1 pump
AUX 1
PUMP
Pump control
Pump output
Pump start delay
Overrun time
Isolation valve
(LL Slave)
Auto
Pump C
0 sec
5 min 30 sec
Use for local (Stand-alone) demands
Use for Lead Lag Master demands
Advanced
Settings>>
Logout
Pump Configuration
Pump Configuration
Auxiliary 1 pump
On options
Force on
Central Heat:
DHW:
Local Lead Lag:
Frost Protection:
Aux pump:
Logout
Force off
Auxiliary 1 pump
Misce
Local burner demand*
Demand*
Service active*
Demand*
Service active*
Pump demand Service active*
Central Heat DHW
X is set
Y is set
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
On options
Force off
Z is set
Control
Settings>>
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Logout
Auxiliary 1 pump
Misce
On options
Force on
Miscellaneous
Pump exercise interval
Pump exercise time
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Control
Settings>>
Pump Configuration
Force pump off when:
DHW priority is active
DHW high limit
CH anti-condensation
DHW anti-condensation
Logout
Misce
Auxiliary 1 pump
Force on
Force off
Force pump on when:
Local burner demand*
Outlet high limit
Lead Lag slave demand
Pump Configuration
On options
Force on
0
*Inhibit pump for burner fault or disable
Control
Settings>>
Logout
Pump exercise settings apply to all
pumps
Control
Settings>>
Figure 18 - Aux 1 Pump
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Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Pump Configuration
AUX 2
PUMP
Auxiliary 2 pump
Pump control
Pump output
Start Permissive
Interlock (e.g.
combustion air damper)
Pump A
Pump start delay
0 sec
Overrun time
3 min
L/L Slave
Auto
Use for local (Stand-alone) demands
Use for Lead Lag Master demands
Advanced
Settings>>
Logout
Pump Configuration
Pump Configuration
Auxiliary 2 pump
On options
Force on
Central Heat:
DHW:
Local Lead Lag:
Frost Protection:
Aux pump:
Logout
Auxiliary 2 pump
Force off
Misce
Local burner demand*
Demand*
Demand*
Pump demand
Central Heat
Y is set
X is set
Service active*
Service active*
Service active*
DHW
Z is set
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Control
Settings>>
On options
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Logout
Force off
On options
Force on
Miscellaneous
Pump exercise interval
Pump exercise time
*This setting may be inhibited due
to burner fault or disable
Control
Settings>>
Auxiliary 2 pump
Misce
Force pump off when:
DHW priority is active
DHW high limit
CH anti-condensation
DHW anti-condensation
Logout
Misce
Pump Configuration
Auxiliary 2 pump
Force on
Force off
Force pump on when:
Local burner demand*
Outlet high limit
Lead Lag slave demand
Pump Configuration
On options
Force on
*Inhibit pump for burner fault or disable
Control
Settings>>
Logout
Pump exercise settings apply to all
pumps
Control
Settings>>
Figure 19 - Aux 2 Pump
Part No. 750-322
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CB Falcon Lead/Lag
13-Boiler Wiring Diagrams
Model CFC ClearFire condensing boiler
32
Part No. 750-322
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Model CFW ClearFire hydronic boiler
Part No. 750-322
33
CB Falcon Lead/Lag
Model CFV/CFH ClearFire steam boiler
115V/1PH AC FUSED
POWER SUPPLY W/
GROUNDED NEUTRAL
1
CC-BLOWER CIRCUIT BREAKER & BLOWER MOTOR FUSE SELECTION
BOILER SIZE
BLOWER MODEL
CIRCUIT BRKR
10/15/20/25/30 HP
G1G170-AB05-20
10 A
40 HP
G3G200-GN26-01
15 A
50/60 HP
G3G250-GN39-01
20 A
2
LL1
3
4
EDS*
N
W
1
5
BLOWER
FUSE
L1
4
(REF. 8)
6
CNTRL
CIRC
FUSE
(5 AMP)
11
B/R
W
DISPLAY
PS FUSE
1 AMP
RESET
PB
17
(MOM)
18
(7)
(8)
(L2)
(NO)
(L1)
(COM)
15
BOILER STATUS
ALWCO 81
80
14
(REF. 8)
(1)
R/W
(LLCO)
(G)
11
BK
BL
MR
MR
MR
5
G
15
4
(L2)
(L1)
REM
(REF. 8)
6
19
DEMAND
OFF LOC
7
(1)
FAD SWITCH
(120V 1A)
(4)
OLC
(NO)
(COM)
RLY1
REMOVE
JUMPER
13
(2)
14
(10)
(NC)
CAPS
20
(A) (B) (C)
84
85
86
8
(LLCO)
(L)
(REF. 15)
(G)
(H)
10
11
RLY2
PROBES
36
CR-1
37
15
(A1)
(A2)
48
FW PUMP
(120/240V 1A)
28
(REF. 8)
(V+)
(V-)
J1
3C 18AWG
SHIELDED
(11)
FALCON
(21)
20
(24)
19
NOTES:
DASHED LINES INDICATE CUSTOMER CONNECTIONS
ALL CONTROL WIRE IS #18 AWG UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED
COLOR DESIGNATIONS APPLY TO WIRE COLORS INSIDE CONTROL PANEL
DENOTES CONTROL PANEL TERMINAL
**FALCON L-L MASTER - HEADER PRESSURE TRANSMITTER
(C)
J9
S6
S7
J6
8
ALARM
7
6
5 PRE-IGN INTLK
4
3 LCI
2 ANNUN #1/IAS
#2
1 ANNUN #2/LWCO
J10
S8
S9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
4
W
REM
60
58
28
DEMAND
OFF LOC
25
26
59
27
(18)
FALCON LEAD-LAG MASTER ONLY:
L-L HEADER
PRESS
28
XMTR
BR
BK
+
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
SETBACK
NIGHT
DAY
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
S10
8
33
34
(5VDC)
TOD/SP2
J7
FALCON LEAD-LAG
JUMPER
COMMS
B
C
A
B
1
(REF. 7)
C
MB2
WH
24
29
30
EMS/GLOBAL MODBUS
CONNECTIONS
31
DATA +
32
DATA -
21
CUSTOMER CONNECTIONS:
b a
JUMPER COM1
a b
COM2
(REF. 8)
25
CR-2
16
REMOTE ALARM
REMOTE ENABLE
(24V 1A)
(REMOVE JUMPER FOR
FOR REMOTE L-L ENABLE)
DATA DATA +
28
MODBUS 29 & 30, 31 & 32
REMOTE L-L ENABLE 24 & 25
LEAD-LAG HEADER PRESSURE 26 & 28
BOILER STATUS 17 & 18
REMOTE ALARM 19 & 20, 21 & 22
(R)
PRESS
- XMTR
+
BK
BR
ANNUN #3/ALWCO
ANNUN #4/HLC
ANNUN #5/HGPS
ANNUN #6/LGPS
ANNUN #7
ANNUN #8
J3
RED BLK
24 VAC
23
LEAD-LAG MODBUS
22
REMOTE ALARM
12 VDC
S3
S4
S5
27
CR-1
(14)
J8
S1
S2
MB1
CR-1
(N) (L) (G)
6
7 J5
BLOWER
6
5
4 EXT IGN
3
FUEL VALVE
2
1 INTLK
A
27
PS
BK
24
4
9
(REF. 8)
4
24
5
4
(REF. 16)
23
TRANSFORMER
J2
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
8
9
(REF. 15)
(NO)
J4
12
OR
GY
(REF. 15)
(COM)
21
28
10
BL
LWCO DF16
18
27
LGPS
PR
(REF. 9)
PROBE
26
HGPS
9
(2)
88
17
25
3
(4)
HLC
8
16
2
4
W
(NC)
22
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
16
13
IGNITION
ELECTRODES
FLAME
DETECTOR
832-2434
826-211
5
12
S2
(REF. 8)
(REF. 15)
4
9
10
DC CONTROL
CONNECTOR
G
3
(REF. 8)
UVFD
(2)
46
4
W
BL
WH
S1
BLOWER
(REF. 9)
(1)
7
BL
(REF. 14)
14 GAUGE
(3)
CB
R
8
BK
GAS
VALVE
W
2
G
N
L
G
(N.O. HELD
CLOSED)
IGNITION
TRANSFORMER
FUSE RATING, CL CC
6A
12 A
15 A
AC POWER
CONNECTOR
(A1)
(A2)
4
(REF. 8)
(REF. 10)
CR-2
(11)
(14)
39
40
FAD MOTOR *
(120V 10A)
9
1
SYSTEM DISPLAY
TIME OF DAY (TOD/SP2) 33 & 34
FRESH AIR DAMPER INTERLOCK 13,14,39,40
17,18,
TERMINALS: L1,LL1,2,3,4-4-4,5-5-5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,
N,G,1,
33,34,35, 36,37,38, 39,40, S1,S2,
19,20,21,22, 23,24,25,26,27, 27,28,29,30,31,32,
34
Part No. 750-322
LEAD LAG OPERATION
system display and the other port will support communications
from the LL Master with its slaves. The diagram on page 4
shows a simplified wiring diagram with a 4 system Lead Lag
arrangement.
The Lead Lag master is a software service that is hosted by a
falcon control.
Contents
The LL master uses a few of the host unit's sensors (header
temperature and outdoor temperature) and also the STAT
electrical inputs in a configurable way, to provide control
information.
General Description of the Lead Lag Application ......... 31
Lead Lag (LL) Master General Operation ....................... 31
System Wiring Hookup .................................................... 33
Lead-Lag Operation .......................................................... 34
LEAD LAG (LL) MASTER
GENERAL OPERATION
Slave Operation and setup .............................................. 35
LL Master Operation and Setup ...................................... 37
The LL master coordinates the firing of its slave falcons. To do
this it must add stages and drop them to meet changes in
load, and it sends firing rate commands to those that are
firing.
Many of the descriptions used herein refer to functions or
tables internal to the Falcon. Only those functions
specifically identified as ‘parameters’ are userconfigurable.
The LL master turns the first stage on and eventually turns the
last stage off using the same criteria as for any modulation
control loop:
• When the operating point reaches the Setpoint minus the
On hysteresis, then the first Falcon is turned on.
• When the operating point reaches the Setpoint plus the Off
hysteresis then the last slave Falcon (or all slave units) are
turned off.
Slave Parameters ............................................................. 36
GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF
THE LEAD LAG APPLICATION
Falcon devices contain the ability to be a stand alone control,
operate as a Lead Lag Master control which also uses the
falcon control function as one of the slaves or to operate
solely as a slave to the lead lag system. Conceptually it is not
a part of that specific control, but is an entity that is "above" all
of the individual Falcon controls (including the one that hosts
it). The master sees each slave (including the one that hosts
it) as a set of Modbus devices, each having certain registers,
and in this regard it is entirely a communications bus device,
talking to the slave Falcon controls via Modbus. Falcon
devices utilize two ‘ModBus™’ ports (MB1 and MB2) for
communications. One port will be designated to support a
The LL master PID operates using a percent rate that is, 0% is
a request for no heat at all, and 100% means firing at the
maximum modulation rate.
The firing rate is sent to the slaves as a percentage
apportioned according to the rate allocation algorithm
selected by the Rate allocation method parameter.
For some algorithms this rate might be common to all slave
units that are firing. For others it might represent the total
system capacity and be allocated proportionally.
For example, if there are 4 slaves and the LL master's
percent rate is 30%, then it might satisfy this by:
firing all four slaves at 30%,
or
by operating the first slave at 80% (20% of the system’s
capacity) and a second slave at 40% (10% of the system’s
capacity).
750-322
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
750-322
The LL master may be aware of slave falcons minimum firing
rate and use this information for some of its algorithms, but
when apportioning rate it may also assign rates that are less
than this. In fact the add-stage and drop-stage algorithms may
assume this and be defined in terms of theoretical rates that
are possibly lower than the actual minimum rate of the falcon
control. In any case a falcon that is firing and is being
commanded to fire at less than its minimum modulation rate
will operate at its minimum rate: this is a standard behavior for
a falcon control in stand-alone (non-slave) mode.
If any slave under LL Master control is in a Run-Limited
condition, then for some algorithms the LL master can
apportion to that stage the rate that it is actually firing at.
Last stage The falcon that is firing and that was added the
most recently to the group of slaves that are firing.
Typically this is also the modulating stage, however as
the load decreases then the last-added stage will be at
its minimum rate and the previous stage will be
modulating.
Lead boiler The Lead boiler is the falcon that is the first stage
to fire among those stages which are in the equalize
runtime (Lead/Lag) group. If a boiler is in the "Use first"
group it may fire before the Lead boiler fires.
First boiler A falcon may be assigned to any of three groups:
"Use First", "Equalize Runtime", or "Use Last". If one or
more units are in the "Use First" category, then one of
these (the one with the lowest sequence number) will
always be the first boiler to fire. If there is no falcon in
the "Use First" category and one or more are in the
"Equalize Runtime" category, then the First boiler is also
the Lead boiler.
Additionally when a slave imposes its own Run-limited rate
this may trigger the LL
Master to add a stage, if it needs more capacity, or drop a
stage if the run-limiting is providing too much heat (for
example if a stage is running at a higher-than commanded
rate due to anti-condensation).
Add-stage method
By adjusting the parameters in an extreme way it is possible
to define add-stage and drop-stage conditions that overlap or
even cross over each other. Certainly it is incorrect to do this,
and it would take a very deliberate and non-accidental act to
accomplish it. But there are two points in this:
1. LL master does not prevent it, and more important;
2. it will not confuse the LL master because it is implemented as a state machine that is in only one state at a
time; for example:
• if its add-stage action has been triggered, it will
remain in this condition until either a stage has been
added,
or
• the criteria for its being in an add-stage condition is
no longer met; only then will it take another look
around to see what state it should go to next.
Add-stage detection timing
Add-stage request An Add-stage method implements the
criteria for adding another stage. Criteria that may apply
are the firing rate of a stage or stages vs. a threshold,
the amount of operating point versus setpoint error seen
by the master, the rate at which setpoint error is
developing, and the rate at which a stage or stages are
approaching their maximum or baseload firing rate.
Typically these use Add-stage detection timing to
determine how long these things have persisted. When
all criteria have been met for a sufficient time, then an
Add-stage request is active.
Drop-stage method
Drop-stage detection timing
Assumptions:
Modulating stage The modulating stage is the falcon that is
receiving varying firing rate requests to track the load.
First stage This is the falcon that was turned on first, when no
slaves were firing.
Previous stage The falcon that was added to those stages
that are firing. Just prior to the adding of the unit that is
under discussion.
Next stage The falcon that will or might be added as the next
unit to fire.
36
Drop-stage request A Drop-stage method implements the
criteria for dropping a stage. Criteria that may apply are
the firing rate of a stage (or stages) vs. a threshold, the
amount of operating point versus setpoint error seen by
the master, the rate at which setpoint error is
developing, and the rate at which a stage or stages are
approaching their minimum firing rate.
Typically these use Drop-stage detection timing to
determine how long these things have persisted. When
all criteria have been met for a sufficient time, then an
Drop-stage request is active.
750-322
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
SYSTEM WIRING HOOKUP
SYSTEM DISPLAY
COM2
COM1
1
120
VAC
L1
2
+12 +12
3
GND
(c)
4
5
6
7
8
9
(b) (a) N/C N/C (a)
(b)
MODBUS
L2
NEUTRAL (L2)
N
120 VAC (L1)
L
Bldg EMS
3rd Party
EARTH
GROUND
POWER SUPPLY
12 DC OUT +
V+
DC OUT
(COMMON GND)
V-
V ADJ
WIRING KEY
(Display wiring typical
for remaining slaves)
LINE VOLTAGE
LOW VOLTAGE
a
DATA
b
c
a
b
MB1
c
1
MB2
LL MASTER
& SLAVE 1
a
b
c
a
b
MB1
c
1
MB2
b
c
a
MB1
b
3
J3
2
J3
c
1
MB2
2
b
MB1
c
a
b
MB2
SLAVE 4
Fig. 1. Typical Falcon L/L wiring with 4 Slaves
37
3
ECOM
SLAVE 3
a
3
ECOM
SLAVE 2
a
2
ECOM
J3
c
1
2
3
ECOM
J3
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
750-322
LEAD-LAG OPERATION
This is a summary of the functional capability of the
embedded lead-lag on the falcon control. OEM configurable
parameters may be adjusted as part of the OEM factory
configuration and in the field using the System Display with
appropriate password permissions.
1.
2.
3.
Field Installation Configuration
a. The master and slave controllers are enabled via
the Falcon display.
b. All falcon controllers are programmed with a default
address of 1. Assuming the Master controller
remains address 1, the address of the slave controllers in the system must have a unique address
(1..8).
Basic Operation
a. Firing rate determination – Parallel common-base
limited
(1) All boilers have a single assignable base load firing rate.
(2) Allocation
(a) As load increases:
(i) Until all stages are Firing - No stage is
requested to exceed the common base
load rate.
(ii)After all stages are Firing - There is no
restriction on the slave's commanded firing
rate.
(b) As load decreases:
(i) As long as all available stages are firing There is no restriction on the slave's commanded firing rate.
(ii)When at least one stage has been
dropped - No stage is requested to exceed
the common base load rate.
b. Rotation
(1) The lead boiler is rotated based sequence order.
The lead boiler rotation time is a configurable
OEM assigned parameter. Rotation is sequential
by address (1-2-3-4; 2-3-4-1; etc.)
(2) Rotation trigger occurs at the start of each new
heat cycle.
c. Source of heat for call – The call for heat originates
at the master boiler. This source may be configured
to be an external thermostat or via EnviraCOM
Remote Stat.
d. Slave boiler lockout – If any slave is in lockout the
master boiler will cause it to be skipped and all system load setting calculation settings will be based
only on available boilers.
38
4.
e. Master boiler lockout – If the master boiler is in lockout then its burner control function will be skipped in
the rotation the same as the slave controllers. However, the master boiler function will continue to operate.
System Component Failure Responses
a. If the system header sensor becomes disconnected
from the master boiler then the master boiler will
control off of one of the following OEM configurable
actions
(1) Disable - No backup will be used
(a) Lead Outlet - Outlet temperature of the lead
boiler will be used as the backup during firing
(i) Slave Outlet Average - Average of the
outlet temperatures of all slave boilers
that are firing will be used as a backup
(b) If the sensor chosen by the above parameter
is faulty then the backup sensor provided
may be used. When burner demand is off and
no burners are firing then, for either "Lead
Outlet" or "Slave Outlet Average", the lead
boiler's outlet temperature is used to monitor
for burner demand.
System Display Configuration – The following parameters are available for OEM configuration and may be
adjusted through a System Display or programmed at
the OEM production facility.
Master falcon
LL frost protection enable
LL frost protection rate
Base load rate
LL CH demand switch
LL CH set point source
LL Modulation sensor
LL Base load common
LL Modulation backup sensor
LL CH 4mA water temperature
LL Lead selection method
LL CH 20mA water temperature
LL Lag selection method
LL Add stage method 1
LL Add stage detection time 1
LL Add stage error threshold
LL Add stage rate offset
LL Add stage inter-stage delay
LL Drop stage method 1
LL Drop stage detection time 1
LL Drop stage error threshold
LL Drop stage rate offset
LL Lead rotation time
LL Force lead rotation time
LL Drop stage inter-stage delay
Slave falcon
Slave mode
Base load rate
Slave sequence order
LL Demand to firing delay
750-322
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
SLAVE OPERATION AND SETUP
Slave Data Supporting Lead Lag
This data is provided by each slave falcon control to support operation when a LL master exists. The illustration below
summarizes the slave's registers and data:
LL Slave
Some slave changes relate to pump control, frost protection, and also are available to 3rd party (non falcon) LL master devices.
The generic LL slave is updated to operate as shown by the diagram below:
39
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
750-322
Frost protection requests
The frost protection in this status register will be set or cleared
to match the status generated by the frost protection detection
functions.
Firing for local frost protection
This provides indication to the LL master that although the
burner is firing independently, it is doing so for frost protection
and thus is still available as a lead/lag slave. This is set when
1) frost protection is controlling the falcon per the priority
scheme (which occurs only if frost protection is enabled), and
2) burner demand is true and the burner is currently firing or
preparing to fire to serve that demand. Otherwise it will be
clear.
Aux Pump X, Y, and Z
The pump control in the Slave can be used by previouslyexisting command devices to create the same behavior.
However before these bits controlled actions is specific pump
blocks, they are now more general. The pump X, Y, and Z bits
control actions in any pump block defined to handle them (see
the pump control block definition).
SLAVE PARAMETERS
SLAVE ENABLE: DISABLE, ENABLE VIA MODBUS,
ENABLE FOR FALCON MASTER
It enables or disables the "LL Slave" Demand and Rate
module.
If the slave mode is set to Disable then:
none of the slave functions are active, Slave Status register is zero, the LL – Master Service Status register is not
writable and is held at zero (this is important for pump
control which might otherwise use values in this location).
The Slave Command register is writable but it is mostly
ignored, however the Aux pump X, Y, and Z are effective
for any setting of the Slave enable parameter.
The Enable for falcon Master option Slave write and
Slave read parameters; if "Enable for falcon Master" is not
selected, then these parameters are disabled.
SLAVE MODE: USE FIRST, EQUALIZE RUNTIME, USE
LAST
If set to Use First, then this falcon will be used prior to
using other falcons with other values.
If set to Equalize Runtime, then this falcon will be staged
according to a run time equalization algorithm. (Any falcon
set to Use First will precede any that are set to Equalize
Run time.)
40
750-322
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
falcon controls will be used in a round-robin scheme.
• Modulation - each demand source has one or more
setpoints that may be active and an operation sensor.
These are used to detect turn-on and turn-off conditions.
The difference between operating point and setpoint
determines the LL master's firing rate.
• Stager - the stager determines when slave falcons should
turn on as the need for heat increases, and when they
should turn off as the need for heat decreases.Rate
allocation - the PID block's output is used to determine the
firing rate of each slave unit using various rate allocation
techniques.
• Add-stage methods - various methods can be used to
determine when a new stage should be added.
• Drop-stage methods - various methods can be used to
determine when a stage should be dropped
• Sequencer - the sequencer determines which unit will be
the next one to turn on or turn off.
If the slave sequence number value is zero, then the slave
falcon's ModBus address will be used instead.
Overall Control
If two falcons which are set the same mode both have the
same sequence number then an alert will occur and the
order in which they are used will be arbitrary and is not
guaranteed to be repeatable.
LL MASTER ENABLE: DISABLE, ENABLE,
If set to Use Last, then this burner will be used only after all
Use First and Equalize Runtime falcons have been brought
online.
SLAVE SEQUENCE ORDER: 0-255
Slave sequence order is used to determine the order in
which falcons will be used (staged on) for those falcons
which the same Slave mode setting. Numbers may be
skipped, that is 3 will be first if there is no 1 or 2.
Note: For Equalize Runtime purposes, 1 does not mean
the falcon will be used first every time; that will vary over
time based on the master's run time equalization scheme.
In this case the sequence number determines the relative
order in which
DEMAND-TO-FIRING DELAY: MM:SS OR NONE
This delay time is needed by the LL master to determine
the length of time to wait between requesting a slave falcon
to fire and detecting that it has failed to start. It should be
set to the total time normally needed for the burner to transition from Standby to Run, including such things as
transition to purge rate, prepurge time, transition to lightoff
rate, all ignition timings, and some extra margin.
BASE LOAD RATE: RPM OR %
This specifies the preferred firing rate of a burner, which is
used for some types of control algorithms.
FAN DURING OFF-CYCLE RATE: RPM OR % (0=DISABLE)
This determines if or where the fan is to be operating
during the standby period.
LL MASTER OPERATION AND
SETUP
LL master operation is subdivided into the following functions:
• Overall control - The LL master has parameters that
enable and disable its operation.
• Periodic data polling - The LL master uses polling to
discover new slave falcon devices and to periodically
refresh the information it has about a known slave falcon
devices.
• Slave control - the LL master sends each active slave a
command and also performs a slave status read for each
known slave device. It also sends a Master status
broadcast that is heard by all slaves.
• Slave status manager - The LL master keeps track of
slave status for each falcon that is enabled as a slave
device.
• Demand and priority - different sources of demand can
cause the LL master to operate in different ways. These
sources have a priority relationship.
41
LL MASTER MODBUS PORT: MB1, MB2
If Disable is selected then all LL master functions are inactive.
If Enable is selected then it acts as the active bus master on
the ModBus port it is assigned.
LL OPERATION SWITCH: OFF, ON
This controls the LL master in the same way that the Burner
switch controls a stand-alone unit. If "On" then the LL master
is enabled to operate. If this parameter is "Off" then the LL
master turns off all slaves and enters an idle or standby
condition.
Periodic Data Polling messages
The LL master uses polling to discover new slave devices and
to periodically refresh the information it has about known
slave Falcon devices.
Thereafter it polls the known devices to make sure they are
still present and to obtain updated status information. It also
periodically polls the entire slave address range to discover
any new slave devices.
A polled device is read to determine the values of the
following data items:
a. The slave's type (compatibility) as indicated by the
Slave type
b. The slave enable status Slave enable
c. The slave mode as set in Slave mode
d. The slave sequence order as set in Slave
sequence order
e. Demand-to-firing delay: mm:ss or None
This delay time is needed by the LL master to
determine the length of time to wait between
requesting a slave to fire and detecting that it has
failed to start. It should be set to the total time normally needed for the burner to transition from
Standby to Run, including such things as transition
to purge rate, prepurge time, transition to lightoff
rate, all ignition timings, and some extra margin.
f. CT - Burner run time
This parameter will be needed if measured run-time equalization is being used.
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
750-322
Slave Control
The LL master sends each active slave a command and also
performs a slave status read for each known slave device. It
also sends a Master status broadcast that is heard by all
slaves.
There are 5 commands that might be sent:
• All slaves are commanded to turn off and remain off.
• The LL master sends message to slaves that are off, to
turn their fans on.
• The LL master suspends operation which request a burner
to recycle and remain in Standby if it has not yet opened its
main valve (e.g. it is in Prepurge or PFEP) but to keep
firing if it has reached MFEP or Run. This suspend may be
for the fan to be on or off in standby.
This message is used to abort the startup of a slave that is
not yet firing (because demand went away just before it
was firing), but to keep it on if it actually is firing (the LL
master will discover what happened in a subsequent status
response).
The LL master also sends this message to a slave that is
OnLeave. (This ensures that if the slave is firing when it
returns to LL master control, it will stay that way until the
master has decided whether to use it; or conversely, if the
slave stops firing for some reason that it will not start up
again until the LL master has requested this.
• RecoveryTime: Saves how long the slave must be OK to
recover.
• RecoveryTimer: Used to measure the slaves recovery
time
• RecoveryLimitTimer: Enforces a maximum slave
recovery time
• DataPollFaultCounter: Used to tolerate momentary
communication problems and to act on these if they are
excessive.
• StatusReadFaultCounter: Used to tolerate momentary
communication problems and to act on these if they are
excessive.
• AbnormalFaultCounter: Used to tolerate momentary
abnormality
• StagingOrder: Used to record the stage-on order, for use
by the sequencer when it needs to drop a stage.
• Storage for each item described in the Periodic data polling
section
• Storage for each item described in the Slave status read
response section
• Slave Command - the command word from the master to
the slave.
Features common to all states
In either case, the command will be to turn on the off cycle
fan if any other slave burners are firing, or to turn the fan off
if the slave is the only slave that might (or might not) be
firing.
• Whenever a slave device is not in an expected condition
then a recovery function is used to set up timers to give a
faulty slave:
— minimum time that it must appear to be OK, and
— limit how long a slave has to recover from any error.
• If the slave status read was bad then the slave's
FaultCounter is incremented and if it to reaches the fault
value tries, then a recovery action is invoked.
This action does nothing else if the status read was Bad.
• The LL master sends message to turn the burner on and to
assign the burner’s firing rate.
If the slave status read was OK then the status function
puts the slave read response data in a slave status table.
If the commanded modulation rate is less than the burner’s
minimum modulation rate, then the burner should always
operate at its minimum rate.
If a transition to another state is indicated then the SlaveState is simply set to the indicated state.
Data poll response handling
Slave Status Manager
The LL master keeps track of slave status for each unit that is
enabled as a slave device. The slave status manager
operates internally for each slave device (up to 8).
There is a table entry for each device containing the following
data:
• SlaveState:
— Unknown - indicates the table entry is unused and
empty
— Available - indicates the slave is OK and ready to use,
but is not
— currently firing as a slave
— AddStage - stage is getting ready to fire
— SuspendStage - stage was getting ready but is not
needed
— Firing - indicates the slave is currently firing
— OnLeave - indicates the slave is operating for some
other demand source within it that has higher priority
than slave demand.
— Disabled - indicates the slave is locked out or disabled
in some way
— Recovering - indicates the slave is in a time delay to
ensure that it is
OK before it is again considered to be available.
42
VALID RESPONSE MESSAGE
When a slave responds with a properly formatted message
it is examined to see if Slave enable value is "Enable for
Master".
• If the "Enable for Master" value is not present then the
slave status table is checked and if the slave is not in
the table then the message is ignored (this is normal).
However if the slave is in the table then the message is
stored as usual and the slave will invoke the action as a
disabled slave and cause recovery action to occur.
• If the "Enable for Master" value is present then the slave
status table is checked and if the slave is not in the table
then the slave data is stored in an empty position in the
table. However if the slave is in the table then the
message is stored as usual (this is the normal case).
INVALID RESPONSE OR NO RESPONSE
When a CB Falcon responds to a data poll with an improperly formatted message or it does not respond then the
slave status table is checked and:
If the polled slave device is in the table then the Data Poll
Fault is noted. If this causes a fault counter to exceed the
fault value then the SetRecovering handling is invoked.
750-322
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
SlaveState states
Recovering A slave that is recovering is checked once per
second.
If the slave has recovered the SlaveState table is changed
to Available.
If the slave has not yet recovered when its recovery timer
reaches the RecoveryTimeLimit then:
If the slave is not enabled for the LL master its SlaveState
table is Set to Unknown (which logically removes it from
the slave table). Otherwise the RecoveryLimitTimer is
cleared which starts a new recovery measurement and the
slave remains in recovery (indefinitely).
Available A slave in the Available state remains that way
until the Stager moves it into the AddStage state or the ProcessSlaveStatus action moves it to some other state.
AddStage A slave in the AddStage state remains that way
until the ProcessSlaveStatus moves it to Firing or some
other state, or the Stager times out and moves it into the
Recovering state if it fails to fire.
SuspendStage A slave in the SuspendStage state
remains that way until the ProcessSlaveStatus moves it to
some other state, or the Stager times out and moves it into
either the Firing or the Available state.
Firing A slave in the Firing state remains that way until the
ProcessSlaveStatus moves it to some other state, or the
Stager drops the stage and moves it into the Available
state.
OnLeave A slave in the OnLeave state remains that way
until the ProcessSlaveStatus moves it to some other state.
Disabled A slave in the Disabled state remains that way
until the ProcessSlaveStatus moves it to Recovering.
Demand and Priority
Different sources of demand can cause the LL master to operate in different ways. These sources have a priority relationship.
CH Demand
Warm Weather Shutdown
LL CH DEMAND SWITCH: DISABLE, STAT, ENVIRONCOM
REMOTE STAT
The inputs that can function as the CH demand switch are:
STAT, EnvironCOM Remote Stat. If the CH demand switch
value is Disable, the LL master does not respond to CH
demand.
WARM WEATHER SHUTDOWN ENABLE: DISABLE,
SHUTDOWN AFTER DEMANDS HAVE ENDED,
SHUTDOWN IMMEDIATELY
43
WARM WEATHER SHUTDOWN SETPOINT:
TEMPERATURE OR NONE
When warm weather shutdown is Disabled then it has no
effect (i.e. the Warm Weather Shutdown (WWSD) status
shown on the priority diagram is false).
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
750-322
100% firing of this boiler, and where 0% or any value less
than the boiler's minimum firing rate represents the
minimum firing rate).
These two parameters are shared by the stand-alone
control and the LL master and have the same effect for
either control.
This function requires the outdoor temperature. This temperature may be obtained from either a local sensor or a LL
slave. If WWSD is enabled but the outdoor temperature is
invalid and unknown, then the WWSD function acts as if it
is disabled and has no effect and an alert is issued indicating an invalid outdoor temperature.
If it is enabled then it uses a 4°F (2.2°C) hysteresis:
Priority Control
CH heat demand is a simple signal such as STAT, EnviroCOM remote stat, or Warm Weather Shutdown.
Frost protection input to the priority logic is not a heat
demand, it is a burner demand (because frost protection
always turns on pumps without regard to the priority control
- it is a priority item only if it also wants to fire).
If WWSD is false, then when the Outdoor temperature is
above the value provided by Warm weather shutdown
setpoint then:
Master Status
If "Shutdown after demands have ended" is selected
then any current CH demand that is present prevents
WWSD from becoming true; that is if CH demand is
false then WWSD becomes true.
MASTER HEAT DEMAND
Is a data item which contains the status for the following
sources of demand. All sources that are currently calling
for heat will be true (multiple items may be true at the same
time) except when WWSD is active, then CH demand is
inhibited.
Otherwise if "Shutdown immediately" is selected then
WWSD becomes true, it immediatetly causes CH
demand to end.
If WWSD is true, then when the Outdoor temperature is
below the value provided by Warm weather shutdown
setpoint minus 4°F (2.2°C) then WWSD becomes
false.
When warm weather shutdown is true then:
New occurrences of CH demand is inhibited.
DHW demand is not affected.
Frost protection
LL master frost protection is enabled with Frost protection
enable: Disable, Enable
The need for frost protection is actually detected independently by each slave which notifies the master whether
frost detection occurred in CH frost detection, and/or its
DHW frost detection, and whether it is severe enough to
require burner firing as well as pump operation. This is
done via its Slave status parameter.
If Frost protection enable is Enable then the master's
Slave write message, will indicate CH or DHW frost protection or both as read from each slave's Slave Status.
This will cause any slave pumps which are enabled to
follow this status to turn on without any other action
required from the master.
If any slave is indicating CH or DHW frost protection, and
additionally that slave's Slave status register indicates
burner firing is requested then the LL master's frost protection burner demand will be true.
If the priority scheme allows the master to honor this
demand, then it will fire a single burner (the current lead
burner as specified by the sequencer) at the rate indicated
by Frost protection rate: 0-100%. (100% represents
44
CH Demand
CH Frost demand – true if any slave is calling for CH
frost protection and Frost protection enable is true.
MASTER ACTIVE SERVICE
Is a data item which contains the identity of a single source
of demand that the LL Master is currently serving according to its priority:
• None – no active service, LL master is idle
• CH
• Frost – burner demand is true for frost protection
• WWSD – no high priority demand is active, and WWSD
is inhibiting CH demand (if any).
MASTER SERVICE STATUS
Is a data item used by pump control logic that combines
the Master Heat Demand and Master Active Service data.
It is implemented as described by the Pump Control Block
diagram.
Outdoor Temperature
For a CB Falcon that hosts a LL master, the outdoor temperature may be known from either of two sources. If the
host has an outdoor sensor that is reporting a valid temperature then this sensor reading is used. Otherwise, if any
slave is reporting a valid temperature as part of its Data
Poll message, then this temperature is used.
The resulting outdoor temperature provides all outdoor
temperature needs for both stand-alone and LL master
purposes. If neither source has a valid temperature then
the outdoor temperature is simply invalid and unknown,
and the functions which need this information handle it
accordingly per their individual definitions.
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CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
Modulation
Each demand source has one or more setpoints that may be active and an operation sensor. These are used to detect turn-on
and turn-off conditions. The difference between operating point and setpoint determines the LL master's firing rate
Modulation Sensor
When the burner demand is off and no burners are firing
then, for either Lead Outlet or Slave Outlet Average, the
lead boiler's outlet temperature is used to monitor for
burner demand.
LL MODULATION SENSOR: S5
The LL master's modulation sensor uses the S5 sensor
(connector J8 terminal 11 and 12).
Setpoints
If the LL master is enabled and its sensor is faulty then an
alert will be issued.
LL MODULATION BACKUP SENSOR: DISABLE, LEAD
OUTLET, SLAVE OUTLET AVERAGE
If the sensor chosen by the LL Modulation sensor is
faulty then the backup sensor provided here may be used.
If Disable is selected then no backup will be used.
If Lead Outlet is selected then the outlet temperature of
the lead boiler will be used as the backup during firing.
If Slave Outlet Average is selected then average of the
outlet temperatures of all slave boilers that are firing will
be used as a backup.
45
LL CH SETPOINT SOURCE: LOCAL, S2 4-20MA
If the setpoint source is Local then the control's local setpoint system is used. This setting enables the normal use
of the CH setpoint, CH TOD setpoint, and the CH outdoor
reset parameters and functions.
If the setpoint source is S2 4-20mA then the setpoint is
determined by the 4-20mA input on S2, and the two parameters described below. If the 4-20mA signal goes out of
range or is invalid, and this persists for a specified time,
then the setpoint source reverts to "Local". In this case
once it has gone to "Local", it remains that way until the 420mA signal is stable again.
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
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LL CH 20MA WATER TEMPERATURE: TEMPERATURE
OR NONE
If this parameter is invalid or None then the outdoor reset
function will be inhibited and will not run: if it is enabled
then an alert is issued.
CH 4MA WATER TEMPERATURE: TEMPERATURE OR
NONE
These provide the 20mA and 4mA temperatures for the
interpolation curve. If either of these have the None value,
are invalid, are out of range, or are too close for interpolation, an alert is issued and the setpoint reverts to "Local"
when it is selected as 4-20mA.
LL CH SETPOINT: DEGREES OR NONE
This setpoint is used when the time-of-day input is off. If
the ODR function is inactive then the setpoint is used as-is.
If the ODR function is active then this setpoint provides one
coordinate for the outdoor reset curve.
LL CH TOD SETPOINT: DEGREES OR NONE
This setpoint is used when the time-of-day input is on. If
the ODR function is inactive then the setpoint is used as-is.
If the ODR function is active then this setpoint provides one
coordinate for the shifted (because TOD is on) outdoor
reset curve.
TIME OF DAY
The Time of Day has one sources of control: a switch contact. Closed TOD is an on condition; open, then TOD is off.
OUTDOOR RESET AND BOOST (BOOST IS FUTURE)
The outdoor reset and boost functions for the LL CH functions will be implemented as described for a stand-alone
CH loop.
Each of the loops which implements outdoor reset and
boost has its own parameters. The parameters used by the
LL master are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
LL setpoint
LL CH TOD Setpoint
LL Outdoor reset enable:
Disable, enable
LL CH ODR minimum outdoor
degrees or None
temperature:
LL CH ODR maximum outdoor
degrees or None
temperature:
LL CH ODR low water temperature: degrees or None
LL CH ODR boost time:
mm:ss or None
LL CH ODR boost max setpoint:
degrees or None
LL CH ODR boost step:
degrees or None
LL CH ODR boost recovery step time:mm:ss or None
The outdoor reset function requires the outdoor temperature. This temperature may be obtained from either a local
sensor or a LL slave as described earlier. If the outdoor
temperature is invalid and unknown, then no outdoor reset
action occurs and an alert is issued indicating an invalid
outdoor temperature.
LL CH ODR MINIMUM WATER TEMPERATURE:
DEGREES OR NONE
This specifies the minimum outdoor reset setpoint for the
LL master. If the outdoor reset function calculates a temperature that is below the temperature specified here, then
this parameter's temperature will be used.
46
Demand and Rate
On/Off Hysteresis Includes hysteresis shifting at turn-on,
turn-off
LL OFF HYSTERESIS: DEGREES OR NONE
LL ON HYSTERESIS: DEGREES OR NONE
The LL hysteresis values apply to all setpoint sources. The
behavior of the hysteresis function is identical to the behavior of the stand-alone CH hysteresis function, except:
• where stand-alone CH hysteresis uses the on/off status
of a single burner, the LL hysteresis uses the on/off
status of all slave burners: this status is true if any slave
burner is on, and false only if all are off.
• where stand-alone CH hysteresis uses time of turn-on
and turn-off of a single burner, the LL hysteresis uses
the turn-on of the first slave burners and the turn-off of
the last slave burner.
LEAD LAG PID
The behavior of the Lead Lag PID function is identical to
the behavior of the stand-alone CH PID function. The same
gain scalars and algorithms are used.
Additionally:
RATE ADJUSTMENT
When the Slave dropout/return compensation parameter specifies a rate adjustment and a rate compensation
event occurs (a slave leaves while firing, or a slave returns)
then rate adjustment will alter the integrator value so that
the commanded rate compensates for the added or lost
capacity.
INTEGRATOR COMPENSATION
A stand-alone CB Falcon includes a feature to smooth the
response when a rate override has occurred (such as
delta-T rate limit) causing the PID output to be ignored.
Whenever an override has occurred then, at the moment
the override ends, the integrator is loaded with a value that
causes the PID output to match the current rate, whenever
this is possible within the integrator’s limits. The Lead Lag
PID will implement similar behavior: The rate allocator will
provide a trigger that causes the integrator's value to be
recomputed and this trigger will activate whenever a rate
allocation limit is released; that is, this event will occur any
time the system transitions from the condition in which it is
not free to increase the total modulation rate, to the condition where this rate may increase.
Implementation:
The examples below are ways in which this may occur, but
in implementation what is necessary, first of all, is to use a
rate allocator that assigns rate to each slave and can
detect when all of the assigned rate is absorbed, or if there
is excess requested rate that the firing stages could not
absorb.
Then:
1. Whenever the system is rate limited, that is, when A)
all firing stages are commanded to their respective
maximums and also B) the PID is asking for more
750-322
2.
3.
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
heat than that, note that this has occurred by setting
a flag and also record total rate that the system
absorbed (the total of the commanded maximums,
not the PID's requested rate which might include
excess).
Whenever the rate allocator completes an execution
pass and detects that both conditions of step 1 are
no longer true (demand has decreased) then it clears
the flag.
Whenever the rate allocator completes an execution
pass and detects both conditions of step 1 are true,
and it also detects that the total rate potentially
absorbed by the system (the commands have not yet
been sent) has increased from the value that was
saved when the flag was set, then it re-computes the
integrator value based on the old commanded maximum, clears the flag, and actually allocates the old
rate that was saved when the flag was set.
Examples include:
• The rate allocator has encountered a limit such as base
load (for a "limited" rate allocation scheme) and this limit
is released.
• All stages are at their maximum (base load, or max
modulation) and one or more stages are rate-limited
(such as due to slow-start or stepped modulation
limiting due to high stack temperature, etc.) and the rate
limited stage recovers, changing from rate-limited to
free to modulate.
(This is indicated by the Slave Status "slave is modulating":
the changing from false to true is not, itself, a trigger, but
while it is true the rate allocator can assign to the slave
only the firing rate that it is reporting; thus the release of
this might allow more rate to be absorbed by the system. It
also might not do this, if for example the slave was in anticondensation and thus the rate limit was maximum
modulation rate.)
• All firing stages are at their maximum (base load, or
max modulation) and a stage which was OnLeave
returns in the firing state and is available for modulation.
• An add-stage is in-progress and all firing burners are at
their limits (max modulation rate or base load) and then
the new stage becomes available.
This also applies when the system is first starting up, that
is, all firing burners are at their limits (zero) because non
are firing, and thus when the add-stage is finished the
system transitions from no modulation at all, to modulating
the first stage.
Lead Lag Burner Demand
Lead Lag burner demand will be present when Frost protection burner demand is true, as described in the section
on Frost protection. For the CH, and DHW demand
sources, Lead Lag burner demand will be true when one of
these is true and also setpoint demand from the hysteresis
block is true.
Rate Allocation
The PID block's output is used to determine the firing rate of
each slave using various rate allocation techniques.
The rate allocator first generates the Slave Command.
Except for the Firing state, the value ultimately depends
only upon the SlaveState. The values are:
Available
AddStage
SuspendStage depending on whether any other slave
stage is firing, no matter what SlaveState it is in.
Firing
OnLeave - same as SuspendStage
This ensures that when a slave returns and is already
firing, it will remain firing until the master decides what
to do about that, or if it is not firing it will remain off.
Disabled - same as Available
Recovering - same as Available
It next runs a rate allocator that depends upon the rate allocation method. This routine fills in the modulation rate for
all Firing boilers.
Each rate allocation method also provides functions to
return identification of the modulating stage and the last
stage, for use by the Add-stage and Drop-stage methods.
Rate Allocation Parameters
BASE LOAD COMMON: 0-100%
If set to zero, this parameter is disabled. For any non-zero
value, it uses the individual base load rates of each slave
to be ignored by the LL master's routines and this common
value to be used instead. It is an easy way to set all base
loads to the same value, without having to set each slave.
Some rate allocation algorithms may specify the use of this
parameter, and that the slave base load settings are
ignored.
RATE ALLOCATION METHOD: PARALLEL COMMONBASE LIMITED
This selects the rate allocation method. This performs
three purposes:
1) it determines how the LL master allocates firing rate
to each active stage,
2) the modulating stage and last stage are determined
for the
Add-stage and Drop-stage methods,
3) it determines the overflow rate and underflow rate
and can provide this to staging algorithms.
OVERFLOW RATE AND UNDERFLOW RATE
The rate allocator knows the rate assigned to each
stage, and the requested rate, and thus can determine
the difference between these.
This difference has two forms: overflow (used by Addstage methods), underflow (used by Drop-stage
methods).
When asked for rate overflow the threshold that is used
is the upper limit of the modulating stage per the current
rate allocation rules. Additionally this threshold may be
Common Features
All rate allocation methods share certain features.
47
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
750-322
There is no restriction on the slave's commanded
firing rate.
shifted if the Add-stage method is using a dRate/dt
behavior. Rate overflow is a positive or negative percentage offset from the threshold. For example:
If the modulating stage is at the staging threshold position but the
LL master is not asking for more heat than this, then
the overflow rate is 0%. If it is at this location (limited)
or above this location (unlimited) and the LL master
is asking for 10% more than the threshold value,
then the overflow rate is 10%. If it is below the
staging threshold position by 5%, then the overflow
rate is -5%.
When asked for rate underflow the threshold that is
used is the minimum modulation rate of the last stage.
Additionally this threshold may be shifted if the Dropstage method is using a dRate/dt behavior.
Rate underflow is a positive or negative percentage
offset from the threshold. For example:
If the last stage is at the threshold position but the LL
master is not asking for less heat than this, then the
underflow rate is 0%. If it is at this location and the LL
master is asking for 10% less than the threshold
value, then the underflow rate is -10%. If the last
stage is 5% above the threshold then the underflow
rate is 5%.
As load decreases:
As long as all available stages are Firing There is no
restriction on the slave's commanded firing rate.
When at least one stage has been dropped:
No stage is requested to exceed the common base
load rate.
MODULATING STAGE
Since all Firing stages receive the same rate, any stage
can be considered to be the modulating stage. The one
with the highest StagingOrder number is considered to
be the modulating stage.
Last stage
The stage with the highest StagingOrder number is the
last stage.
OVERFLOW AND UNDERFLOW
For the Parallel common-base limited the Base load
common parameter provides the overflow threshold.
For the Parallel common-base limited the minimum
modulation rate provides the underflow threshold.
Stager
The Stager is an internal program that determines when slave
CB Falcons should turn on as the need for heat increases,
and when they should turn off as the need for heat decreases.
Rate allocation methods
PARALLEL COMMON-BASE LIMITED
Allocation
All stages that are Firing receive the same firing rate.
Only the Base load common parameter is used for base
loading, the individual slave's base load values are
ignored.
As load increases:
Until all stages are Firing:
No stage is requested to exceed the common base
load rate.
After all stages are Firing:
48
In all cases:
• The first burner turns on due to the combination of heat
demand (call for heat) and setpoint demand (operating
point falls below the setpoint minus the on hysteresis).
• The last burner (or all burners) turn off due to the loss of
burner demand which is caused by either the loss of heat
demand (no call for heat) or the loss of setpoint demand
(the operating point climbs above the setpoint plus the off
hysteresis).
• In between those two extremes the Add-stage and Dropstage methods determine when staging occurs.
The stager handles burner on and burner off events. It
operates according to this state transition diagram.
750-322
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
The stager has the following variables:
StagerState: encodes the current state of the stager.
StagerTimer: multipurpose 1 second timer used by states
which measure time.
StagerTimeLimit: the timeout value for the StagerTimer
LeadStartup: flag indicating the lead boiler is starting
AddStageA: the stage being added to those already firing
Stager Parameters
ADD-STAGE INTERSTAGE DELAY: MM:SS
This specifies the minimum time that the Stager waits after
adding one stage before adding another stage or dropping
a stage.
49
DROP-STAGE INTERSTAGE DELAY: MM:SS
This parameter specifies the minimum time that the Stager
waits after dropping one stage before dropping another
stage or adding a stage.
Functions common to all stager states
These functions handle overall burner demand responsibility, and take care of cleaning up any anomalous conditions.
BURNER DEMAND
The stager checks the Master’s LL burner demand. If this
demand is off all slaves with SlaveStates of AddStage,
SuspendStage, or Firing are set to Available by the Rate
Allocator turning them all off and the StagerState is set to
be Idle.
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
750-322
STAGERSTATE = IDLE WITH SLAVES ACTIVE
If the stager runs and its state is Idle, it checks the status of
all slaves. If any of these have SlaveState=AddStage, SuspendStage, or Firing then these are set to Available (this
will cause the Rate Allocator to turn them all off).
Stager States
If any slave boiler is firing then StagerState = Active
Otherwise StagerState = Idle
STAGERSTATE = ACTIVE
During this state the stager is ready to manage add-stage
and drop-stage requests.
If AddStageRequest is true
The stager's operation is defined for each of its states:
STAGERSTATE = IDLE
Burner demand means that a demand source is calling for
heat and there is also setpoint demand.
When there is no burner demand the stager is forced to be
Idle.
When burner demand becomes true (Call for Heat) the
stager checks the sequencer to identify the lead boiler.
That boiler is given a command to start.
The stager resets (to verify it is at 0) and starts its StagerTimer, and sets the StagerTimeLimit to the value of the
slave's Demand-to-firing delay time.
If the Stager fails to get even one boiler from the
Sequencer, it issues an alert and suspends until it runs
again.
STAGERSTATE = ADDSTAGERESPONSE
During this state the stager is waiting for slave to transition
to Firing.
If the identified boiler has a SlaveState=Firing then the
stager:
Resets and starts it’s StagerTimer, sets the StagerTimeLimit to Add-stage interstage delay, and changes the
StagerState to InterstageDelay.
If the boiler's SlaveState is still AddStage then:
The Stager ask the Sequencer for an available slave.
When an available slave is found the stager repeats the
above steps to bring this stage to Active.
If DropStageRequest is true and more than 1 slave burner
is firing, the stager:
Invokes SetRecovering for the stage identified by
DropStageRequest. This will turn the stage off and put
it into the recovering state until it has finished its postpurge (if any).
Resets and starts its StagerTimer, sets StagerTimeLimit to Drop-stage interstage delay, changes the
StagerState to InterstageDelay, invokes an action to
reset the Add/Drop detection timers.
When the Interstage time has elapsed, the Stager can
execute an AddStage or DropStage request.
Add Stage Methods
Various methods can be used to determine when a new stage
should be added. The internal algorithms that generate
AddStageRequests are called Add-stage methods.
All methods work by observing various criteria such as the
Firing stages, the commanded rate, or setpoint error.
Adding Stages Parameters:
The stager checks to see if the StagerTimer has reached
the StagerTimeLimit.
If so then the stager: Changes the SlaveState to SuspendStage, resets and starts its StagerTimer, sets the
StagerTimeLimit to T_StagerSuspend. This allows additional time for the slave to reach its firing condition.
STAGERSTATE = ADDSTAGESUSPEND
During this state the stager is waiting to see if the slave has
transitioned to Firing or Available.
If the identified boiler has a SlaveState=Firing then the
stager:
ADD-STAGE DETECTION TIME1: MM:SS
This provides time thresholds.
In the descriptions below, the relevant parameter is
referred to as Add-Stage detection timeN.
Add-Stage method1:
Disable,
Error threshold,
Rate threshold,
dError/dt and threshold,
dRate/dt and threshold }
In the descriptions below, the relevant AddStageDetectTimer is referred to as
AddStageDetectTimerN.
Resets and starts its StagerTimer, sets the StagerTimeLimit to Add-stage interstage delay, it changes the
StagerState to InterstageDelay.
The stager checks to see if the StagerTimer has reached
the StagerTimeLimit.
ADD-STAGE ERROR THRESHOLD: DEGREES
This provides the error threshold as defined by the
methods below.
ADD-STAGE RATE OFFSET: -100% TO +100%
This provides the rate offset threshold as defined by the
methods below.
If so then:
If the boiler's SlaveState is set to Available.
50
750-322
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
Add-stage methods
ERROR THRESHOLD
For error threshold staging, a stage is added when the
error becomes excessive based on degrees away from
setpoint, and time.
ADD-STAGE CONDITION:
- The modulating burner(s) is at its (their) maximum
position per the rate allocation rules,
- The operating point is below the setpoint by an
amount greater than
or equal to Add-stage error threshold
When the Add-stage condition is false then AddStageDetectTimerN is set to zero. (If the condition is true
then AddStageDetectTimerN is not zeroed and thus
allowed to run.) If this timer reaches or exceeds LLAdd-stage detection timeN then AddStageRequestN
is true.
RATE THRESHOLD
For rate based staging, a stage is added based on the rate
of the modulating stage.
ADD-STAGE CONDITION:
The modulating burner is at a rate that is at or above the
rate which is calculated by adding the Add-stage rate
offset to the maximum position per the rate allocation
rules.
Examples:
rate offset = 20% The add-stage condition will occur
if the modulating stage is 20% above base load for
unlimited allocations, or, if limited, when there is 20%
more rate to distribute than can be absorbed by firing
the stages at base load.
rate offset = -20% The add-stage condition will be as
described just above, but the threshold is now 20%
below the modulating stage's base load rate.
To support this, the current Rate Allocation method asks
for the current "Overflow rate" - see the Rate Allocator
section.
Drop-Stage method:
Disable,
Error threshold,
Rate threshold,
dError/dt and threshold,
dRate/dt and threshold
DROP-STAGE ERROR THRESHOLD: DEGREES
This provides the error threshold as defined by the
methods below.
DROP-STAGE RATE OFFSET: -100% TO +100%
This provides the rate offset threshold as defined by the
methods below.
LL boiler off options:
Options disabled,
Enable all boilers off (ABO)
Enable lead drop-stage on error (LDSE)
Enable both ABO and LDSE
This provides options for customizing the way stages are
dropped, as described below.
LL ALL BOILERS OFF THRESHOLD: TEMPERATURE OR
NONE
When the LL boiler off options specifies "Enable all boilers
off (ABO)" or "Enable both ABO and LDSE" then this
parameter provides the boiler off threshold temperature
that is used. In this case, if the temperature is the None
value then a parameter error lockout occurs.
Drop-stage methods:
Error threshold
For error threshold staging, a stage is dropped when the
error becomes excessive based on degrees away from
setpoint and time.
DROP-STAGE CONDITION:
- The modulating burner(s) is at its (their) minimum position
per the rate allocation rules,
- The operating point is above the setpoint by an amount
greater than or equal to Drop-stage error threshold
When the Drop-stage condition is false then
Drop Stage Methods
Various methods can be used to determine when a stage
should be dropped. The internal algorithms that generate
DropStageRequests are called Drop-stage methods.
DropStageDetectTimerN is set to zero. (If the condition
is true then
DropStageDetectTimerN is not zeroed and thus
allowed to run.) If this timer reaches or exceeds Dropstage detection timeN then DropStageRequestN is
true.
One or two methods may be active at any time. If two are
active then their requests are OR'd together.
All methods work by observing various criteria such as the
Firing stages, the commanded rate, or Setpoint.
Rate threshold
For rate based staging, a stage is dropped based on the
rate of the last stage.
Dropping Stages Parameters:
DROP-STAGE DETECTION TIME: MM:SS
This provides time thresholds. They differ only in that:
Drop-Stage detection time is used with
DropStageDetectTimer
In the descriptions below, the relevant parameter is
referred to as LL – Drop Stage detection timeN}.
DROP-STAGE CONDITION:
-The modulating burner(s) is at a rate that is at or below the
minimum modulation rate plus a rate offset.
51
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
750-322
Examples:
rate offset = 20% The Drop-stage condition will occur
when the last stage is less than a threshold that is the
minimum modulation rate plus another 20%.
ALL BOILERS OFF - ABO:
The ABO temperature provides a Burner Off threshold that
essentially replaces the normal Burner Off threshold as
given by the LL off hysteresis parameter; it is processed
by the same logic block using some additional rules.
rate offset = 0% The Drop-stage condition will occur
when the last stage is at the minimum modulation rate.
If ABO is enabled then:
• When the LL master operating point reaches or
exceeds the ABO threshold this turns off LL master
burner demand.
• The Burner Off threshold provided by LL off hysteresis
is ignored if one or more lag boilers are firing.
• If LDSE is enabled:
The Burner Off threshold provided by LL off
hysteresis is ignored also for the lead boiler when it
is firing solo (i.e. when no lag boilers are firing).
• If LDSE is disabled:
When the lead is firing solo and the operating point
reaches the Burner Off threshold specified by LL off
hysteresis turns off LL master burner demand (and
thus the lead boiler).
rate offset = -20% The Drop-stage condition will occur if
the last stage is at minimum modulation and there is
20% less rate to distribute than can be absorbed; that
is, the rate allocator would like the minimum modulation
rate to be lower than it is.
To support this, the current Rate Alloction method asks for
the current "Underflow rate" - see the Rate Allocator
section.
Boiler off options
The LL boiler off option controls two optional behaviors.
One option is to enable the use of the LL all boilers off
threshold and is abbreviated "ABO", and the other controls whether a lead boiler is affected by a drop-stage
method based upon error, and is abbreviated as "LDSE".
As usual, whenever LL master burner demand is turned off by its hysteresis block, it does not recur until the operating point falls
below the Burner On threshold.
Summary of the burner-off thresholds that are used:
LDSE
ABO
DSE
enabled
enabled
exists
LL Off Hysteresis
All Boilers Off Threshold
0
0
x
OpPt > Off Hyst means all off
Ignored (disabled)
0
1
x
OpPt > Off Hyst ignored if lags exist.
OpPt > Off Hyst drops lead if it is solo.
OpPt > ABO means all off
Illegal, param error lockout
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
Illegal, param error lockout
1
1
1
Ignored by both lags and lead.
Same thresholds as "0 0 x" above.
LEAD DROP-STAGE ON ERROR - LDSE:
If LDSE is enabled then either Drop-stage method1 must
be enabled to provide staging based on "Error threshold";
otherwise a parameter error lockout occurs.
Normally, for a lag boiler, dropping a stage based on error
involves meeting three criteria: 1) the operating point temperature must exceed an offset from setpoint, 2) this
condition must persist for a period of time, and 3) the measured time starts only when the modulating boilers are
firing at the minimum modulation rate. And normally when
LDSE is not enabled, the lead boiler is special case that is
not affected by a drop-stage event: it shuts down only
when the operating point reaches the burner-off threshold
(or ABO threshold, if that is enabled).
If LDSE is enabled:
• Enabling (or disabling) LDSE has no effect on the dropstage behavior for a lag boiler; however
• When only the lead boiler is firing then an error based
drop-stage event does act to drop the lead boiler, and
moreover, only one of the three criteria above are
52
OpPt > ABO means all off
considered by the method in this case: the operating
point temperature. Thus dropping the lead does not
depend on exceeding this temperature for a period of
time, nor does it require the lead to be at minimum
modulation rate. When LDSE is enabled and the lead is
firing solo, then simply reaching the drop-stage
threshold causes a dropstage event that causes the
lead to turn off and [rf3259] which thus ends LL master
demand until the operating point again falls to the
Burner On threshold.
Sequencer
The sequencer determines which CB Falcon will be the next
one to turn on or turn off whenever an Add-stage event
occurs. It maintains the following variables:
LeadBoilerSeqNum - sequence number of the current
lead boiler in the Slave Status table.
Lead BoilerRunTime - the cumulative time that the current
lead boiler has been running
750-322
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
Voluntary Lead Rotation
In all cases, if a boiler sequence number is needed and
Slave sequence order is 0, then the boiler's ModBus
address is used as its sequence number.
In all cases, if two boilers being compared have the same
effective sequence
number, then the one that is selected is undefined (either
may prevail).
Sequencer Parameters
LEAD SELECTION METHOD: ROTATE IN SEQUENCE
ORDER, MEASURED RUN TIME
This determines the selection method for lead selection
and sequencing, as described below.
LAG SELECTON METHOD: SEQUENCE ORDER,
MEASURED RUN TIME
This determines the selection method for lag selection and
sequencing, as described below.
LEAD ROTATION TIME: HH:MM OR NONE
This determines the lead rotation time as defined below.
FORCE LEAD ROTATION TIME: HH:MM OR NONE
If this parameter is a non-zero time, then it is used to force
the rotation of the lead boiler if it stays on longer than the
time specified.
The current lead boiler is identified by the LeadBoilerSeqNum value. This value will change when the stager has
asked the sequencer for a boiler to add and either:
• the boiler identified by LeadBoilerSeqNum is
neither Available nor Firing (i.e. it has a fault or is
OnLeave), or
• the LeadBoilerRunTime value exceeds Lead
rotation time.
In either of these cases, the algorithm performed is:
If the Lead selection method is "Rotate in sequence
order", then LeadBoilerSeqNum is incremented, and then
new lead boiler is the one that is a slave in Equalize
Runtime mode that is responding to the LL master (i.e. not
OnLeave or Recovering, but it might be Firing), and:
— has a sequence number equal to
LeadBoilerSeqNum, or.
— If no boiler has this then the closest one with a
sequence number greater than this number is used, or
— If no boiler has a greater sequence number, then the
one that has the smallest sequence number is used
(wrap around).
Otherwise when the Lead selection method is "Measured run time", then the lead boiler is the one having the
lowest Measured run time value. If two have the same
measured run time, then either may be selected.
The LeadBoilerRunTime value is then set to zero to give
the new lead boiler a fresh allotment.
Sequencer Add Boiler Selection
The sequencer selects the next boiler to be added according to a sorted order. This description assumes this is
implemented by assigning an ordering number and that the
lowest numbers are the first to be added.
• Any Available slaves that have a mode of Use First will
have the lowest ordering numbers. If two or more Use
First boilers exist, they are numbered according to their
assigned Slave sequence order or Modbus address if
this value is zero, as descibed above.
• Next are slaves that have the mode of Equalize
Runtime. When the add boiler routine gets to this group
it first invokes the Voluntary Lead Rotation routine (to
make sure this is done, but only once) and then selects
an Available boiler, if any, ordered according to:
— The first is the lead boiler per the LeadBoilerSeqNum
parameter.
— The rest are the other slaves ordered according to the
LL –Lag selection method} parameter:
• If this parameter is "Rotate in sequence order", then
they are ordered according to their LL – Slave
sequence order or Modbus address if this value is
zero, as descibed above.
• If this parameter is "Measured run time" then they are
ordered according to their reported run time. If two have
the same measured run time, then either may be
selected.
• Last are any Available slaves that have a mode of Use
Last. These will have the highest numbers. If two or
more Use Last boilers exist, they are numbered
according to their assigned Slave sequence order or
Modbus address if this value is zero, as described
above.
53
Note: if the old lead boiler is the only one, then this process
may end up re-designating this as the "new" lead with a
fresh time allotment.
Sequencer ordering function
Part of the sequencer is called by the stager just before the
stager runs, to give the sequencer a chance to assign
order numbers to stages that very recently turned on, and
to maintain these in a sequence. It uses the StagingOrder
item in the Slave Status table for this purpose.
The sequencer ordering function examines all slaves and
sets to zero the StagingOrder of any stage that is not
Firing.
This ensures that any stage that has left the Firing condition recently is no longer in the number sequence.
Next, skipping all of those that have 0 values in StagingOrder it finds the lowest numbered StagingOrder and
gives it the value 1, the next receive 2, etc.
Thus if gaps have developed due to a slave dropping
out these are filled in.
Finally, the ordering function continues on, giving the next
numbers to and Firing stages which have a 0 StagingOrder
values (i.e. they recently were added, or they recently
returned from OnLeave).
CB FALCON LEAD/LAG
750-322
SLAVE READ: DATA
This provides the slave status message to be read by a CB
Falcon Master. It includes all of the data that is read from a
slave.
Example:
Notfiring
Notfiring
Firing
Firing
Firing
Firing
Before
3
0
2
5
0
4
After
0
0
1
3
4
2
Sequencer Drop Lag boiler selection
When the stager asks the sequencer for a lag boiler to drop
the sequencer looks at the StagingOrder numbers of all
Firing boilers. If only one Firing boiler is found, or none are
found, then this selection function returns a value that indicates no boiler may be dropped. Otherwise it returns an
identifier for the boiler having the highest StagingOrder
number.
SEQUENCER 1 MINUTE EVENT
Part of the sequencer is called by the timing service at a 1
minute rate to implement lead rotation.
The 1 minute event checks the boiler identified by LeadBoilerSeqNum. If it is Firing then the LeadBoilerRunTime
is incremented.
FORCED LEAD ROTATION:
When the boiler identified by LeadBoilerSeqNum is firing
and also LeadBoilerRunTime reaches the Force lead
rotation time parameter time then:
1. The current lead boiler is noted.
2. Lead rotation occurs as described above under Voluntary Lead Rotation (this changes the designation,
but does not change the actual firing status).
SLAVE WRITE: DATA
This allows the slave to accept command messages from a
CB Falcon master
54
SLAVE MODE: USE FIRST, EQUALIZE RUNTIME, USE
LAST
• If set to Use First, then this slave will be used prior to
using other slaves with other values.
• If this parameter is set to Equalize Runtime, then this
slave will be staged according to a run time
equalization. (Any units set to Use First will precede any
that are set to Equalize Runtime.)
• If this parameter is set to Use Last, then this slave will
be used only after all Use First and Equalize Runtime
units have been brought online.
SLAVE PRIORITY SEQUENCE ORDER: 0-255
Slave sequence order is used to determine the order in
which the slaves will be used (staged on) for those with the
same Slave mode setting. Numbers may be skipped, that
is 3 will be first if there is no 1 or 2.
NOTE: For Equalize Runtime purposes, 1 does not
mean the CB Falcon will be used first every
time; that will vary over time based on the master's run time equalization scheme. In this case
the sequence number determines the relative
order in which CB Falcon controls will be used
in a round-robin scheme.
If the slave sequence number value is zero, then the slave
CB Falcon's ModBus address will be used instead.
If two CB Falcons are set to the same mode and both have
the same sequence number then an alert will occur and the
order in which they are used will be arbitrary and is not
guaranteed to be repeatable.
APPENDIX - Building Energy Management System (EMS) interface
See also the Falcon Modbus manual 750-308
The following is used as a reference in this appendix:
MODBUS Application Protocol Specification V1.1a, June 4,
2004, http://www.Modbus-IDA.org.
This appendix describes the interface to the CB Falcon boiler controller on either the MB1 or MB2
Modbus port and the Falcon display COM 2 port. These ports are RS-485 connections that use the
Modbus communication protocol to allow configuration and status data to be read from and written
to the Falcon.
The CB Falcon functions as a Modbus Slave on this interface. It responds to a single Modbus address
to service the requests of the Modbus Master on the RS-485 network.
Definitions
The following definitions apply in this appendix:
Modbus—Application layer communication protocol standard adopted by the Modbus-IDA trade
association. Recognized as an industry standard protocol for RS-485 serial communication.
RTU—Remote Terminal Unit serial transmission mode. Mode used to encode data for Modbus where
each 8-bit byte is sent as two 4-bit hexadecimal characters.
WIRING
Shown below are wiring connections at each boiler and network connections for EMS communication.
J3 COMMS
9
A
B
C
BLK
B
1
C
MB2
MB1
RED
A
WH
DATA-
39
12 VDC +
-
LEAD/LAG
MODBUS
40
DATA+
EMS/GLOBAL MODBUS
CONNECTIONS
41
DATA+
42
b a
JUMPER COM1
DATA-
a b
COM2
9
1
SYSTEM DISPLAY
A1
ENABLING MODBUS COMMUNICATIONS
NOTE: The 833-03577 Falcon display must have software version 1.4.0 or later for
building EMS interface capability.
To establish communications with a building EMS, each Falcon display in the lead lag network must
have its COM 2 Modbus port enabled. Use the following steps to enable:
1. On the display Home page press <1234 SETUP>.
2. Go to <ADVANCED SETUP>, then to <User Preferences>.
3. Go to the COM 2 tab. Make sure ‘Enable Modbus Gateway?’ is checked. The Modbus baud rate
can also be changed here if necessary (selectable between 38400, 19200, or 9600).
NOTE: The Modbus Gateway must be enabled at each boiler in the lead lag network (not just the
Master host) for individual boiler status monitoring.
INTERFACE
Physical Layer
The Falcon Modbus port is a 3-pin connector that interfaces to RS-485 signals as indicated in Table 1.
Table 1: RS-485 signals
Signal
Terminal
Data + (a)
1
Data - (b)
2
Common (c)
3
A2
The serial transmission mode on the Modbus network is the RTU mode. Message format has the
characteristics shown in Table 2.
Table 2: RS-485 message format
Coding system
8-bit binary
Number of data bits per character
10 =
1 start bit
8 data bits
No parity bit
1 stop bit
Bit transfer rate
38400 bps
Duplex
Half duplex
Error checking
2 byte CRC-16 polynomial
Bit transfer order
LSB first
End of message
Idle line for 3.5 or more characters
Application Layer
The Falcon Modbus interface supports the following function codes:
• 03 (0x03) Read Holding Registers
• 06 (0x06) Write Single Register
• 16 (0x10) Write Multiple Registers
• 17 (0x11) Report Slave ID
All the configuration and status data are accessed as 16-bit holding registers in this interface. Since
all Falcon digital signals accessed in this interface are read only, these digital signals are mapped to
bits within holding registers instead of coils or discrete inputs, to simplify the interface. Variable
length data are also represented by holding registers and therefore must be accessed individually and
not as part of a group. The length of the variable length data is returned in the response. All 32-bit
data items are accessed as two consecutive, 16-bit holding registers, i.e., each item uses 2 register
address spaces.
Except for variable length data items the registers can be accessed as a single register or up to 20
registers for writes and 125 registers for reads. Data is mapped into logical groups with room for
future expansion, so some gaps exist in the register map.
Data organization is intended to allow for efficient register access. Status data is organized into register blocks by application function and a function status change indicator is used to denote when any
data has changed within the register block since the last time the registers were read (See Fig. 1).
The Falcon sets the status change indicator bit when at least one of the registers in the functional
block has changed value since it was last read. The Modbus master can read the status change register and determine which functional register blocks have changed value since its last access and
only read those register blocks. The Modbus master can ignore the status change register and poll
status data as it deems fit.
A3
Hydronic CFC-W to BMS
Bolded registers are typical boiler/burner status monitoring points.
Highlighted registers are allowed Modbus read/write points.
Hex
Decimal
Parameter
CONTROLLER STATUS
0002
0002
Digital I/O
R/W
Format
Description
R
U16
0003
R
U16
Bit map:
15=Safety relay
14=Time of Day
13=STAT (Demand)
12=High Fire Switch (HFS)
11=Low Fire Switch (LFS)
10=Load Control Input(LCI)
9=Pre-ignition interlock (PII)
8=Interlock (ILK)
7=Alarm
6=Main valve (ignored on DBI burner)
5=Pilot valve (Main fuel valve on DBI burner)
4=Ignition
3=Blower motor
2=Pump C
1=Pump B
0=Pump A
Only applicable when Annunciation is enabled Bit map: 15-14=Reserved
(always 0) 13=STAT2 12-8=Reserved (always 0)
7=Annunciator 8 - Propane (LP) gas (dual fuel burner)
6=Annunciator 7 - Natural Gas (dual fuel burner)
5=Annunciator 6 - Low Gas Pressure
4=Annunciator 5 - High Gas Pressure
3=Annunciator 4 - High Air Pressure
2=Annunciator 3 - Auxiliary Low Water
1=Annunciator 2 - Low Water
0=Annunciator 1 - Interrupted Air Switch
0003
Annunciation I/O
TREND STATUS
0006
0007
0008
0009
000A
000B
000C
000D
000E
000F
0010
0011
0013
0006
0007
0008
0009
0010
0011
0012
0013
0014
0015
0016
0017
0019
Demand source
Outlet Limit channel
Firing rate
Fan speed
Flame signal
Inlet channel
DHW Limit channel
Outdoor channel
Stack Limit channel
Header channel
Active CH setpoint
Active DHW setpoint
Register Access Status
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
0015
0021
Analog remote input
BURNER CONTROL STATUS
R
U16
0020
0032
Burner control status
R
U16
0021
0033
Burner control state
R
U16
A4
3=DHW, 4=Lead Lag slave, 5=Lead Lag master, 6=CH frost protection,
7=DHW frost protection, 8=No demand due to burner switch (register 199)
turned off, 9=DHW storage, 10=Mix
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
Actual firing rate (% or RPM).
RPM
0.01V or 0.01μA precision (0.00-50.00V)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
(register 65).
(register 81).
Register data write access status:
0=No register writes allowed,
1=Installer register writes allowed,
2=OEM register writes allowed.
3=All register writes allowed.
0=No signal, 4-20 mA (0.1 mA precision)
y
5=Unconfigured safety data, 6-33=Reserved, 34=Standby Hold, 35=Standby
Delay, 36-47=Reserved, 48=Normal Standby, 49=Preparing, 50=Firing,
51=Postpurge, 52-65535=Reserved
0=Disabled
1=Locked out
4=Anti-short cycle
5=Unconfigured safety data
34=Standby Hold
35=Standby Delay
48=Normal Standby
49=Preparing/Pre-purge/Ignition
50=Firing
51=Postpurge
Residential & commercial models. Model type
determined by register 176.
0=Initiate
1=Standby Delay
2=Standby
3=Safe Startup
4=Prepurge - Drive to Purge Rate
5=Prepurge - Measured Purge Time
6=Perpurge - Drive to Lightoff Rate
7=Preignition Test
8=Preignition Time
9=Pilot Flame Establishing Period (Main Trial for Ignition with DBI)
10=Main Flame Establishing Period (Not used with DBI)
12=Run
13=Postpurge
14=Lockout
255=Safety Processor Offline
Hydronic CFC-W to BMS
Hex
Decimal
Parameter
R/W
Format
Description
0022
0024
0034
0036
Lockout code (Active)
Annunciator first out
R
R
U16
U16
0025
0037
Annunciator hold
R
U16
0026
0038
Sequence time
R
U16
0027
0028
0029
0039
0040
0041
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
002B
002C
002D
0043
0044
0045
Delay time
Hold code
Burner control flags
SENSOR STATUS
Outlet OP channel (J8-10)
DHW OP channel (J9-3)
Stack OP channel (J9-6)
DEMAND & MODULATION STATUS
0=No lockout, 1-4096 (refer to Table 44, Falcon Lockout and Hold Codes)
Source for annunciator first out:
0=None or undetermined
1=ILK
2=PII
11=Annunciator 1 - Interrupted Air Switch
12=Annunciator 2 - Low Water
13=Annunciator 3 - Auxiliary Low Water
14=Annunciator 4 - High Air Pressure
15=Annunciator 5 - High Gas Pressure
16=Annunciator 6 - Low Gas Pressure
17=Annunciator 7
18=Annunciator 8
Source for burner control hold condition (see Hold code):
0=None or undetermined
1=ILK
2=PII
3=LCI
11=Annunciator 1 - Interrupted Air Switch
12=Annunciator 2 - Low Water
13=Annunciator 3 - Auxiliary Low Water
14=Annunciator 4 - High Air Pressure
15=Annunciator 5 - High Gas Pressure
16=Annunciator 6 - Low Gas Pressure
17=Annunciator 7
18=Annunciator 8
Running time for timed burner control operation (seconds)
Running delay time (seconds). Applicable when burner control in delayed or hold
state.
Reason for burner hold (same codes as lockout, see Table 44)
Bit map: 15-1=Reserved (always 0) 0= Flame detected
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision) or other (see register 610)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision) or other (see register 612)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision) or other (see register 613)
0038
0039
0056
0057
Active rate limiter
Limited rate
R
R
U16
U16
003A
003B
003C
0058
0059
0060
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
0040
0041
0042
0043
0044
0045
0046
0047
0048
0064
0065
0066
0067
0068
0069
0070
0071
0072
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
0=Unknown, 1=Disabled, 2=Normal, 3=Suspended
control
0=Off, 1=On
0=Off, 1=On
RPM or %
0=Off, 1=On
0=Off, 1=On
0°-130° (0.1°C precision)
0°-130° (0.1°C precision)
0050
0051
0080
0081
Active rate override
Override rate
Demand rate
CENTRAL HEATING (CH) STATUS
CH status
CH setpoint source
CH heat demand
CH burner demand
CH requested rate
CH frost heat demand
CH frost burner demand
Active CH on hysteresis
Active CH off hysteresis
DOMESTIC HOT WATER (DHW) STATUS
DHW status
DHW setpoint source
0=None, 1=Outlet high limit, 2=Delta T limit, 3=Stack limit, 4=Slow start limit,
5=Anti-condensation, 6=Minimum modulation, 7=Forced rate
RPM or %
0=None, 1=Burner control default, 2=Burner control, 3=Manual firing rate,
4=Manual firing rate off
RPM or %
RPM or %
R
R
U16
U16
0052
0053
0054
0055
0056
0057
0058
0059
0082
0083
0084
0085
0086
0087
0088
0089
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
0=Unknown, 1=Disabled, 2=Normal, 3=Suspended
0=Unknown, 1=Normal setpoint, 2=TOD setpoint, 3=Outdoor reset
Countdown of time when DHW has priority over CH (secs). Applicable when
DHW priority time is enabled (see register 452).
0=Off, 1=On
0=Off, 1=On
RPM or %
0=Off, 1=On
0=Off, 1=On
0°-130° (0.1°C precision)
0°-130° (0.1°C precision)
0060
0061
0062
0063
0064
0065
0066
0067
0068
0069
006A
006B
006C
006D
006E
006F
0070
0096
0097
0098
0099
0100
0101
0102
0103
0104
0105
0106
0107
0108
0109
0110
0111
0112
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
See table 41.
Running overrun time for CH pump (seconds)
Running overrun time for CH pump due to frost protection (seconds)
Number of days that CH pump has not run (sat idle).
See table 41.
Count down (seconds) when DHW pump is delayed from starting.
Running overrun time for DHW pump (seconds)
Running overrun time for DHW pump due to frost protection (seconds)
Number of days that DHW pump has not run (sat idle).
See table 41.
Running overrun time for Lead Lag pump (seconds)
Number of days that LL pump has not run (sat idle).
See table 41.
Running overrun time for Boiler pump (seconds)
Number of days that boiler pump has not run (sat idle).
See table 41.
Number of days that auxiliary pump has not run (sat idle).
DHW priority count
DHW heat demand
DHW burner demand
DHW requested rate
DHW frost heat demand
DHW frost burner demand
Active DHW on hysteresis
Active DHW off hysteresis
PUMP STATUS
CH pump status
CH pump overrun time
CH FP overrun time
CH pump idle days count
DHW pump status
DHW pump start delay time
DHW pump overrun time
DHW FP overrun time
DHW pump idle days count
System pump status
System pump overrun time
System pump idle days count
Boiler pump status
Boiler pump overrun time
Boiler pump idle days count
Auxiliary pump status
Auxiliary pump idle days count
A5
Hydronic CFC-W to BMS
Hex
Decimal
0080- 0081
0082- 0083
0084- 0085
0086- 0087
0088- 0089
008A-008B
008C- 008D
008E-008F
0090- 0091
0128- 0129
0130- 0131
0132- 0133
0134- 0135
0136- 0137
0138- 0139
0140- 0141
0142-0143
0144- 0145
00B1
00B2
00B3
00B4
Parameter
STATISTICS
Burner cycle count
Burner run time
CH pump cycle count
DHW pump cycle count
System pump cycle count
Boiler pump cycle count
Auxiliary pump cycle count
Controller cycle count
Controller run time
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
R/W
Format
Description
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
U32
U32
U32
U32
U32
U32
U32
U32
U32
0-999,999
Hours
0-999,999
0-999,999
0-999,999
0-999,999
0-999,999
0-999,999
Hours
0177
0178
0179
0180
Password
Temperature units
Antishort cycle time
Alarm silence time
W
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
00B6
0182
Reset and restart
W
U16
00B7
00B8
0183
0184
R
R
00C1
00C2
00C3
00C4
00C5
00C6
00C7
00C8
00C9
00CA
00CB
00CC
00CD
0193
0194
0195
0196
0197
0198
0199
0200
0201
0202
0203
0204
0205
00D0
00D3
00D4
00D5
00D6
00D7
0208
0211
0212
0213
0214
0215
01C0
01C5
01C6
01C7
01C8
0448
0453
0454
0455
0456
01D0
01D3
0464
0467
Burner name
Installation data
MODULATION CONFIGURATION
CH maximum modulation rate
DHW maximum modulation rate
Minimum modulation rate
Prepurge rate
Lightoff rate
Postpurge rate
CH forced rate
CH forced rate time
DHW forced rate
DHW forced rate time
Burner switch
Firing rate control
Manual firing rate
CH CONFIGURATION
CH enable
CH setpoint
CH time of day setpoint
CH on hysteresis
CH off hysteresis
CH outdoor reset enable
DHW CONFIGURATION
DHW enable
DHW setpoint
DHW time of day setpoint
DHW on hysteresis
DHW off hysteresis
LIMITS CONFIGURATION
Outlet high limit setpoint
Stack limit setpoint
01D7
01DB
0471
0475
Delta-T inlet/outlet degrees
DHW high limit setpoint
Variable length password string (up to 20 characters) requesting Falcon
permission to write registers.
(Celsius)
0-28800 seconds (8 hours), 0xFFFF=Not configured
0-600 minutes
Successful login required before request is granted. Force soft reset of Falcon
subsystems:
0=None,
1=Burner control,
2=Application,
3=Burner control & application,
4=Clear alert log
Variable length string (up to 20 characters)
Variable length string (up to 20 characters)
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R/W
R
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
RPM or %
RPM or %
RPM or %
SAFETY parameter: RPM or %
SAFETY parameter: RPM or %
SAFETY parameter: RPM or %
RPM or %
0-64800 seconds (18 hours), 0xFFFF=Not configured
RPM or %
0-64800 seconds (18 hours), 0xFFFF=Not configured
0=Off, 1=On. Used to enable/disable burner control.
0=Auto, 1=Manual in Run, 2=Manual in Run&Standby
Firing rate used when control is set to manual (% or RPM)
R/W
R/W
R
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
0=Disable Central Heating, 1=Enable Central Heating
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision) Setpoint when Time Of Day switch is on.
0°-130° (0.1°C precision)
0°-130° (0.1°C precision)
0=Disable outdoor reset, 1=Enable outdoor reset
R/W
R/W
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
0=DHW disabled, 1=DHW enabled
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision) Setpoint when Time Of Day switch is on.
0°-130° (0.1°C precision)
0°-130° (0.1°C precision)
R
R
U16
U16
R
R
U16
U16
SAFETY parameter: -40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
SAFETY parameter: -40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
Temperature delta between inlet & outlet sensors when Delta-T limit occurs: 0°130° (0.1°C precision)
SAFETY parameter: -40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
A6
Hydronic CFC-W to BMS
Hex
Decimal
0200
0201
0202
0203
0204
0205
0206
0207
0208
0209
020A
020B
020C
0512
0513
0514
0515
0516
0517
0518
0519
0520
0521
0522
0523
0524
0210
0211
0212
0213
0528
0529
0530
0531
0220
Format
Description
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
0-64800 seconds (18 hours), 0xFFFF=Not configured
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
0-64800 seconds (18 hours), 0xFFFF=Not configured
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
0°-130° (0.1°C precision)
0-64800 seconds (18 hours), 0xFFFF=Not configured
0°-130° (0.1°C precision)
U16
U16
U16
U16
0=Disable CH frost protection, 1=Enable CH frost protection
0=Disable DHW frost protection, 1=Enable DHW frost protection
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision) (applicable for CH only)
0=Continuous until condition doesn’t exist, 1=Active 5 min, off 55 min cycle
0544
Parameter
R/W
OUTDOOR RESET (ODR) CONFIGURATION
CH ODR maximum outdoor temperature R
CH ODR minimum outdoor temperature
R
CH ODR low water temperature
R
CH ODR boost time
R
CH ODR boost maximum setpoint
R
Lead Lag ODR maximum outdoor temperat R
Lead Lag ODR minimum outdoor temperatuR
Lead Lag ODR minimum water temperatureR
Lead Lag ODR boost time
R
Lead Lag ODR boost maximum setpoint
R
CH ODR boost step
R
CH ODR boost recovery step time
R
Lead Lag ODR boost step
R
FROST PROTECTION CONFIGURATION
CH frost protection enable
R
DHW frost protection enable
R
Outdoor frost protection setpoint
R
Frost protection method
R
LEAD LAG CONFIGURATION
Lead Lag slave enable
R
U16
0221
0222
0223
0224
0225
0226
0227
0228
0229
022A
022B
022C
022D
022E
022F
0230
0231
0232
0233
0234
0545
0546
0547
0548
0549
0550
0551
0552
0553
0554
0555
0556
0557
0558
0559
0560
0561
0562
0563
0564
Lead Lag master enable
Lead Lag setpoint
Lead Lag time of day setpoint
Lead Lag outdoor reset enable
Lead Lag on hysteresis
Lead Lag off hysteresis
Lead Lag hysteresis step time
Lead Lag P-gain
Lead Lag I-gain
Lead Lag D-gain
Lead Lag master STAT input enable
Add stage method
Add stage error threshold
Add stage rate offset
Add stage time
Drop stage rate offset
Drop stage time
Minimum stage off time
Slave mode
Slave priority
R
R/W
R/W
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R/W
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
0=Lead/Lag slave disabled,
1=Lead/Lag simple slave enabled for EnviraCom master,
2=Lead/Lag simple slave enabled for Global Modbus master,
3=Lead/Lag full slave enabled for Global Modbus master
0=Not a Lead/Lag master 1=Lead/Lag master
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision)
-40°-130° (0.1°C precision) Setpoint when Time Of Day switch is on.
0=Disable outdoor reset, 1=Enable outdoor reset
0°-130° (0.1°C precision)
0°-130° (0.1°C precision)
0°-130° (0.1°C precision)
0-100
0-100
0-100
0=Disable STAT input, 1=Enable STAT input
0=Rate, 1=Error
0235
0236
0237
0238
0565
0566
0567
0568
Slave command
Base load rate
Fan during off cycle rate
Slave sequence order
EXTENDED CH CONFIGURATION
R
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
Seconds
Seconds
0=Don’t Use, 1=Use First, 2=Equalize Runtime, 3=Use Last.
1-8
Bit map: 15=Slave demand request, 14=Slave suspend startup, 13=Slave run
fan request, 12=Turn on System pump with overrun, 11=Turn on System pump
with no overrun, 10=Turn on Auxiliary pump, 9=Reserved (always 0),
8=Commanded rate is binary fraction % , 7-0=Commanded rate
RPM or % (applicable for Base Load sequencing type only)
RPM or %
0-255
0240
0576
R
U16
Alternative modulation sensor when primary CH sensor is bad: 0=No backup
sensor, 1=Header sensor
0360- 0370
0371- 0381
0382- 0392
0393- 03A3
03A4-03B4
03B5-03C5
03C6-03D6
03D7-03E7
03E8-03F8
03F9-0409
040A-041A
041B-042B
042C- 043C
043D- 044D
044E-045E
045F
0864- 0880
0881- 0897
0898- 0914
0915- 0931
0932- 0948
0949- 0965
0966- 0982
0983- 0999
1000- 1016
1017- 1033
1034- 1050
1051- 1067
1068- 1084
1085- 1101
1102- 1118
1119
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
Most recent lockout. See Table 4.
2nd newest lockout. See Table 4.
3rd newest lockout. See Table 4.
4th newest lockout. See Table 4.
5th newest lockout. See Table 4.
6th newest lockout. See Table 4.
7th newest lockout. See Table 4.
8th newest lockout. See Table 4.
9th newest lockout. See Table 4.
10th newest lockout. See Table 4.
11th newest lockout. See Table 4.
12th newest lockout. See Table 4.
13th newest lockout. See Table 4.
14th newest lockout. See Table 4.
Oldest lockout
0460- 0465
0466- 046B
046C- 0471
0472- 0477
0478- 047D
047E-0483
0484- 0489
048A-048F
0490- 0495
0496- 049B
049C- 04A1
04A2-04A7
04A8-04AD
04AE-04B3
04B4-04B9
04BA-0FFF
1120- 1125
1126- 1131
1132- 1137
1138- 1143
1144- 1149
1150- 1155
1156- 1161
1162-1167
1168- 1173
1174- 1179
1180- 1185
1186 1191
1192- 1197
1198- 1203
1204- 1209
0954-4095
CH modulation backup sensor
LOCKOUT HISTORY
Lockout history record 1
Lockout history record 2
Lockout history record 3
Lockout history record 4
Lockout history record 5
Lockout history record 6
Lockout history record 7
Lockout history record 8
Lockout history record 9
Lockout history record 10
Lockout history record 11
Lockout history record 12
Lockout history record 13
Lockout history record 14
Lockout history record 15
RESERVED
ALERT LOG
Alert log record 1
Alert log record 2
Alert log record 3
Alert log record 4
Alert log record 5
Alert log record 6
Alert log record 7
Alert log record 8
Alert log record 9
Alert log record 10
Alert log record 11
Alert log record 12
Alert log record 13
Alert log record 14
Alert log record 15
RESERVED
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
Most recent alert (see Table 8).
2nd newest alert.
3rd newest alert.
4th newest alert.
5th newest alert.
6th newest alert.
7th newest alert.
8th newest alert.
9th newest alert.
10th newest alert.
11th newest alert.
12th newest alert.
13th newest alert.
14th newest alert.
Oldest alert.
A7
Seconds
Steam CFH-V to BMS
Bolded registers are typical boiler/burner status monitoring points.
Highlighted registers are allowed Modbus read/write points.
Hex
Decimal
Parameter
CONTROLLER STATUS
0002
0002
Digital I/O
R/W
Format
Note
R
U16
Bit map:
15=Safety relay
14=Time of Day
13=STAT (Demand)
12=High Fire Switch (HFS)
11=Low Fire Switch (LFS)
10=Load Control Input(LCI)
9=Pre-ignition interlock (PII)
8=Interlock (ILK)
7=Alarm
6=Main valve (ignored on DBI burner)
5=Pilot valve (Main fuel valve on DBI burner)
4=Ignition
3=Blower motor
2=Pump C
1=Pump B
0=Pump A
0003
0003
Annunciation I/O
R
U16
0008
0009
000A
0013
0008
0009
0010
0019
Firing rate
Fan speed
Flame signal
Register Access Status
R
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
0014
0015
0016
0020
0021
0022
Steam pressure
R
Analog remote (modulation or SP) input R
Active Steam pressure setpoint
R
U16
U16
U16
Bit map: 15-14=Reserved (always 0) 13=STAT2 12-8=Reserved (always 0)
7=Annunciator 8 - Unused
6=Annunciator 7 - High Water
5=Annunciator 6 - Low Gas Pressure
4=Annunciator 5 - High Gas Pressure
3=Annunciator 4 - High Limit
2=Annunciator 3 - Auxiliary Low Water
1=Annunciator 2 - Low Water
0=Annunciator 1 - Interrupted Air Switch
Actual firing rate (% or RPM).
RPM
0.01V or 0.01μA precision (0.00-50.00V)
Register data write access status:
0=No register writes allowed,
1=Installer register writes allowed,
2=OEM register writes allowed.
3=All register writes allowed.
0-150 psi (0.1 psi precision)
0=No signal, 4-20 mA (0.1 mA precision)
0-150psi (0.1psi precision)
0020
0032
BURNER CONTROL STATUS
Burner control status
R
U16
0021
0033
Burner control state
R
U16
0022
0024
0034
0036
Lockout code (Active)
Annunciator first out
R
R
U16
U16
0025
0037
Annunciator hold
R
U16
A8
Bit map: 52-65535=Reserved
0=Disabled
1=Locked out
4=Anti-short cycle
5=Unconfigured safety data
34=Standby Hold
35=Standby Delay
48=Normal Standby
49=Preparing/Pre-purge/Ignition
50=Firing
51=Postpurge
Burner control sequence (I/O) state.
0=Initiate
1=Standby Delay
2=Standby
3=Safe Startup
4=Prepurge - Drive to Purge Rate
5=Prepurge - Measured Purge Time
6=Perpurge - Drive to Lightoff Rate
7=Preignition Test
8=Preignition Time
9=Pilot Flame Establishing Period (Main Trial for Ignition with DBI)
10=Main Flame Establishing Period (Not used with DBI)
11=Direct Burner Iginition)
12=Run
13=Postpurge
14=Lockout
255=Safety Processor Offline
0=No lockout, 1-4096 (refer to Table 44, Falcon Lockout and Hold Codes)
Source for annunciator first out:
0=None or undetermined
1=ILK
2=PII
11=Annunciator 1
12=Annunciator 2
13=Annunciator 3
14=Annunciator 4
15=Annunciator 5
16=Annunciator 6
17=Annunciator 7
18=Annunciator 8
Source for burner control hold condition (see Hold code):
0=None or undetermined
1=ILK
2=PII
3=LCI
11=Annunciator 1
12=Annunciator 2
13=Annunciator 3
14=Annunciator 4
15=Annunciator 5
16=Annunciator 6
17=Annunciator 7
18=Annunciator 8
Steam CFH-V to BMS
Hex
0026
Decimal
0038
Parameter
Sequence time
R/W
R
Format
U16
Note
Running time for timed burner control operation (seconds)
0027
0028
0029
0049
004A
0039
0040
0041
0073
0074
Delay time
Hold code
Burner control flags
Active Steam pressure on hysteresis
Active Steam pressure off hysteresis
R
R
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
Running delay time (seconds). Applicable when burner control in delayed or hold stat
Reason for burner hold (same codes as lockout, see Table 44)
Bit map: 15-1=Reserved (always 0) 0= Flame detected
0-150psi (0.1psi precision)
0-150psi (0.1psi precision)
0080- 0081
0082- 0083
0128- 0129
0130- 0131
STATISTICS
Burner cycle count
Burner run time
R
R
U32
U32
0-999,999
Hours
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Variable length password string (up to 20 characters) requesting permission to write
registers.
Successful login required before request is granted. Force soft reset of control
subsystems:
Variable length string (up to 20 characters)
Variable length string (up to 20 characters)
00B1
0177
Password
W
00B6
00B7
00B8
0182
0183
0184
W
R
R
U16
00C1
00C3
00C4
00C5
00C6
00C7
00C8
00CB
00CC
00CD
00DC
00DD
00DE
021E
0193
0195
0196
0197
0198
0199
0200
0203
0204
0205
0220
0221
0222
0542
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R
R
R/W
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
RPM or %
RPM or %
SAFETY parameter: RPM or %
SAFETY parameter: RPM or %
SAFETY parameter: RPM or %
RPM or %
0-64800 seconds (18 hours), 0xFFFF=Not configured
0=Off, 1=On. Used to enable/disable burner control.
0=Auto, 1=Manual in Run,2=Manual in Run&Standby
Firing rate used when control is set to manual (% or RPM)
0-150psi (0.1psi precision)
0-150psi (0.1psi precision)
0-150psi (0.1psi precision)
0-150psi (0.1psi precision)
022B
022C
022D
022E
022F
0230
0231
0232
0233
0234
0555
0556
0557
0558
0559
0560
0561
0562
0563
0564
Reset and restart
Burner name
Installation data
MODULATION CONFIGURATION
Maximum modulation rate
Minimum modulation rate
Prepurge rate
Lightoff rate
Postpurge rate
Steam forced rate
Steam forced rate time
Burner switch
Firing rate control
Manual firing rate
Steam pressure set point
Steam pressure on hysteresis
Steam pressure off hysteresis
Steam TOD pressure set point
LEAD LAG CONFIGURATION
Lead-Lag enable
Add stage method
Add stage error threshold
Add stage rate offset
Add stage time
Drop stage rate offset
Drop stage time
Minimum stage off time
Slave mode
Slave priority
R/W
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
0=Off, 1=On. Used to enable/disable burner control.
0=Rate, 1=Error
0235
0236
0237
0238
02E2
02E3
0326
0565
0566
0567
0568
0738
0739
0806
Slave command
Base load rate
Fan during off cycle rate
Slave sequence order
L-L Steam pressure SP
L-L TOD Steam pressure SP
Active L-L Steam pressure
R
R
R
R
R/W
R/W
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
Seconds
Seconds
0=Don’t Use, 1=Use First, 2=Equalize Runtime, 3=Use Last.
1-8
Bit map: 15=Slave demand request, 14=Slave suspend startup, 13=Slave run fan
request, 12=Turn on System pump with overrun, 11=Turn on System pump with no
overrun, 10=Turn on Auxiliary pump, 9=Reserved (always 0), 8=Commanded rate is
binary fraction % , 7-0=Commanded rate
RPM or % (applicable for Base Load sequencing type only)
RPM or %
0-255
0-150psi (0.1psi precision)
0-150psi (0.1psi precision)
0-150psi (0.1psi precision)
0360- 0370
0371- 0381
0382- 0392
0393- 03A3
03A4-03B4
03B5-03C5
03C6-03D6
03D7-03E7
03E8-03F8
03F9-0409
040A-041A
041B-042B
042C- 043C
043D- 044D
044E-045E
0864- 0880
0881- 0897
0898- 0914
0915- 0931
0932- 0948
0949- 0965
0966- 0982
0983- 0999
1000- 1016
1017- 1033
1034- 1050
1051- 1067
1068- 1084
1085- 1101
1102- 1118
LOCKOUT HISTORY
Lockout history record 1
Lockout history record 2
Lockout history record 3
Lockout history record 4
Lockout history record 5
Lockout history record 6
Lockout history record 7
Lockout history record 8
Lockout history record 9
Lockout history record 10
Lockout history record 11
Lockout history record 12
Lockout history record 13
Lockout history record 14
Lockout history record 15
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
0-1 byte
Most recent lockout. See Table 4.
2nd newest lockout. See Table 4.
3rd newest lockout. See Table 4.
4th newest lockout. See Table 4.
5th newest lockout. See Table 4.
6th newest lockout. See Table 4.
7th newest lockout. See Table 4.
8th newest lockout. See Table 4.
9th newest lockout. See Table 4.
10th newest lockout. See Table 4.
11th newest lockout. See Table 4.
12th newest lockout. See Table 4.
13th newest lockout. See Table 4.
14th newest lockout. See Table 4.
Oldest lockout
0460- 0465
0466- 046B
046C- 0471
0472- 0477
0478- 047D
047E-0483
0484-0489
048A-048F
0490- 0495
0496- 049B
049C- 04A1
04A2-04A7
04A8-04AD
04AE-04B3
04B4-04B9
1120- 1125
1126- 1131
1132- 1137
1138- 1143
1144- 1149
1150- 1155
1156- 1161
1162-1167
1168- 1173
1174- 1179
1180- 1185
1186 1191
1192- 1197
1198- 1203
1204- 1209
ALERT LOG
Alert log record 1
Alert log record 2
Alert log record 3
Alert log record 4
Alert log record 5
Alert log record 6
Alert log record 7
Alert log record 8
Alert log record 9
Alert log record 10
Alert log record 11
Alert log record 12
Alert log record 13
Alert log record 14
Alert log record 15
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
U16
Most recent alert (see Table 8).
2nd newest alert.
3rd newest alert.
4th newest alert.
5th newest alert.
6th newest alert.
7th newest alert.
8th newest alert.
9th newest alert.
10th newest alert.
11th newest alert.
12th newest alert.
13th newest alert.
14th newest alert.
Oldest alert.
A9
Seconds
e-mail: info@cleaverbrooks.com
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