HP Integrity BL860c Server Blade User Service Guide

HP Integrity BL860c Server Blade User
Service Guide
HP Part Number: AD217–9011A
Published: June 2007
© Copyright 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P
Legal Notices
The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services.
Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions
contained herein.
Printed in U.S.A.
Intel, Pentium, Intel Inside, Itanium, and the Intel Inside logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in
the United States and other countries.
Linux is a U.S. registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.
Microsoft and Windows are U.S. registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Table of Contents
About This Document.......................................................................................................15
Intended Audience................................................................................................................................15
New and Changed Information in This Edition...................................................................................15
Publishing History................................................................................................................................15
Document Organization.......................................................................................................................15
Typographic Conventions.....................................................................................................................16
HP-UX Release Name and Release Identifier.......................................................................................16
Related Documents...............................................................................................................................17
HP Encourages Your Comments..........................................................................................................17
1 Introduction...................................................................................................................19
Server Blade Overview.........................................................................................................................19
Server Blade Dimensions.................................................................................................................19
Server Blade Components.....................................................................................................................19
Front View.......................................................................................................................................19
SAS Disk Drives...............................................................................................................................21
Top View (with access cover removed)...........................................................................................21
SAS Backplane......................................................................................................................................22
I/O Subsystem.......................................................................................................................................23
Memory Subsystem..............................................................................................................................23
DIMMs.............................................................................................................................................23
Power Subsystem (on System Board)...................................................................................................24
CPU / Core Electronics Complex..........................................................................................................24
Enclosure Information..........................................................................................................................24
2 Controls, Ports, and LEDs............................................................................................25
Front Panel............................................................................................................................................25
Front Panel LEDs.............................................................................................................................26
SAS Disk Drive LEDs.......................................................................................................................27
Controls and Ports...........................................................................................................................28
SUV Cable........................................................................................................................................29
Rear Panel.............................................................................................................................................29
3 Power Off and Power On the Server.........................................................................31
Power States..........................................................................................................................................31
Power Off the Server.............................................................................................................................31
Power On the Server.............................................................................................................................32
4 Removing and Replacing Components......................................................................33
Safety Information................................................................................................................................33
Service Tools Required..........................................................................................................................33
Removing and Replacing a Hot–Plug SAS Disk Drive........................................................................34
Removing a SAS Disk Drive............................................................................................................34
Replacing a SAS Disk Drive............................................................................................................35
Removing and Replacing Disk Drive Blanks..................................................................................35
Removing a Disk Drive Blank....................................................................................................35
Replacing a Disk Drive Blank....................................................................................................36
Preparing the Server Blade for Servicing..............................................................................................36
Table of Contents
3
Power Off the Server Blade..............................................................................................................36
Removing and Replacing the Server Blade from the Enclosure...........................................................37
Removing the Server Blade from the Enclosure..............................................................................37
Replacing the Server Blade into the Enclosure................................................................................38
Removing and Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel.....................................................................38
Removing the Server Blade Access Panel........................................................................................38
Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel........................................................................................39
Removing and Replacing Internal Components..................................................................................40
Removing and Replacing DIMMs........................................................................................................40
Removing a DIMM..........................................................................................................................40
DIMM Load Order...........................................................................................................................41
DIMM Configuration.......................................................................................................................41
Replacing a DIMM...........................................................................................................................42
Removing and Replacing a Processor...................................................................................................42
Removing a Processor.....................................................................................................................42
Replacing a Processor......................................................................................................................43
Removing and Replacing the SAS Backplane.......................................................................................45
Removing the SAS Backplane.........................................................................................................45
Replacing the SAS Backplane..........................................................................................................46
Removing and Replacing the Front Display Assembly........................................................................46
Removing the Front Display Assembly..........................................................................................46
Replacing the Front Display Assembly...........................................................................................47
Removing and Replacing the System Battery.......................................................................................47
Removing the System Battery.........................................................................................................47
Replacing the System Battery..........................................................................................................48
Removing and Replacing the Mezzanine Cards..................................................................................49
Removing a Mezzanine Card..........................................................................................................49
Replacing a Mezzanine Card...........................................................................................................49
Removing and Replacing the System Board.........................................................................................50
Removing the System Board...........................................................................................................50
Replacing the System Board............................................................................................................51
5 Troubleshooting............................................................................................................53
Methodology.........................................................................................................................................53
General Troubleshooting Methodology..........................................................................................53
Recommended Troubleshooting Methodology ..............................................................................54
Basic and Advanced Troubleshooting Tables..................................................................................55
Troubleshooting Tools...........................................................................................................................58
Front Panel LEDs.............................................................................................................................58
Locator LED................................................................................................................................59
System Health LED....................................................................................................................60
Internal Health LED...................................................................................................................60
NIC LEDs...................................................................................................................................60
Diagnostics.......................................................................................................................................61
Online Diagnostics/Exercisers.........................................................................................................61
Online Support Tool Availability...............................................................................................61
Online Support Tools List..........................................................................................................62
Offline Support Tool Availability....................................................................................................62
Offline Support Tools List...............................................................................................................62
General Diagnostic Tools.................................................................................................................63
Fault Management Overview..........................................................................................................63
HP-UX Fault Management..............................................................................................................63
WBEM indication providers and EMS Hardware Monitors......................................................64
Errors and Error Logs...........................................................................................................................64
4
Table of Contents
Event Log Definitions......................................................................................................................64
Event Log Usage..............................................................................................................................64
iLO MP Event Logs..........................................................................................................................65
System Event Log (SEL) Review.....................................................................................................65
Supported Configurations....................................................................................................................67
System Build-Up Troubleshooting Procedure.................................................................................67
CPU/Memory/SBA................................................................................................................................68
Troubleshooting Server Blade CPU.................................................................................................68
IPF Processor Load Order..........................................................................................................68
Processor Module Behaviors......................................................................................................68
Customer Messaging Policy.......................................................................................................69
Troubleshooting Blade Memory......................................................................................................69
Memory DIMM Load Order......................................................................................................69
Memory Subsystem Behaviors...................................................................................................69
Customer Messaging Policy.......................................................................................................69
Troubleshooting Blade SBA.............................................................................................................69
Enclosure Information..........................................................................................................................70
Cooling Subsystem...............................................................................................................................70
Communications Module (LBAs, Ropes, and PDH/PCI-X Buses).......................................................70
I/O Subsystem Behaviors.................................................................................................................70
Customer Messaging Policy............................................................................................................70
Management Subsystem (iLO MP and BMC)......................................................................................70
I/O Subsystem (SCSI, LAN, FibreChannel, HDD, and Core I/O).........................................................71
SAS Disk Drive LEDs.......................................................................................................................71
LAN LEDs.......................................................................................................................................71
Boot Process LEDs................................................................................................................................72
Firmware...............................................................................................................................................72
Identifying and Troubleshooting Firmware Problems....................................................................73
Updates............................................................................................................................................73
Server Interface (System Console)........................................................................................................73
Troubleshooting Tips.......................................................................................................................74
Environment.........................................................................................................................................74
Reporting Your Problems to HP...........................................................................................................74
Online Support................................................................................................................................74
Phone Support.................................................................................................................................74
Information to Collect Before you Contact Support........................................................................75
A Parts Information..........................................................................................................77
Server Blade Components List..............................................................................................................77
B Operating System Boot and Shutdown......................................................................79
Operating Systems Supported on the Server Blade..............................................................................79
Configure System Boot Options...........................................................................................................79
Booting and Shutting Down HP-UX.....................................................................................................80
Adding HP-UX to the Boot Options List.........................................................................................80
Adding the HP-UX Boot Option................................................................................................80
HP-UX Standard Boot......................................................................................................................81
Booting HP-UX (EFI Boot Manager)..........................................................................................81
Booting HP-UX (EFI Shell).........................................................................................................82
Booting HP-UX in Single-User Mode“Booting and Shutting Down Microsoft Windows”
(page )..............................................................................................................................................83
Booting HP-UX in Single-User Mode (EFI Shell).......................................................................83
Booting HP-UX in LVM-Maintenance Mode..................................................................................84
Table of Contents
5
Booting HP-UX in LVM-Maintenance Mode (EFI Shell)...........................................................84
Shutting Down HP-UX....................................................................................................................84
Shutting Down HP-UX (/sbin/shutdown Command)...............................................................84
Booting and Shutting Down HP OpenVMS.........................................................................................85
Adding OpenVMS to the Boot Options List....................................................................................85
Booting OpenVMS...........................................................................................................................86
Booting OpenVMS (EFI Boot Manager).....................................................................................86
Booting HP OpenVMS (EFI Shell)..............................................................................................87
Shutting Down OpenVMS...............................................................................................................87
Booting and Shutting Down Microsoft Windows................................................................................88
Adding Microsoft Windows to the Boot Options List....................................................................88
Booting the Microsoft Windows Operating System........................................................................90
Shutting Down Microsoft Windows................................................................................................91
Windows Shutdown from the Command Line..........................................................................91
Booting and Shutting Down Linux.......................................................................................................92
Adding Linux to the Boot Options List...........................................................................................92
Booting the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Operating System..............................................................93
Booting Red Hat Enterprise Linux from the EFI Shell...............................................................93
Booting the SuSE Linux Enterprise Server Operating System........................................................94
Booting SuSE Linux Enterprise Server from the EFI Shell.........................................................94
Shutting Down Linux......................................................................................................................95
C Utilities..........................................................................................................................97
NVRAM Backup Utility........................................................................................................................97
Downloading and Installing the NVRAM Backup Utility..............................................................97
Using the NVRAM Backup Utility..................................................................................................97
Syntax.........................................................................................................................................97
Parameters..................................................................................................................................97
Extensible Firmware Interface..............................................................................................................98
EFI Commands..............................................................................................................................100
EFI/POSSE Commands.......................................................................................................................101
help................................................................................................................................................101
Syntax.......................................................................................................................................101
Parameters................................................................................................................................101
Operation..................................................................................................................................101
baud...............................................................................................................................................104
Syntax.......................................................................................................................................104
Parameters................................................................................................................................104
Operation..................................................................................................................................104
boottest...........................................................................................................................................104
Syntax.......................................................................................................................................105
Parameters................................................................................................................................105
cpuconfig.......................................................................................................................................105
Syntax.......................................................................................................................................105
Parameters................................................................................................................................105
Operation..................................................................................................................................106
conconfig........................................................................................................................................106
Syntax.......................................................................................................................................106
Parameters................................................................................................................................106
Notes.........................................................................................................................................106
default............................................................................................................................................107
Syntax.......................................................................................................................................107
Parameters................................................................................................................................107
Operation..................................................................................................................................107
6
Table of Contents
errdump.........................................................................................................................................108
Syntax.......................................................................................................................................108
Parameters................................................................................................................................108
Operation..................................................................................................................................108
info.................................................................................................................................................108
Syntax.......................................................................................................................................108
Parameters................................................................................................................................108
lanaddress......................................................................................................................................112
Syntax:......................................................................................................................................112
Parameters................................................................................................................................112
monarch.........................................................................................................................................112
Syntax.......................................................................................................................................112
Parameters................................................................................................................................112
Operation..................................................................................................................................112
pdt..................................................................................................................................................113
Syntax.......................................................................................................................................113
Parameters................................................................................................................................113
Operation..................................................................................................................................113
sysmode.........................................................................................................................................114
Syntax.......................................................................................................................................114
Parameters................................................................................................................................114
Operation..................................................................................................................................114
Specifying SCSI Parameters................................................................................................................115
Using the SCSI Setup Utility..........................................................................................................115
Using the Boot Option Maintenance Menu........................................................................................119
EFI Shell Paths...............................................................................................................................119
Boot from a File........................................................................................................................120
Add a Boot Option...................................................................................................................120
Delete Boot Option(s)...............................................................................................................121
Change Boot Order...................................................................................................................121
Manage BootNext Setting.........................................................................................................122
Set Auto Boot TimeOut............................................................................................................122
Select Active Console Output Devices.....................................................................................122
Select Active Console Input Devices........................................................................................123
Select Active Standard Error Devices.......................................................................................124
Using the System Configuration Menu.........................................................................................124
Security/Password Menu..........................................................................................................124
Resetting Passwords.................................................................................................................124
Integrated Lights Out Management Processor...................................................................................125
Accessing the iLO MP....................................................................................................................125
Interacting with the iLO MP.....................................................................................................125
iLO MP Command Interface...............................................................................................................125
iLO MP Welcome Screen...............................................................................................................126
iLO MP Help System.....................................................................................................................126
iLO MP Commands.......................................................................................................................126
Blade Parameters...........................................................................................................................128
Reset BMC Passwords...................................................................................................................128
Configure Serial Port Parameters..................................................................................................128
Example
HP-UX..................................................................................................................129
Console Log...................................................................................................................................129
Command Mode............................................................................................................................129
Console..........................................................................................................................................129
<Ctrl–B>..........................................................................................................................................129
<Ctrl–N>rs......................................................................................................................................129
Date................................................................................................................................................129
Table of Contents
7
Default Configuration....................................................................................................................129
Display FRUID...............................................................................................................................130
Disconnect LAN Console...............................................................................................................130
Domain Name Server Settings.......................................................................................................130
iLO MP Firmware Update.............................................................................................................130
Help...............................................................................................................................................130
Display System ID.........................................................................................................................131
Inactivity Timeout.........................................................................................................................131
Configure LAN Console................................................................................................................131
Configure LDAP Parameters.........................................................................................................131
Locator LED Status........................................................................................................................132
LAN Status.....................................................................................................................................132
Return to Main Menu....................................................................................................................132
Power Control................................................................................................................................132
Power Status..................................................................................................................................132
Reset BMC......................................................................................................................................132
Reset System..................................................................................................................................132
Set Access.......................................................................................................................................133
Display Logs..................................................................................................................................133
Security Options............................................................................................................................134
System Status.................................................................................................................................134
Firmware Revision Status..............................................................................................................134
Transfer Of Control........................................................................................................................134
Tell..................................................................................................................................................134
User Configuration........................................................................................................................134
Virtual Front Panel.........................................................................................................................135
Who................................................................................................................................................135
Exit from MP..................................................................................................................................135
Diagnostics.....................................................................................................................................135
Index...............................................................................................................................137
8
Table of Contents
List of Figures
1-1
1-2
1-3
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-13
4-14
4-15
4-16
4-17
4-18
4-19
4-20
5-1
5-2
C-1
Front View of the BL860c Server Blade.........................................................................................20
SAS Disk Drive Slots.....................................................................................................................21
Top View of the BL860c Server Blade (access cover removed).....................................................22
Server Blade FRont View...............................................................................................................26
Front Panel View of the BL860c Server Blade...............................................................................27
SAS Disk Drive LEDs....................................................................................................................28
Front Panel Controls and Ports.....................................................................................................28
SUV Cable Ports............................................................................................................................29
BL860c Server Blade Rear Panel Connectors.................................................................................30
Removing a SAS Disk Drive..........................................................................................................35
Removing a Disk Drive Blank.......................................................................................................36
Removing the Server Blade from the Enclosure...........................................................................38
Removing the Server Blade Access Panel......................................................................................39
Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel......................................................................................40
DIMM Slot Locations.....................................................................................................................41
Removing the Processor Module on the Server Blade Board.......................................................43
ZIF Socket on the Processor...........................................................................................................43
Processor Module..........................................................................................................................44
Alignment Holes in Processor Slot 0.............................................................................................44
ZIF Socket on Processor Slot 0.......................................................................................................45
Installing a Processor in Slot 0.......................................................................................................45
Removing the SAS Backplane.......................................................................................................46
Removing the Front Display Assembly Housing Screws.............................................................47
Removing the Front Display Assembly from the Front of the Server Blade................................47
System Battery Location................................................................................................................48
Server Blade with All Three Mezzanine Cards Installed..............................................................49
Air Baffle Locations.......................................................................................................................51
Trusted Platform Module Location...............................................................................................51
System Board.................................................................................................................................51
Server Blade Front Panel LEDs......................................................................................................59
SAS Disk Drive LEDs....................................................................................................................71
EFI Boot Sequence.........................................................................................................................99
9
10
List of Tables
1
2
1-1
1-2
2-1
3-1
4-1
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-5
5-6
5-7
5-8
5-9
5-10
5-11
5-12
5-13
5-14
5-15
5-16
5-17
A-1
C-1
C-2
C-3
C-4
C-5
C-6
C-7
C-8
Publishing History Details............................................................................................................15
HP-UX 11i Releases.......................................................................................................................16
Server Dimensions.........................................................................................................................19
Server Blade Memory Array Capacities........................................................................................23
Integrity BL860c Server Blade Front Panel....................................................................................27
Power States...................................................................................................................................31
BL860c Server Blade Memory Array Capacities...........................................................................42
Troubleshooting Entry Points .......................................................................................................55
Basic Front Panel LED Troubleshooting States.............................................................................55
Basic Low End Troubleshooting....................................................................................................56
Advanced Low End Troubleshooting...........................................................................................57
Server Blade Front Panel LEDs......................................................................................................59
Locator LED Status........................................................................................................................60
System Health LED States.............................................................................................................60
Internal Health LED States............................................................................................................60
NIC LEDs.......................................................................................................................................61
Online Support Tools List..............................................................................................................62
Offline Support Tools List.............................................................................................................62
General Diagnostic Tools List........................................................................................................63
Rope-to-ACPI Paths.......................................................................................................................70
SAS Disk Drive LEDs....................................................................................................................71
1GB LAN States.............................................................................................................................72
Normal Boot Process LED States...................................................................................................72
Blade Server Environmental Specifications..................................................................................74
FRU List ........................................................................................................................................77
EFI Commands............................................................................................................................100
Communications Parameters......................................................................................................104
Server Blade Sockets....................................................................................................................120
Server Blade Drives.....................................................................................................................120
Console Output Devices..............................................................................................................123
Console Input Devices.................................................................................................................124
iLO MP Commands and Descriptions........................................................................................126
Alert Levels..................................................................................................................................133
11
12
List of Examples
C-1
C-2
C-3
C-4
C-5
C-6
C-7
C-8
C-9
C-10
C-11
C-12
C-13
C-14
C-15
C-16
C-17
C-18
C-19
C-20
C-21
C-22
C-23
nvrambkp -h..................................................................................................................................98
help Command............................................................................................................................103
help bch Command.....................................................................................................................103
help configuration Command.....................................................................................................103
help cpuconfig Command...........................................................................................................104
boottest Command......................................................................................................................105
boottest early_cpu off Command................................................................................................105
cpuconfig Command...................................................................................................................106
cpuconfig 2 Command................................................................................................................106
conconfig Command...................................................................................................................106
conconfig 2 primaryCommand...................................................................................................107
conconfig 3 offCommand............................................................................................................107
conconfig 3 onCommand.............................................................................................................107
info all Command........................................................................................................................109
info cpu Command......................................................................................................................111
info mem Command....................................................................................................................111
info io Command.........................................................................................................................111
info boot Command.....................................................................................................................112
lanaddress Command..................................................................................................................112
monarch Command.....................................................................................................................113
pdt Command..............................................................................................................................114
pdt clear Command.....................................................................................................................114
sysmode Command.....................................................................................................................115
13
14
About This Document
This document provides information and instructions on servicing the HP Integrity BL860c server
blade.
The document printing date and part number indicate the document’s current edition. The
printing date changes when a new edition is printed. Minor changes may be made at reprint
without changing the printing date. The document part number changes when extensive changes
are made.
Document updates may be issued between editions to correct errors or document product changes.
To ensure that you receive the updated or new editions, you should subscribe to the appropriate
product support service. See your HP sales representative for details.
The latest version of this document can be found on line at http://www.docs.hp.com.
Intended Audience
This document is intended to provide technical product and support information for authorized
service providers, system administrators, and HP support personnel.
This document is not a tutorial.
New and Changed Information in This Edition
This is a new document as part of the HP Integrity BL860c Server Blade release.
Publishing History
The publishing history below identifies the edition dates of this manual. Updates are made to
this publication on an unscheduled, as needed, basis. The updates will consist of a complete
replacement manual and pertinent online or CD documentation.
Table 1 Publishing History Details
Document
Operating Systems
Manufacturing Part Supported
Number
Supported Product Versions
Publication Date
AD217-9005A
HP-UX
BL860c
February 2007
AD217-9011A
HP-UX, HP OpenVMS,
Linux®, and Windows®
BL860c
June 2007
Document Organization
This guide is divided into the following chapters.
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Appendix A
Introduction Use this chapter to learn about the features and specifications of
the HP Integrity BL860c server blade.
Controls, Ports, and LEDs Use this chapter to learn about the locations of the
external controls, ports, and LEDs on the server blade.
Powering Off and Powering On the Server Use this chapter to learn about powering
the server off and on.
Removing and Replacing Components Use this chapter to learn how to remove
and replace the field replaceable components (FRUs) on the server blade.
Troubleshooting Use this chapter to learn about troubleshooting problems you
may encounter with the server blade.
Parts Information Use this appendix to learn the location and part numbers of
the server blade components.
Intended Audience
15
Appendix B
Operating System Boot and Shutdown Use this appendix to learn about booting
and shutting down the operating system on the server blade.
Utilities Use this appendix for information regarding the utilities available for
the server blade.
Console Setup and Connection Use this appendix to learn about the the process
for setting up a console session and connecting to the server blade.
Appendix C
Appendix D
Typographic Conventions
This document uses the following conventions.
WARNING!
A warning lists requirements that you must meet to avoid personal injury.
CAUTION: A caution provides information required to avoid losing data or avoid losing system
functionality.
NOTE: A note highlights useful information such as restrictions, recommendations, or important
details about HP product features.
Book Title
KeyCap
Emphasis
Bold
Bold
ComputerOut
UserInput
Command
Option
Screen Output
[]
{}
...
|
The title of a book. On the Web and on the Instant Information CD, it may
be a hot link to the book itself.
The name of a keyboard key or graphical interface item (such as buttons,
tabs, and menu items). Note that Return and Enter both refer to the same
key.
Text that is emphasized.
Text that is strongly emphasized.
The defined use of an important word or phrase.
Text displayed by the computer.
Commands and other text that you type.
A command name or qualified command phrase.
An available option.
Example of computer screen output.
The contents are optional in formats and command descriptions. If the
contents are a list separated by |, you must select one of the items.
The contents are required in formats and command descriptions. If the
contents are a list separated by |, you must select one of the items.
The preceding element may be repeated an arbitrary number of times.
Separates items in a list of choices.
HP-UX Release Name and Release Identifier
Each HP-UX 11i release has an associated release name and release identifier. The uname( 1)
command with the -r option returns the release identifier. This table shows the releases available
for the BL860c server blade.
Table 2 HP-UX 11i Releases
16
Release Identifier
Release Name
Supported Processor Architecture
B.11.23
HP-UX 11i v 2.0
Intel Itanium
About This Document
Related Documents
You can find other information on HP server hardware management and diagnostic support
tools in the following publications.
Web Site for HP Technical Documentation:
Server Hardware Information:
http://docs.hp.com
http://docs.hp.com/hpux/hw/
Windows Operating System Information
You can find information about administration of the
Microsoft Windows operating system at the following Web sites, among others:
• http://docs.hp.com/windows_nt/
• http://www.microsoft.com/technet/
Diagnostics and Event Monitoring: Hardware Support Tools
Complete information about HP’s
hardware support tools, including online and offline diagnostics and event monitoring tools, is
at the http://docs.hp.com/hpux/diag/ Web site. This site has manuals, tutorials, FAQs,
and other reference material.
Web Site for HP Technical Support:
http://us-support2.external.hp.com/
Books about HP-UX Published by Prentice Hall
The http://www.hp.com/hpbooks/ Web
site lists the HP books that Prentice Hall currently publishes, such as HP-UX books including:
• HP-UX 11i System Administration Handbook
http://www.hp.com/hpbooks/prentice/ptr_0130600814.html
•
HP-UX Virtual Partitions
http://www.hp.com/hpbooks/prentice/ptr_0130352128.html
HP Books are available worldwide through bookstores, online booksellers, and office and
computer stores.
HP Encourages Your Comments
HP encourages your comments concerning this document. We are truly committed to providing
documentation that meets your needs.
Please send comments to: netinfo_feedback@cup.hp.com.
Please include title, manufacturing part number, and any comment, error found, or suggestion
for improvement you have concerning this document. Also, please include what we did right
so we can incorporate it into other documents.
Related Documents
17
18
1 Introduction
The HP Integrity BL860c server blade is a dense, low-cost, c-Class Intel® Itanium ® Dual-Core
server blade. The BL860c server blade supports the HP-UX, OpenVMS, Windows, and Linux
operating systems. The BL860c server blade is designed for commercial server blade customers
deploying c-Class blade enclosures. The BL860c server blade is consistent with other full-slot,
single-width c-Class blades.
NOTE: This documentation is based on the assumption that the c-Class server blade enclosure
is powered on and running properly, and that the Onboard Administrator Integrated Lights Out
(OA iLO) is operational.
This chapter addresses the following topics:
• “Server Blade Overview” (page 19)
• “Server Blade Components” (page 19)
• “SAS Backplane” (page 22)
• “I/O Subsystem” (page 23)
• “Memory Subsystem” (page 23)
• “Power Subsystem (on System Board)” (page 24)
• “CPU / Core Electronics Complex” (page 24)
• “Enclosure Information” (page 24)
Server Blade Overview
The server blade supports up to two Intel Itanium (200 MHz front side bus [FSB]) dual-core
processors. The server blade supports up to 48 GB of memory (using twelve 4 GB, PC2–4200
DIMMs), two hot-pluggable serial-attached SCSI (SAS) disk drives, and up to three mezzanine
I/O cards.
Server Blade Dimensions
Table 1-1 shows the dimensions and weight of the server blade.
Table 1-1 Server Dimensions
Dimensions
Value
Height
36.63 cm (14.42 in.)
Width
5.14 cm (2.025 in.)
Depth
48.51 cm (19.1 in.)
Weight
Unloaded: 8.6 kg (19 lb.)
Fully loaded: 11.3 kg (25 lb.)
Server Blade Components
The following sections detail the components of the server blade. The components are shown in
a front view and a top view. See Figure 1-1for the front view, and see Figure 1-3 (page 22)for
the top view
Front View
The server blade features include the following components:
•
Front bezel: The front bezel assembly provides air vents and electromagnetic interference
(EMI) containment features. The front bezel provides the HP logo, matching family product
Server Blade Overview
19
•
•
•
•
color scheme, and branding name. The display panel LEDs indicate unit ID, power status,
LAN status, and overall server blade health.
Two hot-plug SAS disk drives: These SAS disk drives each have their own carrier. These
SAS disk drives can be removed and replaced without removing the bezel.
Serial, USB, video (SUV) cable port
Power button
Blade extraction lever (to remove and replace blade)
Figure 1-1 Front View of the BL860c Server Blade
1
2
3
20
SAS disk drives
Front panel LEDs
Power button
Introduction
4
5
Blade extraction handle
SUV cable port
SAS Disk Drives
There are two SAS disk drive slots on the BL860c server blade. The SAS disk drives have identical
LEDs that show the status of the SAS hard disk drives.
See Figure 1-2 for the slot numbers of the SAS hard disk drives.
Figure 1-2 SAS Disk Drive Slots
See Figure 2-3 for locations of the SAS disk drive LEDs.
Top View (with access cover removed)
There is one removable access cover located on the right side of the server blade. This cover gives
access to the internal components of the server blade. See Figure 1-3 for their location:
Server Blade Components
21
Figure 1-3 Top View of the BL860c Server Blade (access cover removed)
1
2
3
4
5
Memory DIMMs
System board
Mezzanine card 1
Mezzanine card 2
Mezzanine card 3
6
7
8
9
10
Processors
System board
Trusted Platform module
Front display panel
SAS disk drives
The following field replaceable components (FRUs) are also accessible when the access cover is
removed:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Processors
Memory DIMMs
Mezzanine cards
SAS backplane
Front display panel
System board
None of these items are hot-swappable. They are only accessible when the server blade is removed
from the enclosure.
SAS Backplane
The SAS disk backplane supports two small form factor (SFF) hard disk drives. The backplane
supports hot-plugging a single SAS drive at a time. The activity LEDs and drive present LEDs
shall be controlled by a pre-programmed system-on-chip (PSOC). The system board supplies 12
22
Introduction
V, 5 V, and 3.3 V standby power to the backplane and hosts the SAS controller. The backplane
is designed as a field replaceable unit.
The connection mechanism between the system board and the SAS backplane is through a right
angle connector. This connector is specifically designed for high-speed differential applications,
and supports system speeds up to 5 Gigabits per second and beyond. Power, Sense, and I2C
signals are routed through this connector along with the SAS differential pairs and SGPIO signals.
I/O Subsystem
The I/O subsystem is composed of built in I/O and up to three mezzanine cards. The server blade
does not support PCI Hot Plug (PHP). Two type II and one type I mezzanine cards are supported
with PCI express links, which serves as a bridge between the ZX2 ropes links and PCI-e.
For the system board fast and slow core I/O, memory controllers are used as the ropes to PCI
bridge. Two memory controllers are used to interface to the Core LAN and SAS. The memory
controllers run at 33 MHz and are used to interface with the manageability, USB, and graphics
through the SUV cable. The serial, USB, and video are provided through the PCI devices attached
to logical rope 0.
Memory Subsystem
The server blade physical memory layout includes the PC2-4200 Double Data Rate Synchronous
Dynamic Random Access Memory (DDR2 SDRAM) DIMMs, along with the memory bus traces
and required termination. The memory subsystem supports only DDR 2 SDRAM technology
utilizing industry-standard PC2-4200 type DIMMs. The DIMMs use a 184-pin JEDEC standard
connector. The server blade memory subsystem provides two memory cells; each cell is 144 bits
wide each (128 bits of data, 16 bits of ECC). Each cell has six DIMM slots; and there are 12 DIMM
slots (six DIMMs per cell). All 12 DIMM slots are shared by both processors.
The minimum amount of memory supported in the server blade is 1 GB (two 512 MB DIMMs).
The maximum amount of memory supported in the server blade is 48 GB (twelve 4 GB DIMMs).
The DIMMs used in the server blade are low-profile (1.2” tall) DIMMs. The DIMMs are standard
PC2-4200 registered DIMMs. Only DIMMs qualified by HP are supported.
DIMMs
The memory subsystem supports only DDR2 SDRAM technology utilizing industry-standard
1.2” high PC2-4200 DIMMs. The DIMMs use a 184-pin JEDEC standard connector. You must
load the DIMMs in pairs. To enable chip sparing, load the DIMM in pairs (both DIMMs must be
the same capacity). Table 1-2 summarizes the BL860c server blade memory solutions
Table 1-2 Server Blade Memory Array Capacities
Min / Max Memory Size
Single DIMM Sizes
1 GB / 6 GB
512 MB DIMM
2 GB / 12 GB
1 GB DIMM
4 GB / 24 GB
2 GB DIMM
8 GB / 48 GB
4 GB DIMM
I/O Subsystem
23
NOTE: Loading DIMMs as a pair (two identical DIMMs) enables lock-step mode and chip
sparing.
Load DIMMs from highest capacity to lowest capacity (for example, load 4 GB DIMMs first, then
2 GB DIMMs, then 1 GB DIMMs). Load memory DIMMs into slots 0A and 0B first.
Power Subsystem (on System Board)
Each server blade receives bulk DC voltage from the enclosure. Bulk DC voltage is then converted
to the required DC voltages needed by the server blade’s power block.
The BL860c server blade receives 12 V directly from the enclosure. This passes through E-Fuse
circuitry that resides in the blade. The 12 V supply is always on as long as a power supply is
installed in the enclosure. A control line from the enclosure administrator (OA) can turn on or
off the E-Fuse to supply or cut power to the blade. The 12 V then gets distributed to various
point-of-load (POL) converters. The switched POL voltage rails are 0.9 V, 1.2 V, 1.5 V, 1.8 V, 2.5
V, 3.3 V, 5.0 V, 3.3 V standby, and 5.0 V standby.
CPU / Core Electronics Complex
The BL860c processor subsystem accommodates 1 or 2 Itanium processor modules. It consists
of the ZX2 CEC front side bus, memory and I/O controller; system clock generation and
distribution; multiple POL converters, I2C circuitry for manageability and fault detection; JTAG
Boundary Scan for manufacturing test; and the Intel In-Target Probe interface for system
development and debug.
The speed of the front side bus is 267 MHz. The ZX2 CEC and the processor modules are located
on the system board. Each processor connects to the board through a Zero Insertion Force (ZIF)
socket. Heatsinks, CPU metal frames and bolster plates are part of the mechanical attach
requirements for the CPUs and ZX2.
Enclosure Information
This installation document only covers the BL860c server blade itself, and does not include any
specific server blade enclosure information. For server blade enclosure information, go to:
http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c00698286/c00698286.pdf.
24
Introduction
2 Controls, Ports, and LEDs
This chapter describes the controls, ports, and LEDs found on the front panel and rear panel of
your HP Integrity server blade.
This chapter addresses the following topics:
•
•
•
“Front Panel” (page 25)
“Rear Panel” (page 29)
“SUV Cable” (page 29)
For more information on LED functions and descriptions, see Chapter 5: “Troubleshooting”
(page 53).
Front Panel
The server blade has seven system LEDs, one power button, two reset buttons, and SAS disk
drive LEDs and one front panel port that accepts the serial, USB, video (SUV) cable, for
configuration and troubleshooting purposes. Figure 2-1 shows the LEDs, ports, and controls on
the front panel of the server blade..
Front Panel
25
Figure 2-1 Server Blade FRont View
1
2
SAS disk drives
Front panel LEDs
3
4
Power button
Blade extraction handle
5
SUV cable port
CAUTION: Disconnect the local I/O cable from the I/O port when not in use. The connector is
not designed to provide a permanent connection.
Front Panel LEDs
The server blade contains seven LEDs on the front panel that indicate the server status.
Use Figure 2-2 to locate the front panel LEDs.
26
Controls, Ports, and LEDs
Figure 2-2 Front Panel View of the BL860c Server Blade
1
2
3
UID LED
System health LED
Internal health LED
4
5
NIC 1 LED
NIC 2 LED
6
7
NIC 3 LED
NIC 4 LED
Table 2-1 details the functions of the front panel LEDs.
Table 2-1 Integrity BL860c Server Blade Front Panel
Item
LED Description
1
Unit identification (UID)
2
System health
3
Internal health
4
NIC 1
5
NIC 2
6
NIC 3
7
NIC 4
SAS Disk Drive LEDs
There are two SAS disk drives on the BL860c server blade. They have identical LEDs that show
the status of the SAS hard disk drives.
See Figure 2-3 for locations of the SAS disk drive LEDs.
Front Panel
27
Figure 2-3 SAS Disk Drive LEDs
1
Activity LED
2
Status LED
Controls and Ports
The following section identifies the locations and functions of the front panel controls and ports.
The power button, and server blade extraction lever, and the SUV cable port are located on the
front of the server. . For more information about the power button and server blade power states,
see Chapter 3: “Power Off and Power On the Server” (page 31).
Figure 2-4 Front Panel Controls and Ports
1
2
28
Extraction lever release
button
Power button
Controls, Ports, and LEDs
3
4
iLO MP reset pinhole
button
Extraction lever
5
6
SUV port
Init (ToC) pinhole button
SUV Cable
The HP Integrity BL860c server blade has a serial, USB, and video (SUV) cable included with the
server blade. Use the SUV cable to connect the server to external devices, such as: a terminal
emulator, an external DVD drive, or a monitor. The SUV cable attaches to the front of the server
blade in the SUV cable port. Figure 2-5 shows the SUV cable attached to the server blade.
CAUTION:
The SUV cable is not designed to be used as a permanent connection.
Use caution when walking near the server blade when the SUV cable is installed. Hitting or
bumping the cable can cause the port on the server blade to break. This can damage the system
board, and it will need to be replaced.
Figure 2-5 SUV Cable Ports
1
Serial port
2
USB ports (2)
3
Video port
Rear Panel
See Figure 2-6 to identify the server blade rear panel connectors.
Rear Panel
29
Figure 2-6 BL860c Server Blade Rear Panel Connectors
1
30
GBX signal connector
Controls, Ports, and LEDs
2
Power connector
3 Power Off and Power On the Server
This chapter provides information on how to power off and power on the server blade.
The following sections are included in this chapter:
•
•
•
“Power States” (page 31)
“Power Off the Server” (page 31)
“Power On the Server” (page 32)
Power States
The HP Integrity BL860c server blade has three power states: standby power, full power, and
off. You must install the server blade into the enclosure to achieve the standby and full power
states. Depending on your server blade settings, the server blade may go to standby power mode
(internal health LED is amber); or straight to full power (internal health LED is green) when it
is installed into the enclosure. The enclosure should always have power applied to it, so the only
way to remove all power from the server blade is to remove it from the enclosure. Table 3-1
describes the server power states:
Table 3-1 Power States
Power States
Server Blade Installed Front Panel Power
in Enclosure?
Button Activated?
Standby Power
Applied?
DC Power Applied?
Standby power
Yes
No
Yes
No
Full power
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Off
No
No
No
No
Power Off the Server
The following procedure describes how to power off your BL860c server blade.
1.
Gracefully shut down your OS by pressing the power button (for less than five seconds).
IMPORTANT: Momentarily pressing the power button initiates an ACPI graceful shutdown
of the server blade. This process can take as long as 30 seconds, during which time the only
observable feedback is the blinking disk activity light. The system power goes to standby
mode. When the system goes into standby mode, the power LED turns from green to amber.
Holding the power button for five seconds forces a sudden power-off. This should only be
used if the system has hung, and does not respond to a graceful power-off. Data loss may
occur depending on the current state and activity of the system.
2.
The server blade is now in standby power mode. To remove all power to the server blade,
remove the server blade from the enclosure. See “Removing and Replacing the Server Blade
from the Enclosure” (page 37).
Power States
31
Power On the Server
The following procedure describes how to power on your server blade.
1.
Install your server blade into the server blade enclosure. See “Replacing the Server Blade
into the Enclosure” (page 38).
Depending on your server blade settings, installing the server blade may either go to standby
power mode, or go to full power and start the boot process.
2.
3.
32
If the server blade is in standby mode, press the power button to get your server to full
power.
Start your operating system (if not already autobooting). See Appendix B (page 79), or your
operating system documentation for more information.
Power Off and Power On the Server
4 Removing and Replacing Components
This chapter provides information on removing and replacing components in your HP Integrity
BL860c server blade.
The following sections are included in this chapter:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
“Service Tools Required” (page 33)
“Removing and Replacing a Hot–Plug SAS Disk Drive” (page 34)
“Preparing the Server Blade for Servicing” (page 36)
“Removing and Replacing the Server Blade from the Enclosure” (page 37)
“Removing and Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 38)
“Removing and Replacing Internal Components” (page 40)
“Removing and Replacing DIMMs” (page 40)
“Removing and Replacing a Processor” (page 42)
“Removing and Replacing the SAS Backplane” (page 45)
“Removing and Replacing the Front Display Assembly” (page 46)
“Removing and Replacing the System Battery” (page 47)
“Removing and Replacing the Mezzanine Cards” (page 49)
“Removing and Replacing the System Board” (page 50)
Safety Information
Use care to prevent injury and equipment damage when performing removal and replacement
procedures. Many assemblies are sensitive to damage by electrostatic discharge.
Follow the procedures listed below to ensure safe handling of components, to prevent injury,
and to prevent damage to the HP Integrity server blade:
•
•
•
•
•
When removing or installing any server component, follow the instructions provided in this
guide
Do not wear loose clothing that might snag or catch on the server or on other items
Do not wear clothing subject to static charge build-up, such as wool or synthetic materials
If installing an internal assembly, wear an antistatic wrist strap and use a grounding mat,
such as those included in the Electrically Conductive Field Service Grounding Kit
Handle components by the edges only. Do not touch any metal-edge connectors or any
electrical components on accessory boards
Service Tools Required
Service of this product may require one or more of the following tools:
•
IPF CPU Install Tool Kit, consisting of:
• Disposable ESD Kit
• Labelless CPU install tool (2.5mm hex and Torx 15)
•
•
•
•
1/4-inch flat blade screwdriver
Phillips No. 1 screwdriver
ACX-10 Torx screwdriver
ACX-15 Torx screwdriver
Safety Information
33
NOTE: None of the internal components are hot-swappable because they are not accessible
unless the server blade is removed from the server blade enclosure.
Removing and Replacing a Hot–Plug SAS Disk Drive
The only hot–plug devices in the server blade are the SAS disk drives. The following procedures
show how to remove and replace the SAS disk drives. You do not need to remove the server
blade from the enclosure to replace a SAS disk drive. To assess hard drive status, observe the
SAS disk drive status LEDs. For an explanation of these LEDs, see “SAS Disk Drive LEDs”
(page 71).
IMPORTANT:
disk drive.
Ensure a complete data backup has been performed prior to removing a SAS
If disk drive mirroring is enabled, then it is not necessary to power down the server blade before
removing or replacing a SAS disk drive. If mirroring is not enabled, perform a graceful OS
shutdown before removing a hard drive to protect data.
You do not need to remove the server blade from the enclosure to remove and replace a SAS
disk drive.
Removing a SAS Disk Drive
To remove a SAS disk drive, perform the following steps:
1.
2.
3.
34
Press the release button (1). See Figure 4-1.
Open the ejector lever (2).
Slide the SAS disk drive out of the drive cage (3).
Removing and Replacing Components
Figure 4-1 Removing a SAS Disk Drive
CAUTION: Always populate hard drive bays with either a SAS disk drive or a hard drive blank.
Operating the server blade without a SAS disk drive or disk drive blank results in improper
airflow and improper cooling, which leads to thermal damage.
Replacing a SAS Disk Drive
To replace a SAS disk drive, perform the following steps:
1.
2.
Slide the drive into the cage until it is fully seated.
Close the lever to lock the drive into place.
Removing and Replacing Disk Drive Blanks
The server blade has two disk drive bays. If you only purchased one hard drive, your server
blade has a hard drive blank installed. Hard drive blanks are used to maintain proper airflow
throughout the server blade.
CAUTION: Always populate hard drive bays with either a SAS disk drive or a disk drive blank.
Operating the server blade without a SAS disk drive or disk drive blank results in improper
airflow, which leads to thermal damage.
Removing a Disk Drive Blank
To remove a disk drive blank, perform the following steps:
1.
2.
Press the release buttons simultaneously (1). See Figure 4-2.
Pull the blank out of the disk drive bay.
Removing and Replacing a Hot–Plug SAS Disk Drive
35
Figure 4-2 Removing a Disk Drive Blank
Replacing a Disk Drive Blank
To replace the hard drive blank, slide the blank into the bay until it locks into place. The hard
drive blank is keyed to fit only one way.
Preparing the Server Blade for Servicing
To service any internal server blade component, power down the server blade and remove it
from the server blade enclosure.
CAUTION: Electrostatic discharge can damage electronic components. Be sure you are properly
grounded before beginning any installation procedure. For more information, see the “Safety
Information” (page 33).
Power Off the Server Blade
System power in the server blade does not completely shut off with the front panel power switch,
or the Virtual Power Button feature. The function toggles between on and standby modes, rather
than on and off. The standby position removes power from most electronics and the drives, but
portions of the power supply and some internal circuitry remain active.
WARNING! Before proceeding with any maintenance or service on a server that requires
physical contact with electrical or electronic components, be sure that either power is removed
or safety precautions are followed to protect against electric shock and equipment damage.
Observe all WARNING and CAUTION labels on equipment.
To service internal server blade components:
1.
2.
36
Identify the proper server blade in the server blade enclosure. The enclosure slots are
numbered Bay 1 one through Bay 16 from left to right.
Remove power from the server blade in one of the following ways:
• Use the iLO Virtual Power Button feature in the Remote Console to power off the server
blade from a remote location. It may take up to 30 seconds for the server blade reach
standby mode. Wait for the power LED to go from green to amber.
• Press the power button on the front of the server blade. It may take up to 30 seconds
for the server blade to reach standby. Wait for the power LED to go from green to amber.
Removing and Replacing Components
Removing and Replacing the Server Blade from the Enclosure
Use the following procedures to remove and replace the server blade from the enclosure.
Removing the Server Blade from the Enclosure
Perform the following steps to remove the server blade from the enclosure:
1.
Press the release button (1). See Figure 4-3.
CAUTION: After you press the release button, the server blade is unlocked from the
enclosure. Use both hands to support the server blade when you remove it from the rack.
The server blade weighs approximately 9 kg (20 lb.).
NOTE: The enclosure fans may still be running when the server blade is in standby mode.
Opening the lever removes all power from the server blade.
2.
3.
Open the lever (2).
Grasp the lever and slide the server blade from the enclosure (3). Place a hand under the
server blade to support it as you remove it from the enclosure.
Removing and Replacing the Server Blade from the Enclosure
37
Figure 4-3 Removing the Server Blade from the Enclosure
4.
Place the server blade on a flat, level, antistatic surface.
CAUTION: Always populate server blade enclosure bays with either a server blade or
server blade blank. Operating the enclosure without a server blade or server blade blank
results in improper airflow and improper cooling, which can lead to thermal damage.
Replacing the Server Blade into the Enclosure
Use the following procedure to replace the server blade into the enclosure:
1.
2.
Slide the server blade back into the enclosure.
Close the lever.
NOTE: Once you install the server blade back into the enclosure, the server blade may go
to standby power (Internal health LED is amber), or full power (internal health LED is green,
and the fans may get louder).
3.
If the server blade, has not come up to full power, push the power button to get the server
to full power.
The fans may get much louder as the server powers up to full power.
Removing and Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel
The access panel is located on the right side of the server blade (when mounted in an enclosure).
Removing the Server Blade Access Panel
To remove the access panel, perform the following steps:
38
Removing and Replacing Components
1.
2.
3.
4.
Power off the server blade and remove it from the server blade enclosure. See “Preparing
the Server Blade for Servicing” (page 36).
Unlock the cam on the access panel latch (if necessary) by turning the lock on the latch
counter-clockwise with a 2.5 mm allen wrench.
Pull up on the access panel latch (1). This causes the access panel to slide back about 1.75
cm (0.75 in.).Figure 4-4.
Lift the access panel straight up off the server blade to remove it (2).
Figure 4-4 Removing the Server Blade Access Panel
Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel
To replace the access panel, perform the following steps:
1.
2.
3.
Place the access panel on the blade with the panel hanging over the back of the enclosure
about 1.25 cm (0.5 in), and slide the access panel toward the front of the server until the
thumb indentations click into place (1). See Figure 4-5
Tighten the thumbscrew (2).
Place the server blade back into the enclosure and power it on. See “Preparing the Server
Blade for Servicing” (page 36).
Removing and Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel
39
Figure 4-5 Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel
Removing and Replacing Internal Components
These procedures detail how to remove and replace the internal components in the server blade.
The server blade contains the following field replaceable components (FRUs):
•
•
•
•
•
•
DIMMs
Processors
SAS backplane
Front display board
Mezzanine cards
System board
NOTE: The server blade must be removed from the enclosure to access the internal components,
therefore, no internal devices are hot-swappable or hot-pluggable in the server blade.
Removing and Replacing DIMMs
There are 12 DIMM slots located on the system board. The following procedures show how to
remove and replace memory DIMMs in the server blade.
Removing a DIMM
Use the following procedure to remove a failed DIMM from the server blade.
1.
2.
Power down the server blade and remove it from the server blade enclosure. See “Preparing
the Server Blade for Servicing” (page 36).
Remove the access panel. See “Removing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 38).
NOTE:
3.
40
The server blade ships with at least two DIMMs installed in slots 0A and 0B.
Locate the DIMM slots on the server blade system board. See Figure 4-6.
Removing and Replacing Components
Figure 4-6 DIMM Slot Locations
4.
5.
Open the DIMM slot latches for the DIMM you are removing.
Remove the DIMM from the slot.
IMPORTANT:
match.
Always install DIMMs in identical pairs. DIMM sizes within each pair must
DIMMs do not seat fully if turned the wrong way.
DIMM Load Order
The DIMM load order is as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Load slots DIMM 0A and DIMM 0B first
Load slots DIMM 1A and DIMM 1B second
Load slots DIMM 2A and DIMM 2B third
Load slots DIMM 3A and DIMM 3B forth
Load slots DIMM 4A and DIMM 4B fifth
Load slots DIMM 5A and DIMM 5B sixth
The server blade uses a minimum of 1 GB of memory (two 512 MB DIMMs), and a maximum of
48 GB of memory (twelve 4 GB DIMMs). If you have purchased additional memory, use these
procedures to install more memory into your server blade.
NOTE: Load DIMMs from highest capacity to lowest capacity (for example, load 4 GB DIMMs
first, then 2 GB DIMMs, then 1 GB DIMMs).
The memory subsystem supports chip spare functionality. The DIMMs in a pair must be identical
to enable chip sparing. Chip sparing enables an entire SDRAM chip on a DIMM to be bypassed
(logically replaced) in the event that a multi-bit error is detected on that SDRAM.
In order to use the chip spare functionality, use only DIMMs built with the same HP part numbers.
These DIMMs must be loaded in pairs.
DIMM Configuration
The memory subsystem supports only Double Data Rate Synchronous Dynamic Random Access
Memory (DDR SDRAM) technology utilizing industry-standard PC2–4200 type DDR SDRAM
DIMMs, 1.2 inches tall, using a 184-pin JEDEC standard connector. In the server blade, you must
load the DIMMs in pairs. To enable chip sparing, you must four DIMMs of the same capacity
and configuration. Table 4-1 summarizes the server blade memory solutions.
Removing and Replacing DIMMs
41
Table 4-1 BL860c Server Blade Memory Array Capacities
Min / Max Memory Size
Single DIMM Sizes
1 GB / 2 GB
512 MB DIMM
2 GB / 4 GB
1 GB DIMM
4 GB / 8 GB
2 GB DIMM
4 GB DIMM
NOTE: Loading DIMMs as pairs (two identical DIMMs) enables lock-step mode and chip
sparing.
Replacing a DIMM
Use the following procedure to replace a DIMM.
1.
Ensure the DIMM slot latches are open.
CAUTION: Use only HP low-profile (1.2 in.) DIMMs. DIMMs from other sources may
adversely affect data integrity.
2.
3.
4.
Insert the DIMM into the slot and push down until the latches click shut.
Replace the access panel. See the “Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 39).
Place the server blade into the enclosure. See “Replacing the Server Blade into the Enclosure”
(page 38).
Removing and Replacing a Processor
Use the following procedures to remove and replace a processor in the server blade.
NOTE: The processor load order is processor slot 0, then processor slot 1. The processor slot 0
is the slot closest to the edge of the chassis. See Figure 4-7 for CPU slot locations.
Removing a Processor
To remove a processor, perform the following steps (removing processor 0 is shown in this
procedure):
NOTE: If you are only adding a processor, remove the dust cover from the processor socket,
and proceed to “Replacing a Processor” (page 43).
1.
2.
3.
4.
42
Power off the server, and remove it from the enclosure. See “Preparing the Server Blade for
Servicing” (page 36).
Remove the access panel. See “Removing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 38).
Disconnect the power cable from the processor and power pod module you are removing.
Loosen the captive screws (1 - 2) on the power pod with the (ACX-15) Torx screwdriver.
Removing and Replacing Components
Figure 4-7 Removing the Processor Module on the Server Blade Board
5.
6.
7.
Loosen the captive shoulder screws (3 - 6) on the processor heat sink in the order shown in
Figure 4-7 with the (ACX-15) Torx screwdriver.
Slide the processor sequencer to the right, and hold it in place to uncover the ZIF socket (1).
Unlock the ZIF socket by turning the socket 180º counter clockwise (2). See Figure 4-8.
Figure 4-8 ZIF Socket on the Processor
8.
Carefully remove the processor module by lifting it straight up from the system board. Place
the processor module in an antistatic bag.
Replacing a Processor
To install the processor, perform the following steps:
1.
Ensure the ZIF socket for the processor you are installing is in the open position. Insert the
2.5 mm hex end of the ACX-15 Torx screwdriver into the ZIF socket and gently try to rotate
the socket 180º counter clockwise. If it doesn’t turn, the socket is open.
Removing and Replacing a Processor
43
NOTE:
If you have just removed a processor, then the ZIF socket is unlocked.
Figure 4-9 Processor Module
2.
Carefully insert the processor module into the empty CPU slot (CPU 0 is shown) on the
server blade system board. Line up the guide pins on the processor to the alignment holes
in the processor slot to seat the processor correctly. See Figure 4-10.
Figure 4-10 Alignment Holes in Processor Slot 0
3.
44
Slide the sequencer to the right and hold it there to uncover the ZIF socket. Tighten the ZIF
socket with the 2.5 mm hex end of the processor installation tool. Turn the socket 180º
clockwise. See Figure 4-11.
Removing and Replacing Components
Figure 4-11 ZIF Socket on Processor Slot 0
4.
5.
Tighten the captive shoulder screws (1 - 4) on the processor heat sink in the order shown in
Figure 4-11 with the (ACX-15) Torx screwdriver. See Figure 4-12 (page 45).
Tighten the captive screws (5 - 6) on the power pod with the (ACX-15) Torx screwdriver.
Figure 4-12 Installing a Processor in Slot 0
6.
7.
8.
Connect the power cable to the pod power connector on the processor power pod module.
Install the access panel. See “Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 39).
Place the server blade back into the enclosure and power it up. See “Replacing the Server
Blade into the Enclosure” (page 38).
Removing and Replacing the SAS Backplane
The following procedures details how to remove and replace a failed SAS backplane. The BL860c
backplane supports two serial-attached SCSI (SAS) disk drives on the SAS backplane.
Removing the SAS Backplane
Use the following procedure to remove the failed SAS backplane from the server blade.
1.
2.
3.
Power off the server and remove it from the enclosure. See “Preparing the Server Blade for
Servicing” (page 36).
Remove the access panel. See “Removing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 38).
Remove the SAS disk drives or disk drive blanks. See “Removing a SAS Disk Drive”
(page 34), or “Removing a Disk Drive Blank” (page 35).
Removing and Replacing the SAS Backplane
45
4.
5.
Remove the access panel. See “Removing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 38).
Remove the SAS backplane by lifting it straight out of the server by the backplane handle.
See Figure 4-13.
Figure 4-13 Removing the SAS Backplane
1
SAS backplane
handle
2
SAS backplane
Replacing the SAS Backplane
Use the following procedure to replace new the SAS backplane into the server blade after a SAS
backplane failure..
1.
2.
3.
4.
Slide the SAS backplane into the slot on the system board. See Figure 4-13 (page 46).
Install the SAS disk drives, or disk drive blanks into the server blade. See “Replacing a SAS
Disk Drive” (page 35), or “Replacing a Disk Drive Blank” (page 36).
Install the access panel. See “Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 39).
Place the server blade back into the enclosure and power it up. See “Replacing the Server
Blade into the Enclosure” (page 38).
Removing and Replacing the Front Display Assembly
The following procedures detail how to remove and replace the front display assembly on the
BL860c server blade. The front display assembly is attached to the front of the server blade.
Removing the Front Display Assembly
Use the following procedure to remove the failed front display assembly on the server blade.
1.
2.
3.
46
Power off the server and remove it from the enclosure. See “Preparing the Server Blade for
Servicing” (page 36).
Remove the access panel. See “Removing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 38).
Remove the four screws that hold the front display assembly to the front of the server blade.
There are two screws on each side (1). See Figure 4-14.
Removing and Replacing Components
Figure 4-14 Removing the Front Display Assembly Housing Screws
4.
Remove the front display assembly from the front of the server blade by pulling it straight
off of the front of the server. See Figure 4-15 (page 47).
Figure 4-15 Removing the Front Display Assembly from the Front of the Server Blade
Replacing the Front Display Assembly
Use this procedure to install the new front display assembly into the server blade after a front
display board failure.
1.
2.
3.
Attach the front display assembly to the front of the server blade with the Torx T-15
screwdriver. Make sure the port on the front display assembly is lined up with the plug on
the system board.
Install the access panel. See “Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 39).
Place the server blade back into the enclosure and power it on. See “Replacing the Server
Blade into the Enclosure” (page 38).
Removing and Replacing the System Battery
The following procedures detail how to remove and replace the system battery on the system
board of the HP Integrity BL860c server blade.
Removing the System Battery
Use the following procedure to remove the system battery from the system board.
Removing and Replacing the System Battery
47
1.
2.
3.
4.
Power off the server and remove it from the enclosure. See “Preparing the Server Blade for
Servicing” (page 36).
Remove the access panel. See “Removing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 38).
Note the position of the battery in the socket for the installation of the replacement battery.
Gently pry the system battery out of its socket with your fingers. Move the processor 0 power
cable out of the way if necessary. See Figure 4-16 (page 48).
Figure 4-16 System Battery Location
System battery on the
system board
Dispose of the system battery per your local requirements.
1
5.
Replacing the System Battery
Use the following procedure to remove the system battery from the system board.
1.
2.
3.
48
Install the new system battery by gently pushing the battery into the socket. Move the
processor 0 power cable if necessary.
Install the access panel. See “Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 39).
Place the server blade back into the enclosure and power it on. See “Replacing the Server
Blade into the Enclosure” (page 38).
Removing and Replacing Components
Removing and Replacing the Mezzanine Cards
The following procedures detail how to remove and replace the three mezzanine cards available
on the BL860c server blade. The server blade holds up to three PCI-e mezzanine cards. Slot one
is a PCI-e x4 slot, and slots two and three are PCI-e x8 slots.
Removing a Mezzanine Card
Use the following procedure to remove a mezzanine card from the server blade. See Figure 4-17
(page 49) to determine which card you are replacing.
NOTE: For more information regarding the different cards supported by the BL860c server
blade, see
http://h71028.www7.hp.com/enterprise/cache/316682-0-0-0-121.html?jumpid=reg_R1002_USEN.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Power off the server and remove it from the enclosure. See “Preparing the Server Blade for
Servicing” (page 36).
Remove the access panel. See “Removing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 38).
Unscrew the thumbscrews holding the card you are replacing.
Grasp the mezzanine card by the edges and lift it off of the port.
NOTE: If you are removing mezzanine card one, you need to remove mezzanine card two
to access it (if necessary). Mezzanine card two is installed above mezzanine card one on the
system board.
Figure 4-17 Server Blade with All Three Mezzanine Cards Installed
1
Mezzanine card one,
PCI-e x4
2
Mezzanine card two,
PCI-e x8
3
Mezzanine card three,
PCI-e x8
Replacing a Mezzanine Card
Use this procedure to a mezzanine card on the system board.
Removing and Replacing the Mezzanine Cards
49
NOTE: If you are installing mezzanine card one, you need to remove mezzanine card two to
access it (if necessary). Mezzanine card two is installed above mezzanine card one on the system
board.
For a matrix of supported mezzanine cards, see
http://h71028.www7.hp.com/enterprise/cache/316682-0-0-0-121.html?jumpid=reg_R1002_USEN.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Grasp the mezzanine card by its edges, and line the card up with the post on the system
board. See Figure 4-17 (page 49) for mezzanine card locations on the system board.
Push down on the card right above the port to seat it into the port.
Tighten the three thumbscrews to secure the card to the system board.
Install the access panel. See “Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 39).
Place the server blade back into the enclosure and power it up. See “Replacing the Server
Blade into the Enclosure” (page 38).
Removing and Replacing the System Board
The following procedures detail how to remove and replace the system board from the BL860c
server blade. When a system board fails, you need to remove the following components from
the failed system board (unless they caused the failure), and install them on the new system
board:
• SAS disk drives
• Memory DIMMs
• Processors
• SAS backplane
• Mezzanine cards
• TPM
CAUTION: Electrostatic discharge can damage electronic components. Be sure you are properly
grounded before beginning any removal or installation procedure. See the “Safety Information”
(page 33) for more information.
Removing the System Board
Use this procedure to remove a failed system board in the BL860c server blade.
1.
Power off the server and remove it from the enclosure. See “Preparing the Server Blade for
Servicing” (page 36).
2. Remove the access panel. See “Removing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 38).
3. Remove the hard disk drives. See “Removing a SAS Disk Drive” (page 34).
4. Remove the memory DIMMs. See “Removing a DIMM” (page 40).
5. Remove the processors. See “Removing a Processor” (page 42).
6. Remove the SAS backplane. See “Removing the SAS Backplane” (page 45).
7. Remove the system battery. See “Removing the System Battery” (page 47).
8. Remove the mezzanine cards. See “Removing a Mezzanine Card” (page 49).
9. Remove the controller air baffle from the system board by undoing the tabs and lifting the
air baffle out of the server. See Figure 4-18 (page 51) for the location of the air baffles.
10. Remove the processor air baffle by unsnapping it from the processor frame and lifting the
air baffle out of the server.
50
Removing and Replacing Components
Figure 4-18 Air Baffle Locations
2 Processor air baffle
Controller air baffle
11. Remove the TPM by pulling it straight up and out of the system board. See Figure 4-19
(page 51) for the location of the TPM.
1
Figure 4-19 Trusted Platform Module Location
NOTE:
The system board is attached to the front display panel.
12. Loosen the two captive thumbscrews toward the back of the system board. See Figure 4-20
(page 51) for the thumbscrew locations.
Figure 4-20 System Board
13. Shuttle the system board to the left to disengage the system board from the connectors on
the front display board and the keyways under the system board.
14. Lift the system board out of the server blade.
Replacing the System Board
Use this procedure to install a new system board in the BL860c server blade after a system board
failure.
1.
2.
Install the system board into the server by lining up the keyways on the bottom of the system
board with the pins on the server blade chassis.
Shuttle the system board to the right, and make sure the system board connects to the front
display board.
Removing and Replacing the System Board
51
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
52
Tighten the two thumbscrews on the system board.
Install the TPM. See Figure 4-19 (page 51) for the location of the TPM on the system board.
Install the system battery. See “Replacing the System Battery” (page 48).
Install the air baffles. See Figure 4-18 (page 51).
Install the mezzanine card or cards. See “Replacing a Mezzanine Card” (page 49).
Install the SAS backplane. See “Replacing the SAS Backplane” (page 46).
Install the memory DIMMs. See “Replacing a DIMM” (page 42).
Install the processors. See “Replacing a Processor” (page 43).
Install the hard disk drives. See “Replacing a SAS Disk Drive” (page 35).
Install the access panel. See “Replacing the Server Blade Access Panel” (page 39).
Install the server blade into the enclosure. See “Replacing the Server Blade into the Enclosure”
(page 38).
Removing and Replacing Components
5 Troubleshooting
The purpose of this chapter is to provide a preferred methodology (strategies and procedures)
and tools for troubleshooting server blade error and fault conditions.
The following sections are included in this chapter:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
“Methodology” (page 53)
“Troubleshooting Tools” (page 58)
“Errors and Error Logs” (page 64)
“Supported Configurations” (page 67)
“CPU/Memory/SBA” (page 68)
“Enclosure Information” (page 24)
“Cooling Subsystem” (page 70)
“Communications Module (LBAs, Ropes, and PDH/PCI-X Buses)” (page 70)
“Management Subsystem (iLO MP and BMC)” (page 70)
“I/O Subsystem (SCSI, LAN, FibreChannel, HDD, and Core I/O)” (page 71)
“Boot Process LEDs” (page 72)
“Firmware” (page 72)
“Server Interface (System Console)” (page 73)
“Environment” (page 74)
“Reporting Your Problems to HP” (page 74)
Methodology
General Troubleshooting Methodology
There are multiple entry points to the troubleshooting process, dependent upon your level of
troubleshooting expertise; the tools, processes, and procedures which you have at your disposal;
and the nature of the system fault or failure.
1.
Typically, you select from a set of symptoms, ranging from very simple, system LED is
blinking; to the most difficult, Machine Check Abort (MCA) has occurred. The following is
a list of symptom examples:
• Front Panel LED blinking
• System Alert present on system console
• Server blade won’t power-up
• Server blade won’t boot
• Error/Event Message received
• MCA occurred
2.
Narrow down the observed problem to the specific troubleshooting procedure required.
Isolate the failure to a specific part of the server blade to perform more detailed
troubleshooting. For example:
• Problem- Front Panel LED blinking
Methodology
53
NOTE: The front panel health LED flashes amber with a warning indication, or flashes
red with a fault indication.
—
—
3.
4.
System Alert on system console?
Analyze the alert by using the system event log (SEL), to identify the last error
logged by the server blade. Use the iLO MP commands to view the SEL, through
the MP’s text interface.
You should have a good idea about which area of the server blade requires further analysis.
For example, if the symptom was “server blade won’t power-up”, the initial troubleshooting
procedure may have indicated a problem with the DC power rail not coming up after the
power was turned on.
You have now reached the point where the failed Field Replaceable Unit (FRU or FRUs) has
been identified and needs to be replaced. You must now perform the specific removal and
replacement procedure, and verification steps (see Chapter 4: “Removing and Replacing
Components” (page 33) for more details).
NOTE: If multiple FRUs are identified as part of the solution, fix all identified failed FRUs
to guarantee success.
5.
There may be specific recovery procedures you need to perform to finish the repair.
Should a failure occur, the front panel LEDs and the SEL helps you identify the problem or FRU:
•
•
LEDs. The front panel LEDs and LAN LEDs of the server blade change color and blink to
help identify specific problems, and display LAN activity.
The SEL provides detailed information about the errors identified by the LEDs.
For system alerts of levels 3-5, the attention condition on the system LED can be cleared by
accessing the logs using the slcommand, available in the iLO MP command mode. To access
the iLO MP from the console serial port, enterCtrl–B or ESC-(.
If the LEDs and SEL do not give you enough information for you to identify the problem you
are experiencing, HP also provides diagnostic tools with each operating system (see
“Troubleshooting Tools” (page 58) for more details).
NOTE: Always check the iLO MP SEL in the case of a blinking yellow or red front panel health
LED, before replacing any hardware.
Recommended Troubleshooting Methodology
The recommended methodology for troubleshooting a server blade error or fault is as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
54
Consult the system console for any messages, emails, etc., pertaining to a server blade error
or fault.
View the front panel LEDs (power and health), locally; or remotely through the iLO MP
vfp command.
Compare the state of the server blade’s LEDs (off; flashing or steady; red, green, or amber)
with the LED states listed in Table 5-2 (page 55).
Go to the step number of Table 5-3 (page 56), as specified in the rightmost column of Table 5-2
(page 55), located in the row which corresponds to your front panel LED display state.
Read the symptom/condition information in the leftmost column of Table 5-3 (page 56).
Perform the action(s) specified in the “Action” column.
If more details are required or desired, see the appropriate subsection of this chapter, where
this information is provided in the “Action” column. The “Action” you are directed to
perform may be to access and read one or more error logs (the event log and/or the forward
progress log).
Troubleshooting
You can follow the recommended troubleshooting methodology, and use Table 5-3 and Table 5-4
(page 57), or go directly to the subsection of this chapter which corresponds to your own entry
point of choice. Table 5-1 provides the corresponding subsection or location title for these different
entry points (for example, to start by examining the logs, go directly to “Errors and Error Logs”
(page 64)).
Table 5-1 Troubleshooting Entry Points
Entry Point
Subsection or Location
Front panel LEDs
See “Basic and Advanced Troubleshooting Tables” (page 55) and
“Troubleshooting Tools” (page 58).
System Event Log and
See “Errors and Error Logs” (page 64).
Forward Progress Logs
Offline and Online Diagnostics
See “Troubleshooting Tools” (page 58).
System Event Analyzer (SEA)
See http://h18023.www1.hp.com/support/svctools/webes for more
information about this tool).
Basic and Advanced Troubleshooting Tables
Use the following troubleshooting tables to determine the symptoms or condition of a suspect
server blade. Be aware that the state of the front panel LEDs can be viewed locally; or remotely
using the vfp command from the MP.
The tables are designed to cover troubleshooting symptoms from AC power-on up to booting
the OS, specifically in Steps 1-5. In most cases, Table 5-2: “Basic Front Panel LED Troubleshooting
States”, identifies the step number where troubleshooting should begin. Alternatively, you can
skip Table 5-2, and start with Step 1 in Table 5-3: “Basic Low End Troubleshooting”, sequencing
through the table steps to locate the symptom/condition most descriptive of your current server
blade status. This becomes the first step in your troubleshooting procedure. Where appropriate,
an action or actions prescribed in the “Action” column of Table 5-3: “Basic Low End
Troubleshooting”, is followed by a reference to the corresponding subsection of this chapter for
further information.
NOTE: In Table 5-2, the Unit Identifier (UID)/Locator LED has not been included, because it is
not used directly for troubleshooting server blades. However, indirectly, it can provide useful
system information (for example when it is blue, this indicates the BMC is working). It also
indicates the server blade which has an error or fault condition by illuminating steady blue on
the front of the server blade in question.
Table 5-2 Basic Front Panel LED Troubleshooting States
System Health
Internal Health
Basic Low End Troubleshooting Table Step Number
Off
Off
Step 1 in Table 5-3 and Step 6 in Table 5-4
Off
Steady amber
Step 2 in Table 5-3
Off
Steady green
Step 3a in Table 5-3
Flashing amber Steady green
Step 3b in Table 5-3
Steady green
Steady green
Steps 4a, 4b, 4c, and 5 in Table 5-3, and Steps 6 and 7 in Table 5-4
Flashing red
Steady green
Steps 8a and 8b in Table 5-4
Methodology
55
Table 5-3 Basic Low End Troubleshooting
Step
Condition
Action
1
Server blade appears “dead” -- no front panel Nothing is logged for this condition.
LEDs are on, and no fans are running. BMC
1. For new server installations, review the installation
and iLO MP are running.
procedures.
2. Verify that the enclosure’s power cord(s) are connected
to both the power supplies and to the AC receptacle(s).
3. Verify that AC power, at the proper AC voltage levels,
is available to the receptacle(s).
4. If the power button’s integrated LED on front panel
remains off, then reseat the server blade.
5. As a last resort, replace the server blade. The preceding
problem is fixed when the front panel LED states are as
follows: System health is off and Internal health is steady
amber.
2
Server blade does not power on after front
panel power button is momentarily pressed
(less than four seconds). BMC is running, if
locator LED (UID) can be turned on or off
through the system console.
A fatal fault has been detected and logged, attempting to
power on the server.
1. Examine enclosure power supply LEDs. If they are not
steady green, then replace power supply.
2. If the enclosure power supply LED is green, then you
may need an additional power supply to supply sufficient
power to run the blades in the enclosure.
3. Examine the iLO MP subsystem logs for events related
to DC power rails.
Preceding problem is fixed when the front panel LEDs
are as follows: Health is off and power is steady green.
56
3a
System health LED is off and Internal health
LED is steady green, iLO MP is not running.
3b
System health LED is flashing amber and
A warning or critical failure has been detected and logged
Internal health LED is steady green. The BMC while booting or running system firmware. Examine the
and iLO MP are running.
iLO MP logs for events related to switched DC power or
cooling fans or configuration. Preceding problem is fixed
when both front panel health LED and server power LED
states show: Flashing green or steady green, and steady
green, respectively.
4a
Cannot see iLO MP prompt on system console Nothing may be logged for this condition. Since the BMC
-- blade server power is on. BMC and iLO MP controls the different states of the system health LED, the
are running.
system health LED state indicates that the server blade is
either booting or running system F/W, or booting or
running OS.1. Look for loose, damaged, or disconnected
signal cables between the system console device, and
serial port connector on the front panel.2. Verify proper
‘Terminal type is set: supported settings are hpterm and
VT100+ (default) and VTUTF8.3. Verify that the RS232C
configuration matches between the server blade and the
local console (see “Server Interface (System Console)”
(page 73) for more details). 4. As a last resort, replace the
server blade. Preceding problem is fixed when the iLO
MP menu appears on the system console.
Troubleshooting
A fatal fault has been detected and logged while booting
or running System F/W.1. Cannot access the iLO MP at
this time (see “Management Subsystem (iLO MP and
BMC)” (page 70) for more details). 2. Must reseat or
replace the server blade. Preceding problem is fixed when
iLO MP logs can be read and both front panel health LED
and server power LED states show: Flashing green or
steady green, and steady green, respectively.
Table 5-3 Basic Low End Troubleshooting (continued)
Step
Condition
Action
4b
Cannot see EFI prompt on system console.
BMC and iLO MP are running.
Nothing may be logged for this condition.
1. Examine the iLO MP logs for entries related to
processors, processor power modules (PPM)s, and shared
memory, and core I/O devices (see “Errors and Error
Logs” (page 64) for more details).
2. As a last resort, replace the server blade. Preceding
problem is fixed when the EFI menu appears on the
system console.
4c
Cannot find a boot disk. BMC and iLO MP are Nothing may be logged for this condition.
running.
1. Reinsert the boot disk into the drive bay (see
“Supported Configurations” (page 67) for more details).
2. Search for the boot disk’s ACPI path using the EFI shell
(map –r) command (see “I/O Subsystem (SCSI, LAN,
FibreChannel, HDD, and Core I/O)” (page 71) for more
details).
3. Examine the iLO MP logs for entries related to
processors, processor power modules (PPM)s, and shared
memory, and core I/O devices (see “Errors and Error
Logs” (page 64) for more details).
4. As a last resort, replace the server blade. Preceding
problem is fixed when all boot paths are found.
5
Cannot see OS prompt on system console. BMC Nothing may be logged for this condition.
and iLO MP are running.
1. Examine the iLO MP logs for entries related to
processors, processor power modules (PPM)s, and shared
memory, and core I/O devices (see “Errors and Error
Logs” (page 64) for more details). Preceding problem is
fixed when the OS prompt appears on the system console.
Table 5-4 Advanced Low End Troubleshooting
Step
Symptom/Condition
Action
6
Cannot read System Event Log
from the system console.
System event logging has stopped and a BMC malfunction is assumed
(health is steady green and power is steady green).
1. Examine console messages for any EFI errors or warnings about
BMC operation or communications.
2. Test the operation of the BMC by toggling the UID locator LED on
the front panel -- the blue LED is turned On/Off by the BMC through
the system console.
Preceding problem is fixed when the System Event Log resumes
logging.
7
OS is non-responsive (hung)...
Front panel LEDs indicate that the server blade’s power is turned on,
and it is either booting or running the OS (for example, health is steady
green and power is steady green).
Nothing may be logged for this condition.
1. Use the system console to start a system initialization, or push the
Init (ToC) pinhole button on the front of the server blade.
2. Reboot the OS and escalate.
3. Obtain the system hardware status dump for root cause analysis.
4. Examine the iLO MP logs for entries related to processors, processor
power modules (PPMs), shared memory, and core I/O devices (see
“Errors and Error Logs” (page 64) for more details).
The preceding problem is fixed when the root cause is determined.
Methodology
57
Table 5-4 Advanced Low End Troubleshooting (continued)
Step
Symptom/Condition
8a
MCA occurs during server blade Front panel LEDs indicate that the server blade detected a fatal error
operation; the server blade
that it cannot recover from through OS recovery routines (for example,
reboots the OS.
health is flashing red and power is steady green).
(Note: Server blade reboots OS
if enabled.)
Action
1. Capture the MCA dump with the EFI command,errdumpmca. If
the server blade can boot the OS, you can capture binary MCA dump
files online.
1. Examine the iLO MP logs for entries related to processors, processor
power modules (PPMs), shared memory, and core I/O devices (See
“Errors and Error Logs” (page 64) for more details).
Preceding problem is fixed when the MCA does not repeat, or the
source of the MCA has been determined and dealt with.
8b
MCA occurs during server blade Front panel LEDs indicate that the server blade detected a fatal, front
operation; server blade reboot of side bus error, caused by MBEs reading cache or DIMM; or by any
OS is prevented...
parity in the I/O path between SBA, LBA, or HBA (for example, health
is Off Power is Steady Green).
(Note: The troubleshooting
actions for this step are identical
to those in Step 8a, except that
the server blade in this step must
be hard reset to begin the
booting process)
System firmware is running to gather and log all error data for this
MCA event.
(Note: You must hard reset the
server blade to clear the fatal
condition and boot the OS.)
Preceding problem is fixed when the MCA does not repeat.
1. Examine the iLO MP logs for entries related to processors, processor
power modules (PPMs), shared memory, and core I/O devices (see
“Errors and Error Logs” (page 64) for more details).
Troubleshooting Tools
Front Panel LEDs
The front panel of the server blade contains the unit identifier (UID) LED, System Health LED,
Internal Health LED, and the network interface controller (NIC) LEDs. Figure 5-1 shows the front
panel LED locations.
Server blades use flashing states (amber or red) on these LEDs to indicate a warning or an error.
There are a total of seven buttons, arranged vertically (when the server blade is installed in the
enclosure). In addition to the two integrated button/LEDs, there is one health LED.
The health LED is arranged sequentially in line with the Power button/LED, and as the server
blade starts up, there will be more “green” the further the system proceeds in the startup process:
1.
2.
The power LED turns green soon as the system starts to power up.
The health LED turns green when firmware leaves “exit boot services” and starts the OS
boot.
The health LED is driven by the BMC; the Power LED is driven solely by hardware. Both BMC
and iLO MP code determine the state of the health LED.
58
Troubleshooting
Figure 5-1 Server Blade Front Panel LEDs
Table 5-5 details the functions of the front panel LEDs.
Table 5-5 Server Blade Front Panel LEDs
Item
LED Description
Status
1
Unit Identification
(UID)
Steady Blue = Flagged
System health
Off = Power is off
2
Off = Not flagged
Steady Green = Power is on
Flashing Amber = System is degraded (power is on or off)
Flashing Red = System critical (power is on or off)
3
Internal health
Green = On
Amber = Standby power (main power off, iLO MP power on)
Flashing Red = Critical internal error
Off = Unit off (no power coming from enclosure)
4–7
NIC 1
Steady Green = Linked to network
NIC 2
Flashing Green = Network activity
NIC 3
Off = No activity
NIC 4
Locator LED
The locator LED, or unit identifier (UID) allows a specific server blade to be identified in a rack
or data center environment. One Locator LED is located in the front panel.
Troubleshooting Tools
59
Table 5-6 Locator LED Status
LED Description
Status
Steady Blue
Identification
Off
Not flagged
NOTE:
When the UID is lit, this also indicates that the BMC is working properly.
System Health LED
Server blades added the system health LED for the following reasons:
•
•
•
To carry forward the Attention functionality of legacy Integrity front panel designs.
To indicate whether the system is up or down.
To cover the wide range of faults for which software/firmware is not sure that a FRU must
be reseated/replaced.
This LED indicates the overall health state of the server blade, including the state of system
firmware and the OS. If the LED is amber or red, the server blade needs attention. Examine the
event logs (on iLO MP) for details of the problem. Table 5-7 details the functions of the health
LED.
Table 5-7 System Health LED States
Definition
Flash Rate
Server blade is off.
LED Off
LED Color
Server blade has left the firmware boot, and an OS is booting or running with Steady
no failures, since SEL logs last examined.
Green
A warning or critical failure has been detected and logged.
Flash 1 Hz
Amber
A fatal fault has been detected and logged.
Flash 2 Hz
Red
Internal Health LED
The Internal Health LED indicates the internal health of the server blade. If the LED is red, the
server blade needs attention. Examine the event logs (on iLO) for details of the problem. Table 5-8
details the states of the Internal Health LEDs.
Table 5-8 Internal Health LED States
LED
Status
Green
Server is on and health is good
Amber
Server degraded, check System Event Log
Flashing red
Critical internal error, check System Event Log
Off
Server is off, and health last known state is good
NIC LEDs
Table 5-9 shows the status of the NIC LEDs on the server blade.
60
Troubleshooting
Table 5-9 NIC LEDs
LEDs 4 – 7
Status
Steady green
NIC is connected to the network
Flashing green
Network activity
Off
No activity
Diagnostics
A suite of offline and online support tools are available to enable manufacturing, field support
personnel, and you to troubleshoot server blade problems. In general, if the operating system
(HP-UX) is already running, it is best not to shut it down. Use the online support tools.
If the OS cannot be booted, use the offline support tools to resolve the problem. The offline
support tools are available from the EFI partition. Once you resolve the problem preventing
booting, boot HP-UX, and use the online support tools for any further testing.
If it is not possible to reach the EFI from either the main disk or from LAN, you must troubleshoot,
using the visual fault indicators, console messages, and system error logs that are available.
Online Diagnostics/Exercisers
Online support tools are provided on the server blade. Centralized error archiving and hardware
inventory tools are available as long as the agents/providers that support them are installed on
the managed server blade.
On HP-UX systems, the legacy tools within OnlineDiag continue to be supported. The online
support tools, on HP-UX 11.23 and greater, include the Support Tool Manager (STM) tools, and
the additional Web-Based Enterprise Management (WBEM) features added by SysFaultMgmt.
The STM suite of tools includes verifiers, diagnostics, exercisers, information modules, and expert
tools.
Verifiers quickly determine whether or not a specific device is operational by performing tasks
similar in nature to the way applications use the device. No license is required to run the verifiers.
Diagnostics are tools designed to identify faulty or failed FRUs.
Exercisers stress devices in order to facilitate the reproduction of intermittent problems.
Information modules create a log of information specific to one device, including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The product identifier
A description of the device
The hardware path to the device
The vendor
Onboard log information (if applicable)
Miscellaneous information associated with the device
The firmware revision code, if firmware is present in the device, is also displayed
Expert tools are device-specific troubleshooting utilities for use by sophisticated users. Their
functionality varies from tool to tool, but they are intended to be interactive, and rely on users
to provide information necessary to perform a particular task. These tools require users to have
the appropriate license, if they wish to run them.
Online Support Tool Availability
Online diagnostics are included in the HP-UX OE media, and are installed by default.
Troubleshooting Tools
61
Online Support Tools List
The following online support tools are available on HP-UX 11.23 hosted server blades. In some
cases, a tool, such as a disk exerciser, is generic to many types of hardware; in other cases, a tool,
such as a tape diagnostic, is specific to a particular technology or type of tape drive. Table 5-10
details the online support tools available for the server blade.
Table 5-10 Online Support Tools List
Functional Area
Information
Verify
Exercise
Diagnose
Expert
System
Yes
No
No
No
No
CPU/FPU
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
Memory
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
Graphics
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Core I/O LAN
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Disk/Arrays
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Tape
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
M/O
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
Add-On Network I/O Cards
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Add-On Mass Storage I/O Cards
Yes
No
No
No
No
Offline Support Tool Availability
Updates to the EFI HP service partition (HPSP) are available through the CD Installer option on
the IPF Offline Diagnostics and Utilities CD. At a minimum, an ISO image of the IPF Offline
Diagnostics and Utilities CD is available from the HP web.
Offline Support Tools List
Table 5-11 details the offline support tools available for the server blade.
Table 5-11 Offline Support Tools List
62
Offline Tool
Functional Area
CPUDIAG
Processor Diagnostic
MEMDIAG
Memory Diagnostic
MAPPER
System Mapping Utility
PLUTODIAG
SBA/LBA Chipset
PERFVER
Peripheral Verifier
DFDUTIL
SCSI Disk Firmware Update Utility
DISKUTIL
Disk Test Utility (Non-Destructive)
COPYUTIL
Data Copy Utility
DISKEXPT
Disk Expert Utility
IODIAG
I/O Diagnostics Launch Facility (Executes third party diagnostics and
runs BIST, if available)
CIODIAG2
Core I/O Diagnostic
Specific Card I/O Diagnostics
Card-Specific I/O Diagnostics/BIST
Troubleshooting
General Diagnostic Tools
Table 5-12 details the general diagnostic tools available for most HP Integrity server platforms.
The distribution method is through the Web.
Table 5-12 General Diagnostic Tools List
Diagnostic Tool
Description
IPMI Event Decoder
Provides detailed information about the IPMI event (Problem
description, cause, action)
Fault Management Overview
The goal of fault management and monitoring is to increase server blade availability, by moving
from a reactive fault detection, diagnosis, and repair strategy to a proactive fault detection,
diagnosis, and repair strategy. The objectives are:
•
•
•
•
To detect problems automatically, as close as possible to the time of occurrence.
To diagnose problems automatically, at the time of detection.
To automatically report (in understandable text) a description of the problem, the likely
cause(s) of the problem, the recommended action(s) to resolve the problem, and detailed
information about the problem.
To ensure that tools are available to repair or recover from the fault.
HP-UX Fault Management
Proactive fault prediction and notification is provided on HP-UX by SysFaultMgmt WBEM
indication providers, as well as by the Event Management Service (EMS). The Event Management
Service and WBEM provide frameworks for monitoring and reporting events.
SysFaultMgmt WBEM indication providers and the EMS Hardware Monitors allow users to
monitor the operation of a wide variety of hardware products, and alert them immediately if
any failure or other unusual event occurs. By using hardware event monitoring, users can virtually
eliminate undetected hardware failures that could interrupt server blade operation or cause data
loss.
Complete information on installing and using EMS hardware event monitors, as well as a list of
supported hardware, can be found in the EMS Hardware Monitors Users Guide. An electronic copy
of this book is provided on the web site http://docs.hp.com/hpux/diag.
Troubleshooting Tools
63
WBEM indication providers and EMS Hardware Monitors
Hardware monitors are available to monitor the following components (these monitors are
distributed free on the OE media):
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Chassis/Fans/Environment
CPU monitor
UPS monitor
FC Hub monitor
FC Switch monitor
Memory monitor
Core Electronics Components
Disk drives
Ha_disk_array
Errors and Error Logs
Event Log Definitions
Often the underlying root cause of an MCA event is captured by server blade or BMC firmware
in both the System Event Log (SEL) and Forward Progress Event Logs (FP). These errors are
easily matched with MCA events by their timestamps. For example, the loss of a CPU’s VRM
might cause a CPU fault. Decoding the MCA error logs would only identify the failed CPU as
the most likely faulty FRU. Following are some important points to remember about events and
event logs:
•
•
•
Event logs are the equivalent of the old chassis logs for status or error information output.
Symbolic names are used in the source code; for example, MC_CACHE_CHECK.
The hex code for each event log is 128 bits long with an architected format:
— Some enumerated fields can be mapped to defined text strings.
— All can be displayed in hex, keyword, or text mode.
•
Events are created by firmware or OS code, and are sent over the PDH bus to the BMC for
storage in either or both of the SEL and FP logs (HP-UX shows an I/O path for the BMC).
The iLO MP displays event logs: SEL events are sent over the IPMB, between the BMC and
the MP.
Event logs are read back over the PDH bus by software (i.e., the IPMI driver or agent) for
storage on disk.
•
•
Event Log Usage
To consult the event logs:
1.
2.
3.
64
Connect to the system console.
Enter Ctrl–B to access the MP Main Menu.
Enter the sl command to view event logs: System Event (E) and Forward Progress (F) logs
are useful to determine the context of an error.
Troubleshooting
NOTE: The SEL E shows only event logs with alert level 2 or higher. The SEL defaults to alert
level 2 on the BL860c because there are some level 2 events related to rack infrastructure change.
the alert level can be changed. The SEL is never overwritten unless first manually cleared. It does
get full.
The Forward Progress Log (F) shows all event log outputs. The FPL log is circular. It wraps,
automatically replacing the oldest events with the newest. It never get full. Oldest logs get
overwritten first.
iLO MP Event Logs
The iLO MP provides diagnostic and configuration capabilities. See the HP Integrity and HP 9000
Integrated Lights-Out Management Processor Operations Guide for details on the iLO MP commands.
To access the MP, perform the following:
NOTE:
1.
The iLO MP must be accessed from a terminal console which has access to the MP.
Log in with the proper username and password.
NOTE:
Default operator login and password: login = Oper, password = Oper.
You are now at the MP Main Menu.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Enter cl to display the console history log. This log displays console history from oldest to
newest.
Enter Ctrl–B to return to the MP Main Menu.
Enter sl to display the status logs. The status logs consist of:
• System Event
• Forward Progress
• Current Boot
• Previous Boot
• Live Events
• Clear SEL/FPL Logs
Enter Ctrl–B to return to the MP Main Menu.
System Event Log (SEL) Review
1.
2.
Access the iLO MP command prompt.
Run the sl command. The Event Log Viewer menu displays:
SL
Event Log Viewer:
Log Name
Entries
% Full
Latest Entry
------------------------------------------------------------------E - System Event
9
1 %
29 Oct 2002 19:15:05
F - Forward Progress
129
3 %
B - Current Boot
82
P - Previous Boot
0
L - Live Events
C - Clear All Logs
Enter your choice or [Q] to Quit:
3.
Select Eto review the system events. The Event Log Navigation menu displays:
Enter menu item or [Ctrl-B] to Quit: e
Log Name
Entries
% Full
Latest Timestamped Entry
--------------------------------------------------------------------------E - System Event
12
1 %
31 Oct 2003 23:37:45
Event Log Navigation Help:
+
View next block
(forward in time, e.g. from 3 to 4)
View previous block (backward in time, e.g. from 3 to 2)
Errors and Error Logs
65
<CR>
D
F
L
J
H
K
T
A
U
?
Q
Continue to the next or previous block
Dump the entire log
First entry
Last entry
Jump to entry number
View mode configuration - Hex
View mode configuration - Keyword
View mode configuration - Text
Alert Level Filter options
Alert Level Unfiltered
Display this Help menu
Quit and return to the Event Log Viewer Menu
Ctrl-B Exit command, and return to the MP Main MenuMP:SL (+,-,<CR>,D, F, L, J, H, K, T, A, U, ? for
Help, Q or Ctrl-B to Quit) >a
Alert
1
2
3
5
7
Level Threshold Filter:
: Major Forward Progress
: Informational
: Warning
: Critical
: Fatal
Enter alert level threshold or [Q] to quit filter setup: 3
-> Alert threshold level 3 filter will be applied.Set up alert filter options on this buffer? (Y/[N])
Log Name
Entries
% Full
Latest Entry
------------------------------------------------------------------E - System Event
410
47 %
18 Feb 2003 09:38:10
Event Log Navigation Help:
+
View next block
(forward in time, e.g. from 3 to 4)
View previous block (backward in time, e.g. from 3 to 2)
<CR>
Continue to the next or previous block
D
Dump the entire log for capture and analysis
F
First entry
L
Last entry
J
Jump to entry number
V
View mode configuration (text, keyword, hex)
?
Display this Help menu
Ctrl-B Quit and return to the Main Menu
4.
Select a, then a threshold filter number to filter events to desired level.
MP:SL
Alert
1
2
3
5
7
Enter
->
5.
(+,-,<CR>,D, F, L, J, H, K, T, A, U, ? for Help, Q or Ctrl-B to Quit) >a
Level Threshold Filter:
: Major Forward Progress
: Informational
: Warning
: Critical
: Fatal
alert level threshold or [Q] to quit filter setup: 3
Alert threshold level 3 filter will be applied.
Select v, then t to change the display to text mode:
Display Mode Configuration:
H - Hex mode
Current -> K - Keyword mode
T - Text mode
Enter new value, or [Q] to Quit:
6.
To decode the blinking state of system LED, review the entire SEL and look at events with
alert level 2 and above.
For example:
Log Entry 24: 14 Feb 2003 15:27:02
Alert Level 3: Warning
Keyword: Type-02 1b0800 1771520
Hot Swap Cage: SCSI cable removed
Logged by: BMC; Sensor: Cable / Interconnect - SCSI ChExt Cable
Data1: Device Removed/Device Absent
0x203E4D0AC6020220 FFFF0008F61B0300
Log Entry 73: 00:00:12
Alert Level 3: Warning
Keyword: Type-02 050301 328449
The server's built-in sensors have detected an open chassis door.
66
Troubleshooting
Logged by: BMC; Sensor: Physical Security - Chassis Open
Data1: State Asserted
0x200000000C020570 FFFF010302050300
Supported Configurations
This subsection provides examples of how to use the iLO MP to acquire configuration information
for troubleshooting purposes. It also provides a system build-up procedure.
For a list of all FRUs in the server blade, with their corresponding part numbers, see Appendix A
(page 77).
System Build-Up Troubleshooting Procedure
Use this procedure only when the system powers on and remains powered on but does not enter
into or pass POST, or does not boot to EFI menu.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Remove the access panel to gain access to internal FRUs. See “Removing the Server Blade
Access Panel” (page 38).
Remove all of the HDDs from the front of the chassis. See “Removing a SAS Disk Drive”
(page 34).
Remove the memory DIMMs. See “Removing a DIMM” (page 40).
Remove the processors. See “Removing a Processor” (page 42).
Replace the server blade in the enclosure. The server blade (and MP) powers on.
Enter the DF command from the MP Console Menu. The following displays:
CM> DF
Display FRU Information Menu:
S - Specific FRU
A - All available FRUs
V - Display Mode: Text
7.
Enter Sto show the FRU IDs. The following displays:
FRU IDs:
-------0001-Comm Module
0003-Mezzanine Board
0002-Disk Backplane
0000-Motherboard
If you do not see all of the above FRU IDs, then concentrate on the missing FRU ID(s). The
following alert (IPMI) event displays for this action, as read from the SEL:
Log Entry 4: Dec 2005 00:00:09
Alert Level 7: Fatal
Keyword: Type-02 257100 2453760
Missing FRU device - DIMM0A
Logged by: Baseboard Management Controller,
Sensor: Entity Presence
0x2000000009020050 FF01807115250300
If you do not get the above Alert Level 7 (IPMI) event, but get another high level alert, replace
the server blade.
8.
9.
Add at least one rank of memory DIMMs.
Enter the DFcommand. The following displays:
The following displays:
Display FRU Information Menu:
S - Specific FRU
A - All available FRUs
V - Display Mode: Text
10. Enter S to show the FRU IDs. The following displays (one rank of DIMMs installed):
Supported Configurations
67
FRU IDs:
-------0001-Comm Module
0128-DIMM0A
0002-Disk Backplane
0129-DIMM0B
0003- Mezzanine Board
0000-Motherboard
If you do not see all of the above FRU IDs then concentrate on the missing FRU ID(s). The
following alert (IPMI) event displays for this action, as read from the SEL:
Log Entry 3: Dec 2005 21:50:43
Alert Level 7: Fatal
Keyword: Type-02 257100 2453760
Missing FRU device - Processor 0
Logged by: Baseboard Management Controller,
Sensor: Entity Presence
0x2041CB3DB3020040 FF2080711525030
If you do show the Alert level 7 “Missing FRU device - Processor 0”, continue to the next
step.
11. Insert a processor into CPU slot 0. When you add the processor and turn on system power,
the cooling fans should turn on and stay on, and theDFandScommand output should look
something like this:
FRU IDs:
-------0032-Processor 0
0002-Disk Backplane
0129-DIMM0B
0036-Processor 0 RAM
0003- Mezzanine Board
0000-Motherboard
0001-Comm Module
0128-DIMM0A
If the installed FRUs are all functional, the system should initiate POST on all processors.
Observe the system console output through “Live Events” to ensure that POST initiates and
completes without error.
If POST does not start after a few seconds, suspect some sort of system board or processor
problem. Typical problems show up in the SEL or FWP. If the IPMI event logs do not point
to a root cause, escalate to bring in expert assistance.
CPU/Memory/SBA
All of the CPU, Memory controller, DIMMs, and SBA (I/O rope controller) functions reside on
the server blade FRU. This section discusses the roles of physical CPUs and physical memory
ranks.
Troubleshooting Server Blade CPU
Each server blade supports 1 or 2 IPF processor modules. This results in two physical CPUs,
when two IPF processor modules are installed in server blades.
Each physical IPF CPU core contains logic to support one physical thread. (Note that the operating
system kernel attaches one or more software processes to each available thread, so in multiple
processor server blades, having more threads means all software processes are launched and
executed more rapidly.)
IPF Processor Load Order
For a minimally loaded server blade, one IPF processor module must be installed in CPU slot 0.
Slot 0 is the slot closer to the server blade chassis. Install a processor of the same version into
CPU slot 1 if purchased.
Processor Module Behaviors
All physical CPUs become functional after system power is applied. Each CPU is in a race to
fetch their instructions from their CPU’s instruction and data caches to complete early self test
and rendezvous.
68
Troubleshooting
It is the processor’s cache controller logic that issues cache line fetches from PDH/physical shared
memory, when a requested cache line is not within its instruction or data cache. Cache line fetches
are transferred over the McKinley bus, between processors and PDH/physical shared memory.
Local machine check abort (MCA) events cause one IPF processor module to fail, while the other
IPF processor module continues operating. Double-bit data cache errors in any physical CPU
core causes a Global MCA event, that causes all IPF processor modules to fail and reboot the
operating system.
Customer Messaging Policy
No diagnostic messages are reported for single-bit errors, that are corrected in both instruction
and data caches, during corrected machine check (CMC) events to any physical processor core.
Diagnostic messages are reported for CMC events, when thresholds are exceeded for single-bit
errors; fatal processor errors cause global/local MCA events.
Troubleshooting Blade Memory
The memory controller logic in the Zx1 chip supports two physical ranks, that hold 2 memory
DIMMs each.
Memory DIMMs installed in groups of four are known as a quad, and must be the same size and
configuration.
Memory DIMM Load Order
For a minimally loaded server, two equal-size memory DIMMs must be installed into rank 0’s
slots 0A and 0B. The next two DIMMs are loaded into rank 1’s slots 1A and 1B.
Memory Subsystem Behaviors
All server blades with Zx1 chips provide error detection and correction of all memory DIMM
single-bit errors, and error detection of most multi-bit errors within a 128 byte cache line.
The Zx1 chip provides memory DIMM error correction for up to 4 bytes of a 128 byte cache line,
during cache line misses initiated by processor cache controllers, and by Direct Memory Access
(DMA) operations, initiated by I/O devices. This feature is called chip sparing, as 1 of 72 total
DRAMs in any memory quad can fail without any loss of server blade performance.
Customer Messaging Policy
PDT logs for all double bit errors are permanent; single bit errors are initially logged as transient
errors. If the server logs 2 single bit errors within 24 hours, then it upgrades them to permanent
status in the PDT.
Troubleshooting Blade SBA
Each server blade’s system bus adapter (SBA) supports core I/O, SCSI, LAN, and FibreChannel
functions. The System Bus Adapter (SBA) logic within the Zx1 chip of a server blade uses 6 of 8
ropes to support 4 Lower Bus Adapter (LBA) chips. Each LBA chip interfaces with the SBA in
the Zx1 chip, through one or multiple rope connections, as follows:
•
•
•
One LBA chip uses a single rope connection (used by core I/O) to support a single 32-bit
PCI bus running @ 33 MHz;
One LBA chip use a single-rope connection (used by SCSI controller) to support one 64-bit
PCI-X bus running @ 66 MHz;
Two LBA chips use a dual rope connection (used by LAN and FibreChannel controllers) to
support individual 64-bit PCI-X buses running @ 133 MHz;
CPU/Memory/SBA
69
Enclosure Information
This installation document only covers the BL860c server blade itself, and does not include any
specific server blade enclosure information. For server blade enclosure information, go to:
http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c00172260/c00172260.pdf
Cooling Subsystem
Each server blade contains 4 dual-rotor cooling fans. Three of the four cooling fans cool both
processors and the communications module. One of the four cooling fans cools the PDH module,
the Zx1 chip, and the memory DIMMs.
Communications Module (LBAs, Ropes, and PDH/PCI-X Buses)
This subsection provides information on troubleshooting issues with the internal PCI-X buses.
I/O Subsystem Behaviors
The main role of the I/O subsystem is to transfer blocks of data and instruction words between
physical shared memory and virtual memory (system disks/disk array). The system boot is the
first time blocks of data and instructions words are transferred into physical shared memory
from a local disk/DVD, or from a remote disk on another server through multiple LAN transfers.
This process is referred to as Direct Memory Access (DMA), and is initiated by I/O devices located
in core I/O or on I/O device controllers, and does not involve any processors.
A secondary role of the I/O subsystem is to transfer four bytes of data between the internal
registers within each CPU core, and the internal control/store registers within the Zx1/PDH
/Local Bus Adapters (LBA) and device controller chips. This process is referred to as programmed
I/O, and is initiated by any CPU executing external LOAD/STORE instructions. (Note that both
system firmware and the HP-UX kernel use this method to initiate DMA transfers.)
Customer Messaging Policy
•
•
Always point the customer to the SEL for any action from low level I/O subsystem faults.
IPMI events in SEL/FPL provide the logical Acpi path of the suspect I/O subsystem FRU.
Use Table 5-13 to determine the physical device controller.
Some diagnostic messages are reported for high level I/O subsystem errors; all fatal I/O
subsystem errors cause global MCAs. (Note that HP-UX provides its own path with the
physical rope number of the suspect I/O subsystem FRU. Use Table 5-13 to determine the
physical device controller.)
Table 5-13 Rope-to-ACPI Paths
PCI Bus
Physical Rope #
Logical ACPI Path
Slow core iLO MP @ 33MHz
0
Acpi(HWP0002,PNP0A00,0)/Pci(1 | 0)
Acpi(HWP0002,PNP0A03,0)/Pci(1 | 1)
Acpi(HWP0002,PNP0A03,0)/Pci(1 | 2)
Fast core SCSI @ 66 MHz
1
Acpi(HWP0002,PNP0A00,400)/Pci(1 | 0)
Dual FibreChannel @ 133 MHz 2, 3
Acpi(HWP0002,PNP0A03,400)/Pci(2 | 0)
Acpi(HWP0002,PNP0A03,400)/Pci(2 | 1)
Pair of dual LAN @ 133 MHz
Acpi(HWP0002,PNP0A03,500)/Pci(0 | 0)
4, 5
Management Subsystem (iLO MP and BMC)
Both the iLO MP and the BMC are integrated components (not FRUs) on the server blade. There
are no external or internal LEDs to view or monitor their operational states.
70
Troubleshooting
The server blade front panel LEDs are turned on or off by the BMC, then the system console;
subsequent access to iLO MP commands and menus is controlled by the MP.
I/O Subsystem (SCSI, LAN, FibreChannel, HDD, and Core I/O)
SAS Disk Drive LEDs
The two SAS disk drives on the BL860c server blade have identical LEDs that show the status
of the hard disk drives. Figure 5-2 shows the locations of the hard disk drive LEDs.
Figure 5-2 SAS Disk Drive LEDs
1
Activity LED
2
Status LED
Table 5-14 details the functions of the hard disk drive LEDs.
Table 5-14 SAS Disk Drive LEDs
Activity LED
Status LED
SAS Disk Drive State
Off
Off
Offline or not configured
Solid green
Off
Normal operation; no activity
Flickering green
Off
Normal operation; disk read or write activity
Off
Flashing amber at 1 Hz
Offline, no activity; predictive failure
Solid green
Flashing amber at 1 Hz
Online, no activity; predictive failure
Flickering green
Flashing amber at 1 Hz
Disk activity; predictive failure
Off
Solid amber
Offline; no activity; critical fault
Off
Solid blue
Offline; drive selected by locator function
Flashing green at 1 Hz
Off
Drive rebuilding
LAN LEDs
There are four LAN LEDs on the front panel of the server blade. They are NIC 1 through NIC 4.
Table 5-15 details the functions of the LAN LEDs.
I/O Subsystem (SCSI, LAN, FibreChannel, HDD, and Core I/O)
71
Table 5-15 1GB LAN States
LED Color
State
Off
No link
Steady Green
Link found
Flashing Green
LAN activity on network link
Boot Process LEDs
Table 5-16 shows the normal boot process, as reflected in changes to front panel LED states:
Table 5-16 Normal Boot Process LED States
Step
Health
Power
Normal Power-Up Through HP-UX Boot
1
Off
Off
No AC power to the server blade.
2
Off
Amber
Server blade is shut down (server is off), AC power and
standby power is active, last health status was healthy.
3
Off
Steady Green
Server blade power rails are on when Power switch is
toggled. Hardware drives power LED.
4
Steady green
Steady green
Server blade has powered up and is either at EFI, booting,
or at OS.
The following list itemizes the steps that characterize basic platform boot flow:
1. Server blade power switch requests power from the Management Module (the microcontroller
that manages the enclosure power and cooling). Once the power is request is granted, server
blade power turns on. After the power sequence has completed successfully, BMC releases
system reset.
2. Initial CPU firmware code fetch is Platform Abstraction Layer (PAL) code from FEPROM
in processor-dependent hardware (PDH), retrieved 4 bytes at a time by the data
multiplexer/demultiplexer controller (DMDC) in Zx1. No shared memory or I/O devices
are available at this time. They are not initially configured.
3. Firmware code stack is initially in battery-backed RAM (BBRAM) in PDH, retrieved 4 byes
at a time, through the PDH and DMD buses.
4. PAL code configures all CPUs.
5. System Abstraction layer (SAL) code configures all platform central electronic complex
(CEC) chips, including shared memory and all responding I/O devices.
6. Firmware code and stack are relocated to shared memory, after all x4 DIMM ranks in shared
memory are configured and tested.
7. EFI shell is launched from shared memory, and cache lines are retrieved 128 bytes at a time
by the memory controller in Zx1.
8. HP-UX loader is launched using the EFI device driver.
9. HP-UX boots and starts its own device drivers.
10. HP-UX may use runtime PAL and SAL calls, and APCI features (these abstraction layers
allow platform independence).
Firmware
The server blade has two sets of firmware installed:
•
•
72
Server blade and BMC firmware
iLO MP firmware
Troubleshooting
When upgrading server blade and BMC firmware, you must upgrade both components on the
server blade from the same release. Details about a specific release are available in the associated
Release Notes.
Firmware updates are available fromhttp://www.hp.comunder “Support and Drivers”.
Identifying and Troubleshooting Firmware Problems
Erratic server blade operation, or the fact that the server blade may not boot successfully to the
EFI Boot Manager or to the EFI Shell, are symptoms of possible firmware problems.
NOTE:
Firmware problems are relatively rare. Look for other problem causes first.
Probable firmware failure areas are:
•
•
Unsupported firmware installation
Corrupt firmware installation
To troubleshoot firmware problems:
1.
2.
Verify that all server blade and BMC firmware components are from the same release (use
the MPsr command).
Reinstall server blade and BMC firmware.
Updates
Your server blade has an EFI utility for updating the server blade and BMC firmware, and the
iLO MP firmware. This utility’s name is fweupdate.efi
To update your firmware, follow these steps:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Start up the server blade and get to the EFI command prompt.
Execute the following EFI command at the EFI shell prompt, to determine the current
firmware version: Shell> info fw
Look for the latest firmware updates at http://www.hp.com/bizsupport. If a new
version of the firmware is available, then download it and save it to CD, or copy it over the
network to the server blade you are going to update.
On the server blade you are updating, execute the fweupdate.eficommand from the EFI
command prompt by entering: fweupdate.BL860c.sxxxx.byyyy.mzzzz.efi
where:
smeans system firmware; xxxxis the system firmware version number
bmeans BMC firmware; yyyyis the BMC firmware version number
mmeans iLO MP firmware; zzzzis the iLO MP firmware version number
This command updates the system firmware, BMC firmware, and iLO MP firmware.
Server Interface (System Console)
All system console connections (local RS-232 and iLO MP LAN) are made through the I/O port
connector on the front of the server blade, through the local I/O cable.
HP-UX uses the RS-232 serial text connection to a dumb terminal, or to terminal emulator software
running on a PC, to control server blade operations locally. All other connections are unsupported.
HP-UX alternatively uses the MP’s 10/100 BT LAN connection over a private network, to control
one or more server blade operations -- locally through telnet or Secure Shell (SSH), or remotely
over a public network through a web GUI.
Server Interface (System Console)
73
Troubleshooting Tips
RS-232 connection: If a dumb terminal/PC running terminal emulation software is attached to
the iLO MP “local” port and does not respond to a Ctrl–B key sequence (and the terminal is
running 9600 baud, 8 data bits, is ONLINE, etc.) then it is possible that the iLO MP is not
operational/functional.
Environment
Ambient intake air temperature is often different from ambient room temperature; measure the
operating temperature and humidity directly in front of the cabinet cooling air intakes, rather
than measure only ambient room conditions.
Within the server blade enclosure, temperature sensors report chassis temperature to the BMC.
The BMC controls fan speed, based on this information.
Temperature sensors are found on:
•
•
I/O baseboard, where the processors provide an integrated temperature sensor
Status panel, where a thermal sensor detects the ambient room temperature. This sensor’s
reading is the main parameter used to regulate fan speed, under normal conditions.
Table 5-17 provides environmental specifications for server blades:
Table 5-17 Blade Server Environmental Specifications
Parameter
Operating Range
Recommended
Operating Range
Maximum Rate of Change Non-Operating Range
Temperature
5-35 degrees C (up to
5000 feet)
20-25 degrees C (up
to 5000 feet)
10 degrees C/hr with
tape; 20 degrees C/hr
without tape
-40 degrees to +60
degrees C
Relative
Humidity
15-80% at 35 degrees C 40-60% at 35 degrees
noncondensing
C noncondensing
30% per hour
noncondensing
90% at 65 degrees C
noncondensing
Reporting Your Problems to HP
HP customer care will help you solve server blade problems and, if necessary, initiate appropriate
service procedures. Support is available on the web and by phone.
For information on contacting the HP IT Resource Center (ITRC) near you, go to:
http://www.itrc.hp.com.
Online Support
To contact HP Customer Support online, see the Worldwide Limited Warranty and Technical
SupportGuide or visit us at http://www.hp.com/bizsupport. On our web page, enter the
server blade model number(for example, “BL860c”) and search the field.
The following information is available on this web site:
•
•
•
Software and firmware updates
The latest drivers and utilities
Additional documentation
Phone Support
To contact HP customer support by phone, go to the HP IT Resource Center (ITRC) near you,
at: http://www.itrc.hp.com. Local phone numbers are listed in your native language for
help.
74
Troubleshooting
Information to Collect Before you Contact Support
NOTE: It is highly recommended that you keep detailed records of any changes to your server
blade(s), and of how server blade behavior has changed over time, or as a result of changes made
to your server blade(s).
Before you contact HP support, you should:
1.
Use this chapter (Chapter 5: “Troubleshooting”,) to solve the problem.
• Note failure symptoms and error indications (LEDs and messages).
• Capture and permanently log the current SEL and FPL contents.
• Try to determine precisely what did or did not happen.
2.
Collect the following information:
• The model number of your server blade (for example, “BL860c”).
• The product number of your server blade. This can be found on the identification label,
which is found at the front of the unit. (Typically, of the form “AD000A”)
• The serial number of your server blade. This can be found on the identification label.
3.
Be familiar with your server blade configuration.
• Are you using the LAN, RS232, or web interface to monitor the server blade(s)?
• How many processors and DIMMs have been installed?
• What versions of processor and memory are used and where are they installed?
• What accessories are installed?
4.
Determine the following
• Which firmware versions are in use?
• When did the problem start?
• Have recent changes been made to the server blade(s)?
• Which version of HP-UX is in use?
Reporting Your Problems to HP
75
76
A Parts Information
This chapter provides parts information for the HP Integrity BL860c server blade components
(field replaceable units [FRUs]).
The following sections are included in this appendix:
• “Server Blade Components List”
Server Blade Components List
Table A-1 details the part numbers of the components (or FRUs) in the server blade.
NOTE: Part numbers are found by using the part nomenclature from this list to select the correct
part from the HP Partsurfer. If a part that is not listed in the FRU list needs to be replaced, the
Base Unit Repair Kit is required. Remove processors, DIMMs and HDDs, and transfer these to
the new base unit.
Table A-1 FRU List
Description
Manufacturing Part Number
Part Number
Replacement
Part Number
Exchange
512 MB DDR2 memory
AB563–6001A
AD342A
AB563–69001
1 GB DDR2 memory
AB564–6001A
AD343A
AB564–69001
2 GB DDR2 memory
AB565–6001A
AD344A
AB565–69001
4 GB DDR2 memory
AB566–6001A
AD345A
AB566–69001
Memory
Processors
Itanium 2 CPU 1.6 GHz 3 MB
AD272–2107B
AD272–69001
Itanium 2 CPU 1.4 GHz 12 MB
AD271–2101B
AD271–69001
Itanium 2 CPU 1.6 GHz 18 MB
AD270–2101B
AD270–69001
Internal Disks
36 GB, 10k RPM SAS hot-plug disk
375860–B21
37696–001
36 GB, 15k RPM SAS hot-plug disk
431934–B21
432322–001
72 GB, 10k RPM SAS hot-plug disk
375862–B21
376597–001
72 GB, 15k RPM SAS hot-plug disk
431936–B21
432321–001
146 GB, 10k RPM SAS hot-plug disk
431959–B21
432320–001
BL860c system board
AD217–60001
AD217–67001
2 disk drive SAS backplane
AD217–60003
AD217–67003
Front panel display assembly
AD217–2002B
AD217–67002
Dual port 4 Gbps FC mezzanine card
411419–B21
405920–001N
405920–001
Direct adaptor mezzanine card for connecting to the direct
attach storage blade
431644–B21
436010–001N
463010–001
Dual port 4x Infiniband mezzanine card
410533–B21
410500–001N
410500–001
HPC 4x DDR IB mezzanine HCA
409779–001
409377–001
Boards and Cards
AD217–69001
Server Blade Components List
77
Table A-1 FRU List (continued)
Description
Manufacturing Part Number
Part Number
Replacement
Part Number
Exchange
Cables
Local I/O cable (SUV)
409496–001
416003–001
CPU MVR cable
AD217–2004A AD217–2004A
Miscellaneous
Air baffle, CPU
AD217–3404B
Air baffle, ZX2 controller
AD217–3410A AD217–3410A
Chassis plug, rear
AD217–3411B
AD217–3411B
Top cover, chassis
AD217–2105B
AD217–2105B
TPM module
314581–003
406059–001N
System battery. 3 V .22 A HR LI manganese dioxide part
number
1420-0356
SPS-DRV DVD+R/RW 2x/2x MBII PA
78
Parts Information
AD217–3404B
375557–001
375557–0012
B Operating System Boot and Shutdown
This appendix covers procedures for booting and shutting down operating systems that run on
the server blade. The operating systems that run on the server blade are HP-UX 11i Version 2
(B.11.23), HP OpenVMS v 8.3, Microsoft Windows Enterprise Server 2003, Red Hat Enterprise
Linux 4 update 4, and Novell SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 10.
The following sections are included in this appendix:
• “Operating Systems Supported on the Server Blade” (page 79)
• “Configure System Boot Options” (page 79)
• “Booting and Shutting Down HP-UX” (page 80)
• “Booting and Shutting Down HP OpenVMS” (page 85)
• “Booting and Shutting Down Microsoft Windows” (page 88)
• “Booting and Shutting Down Linux” (page 92)
Operating Systems Supported on the Server Blade
HP supports the following operating systems on the server blade.
• HP-UX 11i Version 2 (B.11.23)
• HP OpenVMS v8.3
• Microsoft Windows Server 2003
• Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
• SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 10
Configure System Boot Options
This section discusses the configurable system boot options on the HP Integrity BL860c server
blade, including the boot options list and the autoboot setting for the server.
• Boot Options List
The boot options list is a list of loadable items available for you to choose
from the EFI Boot Manager menu. Ordinarily the boot options list includes the EFI Shell
and one or more operating system loaders.
The following example includes boot options for HP-UX, Linux, and the EFI Shell. The final
item in the EFI Boot Manager menu, the Boot Option Maintenance Menu, is not a boot option.
The Boot Option Maintenance Menu allows system configuration through a maintenance
menu.
EFI Boot Manager ver 1.10 [14.61]
Please select a boot option
EFI Shell [Built-in]
HP-UX Primary Boot: 4/0/1/1/0.2.0
Boot Option Maintenance Menu
Use ^ and v to change option(s). Use Enter to select an option
NOTE: In some versions of EFI, the Boot Option Maintenance Menu menu is listed as
the Boot Configuration Menu.
To manage the boot options list for each system, use the EFI Shell, the EFI Boot Option
Maintenance Menu, or operating system utilities.
At the EFI Shell, use the bcfg command to support list and manage the boot options list
for HP-UX.
The EFI Boot Option Maintenance Menu provides the Add a Boot Option, Delete Boot
Option(s), and Change Boot Order menu items (use this method if you must add an EFI
Shell entry to the boot options list).
Operating system utilities for managing the boot options list include the HP-UX setboot
command.
Operating Systems Supported on the Server Blade
79
•
See the following section for details:
— Setting HP-UX boot options (see “Adding HP-UX to the Boot Options List” (page 80))
Autoboot Setting
The autoboot setting determines, at startup, whether a system
automatically loads the first item in the boot options list, or remains at the EFI Boot Manager
menu. With autoboot enabled, EFI loads the first item in the boot options list after a
designated timeout period.
Configure the autoboot setting for an HP Integrity system using either the autoboot EFI
Shell command, or the Set Auto Boot Time Out menu item from the EFI Boot Configuration
menu.
Examples of autoboot commands for HP-UX:
— disable autoboot from the EFI Shell by issuing autoboot off
— Enable autoboot with the default timeout value by issuing autoboot on
— Enable autoboot with a timeout of 60 seconds by issuing the autoboot time 60
— Set autoboot from HP-UX using setboot
— Enable autoboot from HP-UX using setboot -b on
— Disable autoboot using setboot -b off
Examples of autoboot commands for Linux:
• Disable autoboot from the EFI Shell by issuing autoboot off
• Enable autoboot with the default timeout value by issuing autoboot on
• Enable autoboot with a timeout of 60 seconds by issuing the autoboot 60
• Disable the automatic retries during autoboot by issuing autoboot -nr 0
For more information on the autoboot command, enter help autoboot.
Booting and Shutting Down HP-UX
This section covers booting and shutting down HP-UX on the HP Integrity BL860c server blade.
• To add an HP-UX entry to the boot options list, see “Adding HP-UX to the Boot Options
List” (page 80).
• To boot HP-UX, use the following procedures:
— “HP-UX Standard Boot” (page 81) describes the standard ways to boot HP-UX. Typically
this results in booting HP-UX in multi-user mode.
— “Booting HP-UX in Single-User Mode“Booting and Shutting Down Microsoft Windows”
(page )” (page 83) describes how to boot HP-UX in single-user mode.
— “Booting HP-UX in LVM-Maintenance Mode” (page 84) describes how to boot HP-UX
in LVM-maintenance mode.
• To shut down the HP-UX operating system, see “Shutting Down HP-UX” (page 84).
Adding HP-UX to the Boot Options List
This section describes how to add an HP-UX entry to the system boot options list.
You can add the \EFI\HPUX\HPUX.EFI loader to the boot options list from the EFI Shell or EFI
Boot Configuration menu (or in some versions of EFI, the Boot Options Maintenance Menu).
NOTE: On HP Integrity servers, the operating system installer automatically adds an entry to
the boot options list.
Adding the HP-UX Boot Option
This procedure adds an HP-UX item to the boot options list from the EFI Shell.
To add an HP-UX boot option when logged in to HP-UX, use the setboot command. For details,
see the setboot(1M) manpage.
1. Access the EFI Shell environment.
Log in to iLO for Integrity and enter CO to access the system console.
80
Operating System Boot and Shutdown
When accessing the console, confirm that you are at the EFI Boot Manager menu (the main
EFI menu). If you are at another EFI menu, choose the Exit option from the submenus until
you return to the screen with the EFI Boot Manager heading.
From the EFI Boot Manager menu, choose the EFI Shell menu option to access the EFI Shell
environment.
2.
Access the EFI System Partition (fsX: where X is the file system number) for the device
from which you want to boot HP-UX.
For example, enter fs2: to access the EFI System Partition for the bootable file system
number 2. The EFI Shell prompt changes to reflect the file system currently accessed.
The full path for the HP-UX loader is \EFI\HPUX\HPUX.EFI and it should be on the device
you are accessing.
3.
At the EFI Shell environment, use the bcfg command to manage the boot options list.
The bcfg command includes the following options for managing the boot options list:
• bcfg boot dump — Display all items in the boot options list for the system.
• bcfg boot rm # — Remove the item number specified by # from the boot options
list.
• bcfg boot mv #a #b — Move the item number specified by #a to the position specified
by #b in the boot options list.
• bcfg boot add # file.efi "Description" — Add a new boot option to the position in
the boot options list specified by #. The new boot option references file.efi and is listed
with the title specified by Description.
For example, bcfg boot add 1 \EFI\HPUX\HPUX.EFI "HP-UX 11i"adds an
HP-UX 11i item as the first entry in the boot options list.
See the help bcfg command for details.
4.
Exit the console and iLO for Integrity interfaces if you are finished using them.
Press Ctrl–B to exit the system console and return to the iLO MP Main Menu. To exit the
MP, type X at the Main Menu.
HP-UX Standard Boot
Use either of the following procedures to boot HP-UX:
• “Booting HP-UX (EFI Boot Manager)”; or
• “Booting HP-UX (EFI Shell)”
Booting HP-UX (EFI Boot Manager)
From the EFI Boot Manager menu, choose an item from the boot options list to boot HP-UX.
1. Access the EFI Boot Manager menu for the system on which you want to boot HP-UX.
Log in to iLO for Integrity and enter CO to choose the system console.
Confirm that you are at the EFI Boot Manager menu (the main EFI menu) when accessing
the console. If you are at another EFI menu, choose the Exit option from the submenus until
you return to the screen with the EFI Boot Manager heading.
2.
At the EFI Boot Manager menu, choose an item from the boot options list.
Each item in the boot options list references a specific boot device and provides a specific
set of boot options or arguments you use when booting the device.
3.
4.
Press Enter to initiate booting using the chosen boot option.
Exit the console and iLO MP interfaces when finished using them.
Press Ctrl–B to exit the system console and return to the MP Main Menu. To exit the MP
Main Menu, type X at the MP Main Menu.
Booting and Shutting Down HP-UX
81
Booting HP-UX (EFI Shell)
From the EFI Shell environment, boot HP-UX on a device by first accessing the EFI System
Partition (for example fs0:) for the root device, then enteringHPUXto initiate the loader.
1. Access the EFI Shell environment for the system on which you want to boot HP-UX.
Log in to the iLO for Integrity and enter CO to choose the system console.
Confirm that you are at the EFI Boot Manager menu (the main EFI menu) when accessing
the console. If you are at another EFI menu, choose the Exit option from the submenus until
you return to the screen with theEFI Boot Managerheading.
From the EFI Boot Manager menu, choose the EFI Shellmenu option to access the EFI Shell
environment.
The EFI shell displays all the files systems and block devices available.
2.
At the EFI Shell environment, issue the mapcommand to list all currently mapped bootable
devices.
The bootable file systems of interest typically are listed as fs0:, fs1:, and so on.
3.
Access the EFI System Partition (fsX: where X is the file system number) for the device
from which you want to boot HP-UX.
For example, enter fs2: to access the EFI System Partition for the bootable file system
number 2. The EFI Shell prompt changes to reflect the file system currently accessed.
NOTE: The file system number might change each time it is mapped (for example, when
the system boots, or when you issue themap -rcommand).
4.
When accessing the EFI System Partition for the desired boot device, issue the HPUX command
to initiate the HPUX.EFIloader on the device you are accessing.
The full path for the loader is \EFI\HPUX\HPUX.EFI. When initiated, the loader references
the \EFI\HPUX\AUTOfile and proceeds to boot HP-UX using the default boot behavior
specified in the AUTOfile.
You have 10 seconds to interrupt the automatic booting of the default boot behavior. Pressing
any key during this 10 second period stops the HP-UX boot process and enables you to
interact with the HPUX.EFIloader. To exit the loader (the HPUX> prompt) enter exit (this
returns you to the EFI Shell).
To boot the HP-UX operating system, do not type anything during the 10 second period
given for stopping at the HPUX.EFIloader.
Shell>
Device
fs0
blk0
blk1
blk2
blk3
blk4
map
mapping table
: Acpi(000222F0,269)/Pci(0|0)/Scsi(Pun8,Lun0)/HD(Part1,Sig72550000)
: Acpi(000222F0,269)/Pci(0|0)/Scsi(Pun8,Lun0)
: Acpi(000222F0,269)/Pci(0|0)/Scsi(Pun8,Lun0)/HD(Part1,Sig72550000)
: Acpi(000222F0,269)/Pci(0|0)/Scsi(Pun8,Lun0)/HD(Part2,Sig72550000)
: Acpi(000222F0,2A8)/Pci(0|0)/Scsi(Pun8,Lun0)
: Acpi(000222F0,2A8)/Pci(0|1)/Scsi(Pun2,Lun0)
Shell> fs0:
fs0:\> hpux
(c) Copyright 1990-2002, Hewlett Packard Company.
All rights reserved
HP-UX Boot Loader for IA64
Revision 1.723
Press Any Key to interrupt Autoboot
82
Operating System Boot and Shutdown
\efi\hpux\AUTO ==> boot vmunix
Seconds left till autoboot 9
5.
Exit the console and iLO for Integrity interfaces when finished using them.
Press Ctrl–B to exit the system console and return to the MP Main Menu. To exit the MP
Main Menu, type X at the MP Main Menu.
Booting HP-UX in Single-User Mode“Booting and Shutting Down Microsoft Windows”
(page 88)
Use the following procedure to boot HP-UX in single-user mode.
Booting HP-UX in Single-User Mode (EFI Shell)
From the EFI Shell environment, boot in single-user mode by stopping the boot process at the
HPUX.EFI interface (the HP-UX Boot Loader prompt, HPUX>) and entering the boot -is
vmunixcommand.
1. Access the EFI Shell environment for the system on which you want to boot HP-UX in
single-user mode.
Log in to the iLO for Integrity (MP) and enter CO to choose the system console.
Confirm that you are at the EFI Boot Manager menu (the main EFI menu) when accessing
the console. If you are at another EFI menu, choose the Exit option from the submenus until
you return to the screen with the EFI Boot Managerheading.
From the EFI Boot Manager menu, choose the EFI Shellmenu option to access the EFI Shell
environment.
2.
Access the EFI System Partition by entering fsX.
where Xis the file system number for the device used to boot HP-UX.
3.
4.
When accessing the EFI System Partition for the desired boot device, issue the HPUXcommand
to initiate the \EFI\HPUX\HPUX.EFIloader on the device you are accessing.
Boot to the HP-UX Boot Loader prompt (HPUX>) by pressing any key within the 10 seconds
given for interrupting the HP-UX boot process. Use the HPUX.EFIloader to boot HP-UX in
single-user mode in the next step.
After you press a key, the HPUX.EFIinterface (the HP-UX Boot Loader prompt, HPUX>)
launches. For help using the HPUX.EFIloader, enter the help command. To return to the
EFI Shell, enter exit.
fs0:\> hpux
(c) Copyright 1990-2002, Hewlett Packard Company.
All rights reserved
HP-UX Boot Loader for IA64
Revision 1.723
Press Any Key to interrupt Autoboot
\efi\hpux\AUTO ==> boot vmunix
Seconds left till autoboot 9
[User Types A Key to Stop the HP-UX Boot Process and Access the HPUX.EFI Loader ]
Type ’help’ for help
HPUX>
5.
At the HPUX.EFIinterface (the HP-UX Boot Loader prompt, HPUX>) enter the boot -is
vmunix command to boot HP-UX (the /stand/vmunixkernel) in single-user (-is) mode.
HPUX> boot -is vmunix
> System Memory = 4063 MB
loading section 0
................................................... (complete)
loading section 1
........ (complete)
loading symbol table
Booting and Shutting Down HP-UX
83
loading System Directory(boot.sys) to MFS
....
loading MFSFILES Directory(bootfs) to MFS
......
Launching /stand/vmunix
SIZE: Text:25953K + Data:3715K + BSS:3637K = Total:33306K
Console is on a Serial Device
Booting kernel...
6.
Exit the console and iLO for Integrity interfaces when finished using them.
Press Ctrl–B to exit the system console and return to the MP Main Menu. To exit the MP,
type X at the MP Main Menu.
Booting HP-UX in LVM-Maintenance Mode
Use the following procedure to boot HP-UX in LVM-maintenance mode.
Booting HP-UX in LVM-Maintenance Mode (EFI Shell)
From the EFI Shell environment, boot in LVM-maintenance mode by stopping the boot process
at the HPUX.EFI interface (the HP-UX Boot Loader prompt, HPUX>) and entering the boot -lm
vmunix command.
1. Access the EFI Shell environment for the system on which you want to boot HP-UX in
LVM-maintenance mode.
Log in to the iLO for Integrity and enter CO to choose the system console.
Confirm that you are at the EFI Boot Manager menu (the main EFI menu) when accessing
the console. If you are at another EFI menu, choose the Exit option from the submenus until
you return to the screen with the EFI Boot Manager heading.
From the EFI Boot Manager menu, choose the EFI Shell menu option to access the EFI Shell
environment.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Access the EFI System Partition (fsX: where X is the file system number) for the device
from which you want to boot HP-UX.
When accessing the EFI System Partition for the desired boot device, issue the HPUXcommand
to initiate the \EFI\HPUX\HPUX.EFI loader on the device you are accessing.
Type any key within the 10 seconds given for interrupting the HP-UX boot process. This
stops the boot process at the HPUX.EFI interface (the HP-UX Boot Loader prompt, HPUX>).
At the HPUX.EFI interface, enter the boot -lm vmunixcommand to boot HP-UX (the
/stand/vmunix kernel) in LVM-maintenance (-lm) mode.
Exit the console and iLO for Integrity interfaces when finished using them.
Press Ctrl–B to exit the system console and return to the MP Main Menu. To exit the MP,
type X at the MP Main Menu.
Shutting Down HP-UX
To shut down HP-UX running on a system, use the shutdown command. You have the following
options when shutting down HP-UX:
• Shut down and reboot an HP-UX system using shutdown -r
• Shut down and halt (power off) an HP-UX system using shutdown -h
For details, see the shutdown(1M) manpage and the following procedure:
Shutting Down HP-UX (/sbin/shutdown Command)
From the HP-UX command line, issue the shutdowncommand to shut down the HP-UX operating
system.
84
Operating System Boot and Shutdown
1.
Log in to HP-UX running on the system that you want to shut down.
Log in to iLO for Integrity (MP) for the server and use the Console menu to access the system
console. Accessing the console through iLO for Integrity (MP) enables you to maintain
console access to the system after HP-UX has shut down.
2.
Issue the shutdowncommand with the appropriate command-line options.
The command-line options you specify dictate the way in which HP-UX shuts down, and
whether the system is rebooted.
Use the following list to choose an HP-UX shutdown option for your system:
• Shut down HP-UX and halt (power off) the system using shutdown -h
Reboot a halted system by powering on the system using the PC command at the iLO
MP Command menu.
•
Shut down HP-UX and reboot the system by issuing shutdown -r
Booting and Shutting Down HP OpenVMS
NOTE: Before booting or installing the OpenVMS operating system on the rx2660 server, see
the following Web site for the Server Errata Sheet for OpenVMS on the HP Integrity rx2660
Server: http://www.docs.hp.com/en/hw.html.
Once you have reached the Enterprise Servers, Workstations and Systems Hardware site, click
the HP Integrity rx2660 Server link and refer to documentation specific to OpenVMS.
This section has procedures for booting and shutting down HP OpenVMS on the HP Integrity
rx2660 server, and procedures for adding OpenVMS to the boot options list.
• To add an OpenVMS entry to the boot options list, refer to “Adding OpenVMS to the Boot
Options List” (page 85).
• To boot HP OpenVMS on an entry-class HP Integrity server, refer to “Booting OpenVMS”
(page 86).
• To shut down HP OpenVMS, refer to “Shutting Down OpenVMS” (page 87).
Adding OpenVMS to the Boot Options List
On the rx2660 you can manage boot options using the command procedure
SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM. This procedure offers you several options:
$ @sys$manager:boot_options.com
OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager Boot Options List Management Utility
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(B)
(D)
(G)
ADD an entry to the Boot Options list
DISPLAY the Boot Options list
REMOVE an entry from the Boot Options list
MOVE the position of an entry in the Boot Options list
VALIDATE boot options and fix them as necessary
Modify Boot Options TIMEOUT setting
Set to operate on the Boot Device Options list
Set to operate on the Dump Device Options list
Set to operate on the Debug Device Options list
(E) EXIT from Boot Manager utility
You can also enter Ctrl-Y at any time to abort this utility.
Enter your choice:
To ADD an entry to the Boot Options list, select option (1):
Enter your choice: 1
Enter the device name (Enter "?" for a list of devices): ?
Booting and Shutting Down HP OpenVMS
85
Device
Name
$1$DGA700:
$1$DGA1510:
$1$DGA4000:
$26$DKB5:
(NODE1)
(NODE1)
(NODE1)
(NODE1)
Device
Name
EWA0:
EWB0:
EFI
Device
Status
Mounted
Mounted
Mounted
Mounted
Error
Count
0
0
0
0
Device
Status
Online
Online
Error
Count
1
0
Volume
Free Trans Mnt
Label
Blocks Count Cnt
(remote mount)
1
(remote mount)
1
WORK
130695025
1
9
DISK_V83
540949440
333
1
Built-in EFI Shell
Enter the device name (Enter "?" for a list of devices): $26$DKB5
Enter the desired position number (1,2,3,,,) of the entry.
To display the Boot Options list, enter "?" and press Return.
Position [1]: 10
Enter the value for VMS_FLAGS in the form n,n.
VMS_FLAGS [NONE]:
Enter a short description (do not include quotation marks).
Description ["$26$DKB5"]: V83 System Disk
efi$bcfg: $26$dkb5 (Boot0008) Option successfully added
Enter your choice:
For more details, see the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 for Integrity Servers Upgrade and Installation
Manual. Here is a link to the manual:
http://h71000.www7.hp.com/doc/83final/ba322_90045/index.html.
Booting OpenVMS
To boot OpenVMS on an rx2660 server, use either of the following procedures:
• “Booting OpenVMS (EFI Boot Manager)” on page 89
• “Booting OpenVMS (EFI Shell)” on page 89
Booting OpenVMS (EFI Boot Manager)
To boot OpenVMS from the EFI Boot Manager menu, perform the following steps:
1. From the EFI Boot Manager menu, choose an item from the boot options list to boot
OpenVMS using the chosen boot option.
2. Access the EFI Boot Manager menu for the server on which you want to boot OpenVMS.
Log in to the iLO MP and enterCOto choose the system console.
NOTE: When accessing the console, confirm that you are at the EFI Boot Managermenu
(the main EFI menu). If you are at another EFI menu, choose the Exit option from the
submenus until you return to the screen with the EFI Boot Manager heading.
86
3.
At the EFI Boot Manager menu, choose an item from the boot options list.
Each item in the boot options list references a specific boot device and provides a specific
set of boot options or arguments to use when booting the device.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Press Enter to initiate booting using the chosen boot option.
Exit the console and iLO MP interfaces when finished using them.
EnterCtrl-Bto exit the system console and return to the iLO MP Main Menu.
Exit iLO MP by typingXat the iLO MP Main Menu.
Operating System Boot and Shutdown
Booting HP OpenVMS (EFI Shell)
From the EFI Shell environment, to boot OpenVMS on a device, first access the bootable partition
(for example fs0:) for the root device and enter\efi\vms\vms_loaderto initiate the OpenVMS
loader.
1. Access the EFI Shell environment for the server on which you want to boot OpenVMS.
Log in to the iLO MP and enterCOto choose the system console.
NOTE: When accessing the console, confirm that you are at the EFI Boot Manager menu
(the main EFI menu). If you are at another EFI menu, choose the Exit option from the
submenus until you return to the screen with the EFI Boot Manager heading.
2.
3.
4.
From the EFI Boot Manager menu, choose the EFI Shell menu option to access the EFI Shell
environment.
At the EFI Shell environment, issue themap -Fscommand to list all currently mapped
bootable devices.
The bootable file systems are listed asfs0:, fs1:, and so on.
Access the bootable partition (fsX: where X is the file system number) for the device you
want to boot OpenVMS.
For example, typefs2:to access the bootable partition for the bootable file system number
2.
The EFI Shell prompt changes to reflect the file system currently accessed.
NOTE: The file system number might change each time it is mapped (for example, when
the server boots, or when themap -rcommand is issued).
5.
When accessing the bootable partition for the desired boot device, issue
the\efi\vms\vms_loadercommand to initiate thevms_loader.efiloader on the device
you are accessing.
fs5:> \efi\vms\vms_loader.efi
HP OpenVMS Industry Standard 64 Operating System, Version V8.3
© Copyright 1976-2006 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
%DECnet-I-LOADED, network base image loaded, version = 05.13.00
%SMP-I-CPUTRN, CPU #02 has joined the active set.
%SMP-I-CPUTRN, CPU #03 has joined the active set.
%SMP-I-CPUTRN, CPU #01 has joined the active set.
%SYSINIT-I- waiting to form or join an OpenVMS Cluster
%VMScluster-I-LOADSECDB, loading the cluster security database
%EWA0, Auto-negotiation mode assumed set by console
%EWA0, Merl5704 located in 64-bit, 66-mhz PCI-X slot
%EWA0, Device type is BCM5704C (UTP) Rev B0 (21000000)
%EWB0, Auto-negotiation mode assumed set by console
%EWB0, Merl5704 located in 64-bit, 66-mhz PCI-X slot
%EWB0, Device type is BCM5704C (UTP) Rev B0 (21000000)
%PKA0, Copyright (c) 2001 LSI Logic, PKM V1.1.01 Chip LSISAS1068
%EWA0, Link up: 1000 mbit, full duplex, flow control disabled
6.
7.
Exit the console and iLO MP interfaces when finished using them.
EnterCtrl-Bto exit the system console and return to the iLO MP Main Menu. To exit the iLO
MP, type Xat the iLO MP Main Menu.
Shutting Down OpenVMS
This section describes how to shut down the HP OpenVMS operating system on an rx2660 server.
From the OpenVMS DCLprompt, issue the@SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWNcommand to shut down
the OpenVMS operating system. Use the following steps:
Booting and Shutting Down HP OpenVMS
87
1.
Log in to OpenVMS running on the server that you want to shut down.
Log in to the iLO MP for the server and use the Console menu to access the system console.
Accessing the console through the iLO MP enables you to maintain console access to the
server after HP OpenVMS has shut down.
2.
At theOpenVMS DCLprompt issue the@SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWNcommand and specify the
shutdown options in response to the prompts given.
$@sys$system:shutdown
SHUTDOWN -- Perform an Orderly System Shutdown
on node NODE1
How many minutes until final shutdown [0]:
Reason for shutdown [Standalone]:
Do you want to spin down the disk volumes [NO]?
Do you want to invoke the site-specific shutdown procedure [YES]?
Should an automatic system reboot be performed [NO]?
When will the system be rebooted [later]:
Shutdown options (enter as a comma-separated list):
REMOVE_NODE
Remaining nodes in the cluster should adjust quorum
CLUSTER_SHUTDOWN
Entire cluster is shutting down
REBOOT_CHECK
Check existence of basic system files
SAVE_FEEDBACK
Save AUTOGEN feedback information from this boot
DISABLE_AUTOSTART
Disable autostart queues
POWER_OFF
Request console to power-off the system
BIB_STATE
Request console to reboot all CPUs to the Itanium BIB state
Shutdown options [NONE]: REBOOT_CHECK
%SHUTDOWN-I-BOOTCHECK, performing reboot consistency check...
%SHUTDOWN-I-CHECKOK, basic reboot consistency check completed
%SHUTDOWN-I-OPERATOR, this terminal is now an operator's console
%SHUTDOWN-I-DISLOGINS, interactive logins will now be disabled
%SET-I-INTSET, login interactive limit = 0, current interactive value = 1
%SHUTDOWN-I-SHUTNET, the DECnet network will now be shut down
NOTE:
HP OpenVMS I64 currently does not support thePOWER_OFFshutdown option.
Booting and Shutting Down Microsoft Windows
This section describes how to boot and shut down Microsoft Windows on the server blade, and
how to add Windows entries to the system boot options list.
• “Adding Microsoft Windows to the Boot Options List” (page 88)
• “Booting the Microsoft Windows Operating System” (page 90)
• “Shutting Down Microsoft Windows” (page 91)
Adding Microsoft Windows to the Boot Options List
To add a Microsoft Windows entry to the system boot options list you must do so from EFI by
using the \MSUtil\nvrboot.efi utility to import boot options from the
EFI\Microsoft\WINNT50\Boot00... file on the device from which Windows is loaded.
This procedure adds the Microsoft Windows item to the boot options list.
NOTE: On HP Integrity servers, the operating system installer automatically adds an entry to
the boot options list.
1.
88
Access the EFI Shell environment.
Log in to the iLO MP and enter CO to access the system console.
When accessing the console, confirm that you are at the EFI Boot Manager menu (the main
EFI menu). If you are at another EFI menu, choose the Exit option from the submenus until
you return to the screen with the EFI Boot Manager heading.
Operating System Boot and Shutdown
From the EFI Boot Manager menu, choose the EFI Shell menu option to access the EFI Shell
environment.
2.
Access the EFI System Partition (fsX: where X is the file system number) for the device
from which you want to boot Windows.
For example, enter fs2: to access the EFI System Partition for the bootable file system
number 2. The EFI Shell prompt changes to reflect the file system currently accessed.
The full path for the Microsoft Windows loader is
\efi\microsoft\winnt50\ia64ldr.efi and it should be on the device you are
accessing. However, you must only initiate this loader from the EFI Boot Menu and not from
the EFI Shell.
3.
List the contents of the \EFI\Microsoft\WINNT50directory to identify the name of the
Windows boot option file (Boot00nn) that you want to import into the system boot options
list.
fs0:\> ls EFI\Microsoft\WINNT50
Directory of: fs0:\EFI\Microsoft\WINNT50
09/18/03
09/18/03
12/18/03
11:58a <DIR>
11:58a <DIR>
08:16a
1 File(s)
2 Dir(s)
1,024
1,024
354
354 bytes
.
..
Boot0001
fs0:\>
4.
At the EFI Shell environment, issue the \MSUtil\nvrboot.efi command to launch the
Microsoft Windows boot options utility.
fs0:\> msutil\nvrboot
NVRBOOT: OS Boot Options Maintenance Tool [Version 5.2.3683]
1.
2.
* 3.
4.
SUSE SLES 10
HP-UX Primary Boot: 0/0/1/0/0.2.0
Windows Server 2003, Datacenter
EFI Shell [Built-in]
* = Windows OS boot option
(D)isplay (M)odify (C)opy E(x)port (I)mport (E)rase (P)ush (H)elp (Q)uit
Select>
5.
Use the Import command to import the Window boot option file.
Select> i
Enter IMPORT file path: \EFI\Microsoft\WINNT50\Boot0001
Imported Boot Options from file: \EFI\Microsoft\WINNT50\Boot0001
Press enter to continue
NOTE: Due to the type of server you purchased, your output may not exactly match the
output shown here.
6.
Enter Q to quit the NVRBOOT utility, and exit the console and iLO MP interfaces if you are
finished using them.
Enter Ctrl-B to exit the system console and return to the iLO MP Main Menu. To exit the
iLO MP, enter x at the Main Menu.
Booting and Shutting Down Microsoft Windows
89
Booting the Microsoft Windows Operating System
Boot the Windows Server 2003 operating system on an HP Integrity server by using the EFI Boot
Manager to choose the appropriate Windows item from the boot options list. Refer to “Shutting
Down Microsoft Windows” (page 91) for details on shutting down the Windows operating
system.
1. From the EFI Boot Manager menu, choose an item from the boot options list to boot Windows
using the chosen boot option.
2. Access the EFI Boot Manager menu for the server on which you want to boot Windows.
Log in to the iLO MP and enter CO to choose the system console.
When accessing the console, confirm that you are at the EFI Boot Manager menu (the main
EFI menu). If you are at another EFI menu, choose the Exit option from the submenus until
you return to the screen with the EFI Boot Manager heading.
3.
At the EFI Boot Manager menu, choose an item from the boot options list.
Each item in the boot options list references a specific boot device and provides a specific
set of boot options or arguments to be used when booting the device.
4.
5.
Press Enter to initiate booting using the chosen boot option.
Once Windows begins loading, wait for the Special Administration Console (SAC) to become
available.
The SAC interface provides a text-based administration tool that is available from the system
console. For details refer to the SAC online help (enter ? at the SAC> prompt).
Loading.: Windows Server 2003, Datacenter
Starting: Windows Server 2003, Datacenter
Starting Windows...
********************************************************************************
Computer is booting, SAC started and initialized.
Use the "ch -?" command for information about using channels.
Use the "?" command for general help.
SAC>
NOTE: Due to the type of server you purchased, your output may not exactly match the
output shown here.
6.
90
Exit the console and iLO MP interfaces when finished using them.
Enter Ctrl-B to exit the console and return to the iLO MP Main menu. To exit the iLO MP,
enter x at the Main menu.
Operating System Boot and Shutdown
Shutting Down Microsoft Windows
Shut down the Windows operating system on HP Integrity servers by using the Start menu or
the shutdown command.
CAUTION: Do not shut down Windows using Special Administration Console (SAC) restart
or shutdown commands under normal circumstances.
Issuing restart or shutdown at the SAC> prompt causes the server to restart or shutdown
immediately and can result in the loss of data.
Instead use the Windows Start menu or the shutdown command to shut down gracefully.
To shut down Windows use either of the following methods.
• Choose Shut Down from the Start menu and choose either Restart or Shut down from the
pull-down menu.
The Restart menu item shuts down and restarts the server. The Shut down menu item
shuts down the server.
You can use this method when using a graphical interface to the server.
•
Issue the shutdown command from the Windows command line.
Refer to “” (page 91) for details.
You can issue this command from a command prompt through the Special Administration
Console (SAC) or from any other command line.
The Windows shutdown command includes the following options:
/s
Shuts down and halts (power off) the server. This is the equivalent of
Start—>Shut Down, Shut down. To power on the server, use the iLO MP PC
command.
/r
Shuts down and restarts the server. This is the equivalent of Start—>Shut Down,
Restart.
/a
Aborts a server shutdown.
/t xxx
Sets the timeout period before shutdown to xxx seconds. The timeout period
ranges from 0–600, with a default of 30.
Refer to the help shutdown Windows command for details.
Windows Shutdown from the Command Line
From the Windows command line, issue the shutdown command to shut down the operating
system.
1. Log in to Windows running on the server that you want to shut down.
For example, access the system console and use the Windows SAC interface to start a
command prompt, from which you can issue Windows commands to shut down the server.
2.
Check to see whether any users are logged in.
Use the query user or query session command.
3.
Issue the shutdowncommand and the appropriate options to shut down the Windows
Server 2003 on the server.
You have the following options when shutting down Windows:
• To shut down Windows and reboot: shutdown /r or choose the Start —> Shut Down
action and choose Restart from the pull-down menu.
• To shut down Windows and halt (power off server hardware): shutdown /s or choose
the Start —> Shut Down action and choose Shut down from the pull-down menu.
To reboot a halted server you must power on the server using the PC command at the
iLO MP Command menu.
•
To abort a shutdown (stop a shutdown that has been initiated): shutdown /a
Booting and Shutting Down Microsoft Windows
91
For example:
shutdown /r /t 60 /c "Shut down in one minute."
This command initiates a Windows system shutdown and reboot after a timeout period of
60 seconds. The /c option specifies a message that is broadcast to any other users of the
server.
Booting and Shutting Down Linux
This section covers booting and shutting down Linux on the server blade. Procedures for Red
Hat Enterprise Linux and SuSE Linux Enterprise Server are given in this section.
• To add a Linux entry to the boot options list, refer to “Adding Linux to the Boot Options
List” (page 92).
• To boot Linux, use the following procedures.
— Refer to “Booting the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Operating System” (page 93) for details
on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.
— Refer to “Booting the SuSE Linux Enterprise Server Operating System” (page 94) for
details on SuSE Linux Enterprise Server.
• To shut down either Red Hat Enterprise Linux or SuSE Linux Enterprise Server, refer to
“Shutting Down Linux” (page 95).
Adding Linux to the Boot Options List
This section describes how to add a Linux entry to the system boot options list. The processes
for adding both Red Hat Enterprise Linux and SuSE Linux Enterprise Servers are given here.
You can add the \EFI\redhat\elilo.efi loader or the \efi\SuSE\elilo.efi loader to
the boot options list from the EFI Shell or EFI Boot Configuration menu (or in some versions of
EFI, the Boot Option Maintenance Menu).
NOTE: On HP Integrity servers, the operating system installer automatically adds an entry to
the boot options list.
92
1.
Access the EFI Shell environment.
Log in to the iLO MP and enter CO to access the system console.
When accessing the console, confirm that you are at the EFI Boot Manager menu (the main
EFI menu). If you are at another EFI menu, choose the Exit option from the submenus until
you return to the screen with the EFI Boot Manager heading.
From the EFI Boot Manager menu, choose the EFI Shell menu option to access the EFI Shell
environment.
2.
Access the EFI System Partition (fsX: where Xis the file system number) for the device
from which you want to boot Linux.
For example, enter fs2: to access the EFI System Partition for the bootable file system
number 2. The EFI Shell prompt changes to reflect the file system currently accessed.
The full path for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux loader is \EFI\redhat\elilo.efi and it
should be on the device you are accessing.
The full path for the SuSE Linux Enterprise Server loader is \efi\SuSE\elilo.efi and
it should be on the device you are accessing.
3.
At the EFI Shell environment, use the bcfg command to manage the boot options list.
The bcfg command includes the following options for managing the boot options list:
• bcfg boot dump — Displays all items in the boot options list for the server.
• bcfg boot rm # — Removes the item number specified by #from the boot options
list.
Operating System Boot and Shutdown
•
•
bcfg boot mv #a #b — Moves the item number specified by #ato the position specified
by #b in the boot options list.
bcfg boot add # file.efi "Description" — Adds a new boot option to the position
in the boot options list specified by #. The new boot option references file.efi and is listed
with the title specified by Description.
For example, bcfg boot add 1 \EFI\redhat\elilo.efi "Red Hat
Enterprise Linux" adds a Red Hat Enterprise Linux item as the first entry in the
boot options list.
Likewise, bcfg boot add 1 \efi\SuSE\elilo.efi "SLES 10" adds a SuSE
Linux item as the first entry in the boot options list.
Refer to the help bcfg command for details.
4.
Exit the console and iLO MP interfaces if you are finished using them.
Enter Ctrl-B to exit the system console and return to the iLO MP Main Menu. To exit the
iLO MP, enter x at the Main Menu.
Booting the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Operating System
You can boot the Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system on HP Integrity servers using either
of these methods:
• Choose a Red Hat Enterprise Linux entry from the EFI Boot Manager menu.
To load the Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system at the EFI Boot Manager menu,
choose its entry from the list of boot options.
Choosing a Linux entry from the boot options list boots the operating system using
ELILO.EFI loader and the elilo.conf file.
•
Initiate the ELILO.EFI Linux loader from the EFI Shell.
Refer to “” (page 93) for details.
On a Red Hat Enterprise Linux boot device EFI System Partition, the full paths to the loader
and configuration files are: \EFI\redhat\elilo.efi and \EFI\redhat\elilo.conf
After choosing the file system for the boot device (for example, fs0:) initiate the Linux
loader from the EFI Shell prompt by entering the full path for the ELILO.EFI loader.
By default the ELILO.EFI loader boots Linux using the kernel image and parameters specified
by the default entry in the elilo.conf file on the EFI System Partition for the boot device.
To interact with the ELILO.EFI loader, interrupt the boot process (for example, type a space)
at the ELILO boot prompt. To exit the ELILO.EFI loader, use the exit command.
Booting Red Hat Enterprise Linux from the EFI Shell
Use this procedure to boot Red Hat Enterprise Linux from the EFI Shell.
1. Access the EFI Shell.
From the system console, choose the EFI Shell entry from the EFI Boot Manager menu to
access the shell.
2.
Access the EFI System Partition for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux boot device.
Use the map EFI Shell command to list the file systems (fs0, fs1, and so on) that are known
and mapped.
To choose a file system to use, enter its mapped name followed by a colon (:). For example,
to operate with the boot device that is mapped as fs3, enter fs3: at the EFI Shell prompt.
Booting and Shutting Down Linux
93
3.
Enter ELILO at the EFI Shell command prompt to launch the ELILO.EFI loader.
If needed, you can specify the loader path by entering \EFI\redhat\elilo at the EFI
Shell command prompt.
4.
Allow the ELILO.EFI loader to proceed with booting the Red Hat Enterprise Linux kernel.
By default, the ELILO.EFI loader boots the kernel image and options specified by the
default item in the elilo.conf file.
To interact with the ELILO.EFI loader, interrupt the boot process (for example, type a
space) at the ELILO boot prompt. To exit the loader use the exit command.
Booting the SuSE Linux Enterprise Server Operating System
You can boot the SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 operating system on HP Integrity servers
using either of these methods:
• Choose a SuSE Linux Enterprise Server entry from the EFI Boot Manager menu.
To load the SuSE Linux Enterprise Server operating system at the EFI Boot Manager menu,
choose its entry from the list of boot options.
Choosing a Linux entry from the boot options list boots the operating system using
ELILO.EFIloader and the elilo.conf file.
•
Initiate the ELILO.EFI Linux loader from the EFI Shell. Refer to “Booting SuSE Linux
Enterprise Server from the EFI Shell” (page 94) for details.
On a SuSE Linux Enterprise Server boot device EFI System Partition, the full paths to the
loader and configuration files are: \efi\SuSE\elilo.efi and \efi\SuSE\elilo.conf.
After choosing the file system for the boot device (for example, fs0:) you can initiate the
Linux loader from the EFI Shell prompt by entering the full path for the ELILO.EFI loader.
By default, the ELILO.EFI loader boots Linux using the kernel image and parameters specified
by the default entry in the elilo.conf file on the EFI System Partition for the boot device.
To interact with the ELILO.EFI loader, interrupt the boot process (for example, type a space)
at the ELILO boot prompt. To exit the ELILO.EFIloader, use the exit command.
Booting SuSE Linux Enterprise Server from the EFI Shell
Use this procedure to boot SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 from the EFI Shell.
1. Access the EFI Shell.
From the system console, choose the EFI Shell entry from the EFI Boot Manager menu to
access the shell.
94
2.
Access the EFI System Partition for the SuSE Linux Enterprise Server boot device.
Use the map EFI Shell command to list the file systems (fs0, fs1, and so on) that are known
and mapped.
To choose a file system to use, enter its mapped name followed by a colon (:). For example,
to operate with the boot device that is mapped as fs3, enter fs3: at the EFI Shell prompt.
3.
Enter ELILO at the EFI Shell command prompt to launch the ELILO.EFI loader.
If needed, you can specify the loader path by entering \efi\SuSE\elilo at the EFI Shell
command prompt.
4.
Allow the ELILO.EFI loader to proceed with booting the SuSE Linux kernel.
By default, the ELILO.EFI loader boots the kernel image and options specified by the
default item in the elilo.conf file.
To interact with the ELILO.EFI loader, interrupt the boot process (for example, type a
space) at the ELILO boot prompt. To exit the loader, use the exit command.
Operating System Boot and Shutdown
Shutting Down Linux
Use the shutdown command to shut down Red Hat Enterprise Linux or SuSE Linux Enterprise
Server.
The Red Hat Enterprise Linux and SuSE Linux Enterprise Server shutdowncommand has the
following options:
Halts (power off) after shutdown.
-h
Use the PC command at the iLO MP Command menu to manually power on or power
off server hardware, as needed.
-r
-c
time
Reboots after shutdown.
Cancels an already running shutdown.
When to shut down. (Required.) You can specify time in any of the following ways:
• Absolute time in the format hh:mm,; hh is the hour (one or two digits) and mm is the
minute of the hour (two digits).
• Number of minutes to wait in the format +m, in which m is the number of minutes.
• now to immediately shut down; this is equivalent to using +0 to wait zero minutes.
Refer to the shutdown(8) Linux manpage for details. Also refer to the Linux manpage for the
poweroff command.
1. From the command line for Red Hat Enterprise Linux or SuSE Linux Enterprise Server, issue
the shutdown command to shut down the operating system.
2. Log in to Linux running on the server you want to shut down.
3. Issue the shutdown command with the desired command-line options, and include the
required time argument to specify when the operating system shutdown is to occur.
For example, shutdown -r +20 shuts down and reboots the server in twenty minutes.
Booting and Shutting Down Linux
95
96
C Utilities
This appendix describes the utilities that are part of the server blade. These include the EFI boot
manager, and EFI-POSSE.
This appendix addresses the following topics:
• “NVRAM Backup Utility” (page 97)
• “Extensible Firmware Interface” (page 98)
• “EFI/POSSE Commands” (page 101)
• “Specifying SCSI Parameters” (page 115)
• “Using the Boot Option Maintenance Menu” (page 119)
• “Integrated Lights Out Management Processor” (page 125)
• “iLO MP Command Interface” (page 125)
NVRAM Backup Utility
The HP Integrity Non-Volatile RAM (NVRAM) configuration backup utility provides the
capability to store and restore critical system settings and EFI Boot Manager options on the HP
Integrity BL860c server blade. This utility is available as an offline EFI application.
Downloading and Installing the NVRAM Backup Utility
Use the following procedures to download and install the NVRAM backup utility onto your
server.
1. Connect to the HP Support & Drivers home pages at:
http://welcome.hp.com/country/us/en/support.html.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Select Download drivers and software.
Enter the server model number (BL860c) and click >> to begin the search.
Select the configuration of your server.
Select the operating system ( HP-UX 11.x).
Select Utility from the Quick jump list.
Select the following utility in the list:
hp Integrity Non-Volatile RAM Configuration Backup Utility.
8.
9.
Select the Release Notes tab to view the release notes with the installation instructions.
Click Download, then Save, and select a directory to save the utility package to. The utility
package downloads to the directory you selected.
Using the NVRAM Backup Utility
The following shows the options you can enter when using the NVRAM backup utility.
Syntax
nvrambkp [-h|-b|-r <archivedb>|-a <archivedb>|-o|-n|-v|-i|-l <log>]
Parameters
-h
-b
-r <archivedb>
-a <archivedb>
-o
-n
-v
Displays help text
Enables paging text (only allowed with -h)
Restores all non-volatile settings from the archived database
Archives all non-volatile settings to the archive database
Restores EFI Boot Manager options only (use only with -r)
Non-interactive mode, no user prompt
Validates the database that used on the server
NVRAM Backup Utility
97
-i
-l <log>
Database information
Creates a log file
Example C-1 nvrambkp -h
Hewlett-Packard (R) IPF Non-Volatile Configuration Back-up Utility
Version 01.00.00
Copyright (C) Hewlett-Packard. All rights reserved.
Usage:
Purpose:
The application provides the capability to archive & restore
critical system settings.
Options:
-h - Display the help text
-b - Enable paging text [Only works with -h]
-r - Restore all the Non-Volatile settings from the <restore database>
The -r option is not allowed with -a option
-a - Archive all the Non-Volatile settings to the <archive database>
The -a option is not allowed with -r option
-o - Restore the EFI Boot Manager options only
The -o option is only allowed with -r option
-n - Non-interactive mode; User will not be prompted
-v - Validate that the database can be used on the system
-i - Information about the database
-l - Log file
Help:
nvrambkp -h
Archive:
nvrambkp [-n] [-a <archive database>] [-l <log file>]
Restore All:
nvrambkp [-n] [-r <restore database>] [-l <log file>]
Restore Boot-Options Only:
nvrambkp -o [-n] [-r <restore database>] [-l <log file>]
Restore Database Validate:
nvrambkp -v [-r <restore database>] [-l <log file>]
Restore Database Information:
nvrambkp -i [-r <restore database>] [-l <log file>]
Extensible Firmware Interface
The Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) is an OS and platform-independent boot and pre-boot
interface. EFI resides between the OS and platform firmware, allowing the OS to boot without
having details about the underlying hardware and firmware. EFI supports boot devices, uses a
flat memory model, and hides platform and firmware details from the OS.
NOTE: EFI and Pre-OS System Environment (POSSE) are similar. EFI is an Intel® specification,
whereas POSSE is the HP implementation that aids HP support.
EFI consolidates boot utilities similar to those found in PA-RISC based systems, such as the Boot
Console Handler (BCH), and platform firmware into a single platform firmware. EFI allows the
selection of any EFI OS loader from any boot medium that is supported by EFI boot services. An
EFI OS loader supports multiple options on the user interface.
98
Utilities
EFI supports booting from media that contain an EFI OS loader or an EFI-defined system partition.
An EFI-defined system partition is required by EFI to boot from a block device.
Figure C-1 EFI Boot Sequence
The EFI boot manager loads EFI applications (including the OS first stage loader) and EFI drivers
from an EFI-defined file system or image loading service. Non-volatile RAM (NVRAM) variables
point to the file to be loaded. These variables contain application-specific data that is passed
directly to the EFI application. EFI variables provides system firmware a boot menu that points
to all the operating systems, even multiple versions of the same operating systems.
The EFI boot manager allows you to control the server’s booting environment. Depending on
how you have configured the boot options, after the server is powered up the boot manager
presents you with different ways to bring up the system. For example, you can boot to the EFI
shell, to an operating system located on the network or residing on media in the server, or the
Boot Maintenance menu. See “Using the Boot Option Maintenance Menu” (page 119) for more
information.
• Boot from a File— Automatically adds EFI applications as boot options or allows you to boot
from a specific file. When you choose this option, the system searches for an EFI directory.
If the EFI directory is found, then it looks in each of the subdirectories below EFI. In each
of those subdirectories, it looks for the first file that is an executable EFI application. Each
of the EFI applications that meet this criterion can be automatically added as a boot option.
In addition, legacy boot options for A: and C: are also added if those devices are present.
You can also launch a specific application without adding it as a boot option. In this case
the EFI boot manager searches the root directories and the \EFI\TOOLS directories of all
of the EFI system partitions present in the system for the specified EFI application.
• Add a Boot Option— Adds a boot option to the EFI boot manager. You specify the option by
providing the name of the EFI application. Along with the name you can also provide either
ASCII or UNICODE arguments the file might use. Given the EFI application name and any
options, the EFI boot manager searches for the executable file in the same directories as
described in “Boot from a File” option. When the file is found, it is executed.
• Delete Boot Options— Deletes a specific boot option or all boot options.
• Change Boot Order— Controls the relative order in which the EFI boot manager attempts
boot options. For help on the control key sequences you need for this option, see the help
menu.
• Manage BootNext Setting— Selects a boot option to use one time (the next boot operation).
• Set Automatic Boot Timeout— Defines the value in seconds that pass before the system
automatically boots without user intervention. Setting this value to zero disables the timeout
feature.
• Exit— Returns control to the EFI boot manager main menu. This displays the active boot
devices, including a possible integrated shell (if the implementation is so constructed).
Extensible Firmware Interface
99
EFI Commands
Table C-1 lists EFI commands for the server blade, and the equivalent BCH commands for
reference.
Table C-1 EFI Commands
EFI Shell Command
BCH Command
Equivalent
(PA-RISC)
BCH Command Parameters
(PA-RISC)
Definition
These commands are found in all other menus
info boot
Boot
[PRI|HAA|ALT|<path>]
Boot from specified path
help <command>
HElp
[<menu>|<command>]
Display help for specified command
or menu
reset
RESET
Reset the system (to allow
reconfiguration of complex)
exit (at EFI shell)
MAin
Return to the main menu
MAin
EFI boot manager
PAth
“change boot order”
[PRI|HAA|ALT|CON|KEY|<path>] Display or modify a path
bcfg
SEArch
[ALL]
Search for boot devices
bcfg
SEArch
[DIsplay|IPL] [<path>]
Search for boot devices
many commands
offer a [-b]
parameter to cause
25 line breaks
ScRoll
[ON|OFF]
Display or change scrolling capability
autoboot
AUto
[BOot|SEarch|STart] [ON|OFF]
Display or set the auto start flag
info boot
BootID
[<processor #>[<bootid #>]]
Display or set processor boot
identifier
EFI boot manager
Boot info
autoboot
BootTimer
[0-200]
Seconds allowed for boot attempt
cpuconfig
CPUconfig
[<proc>][ON|OFF]]
Config/deconfig processor
conconfig
Console config
[index][ON|OFF|primary]
Config primary console
boottest
FastBoot
[ON|OFF] or [test] [RUN|SKIP]
Display or set boot tests execution
date
Time
[cn:yr:mo:dy:hr:mn[:ss]]
Read or set the date
time
Time
[cn:yr:mo:dy:hr:mn[:ss]]
Read or set the real time clock
COnfiguration
Display boot-related information
INformation
100
info all
ALL
Display all system information
info boot
BootINfo
Display boot-related information
info cpu
CAche
Display cache information
info chiprev
ChipRevisions
Display revision number of major
VLSI
iLO MP command
<df>
FRU
Display FRU information
Utilities
Table C-1 EFI Commands (continued)
EFI Shell Command
BCH Command
Equivalent
(PA-RISC)
BCH Command Parameters
(PA-RISC)
Definition
info fw
FwrVersion
Display firmware version for PDC,
ICM, and complex
info io
IO
Display firmware version for PDC,
ICM, and complex
lanaddress
LanAddress
Display core LAN station address
info mem
Memory
Display memory information
info cpu
PRocessor
Display processor information
errdump clear
CLEARPIM
Clear (zero) the contents of PIM
mm
MemRead
pdt
page deallocation
table (pdt)
Display or clear the page deallocation
table
errdump mca
errdump cmc
errdump init
errdump cpe
processor internal [<proc>]
memory (PIM)
[HPMC|LPMC|TOC|ASIC]]
Display PIM information
SERvice
<addr> [<len>] [<type>]
Read memory locations scope of page
deallocation
EFI/POSSE Commands
This section describes the EFI/POSSE commands developed for the server.
NOTE: EFI and Pre-OS System Environment (POSSE) are similar. EFI is an Intel specification,
whereas POSSE is the HP implementation that aids HP support.
help
Provides information on the EFI shell commands. It also has an additional feature to aid those
familiar with the BCH menus to adjust to their equivalent functions in EFI.
Syntax
help [-b] <category>
help [-b] <cmd>
help [-b] bch <bchmenu> <bchcmd>
Parameters
-b
category
cmd
bch
bchmenu
bchcmd
Enable page breaking
Category of commands to view help on commands
Shell command name on which to provide verbose information
Display the list of BCH commands and their corresponding EFI
BCH menu name taken from the top level of the BCH menu
BCH command on which to display information
Operation
If help is invoked with no parameters, a list of shell command categories displays. To list all of
the commands within a category, type help <category> (see examples). If invoked with the
-b switch, any output longer than one page pauses after each page displays. If a shell command
name is used as a parameter, verbose help displays for that command.
EFI/POSSE Commands
101
If help is invoked with the bch option, it displays a list of BCH commands and their corresponding
EFI/POSSE commands. It instructs the user to repeat the command line followed by a menu
name for more information on that menu. If help is invoked followed by bch and a menu name,
it displays a list of commands that appear under that BCH menu. The user may then invoke help
followed by bch, the menu name, and a BCH command name to display information on that
command. This points the user to the command that has taken the place of that BCH functionality,
or will inform the user that the functionality no longer exists. As a shortcut, enter help followed
by bch and a BCH command name to go straight to that command.
102
Utilities
Example C-2 help Command
Shell> help
List of classes of commands:
boot
-- Booting options and disk-related commands
configuration -- Changing and retrieving system information
devices
-- Getting device, driver and handle information
memory
-- Memory related commands
shell
-- Basic shell navigation and customization
scripts
-- EFI shell-script commandsType "help" followed by a class name for a list of commands in that class
Type "help" followed by command name for full documentation
Example C-3 help bch Command
COnfiguration
INformation
PAth
ScRool
SEArch
SERvice
BOot
HElp
RESET
MAin
help
help
help
help
help
help
help
help
help
help
bch
bch
bch
bch
bch
bch
bch
bch
bch
bch
co
in
pa
sr
sea
ser
bo
he
reset
ma
For more help on one of the commands above, at the prompt type:
help bch COMMAND
Example C-4 help configuration Command
Shell> help configuration
Configuration commands:
cpuconfig
date
err
esiproc
errdump
info
monarch
palproc
salproc
time
ver
------------
Deconfigure or reconfigure cpus
Display or set date
Display or set error level
Make an ESI call
View/Clear logs
Display hardware information
View or set the monarch processor
Make a PAL call
Make a SAL call
Display or set time
Displays version info
Type "help" followed by command name for full documentationon that command.
Type "help -a" to display a list of all commands.
EFI/POSSE Commands
103
Example C-5 help cpuconfig Command
Shell> help cpuconfig
CPUCONFIG [cpu] [on|off]
cpu
Specifies which cpu to configure
on|off Specifies to configure or deconfigure a cpu
Notes:
1. Cpu status will not change until next boot
Examples:
* To deconfigure CPU 0
fs0:\> cpuconfig 0 off
CPU will be deconfigured on the next boot
* To display configuration status of cpus
fs0:\> cpuconfig
<CPU configuration data displayed>
baud
Sets the baud rate and communication settings for a universal asynchronous receiver-transmitter
(UART).
Syntax
baud <index> <baudrate>
Parameters
<index> 0 through the total number of UARTS minus one
<baudrate>
baud rate.
Operation
Use this command to change the speed for a UART in the system. This command works for all
UARTs visible to EFI/POSSE. If the UART is part of processor dependent hardware (PDH) space
and is initialized by the core firmware, this command communicates the settings to core firmware
so the UART can be initialized with the new settings on the next boot. System default is 9600
baud.
Other Communication parameters are listed in Table C-2.
Table C-2 Communications Parameters
Parameter
Value
RECEIVE_FIFO_DEPTH
1
TIMEOUT
1000000
PARITY
No parity
DATA_BITS
8
STOP_BITS
1
CONTROL_MASK
0
boottest
Interacts with the speedy boot variable allowing it to be set appropriately.
104
Utilities
Syntax
boottest
boottest
boottest
boottest
boottest
on
off
[test]
[test] [on|off]
Displays status of all speedy boot bits
Run all tests (for a normal boot time)
Skip all tests (for a faster boot time)
Displays status of specific Speedy Boot bit
Sets or clears a specific Speedy Boot bit
Parameters
[test]
Each test can be set or cleared:
booting_valid
Enable/disable system firmware response to BOOTING
bit. If OS Speedy Boot aware set to on.
early_cpu
Enable/disable early CPU selftests.
late_cpu
Enable/disable late CPU selftests.
platform
Enable/disable system board hardware tests.
chipset
Enable/disable CEC tests.
io_hw
Enable/disable EFI driver Core I/O tests.
mem_init
Enable/disable memory initialization.
mem_test
Enable/disable full destructive memory tests.
Example C-6 boottest Command
Shell> boottest
BOOTTEST Settings Default Variable
Selftest
Setting
------------------------------------booting_valid
On (OS speedy boot aware)
early_cpu
Run this test
late_cpu
Run this test
platform
Run this test
chipset
Run this test
io_hw
Run this test
mem_init
Run this test
mem_test
Run this test
Example C-7 boottest early_cpu off Command
Shell> boottest early_cpu off
BOOTTEST Settings Default Variable
Selftest
Setting
------------------------------------booting_valid
On (OS speedy boot aware)
early_cpu
Skip this test
late_cpu
Run this test
platform
Run this test
chipset
Run this test
io_hw
Run this test
mem_init
Run this test
mem_test
Run this test
cpuconfig
Use this command to display the config/deconfig state of processors in the system and allow the
user to configure or reconfigure processors.
Syntax
cpuconfig <cpu> <on|off>
Parameters
<cpu>
<on|off>
specify a processor
state to set the processor to
EFI/POSSE Commands
105
Operation
Issuing cpuconfig with no parameters displays the config/deconfig status of all processors. A
user can reconfigure CPUs by specifying a CPU number and a state (on or off). If a valid state is
entered and is different from the current state of a CPU, its status changes on the next boot. The
last remaining configured CPU in a system cannot be deconfigured.
Example C-8 cpuconfig Command
Shell> cpuconfig
PROCESSOR INFORMATION
# of
CPU
Logical
Slot
CPUs
Speed
----------------0
1
1 GHz
1
1
1 GHz
L3
Cache
Size
---1.5 MB
1.5 MB
L4
Cache
Size
----None
None
Family/
Model
(hex.) Rev
--------1F/01
B1
1F/01
B1
Processor
State
---------Active
Active
Family/
Model
(hex.)
-----1F/00
1F/00
Processor
State
---------Active
Sched Deconf
Example C-9 cpuconfig 2 Command
Shell> cpuconfig 2 off
CPU will be deconfigured on next boot.
Shell> cpuconfig
PROCESSOR INFORMATION
# of
CPU
Logical
Slot
CPUs
Speed
----------------0
1
1 GHz
1
1
1 GHz
L3
Cache
Size
---3 MB
3 MB
L4
Cache
Size
----None
None
Rev
---B2
B2
conconfig
Use this command to configure the primary console, and turn other consoles on for mirroring
from the firmware.
Syntax
conconfig [index][on|off|primary]
Parameters
Index
on
off
primary
Specifies index of console to set as primary
Enables the specified console as a secondary console
Puts console into "Not Configured" (NC) state
Sets the specified console as primary
Notes
1. Primary console setting will take effect after reboot
2. P in status column indicates console is primary
3. S in status column indicates console is secondary
4. NC in status column indicates console is not configured
5. If a disabled console is set to primary it will be enabled
Example C-10 conconfig Command
To display current primary operating system console
Shell> conconfig
CONSOLE CONFIGURATION
106
Utilities
Index Status Type
----- ------ ---1
NC
Serial
2
S
Serial
3
P
VGA
Device Path
----------Acpi(PNP0501,0)
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|1)
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(4|0)
Example C-11 conconfig 2 primaryCommand
To change primary operating system console
Shell> conconfig 2 primary
CONSOLE CONFIGURATION
Index Status Type
Device Path
----- ------ -------------1
NC Serial
Acpi(PNP0501,0)
2
P
Serial
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|1)
3
S
VGA
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(4|0)
Example C-12 conconfig 3 offCommand
To disable a console
Shell> conconfig 3 off
CONSOLE CONFIGURATION
Index Status Type
Device Path
----- ------ -------------1
NC
Serial
Acpi(PNP0501,0)
2
P
Serial
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|1
3
NC
VGA
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(4|0)
Example C-13 conconfig 3 onCommand
To enable a console
Shell> conconfig 3 on
CONSOLE CONFIGURATION
Index Status Type
Device Path
----- ------ -------------1
NC
Serial
Acpi(PNP0501,0)
2
P
Serial
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|1)
3
S
VGA
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(4|0)
default
Allows the user to restore non-volatile memory (NVM) to default values and clear NVM storage
values.
Syntax
default
default
[efi|sal]
clear [bmc|efi|sal]
Parameters
clear
clears NVM storage values
Operation
Default sets NVM and stable store values to predefined default values. To the normal user only
a subset of values are available for default. Executing “default clear” resets the system.
EFI/POSSE Commands
107
errdump
Displays the contents of processor internal memory logged on the first MCA for all processors
present in the system.
Syntax
errdump [mca | cpe | cmc | init | la | clear]
Parameters
mca
cpe
cmc
init
la
clear
dumps the Machine Check Abort error log
dumps the Corrected Platform Error log
dumps the Corrected Machine Check log
dumps the Initialization log
dumps the Logic Analyzer log
erases all of the logs (mca, cpe, cmc, init, la)
Operation
If a user enters no parameters, the usage is displayed. Otherwise, the specified error log displays.
Adding -n to the clear parameter disables the confirmation prompt (Access the errdumpcommand
from the System Configuration menu).
info
Displays most system information.
Syntax
info [ -b] [target]
Parameters
target:
all
cpu
cache
mem
io
boot
chiprev
fw
sys
warning
108
Utilities
valid targets are:
display everything
display information on cpus
display information on cache
display information on memory
display information on io
display boot-related information
display information on chip revisions
display firmware version information
display system information
display warning and stop boot information
Example C-14 info all Command
Shell> info all
SYSTEM INFORMATION
Date/Time: Oct 31, 2003 22:03:39 (20:03:10:31:22:03:39)
Manufacturer: hp
Product Name: server BL860c
Product Number: A9901A
Serial Number: MYJ3350026
UUID: 48B4F371-E34C-11D6-A8D6-07A8C14CB68B
System Bus Frequency: 200 MHz
PROCESSOR MODULE INFORMATION
CPU
Slot
# of
Logical
CPUs
---0
1
------1
1
Speed
L3
Cache
Size
L4
Cache
Size
Family/
Model
(hex.)
Rev
Processor
State
-------1 GHz
1 GHz
-----1.5 MB
1.5 MB
-----None
None
------1F/01
1F/01
--B1
B1
-----------Active
Active
MEMORY INFORMATION
---- DIMM A ----- ---- DIMM B ----DIMM
Current
DIMM
Current
--- ------ ---------- ------ ---------0
1024MB
Active 1024MB
Active
1
------2
------3
------Active Memory
: 2048 MB
Installed Memory : 2048 MB
I/O INFORMATION
BOOTABLE DEVICES
Order Media Type Path
----- ---------- --------------------------------------Seg Bus Dev Fnc Vendor Device Slot
#
#
#
#
ID
ID
#
Path
--- --- --- --- ------ ------ --- ----------00
00
01
00 0x1033 0x0035
XX Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|0)
00
00
01
01 0x1033 0x0035
XX Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|1)
00
00
01
02 0x1033 0x00E0
XX Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|2)
00
00
02
00 0x1095 0x0649
XX Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(2|0)
00
00
03
00 0x8086 0x1229
XX Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(3|0)
00
20
01
00 0x1000 0x0030
XX Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)
00
20
01
01 0x1000 0x0030
XX Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|1)
00
20
02
00 0x14E4 0x1645
XX Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(2|0)
BOOT INFORMATION
Monarch CPU:
Current Preferred
Monarch
Monarch
Possible Warnings
------- --------- ----------------0
0
AutoBoot: OFF - Timeout is disabled
Boottest:
BOOTTEST Settings Default Variable
OS is not speedy boot aware.
EFI/POSSE Commands
109
Selftest
--------early_cpu
late_cpu
platform
chipset
io_hw
mem_init
mem_test
Setting
-------------Run this test
Run this test
Run this test
Run this test
Run this test
Run this test
Run this test
LAN Address Information:
LAN Address
----------------Mac(00306E4C4F1A)
*Mac(00306E4C0FF2)
Path
---------------------------------------Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(3|0)/Mac(00306E4C4F1A))
Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(2|0)/Mac(00306E4C0FF2))
FIRMWARE INFORMATION
Firmware Revision: 1.10 [4341]
PAL_A Revision: 7.31/5.37
PAL_B Revision: 5.37
SAL Spec Revision: 3.01
SAL_A Revision: 2.00
SAL_B Revision: 1.10
EFI Spec Revision: 1.10
EFI Intel Drop Revision: 14.61
EFI Build Revision: 1.10
POSSE Revision: 0.10
ACPI Revision: 7.00
BMC Revision: 2.24
IPMI Revision: 1.00
SMBIOS Revision: 2.3.2a
Management Processor Revision: E.02.25
WARNING AND STOP BOOT INFORMATION
CHIP REVISION INFORMATION
Chip
Type
------------------Memory Controller
Root Bridge
Host Bridge
Host Bridge
Host Bridge
Host Bridge
Other Bridge
Other Bridge
Baseboard MC
110
Utilities
Logical
ID
------0
0
0000
0001
0002
0004
0
0
0
Device
ID
-----122b
1229
122e
122e
122e
122e
0
0
0
Chip
Revision
-------0023
0023
0032
0032
0032
0032
0002
0007
0224
Example C-15 info cpu Command
Shell> info cpu
PROCESSOR MODULE INFORMATION
# of
Logical
CPUs
------1
1
CPU
Slot
---0
1
Speed
-------1 GHz
1 GHz
L3
Cache
Size
-----1.5 MB
1.5 MB
L4
Cache
Size
-----None
None
Family/
Model
(hex.)
------1F/01
1F/01
Rev
--B1
B1
Processor
State
-----------Active
Active
Example C-16 info mem Command
Shell> info mem
MEMORY INFORMATION
---- DIMM A ----- ---- DIMM B ----DIMM
Current
DIMM
Current
--- ------ ---------- ------ ---------0
1024MB
Active 1024MB
Active
1
------2
------3
------Active Memory
: 2048 MB
Installed Memory : 2048 MB
Example C-17 info io Command
I/O INFORMATION
BOOTABLE DEVICES
Order
----1
Seg
#
--00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
Media Type
---------CDROM
Bus
#
--00
00
00
00
00
20
20
20
40
40
80
E0
E0
E0
Dev
#
--01
01
01
02
03
01
01
02
01
01
01
01
01
02
Fnc
#
--00
01
02
00
00
00
01
00
00
01
00
00
01
00
Path
--------------------------------------Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(2|0)/Ata(Primary,Master)/CDROM(Entry0)
Vendor
ID
-----0x1033
0x1033
0x1033
0x1095
0x8086
0x1000
0x1000
0x14E4
0x1000
0x1000
0x14E4
0x103C
0x103C
0x1002
Device Slot
ID
#
------ --0x0035
XX
0x0035
XX
0x00E0
XX
0x0649
XX
0x1229
XX
0x0030
XX
0x0030
XX
0x1645
XX
0x0021
02
0x0021
02
0x1645
01
0x1290
XX
0x1048
XX
0x5159
XX
Path
----------Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|1)
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|2)
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(2|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(3|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|1)
Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(2|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,200)/Pci(1|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,200)/Pci(1|1)
Acpi(HWP0002,400)/Pci(1|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|1)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(2|0)
EFI/POSSE Commands
111
Example C-18 info boot Command
Shell> info boot
BOOT INFORMATION
Monarch CPU:
Current Preferred
Monarch
Monarch
Possible Warnings
-------- -------------------------0
0
AutoBoot: on - Timeout is : 7 SEC
Boottest:
boottest Settings Default Variable
OS is not speedy boot aware.
Selftest
---------early_cpu
late_cpu
platform
chipset
io_hw
mem_init
mem_test
Setting
-------------Skip this test
Run this test
Run this test
Run this test
Run this test
Run this test
Run this test
lanaddress
Allows the user to display the core I/O MAC address.
Syntax:
lanaddress
Parameters
none
Example C-19 lanaddress Command
LAN Address Information:
LAN Address
----------------Mac(00306E4C4F1A)
*Mac(00306E4C0FF2)
Path
---------------------------------------Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(3|0)/Mac(00306E4C4F1A))
Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(2|0)/Mac(00306E4C0FF2))
monarch
Displays or modifies the ID of the bootstrap processor. The preferred monarch number is stored
in NVM.
Syntax
monarch <cpu>
Parameters
<cpu>
specifies a cpu
Operation
If specified with no parameters, monarch displays the Monarch processor for the system.
Specifying a processor number alters the preferred Monarch processor. None of these changes
takes affect until after a reboot.
112
Utilities
Example C-20 monarch Command
Shell> monarch
Current
Preferred
Monarch
Monarch
--------------0
0
0
0
Possible Warnings
-----------------
To view monarch: fs0 :\ monarch
| Processor
-----------------+----------current status
|
0
next boot status |
0
To set the monarch processor to 1: fs0 :\ monarch 1
| Processor
-----------------+----------current status
|
0
next boot status |
1
pdt
Displays or clears the contents of the Page Deallocation Table.
Syntax
pdt (clear)
Parameters
<clear>
clears the pdt
Operation
With no options specified, the command displays the PDT information for the system. The PDT
is cleared and a reboot is required for memory reallocation and safe booting.
EFI/POSSE Commands
113
Example C-21 pdt Command
Shell> pdt
PDT Information
Last Clear time: PDT has not been cleared
Number of total entries in PDT:
50
Number of used entries in PDT:
0
Number of free entries in PDT:
50
Number of single-bit entries in PDT:
0
Number of multi-bit entries in PDT:
0
Address of first multi-bit error: x0000000000000000
Example C-22 pdt clear Command
Shell> pdt clear
Are you sure you want to clear the PDT? [y/N] y
Shell>
Shell> pdt
PDT Information
Last Clear time: 10/21/01 5:00p
Number of total entries in PDT:
50
Number of used entries in PDT:
0
Number of free entries in PDT:
50
Number of single-bit entries in PDT:
0
Number of multi-bit entries in PDT:
0
Address of first multi-bit error: 0x0000000000000000
sysmode
Display or modify the system mode.
Syntax
sysmode <normal | admin| service>
Parameters
<normal>
sets system mode to normal
<admin>
sets system mode to admin
<service>
sets system mode to service
Operation
If specified alone, sysmode displays the system mode. If a mode is specified as a parameter, then
the system mode is changed. This new mode takes effect immediately. The system mode is
retained on successive boots. Interaction with sysmode in a variety of scenarios is outlined below.
114
Utilities
Example C-23 sysmode Command
Shell> sysmode
System Mode: NORMAL
Shell> sysmode admin
You are now in admin mode.
Shell> sysmode service
You are now in service mode.
Shell> sysmode normal
You are now in normal mode
Specifying SCSI Parameters
The following SCSI parameters may be configured for the SCSI board:
• SCSI ID (SCSI initiator ID)
• Maximum data transfer rate (SCSI rate)
• Bus width
• Whether the HBA is bootable (driver support)
• Avoid bus resets (secondary cluster server)
Using the SCSI Setup Utility
1.
At the EFI shell prompt, type this command to map the parameters for all PCI cards installed
in the system:
info io
A list of all the devices that are installed in the server blade and managed by EFI drivers
displays. The output looks like this:
Seg
#
--00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
Bus
#
--00
00
00
00
00
20
20
20
40
40
80
E0
E0
E0
Dev
#
--01
01
01
02
03
01
01
02
01
01
01
01
01
02
Fnc
#
--00
01
02
00
00
00
01
00
00
01
00
00
01
00
Vendor
ID
-----0x1033
0x1033
0x1033
0x1095
0x8086
0x1000
0x1000
0x14E4
0x1000
0x1000
0x14E4
0x103C
0x103C
0x1002
Device Slot
ID
#
------ --0x0035
XX
0x0035
XX
0x00E0
XX
0x0649
XX
0x1229
XX
0x0030
XX
0x0030
XX
0x1645
XX
0x0021
02
0x0021
02
0x1645
01
0x1290
XX
0x1048
XX
0x5159
XX
Path
----------Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|1)
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|2)
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(2|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(3|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|1)
Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(2|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,200)/Pci(1|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,200)/Pci(1|1)
Acpi(HWP0002,400)/Pci(1|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|1)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(2|0)
In the example above, a single SCSI interface is shown in the listing. The information for
both channels of the SCSI interface is shown in bold, for highlighting purposes.
For each channel of the SCSI board, you need to note certain information. As an example,
look at the information for the SCSI interface (the first two bold lines). For each channel of
this SCSI interface, note the following information:
• Bus #—identifies the bus the device is on; for the SCSI interface, this is the same for
both channels. In this example, the bus number is 20.
• Dev #—the ID the device is assigned on the bus; for the SCSI interface, this is the same
for both channels. In this example, the SCSI interface is device 01.
• Fnc #—identifies the channel of the device (00 for channel A, 01 for channel B, and
so on). In this example, because the SCSI interface has two channels, one channel is 00
and the other is 01.
Specifying SCSI Parameters
115
•
Vendor ID—shows the device’s vendor ID; for the SCSI interface, this is the same for
both channels. For all the SCSI interface the ID is 0x1000.
• Device ID—shows the device ID; for the SCSI interface, this is the same for both
channels. For the SCSI interface the ID is 0x0030.
• Slot #—identifies the physical card slot in the system where the SCSI interface is
installed; for the SCSI interface, this is the same for both channels. In this example, the
SCSI interface is on the system board therefore the slot number is xx.
• Path—identifies the device’s path; for the SCSI interface, this is the same for both
channels. In this example, the SCSI interface path is Acpi(HWP0002,200)/Pci(1|0)
for channel A and Acpi(HWP0002,200)/Pci(1|1) for channel B.
Using the SCSI interface information from the example above, the pieces of information
that, combined, tell you this is a SCSI interface are the following (shown in bold, for
highlighting purposes):
00
00
20
20
01
01
00
01
0x1000
0x1000
0x0030
0x0030
xx
xx
Acpi(HWP0002,200)/Pci(1|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,200)/Pci(1|1)
The vendor (0x1000) and device (0x0030) are the IDs for a SCSI interface. Of the devices with
those IDs, this device has two channels (Fnc # of 00 immediately followed by Fnc # of 01).
Also, this SCSI interface has a non-numeric (XX) slot # indicating that it is on the system
board.
2.
From the EFI shell prompt, type the following command to obtain the controller’s handle
for the SCSI interface:
devtree
A tree of all EFI-capable devices installed in the system displays. The output looks like this:
Shell> devtree
Device Tree
Ctrl[04]
Ctrl[0A]
Ctrl[12]
Ctrl[13]
Ctrl[14]
Ctrl[15]
Ctrl[48]
Ctrl[83]
Ctrl[16]
Ctrl[49]
Ctrl[0B]
Ctrl[17]
Ctrl[18]
Ctrl[19]
Ctrl[4B]
Ctrl[0C]
Ctrl[0D]
Ctrl[0E]
Ctrl[1A]
Ctrl[1B]
Ctrl[36]
Ctrl[37]
Ctrl[31]
Ctrl[32]
Ctrl[30]
Ctrl[1C]
Ctrl[32]
Ctrl[30]
Ctrl[33]
Ctrl[34]
Ctrl[35]
Ctrl[31]
116
Utilities
Acpi(HWP0002,0)
Usb Open Host Controller
Usb Open Host Controller
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|2)
PCI IDE/ATAPI Controller
DW-28E
FAT File System [FAT32] 118 MB
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(3|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(3|0)/Mac(00306E4C4F1A)
Acpi(HWP0002,100)
LSI Logic Ultra320 SCSI Controller
LSI Logic Ultra320 SCSI Controller
Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(2|0)
Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit Ethernet (BCM5701)
Acpi(HWP0002,200)
Acpi(HWP0002,400)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|0)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|1)
16550 Serial UART Driver
VT-100+ Serial Console
Primary Console Input Device
Primary Console Output Device
Primary Standard Error Device
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(2|0)
Primary Console Output Device
Primary Standard Error Device
Acpi(PNP0501,0)
16550 Serial UART Driver
VT-100+ Serial Console
Primary Console Input Device
Ctrl[32]
Ctrl[30]
Ctrl[44]
Ctrl[46]
Primary Console Output Device
Primary Standard Error Device
VenHw(904EFCF0-F0A8-11D4-B4CA-303031303833)
VenHw(D65A6B8C-71E5-4DF0-A909-F0D2992B5AA9)
In the above example, the SCSI interface information is shown highlighted bold. You can
tell the information is for the SCSI interface because the path on the first
line—Acpi(HWP0002,100)— is the path from the information displayed by the info io
command. The next two lines are for the SCSI interface two channels, one line for each
channel (they contain the SCSI interface description [LSI Logic Ultra160 SCSI
Controller]). Note the value shown for Ctrl—17 and 18—at the beginning of each of
those lines; this is the controller’s handle for each channel. You need to know it for the next
step.
NOTE:
3.
The controller’s handle values will change on every boot.
Still at the EFI shell prompt, type this command to obtain the EFI driver’s handle for the
SCSI interface:
drvcfg
A list of all EFI-capable configurable components in the system is displayed. The output
may look like this:
Shell> drvcfg
Configurable Components
Drv[3D] Ctrl[15] Lang[eng]
Drv[3F] Ctrl[19] Lang[eng]
Drv[45] Ctrl[17] Lang[eng]
Drv[45] Ctrl[18] Lang[eng]
This listing shows which driver controls which device (controller). In the above example,
the SCSI interface information is shown highlighted bold. You can tell the information is
for this SCSI interface because the values shown for Ctrl—17 and 18—are the controller’s
handles for the SCSI interface two channels (from the information displayed by the devtree
command).
NOTE:
The EFI driver’s handle values change on every boot.
TIP: From this command (drvcfg), record these two pieces of information for each channel
of each SCSI interface for parameters to be changed:
• Drv(the EFI driver’s handle)
• Ctrl(the controller’s handle)
4.
Using the information (the driver’s handle [Drv] and the controller’s handle [Ctrl]) from
the drvcfgcommand, start the EFI SCSI Setup Utility for one channel of this SCSI interface.
At the EFI shell prompt, enter:
drvcfg -s drvr_handle cntrl_handle
where
• drvr_handleis the handle of the driver that controls the channel whose SCSI ID you
want to display or change
• cntrl_handleis the handle of the controller for the channel whose SCSI ID you want
to display or change
Continuing the example for channel A of this SCSI interface, enter:
drvcfg -s 45 18
5.
The EFI SCSI Setup Utility starts and its main menu displays, showing a list of all the EFI
capable SCSI interfaces in the system.
Specifying SCSI Parameters
117
TIP: To move the cursor in the EFI SCSI Setup Utility, you can use these keys:
• Arrow keys: ↑ ↓ ← →
• Alternate keys:
H = left
J = down
K = up
L = right
I = home
O = end
Move the cursor to highlight the channel of the SCSI interface; and press Enter (to determine
which channel of the interface to highlight, match the PCI Bus, PCI Dev, and PCI Func
values on this screen to the Bus #, Dev #, and Fnc # values from the info io command).
CAUTION:
6.
Do not select the <Global Properties> option on the main menu.
The “Adapter Properties” screen for this channel of the SCSI interface displays. Make sure
the utility is running for the channel of the SCSI interface by comparing the values shown
for PCI Bus, PCI Device, and PCI Function to the Bus #, Dev #, and Fnc # values
from the info io command.
CAUTION: Do not change the value for any of these fields on the “Adapter Properties”
screen:
• Auto Termination
• SCSI Parity
• SCSI Bus Scan Order
• Spinup Delay (Secs)
Changing any of these fields can cause unpredictable results.
CAUTION: Do not change the value for any of these fields on the “Device Properties”
screen:
• Scan Id
• Scan LUNs > 0
• Disconnect
• SCSI Timeout
• Queue Tags
• Format
• Verify
Changing any of these fields can cause unpredictable results.
7.
8.
9.
118
Utilities
Display (and optionally change) any SCSI parameters listed below for the channel of the
SCSI interface, or restore its SCSI parameters to their default values.
• SCSI ID
• Maximum data transfer rate
• Bus width
• Whether the SCSI interface is bootable (driver support)
• Avoid bus resets (secondary cluster server)
• Restore Defaults
Use the arrow keys to navigate to the appropriate SCSI parameter.
Use the plus (+) and minus (-) keys to scroll through the values until the value you want
displays.
10. Press Esc to exit the “Adapter Properties” screen. You are given these choices:
• Cancel the exit from the screen (to stay in the “Adapter Properties” screen for the channel
of the SCSI interface)
• Save the changes you made and then exit the screen
• Discard the changes you made and then exit the screen
11. Move the cursor to the action (cancel, save, or discard) you want to take; press Enter.
If you selected cancel, you remain in the “Adapter Properties” screen for the channel of
the SCSI interface. You can still change the channel’s parameters listed above.
If you selected save or discard, you go to the EFI SCSI Setup Utility’s main menu.
CAUTION:
12.
13.
14.
15.
Do not select the <Global Properties> option on the main menu.
Press Esc to exit the main menu and the EFI SCSI Setup Utility.
Select the option for exiting the utility.
When prompted, press Enter to stop the SCSI interface; you are at the EFI shell prompt.
At the EFI shell prompt, enter this command:
reset
The system starts to reboot. This is required to cause the new SCSI setting.
Using the Boot Option Maintenance Menu
This menu allows you to select console output and input devices as well as various boot options.
It contains the following items:
• “Boot from a File”
• “Add a Boot Option”
• “Delete Boot Option(s)”
• “Change Boot Order”
• “Manage BootNext Setting”
• “Set Auto Boot TimeOut”
• “Select Active Console Output Devices”
• “Select Active Console Input Devices”
• “Select Active Standard Error Devices”
• “Security/Password Menu”
• “Resetting Passwords”
These items are described in the following sections.
In all menus, select:
• Help to display the help available for the command
• Exit to return to the main Boot Options Maintenance menu
• Enter to select an item after using the arrow keys to highlight the item
• Save Settings to NVRAM to save your changes
NOTE: The options shown here are examples. Your system may have different options available
based on the system configuration and installed hardware components.
EFI Shell Paths
All devices in the server blade are represented by paths in the EFI shell. To identify the correct
socket or disk drive, use the following tables.
Using the Boot Option Maintenance Menu
119
Table C-3 Server Blade Sockets
Socket
Path
1 PCI
Acpi(HWP0002,400)/pci(0|0)
2 PCI
Acpi(HWP0003,400)/pci(0|0)
Table C-4 Server Blade Drives
Drive
Path
SCSI Disk
Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun0,Lun0)
SCSI Disk
Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|1)/Scsi(Pun0,Lun1)
Removable Media Boot
Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(1|0)/Usb(0,0)/HD
Boot from a File
Use this option to manually run a specific application or driver.
NOTE: This option boots the selected application or driver one time only. When you exit the
application, you return to this menu.
This option displays the file systems that are on your server or workstation and lets you browse
these file systems for applications or drivers that are executable. Executable files end with the
.efi extension. You can also select remote boot (LAN) options that have been configured on
your network.
For example:
Boot From a File. Select a Volume
NO VOLUME
CD_FORMAT
Removable
Load File
Load File
Exit
LABEL [Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(2|0)/Ata(Primary,Master)/CDROM
[Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(2|0)/Ata(Secondary,Master)/CDROM
Media Boot [Acpi(HWP0002,500)/Pci(2|0)/Ata(Secondary,Master)
[EFI Shell [Built-in]]
[Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(3|0)/Mac(00306E4C4F1A)]
In this example:
• NO VOLUME LABEL is a hard drive. When you format a hard drive, the EFI tools provide
an option to LABEL the disk. In this example, the volume was not labelled.
• CD_FORMAT is the label created for the disk currently inside the DVD drive.
• Removable Media Boot allows you to boot from a removable media drive (CD/DVD drive).
This option does not support booting from a specific file on a specific removable media disc.
• The two Load Files are the EFI Shell and the LAN.
Add a Boot Option
Use this option to add items to the EFI boot menu.
This option displays the file systems that are on your system and lets you browse these file
systems for applications or drivers that are executable. Executable files end with the
.efiextension. You can also select remote boot (LAN) options that have been configured on
your network. The option you have selected will be added to the EFI boot menu.
If you add a new drive to your system, you must manually add its boot options list if you want
to make it a bootable device.
120
Utilities
When adding a boot option that already exists in the Boot Manager list of boot options, you can
choose whether to create a new option or modify the existing one. If you:
• Choose to modify an existing option, you may change the boot option name and/or add
boot option arguments to the existing option.
• Create a new boot option for an already existing option, multiple instances of the same boot
option exist.
For example:
Add a Boot Option. Select a Volume
NO VOLUME LABEL [Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(2|0)/Ata(Primary,Master)/CDROM
Removable Media Boot [Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(2|0)/Ata(Secondary,Master)
Load File [EFI Shell [Built-in]]
Load File [Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(3|0)/Mac(00306E4C4F1A)]
Exit
In this example:
• Most of the items are the same options in Boot From a File.
• NO VOLUME LABEL is a hard drive. You can search through the disk for bootable
applications to add to the Boot Manager list of Boot options.
• Removable Media Boot treats the Removable Media (generally a CD) as a bootable device.
• Load File EFI Shell adds a new instance to the EFI Shell. Load File with the MAC address
adds a network boot option.
Delete Boot Option(s)
Use this option to remove boot options from the EFI boot menu.
NOTE:
This does not delete any files, applications or drivers from your system.
This option displays a list of boot options that are configured on your system. The names match
the options on the main Boot Manager menu (above).
If you remove a drive from your system, you must manually delete it from the boot options list.
• To delete an item from the list, use the arrow keys to highlight the item and press Enter.
• To remove all of the entries from the EFI boot menu, select Delete All Boot Options. This
setting may be used as a security device on systems that are accessed remotely.
Change Boot Order
Use this option to change the order of boot options. The order in which options are listed in the
EFI boot menu also reflects the order in which the system attempts to boot. If the first boot option
fails, the system tries booting the second, then the third, and so forth, until a boot option succeeds
or until all options have failed.
For example, if you normally boot using a configuration on your LAN but would like to boot
from a local hard drive if the LAN is unavailable, move the LAN boot option to the top of the
list, followed by the hard drive boot option.
The menu lists boot options that currently exist in the main Boot Manager menu. Change the
priority of the items by moving them up or down in the list:
• Press U to move an option up.
• Press D to move an option down.
• Select Save Settings to NVRAM to modify the order in the Boot Manager menu, which
modifies the order that the Boot Manager attempts to boot the options.
• The items at the bottom of the screen are descriptions of the selected option.
For example:
Change boot order. Select an Operation
EFI Shell [Built-in]
Using the Boot Option Maintenance Menu
121
Current OS
Save Settings to NVRAM
Help
Exit
VenHw(D65A6B8C-71E5-4DF0-A909-F0D2992B5AA9)
Boot0000
Manage BootNext Setting
Use this option to run the selected boot option immediately upon entering the main Boot Manager
menu. This option is useful for booting an option that only needs to be booted once, without
changing any other setting in the main Boot Manager menu. This is a one-time operation and
does not change the permanent system boot settings.
This option displays the file systems that are on your system and lets you browse these file
systems for applications or drivers that are executable. Executable files end with the
.efiextension. You can also select remote boot (LAN) options that have been configured on
your network.
To restore the default boot next setting, select Reset BootNext Setting.
For example:
Manage BootNext setting. Select an Operation
EFI Shell [Built-in]
Current OS
Reset BootNext Setting
Save Settings to NVRAM
Help
Exit
VenHw(D65A6B8C-71E5-4DF0-A909-F0D2992B5AA9)
Boot0000
Set Auto Boot TimeOut
Use this option to set the amount of time the system pauses before attempting to launch the first
item in the Boot Options list.
For example:
Set Auto Boot Timeout. Select an Option
Set Timeout Value
Delete/Disable Timeout
Help
Exit
Interrupting the timeout during the countdown stops the Boot Manager from loading any boot
options automatically. If there is no countdown, boot options must be selected manually.
• To set the auto boot timeout value, in seconds, select Set Timeout Value and enter the desired
value.
• To disable the timeout function, select Delete/Disable Timeout.
NOTE: When this option is selected, the system does not automatically boot. The system stops
at the EFI boot menu and waits for user input.
Select Active Console Output Devices
Use this option to define the devices that display output from the system console. This list
normally includes the VGA monitor and a serial port for directing output to a terminal emulation
package.
122
Utilities
NOTE:
Multiple consoles are not supported for HP-UX.
For example:
Select the Console Output Device(s)
Acpi(PNP0501,0)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(PcAnsi)
Acpi(PNP0501,0)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(Vt100)
* Acpi(PNP0501,0)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(Vt100+)
Acpi(PNP0501,0)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(VtUtf8)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|1)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(PcAnsi)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|1)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(Vt100)
* Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|1)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(Vt100+)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|1)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(VtUtf8)
* Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(2|0)
* indicates a currently selected device.
This menu is identical to Console Error Devices. The server blade does not support different
configurations for Output and Error console. For correct operation:
• When changes are made to either Output or Error console menus, the identical change must
be made in both menus.
• When changing serial devices, changes must be made to Output, Input, and Error menus
for proper operation.
Table C-5 Console Output Devices
To select:
Choose:
iLO MP Serial Console
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|1)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(Vt100+)
•
•
•
Each option is identified with an EFI device path. Not all options are available, depending
on the configuration of the system and the options purchased. Device paths might differ
slightly on different product models.
On both serial device examples, UART 9600 indicates the current baud rate of the serial
device (can be changed with the EFI shell baud command), VenMsg Vt100+ is the current
emulation type (several different terminal emulation protocols are supported, see list above).
Only one terminal emulation type (PcAnsi, Vt100, and so on) can be selected for each serial
console, but multiple serial consoles can be selected at a time.
Select Active Console Input Devices
Use this option to define the devices that are used to provide input to the system console.
This option displays the console devices on your system. This normally includes a standard
keyboard and mouse, and a serial port for receiving output from a terminal emulation package
on a laptop. Several different terminal emulation protocols are supported.
• When changing serial devices, changes must be made to Output, Input, and Error menus
for proper operation.
NOTE: Some Operating Systems support multiple input devices, such as a simultaneous serial
and keyboard input. See your OS documentation to determine how many consoles are supported
with your system.
For example:
Select the Console Input Device(s)
Acpi(PNP0501,0)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(PcAnsi)
Acpi(PNP0501,0)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(Vt100)
* Acpi(PNP0501,0)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(Vt100+)
Acpi(PNP0501,0)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(VtUtf8)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|1)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(PcAnsi)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|1)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(Vt100)
Using the Boot Option Maintenance Menu
123
* Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|1)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(Vt100+)
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|1)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(VtUtf8)
* indicates a currently selected device.
• Each option is identified with an EFI Device path. Not all options will be available, depending
on the configuration of the system and the options purchased. Device paths may differ
slightly on different product models.
• On both serial device examples, UART 9600 indicates the current baud rate of the serial
device, VenMsg Vt100+ is the current emulation type. Several different terminal emulation
protocols are supported (see list above).
• Only one terminal emulation type (PcAnsi, Vt100, and so on) can be selected for each serial
console, but multiple serial consoles can be selected at a time.
Table C-6 Console Input Devices
To select:
Choose:
iLO MP Serial Console
Acpi(HWP0002,700)/Pci(1|1)/Uart(9600 N81)/VenMsg(Vt100+)
Select Active Standard Error Devices
Use this option to define the devices that display error messages from the system console.
This menu is identical to Console Output Devices. The server blade does not support different
configurations for Output and Error console. For correct operation:
• When changes are made to either Output or Error console menus, the identical change must
be made in both menus.
• When changing serial devices, changes must be made to Output, Input, and Error menus
for proper operation.
Using the System Configuration Menu
The System Configuration Menu (on systems with EFI firmware version 2.0 or higher) includes
the following options:
• The Security/Password Menu lets you change the administrator and user passwords
• The Advanced System Information Menu displays information about system and component
configuration
• Set System Date lets you modify the system date
• Set System Time lets you modify the system time
• Reset Configuration to Default lets you restore system settings to their original configuration
• Help displays additional information about the available options
• Exit returns to the EFI startup menu
Security/Password Menu
You can set administrator and user passwords to provide different levels of access to the system
firmware:
Resetting Passwords
If you forget your passwords, they can be reset using an iLO MP command.
• Run the MP BPcommand to reset the iLO MP and reset the password (see “Reset BMC
Passwords” (page 128)” for more information).
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Utilities
NOTE:
You can only run this command when directly connected to the server blade.
Integrated Lights Out Management Processor
The integrated Lights Out Management Processor (iLO MP) is an independent support system
for the server. It provides a way for you to connect to a server and perform administration or
monitoring tasks for the server hardware.
The iLO MP controls power, reset, Transfer of Control (ToC) capabilities, provides console access,
displays and records system events, and displays detailed information about the various internal
subsystems. The iLO MP also provides a virtual front panel used to monitor system status and
the state of front panel LEDs. All iLO MP functions are available through the LAN and the local
RS-232 port.
The iLO MP is available whenever the system is connected to a power source, even if the server
main power switch is off.
Access to the iLO MP can be restricted by user accounts. User accounts are password protected
and provide a specific level of access to the server and iLO MP commands.
Multiple users can interact with the iLO MP. From the MP Main Menu, users can select any of
the following options: enter iLO MP command mode, enter console, view event logs, view console
history, display virtual front panel, enter console session, or connect to another iLO MP. Multiple
users can select different options from the MP Main Menu at the same time. However, iLO MP
command mode and console mode are mirrored, The iLO MP allows only one user at a time to
have write access to the shared console. For more information regarding the iLO MP, see the HP
Integrity and HP 9000 Integrated Lights Out Management Processor Operations Guide.
Accessing the iLO MP
You can connect to the iLO MP using the following methods:
• The local RS-232 port using a local terminal
• The iLO MP LAN port using Web GUI, telnet, or SSH if login access through the iLO MP
LAN is enabled
Interacting with the iLO MP
To interact with the iLO MP, perform the following steps:
1. Log in using your iLO MP user account name and password.
NOTE: If the iLO MP is not displaying the MP Main Menu, use Ctrl–B to access the MP
Main Menu and the iLO MP prompt.
2.
Use the iLO MP menus and commands as needed. A list of available commands can be
displayed by using the iLO MP help function (in the MP Main Menu, enter HE followed by
LI at the MP HELP: prompt). Log out using the x command (in the MP Main Menu, enter
x at the MP> prompt) when done.
iLO MP Command Interface
Use the iLO MP menus and commands as needed. The login screen, which includes the Main
Menu, is shown below. Main Menu commands (CO, VFP, CM, CL, SL, HE, and X) can be entered
after the MP prompt. Commands not displayed in the MP Main Menu can be accessed in command
mode by first using the CM command at the MP prompt (display a list of available commands
using the iLO MP help function. Display the list of commands as follows: in the MP Main Menu,
enter HE after the MP> prompt, then enter LI after the MP HELP: prompt). Return to the MP
Main Menu by typing Ctrl–B.
Integrated Lights Out Management Processor
125
NOTE: At publication, the current version of the iLO MP Revision is H.03.15.
Check the HP web site for the latest revision.
iLO MP Welcome Screen
iLO MP Welcome screen commands:
MP Login: Admin
MP password: *****
Hewlett-Packard Integrated Lights-Out HP Integrity and HP 9000
(C) Copyright Hewlett-Packard Company 1999-2005. All rights reserved
System Name: xxxxxxxxx
Revision H.03.19
MP MAIN MENU:
CO:
Console
VFP: Virtual Front Panel
CM:
Command Menu
CL:
Console Log
SL:
Show Event Logs
HE:
Main Menu Help
X:
Exit Connection
iLO MP Help System
The iLO MP has a robust help system. To invoke iLO MP HELP, enterheafter the MP> prompt.
The following displays:
HE
==== MP Help: Main Menu =======================================================
Hardware Revision H0 Firmware Revision H.03.19 Dec 15 2005,13:02:01
Integrated Lights-Out for HP Integrity and HP 9000 - Management Processor (MP)
MP Help System
Use Ctrl-B to exit MP command interface and return to the main MP menu.
Enter a command at the help prompt:
OVerview
LIst
<COMMAND>
TOPics
HElp
Q
:
:
:
:
:
:
Launch the help overview
Show the list of MP Command Menu commands
Enter the command name for help on individual command
Show all MP Help topics and commands
Display this screen
Quit help
Enter one of the commands described above: OV, LI, <command>, TOP, HE, Q
iLO MP Commands
iLO MP commands are listed in Table C-7 and described in the following paragraphs. These
commands should be entered from the Command Menu. TypeCMfrom the MP Main Menu to
access the Command Menu,
Table C-7 iLO MP Commands and Descriptions
126
Command
Description
BLADE
Set server blade infrastructure parameters
BP
Reset BMC passwords
CA
Configure asynch/serial ports
CL
View console log
Utilities
Table C-7 iLO MP Commands and Descriptions (continued)
Command
Description
CM
Select command mode
<Ctrl–B>
Return to MP Main Menu from any iLO MP submenu
<Ctrl–N>rs
Reset iLO MP and allow password reset, user accounts are defaulted
CO
Select console mode
DATE
Date display
DC
Default configuration
DF
Display FRU information
DI
Disconnect remote or LAN console
DNS
Configure DHCP and DNS
FW
Upgrade iLO MP firmware
HE
Display help for menu or command
ID
System information
IT
Inactivity timeout settings
LDAP
Configure LDAP parameters and group administrators
LC
LAN configuration
LM
License management
LOC
Locator LED display and configuration for server blade and enclosure
LS
LAN Status
MA
Return to Main Menu
PC
Remote power control
PR
Power restore
PS
Power management module status
RB
Reset BMC
RS
Reset system through RST signal
SA
Set access
SL
Show event logs
SNMP
Enable/disable the SNMP feature, set community string
SO
Security options
SS
System processor status
SYSREV
Current system firmware revisions
TC
Reset via transfer of control (TOC)
TE
Tell- send a message to other users
UC
User configuration
VFP
Displays LED status as shown on the server blade
WHO
Display connected iLO MP users
iLO MP Command Interface
127
Table C-7 iLO MP Commands and Descriptions (continued)
Command
Description
X
Exit iLO MP and disconnect
XD
Diagnostics and/or reset of iLO MP
Blade Parameters
BLADE: Blade parameters configuration
This command allows you to configure the server blade infrastructure parameters.
Command line usage:
BLADE [ -rack <Rack name> ] [ -enclosure <Enclosure name> ] [ -bay <Bay
name> ] [ -nc ]
• Rack Name: The Rack Name is used to logically group together enclosures in a rack. The
Rack Name is shared with the other enclosures in the rack.
• Enclosure Name: The Enclosure Name is used to logically group together the blade servers
installed in the same enclosure. The Enclosure Name is shared with the other servers in the
enclosure.
• Bay Name: The Bay Name is used to assist in identifying a blade.
• Bay Number: The blade enclosure can support as many as 8 servers. The bays are numbered
(when viewed from the rack front) from left to right from 1 to 8. The Bay number is used to
locate and identify a blade.
• Rack Serial Number: The Rack Serial Number identifies the components in the rack as a
logical grouping.
• Enclosure Serial Number: The Enclosure Serial Number identifies a particular BLADE
enclosure.
• Blade Serial Number: The Blade Serial Number identifies the serial number for the server.
NOTE: The configurable blade parameters can be modified only with “M”. privilege, regardless
of the connection (serial, web, telnet). Other users have read-only permission for these parameters.
The maximum length of configurable blade parameters is 32 characters and alphanumeric only.
Reset BMC Passwords
BP: Reset BMC Passwords
This command resets BMC passwords (both USER and ADMIN passwords).
Configure Serial Port Parameters
CA: Configure local and remote serial port parameters
Set up the local serial port parameters as follows:
• BAUD RATES: Input and output data rates are the same; 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 38400,
115200 bit/sec.
• FLOW CONTROL: Hardware uses RTS/CTS; Software uses Xon/Xoff.
IMPORTANT:
Do not mix HP and vt100 terminal types at the same time.
Set up the remote serial port parameters as follows:
• BAUD RATES: Input and output data rates are the same; 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 38400,
115200 bit/sec.
• FLOW CONTROL: Hardware uses RTS/CTS; Software uses Xon/Xoff.
The iLO MP mirrors the system console to the iLO MP local and LAN ports. One console output
stream is reflected to all of the connected console users. If several different terminal types are
used simultaneously by the users, some users may see strange results.
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Utilities
Example
HP-UX
Applications that care about the terminal type (install, SAM, vi, etc.) running on HP-UX use two
methods to determine the terminal type:
1. The $TERM shell environment variable.
2. The application directly queries the terminal (in this case, the write enabled terminal
establishes the terminal type).
Make sure that settings #1 and #2 agree with your terminal type.
Console Log
CL: Console Log—view the history of the Console output
This command displays up to 60 Kilobytes of logged console data (about 60 pages of display in
text mode) sent from the system to the Console path.
Command Mode
CM: Command Mode—enter command mode
This command switches the console terminal from the MP Main Menu to mirrored command
interface mode. If the current mux authority is administrator and the new login is as
operator, the command mux is denied (remains in MP Main Menu mode). If a command is in
progress, a message displays warning the new user of system status.
Console
CO: COnsole—leave command mode and enter console mode
This command switches the console terminal from the MP Main Menu to mirrored/redirected
console mode. All mirrored data displays. Type Ctrl–B to return to the MP Main Menu.
For VT100 and HPterm, verify that the iLO MP setting in the CA command is correct and all
mirrored consoles are of the same terminal type for proper operation.
<Ctrl–B>
<Ctrl-B>:Return to the MP Main Menu from any submenu in the iLO MP environment.
This command returns you to the MP Main Menu from anywhere in the iLO MP environment.
<Ctrl–N>rs
<Ctrl-N>rs: Reset iLO MP and allow password reset
This command resets the iLO MP if it is hung. Use this in the place of the iLO MP reset button
(not part of the BL860c server blade). It also allows you to reset the iLO MP password.
IMPORTANT:
You can only run this command when directly connected to the server blade.
NOTE: To execute this command, press the Ctrl key and the N key. Release these keys, and
press rs.
Date
DATE: Date display
This command displays the current date, as generated by the OS or system firmware.
Default Configuration
DC: Default Configuration—reset all iLO MP parameters to the default configuration
iLO MP Command Interface
129
This command sets all iLO MP parameters back to their default values. You may reset all, or a
subset of the following parameters:
• IP configurations
• Command Interface configuration
• Disable remote access, security configuration
• Reset LDAP and SNMP configuration parameters
• Reset User and Blade configuration parameters
• Session configuration (for example; setting the security configuration to default erases all
users and passwords)
There are three ways to reset passwords in the MP:
1. In the SO command, change individual users.
2. In the DC command, choose “Reset Security Configuration”.
3. Forgotten passwords can be reset by using the Ctrl–Nrs command.
NOTE:
All user information (logins, passwords, and so on) is erased in methods 2 and 3.
Display FRUID
DF:Display FRUID information
This command displays FRUID information from the BMC for FRU devices. Information provided
includes serial number; part number; model designation; name and version number; and
manufacturer.
Disconnect LAN Console
DI: DIsconnect LAN/WEB console
This command disconnects LAN/WEB users from MP. It does not disable the ports. The remote
console is no longer mirrored. The DI command also shows the number and type of current LAN
based connections. Choose any or all types:
DI
Current user access state:
T - Telnet
: Disconnected
W - Web SSL
: Disconnected
H - SSH
: Disconnected
Enter parameter(s) to change, A to disconnect All, or [Q] to Quit:
Domain Name Server Settings
DNS: Domain name server settings
This command configures the DNS server settings. DHCP must be enabled for this command to
work. DNS lets you configure DNS Domain Name and DNS servers (up to 3) either manually
or automatically though DHCP. It further allows a DDNS update through the primary DNS
server as long as it is authoritative for the zone.
iLO MP Firmware Update
FW: Activates iLO MP firmware upgrade mode
This command is available from either the LAN or local serial port. This command activates
firmware upgrade mode, which loads new firmware through the iLO MP LAN by FTP (which
must be operational). An iLO MP Reset is generated after the upgrade is complete.
Help
HE: Display help for menu or command
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Utilities
This command displays the iLO MP hardware and firmware version identity, and the date and
time of firmware generation. If executed from the MP Main Menu, general information about
the iLO MP, and those commands displayed in the MP Main Menu, will be displayed. If executed
in command mode, this command displays a list of command interface commands available to
the user. It also displays detailed help information in response to a topic or command at the help
prompt.
Display System ID
ID: Display/modify system information
This command allows the user to display and modify the following:
• SNMP contact information
• SNMP server information
• SPU hostname
Inactivity Timeout
IT: Inactivity Timeout settings
The session inactivity timeout is up to 1,440 minutes—default is 60 minutes. This timeout prevents
sessions to the system from being inadvertently left open. A session can be started by the SE
command. An open session can prevent users from logging onto the iLO MP through a port and
can also prevent system applications from initiating an outbound connection.
iLO MP inactivity timeout is up to 1,440 minutes—default is 5 minutes. This timeout prevents
a user from inadvertently keeping the iLO MP locked in a iLO MP Command Interface mode
preventing other users from looking at the console output. The iLO MP Command Interface
inactivity. timeout may not be deactivated.
Flow control timeout is 0 to 60 minutes. If set to 0, no timeout is applied. This timeout prevents
mirrored flow control from blocking other ports when inactive.
Configure LAN Console
LC: LAN configuration (IP address, and so on)
This command displays and allows modification of the LAN configuration. Configurable
parameters include:
• iLO MP IP Address
• iLO MP Host Name
• DHCP status (also able to set the Web and SSH access ports)
• SSH Access Port number
• Subnet Mask
• Gateway Address
• Web Console port number
• Link State
The iLO MP Host Name set in this command displays at the iLO MP command interface prompt.
This field can be programmed to any useful name or phrase. For clarity, it is useful to enter
MP-host-name-on-systemas the iLO MP Host name, so both names show up in the prompt
(limit 19 characters, no spaces allowed).
Configure LDAP Parameters
LDAP:Configure LDAP parameters and group administrators.
LDAP directory support is an iLO MP Advanced feature that allows you to centralize user account
administration using directory services. Configure directory settings with the LDAP command.
• LDAP Directory Authentication: activates or deactivates directory support on this MP. If
directory authentication is enabled and configured properly, users may log into iLO MP
iLO MP Command Interface
131
•
using directory credentials. If it is disabled, user credentials are not validated using the
directory.
Local User Accounts: Includes or excludes access to local iLO MP user accounts. If local user
accounts are enabled, a user may log into iLO MP using locally-stored user credentials
(created through the UC command). If they are disabled, user access is limited to valid
directory credentials only.
NOTE: Locally-stored user accounts can be active while directory support is enabled. This
allows both local- and directory-based user access. If both directory authentication and local user
accounts are enabled, login is attempted against the directory first, then local accounts.
Locator LED Status
LOC: Locator LED Status
This command displays the current status of the server blade locator LED, and the enclosure
LED.
LAN Status
LS: LAN Status
This command displays all parameters and the current status of the iLO MP LAN connections.
The LAN parameters are not modified by the execution of this command.
Return to Main Menu
MA: Return to MP Main Menu
This command makes the iLO MP return to the non mirrored MP Main Menu. This is the same
as executing Ctrl–B.
Power Control
PC: Power Control—turn system power on and off
This command allows you to switch the system power on or off. You can set the action to take
place immediately, or after a specified delay. For proper system shutdown, shut down the OS
before issuing this command or use the graceful shutdown option. This command also allows
control of the power management module. It allows you to switch the system ON politely
(requesting the enclosure management module [EMM] for required power), FORCE ON (without
requesting EMM for required power [not recommended]), or OFF. Use the command to power
cycle the server blade (restart after a fixed delay).
Power Status
PS: Power status—display the status of the server blade power, temperature and fans.
This command displays the server blade power, temperature, and fan status.
Reset BMC
RB: Reset BMC
This command resets the BMC.
Reset System
RS: Reset system (except iLO MP and BMC) through RST signal
IMPORTANT:
Under normal operation, shut down the OS before issuing this command.
This command causes the system (except the MP) to be reset through the RST signal.
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Utilities
Execution of this command irrecoverably halts all system processing and I/O activity and restarts
the computer system. The effect of this command is very similar to cycling the system power.
The OS is not notified, no dump is taken on the way down, and so on.
Set Access
SA: Set access options—enable/disable LAN access methods
This command disconnects LAN and web users if access is disabled.
Display Logs
SL: Display contents of the system status logs
This command displays the contents of the event logs that have been stored in nonvolatile
memory.
• System Event Log (SEL)—Events (filtered by alert level) and errors
• Forward progress Log (FPL)—All events
• Live events—View events as they occur
• Clear logs—Clears the SEL and FPL before they get full
• Current boot log—All events between “start of boot” and “boot complete”
• Previous boot log—The events from the previous boot
Reading the system event log turns off the health LED. Accessing this log is the only way to turn
off the health LED when it is flashing and alerts have not been acknowledged at the alert display
level.
Events are encoded data that provide system information to the user. Some well-known names
for similar data would be Chassis Codes or Post Codes. Events are produced by intelligent
hardware modules, the OS, and system firmware. Use SLto view the event log.
Navigate within the logs as follows:
• + — View the next block (forward in time)
• - — View the previous block (backward in time)
• Enter (<CR>) — View the next block in the previously selected direction (forward or backward
in time)
• D — Dump the entire log for capture or analysis
• F — First entry
• L — Last entry
• J — Jump to entry number __
• V — View mode configuration (text, keyword, hex)
• ? — Display this help menu
• Q — Quit
Table C-8 defines alert (or severity) levels.
Table C-8 Alert Levels
Severity
Definition
0
Minor forward progress
1
Major forward progress
2
Informational
3
Warning
5
Critical
7
Fatal
iLO MP Command Interface
133
Security Options
SO: Configure security options and access control
Use this command to modify the security options of MP. These are:
• Login time-outs
• Allowed password faults
• Allow firmware upgrade over PCI
• Allow iLO MP reset from ipmi
• SSL certificate generation
• SSH key pair generation
Login timeout: is effective on all ports, including the local port, and timeout value is the
same for all ports. However, the local port cannot be disconnected like other ports on login
timeout. So if a local port user sits at the 'iLO MP login:' prompt, nothing happens even if a
timeout occurs. But if a local port user enters a login name, and then sits at the 'iLO MP password:'
prompt, if timeout occurs at this stage, this login is cancelled and you go back to the 'iLO MP
login:' prompt.
System Status
SS: Displays the status of the system processors
The SS command displays the status of the system processors and which processor is the monarch.
Firmware Revision Status
SYSREV: Displays the revision status of firmware in the system.
This command displays the revision status of firmware in the system.
NOTE:
At the time of production of this guide, the firmware revisions were:
FIRMWARE INFORMATION
MP FW: H.03.15
BMC FW: 04.05
EFI FW: 05.16
System FW: 62.14
Transfer Of Control
TC: System reset through INIT or TOC (Transfer of Control) signal
Under normal operation, shut down the OS before issuing this command.
This command causes the system to be reset through the INIT (or TOC) signal. Execution of this
command irrecoverably halts all system processing and I/O activity and restarts the computer
system. It is different from the RS command in that the processors are signaled to dump state
on the way down.
Tell
TE: TEll—sends a message to other terminals
Up to 80 characters can be typed in. The message is broadcast to the other mirrored clients. The
message displays to all users currently in the iLO MP Command Mode.
User Configuration
UC: User Configuration—controls user access
Use this command to modify the user configuration of the MP. These include user accounts,
passwords, etc. There are two default users - Admin and Oper. The Admin user has all 4 rights
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Utilities
(C,P,M and U), and the Oper user has the Console access right by default. The configuration of
these default users can also be changed using this command. Most of the parameters are familiar,
the following require some extra explanation:
MODE: Single/Multiple If the mode is Single, the state changes to disabled after the first
login
USER'S STATE: Enabled/Disabled A disabled user's login is not accepted
SYSREV or SR command (at time of release):
MP FW
: H.03.19
FI FW
: 05.16
System FW : 01.60
BMC FW
: 04.08
Virtual Front Panel
VFP: Display Virtual Front Panel
The VFP command presents a summary of the system by using direct console addressing. If the
terminal is not recognized by the MP, VFP mode will be rejected. Each individual user will get
this summary in order to avoid issues related to terminal type and screen display mode.
Who
WHO: Displays a list of iLO MP connected users
This command displays the login name and operating mode (Main Menu, command, and so on)
of the connected console client users, and the port on which they are connected. For the LAN
and WEB console clients the remote IP address is also displayed.
If the local console client user did not originate the iLO MP command interface session, there is
always one default user listed for the local serial port: local user i. If the local console operator
types CTRL–B, then the login name that the local operator used is displayed instead.
Exit from MP
X: Exit from iLO MP command interface and disconnect from the system
This command disconnects the executing user from the system. This command is available from
the local port.
Diagnostics
XD: Diagnostics and/or Reset of MP
This command allows the user to perform some simple checks to confirm the MP's health and
its connectivity status. The following tests are available:
• iLO MP Parameter Checksum
• Verify I2C connection (get BMC Device ID)
• LAN connectivity test using ping
Also, you can reset the iLO MP with this command. You can safely reset the iLO MP without
affecting the operation of the server.
iLO MP Command Interface
135
136
Index
A
access panel
remove and replace, 38
adapter
slot number, determining withinfo command, 116
antistatic wrist strap, 33
autoboot, 80
B
Boot
EFI boot manager, 98
boot from file, 120
boot option
add, 120
change boot order, 121
delete, 121
manage bootnext setting, 122
set auto boot timeout, 122
boot option maintenance menu, 119
boot options list, 79
add HP-UX, 80
adding Linux, 92
adding Windows, 88
booting
Linux, 92
OpenVMS, 85
Red Hat Linux, 93
SuSE Linux, 94
from EFI shell, 94
Windows, 88
buttons, power, 28, 36
C
chip sparing, 41, 42
commands
devtree
controller handle, determining, 117
EFI-capable devices and controller handles,
displaying, 116
drvcfg
EFI configurable components, displaying, 117
EFI driver handle, determining, 117
EFI SCSI Setup Utility, starting, 117
info
adapter slot number, determining, 116
adapter’s path, determining, 116
components list, 77
configurable components, EFI capable, displaying, 117
configure system boot options, 79
controller handle, determining, 117
D
devtreecommand
controller handle, determining, 117
EFI-capable devices and controller handles, displaying,
116
diagnostics, 61
dimensions of server blade, 19
DIMMs
configuration, 41
load order, 69
remove and replace, 40
disk drive
activity LED, states, 71
status LED, states, 71
drvcfgcommand
EFI configurable components, displaying, 117
EFI driver handle, determining, 117
EFI SCSI Setup Utility, starting, 117
E
EFI
capable devices
and controller handles, displaying, 116
configurable components, displaying, 117
driver handle, determining, 117
EFI SCSI Setup Utility
starting, 117
EFI/POSSE commands, 101
enclosure information, 24, 70
error logs, 64–66
Extensible Firmware Interface
commands, 100
Extensible Firmware Interface, EFI, 98
F
fault management, 63
field replaceable unit (FRU), 77
firmware
BMC and MP, 72
troubleshooting, 73
forward progress log, 64
front panel port, 25
G
gigabit LAN, 71
H
handle
controller, determining, 117
hard drive blank
remove and replace, 35
hotplug SAS disk drives
remove and replace, 34
I
iLO MP, 125–135
accessing, 125
command interface, 125
commands, 126
137
event log, 65
help, 126
infocommand
adapter path, determining, 116
adapter slot number, determining, 116
installing (see replacing)
integrated Lights Out Management Processor (see iLO
MP)
L
LEDs
front panel, 21, 27
internal health, 27
LAN, 71
NICs, 27, 58, 71
server blade, front panel, 58
server health, 27
system health, 60
unit identification (UID), 55, 59
load order
DIMMs, 69
processors, 68
M
Management Processor (see iLO MP)
memory (see DIMMs)
chip sparing, 41
N
NICs
LEDs
location, 27
O
online support tools, 62
P
part numbers, 77
parts list, 77
path, determining for adapter
withinfo command, 116
point-of-load voltage rails
specifications, 24
port
front panel, 25
power button, definition, 28
power off server, 31, 36
power on server, 32
power states, 31
power subsystem
specifications, 24
powering down, server blade, 36
processor load order, 68
processor remove and replace, 42
R
remove and replace
DIMMs, 40
processor, 42
138
Index
SAS disk drive, 34
server blade access panel, 38
server blade from enclosure, 37
replacing
DIMMs, 41
S
safety information, 33
SAS disk drive
remove and replace, 34
SAS disk drive LEDs, 71
SCSI
setup utility, 115
specifying parameters, 115
SCSI adapter
path
determining withinfocommand, 116
server blade
components, 19
dimensions, 19
LEDs, 21, 27
overview, 19
powering down, 36
rear panel connectors, 29
top view, 21
weight, 19
server blade access panel remove and replace, 38
service tools, 33
servicing the server blade, 36
shut down
Linux, 95
Windows, 91
from command line, 91
single-user mode, 83
slot number of adapter, determining withinfocommand,
116
standby mode, 31
status log, 65
SUV cable, 25
system configuration menu, 124
system event log, 54, 64, 65
T
tools, 33
troubleshooting
online support, 74
phone support, 74
troubleshooting through the MP, 67
troubleshooting, basic and advanced, 55
U
unit identification (UID)
LEDs
location, 27
unit identification (UID), LEDs, 55
W
weight of server blade, 19
Z
ZIF socket, 43
139
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