Scanning - Shortwave - Ham Radio
Equipment - Computers - Antique Radio
Volume 26, No. 5
May 2007
U.S. $5.95
Printed in the
United States
A Publication of Grove Enterprises
Storm Chasing
with
Amateur Radio
In this issue:
•
•
•
•
Exploring 10 Meter Beacons
Start Your Own SW Station!
Make a Hard-Hat Antenna
Head-to-Head: Four Mid-Priced
Portables
WiNRADiO... not just great radios!
WiNRADiO not only makes award-winning radios, but also all the accessories to go with them
to provide you with the best possible reception.
Here is just a small selection:
Antennas
Accessories
WR-LWA-0130
Long-wire balun
WR-AX-71C
All-purpose VHF/UHF
scanning antenna
WR-LNA-3500
VHF/UHF
low-noise
amplifier
WR-AX-06B
Telescopic
VHF/UHF antenna
WR-BT-3500
VHF/UHF
power injector
(bias "T")
WR-CMC-30
WR-AX-81S
HF/VHF
common-mode
choke
High intercept point
active HF antenna
WR-SP-30
Surge protector
WR-AX-37E
Directional UHF
log-periodic
antenna
For more information about these products, please visit:
www.winradio.com
...the future of radio.
TM
C O N T E N T S
Vol. 26 No. 5
May 2007
Scanning - Shortwave - Ham Radio
Equipment - Computers - Antique Radio
Volume 26, No. 5
May 2007
U.S. $5.95
Printed in the
United States
����������������������������������
Storm Chasing
with
Amateur Radio
In this issue:
•
•
•
•
Exploring 10 Meter Beacons
Start Your Own SW Station!
Make a Hard-Hat Antenna
Head-to-Head: Four Mid-Priced
Portables
Lead Story
Storm Chasing
By Seth Price
It’s nothing like the movies,
says Seth Price: Dodging flying cows isn’t usually a factor
in storm chasing, but bad food
and boredom certainly are.
Amateur radio is a real gift on
two counts: visiting with hams
around the country during inactive periods helps pass the time
and provides a service for hams
looking to make a contact with
often sparsely-populated counties, but amateur radio is also
a vital link in the SKYWARN
nets that provide ground-truth
information to the National
Weather Service during severe
weather.
For a taste of what storm
chasing is really like, and information on how to get trained as
an amateur radio operator and
a weather spotter, turn to the
article on page 8.
Cover photo courtesy NOAA Photo
Library, NOAA Central Library;
OAR/ERL/National Severe Storms
Laboratory (NSSL)
New Heights for Amateur Radio..................................... 12
By Bill Brown
“The higher the better” is the mantra hams use whenever they talk
about their antennas. Some hams take that concept to the extreme by
launching satellites. Others like Bill Brown dabble with transmissions from
Near Space by means of Amateur Radio High Altitude Balloons (ARHAB).
The “payload” may be a simple transmitter or it may be combined with
other experiments. Tracking the balloon to retrieve the payload requires
skill in direction-finding and using FAA winds aloft data to predict the
landing zone. Turn to page 12 to see the one that almost landed in MT’s
back yard!
Exploring the World of 10 Meter Beacons ...................... 14
By Ken Reitz
How can you tell if a band is dead if no one is talking? Dozens of 10meter aficionados have made sure that’s not a problem on their watch:
The 10 meter band is populated with low-powered beacons which transmit
their signals day and night, year after year. Tune in to a few of the most
popular frequencies and you can quickly tell whether the band is open or
not. Over time, you can learn a lot about propagation, you can test your
equipment, and you can make maximum use of your time on the air.
The Electronics Industry Goes Green .............................. 17
By Gregory Smith
You may wax nostalgic about the smell of smoking flux and burned wire
insulation, but solder as we know it is changing. The tin-lead composition
which has served the electronics industry so well is being phased out for
non-critical applications, due to concerns over hazardous waste. Trouble
is, the new alloys have a higher failure rate for a variety of reasons.
You can still can use the old leaded alloys in construction projects, but
we thought you’d like to know what may be behind increased equipment
failures in modern electronics. When you say “they don’t make them like
they used to,” you’re right. But it’s for a good reason.
Reviews
Lately we’ve been reviewing several low
and mid-priced portables. This month a new
player gets into the game. Todd Van Gelder
compares four of the more popular portables
together – the Grundig G4000A, Kaito 1103,
Grundig G5, and the Sony ICF-SW7600GR.
We think you’ll find the overview quite useful
(page 66)
Uniden has released the BC-RH96
remote control head which works with the
Uniden BCD996T and BCT15 base/mobile
scanners, and the BCD396T and BR-330T
handheld scanners. The nearly full-featured
head allows increased options for mounting
your scanner in a vehicle, and easy removal
to prevent theft. See page 69 for the full
review.
Mac users, listen up! John Catalano has
been temporarily forced to use an Apple
Macintosh computer, and you are the beneficiaries. This month you can read about five
noteworthy radio programs which operate
on the Mac computer (see page 72).
MONITORING TIMES
(ISSN: 0889-5341;
Publishers Mail Agreement #1253492) is
published monthly
by Grove Enterprises,
Inc., Brasstown, North
Carolina, USA.
Copyright © 2007 Grove Enterprises, Inc.
Periodicals postage paid at Brasstown,
NC, and additional mailing offices. Short
excerpts may be reprinted with appropriate credit. Complete articles may not be
reproduced without permission.
Address:
Telephone:
Fax:
Internet Address:
Editorial e-mail:
Subscriptions:
7540 Highway 64 West,
Brasstown, NC 28902-0098
(828) 837-9200
(828) 837-2216 (24 hours)
www.grove-ent.com or
www.monitoringtimes.com
editor@monitoringtimes.com
order@grove-ent.com
Subscription Rates: $28.95 in US; $39.50
Canada; and $58.50 foreign elsewhere,
US funds. Label indicates number of issues left. Renewal notice is cover sheet 3
months before expiration. See page 76
for subscription information.
Postmaster:
Send address changes to Monitoring Times,
7540 Highway 64 West, Brasstown, NC
28902-0098.
Disclaimer:
While Monitoring Times makes an effort
to ensure the information it publishes is
accurate, it cannot be held liable for the
contents. The reader assumes any risk for
performing modification or construction
projects published in Monitoring Times.
Opinion or conclusions expressed are
not necessarily the view of Monitoring
Times or Grove Enterprises. Unsolicited
manuscripts are accepted. SASE if material
is to be returned.
Owners
Bob and Judy Grove
judy@grove-ent.com
Publisher
Bob Grove, W8JHD
bobgrove@monitoringtimes.com
Managing Editor
Rachel Baughn, KE4OPD
editor@monitoringtimes.com
Assistant Editor
Larry Van Horn, N5FPW
Art Director
Bill Grove
Advertising Svcs.
Beth Leinbach
(828) 389-4007
bethleinbach@monitoringtimes.com
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Departments:
Letters .................................................. 4
Communications .................................. 6
Stock Exchange ................................... 75
Advertisers Index ................................. 75
Second Departments
Milcom ............................................... 52
HF Comms Alive and Well
The Fed Files ...................................... 54
A Super Week in Miami
Boats, PLANES, Trains ......................... 56
Airport Information for Listeners
First Departments
Below 500 kHz ................................... 58
Getting Started
Beginners Corner................................ 20
Start Your Own SW Station
Ask Bob.............................................. 22
The MT Help Desk .............................. 23
Scanning Report ................................. 24
Crossing the Digital Divide
Utility World........................................ 28
DX Destinations
Outer Limits........................................ 59
Pirate Radio and the Media
On the Ham Bands ............................. 60
An Island with a Mountain with a Lighthouse
Technical Departments
CHU Stays Put!
Antenna Topics ................................... 62
Digital Alligators on HF?
Radio Restorations .............................. 64
Digital Digest ...................................... 31
A Pedestrian-Mobile Antenna
Introducing the BC-348
Global Forum ..................................... 32
MT Review .......................................... 66
Broadcast Logs ................................... 35
Programming Spotlight ....................... 36
First Look............................................ 69
The QSL Report .................................. 38
On the Bench ..................................... 70
Missionaries in Micronesia
Spotlight on R Netherlands
75 Million QSOs and Growing
English Language SW Guide ............... 39
EDITORIAL STAFF
Grundig G4000A, G5, Kaito 1103,
Sony ICF-SW7600GR
Uniden BC-RH96 Remote Head
Getting That Rig Back on the Air
Computers & Radio............................. 72
Mac Radio Programs
What’s New........................................ 74
Email firstlast@monitoringtimes.com
TJ “Skip” Arey .......... On the Ham Bands
Rachel Baughn ........ Communications
............................... Letters to the Editor
............................... What’s New?
Kevin Carey ............ Below 500 kHz
John Catalano ........ Computers & Radio
Mike Chace ............. Digital Digest
Jim Clarke .............. First Look
Marc Ellis ................ Radio Restorations
Bob Grove .............. Ask Bob
Glenn Hauser ......... Global Forum
Chris Parris ............. Fed Files
Ken Reitz ................. Beginners Corner
Lee Reynolds ........... First Look
Iden Rogers ............. Planes
Clem Small ............. Antenna Topics
Doug Smith ............. American Bandscan
Hugh Stegman ........ Utility World
Ernest Robl .............. Trains
Gayle Van Horn ...... Frequency Manager
............................... Broadcast Logs
............................... QSL Corner
Larry Van Horn ........ Milcom
............................... First Look
............................... MT Help Desk
Dan Veeneman ....... Scanning Report
Ron Walsh ............... Boats
Fred Waterer ........... Programming
Spotlight
George Zeller.......... Outer Limits
LETTERS
to the Editor
Digital Wires Crossed
The screenshot in the April edition of
“Digital Digest” was supposed to be the
RFSM2400 program decoding MIL-188110A. Unfortunately, what we showed you
was a MIL-STD-188-203-1A, or Link 11,
screenshot intended for the May issue. Following is the screenshot of the Russian software
program and the correct decode for April. We
apologize for the confusion!
MT at Winterfest
The 20th Winter SW Festival in Kulpsville, PA, has come and gone (see feature
article in March 2007 MT), leaving behind
good memories, new knowledge and new
friends. At the banquet, supporters from the
early days of the Fest were acknowledged,
including Grove Enterprises and Universal
Radio, both of whom donated prizes for the
very first and every subsequent year. Your
editor, Rachel Baughn, was honored to accept
the plaque on behalf of Grove Enterprises.
Harmony on the Ham Bands
“I guess I could not agree more with
your article, ‘Waking the Dead, Unruding
the Rude.’ [Now available on line at www.
4
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
monitoringtimes.com/html/mtham.pdf] I
live in the Denver area and while not as bad
(at least I hope you are not talking about this
area) as the situation you describe, there are
definitely some snotty 2M repeaters around
where it feels like a group of friends are just
talking to each other, and outsiders – or even
people actively trying to get inside – are
treated indifferently or with hostility. This one
small group in particular acts like it owns the
repeater and snippily ‘lays down the law’ to
anyone who is new or isn’t quite up to snuff on
a protocol; for example, letting squelch tails
tail off between calls – a characteristic of an
Echolink repeater you wouldn’t know about
until you had encountered it.
“I’ve found it extremely difficult to try
and get connected with the ‘2 meter people’
even though I attend every club meeting and
have even offered to help them with some of
their projects. ... It almost feels like the hams
here are ‘protecting a territory.’ Not sure exactly what it is. I was kind of happy to find
modes like PSK31 on HF – people there seem
much more friendly.
“I think your suggested antidote of reaching out to new people is the right prescription
and hope that your article reaches the right
audience. I do think ham radio is in a state of
transition – it will be interesting to see if it can
remain relevant in the future. I hope it does, I
love this hobby.”
– Robert White K0RCW
Regarding what to talk about on the air
(February 2007 Ham Bands): “Too bad that
there are not more enlightened and broadlybased hams like you. I could have become a
ham about 55 years ago, but the vast majority of conversations I overheard never got
beyond ‘gear’ and weather. I stayed an SWL
and to this day, have not been motivated to
get a ticket. I’m fond of electronic gear and
have enjoyed living
through a very exciting time (from crystal
sets to trunking scanners – I now own two
scanners, a good SW
receiver, stereo, iPod,
Shuffle, etc.) but I
still find that the average ham has little to
talk about. I hope that
your M/T piece will
have a major effect
on the hobby.”
– Maury Midlo
Radio Cats!
From John Musgrave, Oona River,
BC, Dec 24: “I often
This column is open to your considered
comments. Opinions expressed here are not
necessarily those of Monitoring Times. Your
letters may be rephrased or shortened for length
and clarity. Please mail to Letters to the Editor,
7540 Hwy 64 West, Brasstown, NC 28902, or
email editor@monitoringtimes.com
Happy monitoring!
- Rachel Baughn, KE4OPD, Editor
wonder about the connection between cats
and radios. I was thinking about cats and Fessenden, who loved cats – like me.
“Of course, in the days of tube radios cats
did stake-out tons of radios as warm places to
snooze. Somewhat safer than warm radiators
of parked cars!
“Certainly back in ‘52-’53 I can remember the family tomcat ‘Fluffy,’ a Persian,
lounging on top of the Eddystone radio.
“One sports-fishing camp I ‘watched’
over winters in the 1980s had a Siamese black
and white neutered tom called Dave. He was
extremely smart, left-pawed, but very dexterous.
“He used to lay on the shelf above my
Realistic DX302, reach down, and crank the
tuning-knob (kHz) which had a little handle.
This used to startle visitors. He did reach the
state of being able to tune a station in – he’d
crank by a station, stop, crank back until he
got best signal.
“I think mainly he liked to watch the red
LEDs change. Sadly, on Dec 24 he died of
FUS (Feline Urological Syndrome) – it was
too stormy for planes to fly, so we couldn’t
get him to a vet.
“Certainly I’ve see photos of readers’
‘set-ups’ in MT with cats attached to the radios, with such statements as ‘I know for a fact
the radios work better with the cat attached.’
“Universal Radio seem to have cats on
the payroll.
“So, today we celebrate 100 years of
voice broadcasting – with the first being from
shore to ‘all the ships at sea’!”
To prove John’s point, here’s another of
those shack photos – This one came in several
years ago from Howard Klann KD8ABP of
Calumet, Michigan, but it never got published.
Howard says, “I have a radio shack buddy.....
Misty likes to come in and watch and lis-
ten.....” Equipment includes Yaesu FT-897D,
8900R, YS-500, G-450A, Drake R8-B,
Icom-V8, RCI-2995DX, MFJ 949E, 989C,
Diamond GZV4000.
Hello from Canada
In the February MT Help Desk column,
Randy True asked about a filter that would
pass only 225-400 MHz, blocking frequencies above and below that military aircraft
range. A. Humphrey from Colborne, Ontario,
replies:
“I think maybe cable TV may have an
answer, as they installed a filter on my cable
to block out reception on certain channels I
get above and below.” (Bob Grove concurs
that’s a good possibility.)
He is also looking for information: “I
need a copy of an owner’s manual for a Radio
Shack 1978 Kit SW regen receiver 3 transistor
Science Fair Globe Patrol Cat. No. 28-205.
Mine works perfectly on all frequencies
AM+SSB. I added a fine tune knob on main
tuning shaft.
“Also: Any information on a Philips
Opal car radio 6 volt portable, white plastic
case, pushbuttons. Coverage 200 meters-2000
meters.” (150 kHz-1500 kHz)
Mr. Humphrey has been an electronics
technician and experimenter since his teenage years, has owned and built many kinds
of radios and antennas. He has reasonable
reception of shortwave and mediumwave
broadcasts, amateur HF, scanning NY state
and Ontario. Though a relative youngster at
60, he is retired due to poor health, but he
would still like to be of use to any MT reader
who is willing to use snail mail.
Anyone who has information on the
above equipment, or who would like to exchange scanner frequencies for the Rochester/
Buffalo area for Ontario frequencies, or who
would like to ask A. Humphrey a question
about radio or electronics may write him at
the following address: 6 Percy St., Apt 116,
Colborne, ON K0K 1S0 Canada.
Kentucky Music Hall of Fame
“This past summer (‘06) I visited the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Renfro Valley. Of interest to radio buffs like me was
the old radios, radio equipment (microphones,
etc), WHAS display and WRVK display. WRVK
studio and tower is just up the road and there is
a TIS station down the road a ways.
“Well worth a visit. Located off I-75 between London, KY, and Berea. The ‘Sunday
Mornin’ Gatherin’ radio program originates
weekly in the Old Red Barn.”
– R.C. (Col. DX) Watts
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
5
“Communications” is compiled by Rachel
Baughn KE4OPD (mteditor@monitoringtimes.com)
from news stories submitted by our readers. Thanks to
this month’s fine list of reporters, and especially to George
Zeller’s “Outer Limits” column which was overflowing
with news this month: Anonymous, John Figliozzi, Bob
Grove, Alokesh Gupta, Alan Heil, Norman Hill, Allen
Lutins, John Mayson, Paul McNamee, Fred Moore, Jerry
None, Ken Reitz, Doug Robertson, Larry Van Horn, and
Ed Yeary.
BROADCASTING
VOA English Broadcasts
Slashed
Eleven former directors of the Voice of
America have issued a joint statement calling
on Congress to reverse a Bush administration
plan to substantially reduce VOA’s English
broadcasts and those in 15 other languages.
“The Bush administration has proposed
to eliminate VOA English in every continent
except Africa, abolish services in Cantonese,
Croatian, Georgian, Greek, Thai and Uzbek,
cease radio broadcasts in Russian, Ukrainian,
Serbian, Albanian, Bosnian, Macedonian, and
Hindi (to India), and significantly scale back
programming in Tibetan and Portuguese to
Africa.”
The statement concludes, “We urgently
appeal for an increase of the proposed $178
million VOA budget to $204 million for fiscal
year 2008 beginning October 1 ... Surveys show
anti-American opinion abroad to be at an alltime high. At this critical moment in the post
9/11 era, the United States simply cannot, for
its own long term strategic safety and security,
unilaterally disarm in the global contest of
ideas.”
Webcasting in Trouble
Much of the buzz at this year’s Winterfest
centered around streaming audio on the internet substituting as “the new shortwave radio”
of the near future. Webcasting also provides a
legal outlet for small-time broadcasters who
otherwise might be tempted to broadcast as an
unlicensed pirate station. The little Acoustic
Energy internet radio caught the imagination of
‘Fest attendees as the push of a button brought
in remote stations, whether a US domestic station or a broadcaster from Africa or Asia. To
this editor’s eye, streaming audio appears to be
the most promising solution to the sameness on
the domestic radio dial and the disappearance
of shortwave broadcasting to North America.
However, a new ruling by the Copyright
Royalty Board (CRB) could put an end to music
streaming originating in the U.S. On March 2nd,
CRB announced a new scale to replace the old
fee system, which based music royalties on a
percentage of revenue and audience reach. The
new system will charge all webcasters a flat
fee (with little special consideration for public
broadcasters). Worse, it is retroactive to the
beginning of 2006, landing some non-commercial stations like University of Pennsylvania’s
WXPN with an outstanding bill of $1 million or
more! For many small or nonprofit broadcasters,
the fee amounts to more than 100 percent of the
6
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
station’s annual revenue and will effectively put
them out of business.
Contrary to rewarding artists and labels
with increased revenue, the move is likely to
backfire by shutting down the one place where
many new artists garner exposure and sales. This
column has previously mentioned noncommercial broadcaster KCRW-FM in Santa Monica,
whose internet audience greatly outnumbers its
over-air audience. Both WXPN and KCRW are
known for giving airtime to artists and music
outside of the mainstream – and their internet
stream may even play artists that aren’t given
airtime. While the royalties were presumably
determined with such artists’ benefit in mind,
the financial reality would end up suppressing
the music that needs the exposure the most.
For an excellent background on copyright
law and how it has changed over the years, as
well as what went wrong in the CRB’s deliberations, see www.kurthanson.com/archive/
news/031607/index.shtml And do write your
Congressman, because that’s likely where this
dispute will end up.
What’s Wrong with this
Picture?
At a time when internet stations are being
required to pay 10 times the royalty owed by
terrestrial broadcasters for giving a song airplay,
four major broadcast companies have agreed
to pay the government $12.5 million for doing
just the opposite. These companies accepted
remuneration from record labels in exchange
for playing the label’s music. Crazy world, isn’t
it?!
(Terrestrial stations pay royalties to the
composer, but not to the label or performing
artist(s).That may also be about to change.)
FCC Approves IBOC Rules
Digital terrestrial radio rules have now
been finalized by the Federal Communications
Commission. AM stations, previously limited to
daytime-only digital operation, will be allowed
to run their digital signals at night.
Stations must offer at least one free-to-air
program stream, simulcasting their analog signal. Digital-only stations will not be allowed at
this time. No deadline was set for shutting down
analog radio and going digital-only.
Doug Smith, MT’s American Bandscan
columnist said, “Many of the 50kW clear-channel stations are already equipped for IBOC and
will likely begin operating at night as soon as
the rules go into effect. The likely result will
be massive interference in the 640-1220 and
1500-1580 kHz bands.” See his blog at www.
americanbandscan.blogspot.com for more on
this story.
Police Confiscate Shortwave
Radios
BBCMS, via Clandestine Radio Watch #220,
notes that Short Wave Radio Africa reported in
December that local police in Mataga, Zimbabwe,
are confiscating shortwave radios distributed by
the “Radio Communication Project.” That project
donates solar-powered and wind-up shortwave
receivers to rural residents so that they can receive
foreign radio broadcasts that are independent of
“state propaganda.” According to this report, Zimbabwean authorities are confiscating shortwave
radios within the country on a widespread basis.
Who said that shortwave radio was dead?
The Zimbabwean government doesn’t believe it.
(Story coutesy of Outer Limits column.)
TV Marti Executive Pleads
Guilty
The Miami Herald newspaper reported in
November that Jose M. Miranda, a senior executive at TV Marti, was indicted for taking over
$100,000 in kickbacks from production vendors
having contracts with the anti-Castro television
network funded by the United States. One vendor
involved in the indictment was Perfect Image Film
and Video Productions. Miranda’s position at TV
Marti involved selecting and acquiring programs
for broadcast on the station.
But, an internal review of this story by the
Miami Herald, as reported in Editor and Publisher, found that on different occasions other
Washington journalists have taken money payments from shortwave broadcasters including the
Voice of America. The fact that journalists are
sometimes taking payments from governments to
produce “independent” news coverage obviously
compromises the independence of the news coverage from some journalists.
Miranda pled guilty federal court in midFebruary to “unlawfully participating in government matters in which he had a financial interest.”
Sentencing was scheduled in late April after the
deadline for this month’s MT.
We can unequivocally report that the “Outer
Limits” column in Monitoring Times receives
no payments from any government broadcaster
in any country. (Story courtesy of Outer Limits
column.)
San Francisco Liberation Radio
Appeals
San Francisco Liberation Radio has appealed
the seizure of its equipment by the FCC in October
2003. The San Mateo County Times reports that
2007 legal arguments revolved around whether
the station received due process of law during the
bust. The 9th US District Court of Appeals held
a late winter hearing on this case in California.
Senior Circuit Judge Betty Fletcher suggested that
the station should lobby the Congress to change
broadcasting laws, but the 9th District court still
had the appeal on due process issues under review
at press time for MT. Meanwhile, the station retains an internet podcast presence via a new web
site at www.liberationradio.net/listen/ but is not
broadcasting on FM currently. (Story courtesy of
Outer Limits column.)
MISCELLANEOUS
Spies Sentenced
Despite apologizing for a secret life of
informing on Miami’s exile community for
Cuba, convicted ex-Florida International University academics Carlos and Elsa Alvarez received
maximum sentences in February. Carlos Alvarez
received the maximum five-year prison sentence
for conspiring to act as an unregistered Cuban
agent and Elsa Alvarez received the maximum
three years’ imprisonment for harboring her
husband’s illicit intelligence work and failing to
report it to authorities.
Elsa Alvarez said her husband’s goal was to
“help Cubans to become unified’’ on both sides
of the Florida Straits. “I believe Carlos acted in
good faith at all times,’’ she added.
In sentencing them, Moore condemned them
for breaking federal law with their “personal foreign policy.’’ But the Alvarezes and their lawyers
kept insisting the information passed along to
Cuban agents was “innocuous’’ and ‘’harmless
gossip,’’ causing “no harm’’ to the United States
or the exile community.
At sentencing, prosecutor Matthew Axelrod
said they both relied on shortwave radios, computers and encrypted information to correspond with
their Cuban intelligence handlers and also traveled
to Cuba and other countries to meet them.
Compensation to Consumers?
When automatic garage door openers in your
neighborhood suddenly start malfunctioning, who
do you blame? Savvy MT readers know it’s (all
together, now) “military LMR radio systems.”
Once “borrowed” on a non-interference basis,
the military is repopulating these relatively vacant channels with new base communications
systems.
One widow on a fixed income near Quantico
felt she should get some kind of hardship compensation for being required to purchase a new
receiver and remote for her garage door opener.
Seems a valid point to us, but it’s not due from
the Dept of Defense; any manufacturer using
those military frequencies had to know it was a
gamble.
AMATEUR RADIO
Herman Munster’s Ham QSO
Ulis Fleming forwards an interesting episode
with actor Fred Gwynne from an ancient television episode of The Munsters as he clumsily
attempts a ham radio contact. The scene opens
at an FCC district office, where the FCC makes
the mistake of approving Herman Munster’s
application for a ham radio license. They appar-
ently were not busting pirates that day. Herman’s
two-way radio contact and his antique equipment
are amusing. You can view it yourself at www.
youtube.com/watch?v=tq9UsrmkxTY&eurl
(Story courtesy of Outer Limits column.)
Ham Radio Suspended in Iraq
Iraq Amateur Radio Society (IARS) President Diya Sayah, YI1DZ, has informed hams
worldwide that all Amateur Radio activity in Iraq
has been suspended until the security situation
there improves. Sayah said the suspension affects both Iraqi citizens as well as any foreigners
– including military personnel and contractors
– who have been on the air from Iraq identifying with YI9-prefix call signs. It does not affect
the operation of Military Affiliate Radio System
(MARS) stations, since they operate on military
frequencies. Some modes like IRLP and EchoLink
still are okay to use, as long as they don’t involve
transmitting a signal over the air.
Sayah told the American Radio Relay League
that the government expressed concerns over the
difficulty of identifying “enemy” as opposed to
“friendly” radio traffic, the potential for revealing
military movements via radio, and eavesdropping.
Sayah has also asked the worldwide Amateur
Radio community to use its influence to reverse
the Iraqi government policy, which may reflect
some misunderstanding of the role of amateur
radio operators.
Dayton Hamvention
Don’t miss the 56th show on May 18,19 &
20 at Hara Arena in Dayton, Ohio. The theme this
year is: Local Clubs: The Heart of Ham Radio
– to acknowledge the support that local ham radio
clubs around the world provide to their communities and to amateur radio. For details, visit www.
hamvention.org
Traditionally, the Hamvention® honors
three amateur radio operators who have made
significant contributions to the Amateur Radio
Service. Recipients of this year’s Hamvention
awards are Jim Haynie, W5JBP, whose leadership of the Amateur Radio Relay League (ARRL)
helped define amateur radio’s role in emergency
communication; Ed Hare, K4ZDH, whose technical documentation of BPL interference helped
defend ham bands; and David Cameron, VE7LTD,
whose efforts in developing the Internet Repeater
Linking Project (IRLP) turned amateur radio
repeaters into a worldwide communication network.
European DX Council
Shortwave listeners worldwide are cordially
invited to the 2007 EDXC Conference, to be held
November 1-4 in Lugano, Switzerland. Anticipated speakers include Bob Zanotti, Jeff White,
Anker Petersen, and Torre Ekblom.
The venue will be the Hotel Dischma (make
your own reservations at www.hotel-dischma.ch;
phone +41 91 994 21 31) and discounted rooms
for the conference are limited. Conference fee is
Eur 95 per person, which includes seminars, banquet, a tour of Lugano and the local radio and TV
station. For more information, please contact Mr.
Tibor Szilagyi, Sweden (email: tiszi2035@yahoo.
com; +46 8 500 264 83)
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
7
Storm Chasing
with
Amateur Radio
By Seth Price, N3MRA
Introduction
Forget what you see in the movies. There
are no flying cows to dodge, no houses to drive
through. Storm chasing is real. About the only
thing we talk about dodging is boredom during the long van rides. Instead of fine dining,
you might end up eating a convenience store
burrito or some Pringles from the last stop.
Hours are spent waiting, waiting, then rushing
to the next town, many times with no storm to
see. Most nights, you watch a sunset instead
of a tornado. However, with a lot of skill, and
a fair amount of luck, some afternoons are
spectacular, and make it all worthwhile. Each
year, storm chasers from local emergency
groups, universities, Skywarn spotters, and
tourists flock to Tornado Alley to get in on
the action.
For many years now, there has been a
partnership between Pulaski County High
School in Virginia and Virginia Polytechnic
Institute and State University (Virginia Tech).
A meteorology class is taught to high school
and college students to train them how to predict the how, why, when and where of severe
weather. Once a student has completed this
course, he or she is eligible for the ultimate
in field meteorology study: a storm chase in
the Great Plains.
After completing this course, I began
chasing in 2003 with this group. Because I
have been a licensed amateur radio operator
since 1992, I brought along some radio equipment for the chase. I suppose the rest is history,
as they say.
Before thinking that this is all fun and
games, I will highlight the importance of
amateur radio in emergency communications,
including weather emergencies such as severe
thunderstorms, flooding and tornadoes.
Skywarn
Skywarn is a volunteer group established
by the National Weather Service (NWS) to
track and report severe weather. They are the
“ground truth” which confirm the forecasts
and predictions from the NWS.
Meteorologists at the NWS make forecasts and predict where severe weather will
strike. Without Skywarn, it becomes difficult
to tell if there is just heavy
rain or hail in a precipitation
core. The exchange of information flows both ways. The
NWS could see a hook echo
on radar and then query the
Skywarn spotters to see if
there is a tornado. Sometimes
it works this way; sometimes
the Skywarn spotters see a
tornado before a hook echo
has been spotted on radar.
In general, Skywarn spotters are not storm chasers,
they are public servants
which observe the weather
around them and report their
findings. Storm chasers predict where the severe weather
Tornado in Furnas County, NE. This supercell later produced the will strike, be there when it
Hallam, NE tornado, which was the widest tornado in recorded does, and report their findhistory. 5/22/04
8
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
ings. While some Skywarn spotters are storm
chasers, not all are. Being Skywarn trained
does not make a storm chaser, and being a
storm chaser does not mean Skywarn trained,
though it should.
Amateur Radio
One method of communicating weather
information is through amateur radio. In
some ways, amateur radio is similar to CB,
and while a full discussion of its similarities
and differences is beyond the scope of this
article, it will suffice to say that it is a hobby
in itself and that Skywarn spotting is just one
small part of what can be done with amateur
radio.
While there are many available amateur
radio bands (sets of wavelengths and corresponding frequency ranges), most Skywarn
operations take place at the local scale, on
VHF and UHF. For most Skywarn operations,
two meter and seventy centimeter repeaters
are used. Repeaters listen on one frequency
and transmit on another, such that they can be
placed in a position to take a signal and repeat
it to extend the distance of the original transmitter. Many repeater sites have emergency
power sources, so they are often used when
the electricity has been knocked out.
Skywarn Nets
We have answered who and why of Skywarn communication, but we have not talked
about the when and how.
What is considered severe weather?
That is up to your NWS office, though some
standard rules apply. Tornadoes are always
considered severe weather. High winds, hail,
flooding and winter weather are reportable
as well. Lightning is never considered when
issuing severe storm warnings.
How high is high wind? How much snow
is considered too much? This is where your
NWS must make the call. An inch of snow
might completely paralyze Miami, whereas
it would change absolutely nothing in Min-
Back-sheared anvil near Lexington, NE. We
are looking at the back of the cell, and the
back-sheared portion indicates a strong updraft, and thus a strong storm. 5/17/05
neapolis. The bottom line is that you must
remain in contact with your NWS office long
before the severe weather begins.
Now that there is a fuzzy definition of a
severe weather event, we can outline what you
need to do as a Skywarn spotter.
Watches, Warnings, and
Severe Weather Outlooks
While the meteorology behind storm
chasing is beyond the scope of this article,
describing the products issued by the Storm
Prediction Center (SPC) and NWS are important for the Skywarn Spotter.
There is always some confusion about
watches, warnings and statements from the
NWS. To understand what is happening, and
to avoid causing undue panic, I will explain
each of these.
Watches, such as tornado watches and
severe storm watches, are issued when conditions are likely to deteriorate. Watches are
issued to give the emergency management
and local law enforcement a “heads up” as
to what to expect. Normally, a watch box is
issued long before there is any visible sign
of severe weather, and is based on model
runs and soundings from NWS weather balloons. A watch box is normally many miles in
length, maybe as much as several states, and
normally slopes from southwest to northeast.
The issuance of a severe storm watch does not
guarantee storms, nor does it mean the area
outside of the watch box will remain stormfree.
Warnings are the severe form of watches.
A tornado warning means there IS a tornado,
take action immediately. A severe storm warning means that large hail, high winds, or heavy
rains have been reported in the affected area.
(Warnings are the equivalent of moving from
yellow alert to red alert, for you Trekkies out
there.)
Warnings are much more localized. Most
NWS offices still use a county based system
of warning, where the affected counties are
placed under a warning. This is convenient for
NOAA radio and radio broadcasts. However,
many sites are working on a polygon-based
warning system. In this system, a polygon is
placed in the path of the storm, which alerts
more specific communities. To put it another
way, think of a tornado moving northeast,
right at the northeast corner of the county.
Alerting the whole county places undo strain
on the emergency services south and west of
the storm. Polygon warning systems are much
more convenient for the internet and television
broadcasters, as this graphic can immediately
be placed on the air. Warning a large county for
a small, but severe storm can cause the NWS
to sound like it is “crying wolf,” and people
will soon ignore the warning. However, the
more visual polygon-based warnings are not
as well suited to radio announcements. This
can be a problem, as prime-time for tornadoes
tends to be during the 5pm-6pm rush hour,
when people are stuck in their cars listening
to the radio.
Now that I have told you more about
warnings than you wanted to know, I should
also mention SPC Severe Weather Outlooks.
The SPC evaluates a tremendous amount of
model data, balloon soundings, and ground
observations, and draws a graphic of what
can be expected on any given day. The four
categories are “no risk,” “slight risk,” “moderate risk,” and “high risk.”
Treat this as the NWS equivalent to the
Smokey the Bear “Fire Danger” signs that
you see along the highway or in parks. No
risk means severe storms are unlikely. A slight
This is an example of the new polygon-based
warning system under development by the
NWS. In the county-based warning system,
three whole counties would require warnings.
Under the polygon based warning system, only
the affected areas would be warned, which
lowers stress and strain on emergency management personnel.
risk means that there are some signs pointing to severe weather in this area. Moderate
risks encompass a smaller geographic area,
but show an increased likelihood of severe
weather in this area. High risks are the ones
which emergency managers fear.
Using the word “risk” might be misleading for the storm chase community, as many
of my best chase days have been on “slight
risk” days, and many “high risk” days have
been busted. High risks are often associated
with passing frontal systems, which lead to
severe lifting and squall lines – dangerous for
the community, but very hard to chase due to
their speed, size and lack of discrete cells.
A final note about watches, warnings, and
Severe Weather Outlooks for the storm chaser.
You cannot chase watches and warnings and
Unusual blue-green wall cloud. The blue-green color comes from a storm top of at least 48,000ft,
and does not necessarily indicate hail or tornadoes, though storms that reach this height often
produce severe weather. 5/24/05
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
9
expect to be successful. You can easily drive
around in a watch box all day and not reach the
affected area. Even warnings can be hard to
chase – many times we have been in a warned
county and have seen no severe weather!
How to Get Involved
While most days of storm chasing are
spent in the car, not chasing storms, it is not
a good idea to just jump into storm chasing
without any experience. At best, you will be
disappointed by the lack of storms you find
without any meteorological training. At worst,
you could be in the wrong place at the wrong
time! Before storm chasing, I would recommend Skywarn training, as the absolute bare
minimum. If possible, find someone in your
area who is already involved with Skywarn
and storm chasing. Learn the ropes before
trying it out for yourself. You save yourself
the frustration of many busted chase days!
Getting certified as a Skywarn spotter
is free, only takes up a few hours, and is
relatively easy. Get to know a few members
of the local amateur radio club, check their
website and check the local NWS website for
training dates. Most groups offer a combination of courses: Basic and Advanced courses
in the same night, or Basic, Advanced and
Hurricane, or some other combination. Look
for these nights in particular and attend the
sessions.
Now that you are certified for Skywarn,
getting into amateur radio is the next item on
your “to do” list. The American Radio Relay
League (ARRL) is the largest amateur radio
organization in the country, and thus provides a
series of books for learning to get your license.
Getting licensed to transmit on the amateur
radio frequencies is as simple as taking a
multiple choice exam issued by the Federal
Developing cells on a flanking line in Yuma County, CO. A strong supercell creates a downdraft
of rain-cooled air. The cold air forces the warmer air out of the way, which creates new areas of
lift, and thus new storms form along this boundary. 5/24/05
Communications Commission (FCC) and administered at local amateur radio events.
There is some confusion as to which
license classes exist and what is required for
getting on the air. At the date of this publication, there are three license classes: Technician,
General and Extra class, in order of increasing
difficulty and thus license privileges. A technician class license will get you on the air and
give you VHF/UHF privileges, which is to say
the two meter and seventy centimeter amateur
radio bands. Because these are the most used
Wall cloud near Maroa, IL. The peculiar thing about this is that it is spinning clockwise instead
of the usual counterclockwise. 5/17/06
10
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
frequencies for Skywarn, many Skywarn
spotters and storm chasers are technician class
operators.
How about the tests themselves? Particularly for the technician class license, much of
the test is dedicated to rules and regulations.
There is no better way to do this than to memorize the answers to the questions. In truth, most
amateurs might know the band plan for their
favorite band, but they almost always have a
total band plan chart to avoid having to memorize this. Websites, such as QRZ.com, have
practice tests online which randomly select
questions and tell you if you are correct, and
after the appropriate number of questions, tell
you if you passed the practice exam.
In addition to the website, I would recommend getting a beginner’s book from the
ARRL. There are many to choose from, and
they provide the background that the website
does not. Many people just use the website,
and once they pass their exam, they say “great,
now what?” If you have these beginner guides,
they will tell you all the ins and outs of getting
on the air and good operating practices.
Another way to get involved is to meet
your local amateur radio club. Any active club
will participate in contests and other operating activities where newer amateurs are often
paired up with experienced ones to learn the
ropes of radio. Some clubs even have a station
set up so that you can use a few radios there
and figure out what you like, without having
to buy them all yourself!
In addition to learning how to use amateur
radio, you will learn what emergency services
are already in place. You don’t have to be the
lone ranger reporting the tornado; there might
already be a highly sophisticated emergency
communication system already running in your
area.
A Day in the Life of a Storm
Chaser
If you want to chase storms, you must
understand the meteorology behind the Severe
Weather Outlooks and predict where you need
to be to see storms. This is the challenge! You
look at data collected early in the morning, and
then at SPC’s Severe Weather Outlooks for the
day, and try to figure out where you need to be
10-12 hours later. A quick shower, mediocre
continental breakfast at the hotel, and you are
on the road.
If you were lucky with your end of the day
analysis the night before, you might not have
to drive so far, but if conditions changed overnight, you may be on the road through lunch.
Or, if not, you might wish you were driving
when you arrive at your predicted destination
and play the waiting game for several hours.
In my case, I bring along an HF radio, a
Yaesu FT-857D and talk to hams on 10, 15 or
20 meters. Some DXers try to talk to every
county in the United States (a challenge called
county hunting), and sometimes I end up in
some sparsely populated counties and I make
their day, as well as keeping myself entertained.
Of course, while you are doing something to
pass the time, you are constantly checking for
updates on surface conditions. Often, the place
with the best chance of severe weather may
have shifted. It always helps to find a place
with free wireless internet to download new
data.
I once heard that one
out of every nine storm chase
days ends in a supercell, if
you are an experienced crew
and the weather gods are
smiling upon you. So, we
will say eight days end just as
described above. For the ninth
day, however, things get very
intense!
You start to see some
nice cumulus towers going
up, and you drive to where
they may be. You are constantly comparing the satellite
view, your view, and an atlas
to see how to get where you A trip to the Storm Prediction Center (SPC) homepage will show
need to be.
graphics like this one. The day for which this was issued, there
You begin to see light- were several tornado reports across Texas and Kansas, and damning, and hopefully have aging wind and hail across Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas.
taken all the non-essential
antennas off the roof of your vehicle! Using an chasing a try. It has been quite enjoyable for
ARRL Repeater Directory, you find the local me, and I hope that I have left you with enough
repeater and listen for a Skywarn net. Normally, information to get started.
Skywarn operates on Stand-By mode before a
storm, where a net control operator is waiting
WEBSITES OF INTEREST:
for severe weather reports. Someone sees large
hail, or some other criteria outlined by the www.weather.gov - National Weather
Service
NWS serving the area. A local Skywarn net
is called. You check in, report your position www.spc.noaa.gov - Storm Prediction
Center
and your findings. Don’t exaggerate! If you
www.qrz.com - Practice Tests
do not see anything, then you have nothing to www.arrl.org - American Radio Relay
report!
League
While you monitor the radio, someone else is looking at radar images
and comparing those to a map. Avoiding large hail and tornadoes is the key
EF-SWL
to any successful storm chase! Even
one large hailstone can ruin a windshield and leave you sitting on the
sidelines for a few days. The driver
of the crew gets his directions from
the map/radar people, and your team
dodges the hail and tornadoes, while
trying to keep up with the storm.
Finally, after dark (NEVER chase
The Par EF-SWL is an end-fed short wave
after dark), you stop again and look
antenna optimally designed for 1-30 MHz
at the Day 2 SPC Severe Weather
reception. The radiator is 45 feet of genuine
#
Outlooks. The storms might be over
14 gauge black polyethylene coated FlexWeave wire (168 strands of #36 gauge woven
for the chase team, but the day may
copper). This material is very strong yet
still not be finished. It could be a
can easily be coiled like a rope for portable
twelve hour drive to tomorrow’s deswork. The UV resistant matchbox houses
tination, and the more driving done
a wideband 9:1 transformer wound on a
tonight, the less tomorrow. Driving
binocular core. Unlike other transformers,
four hours after dark is not uncomexternal stainless studs on the matchbox
mon. Dinner may or may not happen.
allow the user to configure the primary and
You welcome the opportunity to go
secondary grounds for best noise reduction
to bed, when you will wake up and
at their particular location. Output is via a
do it over again tomorrow.
silver/teflon SO239 connector.
Conclusion
Now that you’ve read some background information, get involved!
Take a Skywarn class from the NWS,
practice for your amateur radio exA “Sheriff-nado” as they are called. While this looks simi- ams, spend some time learning how
lar to a tornado, it is not. The dust is actually being kicked emergency communication systems
up from the storm’s outflow, and close inspection will work.
reveal that the “funnel” is not ragged and not rotating. Overall, I hope that you give SkyThis was incorrectly called in as a tornado. 5/23/06.
warn, amateur radio, and storm
$
Par EF-SWL
Order #2205
57.95
Universal also carries the Par MON3 omni
VHF-UHF base antenna and Par RF filters.
Note: Orders under $100 ship UPS for only $6.95.
Universal Radio
6830 Americana Pkwy.
Reynoldsburg, OH 43068
� Orders: 800 431-3939
� Info:
614 866-4267
� Fax:
614 866-2339
www.universal-radio.com
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
11
New Heights for
Amateur Radio
By Bill Brown, WB8ELK
A
number of groups around the world
have been taking Amateur Radio to
new heights. Carried aloft by weather
balloons, these radio experiments fly to stratospheric altitudes (over 100,000 feet) into a
region called Near Space.
There is now enough activity by the Amateur Radio High Altitude Balloon (ARHAB)
community that you can listen in with your
radio just about every weekend and often during weekdays as well. The experiments range
from radio beacons, GPS location packets
(APRS), radio repeater relays, WiFi links as
well as live TV transmissions.
Why fly on a balloon? The answer is
quite simply that radio line of sight range
increases dramatically with
height; something you can
experience by taking a radio
to a mountaintop or up in a
plane. From a balloon’s lofty
perch at 100,000 feet, it can
literally transmit nearly 400 Bill Brown WB8ELK launches the HiBall-10 high altitude
miles in all directions with balloon. Gary Dion N4TXI to the right. (Photo by Vicky Wilson
very low power. I’ve flown a KE4JQX)
50 milliwatt transmitter on the
VHF bands and it has been heard by ground sometimes will have amateur radio experistations over a 12-state region. On the ground ments onboard as well. Our local university’s
this same transmitter is lucky to get out a mile engineering department in Huntsville, Alabama, (UAH) has a senior electrical engineeror two.
Quite often, universities will fly experi- ing class where they design and build an
ments to collect atmospheric data and these experiment (dubbed a BalloonSat) and then
fly it into the stratosphere. They are actually
building a satellite payload and flying it into
an environment that is quite literally the edge
of space – all in a relatively short mission
that costs hundreds of dollars instead of millions.
Typical Flight
A typical balloon flight consists of a
latex weather balloon (think party balloon on
steroids) plus a parachute with the experiment
dangling at the bottom (see Photo 1). The following website link shows a video and some
more photos of my most recent launch:
www.wb8elk.com/hiball10.htm
Edwin Flowers KG4LVO and Marty Clark KG4WPV recover the payload from the mountaintop
near Peachtree, NC (Photo by Dewhitt Sharp)
12
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
Up to twelve pounds can be flown by just
filing a NOTAM with the Federal Aviation
Administration (no more than 6 pounds in
any payload). Most groups adhere to this rule,
but some of the larger groups, universities
and government agencies do fly much larger
experiments which require a waiver from the
FAA.
The usual ARHAB mission takes about
90 minutes to reach 100,000 feet. At that point
the balloon has expanded to its maximum
size due to the near vacuum environment and
COMMON ARHAB FREQUENCIES:
14.060 MHz – HF CW data
14.070 MHz – HF PSK31 data
28.322 MHz – HF CW tracking beacon
144.39 MHz FM – APRS GPS packet data
144.34 MHz FM – Alternative GPS packet or
voice comms
146.52 MHz FM – Chase crew comms
146.565 MHz FM – low power voice or CW
beacons
426.25 MHz TV – Live Camera Television
434.00 MHz TV – Live Camera Television
439.25 MHz TV - Live Camera Television
Full Flight path of HiBall-10 (landing in Peachtree, NC near Murphy)
bursts. I have seen recordings of this event
from live TV downlinks and it’s quite spectacular. The parachute inflates and brings the
experiment down to a gentle landing some
distance away from the launch site, usually
taking about 40 minutes. Fortunately, we have
prediction software now that allows us to use
the FAA winds aloft data to help us forecast
the landing zone fairly precisely.
Part of the fun is chasing the balloon and
recovering the payload. There are a number of
amateur radio operators who will jump at the
chance to tromp through the woods or across
fields to find these experiments. For example,
in a recent flight attempt for a record time
aloft, I launched a balloon from Huntsville
which flew over 150 miles downrange to land
about a mile or so from Monitoring Times
headquarters in Brasstown, North Carolina!
Although it was transmitting a radio signal, the GPS unit had failed a few thousand
feet before it landed, so I didn’t know exactly
where it had come down. One of our balloon
trackers, Eddie Foust WD4JEM, called his dad
Jim Foust K4AIH who lives in the area, and
sure enough he could hear the signal. Eddie
then contacted Monitoring Times publisher
Bob Grove W8JHD who could hear it from
his house and headed out in the morning to pin
down the landing site near a mountaintop. On
the other side of the mountain, Edwin Flowers
KG4LVO and Marty Clark KG4WPV from
Andrews, NC, homed in on the signal using
nothing but their handheld radios checking for
maximum signal strength. They found it 50
feet up in a tree right on top of the mountain
peak and recovered it.
Listening In
There’s a website where you can find
launch announcements for most ARHAB
flights: www.arhab.org
There you will find time, location and
frequencies that will be used. Just find a launch
within 400 miles of your location and tune in,
although some flights carry HF transmitters
that can be heard thousands of miles away. If
you click on the callsign of a balloon flight
announcement on the ARHAB page, it will
direct you to FindU.com. This is a wonderful
website that links amateur radio GPS APRS
packets into the internet and displays their
location on a map in real-time.
You’ll hear GPS packet data (APRS),
Morse Code, or recorded voice beacons and
live television. In addition, when a repeater
relay experiment is onboard, you can listen in
on live conversations between mission control
and ground stations hundreds of miles away
using the balloon as a Near Space satellite.
As an example of one recent flight, I
had GPS position data transmitting on 144.39
MHz FM, a simplex voice repeater relay on
144.34 MHz FM, and live TV camera downlink on 439.25 MHz (cable ready TV channel
60).
If you’d like to watch a launch or join in
on the recovery hunt, find the nearest group
on the ARHAB links page and join in on the
fun. If you’d like an opportunity to listen in
on almost a dozen balloons launched at once,
every summer a conference is held in the Great
Plains called the Great Plains Superlaunch:
www.superlaunch.org .
Government Balloons
For those who want a real monitoring
challenge, the Weather Bureau launches
radiosondes to calculate their winds aloft
forecasts twice daily (0000 and 1200 UTC)
from sites across the US and the world. These
transmit on 1.680 GHz but can drift from
1.675 to 1.685 GHz (WFM). You’ll hear a
series of high-pitched tones which indicate
temperature, pressure and humidity. I’ve
tracked these using a small directional antenna
and either an AOR AR-3000A or an ICOM
R-3 in Wideband FM mode. They are fun to
chase and recover, but a real challenge due to
the frequency drift.
Another balloon is called the Ozonesonde. There is a site in Huntsville that
launches every Saturday around 1800 UTC.
As the name implies, it measures ozone in the
atmosphere and transmits around 402.5 MHz
(WFM mode). The frequency on this type of
balloon can drift from 401 to 404 MHz. It
transmits via 300 baud ASCII and sounds like
high- speed RTTY signals. These are great fun
to track down; they even offer a reward for
their return to help pay your gas. There are
a few other sites that launch these in the US:
Boulder, Colorado (every Friday around 1800
UTC) and also upstate New York.
Keep Looking Up
This is an opportunity for anyone with
a radio to participate in a low-cost space
program. It’s always a thrill to participate in
a Near Space balloon flight and widen your
monitoring horizons.
Bill Brown (WB8ELK@gmail.com) works as
an Electrical Engineer and is one of the founders of High Altitude Research Corporation in
Huntsville, AL. He has been flying Near Space
balloons for 20 years.
ARHAB WEBLINKS
Launch announcements:
www.arhab.org
Huntsville AL balloon info:
www.wb8elk.com
Great Plains Superlaunch conference and
launch:
www.superlaunch.org
Tracking software, FAA info and CO balloon
launches:
www.eoss.org
Online Balloon Track program:
www.nearspaceventures.com
Live Internet Balloon and Vehicle tracking:
www.FindU.com
or alternatively:
www.aprsworld.net
MT READERS ONLY
To access the restricted website for the month
starting May 1, go to www.monitoringtimes.
com, click on the key,
and when prompted, enter
“mtreader” under the user
name. Your password for
May is “hamitup” – Check
in each month for new
material!
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
13
Exploring the World of 10 Meter Beacons
By Ken Reitz KS4ZR
T
une through the 10 meter band almost
any time of day, any day of the week
during the doldrums of this sunspot cycle
and you’ll come to one conclusion: The band is
dead! Now tune from 28.200 to 28.300 MHz
and you’ll hear something very interesting: low
power beacons sending out their endless messages and giving you vital information on the
real status of the band.
Beacon Rules
Ten meter beacons are used to study propagation in the atmosphere and help indicate the
Maximum Usable Frequency (MUF) for the HF
bands. The Federal Communications Commission makes a special note of beacon operations
in FCC Rules part 97.203. Here are the basics: 1)
Any amateur holding a technician level license
or higher may operate a beacon station. 2) You
can’t operate on more than one channel in the
This QSL is from IY4M the beacon/robot from
the Associazioni Radioamatori Italiani commemorating Guglielmo Marconi’s beginning of
radio in Bologna, Italy. (Courtesy: Associazioni
Radioamatori Italiani)
14
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
same band from the same station location. 3)
Transmitted power must be less than 100 watts.
4) The specified band segment for 10 meters is
28.200-28.300 MHz. 5) A beacon may transmit
one-way communications. There are a few
other items covering setting up a beacon in the
“national quiet zone” around the National Radio
Astronomy Observatory in West Virginia and at
Arecibo in Puerto Rico.
While FCC rules confine U.S. amateur beacon operations from 28.2-28.3 MHz, other countries make beacon frequencies available much
lower. In fact, there are some 48 international
beacons operating from 28.115 to 28.200MHz
transmitting from Europe, the Mideast, South
America, Canada, Japan, and West Africa (see
International Beacon Chart).
Beacon Construction &
Operation
The FCC leaves the 10 meter beacon band
open to operating almost any kind of transmitter
(as long as the basic rules are obeyed). That’s
the fun side of the band. The result is that there
are almost no two beacons alike. Dozens of approaches to building and operating these beacons
can be found. What beacon operators are looking
for in a transmitter is low power output, easy
construction, and tough as a brick. These rigs
have to endure 24/7 operating conditions year
‘round. They have to take driving rain, lightning,
ice storms, searing summer heat and still keep
going. You might think this means that only
MilSpec radios would be capable of this sort of
duty. But, that’s not the case.
Many beacon operators use old CB radios
converted to operate in the 10 meter band. These
rigs are further modified so that the transmissions use one side-band of the original AM signal
to send CW via a microchip. Some operators
use home-brew CW QRP (low power) transmitters, others use older low power 10 meter ham
rigs such as the Radio Shack HTX-100 and
the Uniden HR2510. Most use simple vertical
antennas, often not more than 10 or 20 feet off
the ground.
There is an unofficial list of current 10 meter beacons kept up to date by Bill Hays, WJ5O
(www.qsl.net/wj5o/bcn.htm). Check out his
own home page (http://home.stx.rr.com/wj5o)
and you’ll find tons of tips for 10 meter DXers,
as well as quite a few ideas about building your
own 10 meter beacon. You can also tune in to
the 10 meter beacon operator calling frequency
at the top of the hour on 28.327 MHz and see
what’s happening. Listen for Bill’s own beacon
on 28.289 MHz.
There is also a “beacon reflector,” which
is an automatic e-mail service that delivers the
latest reception reports from contributors to the
reflector from around the world. To join, send
an e-mail to hfbeacons@explore.plus.com and
in the subject write: subscribe. Then sit back
and wait; you’ll get tons of beacon reports and
conversations about beacons from some of the
world’s top 10 meter beacon band monitors.
Sampling the 10 Meter
Beacons
Last summer I spent a few weeks monitoring the 10 meter beacon band and was amazed
to log dozens of stations throughout the period,
despite generally dismal HF conditions. This
seeming contradiction is the main thing that
keeps beacon listeners tuned in. I sent reception
reports via e-mail to a number of operators and
received some great QSLs and a lot of information about these stations and their operators. I
asked each to describe his or her beacon station,
how long it had been in operation, how many
signal reports they receive each week, and where
they come from. Here’s a round-up of a few of
the beacon operators’ replies:
Ron Anderson KA0PSE/B
(28.218.5) Duluth, MN
“The rig is a home-brew right out of QST
magazine, March 2000, with a couple of modifications, mainly a little CPU fan to cool the finals.
It puts out a faithful 3.85 watts into an AR-10
vertical antenna at about 40 feet on the roof of
my work QTH (WDSE-TV Public Broadcast
Studio). The rig was fun to build and I think it
sounds pretty good ... The beacon has been on
the air since December 1, 2001. When the band
is up ... I have received reports from California
ning 5 watts into a 1966 Supermag antenna from
Antenna Specialists. He uses an Autek Research
MK-1 controller to send CW. Allan reports that
he hasn’t received a DX report in 6 years but
received many during the peak of the last solar
cycle.
QSL card from Ron Anderson KA0PSE/B
runs 4 watts from a home-brew into a AR-10
vertical at 40’ from his workplace at WDSE-TV
Public TV Broadcast Studio in Duluth, MN.
(Courtesy: Ron Anderson KA0PSE)
to Germany to Uruguay to South Africa and
Australia, usually about 6 per month.”
Domenic Bianco KC9GNK/B
(28.2836) Madison, WI
For two years Domenic ran a 10 watt beacon using an attic mounted antenna and received
1-3 reports per week. Then he reconfigured the
beacon to use an Icom 718 feeding a Ringo AR10
antenna on a 43 foot tower (see QSL photo). The
extra power nets an amazing 5-10 signal reports
a day from beacon monitors. Domenic’s new
beacon, on the air for just a year, is the easiest
catch on the band. He uses a Logikey K-5 keyer
to run the beacon.
Bruce Burkeen’s KM4GS/B beacon is in here
among his other ham gear and is currently
running 4 watts output into a Hustler 4BTV
antenna mounted on a barn roof. (Courtesy:
Bruce Burkeen)
vertical mounted in the center of a 72 foot long
metal barn roof. The controller is a ComSpec
ID-8 board in a metal Bud box on top of the
radio. As for reports ... I get 4 or 5 a week. Most
everything is in the 400-500 mile range ... When
the cycle is at its peak the reports will run 25-50
per week with VK’s (Australia) and ZL’s (New
Zealand) sending most of the DX reports.”
Ronnie Casey K4JDR/B
(28.298) Raleigh, NC
Ronnie uses a Uniden HR2510 10 meter
rig in CW mode controlled by a ComSpec ID-8
and feeding a Solarcon A99 cut to the frequency
and mounted at 26-ft. He notes that there are a
number of shortwave listeners who send QSL
reports to him. His beacon has been on the air
continuously since 1998.
Ronnie Casey’s K4JDR beacon uses a Uniden
2510 10 meter rig and has been in operation
24/7 since 1998. (Courtesy: Ronnie Casey
K4JDR)
Domenic Bianco KC9GNK/B sends this QSL
for received reports. His 40 watts is the easiest
catch on the band. Let him know what you are
using to tune in. (Courtesy: KC9GNK)
Bruce Burkeen KM4GS/B
(28.292.5) Gainesville, KY
Bruce’s beacon is celebrating 20 years on
the air: “I started the beacon in 1987 using a ...
CB rig and a Commodore VIC20 that keyed
a relay to send CW. It worked pretty well for
several years ‘til the relays were worn out (a
relay has to make a lot of cycles to send CW
24/7). In those days it was 100% solar powered
to a ground mounted Antron 99 CB antenna.
“I have switched my beacon transmitter
to a Kenwood TS-130 feeding a Hustler 4BTV
Les Ellis WB0FTL/B (28.217)
Alden, MN
Les has been a loyal subscriber to Monitoring Times since day one and says he still has
every issue! He uses a Radio Shack HTX-100 10
meter transceiver in the 5 watt output CW mode.
He uses a Power-One HE15-9 power supply and
an Embedded Research TiCK CMOS keyer for
a controller. His antenna is an AR-10 vertical at
25-ft above ground.
Allan Gallo W0ERE/B (28.2828)
Hillandville, MO
Allan’s beacon hit the air in May 1996,
also using a Radio Shack HTX-100 ten meter
rig (which is a testimony to that old rig!) run-
Bill Hays WJ5O/B (28.289 MHz)
Corpus Christi, TX
The aforementioned Bill Hays has operated
his beacon since 1992. His original converted
CB rig lasted 11 years and was replaced with
another which still runs 3 watts into a home-brew
vertical on top of his roof. He uses a PIC based
12F629 keyer to run the beacon.
Bill Hays sends this QSL for reports of his
WJ5O/B. Even with just 2 watts into a roof
mounted vertical he still gets DX reports even
at the bottom of the solar cycle. Ten is alive!
(Courtesy: Bill Hays WJ5O)
SWLers Test Your Gear
The 10 meter band presents an excellent
opportunity for SWLers to test their radio and
antenna set-up. A number of automated beacons
are situated throughout the U.S. and the world
which lets you see how good your system is and
just how good or bad band conditions are. Check
out the following four automated 10 meter systems.
The PropNet Project
PropNet uses the digital format known as
PSK31 for transmitting and receiving signals on
a specific frequency on 10 meters. Their motto
is : “If the band is open and nobody is transmitting, can anybody hear it?” Here’s how the
PropNet project works: “Participants, known as
Probes, will periodically transmit on an anchor
frequency [on 10 meters its 28.131 MHz]. Any
station that receives that transmission forwards
the ‘catch’ to an Internet server that plots the
event on a map hosted at findU [the Automatic
Position Reporting System (APRS) database
access site]. While an amateur radio license is
required in order to be a transmitting participant,
unlicensed individuals are encouraged to participate as receive-only stations reporting what they
capture.”
You can get more information and see the
latest “catches” on propNet at www.propnet.
org.
The 250 Synchronized Propagation Beacon
Project
Begun in May 2005, the 250 Synchronized
Propagation Beacon Project is a work in progMay 2007
MONITORING TIMES
15
ress. According to their web site (www.wb4wor.
net/sync) the project was started “...by several
10 meter beacon operators in an ad-hoc fashion
to experiment with operating 10 meter beacons,
similar in concept to the IARU beacon project
on the other amateur HF bands to help with the
crowding of recent years in the 10 meter beacon
band.”
The project uses 28.250 MHz, hence the
name, and is run by WB4WOR, a club station of
which Charles Layno, W4CL of Greensboro, NC,
is trustee. The idea is to have a set list of stations
at various locations in the U.S. automatically
transmitting for 10 seconds each at decreasing
power levels starting out at 20 watts going to 2
watts, 200 mw and finally 20 mw. What you can
and cannot hear tells you everything you need
to know about where propagation on 10 meters
is happening. Check out their frequency, and for
more developments keep checking out their web
site for updates.
IY4M Robot
The first amateur radio robot beacon, IY4M,
operates on 28.195 MHz. Known as the Guglielmo Marconi Memorial Beacon Robot, IY4M
is located in Bologna, Italy. QSLs are handled
by IK4UPU. To celebrate the 100th anniversary
of Marconi’s revolutionary radio activities from
Bologna, the Associazioni Radioamatori Italiani
redesigned the IY4M robot for automatic transmission of beacon information every 30 seconds
and then stands by for automatic QSO mode in
which the robot station will engage in two way
exchange of information in CW from 10 to 60
wpm.
For detailed information about how to
do a QSO with IY4M go here: www.ari-bo.it/
iy4me_2.htm. The robot will send you all kinds
of information including your signal report and
current weather conditions at the IY4M location.
When the solar cycle improves this will be a great
frequency to monitor.
NCDX/IARU 28.200 Beacons
The Northern California DX Foundation
in conjunction with the International Amateur
Radio Union (IARU) have established a system
of 18 beacons around the world (see list below)
all operating on 28.200 MHz. To ensure that
propagation tests are equal, each NCDX beacon
station is identical. They use standard HF ham
transceivers and antennas. The controller, which
times the transmissions and steps the power output
up and down, was devised by Bob Fabry, N6EK,
who uses an Intel 8748 microprocessor in the
controller. Details and schematics are found on
the NCDX web site (www.ncdxf.org/Beacon/
BeaconController.html).
Here’s how the 28.200 beacon system
works (from the NCDXF page): “...Each beacon
transmits every three minutes night and day...A
transmission consists of the call sign of the beacon sent at 22 wpm followed by four one-second
dashes. The call sign and the first dash are sent
at 100 watts. The remaining dashes are sent at 10
watts, 1 watt and 100 milliwatts.”
DIY 10 Meter Beacon
As with many other aspects of amateur
radio, the 10 meter beacon band is a niche with
16
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
ardent devotees. It presents a great opportunity
for experimenters, home-brewers, and SWLers
alike. And, as with so many other aspects of this
hobby, opinions are divided. Some fear that there
are too many beacons on the band. Others believe
you can’t have too many. My own feeling after
monitoring the beacon band for quite some time is
that as long as operators stick to the “gentleman’s
agreement” regarding beacon operating on 10
meters it will be a useful resource for a long time
to come.
If you decide to start your own 10 meter beacon operation, here are some tips: When you pick
an operating frequency, check with the WJ5O list
and try to avoid being on top of an existing station.
Be able to monitor your transmission to insure that
it’s functioning properly. Keep the transmission
output as low as possible. If every beacon on the
band is operating at under 5 watts there’ll never
be a problem with overcrowding. According to
the WJ5O list, very few stations operate over 10
watts with many in the mW range.
When planning your beacon, you may want
to isolate the transmitter and antenna from your
main radio operations and antenna location to
avoid interfering with yourself. And, finally, make
sure your beacon is operating 24/7. There’s little
point in a beacon which is on intermittently. The
exception is when you’re 100% direct solar power
and the power is only up when the sun is up.
Monitoring the Beacon Band
I’ve used a variety of receivers to listen to
the 10 meter beacon band. Any receiver with SSB/
CW capability will work. I’ve used a number of
portables with only the built-in telescoping whip
antenna and had excellent results. I’ve used my
ham rig with a beam antenna and, not surprisingly,
was able to copy beacon stations which were much
weaker with an omni-directional antenna. Still,
you don’t need much of a signal to receive these
little workhorses.
Most beacons use a programmable microchip
to send their message in an unending loop of CW
typically at 10 or 15 wpm. Many start the loop
with a series of three attention getting V’s. This is
typically followed by the letters “de” (Morse code
for “from”) and the call sign of the station which
adds /B to the suffix to indicate it’s a beacon. Even
if you don’t know Morse code, you can copy the
station call signs, because they are repeated over
and over. Concentrate on getting one letter at a
time. If you can only copy the first letter or two
and the number in the call, you have all you need
to determine what station you’re receiving. For
example, if I copy W0 and my receiver shows I’m
tuned to 28.282 then I check out the WJ5O list and
see I’m copying W0ERE/B, Highlandville, MO,
which is running 5 watts into a vertical antenna.
It’s just that simple!
You can QSL beacon stations either via email or via postal mail. Some stations will send
their e-mail address as part of the transmission.
If not, simply go to www.qrz.com and look up
the call sign. Then click on the place where it is
indicated for the e-mail address. To receive a paper
QSL card, use the mailing address at the same
web site and don’t forget to include an SASE. As
indicated above, some beacon operators receive
many QSL requests per month and at $.39 each,
the postage can add up.
In your report, use the RST reporting
method, where R= Readability (on a scale of 1-5),
S=Signal Strength (on a scale of 1-9) and T=Tone
(also on a 1-9 scale). A great signal report would
be 599; a weak signal report would be 519; and a
poor signal report would be 419. On your report
list the day, time, year, frequency and RST along
with a run-down on your receiving equipment and
your location.
The 10 meter band is a slave to the sun. When
the ionosphere is energized there’ll be propagation. After the sun goes down, propagation will be
limited to ground wave, typically 5-10 miles. At
sundown you can “ride the terminator” (the line
between those areas lit by the sun and those not)
for some interesting DX.
Beacon monitoring is a year ‘round activity. In the winter months you may hear more DX
stations and in the summer you’ll generally hear
more stations within a 500 mile radius. But, sometimes, without any warning the band will open
up and you’ll get some really great catches. As
the new solar cycle builds, you’ll hear more and
more beacons throughout the day. The more you
listen to the 10 meter beacons the more intrigued
you’ll be with the whole subject of propagation.
If you’re a ham and you see the band is open
why not just move up the band to the SSB segment
or down to 28.120 (the BPSK31 segment) or the
bottom of the band where the CW ops lurk, or
28.680 (the SSTV calling frequency) or 29.600
(the FM calling frequency) on this multi-faceted
band and get a QSO going? You know the band
is open!
LOG THE INTERNATIONAL 10 METER BEACONS
You can log nearly 50 DXCC countries and at
least 40 states by just listening to the 10
meter beacon band. Check out the unofficial
10 Meter Beacon List at www.qsl.net/wj5o/
ben.htm for the current list. Here’s the official NCDXF/IARU list:
NCDXF/IARU
INTERNATIONAL BEACON PROJECT
(All stations transmit on 28.200MHz)
4U1U
United Nations, NYC
VE8AT
Nunavut, Canada
W6WX San Jose, CA
KH6WO Laie, Oahu, HI
ZL6B
Masterton, New Zealand
VK6RBP Rolystone, Australia
JA2IGY Mt. Asama, Japan
RR9O
Novosibirsk, Russia
VR2B
Hong Kong, China
4S7B
Columbo, Sri Lanka
ZS6DN Pretoria, South Africa
5Z4B
Kiambu Kenya, Africa
4X6TU Tel Aviv, Israel
OH2B
Karkkila, Finland
CS3B
Medeira Island
LU4AA Buenos Aires, Argentina
OA4B
Lima, Peru
YV5B
Caracas, Venezuela
OTHER RESOURCES:
Gunter DF4PV, has a weathercam on DM0ING
on 28.213 has created a map of Europe with
the 10 meter beacons here: http://freenethomepage.de/df4pv10/Baken.jpg
Enrico, IW3FZQ has updated beacon audio files
on his web page. http://www.qsl.net/iw3fzq
Rodney, AC6V has an extensive beacon page at
http://www.ac6v.com/beacons.htm
Good News for the
Environment
Tin/lead solder in electronics is going
the way Freon® (Chlorofluorocarbon) did
ten years ago. Freon products used to be used
for cleaning flux off of circuit boards after
the soldering process. Chlorofluorocarbons
are now infamous for greatly adding to the
depletion of the earth’s ozone shield.
Have you ever wondered where your
old IBM Personal Computer and all the other
models that became technologically obsolete
landed up? How about all the other electronic
products: radios, TV’s, VCR’s, printers, scanners and endless electronic gadgets? Even with
expensive radios, it is often less expensive
to scrap a pc board than to troubleshoot and
repair a problematic circuit. In most cases, the
printed circuit boards are not recycled or parts
reclaimed. In printed circuit boards, the metal
that is of most concern is lead. Lead is used
on pc board traces, component leads, and in
solder.
Hazardous electronic product waste has
become a global environmental concern. After
electronic products reach the end of their useful life they need to be disposed of. Reclaiming metals and plastics is a costly operation;
the most cost-effective disposal method is to
simply send scrap electronics to a landfill.
However, this creates a problem, because
hazardous materials can leach into the ground,
contaminating both soil and water.
European and Asian countries have addressed this concern by eliminating hazardous
materials in manufacturing electronic products. Materials that are of concern are lead,
cadmium, hexavalent chromium, mercury and
PBB/PBDE (flame retardants).
The effort to remove lead from electronic
products, along with other hazardous waste,
can only help our environment. However,
lead-free technology will affect each of us as
consumers of electronic products.
Japan Leads the Way
Over the last several years, major electronic industries in Japan and JEITA (Japan
Electronics and Information Technology In-
dustries Association) have been researching
alternatives to tin-lead solder. Tin-lead solder
has been used for decades with outstanding,
proven reliability. Finding a substitute solder
was not an easy task, since other alloys had
many unacceptable characteristics, such as
higher melting points and poorer joint quality.
As acceptable alternative alloys were discovered, companies quickly patented the alloy for
their exclusive use in electronic products.
Japanese companies realized that changing over to lead-free products would be an
important step for homeland ecology, since
Japan has such a small land mass. Also, the
Japanese consumer wants the latest electronic
technology, which means a shorter product
life and a greater number of products to be
recycled.
A second reason for going lead-free was
to provide a marketing edge for exported
products. It is interesting to note that this effort was done on a volunteer basis. The now
predominant Sn96.5Ag3.0Cu0.5 (Tin/Silver/
Copper) alloy is used in Japan wherever special
patented solder is not utilized. This alloy usage
is increasing elsewhere in the world as well.
The European Union took a different
approach to this situation by introducing legislation in the form of directives that would
phase out leaded solder, beginning July 1,
2006. These directives are known as the WEEE
(Waste from Electrical Equipment) and RoHS
(Restriction of Hazardous Substance). The European Commission has estimated that to make
products compliant to both RoHS and WEEE
Directives will increase the cost between 1 to
4 percent.
American Companies Stall
American companies, on the other hand,
were not interested in going over to lead-free
solder products. Their salient arguments
against going to lead-free solder were poor
reliability and added cost. Lastly, end of product life disposal did not pose a major issue in
the U.S. The domestic mindset was that the
industry was staying with tin-lead.
Meanwhile, however, the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) had a real concern
with the disposal of hazardous waste, including
materials used in electronic manufacturing.
The EPA requested that U.S. manufacturers
eliminate or limit the use of these hazardous
materials, lead, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, mercury and PBB/PBDE.
With global markets legislating that products must be lead-free, this became an import
requirement, and American corporations went
into overdrive. At the 11th hour, they found it
exceedingly difficult to find a solder alloy that
would give results equal to tin-lead. Japanese
patents on successful soldering alloys made
the job of finding a cost-effective solution
even more difficult.
Globally, 100 lead-free alloy configurations have been considered; however, after
all the research and testing only a dozen or so
are being used. Global agreement has generally been achieved on tin-silver-copper and
tin-copper alloys, mostly for wave solder applications. SAC305 (tin-silver-copper) is the
solder acronym you will see most often.
Always Exceptions
In electronics and associated hardware
applications where high reliability is a necessity, tin-lead solder is still required. These
critical applications are aerospace, military
and medical electronics. The RoHS directive
has provided exemptions for industries that
require high reliability and wide temperature
operation. These exemptions are known as
RoHS5 and RoHS6.
In addition, one of the largest domestic
telecommunications companies has stated, for
reliability reasons, that all network hardware
will specify the tin-lead solder fabrication. The
telecom industry requires 99.999% reliability
on their equipment. On the other hand, this
same company will market and sell cell phones
manufactured with lead-free solder because of
their typical 2 year life cycle.
Engineering Challenges
Lead-free soldering brought many manufacturing and engineering challenges. One of
the most interesting problems was the growth
of tin whiskers. These are conductive filament
or needlelike structures that begin growing
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
17
after a product is manufactured. Any soldered
component that has a mechanical stress point
would be subject to tin whiskers.
Sometimes, there is enough potential and
current capacity to burn open the shorted circuit path. Another possible result of whiskers
is an intermittent short that causes a circuit
problem one moment and is gone when an
attempt is made to troubleshoot.
A tin whisker starts as a single tin crystal,
typically only a few micrometers in diameter.
Tin whiskers can grow to a length of 10 millimeters; however, 1 millimeter length is most
common. This problem can show up in passive
components, such as ceramic capacitors, resistors, sealed relays and sealed hybrid circuits,
printed circuit boards and – tragically – in
pacemakers.
In the case of the pacemaker, the manufacturer specified a tin-lead crystal assembly.
The crystal manufacturer supplied the manufacturer a lead-free part. The crystal shorted
out, due to a tin whisker, and the pacemaker
no longer functioned. This event alone brought
serious attention to lead-free solder technology.
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center,
NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP)
Program and the Center for Advanced Life
Cycle Engineering (CALCE) at the Univer-
sity of Maryland, along with other military
contracting companies, did many studies on
tin whiskers. The bottom line was that whisker
growth could be minimized but not eliminated.
The overall recommendation was to eliminate
mechanical stress on components when soldering and use a conformal coating on printed
circuit board surfaces after assembly. Other
problems were identified as well.
The electronics industry is continuously
reducing the size of electronic components.
Microprocessors and other large scale integration devices have miniscule lead pitch, pin to
pin. This situation exacerbates the whisker
problem and makes circuits less reliable.
Vibration and handling have been known to
shed whiskers onto other circuitry.
The following is a quote from CALCE:
“Whisker growing in fielded product represents a potential failure time bomb.” Texas
Instruments is using Nickel/Palladium/Gold
on their device pins to avoid the whisker
problem.
“Popcorning” reaction is another effect
caused by the higher solder temperature. If an
encapsulated component contains moisture, as
the solder temperatures exceeds 100 degrees
C, the moisture within the molded part will
become a gas. If this high pressure gas cannot
find a path to escape, it tends to pop the molding compound like popcorn.
Higher solder melting temperatures are
required for lead-free alloy solders. Typical
melting points for tin-copper are 227 degrees C
and for tin-silver, 221 C. With higher soldering
temperatures, soldering has to be done within a
shorter period of time or the part will be damaged. Part removal at this higher temperature
will damage the part in most cases.
Plastic component cases are especially
prone to damage, as well. This means that
soldering processes have to be redesigned as
well as new soldering equipment. Even fixedtemperature hand-soldering irons will not be
suitable for this type of solder.
One very important characteristic of tinlead solder joints is that they are accepting of
wide variations in temperature. All components and circuit boards contract and expand
with temperature. Each material has its own
mechanical expansion co-efficient, which
means that if the solder does not stretch or
contract to neutralize this dimensional change,
the component or solder joint can crack. Most
lead-free solders lack this characteristic.
There is also an inspection dilemma: If
you visually compare a lead-free joint to a
tin-lead solder joint it will look grainy and
dull. Leaded solder joints of similar appearance would likely fail a visual quality control
inspection. This aspect of lead-free soldering
poses a challenge to the electronic industry to
identify bad assemblies.
The flux chemistries that worked well
with a leaded process are not the best fit for
lead-free soldering. Fortunately, most hand
soldering applications require the use of wire
solder. Manufacturers, such as Kester, incorporate a flux core(s) with the applicable chemistry compatible with the lead-free solder.
For the Hobbyist
How will the changeover to lead-free
solder affect the radio hobbyist? You will still
be able to buy tin-lead solder as you have in
the past for electronics usage. There is no
legislation preventing you from using this
solder. However, electronic distributors such
as Digikey are depleting inventory of parts
with tin-lead solder dipped or plated leads.
In most cases, soldering will be slightly
different than it was with its tin-lead predecessor. When soldering components to a pc board,
you will notice that the lead-free solder does
not spread out as did tin-lead solder. Also, it
takes a longer time to melt lead-free solder in
making a joint. Soldering parts that are RoHS
compliant (lead-free) with leaded solder will
not cause a joint problem. If you would like to
use a lead free solder, a tin-copper alloy would
be a good choice.
Get Set for Product Failure?
This author wonders how product reliability will be with consumer products such
as large screen TVs and high end radios.
With many of these products selling for more
than $1000, it would be painful experience to
replace one of these items after its warranty
expires.
Solid state technology has given the consumer outstanding product life to date, even
considering increasingly complex electronic
circuits. The industry reports the average life
of current consumer electronics products to be
3 years. More than 10 percent fail within a 2
18
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
year period.
In the brave new world of lead-free solder,
those industry averages are not yet known. We
suspect the consumer will be very irate if, as
anticipated, their TVs, amateur radio equipment, land-line telephones, appliances, and
even garage door openers begin to fail at an
even faster rate.
Solder Reference
Kester is the world-wide leading manufacturer
of solder products. They offer a wealth of
information on their website (kester.com) and
provide this useful information in table 1.
SnAgCu(Bi) Alloys
Higher melt point lead-free alternative.
SnAgCu family is electronics industry standard which in most cases has shown equal or
greater thermal cycle fatigue resistance than
SnPb.
Higher surface tension and poorer wetting
than SnPb.
Ag provides greater strength but less
ductility than Pb.
Cu reduces the melting point of the
solder. Cu improves thermal cycle fatigue
resistance. Cu improves wet ability. Cu retards
the dissolution rate of copper from boards and
components into the molten solder during
soldering.
Bi reduces melting point of the solder.
Bi improves wet ability. In the presence of
lead from HASL boards or components Bi
can greatly reduce thermal cycle fatigue resistance due to the formation of Sn16Pb32Bi52
(MP=95C) which can diffuse along the grain
boundaries
TABLE OF ALLOYS
ALLOY:TIN-LEAD
Sn63Pb37
Sn60Pb40
Sn55Pb45
Sn50Pb50
Sn45Pb55
Sn40Pb60
Sn35Pb65
Sn30Pb70
No. 123
Sn25Pb75
Sn20Pb80
Sn10Pb90
Sn05Pb95
LEAD-FREE
Sn96.5Ag3.5
Sn96Ag04
Sn95Ag05
100%Sn
Sn95Sb05
Sn99.3Cu0.7
Sn96.6Ag3.0Cu0.5
Sn95.5Ag3.8Cu0.7
SAF-A-LLOY
MELTING RANGE °F/°C
361/183
361-374/183-190
361-397/183-203
361-420/183-214
361-440/183-225
361-460/183-238
361-477/183-247
361-496/183-258
366-503/186/262
361-514/183-268
361-536/268-302
514-576/268-302
574-597/301-314
MELTING RANGE °F/°C
430/221
430-444/221-229
430-473/221-245
450/232
450-464/232-240
440/227
422-428/217-220
422-430/217-221
428-454/219-235
WIRE
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
BAR
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
WIRE
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
BAR
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
SOLDERPASTE PREFORMS
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
SOLDERPASTE PREFORMS
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
REFERENCES
• The trade name Freon® is a registered trademark
belonging to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company
(DuPont)
• Photograph 1 (needlewhisker): Courtesy of Center
for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering (CALCE) at
University of Maryland
• Photographs 2 (hot dip limitations) & 3(whisker):
Courtesy of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program”
• Solder Reference Tables Courtesy of the Kester
Corporation
• Additional website information can be found at:
http://nepp.nasa.gov/whisker
http://www.calce.umd.edu/
The author wishes to thank Michael
Osterman, Ph.D. (CALCE) and Jay Brusse
(GSFC/NASA) for permission to use their
photographs in this article.
Gregory L. Smith, is a Senior Electronics
Technician for ASCO Power Technologies a
Division of Emerson Network Power and holds
an FCC Amateur Extra Class License
WiNRADiO G315i
THE BEST IS NOW EVEN BETTER; ENTER…
THE WiNRADiO WR-G315!
Setting the standard for computer-hosted, software-defined receivers (SDR), WiNRADiO has
announced this new, advanced, 2/3-length PCI-card receiver with multimode detection (AM, AMS,
LSB, USB, DSB, ISB, CW, FM) and wideband frequency coverage (9 kHz-1800 MHz, optionally
expandable to 3500 MHz, less cellular on consumer models). Its on-board DSP allows powerful
demodulation capabilities, notch filtering and noise blanker, and accommodates future upgrades, all in
software.
Not only a flexible receiver, but a reliable test instrument as well, the new 315 series has a calibrated, on-screen signal strength meter (dBm, uV, S-units);
90 dB spur-free dynamic range; extraordinary sensitivity (down to the -140 dBm range); a professional-level, multifunction, spectrum analyzer (RF and audio)
with surveillance-style recording; and 1 Hz tuning accuracy! IF bandwidth is continuously adjustable from 1 Hz-15 kHz (a wideband FM option is available).
Several receivers can be multitasked for automatic multi-channel monitoring and recording, limited only by the number of PCI slots in your computer.
Each receiver offers virtually unlimited storage (your computer hard-drive); multiple scanning, tuning and squelch options; and fast, 50-channel-per-second
scanning speed!An SMA antenna connector and an audio output jack are provided as well.
A model WR-G315e is also available as an external module, eminently suitable for portable/mobile laptop applications. Both models operate on a PC with
at least 500 MHz Pentium CPU and Windows 98/ME/2000/XP.
For more details, see our web page: http://www.grove-ent.com/wr315i.html (PCI card receiver)
and http://www.grove-ent.com/G315E.html (external module receiver).
Included are: Application software, user's manual, flexible-wire test antenna, audio patch cord,
and BNC-to-SMA antenna adapter
Order RCV64 (external):
r
Orde
!
NOW
Only $
95*
2,049
Order RCV54 (internal):
Only $
95*
1,899
800-438-8155
828-837-9200 fax: 828-837-2216
www.grove-ent.com
order@grove-ent.com
7540 Highway 64 West
Brasstown, NC 28902
* plus $24.95 (RCV54) or $28.95 (RCV64) Priority Mail or UPS Ground shipping in the US
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
19
G
ETTING STARTED
Ken Reitz, KS4ZR
kenreitz@monitoringtimes.com
THE BEGINNER’S CORNER
How to Start Your Own
International Shortwave Radio Station
M
any decades ago when I first started
listening to shortwave radio, one of
my favorite shows was the VOA’s
Jazz Hour with Willis Conover. I was also a
regular listener to WNYW “Radio New York
Worldwide.” And when, WRNO first started up
I was a “Charter Listener.” In those days WRNO
was the only full-time Top 40 rock radio station
on shortwave. It called itself “The Rock of New
Orleans World Wide.”
U.S. broadcast history is dotted with a
number of people who, like WRNO founder
Joseph M. Costello III, sought to bring another
voice of America to the HF bands. Haven’t you
ever wanted to do so as well?
❖ FCC Says Yes and No
The U.S. is one of the few countries to
allow, if not actually encourage, international
shortwave broadcasting by citizens and organizations. The FCC sets out the guidelines for
such an effort in a publication called Fact Sheet
on Building a High Frequency (Shortwave)
International Broadcasting Station. The stated
requirements are few but a little daunting.
The FCC recognizes the crowded nature of
today’s HF frequencies and sets a high enough
bar that only the really serious will try. Aside
from the various filing fees, the FCC requires a
minimum power output of 50 kW and a directional antenna array capable of a minimum of
10 dB gain. Those are the actual requirements,
but there are other more vague requirements as
well: “...In general, applicants must satisfy the
Commission that they are legally, technically,
and financially qualified, to build and operate
the proposed HF international broadcasting
station.” You can bet you won’t get far without a
pretty good looking business plan, an accredited
radio engineer on staff, and the smarts to step
lively through the various flaming hoops the
Commission will set before you.
The Commission warns prospective shortwave broadcasters against wanting to simply
broadcast to the U.S. alone, but it recognizes
that transmitters located at the corners of the
continent and beamed across to the rest of the
world will, in fact, be broadcasting to the entire
U.S. It’s not really that concerned.
Nor is it concerned about content. Tom
Polzin, with the FCC’s International Bureau,
told me that they wanted American commercial
HF broadcasters to “reflect the cultural values”
of our country. That’s certainly being done. He
20
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
said that regulation of the HF bands was “a
little bit more wide open” than the country’s
AM and FM bands. That’s for sure; very few
AM or FM outlets would keep their licenses
with the various SNAFUs encountered by HF
broadcasters.
And, as if to scare the heck out of anyone
still considering setting up their own HF station,
the Commission fires one last sinking shot:
“Individuals or groups considering building
and operating an international broadcasting
station should consider the quality of the service
the station may provide, given the extremely
congested frequencies currently available and
the high cost of the station. The cost of a station
with a minimum transmitter power of 50 kW and
a directional antenna with a minimum gain of
10 dB, the land for the station, the studios, and
operational cost could easily exceed one million dollars.” Well, no wonder the private HF
landscape is mostly populated by religious organizations. Who else has that kind of money?
There are ways around getting on the air
for under a million dollars, but you’ll need a lot
of help in the way of used or free equipment,
cheap land, good neighbors, a helping county
commissioner’s office, and volunteers. It may
be possible to put together a shaky 50 kW signal
for a tenth the FCC estimate. But, that’s still
$100,000!
So, want to give it a shot anyway? Get your
investors together, read the Fact Sheet, develop
a plan, hire a good engineer and get ready to
shell out the bucks. Or....
❖ Shortwave Broadcasters
“For Hire”
If you haven’t quite got the money or the
stamina for the long haul needed to launch your
own shortwave HF station, you might consider
bringing your passion to the bands via existing
HF outlets. The following are the three “for
hire” HF International Broadcasters willing to
let you be the programmer for a price. (Cheap,
compared to $100,000.)
This is WBCQ’s log periodic beam antenna
for 7.415 MHz which was built by Sommer
Antennas of Geneva, FL and takes the station’s
50 kW input. It features a 30’ boom with the
longest element being 60’. (Courtesy: WBCQ
The Planet)
WBCQ “The Planet”
Located in Monticello, Maine, WBCQ is
the brainchild of long time shortwave activist
Allan Weiner who had the courage of conviction
to do what you might consider doing: starting
your own shortwave station. From his history
of pirate shortwave broadcasting in the 1970s,
to his current legal on-air activities, his goal has
been to offer an HF voice to all comers. He was
granted a shortwave broadcast license from the
FCC in December 1997. Ten years later, WBCQ
is heard on four frequencies: 5.110, 7.415,
9.330, and 17.495 MHz.
You can buy time on WBCQ for your
own program, which can be fed to the station
for airing by tape, CD, Internet stream or live
via telephone. While WBCQ does not publish
a rate card and prefers to negotiate rates on
each individual contract, they typically charge
$75/hour and $40 for half an hour. Per minute
price goes down with longer program time and
more programs per week.
Billing themselves as “Free Speech Radio,”
WBCQ tries to attract a wide representation
of views for their programming. Tom Barna,
an engineer at WBCQ for the last eight years,
says that 4 PM to Midnight (ET) is their “prime
time.” You’ll get the most impact for your money
during this period. To learn more about WBCQ
visit their web site: www.wbcq.com or call 207538-9180.
WRMI “Radio Miami International”
WRMI started in the 1980s by buying time
on existing shortwave outlets to air its programming. In 1994 the FCC granted them an HF
license and they were on their own claiming
listeners from “Alaska to Tierra del Fuego.”
WRMI broadcasts on 7.385 and 9.955 MHz.
Not forgetting its own beginnings and
always looking for more sources of income,
WRMI has been selling broadcast time to a wide
variety of political and religious organizations
since the beginning. You can get your message
out to most of this hemisphere for as little as
$1/minute when you buy bulk time slots. Full
details may be found on their web site: www.
wrmi.net or by calling 305-559-9764.
Here’s a tip: check out their propagation
charts to determine the frequency and time of
day you would get the most out of your broadcast
buck. WRMI is also known as Radio Cuba Libre
for its close ties with the anti-Castro Cuban community in Miami. As a result WRMI’s 9.955 MHz
frequency gets jammed by the Cuban government
whenever their anti-Castro programs air.
WWCR “World Wide Christian Radio”
WWCR began in the Spring of 1989 (see
MT March 2006) with the plan of selling its
transmitter time to any one interested in buying.
As with any business, it’s been a struggle, but by
all accounts it’s been a big success. WWCR now
uses four 100 kW transmitters on ten frequencies
to reach across the continent and world wide. For
a current schedule of frequencies and times see:
wwcr.com/wwcr_transmitter/wwcr_transmitter_schedules.html.
As with the other “for hire” shortwave
broadcasters, WWCR charges less per minute
the more minutes you buy. They charge $18.50
for 4.5 minutes on a once-a-week basis. That
fee drops to $15 when you buy 4.5 minutes five
days a week. A once-a-week 29.5 minute show
will cost $99. A daily (M-F) 29.5 minute show
Transmitter #4 at WWCR from Continental Electronics pumps out 100 kW. New or used transmitters are still expensive buy, ship and operate. Care to pick up the electric tab at WWCR for a
month? You can “borrow” this transmitter for as little as $15 for 4.5 minutes. (Photo by Cameron
Keel courtesy WWCR)
drops to $80/show. For more information visit
them at www.wwcr.com or call 615-255-1300
during normal business hours (Central Time).
QSL sent to early listeners of WRNO “The Rock
of New Orleans Worldwide” back when WRNO
rocked! This one is dated 2-26-82 (eight days
after their on-air launch) embossed with the
WRNO seal and signed by the late Joseph M.
Costello III, WRNO founder and New Orleans
media mogul. (Courtesy: Author)
❖ Final Notes on DIY
Shortwave
You could be the next Willis Conover. Well,
probably not; he may have been the greatest radio
announcer of all time. But, if you’ve ever thought
you’d like to be on the air but couldn’t figure out
how, this could be your big chance. Look around
for a sponsor who might help foot the bill for the
air time; set up some simple recording equipment at
home, and give HF worldwide shortwave broadcasting a shot. And, there’s no cheaper way to address
the continent and the world than via shortwave.
Compare any of the above prices to satellite or
network distribution and it’s easily the cheapest.
If you think you still want to start your own
station, know that there’s barely enough money,
even with all the paid religious programs being
aired, for the existing American commercial HF
stations to meet expenses.
The upside is that we’re beginning the climb
into the next solar cycle. This means that these commercial HF stations will have far better signals for
much greater parts of the day over the next several
years. Who knows, your program may just take
off!
FREE SPEECH RADIO
WBCQ Shortwave
Not a power line installation but a big time
Rhombic array antenna at WWCR’s antenna
farm. This, along with its 100 kW transmitter,
accounts for its needle bending signal strength
across North America. Look for plenty of real
estate if you plan this type of antenna for your
own HF broadcast station. (Photo by Cameron
Keel courtesy WWCR)
7.415 - 9.330 - 5.110 - 18.910
wbcq.com
spacetransmissions.com
We are the only free speech
shortwave station on the planet
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
21
A
SK BOB
GENERAL QUESTIONS RELATED TO RADIO
Q. I just purchased a discone antenna but have not yet installed it.
If I’m not interested in frequencies
below about 121 MHz, can I simply
leave off the top vertical element
which is for lower frequencies?
(Bob Schweikert, N4NMK)
A. Discone performance is relatively flat
from its lowest frequency clear to the top,
but performance drops off rapidly below the
bottom. It depends, therefore, what the lower
cutoff frequency is for the discone and where
the vertical whip takes off.
Try tuning in a local airport weather
station (ATIS) broadcast with and without
the top element. You might even try it with
a weak FM broadcaster. That should tell you
all you need to know!
Q. What can I expect for distance
of signal reception in the “Close
Call” mode of Uniden and Radio
Shack scanners? (Steve, email)
A. Depending on whether you are using
the original rubber whip, a mobile antenna,
or a base antenna, and on the power of the
transmitting station, you should be able to
hear handy-talkies for several hundred feet,
mobiles up to a half mile or so, and base
stations a mile or more away.
Q. What is the name of the flexible
pin plug that can be inserted into
the center of a standard shortwave/
CB-style female antenna connector (SO-239) so a single wire can
be attached? (Robert Gorsch)
A. These are also commonly used on test
prods for multimeters as well. Because
of its shape, it’s known as a banana plug
and should be in stock at your local Radio
Shack.
Q. I recently purchased a shortwave portable and I notice the
presence of many strong interference signals below the AM broadcast band, spaced about every 30
kHz. They stop at the AM band and
aren’t heard at shortwave frequen22
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
Bob Grove, W8JHD
bobgrove@monitoringtimes.com
cies. Any idea what they might be? strength meter is 6 dB, and even if you are at
the fringe of marginal reception, a dB or two
(Ray Clemmer)
isn’t going to make much difference. I doubt
A. Chances are you are picking up some you’d see or hear any difference between the
microprocessor radiation from a nearby accessory or appliance, or even the RF radiation from a switching-type power supply.
Take the receiver to another part of the house
– or even to another house – and try again. If
the signal goes away or reduces in strength,
that confirms it. If it stays, it’s in the radio
or its power supply. You can eliminate the
power supply as a possible source by connecting the radio to a 12 volt car battery or
another (transformer-type) power supply.
two antennas.
Q. I recently was under a railroad
trestle and wondered if a dipole
were at its height (175 feet)
whether shortwave reception would
be substantially better than at, say,
10 feet above the ground. (Mark
Burns, Terre Haute, IN)
A. Using the same antenna simultaneously
for transmitting and receiving is not a good
idea, even if you use a good directional
coupler like a TV-style splitter (such as carried by Grove). Depending on the amount
of power your transmitter puts out, you
can damage the front-end RF transistors on
your scanner, as well as damage the delicate
wiring of the splitter. It’s definitely better to
use two antennas or an antenna switch that
physically disconnects the scanner when the
transmitter is to be used.
Even with two antennas or the directional multicoupler, you will have severe
signal overload problems on your scanner
while you are transmitting. The only way to
minimize (probably not entirely cure) that is
to install a sharply-tuned, two-meter notch
filter on the scanner antenna line. Grove
carries the PAR line of filters for a variety
of bands, and they are excellent.
A. Yes, I would suspect that a dipole
antenna, even with nearly 200 feet of coax
– provided it’s low-loss coax – would work
better at 175 feet height than 10 feet, provided that the railroad trestle doesn’t have
rails anymore which would alter the pattern
of the antenna.
When horizontal antennas are close
to the ground at shortwave frequencies,
the ground causes reflections which make
primary reception overhead rather than from
the horizon; these are called near-verticalincidence antennas.
If the antenna is close to those rails,
they behave as reflectors, destroying the
horizontal pattern and creating unpredictable
lobes and nulls, depending upon their spacing, length and frequency of operation.
Q. I would like to use the same
mobile antenna for both my 2
meter transceiver and my scanner.
What type of accessory will split the
common antenna to the two radios
without overloading the front end
of the scanner? (Matt Goodwin,
KG6YLJ, Fresno, CA)
Q. With the imminent arrival of
digital TV, how will that affect my
reception if I’m currently in a fringe
area and get a snowy picture?
(L.C., email)
Q. I have designed two different
Yagi antennas, one with 10 dB
gain and 56 ohm impedance, the
other with 8 dB gain and 50 ohm
impedance. Which should I go
with? (Anwar Ullah)
A. The straightforward answer is that,
while analog TV can be seen with snow,
digital can’t; it’s all or none. Either the
broadcaster beefs up his signal, or you get
a better antenna, or you’ll have a blank
screen.
A. The slight loss from an impedance
mismatch of only a few ohms will be virtually impossible to detect by the receiving
station, especially if you are using low-loss
transmission line. An S unit on a signal
Questions or tips sent to Ask Bob, c/o MT are printed
in this column as space permits. Mail your questions
along with a self-addressed stamped envelope in care
of MT, or e-mail to bobgrove@monitoringtimes.com.
(Please include your name and address.)
M
T HELP DESK
SPECIFIC FREQUENCY AND EQUIPMENT QUESTIONS
Q. Can you recommend a propagation prediction program to use
on HF frequencies? Preferably
Freeware, but if the program is
exceptionally better than a freeware program then I would consider buying. (John via email)
A. There are quite a few freeware HF propagation programs that do an excellent job. I
have included a few of the better programs
(freeware and purchase) available for download from the internet.
W6ELProp by Sheldon C. Shallon,
W6EL that predicts ionospheric (sky-wave)
propagation between any two locations on the
earth on frequencies between 3 and 30 MHz.
This program is for Windows® 95, 98, ME,
XP, 2000, or NT with 2 MB Ram, 2 MB disk
space, and a800x600 256 color monitor or
better recommended (but not required). There
is no charge for W6ELProp when used for
non-commercial purposes. This is a five star
prop program and a must-have if you are a ham
or SWL. You can download the latest version
(2.70) at www.qsl.net/w6elprop/
HamCAP (by Alex VE3NEA at www.
dxatlas.com/hamcap/) is a compact Windows freeware interface program to VOACAP,
incorporating both graphical point-to-point
and area coverage predictions. The program
is pretty much self-contained; the only thing
you probably need to get from the Internet is
the smoothed International Sunspot Number
from the NGDC website. You can find the
users guide at www.voacap.com/hamcap-guide.html
Kangaroo Tabor Software’s WinCAP
Wizard, CAPMan, Active Beacon Wizard
– Propagation and Beacon Programs. These
programs are QSLware. WinCAP Wizard,
utilizing the VOACAP engine, is the successor to CAPMan – the recognized leader
in HF propagation prediction and system
analysis software. WinCAP Wizard is the
quick to-the-point HF propagation prediction
browser, currently in the fifth major version.
You can download it at www.taborsoft.
com/
PropView is a freeware program that uses
the included IonCap propagation prediction
engine to forecast the minimum and maximum
usable frequencies between two locations over
a specified 24 hour period. Results are rendered in an easy-to-understand color-graphic
display. You can specify locations via direct
latitude/longitude entry. Learn more about
this Windows program at www.dxlabsuite.
com/propview/
DX Toolbox – Shortwave / Ham Radio /
HF Radio Propagation. Black Cat’s DX Toolbox searches the web for you, gathering infor-
mation on solar and geomagnetic conditions
that affect radio propagation. It also features
several propagation forecasting tools, allowing
you to quickly and easily estimate current HF
(Shortwave) propagation conditions between
any two locations in the world. It’s ideal for
the ham radio operator, shortwave listener,
or other radio enthusiast, and is available for
Mac OS, Mac OS X, and Windows. While
it isn’t freeware, the price is right at $24.99.
Download it at www.blackcatsystems.
com/software/dxtoolbox.html (See
page 72 for more on this program suite - ed.)
Q. On the frequencies you listed
for Westover ARB which one is
the input freq.? You have it listed
like this 138.0750/148.4625
and so on. (George Dragoon via
email)
A. I always list the repeater output frequency
first and the repeater input second in all my
frequency lists.
Larry Van Horn, N5FPW
larryvanhorn@monitoringtimes.com
frequency 2182 kHz. These Group and Section
offices also make voice broadcasts of weather
and navigational warnings over VHF channel
22A and 2670 kHz, respectively.
A new system is being fielded and is
known as Rescue 21. Rescue 21 will aid the
Coast Guard in carrying out their missions
by providing an advanced command, control,
and communications (C3) system. This new
C3 system will be more robust, more reliable,
and more capable than the current National
Distress System.
Q. I have found that when I
program my two Pro 2055s and
two Pro-97s using [ScanCat]
software, that it renders my Signal Stalker totally useless. I do a
reset of the radio, Stalker works. I
program using Win-97, the radio
works, but when I again program
it with ScanCat, presto, Signal
Stalker is as deaf as a cabbage.
I tried all of the program settings
that I could think of, and it would
not restore Signal Stalker sensitivity. Only when I re-programmed
with Win-97 or reset the radio
would Stalker work again. (Don
Edwards via email)
Q. I live around Daytona Beach,
Florida, and on the frequencies
of 156.8 and 157.100 MHz,
using a Grove flex wire antenna
and a BC780xlt, I am hearing
USCG sector Charleston, South
Carolina. Is this skip or some A. I checked with Jim Springer, the head
type of relay from my local Coast honcho at ScanCat, and here is his answer.
short answer is... we are aware of this
Guard station? (Bill Wilstrom via “The
problem. The medium-short answer is GRE
email)
is the author of the software interface inside
A.
You are hearing Charleston being relayed
to your local transmitters via a radio or hardline
backbone network. This link works both ways
and allows the operators in Charleston to work
vessel traffic in your area.
The Coast Guard is responsible for a
variety of missions spread over 95,000 miles
of coastline in the continental United States,
Alaska, Hawaii, Guam, and Puerto Rico, plus
America’s navigable rivers and lakes. These
waterways are used for recreation, commerce,
and tourism by more than 78 million boaters.
As part of the National Distress System,
the Coast Guard operates approximately 48
Sector field offices, Section and Activity offices, whose responsibilities include listening
for distress calls over VHF maritime channel
16. Approximately 15,000 to 20,000 distress
calls are made over this VHF system each
year.
These stations also listen for distress calls
over the international radiotelephone distress
the radio. We have been going back and forth
on this for months, and while Radio Shack is
very cooperative, GRE keeps saying it’s not
even a supported feature (Aircraft Stalker/
Close Call), literally no help at all. I am not
minimizing the problem, but honestly it only
affects the aircraft and GMRS/FRS ranges. For
90% of the people, they won’t even notice it
is a problem.”
Editor Note: I am still investigating this
issue further as I do not understand why the
WIN-97 software works and ScanCat does
not. There appear to be some additional issues
that need to be looked at. Does WIN-97 in
fact load the aircraft/GMRS bands? Probably
not. They may also know that there is an issue
here. Until we can get all the players on the
record or GRE clears up their firmware issue,
this could continue to be an issue for ScanCat
users - lvh
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
23
S
CANNING REPORT
Dan Veeneman
danveeneman@monitoringtimes.com
THE WORLD ABOVE 30MHZ
Crossing the Digital Divide
M
any big city radio systems
appear to be very complicated, with lots of trunked
radio frequencies and lots of talkgroups.
However, large cities don’t always
mean long, intricate lists of talkgroups.
This month we take a look at two radio
systems in the City of Angels, where
the police and fire departments operate
quite well on traditional, conventional
radio frequencies. One of those systems
is digital, which brings up the issue
of encoding versus encryption – an
important distinction to make when
monitoring.
Code
Code 1
Code 2
Description
Answer your radio
Respond to the given location, but
don’t use lights or siren
Code 3 Respond immediately with lights
and siren to the given location
Code 4 No further units need to respond to
the incident
Code 5 Unit is on a stakeout, so marked
police cars must avoid the given
location
Code 6 Unit is at the given location
Code 7 Unit is requesting to temporarily go
out of service (for food, etc.)
Code 8 Fire reported in the given area
Code 12 A false alarm
Code 30 Burglar alarm
Code 37 A suspect vehicle is reported stolen
❖ Los Angeles,
California
Unlike nearly all other large digital radio
systems, the LAPD operates their radios in
conventional mode rather than trunked. This
means that a specific radio frequency is assigned to a particular purpose, rather than
being shared among many. The system uses
a total of 57 radio channels operating from
23 repeater sites. The following tables show
repeater frequencies for the different divisions
within the city, organized by bureau.
Hi Dan,
I need your assistance. I recently
purchased the Uniden BC246T. Is this
scanner capable of receiving Los Angeles Police Department frequencies? I
am a bit out of my league on this. If you
have any suggestions please advise.
- Mike in California
The Bearcat BC246T is a handheld scanner build by Uniden. It is capable of
tracking Motorola, EDACS, and LTR analog
trunked systems as well as conventional
frequencies. It also has “Close Call” radio
frequency capture technology, enabling it to
automatically tune to nearby transmissions.
It is also able to decode and display Digital
Coded Squelch (DCS) and Continuous Tone
Coded Squelch System (CTCSS) values sent
by many radio systems as subaudible tones.
The BC246T covers six bands of frequencies: 25 to 54 MHz, 108 to 174 MHz, 216 to
225 MHz, 400 to 512 MHz, 806 to 956 MHz
(excluding the cellular telephone frequencies,
as required by regulation) and 1240 to 1300
MHz.
As capable as the BC246T might be, it is
not capable of decoding digital transmissions.
Because the Los Angeles Police Department
(LAPD) operates radios that use APCO Project
25 digital standards, Mike’s scanner will not be
able to make sense of LAPD transmissions.
With more than 9,000 officers, the Los
Angeles Police Department is the third largest
law enforcement agency in the country, behind
24
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
New York City and Chicago. The LAPD “protects and serves” more than 3 million residents
spread out over nearly 500 square miles. It is
divided into a number of Divisions assigned
to specific functions and geographic areas of
the city.
The Communications Division with the
LAPD Information and Communications
Services Bureau is responsible for the citywide radio network, as well as the new 9-1-1
PSAPs (Public Safety Answering Points), San
Fernando Valley and Metropolitan Dispatch
Centers. The Division is the largest within the
LAPD, with well over 500 employees.
Most police agencies use some kind of
variation on a “10-code,” which allows dispatchers and officers to communicate clearly
and quickly. “Control,” as the Communications Division is known on the radio, uses a
number of shorthand code numbers to convey
information to officers in the field while minimizing transmission time. In a city as busy as
Los Angeles, keeping radio transmissions
short is important. Codes used by the LAPD
include:
LAPD Central Bureau
Frequency
Chnl
506.7375
506.9375
507.1875
484.8375
484.8625
484.8125
507.1125
1
2
4
11
13
24
36
484.7875 37
Central Division
Rampart Division
Hollenbeck Division
Northeast Division
Newton Division
Central Traffic Division
Central Bureau (Tactical
1)
Central Bureau (Tactical
2)
LAPD South Bureau
Frequency
Chnl
506.9875
484.2875
507.2375
506.7875
484.3375
507.0375
484.3125
3
5
12
18
25
38
39
6
7
8
14
Description
Southwest Division
Harbor Division
77th Street Division
Southeast Division
South Traffic Division
South Bureau (Tactical 1)
South Bureau (Tactical 2)
LAPD West Bureau
Frequency
Chnl
507.2125
506.9625
506.7625
484.3875
Description
Description
Hollywood Division
Wilshire Division
West Los Angeles Division
Pacific Division
484.3625 22
506.8125 40
484.4125 41
West Los Angeles Traffic
Division
West Bureau (Tactical 1)
West Bureau (Tactical 2)
LAPD Valley Bureau
Frequency
Chnl
506.7125
484.9375
484.9625
507.1625
506.8875
484.8875
484.9125
507.0125
507.2250
9
10
15
16
17
19
23
42
43
Description
Van Nuys Division
West Valley Division
North Hollywood Division
Foothill Division
Devonshire Division
North Valley Division
Valley Traffic Division
Valley Bureau (Tactical 1)
Valley Bureau (Tactical 2)
fact, “The mission is the same, only the vehicle
has changed.” ASD units have the ability to
monitor LAPD radio frequencies and provide
rapid support to ground-based units, especially
for high-risk traffic stops. LAPD helicopters
are also equipped with LoJack receivers monitoring 173.075 MHz, so they are able to quickly
locate and track stolen cars.
Each LAPD has a number of radios,
including two VHF aviation transceivers, two
APCO Project 25 radios to communicate with
ground units, and a wideband transceiver to
communicate with other Southern California
agencies.
Aviation frequencies in use include:
Frequency
123.025
123.075
122.750
122.850
Description
Primary
Secondary
Company 1 (Heliport)
Company 2 (Heliport)
tario, in Northumberland County. Port Hope
Police, 142.250 is the frequency.
I look forward to your reply.
- Darren in Ontario
Port Hope is a town of about 15,000
residents on the north
shore of Lake Ontario. The town is
perhaps most famous
for providing uranium fuel for nuclear
reactors, with a production history that
goes back to World
War II.
While searching my frequency listings
I did manage to find a reference for the Port
Hope Police, listed as operating on 142.245
Note that these aviation frequencies are in
AM (amplitude modulation) mode and are not
in digital format.
❖ LAPD Unit Names
Each LAPD unit typically has a specific
call sign. This call sign is usually made up
of three parts: the division number, the type
of unit, and the “beat” number. For example,
many readers will be familiar with the old
television show “Adam Twelve.” On the show,
the unit was referred to as “1-Adam-12.” This
call sign can be decoded as follows: the Central
Division is assigned the number 1. A patrol
unit with two officers is “A” (“Adam” using
police radio phrasing). A number, such as 12,
refers to a beat or patrol area.
Besides “A,” there are several types of
patrols:
Patrol Type Description
CL
Bicycle
FB
Foot patrol (“foot beat”)
G
Gang enforcement
L
Supervisor or single (“Lone”)
officer
M
Motorcycle
OP
Observation Post
T
Traffic
U
Report-taking
W
Detective
X
Extra patrol
Z
Reserve officer
❖ LAPD Air Support Division
The Los Angeles Police Department lays
claim to operating the largest non-military air
force in the world. The Air Support Division,
headquartered at the Piper Technical Center
in downtown Los Angeles, maintains 17 helicopters, one fixed wing aircraft and several
unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). At the top
of the Center is the Hooper Heliport, the largest
rooftop heliport in the world. The Division logs
approximately 18,000 flight hours per year.
The typical mission for ASD is called Air
Support to Regular Operations, or ASTRO,
where a pilot and a flight officer patrol the
skies above city. The Air Support motto is, in
❖ Los Angeles Fire
Department
Although most LAPD transmissions are
digital, the Los Angeles Fire Department operates a conventional analog radio system in the
800 MHz band. The Bearcat BC246T will do
just fine monitoring this system.
Frequency Chnl Description
860.9375 1
Operations (Division 1,
Central, East and West)
859.9375 2
Operations (Division 2,
South and Harbor)
858.9375 3
Operations (Division 3, San
Fernando Valley)
857.9375 4
Dispatch (Emergency
Medical Service, south of
Mulholland)
856.9375 5
Fire Prevention
858.2375 6
Firefigher Emergency
859.4375 7
Dispatch (Fire, south of
Mulholland)
858.4375 8
Dispatch (Fire and Emergency Medical Service,
north of Mulholland)
857.2375 9
Dispatch (Alternate)
856.2375 10
Operations (Emergency Medical Service, citywide)
860.7625 11
Fire Command
More information about these channels
can be found on the official Los Angeles Fire
Department web site at www.lafd.org/freq.
htm. The department itself employs nearly
4,000 people, including more than 1,000 firefighters spread across 104 neighborhood fire
stations. The department radio system consists
of 18 radio channels operating from nine repeater sites.
❖ Port Hope, Ontario
Hi there,
Is there away around encrypted frequencies? Our local police forces kept the same
frequency but now sounds like something out
of the movie Star Wars. I’m in Port Hope, OnMay 2007
MONITORING TIMES
25
THE WORLD ABOVE 30MHZ
Dan Veeneman
MHz, not too far off Darren’s report. I only saw
one mention of “encryption” but it wasn’t clear
whether the frequency is really encrypted or
merely encoded using digital techniques.
Is there a reader close to Port Hope that
has direct experience listening to 142.245 MHz
with a digital-capable scanner? If so, please
send me an email with your results and I’ll
report your findings in a future column.
❖ Encoding versus
Encryption
Encoding is simply the process of converting information from one form into another
form. In a digital radio system, voice information is converted from analog form into digital
form. The continuously varying analog sound
is encoded into a stream of digital information
made up of zeroes and ones. This stream of binary digits (“bits”) is assembled into individual
messages, then transmitted to a receiver where
it is converted back into an analog signal. All
the digital scanners we’ve discussed in this
column are capable of decoding the digital
information stream and converting it back into
analog form.
Encryption is the process of replacing one
set of information with another set according
to a secret piece of information called a key.
Encrypting digital information is a relatively
straightforward process these days, although
equipment manufacturers typically charge
their customers extra for the capability. What
that means is that in many departments, only
a fraction of radios are capable of encryption.
These more expensive units are often issued to
detectives and supervisors, not the rank-andfile patrol officer.
Encryption Key Management
Besides cost, handling the secret keys
creates additional work for the radio system
operators. There are whole sets of procedures,
collectively called key management, which
26
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
must be followed in order to maintain the
security of an encrypted system.
First, the secret key must be generated.
In order to be secure, this key must be random
enough to not be guessed by someone outside
the system. If the key were too simple or too
easily guessed, it would be relatively easy for
an outsider to figure out the key and decrypt
radio traffic. It is similar to using a very simple
password on your computer. If it’s something
really easy to guess, like “password” or your
name, then it really doesn’t do much good. It
is suspected that many encrypted systems in
use today, including many radio systems, use
secret keys that are relatively easy to guess.
Each radio that is intended to handle encrypted traffic must have the secret key loaded
into it, usually with a special piece of hardware
known as a key loader. This means that each
radio needs to located and physically brought
into contact with a key loader. The logistics
of coordinating such a process, involving all
officers bringing their radios to a service facility with a key loader, can be challenging and
time-consuming.
Once all the radios are loaded with the
secret key, the system can begin encrypted
operation. However, that’s not the end of the
story. In order to maintain security, each key
should have a limited lifetime. It should be
replaced on a regular basis, in case an adversary
has somehow figured out the key currently in
use. This lifetime is sometimes referred to as
a cryptoperiod.
Despite these management difficulties,
several jurisdictions have decided to completely encrypt each and every transmission. For
instance, law enforcement agencies operating
on the county trunked radio system in Orange
County, California, use DES-OFB encryption
for all their voice traffic. DES stands for Data
Encryption Standard, a method of encrypting
digital information first specified in the 1970s.
OFB stands for Output Feedback, which is
a mode of operation for the DES algorithm,
specifying how the encrypted information
should be mixed together.
These specifications are produced and
maintained by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), a branch of
the federal government. NIST publishes Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS),
which spell out in detail how various encryption
functions should be used. NIST also validates
products that use FIPS encryption standards.
Techniques to break DES, including trying
out all possible keys using brute force, have
been honed over the years and improved with
increases in computing power. Because of these
increasing risks, NIST no longer approves the
use of DES for most encryption requirements.
DES is in the process of being replaced by the
Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), which
is believed to be stronger and more resistant
to breaking than DES. Although not always a
good measure of strength, DES uses keys that
are 56 bits long. AES can make use of much
longer keys, up to 256 bits. Some proprietary
encryption schemes used in older radios use as
few as 40 bits, which is not nearly enough to
provide effective protection.
APCO Project 25 makes improvements to
the security of radio systems. First, there are
options to use stronger encryption methods,
including AES. There is also a standard on a
process called Over The Air Rekey (OTAR),
which allows the safe delivery of new secret
keys without needing to physically touch each
radio.
Despite any possible weaknesses in these
encryption schemes, for scanner listeners in
both the United States and Canada it is illegal
to monitor encrypted transmissions, regardless
of how the secret key was determined.
❖ Dayton Hamvention
The month of May once again brings the
annual Hamvention to Dayton, Ohio. Scheduled for May 18, 19 and 20 at the Hara Arena,
the Hamvention brings tens of thousands of
radio and electronics enthusiasts to the largest
gathering of its kind. Three days of product
announcements and demonstrations, technical
sessions, and radio-related meetings make it an
enjoyable weekend.
In addition, for bargain hunters and experimenters, the Hamvention has 550 indoor
exhibit spaces and about 2,500 outdoor flea
market spaces where you can find everything
from brand new two-way radios to old Civil
Defense radiation monitors and everything in
between. Like they say, “If you can’t find it at
Dayton, you can’t find it.”
More information is available on the official web site at www.hamvention.org.
That’s all for this month. You can find me
searching for vintage computers and calculators
during Hamvention weekend; otherwise I’m
available by electronic mail at danveeneman@
monitoringtimes.com. More information about
digital radios and other scanning topics can be
found on my web site at www.signalharbor.
com. Until next month, happy scanning!
U
TILITY WORLD
Hugh Stegman, NV6H
hughstegman@monitoringtimes.com
www.ominous-valve.com/uteworld.html
http://mt-utitlity.blogspot.com
HF COMMUNICATIONS
CHU Stays Put!
C
HU, the Canadian standard frequency
and time station operated by the National Research Council, will not have
to leave 7335 kilohertz (kHz). The station is
announcing on-air, in its usual English and
French, that its license has been modified to
authorize transmissions as a broadcast, rather
than as a utility in the fixed service.
Readers of this column know that the
problem was due to an international treaty,
which reallocated this
band segment to broadcasting and was due to
take effect March 31,
2007. CHU had to find
an option that would not
exceed its tight budget,
and it polled its listeners
for their input. The conclusions given from this
outreach were that people
still use the service; 7335
is by far the most popular
frequency; and the license
should be changed. Now
this has been done.
Listen for CHU’s
transmitters coming from
their site near Ottawa on
3330, 7335, and 14670
kHz. Emission is R3E,
or upper sideband (USB)
with a reduced carrier. It
can be tuned in amplitude
modulation (AM) or USB mode. Power is 3
kilowatts on 3 and 14 megahertz, and 10 kW
on 7335, from vertical antennas. Reception
gets a bit spotty in Western Canada, but phone
lines and the US station WWV can be used as
a fallback.
This signal is controlled by secondary
atomic standards periodically zeroed to the
primary ones at the NRC time office 20
kilometers away. CHU is used by computer
network time setting programs, shortwave
listeners, and a few “atomic” clocks which
can set themselves to the data pulses broadcast
between seconds 31 and 39 of each minute.
Despite propagation uncertainties, accuracy
on shortwave is slightly better than over the
telephone, which has a less predictable lag.
Yes, CHU will QSL (acknowledge) all
reports with an attractive card. Their address
is Radio Station CHU, National Research
Council of Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Bldg
M-36, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0R6.
Also, more than you’ll ever need to know is
28
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
at the station’s web site, inms-ienm.nrc-cnrc.
gc.ca/time_services/shortwave_broadcasts_e.html
❖ Latest Beacon Mystery:
On January 23rd, a mysterious beacon
popped up on the radio. It identified with the
letters “PUN” in Morse code.
PUN was first discovered at the low ends
of 40-meter and 20-meter
amateur, where thousands
of DX chasers listen day and
night, with huge, high-gain
antennas and sensitive receivers cranked wide open.
Needless to say, the hams
did not appreciate the company.
Coverage is wide, but
spotty. The few people
who’ve been able to get
very strong signals have
found the mode to be
modulated CW (MCW),
with a 780-hertz tone on
a standard double-sideband amplitude modulation (AM) carrier. The
best conditions have also
made a weak voice identifier audible. In Spanish,
it’s “Pista Las Peñas.”
PUN was assumed to be a bootlegger or a ham wanting
attention, until listeners started finding nonamateur frequencies, and a lot of them. A
pattern started to emerge.
Let’s do some arithmetic. First, we’ll list
all the confirmed hits: They are 1752, 3504,
7008, 8760, 10512, 12264, 14016, 19272, and
21024 kHz. It doesn’t take long to see that all
these are multiples of 1752, right up through
the entire spectrum reliably propagated by the
ionosphere at this point in the cycle. This is
dizzy.
PUN’s signal sounds like an aeronautical
navigation beacon, but these do not need to
broadcast all over HF. The frequency coverage
is more suggestive of a propagation beacon.
Of course, PUN might simply be a badly
malfunctioning transmitter with the worst
harmonic problem – and the broadest antenna
– in the recent history of radio. The only flaw
in this theory is that three frequencies in the
harmonic sequence are skipped – 5256, 15768,
and 17520 kHz. By now, someone would
certainly have heard these.
Listeners have tried other harmonic sequences based on possible fundamentals in the
traditional aero beacon band. Unfortunately,
none of these have led to audible signals on
the predicted frequencies.
So what the heck is PUN? Propagation
and beam headings from amateurs with rotary
antennas suggest an origin in South America.
One can always fire up good old Google and
drop in “Pista Las Peñas.” They’ll get references to a small, private air strip on Puna
Island near Guayaquil, Ecuador. While this
sounds pretty convincing, there’s still no
proof. Meanwhile, PUN continues to spew
harmonically related signals into the ether.
❖ This Month’s Cuban
Strangeness
The Cuban numbers weirdness just keeps
on coming. Of course, we’re talking about
good old V2a and M8a, the numeric designators given by the online incarnation of the European Numbers Information Gathering and
Monitoring Association (ENIGMA 2000).
V2a, the Spanish voice “Atencion!” station, suddenly changed its oldest schedule,
when it disappeared from 7975 kHz daily at
1600 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and
from 8010 daily at 1700. The new frequencies
are 16178 kHz at 1600, and 17436 at 1700.
These frequencies are a bit high for
Cuban numbers. They briefly went that high
at the top of the last solar cycle, but now we
are nearing the absolute bottom. All last year,
they never went above 14550 kHz. From
Cuba, these schedules are only useful for
transcontinental reception, skipping over the
usual target areas in the southeastern US.
There’s evidence of parallel frequencies, which appear to change often. One day
at 1600, Chris Smolinski and other listeners
heard what was apparently a test transmission.
After a count in the M8a Morse code mode, the
voice came up with repetition of single digits.
6768 kHz was “uno,” and 16178 was “tres” (1
and 3 in Spanish). If there was a “dos” (two),
no one heard it.
Even so, these sound like frequency
numbers. It’s safe to assume use of 6 and 9
megahertz parallels. Heard so far are 6768,
6867, and 9060 kHz AM at 1600, plus 6867
and 9323 kHz AM at 1700.
V2a continues to use two different machine voices, and some lucky listeners have
heard Microsoft Windows XP sound effects in
the transmissions. Never a dull moment with
these people.
U
TILITY WORLD
ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS COLUMN
AFB ............... Air Force Base
ALE ............... Automatic Link Establishment
AM ............... Amplitude Modulation
AWACS ......... Airborne Warning and Command System
CAMSLANT ... Communication Area Master Station, Atlantic
CAMSPAC ..... Communication Area Master Station, Pacific
CW ............... On-off keyed “Continuous Wave” Morse telegraphy
E3 ................. UK MI6/SIS Poacher tune, female, 5-number groups
E10 ............... Israeli phonetic alphabet, female with 5-letter groups
E25 ............... Unknown agency, Arabic pop music and English voices
EAM .............. Emergency Action Message
FAX ............... Radiofacsimile
FEMA ............ US Federal Emergency Management Agency
HFDL ............ High-Frequency Data Link
HF-GCS ........ High-Frequency Global Communication System
JSTARS .......... Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System
LDOC ........... Long Distance Operational Control
LSB ............... Lower Sideband
M8a .............. Cuban 3-msg CW/MCW, ANDUWRIGMT = 1-0
MX ................ Russian single-letter CW beacons
MARS ............ Military Affiliate Radio System
Meteo ........... Meteorological
MCW ............ Modulated CW or AM tone Morse telegraphy
PACTOR ........ Packet Teleprinting Over Radio
RTTY ............. Radio Teletype
Selcal ............ Selective Calling
SHARES......... SHAred RESources, US federal net
STANAG ........ STANdardization AGreement
Unid ............. Unidentified
US ................ United States
USCG ........... United States Coast Guard
UK ................ United Kingdom
V2a............... “Atencion” Spanish numbers, 3-msg format
All transmissions are USB (upper sideband) unless otherwise indicated. All frequencies are in kHz (kilohertz) and all times are UTC (Coordinated Universal
Time). “Numbers” stations have their ENIGMA (European Numbers Information
Gathering and Monitoring Association) designators in ().
2743.0
2899.0
2971.0
3016.0
3415.0
4270.0
4271.0
4350.5
4461.0
4560.0
Hugh Stegman
UTILITY LOGS
ULX2-Israeli Intelligence (E10) null-message format, AM
callup only, parallel 4880, at 1800. (Ary Boender-Netherlands)
Gander-North Atlantic air route control, net B, NFD, position check with Continental 46, at 0319. (Ron PerronMD)
Shanwick-North Atlantic net D, position from US Air Force
transport Reach 0182, at 0322. (Perron-MD) North American 7019, working Gander for a company message and
weather, came from 5649, at 0534 (Allan Stern-FL) Giant
8459-Atlas Air Boeing 747-200 (N506MC), answered
selcal AG-EL from Shanwick, at 0645. (Patrice PrivatFrance)
Santa Maria-North Atlantic net A, Azores, position from
unknown aircraft at 0329. (Perron-MD) TFL716-Arke Fly
Boeing 767-383/ER, (PH-AHX), answered selcal CR-BE, at
0640. OOM116-Zoom Airlines B767-306ER (C-GZNA),
answered selcal PQ-CD, at 0650. (Privat-France)
ART2-Israeli Intelligence (E10), AM callup only, parallel
5435, at 1800. (Boender-Netherlands)
PCD-Israeli Intelligence (E10), AM callup, parallel 6498,
at 1630. (Boender-Netherlands) PCD, callup and message
which stopped in the middle, at 1934. (Mike L-West Sussex,
UK)
CFH-Canadian Forces Metoc Centre, Halifax, NS, RTTY
weather for Canadian airports, at 0815. (Privat-France)
KSM-Maritime Radio Historical Society, Pt. Reyes, CA,
weekly CW marker wheel and standby for any Morse traffic,
simulkey on 6474 (very loud), 12993 (weak/readable), and
16914 (weak/readable), at 2208. (Hugh Stegman-CA)
FTJ2-Israeli Intelligence (E10), AM callup only, at 1800.
(Boender-Netherlands)
YHF-Israeli Intelligence (E10), AM callup, parallel 5820,
at 1630. (Boender-Netherlands) YHF1, test callup with no
message, at 2104. (Mike L-UK)
4880.0
4996.0
5010.0
5091.0
5313.5
5378.0
5470.0
5550.0
5565.0
5616.0
5696.0
5732.0
5821.0
6210.0
6428.0
6498.0
6640.0
6721.0
6761.0
6768.0
6840.0
6855.0
6867.0
6881.0
6985.0
7000.0
7038.7
ULX 1-Israeli Intelligence (E10), AM test callup at 1630.
(Boender-Netherlands)
RWM-Standard time and frequency transmission, Mendeleevo, Russia, with a repeated cycle of CW identifier,
1-second pips, unknown data pulse mode, and key-down
carrier; audible for hours. (Richard W. Parker-PA)
ZY12-Possible Romanian Military, calling ZY10 in ALE, at
2022. (Privat-France)
JSR2-Israeli Intelligence (E10), AM callup only, at 1800.
(Boender-Netherlands) JSR, callup and message at 1904.
(Mike L-UK)
Attcnyrbase180-AT&T National Security/ Emergency
Preparation net, Conyers, GA, ALE sound at 2047. (Jack
Metcalfe-KY)
COLASCOLAS4-Cold Asphalt Company, Paris, France,
calling ILLIZICOLAS4, Illizi, Algeria, ALE at 2119. (PrivatFrance)
Unid-Turkish Army, numbers in Turkish, usually 2200 but
this time at 1955. (Boender-Netherlands)
New York-Caribbean net A, position and selcal check
with British Airways Speedbird 23, at 0028. (Perron-MD)
Reach 516-US Air Force Air Mobility Command transport,
selcal check BS-AC with New York, at 0028. American
182-American Airlines B777, selcal check BK-LM with New
York, at 2335. (Stern-FL)
244-Possible Chinese Military, ALE to 514 at 2010, and to
334 at 2013. (Privat-France)
Gander-North Atlantic net B, position from various aircraft
at 0014. (Perron-MD)
Coast Guard 2112-USCG helicopter, setting guard with
CAMSLANT at 2219. (Mark Cleary-SC)
Panther-US Drug Enforcement Administration, Bahamas,
calling Shark 13 (USCG Cutter Mohawk), at 1757. (ClearySC)
WGY901-FEMA Region 1, Maynard, MA, calling “any station this net” at 1606. (Metcalfe-KY)
FDU-Israeli Intelligence (E10), AM callup and message at
1537. (Boender-Netherlands)
ABC-Israeli Intelligence test callup (E10), twice at 2137.
(Boender-Netherlands)
PCD-Israeli Intelligence (E10), callup and message at 2102.
(Mike L-UK)
Air Canada 073-Flight patching company dispatch via
Aeronautical Radio, Inc LDOC regarding a medical situation, at 0838. Continental 1666, patch via ARINC New York
to MedLink regarding diversion with a medical emergency,
at 0851. (Stern-FL)
R26141-US Army helicopter, ALE to T12, 12th Aviation,
also on 5708, at 1212. (Cleary-SC)
64-14839-Tail number of US Air Force Reserve tanker,
refueling coordination with unknown aircraft, at 2348.
(Cleary-SC)
Unid-Probably a Cuban Intelligence (V2) test transmission,
repeating “uno” in AM at 1600. (Chris Smolinski-MD)
EZI-Israeli Intelligence (E10), callup and message at 2035.
(Mike L-UK)
Cuban Spanish AM female “numbers” (V2a), bad interference from WYFR religious broadcast, at 2100. (Bill
Seamans-LA)
Cuban Spanish AM female “numbers” (V2a), faint MCW
M8a in the background and drifting badly, at 1600. (Seamans-LA) [May be another 7975 replacement. -Hugh]
NN0MRG-US Navy/Marine Corps MARS NNN0MRG, PACTOR bulletins at 1646. (Metcalfe-KY)
USADA1010-US Department of the Army, The Pentagon,
VA, ALE sounding at 0001. (Perron-MD)
JL5-Possible Mexican Military, ALE to JL21 and scrambled
voice, at 0025. (Stegman-CA) FUV-French Navy, Djibouti,
STANAG 4285 test loop using International Telegraph
Alphabet #2, at 2215. (Mike Chace-Ortiz-ME)
“D”-Russian Navy CW cluster beacon (MX), Odessa, also on
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
29
8494.7 and 10871.7, at 1358. (Boender-Netherlands)
“C”-Russian Navy CW cluster beacon (MX), Moscow, also
on 10872, 13528, and 16332, at 1357. (Boender-Netherlands)
7527.0 Juliet 41-USCG helicopter, securing guard with CAMSLANT
at 1545. (Cleary-SC)
7611.0 FAAZBW-US Federal Aviation Administration, Boston, MA,
ALE sound at 1227. (Perron-MD)
7887.0 Cuban Spanish female “numbers” (V2a), AM callup 20481
at 2002, cut to Radio Nacional Venezuela, then back to
numbers at 2004. (Cam Castillo-Panama)
7975.0 Cuban Spanish female “numbers” (V2a), AM callup 31953
31953 31953, at 1603. (Castillo-Panama) [This schedule
moved to 16178 kHz 2 days later. -Hugh]
8009.0 Cuban CW cut numbers (M8a), at 2300. (Perron-MD)
8012.0 040NHQCAP-US Civil Air Patrol, possibly the Chief of Staff
office, ALE sounding at 1058. (Perron-MD)
8040.0 GYA-UK Royal Navy Fleet Weather and Oceanographic
Centre, Northwood, FAX chart at 2303. (Perron-MD)
8061.0 ILLIZICOLAS4-Cold Asphalt company, Illizi, Algeria,
working COLASCOLAS4, Paris, France, at 2113. (PrivatFrance)
8065.0 RCH638-US Army 1/228th Aviation, ALE to SKYWAT (Skywatch, Soto Cano, Honduras), at 0119. (Perron-MD)
8096.0 Cuban MCW “cut numbers” (M8a) callup 96092 77852
98962, at 1800. M8a, MCW callup 78662 05324 23762,
at 1806. M8a, MCW callup 96091 77851 98961, at 1900.
(Castillo-Panama)
8104.0 “Caribbean Yachters Net”-Various vessels getting weather
for Caribbean ports, at 1311. (Perron-MD)
8113.0 VMW-Wiluna Meteo, Australia, coastal weather forecast
at 1337. (Perron-MD)
8135.0 Cuban CW cut numbers (M8a), at 2308. (Perron-MD)
8176.0 VMC-Charleville Meteo, Australia, high seas weather
forecast at 1335. (Perron-MD)
8270.0 PR1-Venezuelan Navy, Radio Station #1, ALE to CGA, Navy
Headquarters, at 1252. (Perron-MD)
8294.0 WEJ-International Maritime Shipping Agents, Miami, FL,
selcalling and working vessel Rio Haina in Spanish, at
1245. WEJ, working vessel Rio Miami in Spanish, at 1325.
(Perron-MD) WBN6510-Seagoing tugboat Sentinel, checking in with Jacksonville at 1813. (Cleary-SC)
8810.0 AL5T-Venezuelan Coast Guard/ Riverine Forces, LSB ALE
to 1EW1, at 1311. (Perron-MD)
8903.0 Kano-Africa/Indian Ocean air route net 4, Nigeria, position
from LTU 161 at 2141. (Perron-MD)
8960.0 Luanda-Regional air control net, Angola, position from
unid aircraft at 2205. (Perron-MD)
8983.0 CAMSPAC Point Reyes-USCG, CA, working C-130 Coast
Guard 1701, at 0022. (Stern-FL) CAMSLANT-USCG, VA,
working helicopter Coast Guard 2102, at 1334. Stingray
1081-Possible US Customs helicopter, working CAMSLANT
at 1537. Coast Guard 2112, helicopter working CAMSLANT at 1831. Coast Guard 1501, an HC-130, working
CAMSLANT at 1501. (Cleary-SC)
9025.0 NM2-Unknown US military, ALE to NW1 (Nightwatch airborne command post), at 1610. (Perron-MD) Sentry 40-US
Air Force E-3 AWACS, ALE initiated patch via Diego Garcia
to Raymond 24 (Tinker AFB, OK), at 2159. (Cleary-SC)
9063.0 Cuban Spanish female “numbers” (V2a), 5-figure groups in
progress at 1610. (Castillo-Panama) [Possible new parallel
to 16178. -Hugh]
9200.0 3000-Italian Carabinieri (military police), ALE phone patch
request (“DIAL4”) to 2053, at 0650. (Privat-France)
9338.0 XPA2-Israeli Intelligence (E10), callup only at 1140. (Mike
L-West Sussex)
9380.0 AL5T-Venezuelan Coast Guard, LSB ALE to 1EW1, also on
8810, at 1213. (Perron-MD)
9450.0 Unid-Arabic Music Station (E25), new-format callup and
message at 1240. (Mike L-UK)
10194.0 WGY908-FEMA Region 8, Denver, CO, test patch to
WGY947, Iowa State Emergency Operations Center, at
1603. (Metcalfe-KY)
10588.0 WGY901-FEMA Region 1, Maynard, MA, working WGY908,
FEMA Region 8, Denver, CO, at 1403. (Cleary-SC)
10692.5 WAROPS-US Army 1/228th Aviation (“Winged Warriors”)
Operations, Soto Cano Air Base, Honduras, ALE to heli-
7039.0
30
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
copter RUH957, at 2028. (Perron-MD)
10780.0 Cape Radio-US Air Force, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL, working B-1B Dark 51, at 1520. (Stern-FL)
11175.0 Offutt-US Air Force HF-GCS, NE, with a long 248-character
EAM, at 1431. Offutt, all-frequency call for Shogun 01
(US Air Force), at 2003. Andrews-US Air Force HF-GCS
control station, MD, voice and “2-tone Alpha-11” data
with Armament (probable Nightwatch net), then went to
11220, at 2310. (Jeff Haverlah-TX) Anvil 63-US Air Force
C-130, patch via McClellan HF-GCS with arrival info for
unknown base ops, at 1547. Reach 194-US Air Force, patch
via Puerto Rico HF-GCS to Shaw AFB Meteo for Honduras
arrival weather, at 1720. (Cleary-SC)
11205.0 Shark 47-US Joint Task Force C-130, working Smasher
(Southern Command flight watch, Key West, FL), at 1643.
(Cleary-SC) Shark 47, working Smasher at 1932. (PerronMD)
11220.0 Andrews-US Air Force, Andrews AFB, MD, working Armament, came from 11175, setting up on several Zulu
frequencies, at 2321. (Haverlah-TX)
11232.0 Darkstar Quebec-US military E-3 AWACS, possibly
Nightwatch net, patch via Trenton to Best Deal, at 1400.
Canforce 2376-Canadian Forces CC-130, getting weather
from Trenton at 1418. (Cleary-SC) Peach 66-US Air Force
E-8 JSTARS, patch via Trenton Military to Peachtree Ops,
then Peach 32, another JSTARS, calling Peach 66 with no
joy, all at 1914 (Perron-MD)
11300.0 Tripoli-Africa/Indian Ocean air net 3, position from British
Airways Speedbird 55K, at 2127. (Perron-MD)
11485.0 WGY9030-FEMA Auxiliary station, TX, sending an ALE
exercise message to USDAHQ1, US Department of Agriculture, DC, at 1632. (Perron-MD)
11545.0 Lincolnshire Poacher-UK Intelligence (E3), identifier 64364,
parallel 13375, at 1803. (Boender-Netherlands)
12577.0 P3AG4-Bulk carrier Irini F, Digital Selective Calling safety
test with Valencia Radio, Spain, at 0935. 3EFW-Panamanian registry vessel Yusho Regulus, DSC safety test with
Greek Coast Guard, at 1126. (Privat-France)
13306.0 New York-North Atlantic air net A, position from Speedbird
18, at 1530. (Perron-MD)
13339.0 Aeromexico Operations-Company LDOC, weather for
Aeromexico 407 in Spanish, at 2040. (Perron-MD)
13927.1 AFA2MH-US Air Force MARS, GA, patching Dark 51, a
US Air Force B-1B, to a Defense Switch number, at 1328.
AFA2XD-US Air Force MARS, patching Music 83 (TN Air
National Guard C-130H) to Bangor, at 1605. (Stern-FL)
CORSO 74-Puerto Rico Air National Guard, MARS patch
via AFA3HS to Tinker AFB, at 2129. (Cleary-SC)
14396.5 WNIY791-Southwestern Bell, Dallas, TX, SHARES Coordination Net check-in, along with WPEE982 (AT&T Denver),
WPDY885 (AT&T Reno), WGY9494 (FEMA, CO), WGY9925
(FEMA, MO), and WGY9927 (FEMA, MI), starting at 1641.
(Metcalfe-KY)
14569.0 CLC51-Venezuelan Army 51st Jungle Infantry, ALE to
SCLC514, 514th Jungle Infantry, at 2257. (Perron-MD)
14606.1 AFA6PF-US Air Force MARS, CA, patching Air Mobility Command transport Reach 1LT to a number in Massachusetts,
at 1708. (Stern-FL)
16178.0 Unid-Probably a Cuban Intelligence (V2) test transmission,
repeating “tres” in AM, at 1600. (Smolinski-MD) [Another
listener heard this start as M8 with a test count before it
switched to V2. -Hugh]
16331.9 “S”-Russian Navy CW cluster beacon (MX), Archangelsk,
at 1357. (Boender-Netherlands)
17458.5 N080DN-North Dakota National Guard, ALE to HQ703N,
National Guard Readiness Center, Arlington VA, at 1910.
(Perron-MD)
17487.0 494FEMAUX-FEMA, Denver, CO, ALE to AAT3BFMARS (US
Army MARS, Delaware), at 1654. (Perron-MD)
18248.6 KWG41-US Department of State, DC, ALE sounding, also
20810.6, at 1325. (Perron-MD)
18267.0 HOUSTON-Texas Public Health Net, LSB ALE sounding,
also 15661, at 2126. (Perron-MD)
21997.0 “13”-HFDL ground station, Santa Cruz, Bolivia, working
aircraft at 1802. (Perron-MD)
23433.0 ELPASO-Texas Public Health Net, LSB ALE sounding, also
on 20662, at 2109. (Perron-MD)
D
IGITAL DIGEST
Mike Chace
mikechace@monitoringtimes.com
DIGITAL MODES ON HF
Digital Alligators on HF?
N
o, it’s not a belated April Fool, but
this month we focus on an often heard
NATO mode that sometimes outfoxes
new listeners. There is also news of a new Algerian ALE network and we take a look at a rare
variant of the French Forces ARQ-E mode that is
a regular fixture on HF at the moment.
❖ Mode of the Month: Link-11
What do TADIL-A, Link-11, CLEW,
SLEW and Alligators all have in common? Well,
turns out that they are all different names for the
same digital data mode, one that can be heard
very regularly on HF at just about any time of
the day and location.
Most commonly referred to as Link-11 or
MIL-STD-188-203-1A, this mode is used to
distribute tactical data (usually fire control or
radar) among fixed stations and mobiles on land,
sea or in the air. Although it can be used (and has
been heard) on VHF and UHF, it is most often
heard on the HF bands. The largest user by far
is the US Navy, though many NATO countries
have the ability to work with this mode.
Once identified by ear, the mode is hard
to mistake. The characteristic “rink, dink, dink,
raaaaassssp” sound of the Link-11 bursts is one
of the easiest to recognize. On a spectrum scope,
the most commonly heard variant CLEW (Conventional Link Eleven Waveform) signal has
an interesting structure as you can see from the
screenshot below. (If you recognize the picture,
it’s because it ran last month in error; for the
correct image of last month’s MIL-188-110A
waveform, see page 4.)
At approximately +605Hz you can note
the presence of a distinctive, unmodulated pilot
tone which is used by the receiving modem to
track frequency errors due to Doppler shift. Then
follow 14 tones of 4PSK modulated data, each
spaced at 110Hz starting at +935Hz and ending
at +2365Hz. Finally, there are two more PSK
modulated tones placed around +2915Hz. These
are used for synchronization purposes. With that
configuration, the system achieves a data rate of
1364bps.
Signals are sent in USB on a whole kilohertz
point most of the time, but it’s not too unusual
to find LSB being used. Which way round is
easy to tell as listening to an LSB-sent signal on
a USB radio will have the Doppler tone at the
high end of the spectrum instead of the lower. The
faster 2250bps SLEW (Single-tone Link Eleven
Waveform) is not usually heard on HF.
Like most venerable modes, Link-11s tend
to use the same channels pretty regularly, daytime
and early evening around 9MHz being a particular favorite for some reason. I have several cases
where the transmissions reappear on the same
frequency years after having been first logged
there. Here are some recently active channels:
2644.4, 3065, 4013.5, 4135, 4156, 4702,
5171, 5446, 5588, 6653, 8008, 8056, 8328,
8898, 9020, 9121, 11445, 17490 kHz USB
Finally, you can hear an audio clip at Leif’s
site (see Resources) before you start hunting for
the signal yourself.
❖ French Forces 184.6bd
ARQ-E
Fewer and fewer examples of the French
Forces ARQ-E signals are left on the HF bands
these days. Most usually, the 100bd, 192bd and
200bd modes are heard, if at all. Lately, however,
the more unusual 184.6bd variant has been putting an excellent signal both day and night into
the Eastern US. The speed also gives a rather
distinctive cadence to an idling signal.
Daytime frequency for RFFX, the routing
indicator used by the station at Versailles, Paris,
is 13572.5 kHz with that station dropping to
8105 kHz during the evening and even lower to
6955 kHz in event of poor conditions. Excellent
daytime propagation may see the station moving
even higher to 18214 kHz, but those conditions
are rare with the current state of the sunspot
cycle. Usual destination for this link is RFFXL,
the station in Naqoura, Lebanon, which can often
be heard sending on 10626 kHz.
The station idles most of the time but the
occasional “controle de voie” test message and
sometimes 5-letter group off-line encrypted
traffic is passed to other stations. Hoka decoders
have an automatic setting for this unusual speed
and most other decoders can have their speed set
manually.
❖ Algerian Construction ALE
Network
The French road construction company
Colas SA’s local subsidiary recently won a contract to build Algeria’s new East-West highway
connecting Morocco, Tunisia, and Algeria, in
addition to a number of important cities along
the way. Their operations can now be heard on
HF on 5378 and 8061 kHz. Doubtless there are
more frequencies to find. The identifiers used so
far include:
COLASCOLAS4
BISKRACOLAS4
DJANETCOLAS4
ELOUEDCOLAS4
ILLIZACOLAS4
MOBRRTCOLAS4
HQ
Biskra
Djanet
El Oued
Illizi
Mobile
❖ Mystery ALE Networks
A new network with interesting call structure has also appeared recently. Frequencies used
are 5254, 7740, 8565, 8980, 11407 and 12806
kHz USB.
Identifiers are made up of Letter-Letter30LP90 and include the following:
FU30LP90
LP30LP90
LP90LP90
RK30LP90
TS30LP90
Propagation suggests an Eastern European
or African location.
Another unidentified network has recently
appeared on 8037 and 9119.5 kHz USB. This
one is almost certainly in the US and features
the identifiers:
AFF
CSM
EMP
FNK
ONK
RMD
RVA
SUF
That’s all for this month; until next time,
enjoy the digital DX.
RESOURCES
Link-11 Audio Clip www.signals.taunus.de/
WAV/LINK11-1364.WAV
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
31
G
LOBAL FORUM
THE WORLD OF SHORTWAVE BROADCASTING
Glenn Hauser
P.O. Box 1684-MT, Enid, OK 73702
glennhauser@monitoringtimes.com
www.worldofradio.com
Missionaries on the March in Micronesia
Last year we uncovered plans by Pacific Missionary Aviation
for a shortwave station in Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia.
It was discovered on the air at the beginning of March, picked up
first by Japanese DXer H. Yokoi and then by Sei-ichi Hasegawa of
the Nagoya DX Circle. It was heard as early as 0830 and as late as
1300 varying slightly from 4755.16 to 4755.17, with music and IDs
in English mentioning FM 88.5 and 4755. This represents a new radio
country on the SW broadcast bands.
Takahito Akabayashi, Tokyo, adds in DX Listening Digest: The
transmitter seemed to be in adjustment, the signal sometimes interrupted, and modulation level low. PMA is a Christian evangelical organization serving Guam, Micronesia, and the Philippines, established
in 1956. According to their web page www.pmapacific.org/projects/
radio_station.php the address is P. O. Box 517, Pohnpei, FM 96941,
but they recommend all correspondence should be addressed to PMA
Guam, P. O. Box 3209, Hagata, Guam 96932.
PMA informed DXing.info that regular broadcasts should begin
by the end of March. PMA was surprised by many reception reports
from Japan, since it was only meant to cover Micronesia and the
Marshall Islands. They said the power is 500 watts. Most transmissions will be in English, but also local languages will be used. E-mail:
radio@pmapacific.org This from Roland Weibel at the station, who
referred to the updated website http://radio.pmapacific.org for more
info, including some photos of the facility.
PMA is involved with Galcom, which specializes in manufacturing fix-tuned radios for missionary stations such as this to hand out
so listeners cannot tune in any other station on them, rather like North
Korea.
Takahito Akabayashi found the facility described as 1000 W with
a quarter-wave vertical antenna. Ron Howard found another item on
the website saying they were covering a radius of 500 to 1000 miles.
The studio in a converted 40-foot refrigeration container and antenna
are in the village of Ninseitamw, Kolonia, on the island of Pohnpei,
FSM at 06° 57’ 56.7” N, 158° 12’ 17.3” E, more or less.
“Tests started on Monday, Feb. 26, 2007, and will last until we get
the official license from the Dept. of Communication, Government of
the Federated States of Micronesia. Please subscribe to the newsletter
to be informed when the radio station has a name, is licensed officially
and on air permanently.”
It’s in the UT +11 timezone, so local night hours, when 60m DX
propagation would be possible, are roughly 07 to 19 UT. Indonesia on
4750 could be an interference problem in Micronesia, but there is not
much else on 4755, except a Brazilian on 4755.4 which might be on
the air in the early morning, R. Imaculada Conceição, so be careful.
It turned out the tests were only heard on March 1, 2 and 3, says S.
Hasegawa; then nothing reported for the next two weeks, and at press
time no reports yet from North America.
. . . And Central African Republic
WRTH 2007 on page 153 mentioned a Future Plan for “R. Tuma
Yere at Boali on 6030 kHz, 1 kW in French, Sango, Aka and Yulbe.”
An HCJB press release via Bruce Atchison and Alokesh Gupta, DXLD,
reported that it began broadcasting March 1 with an antenna “almost
the size of a football field.” As in American football, or as in soccer?
Surely the latter would be more apt in the CAR. This must refer to the
“lazy H” NVIS antenna, which HCJB engineers have been pushing
and installing at various other remote missionary stations, the anti-DX
design which maximizes vertical incidence and minimizes low-angle
radiation suitable for long-distance reception. Nevertheless, some DXers
will eventually pull it in, no doubt.
A WRTH Online update reported: initially operating M-F at
0500-0800 and 1600-2000 as Radio ICDI (Integrated Community
Development International) until another name is chosen. Address: B.
P. 362, Bangui Web: www.icdinternational.org/radio.html E-mail:
radioicdi@gmail.com L.P.: Josue Mbami, Mgr.
If I were picking a frequency for my new station, 6030 would be
close to my last choice, with megawatts of dentroCuban jamming and
R. Martí on it for much of the day – unless I could be sure those would
not be propagating when I’m on the air.
At press time no DX reports of it had reached us; our best chance
should be at *0500 Mondays, when Martí and Cuban jammers are taking
their weekly rest period, but all we heard then was CFVP in Calgary
along with stronger signals on 6025 and 6035. In European evenings,
BBC via Oman 6030 at 1630-2100 was and is the problem, and should
also disrupt reception in the local area.
DXing.info adds: the first test transmission was on February 22,
but official broadcasts began March 1. Radio ICDI makes Christian
broadcasts and community health information available to most of the
country’s 3.5 million people, many of whom live in remote and isolated
areas. This is the country’s first privately owned shortwave station.
weeks on end. The newly commissioned transmitters have trouble standing up
AFGHANISTAN [non] R. Solh, 15265, plays some great music which we often
to the heat of Australia’s outback. The longest on-air trouble-free period is less
listened to until 1500* But there is a lot of repetition; must have a limited
than a few weeks. Components can take up to 60 degree heat, but not for days
library. One song we heard over and over every day at exactly the same time,
on end above 45 (John Wright, Australian Radio DX Club, DXLD)
1451-1457 UT. It had a rapid and increasing beat, with clapping and shoutAUSTRIA David Hermges, long-time head of the shortwave service of the Austrian
ing, refrain played on an accordion-like instrument, the performers obviously
Radio and Radio Austria International, died in Vienna in March following a
having a great time. It reminds us of an Irish reel. Olle Alm suspects that the
lengthy illness. He was 78. Born in England in 1928, he came to Austria after
entire broadcast replays the same recordings every day. That sure must cut
the war and was based in Carinthia. His voice was known to generations of
down on production, and feed costs. All they have to do is respin the same
listeners at home and abroad from his English news bulletins on the first proCD at Rampisham, UK (gh, OK) Sort of a celebration with people forming a
gram of ORF, his announcements for all broadcasts from the Salzburg Festival
circle while applauding. Not a bad song and their music is what could get
and ORF’s Report from Austria (ORF via Hubert Kubiak and via Herbert Meixner,
our attention, from a language we barely understand (Raúl Saavedra, Costa
Austria, A-DX via Wolfgang Büschel, DXLD)
Rica, DXLD) A-07 schedule is 1200-1800 on 17700 instead; check if they
Many SWLs will remember David from his many years as producer/
are still playing it months later (gh)
presenter of Austrian Shortwave Panorama. He
ALBANIA R. Tirana A-07 English: Eu 1845always gave great encouragement to younger
1900 6035, 7465; 2000-2030 7465; NAm
All
times
UTC;
All
frequencies
kHz;
*
before
hr
=
sign
people launching a career in broadcasting – which
0145-0200 & 0230-0300 6115, 7425
on,
*
after
hr
=
sign
off;
//
=
parallel
programming;
+
=
in the 1970s included a young Jonathan Marks,
(Drita Çiço, R. Tirana, DXLD)
continuing but not monitored; 2 x freq = 2nd harmonic; B- who spent some time at Austrian Radio before
AUSTRALIA Nigel Holmes, Radio Australia
head of transmission, explains why ABC NT
06=winter season; A-07=summer season; [non] = Broadcast starting his career at Radio Netherlands (Andy
transmitters on the 60 and 120 m bands
to or for the listed country, but not necessarily originating Sennitt, Media Network) I also contributed to SW
Panorama for a number of years (gh)
keep breaking down. The heat is usually
there; u.o.s. = unless otherwise stated
BOLIVIA New on 4728.2 is Radio Aripalca, in
45 degrees C; that’s over 100 F. It’s hot for
32
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
Aripalca, Municipio de Vitichi, Provincia Nor Chichas, Depto. Potosí, heard
at 1038 with music, ID, relaying news from ATB TV network.
New frequency 3215, for R. Virgen de Remedios, at 0010 relaying
WEWN with QRM from WWCR; also at 1040 with WEWN, 1100 ID (Rogildo
Aragão, Quillacollo, Bolivia, HCDX)
BRAZIL Rádio Cultura, Araraquara, reactivated in mid-Feb on 3365, heard at
0215 with regional songs, ID, good signal (Rudolf Grimm, São Paulo, World
of Radio) Had not been reported for about 6 months (gh)
BULGARIA R. Bulgaria, A-07 English: WEu 0630-0700 9600 11600; 1130-1200
11700 15700; 1730-1800 5900 9600; 2100-2200 5900 9700; NAm 23002400 & 0200-0300 9700 11700 (via Hector Frías, Chile, and Dmitriy Kutuzov,
Russia, DXLD) Will add six daily semihours in Arabic from July 1. And R. Varna
A-07: 2100 Sun to 0300 Mon, 100 kW non-directional on 9900 (Wolfgang
Büschel, DXLD)
CANADA In late Feb, time-signal station CHU changed its announcements every
minute to say it had been licensed to remain on 7335; from April 1 that
is officially in an SWBC band extending to 7350, rather than utility. Now
maybe Vatican and other broadcasters colliding on 7335 will have to notice
CHU (gh)
CHINA [and non] Sound of Hope and jammers on partly revised frequencies:
9200, 10200, 13970, 14600 and 17330. Actual SOH program heard on
10200, 14600 and 17330, on the others only Firedrake. Always when I
have heard SOH they have had talk only, without any music, so that seems
to be the way to distinguish them: Talk = SOH, music = jamming (Olle Alm,
Sweden, DXLD)
COLOMBIA Radio Líder returned to the air March 10 on 6139.8, and was heard
with a good signal for the next few nights, as early as 2325 and as late at
0940 with LA songs, many IDs (Manuel Méndez, Spain, DXLD) Also good here
around 0500. But for how long? Previous active periods lasted less than a
week, then silent for months (gh)
CONGO DR On 5066.337, Radio Candip, Bunia, at 0405 with chatter mentioning Bunia. Mainly poor with a few fair peaks; drifted to 5066.332 by 0420.
Very pleased with this one (Brandon Jordan, AL, World of Radio) Apparently
in skip zone of WWCR 5070 (gh)
CUBA [non] R. República via RMI, A-07: via Sackville 0100-0400 UT Tue-Sat on
9735, instead of one hour later on 9630 in B-06; CBC says 9630 is OK in
winter because CBC 9625 is too high to give good service anyway to northern
Canada. Via T-Systems: M-F 2300-0400 UT Tue-Sat on 5910 from Wertachtal.
On WRMI 9955 itself, R. República as of March was operating daily 0500-0700,
1600-2100; UT Sun/Mon 0200-0400 (Jeff White, RMI, DXLD)
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC Rudolfo “Rudy” Espinal, one of our most favorite SW hosts
of years gone by on R. Clarín, was spotted in a Diaro Libre newspaper photo
this January, identified as director of Turinformativo, Caribbean Traveling
Network (Clara Listensprechen, DXLD)
ETHIOPIA [non] Voice of Oromia Independence, A-07 via T-Systems, Jülich,
Germany: 1700-1730 Saturdays on 15650 (Jeff White, Radio Miami Internatiional, DXLD)
Andenet LeDemocracy Radio, clandestine, (via Samara, Russia), 9445,
heard Sunday from *1600, flute, partial ID in Amharic. Web-site at http://
www.andenet.com/ supposedly includes audio stream. Says it started broadcasts Feb 9, 2007. Voice of Andenet is a branch of KINIJIT Support Group in the
US established in May 2005. Kinijit is a party dedicated to bring unity, peace,
and prosperity to the citizens of Ethiopia through the democratic process.
Derived from the merging of All Ethiopian Unity Party (AEUP), United Ethiopian Democratic Party-Medhin (UEDP-Medhin), Kestedamena and Ethiopian
Democratic League, according to party-web www.kinijit.org/ (Finn Krone,
Denmark, BCDX)
GERMANY Although DW’s program schedule has been revamped, changes are not
as drastic as feared last month. The first half of most hours includes News and
Newslink updated more frequently, and occasionally occupying a full hour;
otherwise feature programs continue during the second half hour, including A
World of Music. But since many SW broadcasts have been cut to half an hour,
you may have to get the features by other means such as on demand from
website. A mailbag program is now called In-Box, for 20 minutes starting at
:15 past certain hours on Sundays, and no more DX Meeting. Thanks to Rich
Cuff for the update (gh)
Of course, no SW broadcasts are aimed at North America any more,
so we recommend these in the A-07 schedule from Rwanda toward West
Africa at 295 degrees, and luckily also onward toward us: 0400-0457 7245,
0500-0530 9700, 0600-0630 15275, 2100-2157 15205, 11865. The same
last two frequencies at 2000-2057 are aimed southeast from Rampisham UK,
so also ought to be audible here off the back (via Joe Hanlon, DXLD)
The new schedule runs until April 30, when the last of DW’s transmitting
stations, the Nauen site which veteran DXers recall was used by Radio Berlin
International for many years, will end transmissions. From May 1 the Nauen
frequencies will be replaced with more usage from VT sites, such as those in
the UK and other VT-owned facilities (Joe Hanlon, NJ, DXLD; Wolfgang Bueschel, World DX Club Contact) More usage of UK sites, Ascension, Portugal,
Rwanda may actually improve our access to DW, incidentally (gh)
GREECE After a sesquimonth of constant carrier and/or modulation dropouts on
the experimental V. of Greece relays via SVO, Olympia Radio, this problem
appeared to have been solved by mid-March, 11645 running without breaks
(Wolfgang Büschel, DXLD) Likewise 15630 when it was via SVO instead of
Avlis; but unknown whether the SVO relays would continue in A-07, not on
VOG’s own schedule (gh)
GUINEA When strife broke out here in early Feb, there was no SW to be heard,
7125 having been silent for at least six months (Chris Greenway, UK, DXLD)
Conakry, 7125 noted again Feb 24, in the clear after 1957; with Afropops
in French, 2021 “Radio Nationale” ID, 2030 urgent-sounding monologue in
vernacular. Speechifying didn’t end until 2111 (Al Quaglieri, NY, DXLD) Then
widely heard until 2400*, overlapping with Russian tune-up tones just before
the hour, and also from *0600, tho RN Flevo had been using 7125 at 07000757 only; sometimes one on top, sometimes the other. In A-07 RN planned
to use 7125 only during a local evening hour instead (gh, OK)
HUNGARY A reorganization of Regional and Minorities programs at Hungarian
Radio has merged the External Service with the new channel MR4. Radio
Budapest, the External Service, is phasing out the use of freelance staff. All
freelance contracts were terminated on 28 February, leading to immediate
closure of the Italian service (Italradio.org via Media Network) Rumors say R.
Budapest may close down in a few months. SW, budget granted by Hungarian
Parliament, may stay alive but only relaying domestic services to Hungarian
abroad (Luigi Cobisi, DSWCI DX Window)
Meanwhile Italian was still on the A-07 schedule, just playing music.
English, while it lasts: Eu Sun 1500-1530 6025 9610; the rest daily: 19001930 3975 6025; 2100-2130 6025 9525; NAm 0100-0130 6040; 02300300 6195 (via Csaba Banky via Paul Gager, Austria, BDXC-UK)
INDIA AIR Guwahati, nominal 4940, appeared frequently in February and March
on 4900 instead at times such as 0045-0145, 1159, 1344 (Gautam Sharma,
India, via Alokesh Gupta, dx_india)
INDONESIA V. of Indonesia had been using 9526 for external broadcasts, or
sometimes 15150, but in mid-Feb started using 11785v instead such as
11784.866, at 1600 in Arabic, then European languages including English
at 2000-2100 (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, DXLD) Unreliable; some days
Spanish at 1700 was missing; or when on was playing news programs one
or two months old (José Miguel Romero, Spain, ibid.)
IRELAND [non] RTE found itself back on SW in Feb, without really trying, since
WRMI decided to resume broadcasting World Radio Network on 7385 M-F at
2200-0200 Tue-Sat, and RTE happened to occupy the first semihour of that
block; with DST March 12, this changed to 2100-2130, although antenna
problems weakened WRMI’s signal (gh)
KOREA NORTH VOK is becoming a reliable QSLer in North America after many
years of poor mail service between the USA and North Korea. The mail now
goes through on a regular basis, which is good for the verification business
(Richard A. D’Angelo, PA, NASWA Journal)
LIBYA [non?] V. of Africa continued to be heard on 17725 around 1500 in English,
but sounding different in early Feb; no more big hum, but low modulation
(gh) Transmissions formerly via Issoudun, France, have been transferred to
Libya (WRTH Feb Update, via Noel Green)
Monitored schedule in March of Voice of Africa. Erratic engineering
indicates these come from within Libya, at least not from a professional site.
Propagation characteristics also indicate a distant site. The sign-on and -off
times given are rounded off. Exact times are up to the will of God (or whoever
is in control in Libya).
1200-1400 21695 17725 Swahili
1400-1600 21695 17725 English
1600-1700 15660 15220 French
1700-1800 11965 11860 French
1800-2000 11965 9885 Hausa
No relays via TDF France heard except for the jamming of Sawt al-Amal
(Olle Alm, Sweden, World of Radio) Shouldn’t one expect, taking into account
“involvement” in the Moyabi transmitting complex that Libya announced, that
V. of Africa would also perhaps be carried via ANU transmitters in Gabon?
(Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, ibid.)
In late Feb, Sawt al-Amal, clandestine for Libya via Moldova, started
using frequencies between the standard channels, jumping around during
the 12-14 UT broadcast, such as 17622.5 to 17627.5 to 17637.5. The Libyan
bubble jammer could only tune in full kHz steps, so caused a 500 Hz beat
with Amal. Later it adapted to the .5 channels. The TDF jammers were barely
audible due to poor propagation, but seemed to park on the 5 kHz channels
adjacent to each side of Amal (Olle Alm, Sweden, DXLD)
MALDIVE ISLANDS [non] Minivan Radio A-07: 1600-1700 daily on 11725 from
T-Systems, Jülich, Germany (Jeff White, RMI, DXLD)
MÉXICO The revived XEYU, R. Universidad Nacional, remained active in Feb on
9599.3v, once with an amazing S9+20 signal in the middle of the night at
0730, but disappeared in early March (gh, OK) Engineer Mejía tells me the
transmitter broke down and they were working on repairing it as soon as
possible (Julián Santiago Díez de Bonilla, DF, condig list)
MYANMAR Got a QSL from Myanmar, after at least 25 years of reports! Decided
to send this one out Registered Mail with Return Receipt, and included some
Myanmar stamps (had to get them from a dealer in Thailand!), 3 IRCs, $1.00
and a Harpers Ferry postcard, and reports from two separate days. 5 weeks
later, I got the return receipt back and the next day a letter from U Ko Ko
Htway, verie signer for Myanma Radio. He seems to take pride in verifying
reports, included a very nice multi-color folder-card, and a personal letter.
He said it was the first time he had received my letter, and he always replies
to listeners (Alex Vranes, Jr., WV, DXLD)
NETHERLANDS [non] RN A-07 English to NAm at 00-02 moved from 6165 Bonaire to 9845 Bonaire, while 6165 switched to Sines, Portugal relay for the
first time, in Spanish at 0000-0400. Then 6165 back to Bonaire for English
at 04-05 (via José Bueno, Spain, and gh)
NICARAGUA R. Chontaleña, the 1070 harmonic heard on 2140 in the morning,
mentioned two months ago, also heard signing off early at 2359 (Harold
Frodge, MI, MARE Tipsheet)
NIGERIA [non] New clandestine brokered by TDP is Radio Saa, in Hausa at 16001700 Wed & Sat on 15180, 500 kW, 185 degrees via Issoudun, France; first
broadcast was only music (DX Mix News, Bulgaria) The next one had Hausa
announcement, African songs (Anker Petersen, Denmark, @titivade DX)
PAKISTAN If you want a QSL card from Radio Pakistan, write to this address: Radio
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
33
THE WORLD OF SHORTWAVE BROADCASTING
Pakistan, 303 Peshawar Road, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, (different from WRTH2007, PWBR). (Alican Yasar, HCDX)
PERÚ Less than two weeks after the report quoted last month that R. La Hora,
Cusco, would be off the air for 2-3 months, it was already back, per Carlos
Gamarra, frequency director, Mon-Sat at 1000-1600 and 2200-2400. Also
R. Universal would shortly return on 49m; both had damage from electrical
discharges (via Dario Monferini, Italy, DXLD) WRTH 07 lists the latter on 6090
in Santa Mónica, Cusco; rarely reported (gh) R. La Hora heard on 4856.43
at 1100 (Chuck Bolland FL, DXLD) And at 2325 with sports (Rogildo Aragão,
Bolivia, HCDX)
ROMANIA RRI heard in English at 0440 on 3400, a very weak mixing spur of 9515
minus 6115 at same time, both good (Nick Rank, Derbyshire, BDXC-UK)
SA’UDI ARABIA In almost daily checks of the Afropop music distraction from
Gabon on 17660, I began to hear another station underneath from about
1450. Eventually this could be identified as BSKSA’s French service, ex-21600.
It was in the clear after 1531 with news, until 1600 when blocked by WYFR
in Portuguese via Ascension (gh, OK) BSKSA went into English at 1600 (Noel
Green, UK, DXLD) On some days reception in English held up past 1700 when
in the clear again, and even past 1830 when WYFR came back on. So BSKSA
English is on 17660 from 1600 to 1900. After 1700 heard with features on
technology; children (Bernie O’Shea, Ont., ibid.)
A new schedule also shows English at 0900-1200 on 15250, 15470
(Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, ibid.) Really monitored only on 15250 at
1000-1155, and the first hour blocked by China (Noel Green, UK, Erik Køie,
Denmark, ibid.) At 1043 one day talking about hair care, especially by females
(Manikant Lodaya, India, ibid.)
In December 2005, the Sa’udi English language newspaper and website
Arab News published an article about the English Service, in which the head
of the service, Hanan Awad, said that they wanted to be on shortwave so
they can be heard all over the world and they had been promised that this
would be considered (Andy Sennitt, Media Network blog)
SERBIA International Radio Serbia announced on its website http://www.radioyu.
org/KT_eng.htm that it would extend its programs from March 5, to improve
reception in Europe, at least during daylight, starting with English at 14001430 (Dragan Lekic, Serbia, DXLD)
Never audible here before or after this date, only DRM from Luxembourg
spreading 6087 to 6103 (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, ibid.) No trace here
in south Italy (Roberto Scaglione, Sicily, ibid.)
Serbia interval signal clearly heard at 1929 using upper sideband,
virtually clear of DRM splash from 6095, fair signal but under very strong
China Radio International in Russian. Believe language was English (Mike
Barraclough, UK, World of Radio) Is this really 250 kW from Bijeljina, Bosnia?
(Wolfgang Büschel, DXLD) No, I found out that it is a low-power mobile 10
kW transmitter near Beograd; Bijeljina to resume in June (Lekic, ibid.)
Besides DRM from 6095, other collisions on 6100 were: 1430-1530
India; 1700-2200 CRI; 1830-1930 & 2030-2130 Iran (DX Mix News, Bulgaria)
SPAIN REE’s A-07 schedule shows English: Eu M-F 2000-2100 9665 50 degrees,
but Sat/Sun 2100-2200 9840 38 degrees; CAf M-F 2000-2100, Sat/Sun
2100-2200 all on 11625 161 degrees. NAm daily 0000-0100 6055 290
degrees (via José Bueno, Noticias DX)
For the past few years, REE had insisted on moving the 0000 transmission
to 15385 by April, when it seldom propagates. The shift to 2100 on weekends
is to avoid live sports coverage in Spanish on other frequencies, which still
sometimes runs over, pre-empting English.
The sked also shows a special broadcast to Spanish UN peacekeeping
forces in Lebanon on 15345, M-F 1800-2200, Sat 1700-2200, Sun 14002200. In the B-06 season this was on 12045 until 2300, and surprisingly well
heard in CNAm. Unfortunately, 15345 collides with Argentina’s European
service, which has been there for sesquidecades and which already collides
with Morocco, neither of which participates in HFCC! (gh)
The new sked still shows German Mon & Thu 1730-1800 on 9665, but
this was canceled in August 2004; it’s dead and gone! (Wolfgang Büschel
and Kai Ludwig, Germany, DXLD)
SWEDEN [and non] Radio Sweden English A07, to NAm: 1230-1300 15240, 13301400 15240 Sackville; 0130-0200 & 0230-0300 6010 Sackville. 1230 also
to Eu/Af/ME/As/Pac on 15735, 13580; 1330 15735. 0130 also to As/Pac on
11675 Madagascar; 2130 Eu 6065, Au 7420 via Madagascar. More details
at: http://RadioSweden.org (via Alokesh Gupta, DXLD)
SYRIA R. Damascus now has a website: http://cobaq10.iespana.es/damasco/
(Geovanny Aguilar Bustamante, Honduras, condig list) Only in Spanish
initially (gh)
TURKEY VOT A-07 English:
1230-1325 Eu 15450, Au/As 13685 [but try both in NAm]
1830-1925 Eu 9785
2030-2125 Au/As 7170
2200-2300 Eu/NAm 6195
0300-0400 Eu/NAm 5975, As/Af 7270
(via Joe Hanlon, DXLD)
Live from Turkey, the worldwide phone-in hardly anybody calls, is on
Tue at 1850 and Thu at 1250; also webcast (gh)
U K Frustrated by government jamming and dwindling audience figures, staff at the
BBC’s China service are worried about an increasingly uncertain future. Reductions in staff of 37 journalists at Bush House were planned. Staff members said
34
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
Glenn Hauser
the cuts would be fiercely resisted, with a “Save the Chinese Service” petition
(Media Guardian via Media Network) Since BBC WS is taxpayer-financed, it is
essential that all languages are continuously reviewed for effectiveness. The
mobile and satellite TV market in China is huge compared to the microscopic
SW market (Jonathan Marks, Media Network blog)
[non] BBC Mundo, Spanish website announced in mid-Feb that it would
broadcast at 11-12 to Cuba and Caribbean on 13870, 13570, 6300 and
5100 kHz (via José Bueno, Spain, playdx) This was nonsense and still not
corrected a month later (gh) Actually heard on 13760 (Noel Green, UK, Raul
Saavedra, Costa Rica, DXLD) And from nearby on 6095 (Chuck Bolland, FL,
ibid.) Sites? Both probably changed for A-07 (gh)
U S A At a time when the Bush administration is fighting a war to promote
democracy in the world, the White House-appointed Broadcasting Board
of Governors voted to reduce funding for government broadcasts to Tibet
by more than 20% and the number of broadcasting hours by 50%, leaving
Tibetans to rely increasingly on official Chinese radio (William Triplett, Variety,
via kimandrewelliott.com)
To sign “Save VOA Programs to Russia and Other Media-at-Risk Countries
Petition” go to: www.petitiononline.com/tl1122/petition.html (FreeMediaOnline.org via Zacharias Liangas, DXLD)
Eleven former directors of the Voice of America have issued a joint statement calling on Congress to reverse a Bush administration plan to substantially
reduce VOA’s English broadcasts and those in 15 other languages. Signed by:
Mary G. F. Bitterman, Robert E. Button, Richard W. Carlson, Geoffrey Cowan,
John Hughes, David Jackson, Henry Loomis, E. Eugene Pell, Robert Reilly, R.
Peter Straus, and Sanford J. Ungar (via Rachel Baughn)
The Broadcasting Board of Governors wants to eliminate a total of
197 positions through the FY 2008 budget request process. 153 of those
positions would come from the Voice of America. It is up to all of us to alert
Congress as to the stupidity of these proposed cuts. The Board continues to
make colossal errors in judgment. What the Board is really doing is getting
rid of long-term radio people, to replace them in some languages with TV.
According to the government’s latest Human Capital Survey, morale at BBG
is among the lowest of any agency (AFGE Local 1812)
James Glassman, television pundit, American Enterprise Institute scholar,
former editor of Roll Call, former Washington Post columnist and author of
books including “Dow 36,000: The New Strategy for Profiting From the Coming Rise in the Stock Market”, is said to be getting the job of chairman of the
Broadcasting Board of Governors, a part-time – but time-consuming – gig
overseeing the Voice of America, Radio Free Europe, Radio Free Asia, Middle
East services (Al Kamen, Washington Post, via Mike Cooper, DXLD)
Greenville VOA Site A (nearest Williamston, NC) is now defunct. The
transmitters and antennas are being “cannibalized” to support Site B. Site
B hasn’t too many years to survive, either. Millions of US$, wasted (Charles
Taylor, Greenville, shortwavesites yg)
For a few nights in late Feb, VOA Spanish inexplicably appeared on
6100 at 0100-0200, colliding with RCI’s Spanish broadcast (Mark Taylor, WI,
DXLD) VOA was supposed to be only on 9480, 9885, 11840 (gh)
KAIJ’s program schedule: see http://24.151.207.180/k/kaij/pages/
programs.php
In March, World of Radio was scheduled Thu 1500 on 9480, Fri 1030
on 5755. Ted Randall Interviews, Fri 0900 on 5755, 1500 on 9480 (gh)
Despite almost constant strong RTTY on 7455, which dissuaded other
US or European broadcast stations from using it, WYFR inexplicably went
there in B-06, at 0700-1045. Even more incredibly, despite the RTTY and
WYFR, WEWN in Spanish also moved to 7455 on February 20, all the way
from 2300 to 1300, replacing what had been a clear frequency for them,
7540. We checked on a number of occasions after 0700; at our location
sometimes WYFR, aimed right at us, would dominate; other times WEWN,
aimed at Central America. Protestants vs Catholics! Only with the start of A-07
March 25 would WYFR quit 7455. US broadcast stations are allowed above
7350 only on a non-interference basis, but the victim has to complain. What
listeners encounter really matters not, broadcasters pick frequencies without
bothering to monitor what is already on them, and the FCC doesn’t warn
them about impending collisions (gh, OK)
The situation may well have changed by now, but as of March, WRMI
was carrying World Radio Network on 7385 M-F at 2100-0100 Tue-Sat,
starting with Ireland [q.v.]; the morning block would shrink from 1300-1600
to 1400-1600 as of March 25, still containing mostly DX programs in English
and Spanish. R. Prague relays, daily but one day late: 0900 English 9955,
0930 Spanish 9955, 1400 English 7385, 0430 Spanish 9955. Radio República
on 9955: daily 0500-0700, 1600-2100; UT Sun/Mon 0200-0400. See also
CUBA [non] (gh)
[and non] Former WRNO broadcaster and Nazi Holocaust denier Ernst
Zundel, after having been deported from Canada, was convicted by a German court on 14 counts of incitement of racial hatred and sentenced to five
years in prison (CBC News via Fred Waterer, DXLD)
WESTERN SAHARA [non] After missing almost a month, Radio Nacional de la
República Árabe Saharaui Democrática, via Algeria, reappeared March 6 on
6300 (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, DXLD) The usual Arabic broadcasts from
1700 to 2300, and 0700-0900 or so, Spanish at 2300-2400. This time they
stayed on the same frequency for at least a week! (gh) Very strong here after
2300 (Bernie O’Shea, Ontario, DXLD)
Until the Next, Best of DX and 73 de Glenn!
B
ROADCAST LOGS
NOTEWORTHY LOGS FROM OUR READERS
0215 UTC on 4780
GUATEMALA: Radio Cultural Coatan (tentative). Spanish musical
variety of slow music tunes. Brief religious program spots at 0227
and mentions of local campesinos at 0242. SIO 322 with swiper
interference observed (Harold Frodge, Midland, MI).
0241 UTC on 9680
UNITED KINGDOM: BBCWS. Report on Chinese holiday seasons
(Howard Moser, Lincolnshire, IL). BBCWS (Cyprus) 9410, 06180649 World Today program (Joe Wood, Greenback, TN). BBCWS
(USA) 11675, 2115 (Moser). BBCWS (Ascension Island) 15400,
1645 (Mike Branco, Islip, NY).
0402 UTC on 4780
DJIBOUTI: Radio Djibouti. Vernacular news bulletin from male/
female duo, SINPO 24332 (Arnaldo Slaen, Buenos Aires, Argentina).
0409 UTC on 5915
ZAMBIA: ZNBC. Local music vocals to vernacular language announcements. “Zambia Broadcasting Corporation” ID, followed
by talk segment and music. Good signal observed (John Wilkins,
Wheat Ridge, CO).
0457 UTC on 6280
ISRAEL: Kol Israel. French newscast with good signal (Wood). French
news 6985, 2036-2046+; Hebrew 7545, 2055 // 6985. Israel’s
Galei Zahal 6972. 61 in local languages to pop music, SIO 242
(Frodge).
0506 UTC on 3810
ECUADOR: HD2IOA (Time/Freq station) Good signal for Spanish
time recordings, minus tone shift at minute marks. Ecuador’s HCJB
9740, Dutch 0640 (Wood). HCJB 9780, 0247; 0300-0305; 12040,
2337-2342 German (Slaen).
0507 UTC on 4777
GABON: RTV Gabonaise. French newscast and taped speeches.
Signal observed from 4770-4780 kHz; 0514-0532; 0518-0533
(Wood). Gabon’s Afrique Numero Un 17630, 1605. Music to
1630, followed by sign-off routine of ID and interval signal (Brano).
9580, 0605-0610 (Wood).
0511 UTC on 6055
SPAIN: REE. Spanish text to Spanish folk tunes program (Wood).
6055, 0543-0556 (Moser). 9680, 2041-2146+ music lesson to
Espanol by Radio. SIO 343 (Frodge).
0512 UTC on 9685
SOUTH AFRICA: Channel Africa. News about Malawi and Uganda,
followed by program Thirty Seven Degrees of fair signal quality
(Wood). 7390, 0315-0356* Beat It program // 3345 (Dave Valko,
PA/Cumbre DX).
0527 UTC on 9885
MOROCCO: VOA relay. Programs Today in History and One World
of good signal quality. VOA Sao Tomé relay 6080, 0615 (Wood).
Morocco’s RTV Marocaine 15345, 1700 (Moser).
0605 UTC on 4885
BRAZIL: Radio Clube do Para. Portuguese station ID/frequency
quote to dance tune I Will Survive (Wood). Brazilians monitored:
Radio Rio Mar 9694.92, 1002-1007 (Slaen; Wood). Radio Nacional da Amazonia 11780, 2259-0001 (Wilkins).
1117 UTC on 3385
PAPUA NEW GUINEA: Radio East New Britain. Rapid text religious
preaching closing with singing and mentions of program’s name
Message of Hope. Radio Manus (Admiralty Islands) 3315, 1207.
Radio East Sepik 3335, 1139-1155 (Valko). PNG stations logged
in vernacular languages from 1000 UTC: Radio West New Britain
3235; Radio Madang 3260; Radio Southern Highlands 3275;
Radio Manus 3315; Radio North Solomons 3325; Radio New
Ireland 3905 (Slaen).
1220 UTC on 9500
UZBEKISTAN: Christian Vision (Tashkent relay) Male/female Hindi
text to English identification “CVC The Voice,” plus India address.
Hindi/English mix reports to slow pop music amid moderate signal
quality (Jim Evans, Germantown, TN).
1228 UTC on 7270
CHINA: PBS Nei Menggu (presumed). Mongolian. Fair signal quality
for talk and traditional music, // 9750 with NHK Japan interference
(Ron Howard, Monterey, CA). China’s Sichuan PBS-2 Chengdu,
Sichuan 6060, 1910-1020 Tibetan (tentative) (Slaen).
1236 UTC on 9526
INDONESIA: Voice of Indonesia (Cimanggis) Indonesian. Regional
Gayle Van Horn,W4GVH
gaylevanhorn@monitoringtimes.com
http://mt-shortwave.blogspot.com
music to station ID and English station address. Service should
have been Korean, but sounded more Bhasa. Moderate signal
SINPO 34333 (Evans). RRI-Fak Fak 4789.98, 1331-1400*;
RRI-Makassar 4749.96, 1345-1402*. RRI-Kendari 3995.04,
1407-1434 (Valko).
1248 UTC on 6140
RUSSIA: Voice of Russia via Chita (Atamanovka) Checking for
reported activity on this frequency, and found VOR in Vietnamese.
Pop music, interval signal at sign-off for poor signal (Howard).
Radiostancia Tikhy Okean 7330, 0938-0945 // 5960 Russian
(Slaen).
1320 UTC on 9570
CUBA: China Radio Int’l relay. Great signal for segment on
reunification of Taiwan. Radio Havana 11760 //9505 at 2055
(Bob Fraser, Belfast, ME). Spanish 9600, 0559 (Wood).
1330 UTC on 9580
AUSTRALIA: Radio Australia. Top Twenty Country Music //
9590 with good signals (Fraser). 17785, 2203 world news and
Queensland rains reliving drought (Moser). 17795, 2345 news
on the Boreno rain forest // 17785, 17750 (MacKenzie). 15515,
0439-0444 (Wood).
1345 UTC on 6080
SINGAPORE: Radio Singapore Int’l. News updates to closing announcements at 1358 and mention of 6150 to replace 6080 kHz
with Mediacorp Radio. Signal close at 1359. Freq 6150 noted
with co-channel Chinese station (Wilkins).
1400 UTC on 4749.96
CLANDESTINE: Open Radio for North Korea. Opening Korean
announcements to 1420. Music mix of Abba’s Waterloo and
Don Mac Lean’s Vincent. Good signal observed from presumed
Novosibirsk site. Station off at 1500 UTC, leaving an unidentified
station on frequency. No idea of station, since band is on the way
out by 1500 at this longitude (Wilkins). WADR-West African
Democracy Radio 17860, 0950-0955 (Slaen).
1515 UTC on 9599.3
MEXICO: Radio UNAM. Operatic vocals to 1601 program announcement, but no identification noted. Orchestral music program at 1602 amid fair signal quality despite fading (Wilkins).
1356-1404 (Valko).
1703 UTC on 11690
JORDAN: Radio Jordan. Middle East news topics at tune-in.
Weather update to SW/FM identification and pop music program.
Noted good on signal peaks (Wilkins).
1915 UTC on 15476
ANTARTICA: Radio Nacional Arcángel San Gabriel. Spanish. Talk
about dogs present in the Antarctic territory, followed by Argentine folk songs. Station ID “Esperanza al Mundo por Radio San
Gabriel.” Interesting program on the history of Antartica. Station
identification as, “desde la Base Esperanza, Territorio Antartico
Argentino, transmite LRA36 Radio Nacional Arcángel San Gabriel,
en español, de lunes a viernes para todo el mundo.” Additional
mention as, “quedese hasta las 18 horas en Radio Arcangel San
Gabriel.” (Slaen).
2016 UTC on 9385
USA: WWRB. Overcomer Ministry programming to station identification at 2305*. Additional US monitored: WINB 13570, 2252;
WWCR 13845, 2335 (MacKenzie). AFN (Key West) 5446 USB,
0605; 7811, 2100-2106 (Frodge). WHRA 7555, 0651 (Wood).
2140 UTC on 7280
GERMANY: Deutsche Welle. Middle East news topics (Fraser).
DW Rwanda relay 11690, 2140. World news to item on Turkish
immigrants (Moser).
2218 UTC on 5995
MALI: RDTV du Mali. French phone-in segment by announcer to
2227. Program promotional to music and station ID at 2030. SIO
343 // 4835, SIO 242 (Frodge).
2240 UTC on 7420
BELARUS: Belarus Radio. Clear station identification, SINPO
34433 // 7390 (Slaen).
Thanks to our contributors – Have you sent in YOUR logs?
Send to Gayle Van Horn, c/o Monitoring Times
English broadcast unless otherwise noted.
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
35
P
ROGRAMMING SPOTLIGHT
Fred Waterer
fredwaterer@monitoringtimes.com
www.doghousecharlie.com/radio
WHAT’S ON WHEN AND WHERE?
Spotlight on Radio Netherlands
36
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
in streaming audio or download the podcast.
Go to the website, www.radionetherlands.nl/
and click on “Listen on Demand” near the top
right.
When I began listening to shortwave, Radio
Netherlands seemed to be one of the “friendliest” radio stations in the world. It’s hard to describe, but the programming had a very personal
touch.
Particularly memorable were Jerry and
Dody Cowan who hosted His and Hers in the
1970s, and of course, Tom Meijer of Happy
Station fame (see March 2007 Programming
Spotlight). Radio Netherlands was indeed “The
Happy Station,” even if you were a “Birthday
Bad-Lucker” (registered listener whose birthday
just missed coinciding with the Happy Station
program).
Later, DX Jukebox became Media Network
with Jonathan Marks and the team. Jerry and
Dody moved on, Tom retired, and very gradually
the tone of the station started to change. Not in
a bad way, just different.
Which brings us to the 21st Century: Radio
Netherlands is perhaps a more serious, news
focused radio station than 30 years ago. You
are more likely to hear news, documentaries
and current affairs instead of the folksy sound
of the 1970s.
In many ways Radio Netherlands has also
picked up the slack left when the BBC dropped
many frequencies to North America. I’ve said
before, I consider Radio Netherlands a sort
of BBC-lite. Which is not necessarily a bad
thing.
In a recent very unscientific survey I conducted, RN consistently scored high or highest
when listeners were asked, “Which international
radio stations are doing a good job, despite limited budgets?”
Responses included:
“I believe that Radio Netherlands, Radio
Sweden, Radio Prague, Radio Australia and
DW easily fall into that category of ‘limited or
decreasing means, but doing an above average
job with them.’ RN sells some of its content on
the international market and always takes a big
haul of prizes from the New York Radio Show.”
(John Figliozzi)
“I must admit I enjoy Radio Netherlands although I have a Swedish background. They tend
to ‘tell it as it is,’ great reports, great reporters
who try to dig to get good answers and perspective. I do not know how limited their budgets
are. Their signal into Guelph ON Canada is just
great.” (Paul in Guelph, Ontario)
“RNW agreed. They stand out more than
any other. No duds in their lineup at all.” (Richard Cuff)
“RN has always been a favorite, with excellent features.” (Dan Murray)
“The US media, as you may know, is highly
‘selective’ in what it covers in these interesting
times (heavy on celebrity gossip, light on global
warming), so I turn to international broadcasters–Radio Netherlands in particular–to fill in
the (sizable) gaps; it’s sad, really, since I’m old
enough to remember the VOA as a source of
pride for an American.” (Anne Fanelli)
Courtesy of Mark Vosmeier
R
adio Netherlands is perhaps one of the
easiest and most enjoyable listens in the
world of international broadcasting.
Just over 80 years ago the first transmissions were made from Holland to the Dutch
East Indies (Indonesia) in late March 1927,
making the Dutch among the first to exploit the
shortwave medium.
I first made the acquaintance of Radio
Netherlands 50 years or so after that, in 1978.
Since that time, for the most part, and in one
form or another, Radio Netherlands has been, if
not a daily visitor, certainly a regular visitor in
my home.
While some of the programming which first
attracted me to Radio Netherlands is long gone
(more on that later) there are still many program
choices that will appeal to a listener in the 21st
Century.
I mentioned that Radio Netherlands is easy
to hear. One can listen to RN via any number
of platforms. Of course, they are on shortwave.
For those of us in North America, the powerful
Bonaire relay in the Netherlands Antilles makes
listening a snap.
One can listen via the World Radio Network, available online and via satellite. Check
out www.wrn.org for schedules.
Programs are also available via the CBC in
Canada on Radio One, during the CBC Overnight programming block (midnight to 6am).
Radio Netherlands has been on at 1 am local
time, but this may have changed by the time
you read this. Consult the schedule at www.cbc.
ca/overnight
CBC Radio Overnight, like all CBC programming, is available live online as well. For
the hard-core DXer, you may even try hearing
them via the 1kW transmitter in Newfoundland,
CKZN, which relays CBC programming.
Finally, you can listen to any Radio Netherlands program via their website, for up to 7
days after the broadcast. You can listen to them
❖ What can you hear?
Here’s a quick review of RN programs to
North America. There may be minor variations
in transmissions to other regions.
Each transmission opens with the Newsline,
featuring a roundup of world news, a review of
the Dutch press and in depth analysis of items
and events in the news. More often than not, you
will hear items that do not get coverage in the
North American media, or perhaps not enough.
Recently I heard features on property rights
in China (leading some to question the future
of socialism in that country), severe flooding
in Madagascar and debate over a proposed
anti-missile defense system in Poland and the
Czech Republic. The plan was threatening to
topple the minority government in Prague, not
to mention upsetting their Russian neighbors.
It was fascinating stuff, and quite frankly I had
not heard anything about these issues prior to
hearing them discussed on RN.
The Newsline team does a fantastic job.
Well worth the time to listen.
Monday
Research File
Radio Netherlands’ science and technology
program. Perhaps along with Quirks and Quarks
on the CBC, the best program in this genre. The
Research File’s goal is “explaining and putting the
latest breakthroughs into perspective, as well as exploring new discoveries and ongoing research.” Recent episodes have looked at addiction, designing
an eco-friendly passenger plane, new technology
that keeps cells alive under the microscope, and
developments in the treatment of Crohn’s disease.
Laura Durnford and Thijs Westerbeek host the program. They are both very professional and make
the subject matter most interesting.
Tuesday
EuroQuest
Hosted by Jonathan Groubert, EuroQuest is a
digest of news and stories from across Europe.
Art, Music, the Environment, Health Matters, and
Culture are just some of the areas covered in this
program.
The program has recently looked at child marriage
among the Roma of Europe, difficulties the disabled
have finding a job, blind shooting competitions (!),
honor killings and the equality of men and women
in Turkey.
EuroQuest is also rebroadcast on over 300 stations worldwide.
Wednesday
Documentary
Radio Netherlands documentaries have received
“over 40 awards and nominations in the past five
years” from “New York Radio Festivals, the AsiaPacific Broadcasting Union, UNICEF, the National
Lesbian & Gay Journalists Association, the Prix
Bayeux for War Correspondents and others.” (RN
website)
These are always well done presentations on any
number of topics, including the ongoing crisis in
Zimbabwe, romance novels, and the use of words
to shape public opinion. Fascinating stuff.
Thursday
Dutch Horizons
Hosted by Chris Chambers, the program “goes
beyond the traditional Dutch stereotypes to find out
what’s really going on in the Netherlands.” Among
the topics looked at in recent weeks have included
the new CCTV Headquarters in Beijing, designed in
Rotterdam, an Amsterdam exhibit of Ottoman antiquities, and women in past centuries, who dressed
and lived as men, and an interview with Ayaan Hirsi
Ali, former Dutch MP, on her latest film about Islam.
Friday
Network Europe
This program has been discussed before in this column. It is a co-operative effort between Deutsche
Welle, Polish Radio, Radio Bulgaria, RN, Radio
France International, Radio Prague, Radio Romania,
Radio Slovakia, Radio Slovenia and Radio Sweden.
It’s a weekly look at events, life and culture in
Europe.
“Network Europe is a unique example of European co-operation. Produced by the continent’s
leading international broadcasters, the programme
reflects the diversity of European society and
voices.”
The program’s website is: http://networkeurope.radio.cz/
Saturday
Weekend Connection
Weekend Connection is produced by the Newsline
team and looks at the week’s news, stories that will
be developing in the coming week, and other items
in depth.
Vox Humana
Early on in 2007, Radio Netherlands has been
running episodes of this program from the archives.
It is an interesting program, looking at life and
people high and low throughout the world.
It may be a look at the work of an innovative musician, a discussion of how a belief in luck and fate
shapes peoples lives in the Far East, or a talk with
the daughter of a murdered scientist from Sri Lanka.
Interesting looks at people from all walks of life.
pirates operated.
Any time I heard it, Radio Luxemburg basically was a pop music station, playing, for the
most part, the top hits in Britain at the time. Nice
to catch, but not very notable program-wise.
Belgium
BRT used to have quite an enjoyable
English service, but that has gone the way of
many others. If you want to hear Belgium, you
have to listen in Flemish via Radio Vlaanderen
International or in French via RTBF.
RVI broadcasts via transmitters in the UK.
6040 kHz was reportedly used in the winter season 1900-1200 UTC; presumably that frequency
might change by the time you read this.
RTBF, the voice of the Francophone community in Belgium, was reportedly on the air
from 0550-0700 and from 1800-2100 on 9970
kHz. Again, these times and frequencies were
reported for the recent winter season and are
subject to change.
A special thank you to my friend and fellow
DXer, Mark Vosmeier, who allowed me to use
some of his Radio Netherlands photos for this
column.
Sunday
Amsterdam Forum
Amsterdam Forum is hosted by Sarah Johnson,
and is billed as Radio Netherlands’ “discussion
program.” Topics have included our attitudes
towards meat and meat production, why teenagers
have trouble being openly gay and the uncontrolled
growth of some African cities. Usually a number
of guests discuss the issue either in the studio or
by phone. The program provides solid, in-depth
coverage of a different issue in each program. Well
worth hearing.
Echoes
Echoes is the Radio Netherlands version of a mailbag
program. Listeners’ letters are acknowledged and
questions answered. Mindy Ran hosts the program.
Another feature of the program is called “Critical Eye.”
It’s basically a commentary about some topic in the
news, or something going on in the culture, by Perro
de Jong. It’s similar to (but not the same as) Alistair
Cooke’s Letter from America.
To hear Radio Netherlands on shortwave,
try 11675 kHz mornings at 1100 or 6165 kHz
evenings at 0000, 0100 and 0500 UTC. These
times and frequencies may have changed by the
time you read this. As of this writing I believe
them to be correct.
❖ Other Benelux
broadcasters…
Sadly, one cannot hear English from the
other two Benelux countries any more.
Radio Luxemburg was occasionally heard
here in the past, but dropped shortwave some
time ago. It was nice to hear and QSL them, but
the programming was nothing special. For many
years Radio Luxemburg took advantage of the
radio situation in Britain, and offered the type
of programming that could not be heard there
at the time…in the same manner as the offshore
❖ Programming for our Future
There is one segment of listeners which
doesn’t get a lot of attention. What about
children’s programming? Think about it: As the
saying goes, children are the future. There’s very
little programming specifically for children. But
there is some.
In the coming weeks, along with an “expert panel” of children in the United States,
Canada, and elsewhere, I’ll ask them for their
thoughts, their likes and dislikes when it comes
to children’s programming on the radio.
What makes them experts? They are children!
We should be reporting back in the coming
months. If you…or your children…have any
thoughts, ideas or suggestions, feel free to email
me!
Until next month, Cheers!
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
37
T
HE QSL REPORT
Gayle Van Horn, W4GVH
gaylevanhorn@monitoringtimes.com
VERIFICATIONS RECEIVED BY OUR READERS
75 Million QSOs and Growing
This month is MT’s annual
focus on amateur radio, and it’s
time for a brief reminder of amateur radio’s popular Logbook of the
World.
ARRL’s Logbook of the World
is the largest repository of amateur
radio log records, submitted for a
worldwide amateur radio audience.
When both radio contacts participate
in a one-on-one contact (QSO) and submit their records to Logbook of
the World, the result is a cardless verification, used for ARRL credit.
The League’s QSL-cardless awards and contact credit system
has far exceeded their original predictions in 2003. In the first month
alone, more than 14 million QSOs were added to the database. Today,
LoTW has grown to over 75 million and is well on its way to being
adopted by the worldwide community of DXers.
LoTW is open to all amateur radio operators, and applying for a
digital certificate is the first step toward taking advantage of the system. The digital certificate authenticates the user’s identity. For more
information about Logbook of the World, please refer to: www.arrl.
org/lotw/
AMATEUR RADIO
Canada (Nuvavut), K9AJ/VYO Southampton
Island (NA-007). Full data photo card. Received in 65 days via ARRL bureau. (L. Van
Horn, NC)
card featuring classic sepia photo, unsigned.
Received in four weeks for reception report
emailed to: english@kaf.radio.hu (Mallory)
Reports may also be directed to: Bródy Sándor utca 5-7, H-1800 Budapest, Hungary.
Guadaloupe Island FG/IK2JYT, 20 meters
SSB. Full data color folder photo card.
Received in 65 days via ARRL bureau. (Van
Horn)
ICELAND
American Forces Radio 13855 kHz USB.
Full data AFRTS Logo card signed by Robert
Winkler. Received in 16 days from a 2003
English report. QSL address: DOD, NMC
DET AFRTS-DMC, 23755 Z Street -Bldg.
2730, Riverside, CA 92518-2017 USA. (Bill
Wilkins, Springfield, MO)
NORTH KOREA
Voice of Korea 9335 kHz. Full data Radio
Pyongyang photo postcard. Received in 69
days. Package arrived in a brown envelope
with a form letter requesting further reports.
English program schedule, copy of Pyongyang Times, plus an assortment of station
souvenirs and info sheet. Station address:
Voice of Korea, External Service, Korean
Central Broadcasting Station, Pyongyang,
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. (Rich
D’Angelo, PA/DX Window) Congrats, Rich,
VO Korea is not verified often, and usually
not directly! - GVH
JAPAN
Nikkei Radio, 6055 kHz. Full data tri-color
logo card unsigned. Received in ten days for
an English report. Station address: Nikkei
Radio Broadcasting Corp., 9-15 Akasaka 1chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-8373 Japan.
(Alokesh Gupta, India)
ROMANIA
Radio Romania International 11940 kHz. Full
data color card, unsigned, plus station schedule. Received in 45 days for an English report
to: engl@rri.ro. Reports may also be directed
to: 60-62 Berthelot St, RO-70747 Bucharest,
Romania. (Frank Hillton, Charleston, SC)
MEDIUM WAVE
675 kHz AM, Vietnam. Full data QSL card
unsigned, verifying 675 AM and 6175 kHz.
Received in 100 days, after numerous attempts via regular mail and email, for both
frequencies. Not a new medium wave or
shortwave country, but a new AM frequency
verified. Station address: 37 Ba Tien , Ha
Noi Vietnam. (Patrick Martin, Seaside, OR)
ST. HELENA
Radio St. Helena 11092.5 kHz USB. Full data
DSWCI 50th Anniversary card signed by Anker
Petersen. Card commemorates anniversary
and 2006 St. Helena Day. Received in 18 days
for an English report and one IRC. QSL address: Danish Shortwave Club International,
Tavleager 31, DK 2670 Greve, Denmark.
(Wilkins; Malloy)
1125 DXGM kHz AM, Philippines. Nice
verification letter, signed by retiring General
Manager Jose M. Lansang. Three souvenir
postcards of Mindanao enclosed. Station
address: Republic BC System, Davao City
8000, Davao Del Sur, Philippines. QSL #
24 Philippines. (Martin)
UTILITY
USCG Station NMN CAMSLANT (Communications Area Master Station Atlantic)
8983 kHz SSB. Full data color/station photo
card, signed by Joseph Cook-QSL Manager.
Received in 288 days for a utility report. QSL
address: NMN, Commanding Officer, c/o
NAVSECGURANT Northwest, Chesapeake,
VA 23322-2598 USA. (Richard W. Parker
KB2DMD, Geryville, PA)
United States (Utah) K7T Philo T. Farnsworth
Special Event Station, 20 meters SSB. Full
data two-color photo card for an SASE. Received in 35 days via QSL Manager W7WES,
C. Wesley Wilkinson, 4203 Williamsburg
Dr., West Valley City, UT 84128-6519. (Van
Horn)
United States (Florida) WA4ECY Corry Station ARC. 17 meters SSB. Full data two color
card. Received in four months for an SASE
via Corry Station ARC, Code 9900 NTTC
Corry Station, Pensacola, FL 32511-5000.
(Van Horn).
Venezuela YV4A, Venezuela Camatagua DX
Club Contest Station. 10/20/40 meters SSB.
Full data two color card. Received in 65 days
for an SASE to QSL Manager, R. Leandro,
P.O. Box 020010, Miami, FL 33102-0010.
(Van Horn)
AUSTRIA
Radio Osterreich 1, 9870 kHz. Verification
letter with illegible signature and photo of
Salzburg on the back, plus German program
schedule. Received for a German reception
report emailed to: roi.service@orf.at Reports
may also be directed to: Listener Service,
Argentinierstrasse 30a A-1040 Vienna,
Austria. (Dan Mallory, MA)
FM
92.9 MHz, Voice of Barbados. Full data
verification letter, signed by Ronald L.H.
Clarke-program Director, Gospel FM &
HOTT FM. Station info sheet and Barbados
Holiday Guide brochure. Received in two
years for an FM report. Station address:
P.O. Box 1267, Barbados. (Arnaldo Slaen,
Buenos Aires, Argentina)
HUNGARY
Radio Budapest 9590 kHz. Full data QSL
38
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
Virgin Radio 1215 kHz AM. Full data QSL
card signed by David Jones-Head of Technology Services. Received in four months for
an English AM report. Station address: No.
1 Golden Square, London W1F 9DJ United
Kingdom. (Daniel L. Serbrick, NJ)
WHKY 1290 kHz AM. Partial data verification
on station letterhead, signed by Jeff Log-Sta.
Manager. Received in 32 days for an AM
report, one U.S. dollar and an address label
(not used). Station address: P.O. Box 1059,
Hickory, NC 28603-1059 USA. (Wilkins)
VENEZUELA
Radio Amazonas International, 4940 kHz.
Full data Spanish computer generated card
signed by Sr. Jorge Garcia Rangel-QSL
Manager, plus two Spanish/English personal
letters. Received in 419 days for an English
report and two U.S. dollars. Station address:
Sr. Jorge Garcia Rangel-QSL Manager, Calle
Roma, Qta: Costa Rica No. A-16, Urbanization Alto Barinas, Barinas 5201, Venezuela.
(Scott Barbour Jr., Intervale, NH)
English
Language
HOW
0000-0100 twhfa
  
Convert your time to UTC.
Broadcast time on  and time off  are
expressed in Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC) – the time at the 0 meridian near
Greenwich, England. To translate your local
time into UTC, first convert your local time to
24-hour format, then add (during Daylight
Saving Time) 4, 5, 6 or 7 hours for Eastern,
Central, Mountain or Pacific Times, respectively. Eastern, Central, and Pacific Times are
already converted to UTC for you at the top
of each hour.
Note that all dates, as well as times, are in
UTC; for example, a show which might air at
0030 UTC Sunday will be heard on Saturday
evening in America (in other words, 8:30 pm
Eastern, 7:30 pm Central, etc.).
Find the station you want to hear.
Look at the page which corresponds to the
time you will be listening. English broadcasts
are listed by UTC time on  , then alphabetically by country , followed by the station
name . (If the station name is the same as
the country, we don’t repeat it, e.g., “Vanuatu,
Radio” [Vanuatu].)
If a broadcast is not daily, the days of
broadcast  will appear in the column following the time of broadcast, using the following
codes:
Codes
s/Sun
m/Mon
t
w
h
f
a/Sat
occ:
DRM:
irreg
vl
TO
USE
THE
USA, Voice of America


SHORTWAVE GUIDE
5995am
6130ca
7405am

published station schedules with confirmations
and reports from her monitoring team and MT
readers to make the Shortwave Guide up-to-date
as of one week before print deadline.
To help you find the most promising signal
for your location, immediately following each
frequency we’ve included information on the
target area  of the broadcast. Signals beamed
toward your area will generally be easier to hear
than those beamed elsewhere, even though the
latter will often still be audible.
Target Areas
af:
Africa
al:
alternate frequency
(occasional use only)
am: The Americas
as:
Asia
ca: Central America
do: domestic broadcast
eu: Europe
me: Middle East
na: North America
oc: Oceania
pa: Pacific
sa:
South America
va: various
MT MONITORING TEAM
Gayle Van Horn
Frequency Manager
gaylevanhorn@monitoringtimes.com
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
occasional
Digital Radio Mondiale
Irregular broadcasts
Various languages
Choose the most promising frequencies
for the time, location and conditions.
The frequencies  follow to the right of the
station listing; all frequencies are listed in kilohertz (kHz). Not all listed stations will be heard
from your location and virtually none of them
will be heard all the time on all frequencies.
Shortwave broadcast stations change some
of their frequencies at least twice a year, in April
and October, to adapt to seasonal conditions.
But they can also change in response to shortterm conditions, interference, equipment problems, etc. Our frequency manager coordinates
9455af
Daniel Sampson
danielsampson@monitoringtimes.com
Larry Van Horn, MT Asst. Editor
Shortwave Broadcast Bands
kHz
2300-2495
3200-3400
3900-3950
3950-4000
4750-4995
5005-5060
5730-5900
5900-5950
5950-6200
6200-6295
6890-6990
7100-7300
7300-7350
7350-7600
9250-9400
9400-9500
9500-9900
11500-11600
11600-11650
11650-12050
12050-12100
12100-12600
13570-13600
13600-13800
13800-13870
15030-15100
15100-15600
15600-15800
17480-17550
17550-17900
18900-19020
21450-21850
25670-26100
Notes
Note 1
larryvanhorn@monitoringtimes.com
Note 2
Thank You ...
Additional Contributors to This
Month’s Shortwave Guide:
Rich D’Angelo/NASWA Flash Sheet;
Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India; Anker
Petersen/DX Window; Arnaldo Coro,
CO2KK/ R. Havana; Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania; Ivo Ivanov; Alan Roe, UK; Adrian
Sainsbury/R.NZ Intl; Harold Sellers/ODXA/
DX Ontario; Raimonds Kreicbergs, Lithuania; Sakthi Vel, India; Wolfgang Bueschel,
Germany; Andreas Volk, Germany; BCL
News; Cumbre DX; DX Mix News, Bulgaria; Hard Core DX; NASWA Journal;
World Wide DX Club-Top News.
Note 3
Note 4
Meters
120 meters (Note 1)
90 meters (Note 1)
75 meters (Regional band, used for
broadcasting in Asia only)
75 meters (Regional band, used for
broadcasting in Asia and Europe)
60 meters (Note 1)
60 meters (Note 1)
49 meter NIB (Note 2)
49 meter WARC-92 band (Note 3)
49 meters
49 meter NIB (Note 2)
41 meter NIB (Note 2)
41 meters (Regional band, not allocated for broadcasting in the western
hemisphere) (Note 4)
41 meter WARC-92 band (Note 3)
41 meter NIB (Note 2)
31 meter NIB (Note 2)
31 meter WARC-92 band (Note 3)
31 meters
25 meter NIB (Note 2)
25 meter WARC-92 band (Note 3)
25 meters
25 meter WARC-92 band (Note 3)
25 meter NIB (Note 2)
22 meter WARC-92 band (Note 3)
22 meters
22 meter WARC-92 band (Note 3)
19 meter NIB (Note 2)
19 meters
19 meter WARC-92 band (Note 3)
17 meter WARC-92 band (Note 3)
17 meters
15 meter WARC-92 band (Note 3)
13 meters
11 meters
Tropical bands, 120/90/60 meters are for
broadcast use only in designated tropical
areas of the world.
Broadcasters can use this frequency range
on a (NIB) non-interference basis only.
WARC-92 bands are allocated officially for
use by HF broadcasting stations in 2007
WRC-03 update. After March 29, 2009,
the spectrum from 7100-7200 kHz will no
longer be available for broadcast purposes
and will be turned over to amateur radio
operations worldwide
GLENN HAUSER’S
WORLD OF RADIO
http://www.worldofradio.com
For the latest DX and programming
news, amateur nets, DX program
schedules, audio archives and much
more!
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
39
0000 UTC - 8PM EDT / 7PM CDT / 5PM PDT
SHORTWAVE GUIDE
0000 0015
Japan, Radio Japan/NHK World
13650as
17810as
0000 0030
Australia, HCJB Global
15525va
0000 0030
Australia, Radio 9660as
12080as 13670as
15240pa
17715as 17750va 17775va
17795va
0000 0030
Burma, Dem Voice of Burma 5955eu
0000 0030
Egypt, Radio Cairo
11950na
0000 0030
Thailand, Radio 9680af
0000 0030
UK, BBC World Service
3915as 11945as
17615as
0000 0030
USA, Voice of America
7405as
0000 0045
India, All India Radio
9705as 9950as
11620as
11645as 13605as
0000 0057
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 11700as
0000 0058
Germany, Deutsche Welle 7245as 13730as
15595as
0000 0059
Spain, Radio Exterior Espana 6055na
0000 0100
Anguilla, University Network
6090am
0000 0100
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
2310do
4835do
0000 0100
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 5025do
0000 0100
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
4910do
0000 0100
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
0000 0100
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
0000 0100
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
0000 0100
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
6160na
0000 0100
China, China Radio Intl
6020na 6075as
7130as
7180as
9425na 9570as
11650as
11885as
0000 0100
Costa Rica, University Network
5030va
6150va
7375va
9725va
0000 0100
Guyana, Voice of 3291do
0000 0100
Japan, Radio Japan/NHK World
6145na
0000 0100
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
0000 0100
Netherlands, Radio
9845na
0000 0100
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 13720pa
0000 0100 DRM
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 15720pa
0000 0100 vl
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
0000 0100
Romania, Radio Romania Intl
9775na
11790na
0000 0100
Singapore, MediaCorp Radio
6150do
0000 0100
UK, BBC World Service
5970as 6195as
9605as
9740as
11955as 15285as
15360as
0000 0100 DRM
UK, BBC World Service
6010na
0000 0100 f
UK, Bible Voice 5980me
0000 0100
Ukraine, Radio Ukraine Intl 7530eu
0000 0100
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
0000 0100
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
6065na
9505na
9715na
11720am
0000 0100
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
5755na
0000 0100
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na 15590na
0000 0100
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 5110na 7415na
9330na
0000 0100
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
0000 0100
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
5810va
0000 0100
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 5850na
0000 0100
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
7315am
7490am
0000 0100
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
9265am
0000 0100
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
0000 0100
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
0000 0100
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 3215na 5070na
7465na
13845na
0000 0100
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 3185na 5050na
6890na
0000 0100 mtwhfa
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 5745ca
0000 0100
Zambia, Christian Voice
4965af
0005 0030 Sun/Mon Austria, Radio Austria Intl
7325na
0005 0100
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 6100na
0013 0028 twhfa
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
7325na
0030 0045 s
Germany, Pan American BC 6165as
0030 0100
Australia, Radio 9660as
12080as 13670as
15240pa
15415as 17715as 17750va
17795va
0030 0100
Lithuania, Radio Vilnius
9875na
0030 0100
Thailand, Radio 5890na
0030 0100 fas
UK, Bible Voice 5955as
0030 0100
USA, Voice of America
7120va 9620va
11695va
11725va 11805va 12005va
15185va
15205va
0033 0100 Sun/Mon Austria, Radio Austria Intl
7325na
0043 0058 twhfa
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
7325na
0055 0100
Italy, RAI Italia
11800na
40
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
0100 UTC - 9PM EDT / 8PM CDT / 6PM PDT
0100
0100
0100
0100
0100
0100
0100
0100
0100
0100
0100
0100
0104
0115
0127
0128
0130 s
0130
0130
0130
0200
0200
0200
0200
0100
0100
0100
0100
0100
0200
0200
0200
0200
0200
0100 0200
0100 0200
0100 0200
0100 0200
0100 0200
0100
0100
0100
0100
0100
0200
0200
0200
0200 DRM
0200
0100
0100
0100
0100
0100
0200 vl
0200
0200
0200
0200
0100 0200 f
0100 0200
0100 0200
0100
0100
0100
0100
0100
0200
0200
0200
0200
0200
0100
0100
0100
0100
0200
0200
0200
0200 mtwhf
0100
0100
0100
0100
0100
0100
0200 as
0200
0200 sm
0200 twhfa
0200
0200
0100 0200
0100
0100
0100
0115
0130
0200 mtwhfa
0200
0200
0130 Sat
0200
0130
0130
0130
0130
0140
0145
0200
0200
0200
0200 twhfa
0200
0200 twhfas
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 6100na
Italy, RAI Italia
11800na
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
6200na 7345na
Vietnam, Voice of 6175na
Germany, Universal Life
7260as
Hungary, Radio Budapest
6040na
Slovakia, Radio Slovakia Int 5930na 9440sa
UK, BBC World Service
7230na 9440sa
Anguilla, University Network
6090am
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 5025do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
4910do
Australia, Radio 9660as
12080as 13670as
15240pa
15415as 15515as 17715as
17750va
17795va 21745va
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
6160na
China, China Radio Intl
6005na 6020na
6075as
6080na
7130eu 7180as
9570na
9580na
11650as 11885as
Costa Rica, University Network
5030va
6150va
7375va
9725va
Cuba, Radio Havana
6000na 6180na
Guyana, Voice of 3291do
Indonesia, Voice of
9525as 11785pa
15150al
Japan, Radio Japan/NHK World
6030va
11860as
11935sa 15325as 17685pa
17810as
17825ca 17845as
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
Netherlands, Radio
9845na
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 13720pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 15720pa
North Korea, Voice of Korea 7140as 9345as
9730am
11735am 13760am 15180am
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Singapore, MediaCorp Radio
6150do
Sri Lanka, SLBC 6005as
9770as 15745as
Taiwan, Radio Taiwan Intl
11875as 15465na
UK, BBC World Service
7320as 9605as
11955as
15285as 15310as 15360as
UK, Bible Voice 5945me
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
6065na
9505na
15195as
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
5755na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
17655as
USA, Voice of America
11705va 12005va
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 5110na 7415na
9330na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
5810va
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 5850na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
5835am
7490am
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
7315am
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
9265am
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WRMI Miami FL
7385na
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 3215na 5070na
5935na
7465na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 3185na 5050na
6890na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 5745ca
Uzbekistan, CVC International
7355as
Zambia, Christian Voice
4965af
Australia, HCJB Global
15405va
Iran, Voice of the Islamic Rep
6120na
7160na
Lithuania, Radio Vilnius
7325na
Sweden, Radio 6010na
11675va
USA, Voice of America
5960va
USA, Voice of America
7405va
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 5915va 7335va
Albania, Radio Tirana
6115eu 7425eu
0200 UTC - 10PM EDT / 9PM CDT / 7PM PDT
0200 0227
0200 0227
0200 0300
0200 0300 twhfa
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
6200na
Iran, Voice of the Islamic Rep
7160na
Anguilla, University Network
Argentina, RAE 11710am
7345na
6120na
6090am
0200 0300
0200 0300
0200 0300
0200 0300
0200
0200
0200
0200
0200
0200
0200
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0200
0200
0200
0200
0200
0200
0200
0200
0200
0200
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300 DRM
0300
0300 DRM
0300
0300 vl
0300
0200 0300
0200 0300
0200 0300
0200 0300
0200 0300
0200 0300
0200
0200
0200
0200
0200
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0200
0200
0200
0200
0200
0300
0300
0300
0300 as
0300 mtwhf
0200
0200
0200
0200
0200
0300
0300 sm
0300 twhfa
0300
0300
0200 0300
0200
0200
0200
0200
0215
0215
0300 mtwhfa
0300
0300
3000
0220
0230
0230
0230
0230
0230
0245
0250
0255
0258
0300 twhfas
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300 vl
0300 UTC - 11PM EDT / 10PM CDT / 8PM PDT
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0307
0320
0330
0330
0330
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0330 s
0330
0330
0330
0330
0400
0400
Croatia, Croatian Radio
7285na
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 7305am
Egypt, Radio Cairo
7270na
Myanmar, Radio 9730do
Philippines, Radio Pilipinas 12025va
15230va
Swaziland, TWR 3200af
Thailand, Radio 5890na
USA, KJES Vado NM
7555na
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 9330na
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 7360af
Anguilla, University Network
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
4835do
0300 0400
0300 0400
0300 0400
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0400 twhfas
0400
0400
0400
0400
0400
0300 0400
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0400
0400
0400
0400
0400
0400
0300 0400
0300 0400 DRM
0300 0400
0300 0400 vl
0300 0400
0300 0400
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0400 vl
0400
0400
0400
0400
0400
0400 s
0400
0300 0400
0300 0400
0300 0400
0300
0300
0300
0300
0400
0400
0400
0400
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0400
0400
0400
0400
0400 mtwhf
0300
0300
0300
0300
0300
0400 as
0400
0400
0400
0400
0300 0400
0300
0300
0300
0300
0330
0330
0330
0330
0400 mtwhfa
0400
0400
0500 vl/mtwhf
0335
0358
0400
0400 twhfas
0400 UTC - 12AM EDT / 11PM CDT / 9PM PDT
9610am
0400 0427
0400 0430
15115va
0400
0400
0400
0400
0400
0400
0400
6090am
2310do
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 5025do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
4910do
Australia, Radio 9660as
12080as 13670as
15240pa
15415as 15515as 17750va
21725va
Canada, CBC NQ SW Service
9625na
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
6160na
China, China Radio Intl
6190na 9460as
9690na
9790na
11770as 13620as
15110as
15120as
Costa Rica, University Network
5030va
6150va
7375va
9725va
Cuba, Radio Havana
6000na 6180na
Germany, Deutsche Welle 11695as 13810as
Guyana, Voice of 3291do
Japan, Radio Japan/NHK World
21610pa
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
Malaysia, RTM/Voice of Malaysia
6175as
9750as
15295as
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 13720pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 15720pa
North Korea, Voice of Korea 7140as 9345as
9730as
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Romania, Radio Romania Intl
6150va
9645na
11895va 15220va
Russia, Voice of 5995me 6240na 7350na
13735na
15425na
Rwanda, Radio 6055do
Singapore, MediaCorp Radio
6150do
South Africa, Channel Africa 3345af 7390af
Sri Lanka, SLBC 6005as
9770as 15745as
Taiwan, Radio Taiwan Intl
5950am 15215sa
Turkey, Voice of 5975va
7270va
UK, BBC World Service
6195as
UK, BBC World Service
3255af 6005me
6145af
6190af
7130af 7160af
9410as
9750af
11760as 15320as
15360as
17760as 17790as 21660as
Ukraine, Radio Ukraine Intl 7530na
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
6065na
9505na
9985am 11740am
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
5755na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
17655as
USA, Voice of America
4930af 6080af
15580af
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 5110na 7415na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
5810va
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 5850na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
5835am
6110am
7520am
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
7315am
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
9265am
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 3215na 5070na
5765na
5935na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 3185na 5050na
6890na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 5745ca
Uzbekistan, CVC International
13685as
Zambia, Christian Voice
4965af
UK, Sudan Radio Service
7120af
Bahrain, Radio Bahrain
6010as
Vietnam, Voice of 6175am
UK, BBC World Service
11665af
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 9330na
0430 mtwhf
0430 as
0458
0458 DRM
0500
0500
0500
0400 0500
0400 0500
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
6200na
Australia, Radio 9660as
12080as
15240pa
15515as 17750va
France, Radio France Intl
7270af
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 5745ca
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 13720pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 15720pa
Anguilla, University Network
Armenia, CVC International 15515as
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
4835do
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 5025do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
May 2007
7345na
13670as
21725va
7315af
6090am
2310do
4910do
MONITORING TIMES
41
SHORTWAVE GUIDE
0200 0300
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
2310do
4835do
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 5025do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
4910do
Australia, Radio 9660as
12080as 13670as
15240pa
15415as 15515as 17750va
21725va
Bulgaria, Radio 9700na
11700na
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
6160na
China, China Radio Intl
11770as 13640as
Costa Rica, University Network
5030va
6150va
7375va
9725va
Cuba, Radio Havana
6000na 6180na
Egypt, Radio Cairo
7270na
Guyana, Voice of 3291do
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
Netherlands, Radio
9830va
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 13720pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 15720pa
North Korea, Voice of Korea 13650as 15100as
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Philippines, Radio Pilipinas 12025va 15115va
15230va
Russia, Voice of 6230na
7250na 13735na
15425na
Singapore, MediaCorp Radio
6150do
South Korea, KBS World Radio
9560na
15575na
Sri Lanka, SLBC 6005as
9770as 15745as
UK, BBC World Service
6035af 6195as
7320as
11750as 11955as 15285as
15310as
15360as 17760as
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
5985am
6065na
9505na
9525na 11855am
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
5755na
USA, KJES Vado NM
7555na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
17655as
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 5110na 7415na
9330na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
5810va
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 5850na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
7315am
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
5835am
7490am
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
9265am
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WRMI Miami FL
7385na
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 3215na 5070na
5765na
5935na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 3185na 5050na
6890na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 5745ca
Uzbekistan, CVC International
7355as
Zambia, Christian Voice
4965af
Taiwan, Radio Taiwan Intl
5950na 9680am
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 12070va
Nepal, Radio
3230as
5005as 6100as
7165as
Vietnam, Voice of 6175na
Albania, Radio Tirana
6115eu 7425eu
Hungary, Radio Budapest
6195na
Sweden, Radio 6010na
Myanmar, Radio 9730do
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 7305am 9610am
Rwanda, Radio 6055do
0400
0400
0400
0400
0400
0500 twhfas
0500
0500
0500
0500
0400 0500
0400 0500
0400 0500
0400 0500
0400 0500
0400 0500
0400 0500
0400 0500 vl
0400 0500
SHORTWAVE GUIDE
0400
0400
0400
0400
0400
0500 vl
0500
0500
0500 vl
0500
0400 0500 DRM
0400 0500
0400 0500
0400
0400
0400
0400
0500
0500
0500
0500
0400
0400
0400
0400
0400
0500
0500
0500
0500
0500 mtwhf
0400
0400
0400
0400
0400
0500 as
0500
0500
0500
0500
0400 0500
0400
0400
0430
0430
0430
0500
0500
0445
0457
0500
0430
0430
0430
0445
0500
0500
0500 a
0500
Canada, CBC NQ SW Service
9625na
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
6160na
China, China Radio Intl
6190na 9460as
13620as
15120as 17725as 17855as
Costa Rica, University Network
5030va
6150va
7375va
9725va
Cuba, Radio Havana
6000na 6180na
Germany, Deutsche Welle 7225af 7245af
12045af
15445af
Guyana, Voice of 3291do
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
Malaysia, RTM/Voice of Malaysia
6175as
9750as
15295as
Netherlands, Radio
6165na
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Russia, Voice of 7150na
7255na 7350na
9840na
12030na 13735na
Rwanda, Radio 6055do
Singapore, MediaCorp Radio
6150do
South Africa, Channel Africa 3345af
Uganda, Radio 4976do
5026do
UK, BBC World Service
3255af 6005af
6190af
6195eu
7120af 7160af
11665af
11760as 12095af 15310as
15360as
15575as 17760as 17790as
21660as
UK, BBC World Service
6010na
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
6065na
6855na
7780va
9505na 9715na
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
5755na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
17655as
USA, Voice of America
4930af 4960af
6080af
9885af
15580af
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 5110na 7415na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
5810va 5850va
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 5850na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
5835am
7490am
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
7315am
USA, WMLK Bethel PA
9265eu
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 3215na 5070na
5765na
5935na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 3185oc 5050na
6890na
Uzbekistan, CVC International
13685as
Zambia, Christian Voice
4965af
Israel, Kol Israel 6280va
7545va 9345va
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
9890na
Australia, Radio 9660as
12080as 13670as
15240pa
15415as 15515va 17750va
21725va
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
6090do
Swaziland, TWR 3200af
4775af
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 5745ca
Italy, RAI Italia
6110af
6145af 7235af
0500 UTC - 1AM EDT / 12AM CDT / 10PM PDT
0500 0507 twhfas
0500 0530 mtwhf
0500 0530
0500 0530
0500
0500
0500
0500
0555
0600
0600
0600
0500 0600
0500 0600
0500 0600
0500
0500
0500
0500
0500
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0500 0600
0500 0600
42
Canada, CBC NQ SW Service
France, Radio France Intl
9805af
13680af
Germany, Deutsche Welle 5945af
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 7360af
11625af
South Africa, Channel Africa 7240af
Anguilla, University Network
Armenia, CVC International 15515as
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
4835do
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 5025do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
Australia, Radio 9660as
12080as
15160as
15240pa 15515as
Bhutan, BBS
6035as
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
China, China Radio Intl
5960na
7220af
11880as 15350as
17505va
17540as 17725as
Costa Rica, University Network
6150va
7375va
9725va
Cuba, Radio Havana
6000na
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
9625na
11995af
9700af
9660af
9685af
6090am
2310do
4910do
13670as
17750va
6160na
6190na
15465as
17855as
5030va
6060na
6180na
9550va
9600va 11760va
Germany, CVC International 9430af
Guyana, Voice of 3291do
Japan, Radio Japan/NHK World
5975eu
6110na
7230eu
15195as 17810as
21755pa
0500 0600
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
0500 0600
Malaysia, RTM/Voice of Malaysia
6175as
9750as
15295as
0500 0600
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 9615pa
0500 0600 DRM
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 9440pa
0500 0600
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do 6090al
0500 0600
Nigeria, Voice of/ Ext. Svc Lagos
15120va
0500 0600 vl
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
0500 0600
Russia, Voice of 7150na
7255na 7350na
9840na
13735na
0500 0600
Singapore, MediaCorp Radio
6150do
0500 0600
Swaziland, TWR 4775af
6120af 9500af
0500 0600 vl
Uganda, Radio 4976do
5026do
0500 0600 DRM
UK, BBC World Service
1296eu
0500 0600
UK, BBC World Service
3255af 6005as
6190af
6195af
7160af 9410eu
9440eu
11665af 11695as 11760as
11765af
11955as 12095eu 15310as
15575as
17640af 17760as 17790as
21660as
0500 0600 mtwhf
UK, BBC World Service
15420af
0500 0600 vl/ mtwhf UK, Sudan Radio Service
9525af
0500 0600
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
0500 0600
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
6855na
7520va
0500 0600
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
5755na
0500 0600
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na
0500 0600
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
11565as 13650as
0500 0600
USA, Voice of America
4930af 6080af
9885af
15580af
0500 0600
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 5110na 7415na
0500 0600
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
0500 0600
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
5850va 7570va
0500 0600
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 7555na
0500 0600 mtwhf
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
5835am
7490am
0500 0600 as
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
7315am
0500 0600
USA, WMLK Bethel PA
9265eu
0500 0600
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
0500 0600
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
0500 0600
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 3215na 5070na
5765na
5935na
0500 0600
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 3185oc 5085na
0500 0600
Uzbekistan, CVC International
13685as
0500 0600
Zambia, Christian Voice
5915al
6065af
0515 0530
Rwanda, Radio 6055do
0525 0600 vl
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
0530 0600
Romania, Radio Romania Intl
9655va
11830va
15435va 17770va
0530 0600 vl
Rwanda, Radio 6055do
0530 0600
Thailand, Radio 13770eu
0500 0600
0500 0600
0500 0600
0600 UTC - 2AM EDT / 1AM CDT / 11PM PDT
0600 0615 as
0600 0620
0600 0630
0600 0630 mtwhf
0600 0630
0600 0630
0600 0630
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0645 mtwhf
0658
0658 DRM
0700
0700
0700
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0600 0700
South Africa, TWR
11640af
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 4005eu
Australia, Radio 9660as
12080as
15160as
15240pa 15515as
France, Radio France Intl
7315af
11995af
13680af 15160af
Germany, Deutsche Welle 7310af
Nigeria, Radio, Natl Svc/Abuja
USA, Voice of America
6080af
9885af
15580af
South Africa, TWR
11640af
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 9615pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 9890pa
Anguilla, University Network
Armenia, CVC International 15515as
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
4835do
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 5025do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
Australia, CVC International 15335as
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
China, China Radio Intl
6115na
11770as
11880as 13645as
15350as
15465as 17505va
17710as
Costa Rica, University Network
6150va
7375va
9725va
7250eu
13670as
17750va
9865af
17770af
15275af
7275do
6105af
6090am
2310do
4910do
6160na
11750af
15140as
17540as
5030va
11870va
0600 0700
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0700
0700 vl
0700
0700
0700
0600 0700 vl
0600 0700
0600 0700
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0700
0700
0700 vl
0700
0700
0700 vl
0700
0700
0700 DRM
0700
0600 0700
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0600
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700 twhfa
0700
0600
0600
0600
0600
0700
0700
0700
0700
0600
0600
0600
0600
0605
0605
0630
0700
0700 vl
0700
0700
0620 m
0630 Sat/Sun
0700
0630 0700
0630 0700
0630 0700
0630 0700
0635
0645
0645
0645
0659
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
Sat/Sun
Sun
twhf
Sun
DRM
0700 UTC - 3AM EDT / 2AM CDT / 12AM PDT
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0705
0706
0730
0730
0800 mtwhfs
0800
0800
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
Croatia, Croatian Radio
9470oc
UK, BBC World Service
6005af
France, Radio France Intl
11725af
Slovakia, Radio Slovakia Int 9440pa
Albania, TWR Europe
11865eu
Anguilla, University Network
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
4835do
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 5025do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
Australia, CVC International 15335as
Australia, CVC International 15335as
Australia, Radio 9660as
9710as
13630as
15160pa 15240pa
17750va
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
China, China Radio Intl
11785eu
13645as
15465as 17490eu
11690oc
15605af
15460pa
6090am
2310do
4910do
12080as
15415as
6160na
11880as
17540as
0700 0800
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0800
0800 vl
0800
0800 vl
0800
0800
0800
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
mtwhf
DRM
vl
DRM
vl
vl
Sat/Sun
mtwhf
0700 0800
0700 0800
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0700
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800 twhfa
0800
0700
0700
0700
0700
0800
0800
0800
0800
0700
0700
0700
0715
0715
0730
0800
0800
0800
0750
0750
0745
vl
Sat
Sat
mtwhfa
0730 0800
0730 0800
17790as
Costa Rica, University Network
5030va
6150va
7375va
9725va 11870va
Germany, CVC International 15640af
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Guyana, Voice of 3291do
5950do
Liberia, ELWA
4760do
Liberia, Star Radio
9525af
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
Malaysia, RTM/Voice of Malaysia
6175as
9750as
15295as
Monaco, TWR Europe
9800eu
Myanmar, Radio 9730do
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 6095pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 6095pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 7145pa
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do 6090al
Nigeria, Voice of/ Ext. Svc Lagos
15120va
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Russia, Voice of 17665oc 17805oc
Russia, Voice of 11615eu
Singapore, MediaCorp Radio
6150do
Solomon Islands, SIBC
5020do 9545do
South Africa, Channel Africa 9620af
Swaziland, TWR 4775af
Swaziland, TWR 6120af
9500af
Taiwan, Radio Taiwan Intl
5950am
UK, BBC World Service
15400af
UK, BBC World Service
5875eu 6190af
6195eu
7320eu
9410eu 11695as
11760me
11765af 11795eu 11940af
11955as
12095eu 15360as 15420af
15575as
17790as
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
6855na
7455na
7780va
9495am 9715na
9985af
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
5755na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
11565as 13650as
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 5110na 7415na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
5850va 7570va
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 7465na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
5835am
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
7315am
7490am
USA, WMLK Bethel PA
9265eu
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 3215na 5070na
5765na
5935na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 3185oc 5085na
Vanuatu, Radio 4960do
Zambia, Christian Voice
5915al
6065af
Albania, TWR Europe
11865eu
Monaco, TWR Europe
9800eu
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 4005eu 6185eu
7250eu
9645eu
11740eu 15595va
Australia, HCJB Global
11750pa
Pakistan, Radio 15100eu 17835eu
0800 UTC - 4AM EDT / 3AM CDT / 1AM PDT
0800 0820 mtwhfs
0800 0820 mtwhfs
0800 0825
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0827
0830
0830
0830
0830
0845 Sat
0900
0900
0800 0900
0800 0900
0800 0900
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0800 0900
Albania, TWR Europe
11865eu
Monaco, TWR Europe
9800eu
Malaysia, RTM/Voice of Malaysia
9750as
15295as
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
7345eu
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 5025do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
Myanmar, Radio 9730do
Pakistan, Radio 15100eu 17835eu
Guam, TWR/KTWR
11840pa
Anguilla, University Network
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
4835do
Australia, CVC International 15335as
Australia, HCJB Global
11750pa
Australia, Radio 5995va
9580va
12080as
13630va 15415as
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
China, China Radio Intl
9415as
11880as
15350as 15465as
17540as
Costa Rica, University Network
6150va
7375va
9725va
May 2007
6175as
9860eu
4910do
6090am
2310do
9710va
17750va
6160na
11785eu
17490eu
5030va
11870va
MONITORING TIMES
43
SHORTWAVE GUIDE
0600 0700
Cuba, Radio Havana
6000va 6060va
6180na
9550va
9600va 11760va
Germany, CVC International 11720af
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Greece, Voice of 11645eu
Guyana, Voice of 3291do
Japan, Radio Japan/NHK World
7230eu
11690va
11715eu 11740as 17870pa
Liberia, ELWA
4760do
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
Malaysia, RTM/Voice of Malaysia
6175as
9750as
15295as
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do 6090al
Nigeria, Voice of/ Ext. Svc Lagos
15120va
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Russia, Voice of 11575eu 17665oc 17805oc
Singapore, MediaCorp Radio
6150do
Solomon Islands, SIBC
5020do 9545do
South Africa, Channel Africa 7240af 15255af
Swaziland, TWR 4775af
6120af 9500af
UK, BBC World Service
1296eu
UK, BBC World Service
6005af 6190af
6195eu
7160eu
9410eu 11675as
11940af
12095eu 11765af 11955as
15360as
15420af 15575as 17640af
17760as
17790as 21660as
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
5945am
6000am
7780va
9860na 11580af
11630va
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
5755na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
11565as 13650as
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 5110na 7415na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
5850va 7570va
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 7555na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
5835am
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
7315am
7490am
USA, WMLK Bethel PA
9265eu
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 3215na 5070na
5765na
5935na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 3185oc 5085na
Vanuatu, Radio 4960do
Yemen, Rep of Yemen Radio 9780me
Zambia, Christian Voice
5915al
6065af
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
17870me
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
17870me
Australia, Radio 9660as
12080as 13670as
15160as
15240pa 15415as 15515as
17750va
Bulgaria, Radio 9600eu
11600eu
UK, BBC World Service
11795af
USA, Voice of America
6080af 9885af
15580af
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 7360af 9660af
11625af
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
17870me
Albania, TWR Europe
11865eu
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
17870me
Monaco, TWR Europe
9800eu
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 7145pa
SHORTWAVE GUIDE
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0900
0900 vl
0900 vl
0900 mtwhf
0900
0900
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0900 DRM
0900
0900 vl
0900 vl
0900
0800
0800
0800
0800
0900
0900
0900 DRM
0900
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
a
vl
DRM
vl
mtwhf
Sat/Sun
f
a
s
0800 0900
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0800
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900 twhfa
0900
0800
0800
0800
0800
0900
0900
0900
0900
0800
0800
0800
0805
0830
0830
0900
0900 vl
0900
0900 mtwhf
0900
0900
Germany, CVC International 15640af
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Greece, Voice of 9420eu
15630eu
Guam, TWR/KTWR
11840pa
Guyana, Voice of 3291do
5950do
Indonesia, Voice of
9525as 11785pa
15150al
Latvia, Radio SWH
9290eu
Liberia, ELWA
4760do
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 6095pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 7145pa
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do 6090al
Papua New Guinea, Catholic Radio
4960do
Papua New Guinea, NBC
4890do
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Russia, Voice of 15195as 17495oc 17665oc
17805oc
Russia, Voice of 12060eu
Singapore, MediaCorp Radio
6150do
Solomon Islands, SIBC
5020do 9545do
South Africa, Channel Africa 9620af
South Korea, KBS World Radio
9570as
9640eu
Swaziland, TWR 6120af
9500af
Taiwan, Radio Taiwan Intl
9610as
UK, BBC World Service
1296eu
UK, BBC World Service
5875eu 6190af
6195eu
7320eu
9740as 11760va
11940af
12095eu 15285as 17790as
17885af
21470af 21660as
UK, BBC World Service
15400af 17830af
UK, BBC World Service
15575as 17830af
UK, Bible Voice 5945eu
UK, Bible Voice 5945eu
UK, Bible Voice 5945eu
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
5950na
6855na
7455na
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
5755na
USA, KNLS Anchor Point AK 7355as
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
9930as 11565as
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
5850na
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 7465na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
5835am
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
7315 an
7490am
USA, WMLK Bethel PA
9265eu
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 3215na 5070na
5765na
5935na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 3185oc 5085na
Vanuatu, Radio 4960do
Zambia, Christian Voice
5915al
6065af
Guam, TWR/KTWR
15170as
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 2485do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
2325do
0900 UTC - 5AM EDT / 4AM CDT / 2AM PDT
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0915 s
0930
0945 s
1000
1000
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
0900 1000
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
44
1000
1000 vl
1000 vl
1000
1000 Sat/Sun
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 5110na
UK, Bible Voice 5945eu
Australia, HCJB Global
11750pa
UK, Bible Voice 5945eu
Anguilla, University Network
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
4835do
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 2485do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
Australia, CVC International 11955as
Australia, Radio 9580va
9590va
Bhutan, BBS
6035as
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
China, China Radio Intl
9415as
15350as
17490eu 17690as
Costa Rica, University Network
6150va
7375va
9725va
13750va
Germany, Deutsche Welle 15340as
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Greece, Voice of 9420eu
15630eu
Guyana, Voice of 3291do
5950do
Italy, IRRS
9310eu
13840eu
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
7415na
6090am
2310do
2325do
15415as
6160na
15210as
17750as
5030va
11870va
17770as
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
vl
DRM
vl
DRM
vl
vl
DRM
mtwhf
0900 1000
0900 1000 Sat/Sun
0900 1000
0900 1000
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
0900
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
0900 1000
0900 1000
0900 1000
0900
0900
0900
0930
1000
1000 vl
1000
1000
Liberia, ELWA
4760do
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 6095pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 7145pa
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do 6090al
Papua New Guinea, Catholic Radio
4960do
Papua New Guinea, NBC
4890do
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Russia, Voice of 17495oc 17665oc
Russia, Voice of 11615eu
Saudi Arabia, BSKSA
15250as 15470as
Singapore, MediaCorp Radio
6150do
Solomon Islands, SIBC
5020do 9545do
South Africa, Channel Africa 9620af
UK, BBC World Service
1296eu
UK, BBC World Service
15400af 15575as
17830af
UK, BBC World Service
5975as 6190af
6195as
7320eu
9470eu 9740as
11760me
11940af 12095eu 15285as
15485eu
17760as 17790as 17885af
21470af
21660as
UK, BBC World Service
15575as 17830af
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
5950na
6885na
7455na
9460va
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
5755na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
9930as 11565as
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 5110na 7415na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
5850na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
7315am
7520am
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 3215na 5070na
5765na
5935na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 3185oc 5085na
Vanuatu, Radio 4960do
Zambia, Christian Voice
5915al
6065af
Lithuania, Radio Vilnius
9710eu
1000 UTC - 6AM EDT / 5AM CDT / 3AM PDT
1000 1027
1000 1030
1000 1058
1000 1100
1000 1100
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100 DRM
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1000 1100
1000 1100 vl
1000 1100
1000 1100
1000 1100 Sat/Sun
1000 1100
1000 1100 vl
1000 1100
1000 1100
1000
1000
1000
1000
1100 DRM
1100
1100
1100
1000 1100
1000 1100
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
9955am
21745af
UK, BBC World Service
5975as
21660as
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 6095pa
Anguilla, University Network
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
4835do
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 2485do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
Australia, CVC International 11955as
Australia, HCJB Global
15540va
Australia, Radio 9580va
9590va
Austria, CVC International 9760eu
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
China, China Radio Intl
5955as
7215as
13590as 13720as
15210as
15350as 17490eu
17750as
Costa Rica, University Network
6150va
7375va
9725va
13750va
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Guyana, Voice of 3291do
5950do
India, All India Radio
13710oc
15235as
17510pa 17800as
Italy, IRRS
9310eu
13840eu
Japan, Radio Japan/NHK World
9695as
11730as 17585va
21755oc
Liberia, ELWA
4760do
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
Netherlands, Radio
13710as
13820as
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 7145pa
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do
Nigeria, Voice of/ Ext. Svc Lagos
North Korea, Voice of Korea 6185as
9850as
Papua New Guinea, Catholic Radio
Papua New Guinea, NBC
4890do
15710as
15285as
11775am
2310do
2325do
15415as
6160na
7135as
15190as
17690as
5030va
11870va
15020as
17895pa
6120na
17720me
12065as
6090al
7255af
6285am
4960do
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
vl
vl
vl
DRM
1000 1100 Sat/Sun
1000 1100
1000 1100
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1000
1000
1030
1030
1030
1100
1100
1045
1058
1100
1030 1100 Sat/Sun
1030 1100
1030 1100 s
1059 1100
1100 UTC - 7AM EDT / 6AM CDT / 4AM PDT
1100 1105
1100 1127
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1128
1130
1130 mtwhf
1158 DRM
1200
1200
1100
1100
1100
1100
1200
1200
1200
1200
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1200 Sat/Sun
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1100 1200
1100
1100
1100
1100
1200 s
1200 vl
1200 Sat/Sun
1200
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1200 vl
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200 vl
1200
1200
1100
1100
1100
1100
1200 vl
1200 DRM
1200 Sat/Sun
1200
Pakistan, Radio 15100as 17835as
Iran, Voice of the Islamic Rep
17600as
Vietnam, Voice of 9840as
7220as
Australia, HCJB Global
15540va
UK, BBC World Service
6130am
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 7145pa
Anguilla, University Network
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
4835do
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 2485do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
Australia, CVC International 13635as
Australia, Radio 5995va
6020va
9560pa
9580va
9590va
Canada, CBC NQ SW Service
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
China, China Radio Intl
5955as
9570as
11650as 11795as
13645as
13665eu 13720as
Costa Rica, University Network
6150va
7375va
9725va
13750va
Germany, Universal Life
6055me
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Italy, IRRS
9310eu
15735eu
Japan, Radio Japan/NHK World
9695as
11730as
Liberia, ELWA
4760do
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
Netherlands, Radio
11675na
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 9870pa
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do
Nigeria, Voice of/ Ext. Svc Lagos
Papua New Guinea, Catholic Radio
Papua New Guinea, NBC
4890do
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light
Saudi Arabia, BSKSA
15250as
Singapore, Radio Singapore Intl
6150as
South Africa, Channel Africa 9620af
UK, BBC World Service
1296eu
UK, BBC World Service
5875am
UK, BBC World Service
6190af
7320eu
9470eu
9740as
1100 1200 Sat/Sun
1100 1200
1100 1200
1100 1200
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1100
1100
1100
1100
1200
1200
1200
1200
1100
1100
1115
1130
1130
1130
1130
1130
1130
1130
1130
1130
1200
1200
1130
1145
1157
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
mtwhf
mtwhfa
a
mtwhf
1200 UTC - 8AM EDT / 7AM CDT / 5AM PDT
1200 1215 f
1200 1230 Sun
1200 1230
7285as
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1230
1258
1259
1300
1300
11775am
2310do
1200
1200
1200
1200
1300
1300
1300
1300
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1300 Sat/Sun
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
15460as
2325do
9475as
12080as
9625na
6160na
5960na
13590as
17490eu
5030va
11870va
6120na
6090al
7255af
4960do
11940af
11945as 15485eu 15575as
17640eu
17790as 17830af 17885af
21470af
UK, Bible Voice 5950as
Ukraine, Radio Ukraine Intl 15675eu
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
5950na
6890na
7780na
11725am 11725na
11830na
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
5755na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
9930as 11565as
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
5850na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
5875am
7315am
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
9265am
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 5070na 5765na
5935na
15825na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 3185oc 5085na
Zambia, Christian Voice
5915al
6065af
UK, Bible Voice 5950as
UK, BBC World Service
7135as 11920as
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
11640eu 17545va
Australia, HCJB Global
15400va
Australia, HCJB Global
15425va
Bulgaria, Radio 11700eu 15700eu
Germany, Universal Life
6055me
Guam, AWR/KSDA
15435as
UK, BBC World Service
5875am 6130am
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 15595va 17765va
1200 1300
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
Sat/Sun
vl
Sat/Sun
f
DRM
vl
1200 1300
7120va
15470as
6080as
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1300 vl
1300
1300
1300 DRM
1300
6130am
6195as
11760me
1200 1300
UK, Bible Voice 5950as
Australia, HCJB Global
15425va
France, Radio France Intl
15275af
21620af
Germany, AWR Europe
15320as
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 9870pa
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 9660as
Anguilla, University Network
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
4835do
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 2485do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
Australia, CVC International 13635as
Australia, Radio 5995va
6020va
9560pa
9580va
9590va
Canada, CBC NQ SW Service
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
China, China Radio Intl
5955as
9460as
9730as
9760as
11690as
11980as 12080as
13790eu
17490eu
Costa Rica, University Network
11870va
13750va
Germany, CVC International 15715me
Germany, Universal Life
6045me
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Italy, IRRS
9310af
15735eu
Italy, IRRS
15750va
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 7145pa
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do
Nigeria, Voice of/ Ext. Svc Lagos
Papua New Guinea, Catholic Radio
Papua New Guinea, NBC
4890do
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light
Romania, Radio Romania Intl
15220eu
Singapore, Radio Singapore Intl
6150as
South Africa, Channel Africa 9620af
South Korea, KBS World Radio
UAE, AWR Africa 15140as
UK, BBC World Service
1296eu
UK, BBC World Service
5975as
6195as
7320eu
9470eu
9740as
9750am 11760me
11940as
15310as 15485eu
17640eu
17790as 17830af
21470af
USA, American Forces Radio
May 2007
17815af
15170as
11775am
2310do
2325do
9475as
9625na
6160na
7250as
11650as
13655eu
9725va
6090al
7255af
4960do
7120va
11875eu
6080as
9650na
6190af
9660am
11895as
15575as
17885af
4319usb
MONITORING TIMES
45
SHORTWAVE GUIDE
1000 1100
1000 1100
1000 1100
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Saudi Arabia, BSKSA
15250as 15470as
Singapore, MediaCorp Radio
6150do
Solomon Islands, SIBC
5020do 9545do
South Africa, Channel Africa 9620af
UK, BBC World Service
1296eu
UK, BBC World Service
6190af 6195as
7320eu
9470eu
9740as 11760me
11940af
11945as 15485eu 15575as
17640eu
17790as 17885af 21470af
UK, BBC World Service
17830af
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
5950na
6855na
6890na
7455na 9460va
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
5755na
USA, KNLS Anchor Point AK 7355as
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
9930as 11565as
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 5110na 7415na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
5850na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
7315am
7520am
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 5070na 5765na
5935na
9985na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 3185oc 5085na
Zambia, Christian Voice
5915al
6065af
Israel, Kol Israel 15760eu 17535eu
Vietnam, Voice of 7285as
Iran, Voice of the Islamic Rep
15460as
17660as
Italy, IRRS
9310va
UK, BBC World Service
9605as 11750as
15285as
15545as
UK, Bible Voice 5950as
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 9870pa
SHORTWAVE GUIDE
1200 1300
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1200
1200
1200
1200
1300
1300
1300
1300
1200
1200
1200
1200
1300
1300
1300
1300
1200
1200
1200
1215
1230
1230
1230
1230
1230
1230
1245
1255
1300
1300 DRM
1300
1300
1258
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300 Sat
1258
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
6890na
7780na
11530am 11970na
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
5755na
USA, KNLS Anchor Point AK 7355as 9920as
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
11565as 12130as
USA, Voice of America
9645va 9760va
11705va
11730va 15190va
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
9955na
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 15665na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
7520am
9660am
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
9265am
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 5070na 5765na
5935na
15825na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 9385na
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 13770am
Zambia, Christian Voice
5915al
6065af
Egypt, Radio Cairo
17835as
Vietnam, Voice of 9840as
12020as
Bangladesh, Bangla Betar 7185as
Sweden, Radio 13580va 15240na 15735va
Thailand, Radio 9810oc
Turkey, Voice of 15450eu 13685va
UK, BBC World Service
17735af
Australia, HCJB Global
15425va
Finland, YLE/Radio Finland 13715do 15400do
1300 UTC - 9AM EDT / 8AM CDT / 6AM PDT
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1325
1330
1350 s
1359
1400
1400
1400
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1400 Sat/Sun
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1300 1400
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1300
1300
1300
1300
1400
1400
1400 vl
1400
vl
vl
s
DRM
1300 1400 vl
1300 1400
1300 1400 DRM
1300 1400
1300 1400
1300 1400
1300
1300
1300
1300
46
1400
1400
1400
1400
Germany, CVC International 15715me
Turkey, Voice of 15450eu 13685va
Egypt, Radio Cairo
17835as
Italy, IRRS
15735as
Poland, Polish Radio
5975eu 9525eu
Anguilla, University Network
11775am
Australia, CVC International 13635as
Australia, Radio 5995va
6020va 9560as
9580va
9590va
Canada, CBC NQ SW Service
9625na
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
6160na
China, China Radio Intl
5955as 7300as
9570na
9655as
9730as 9765as
9870as
11760as 11885na 11900as
11980as
13610eu 13790eu 15230na
Costa Rica, University Network
9725va
11870va
13750va
Germany, Overcomer Ministries
6110na
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Greece, Voice of 9420eu
15630eu
Latvia, Radio SWH
9290eu
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 7145pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 6095pa
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do 6090al
Nigeria, Voice of/ Ext. Svc Lagos
7255af
North Korea, Voice of Korea 7570eu 9335na
11710na
12015eu
Papua New Guinea, Catholic Radio
4960do
Papua New Guinea, NBC
4890do
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Singapore, Radio Singapore Intl
6080as
6150as
South Africa, Channel Africa 9620af
South Korea, KBS World Radio
9570na
9770as
UK, BBC World Service
1296eu
UK, BBC World Service
5975as 6190af
6195as
7320eu
9470eu 9740as
11760me
11895as 11940af 15310as
15420af
15485as 15575as 17640eu
17790af
17830af 17885af 21470af
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
5865as
7495as
7780as
11560na 11855na
11970na
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
5755na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
12130as
USA, Voice of America
9645va 9760va
11705va
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1300
1400 w f
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400 Sat/Sun
1400
1400
1400
1400
1300 1400
1300 1400
1305 1320 m
1305 1330 Sat/Sun
1315
1330
1330
1330
1330
1330
1357
1400
1400
1400
twhf
a DRM
DRM
twhfa
1330
1330
1330
1335
1400
1400
1400 DRM
1400 Sat/Sun
1345 1400 mtwhf
1345 1400
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 9330na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
9955na
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 15665na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
13570am
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 7465na
13845na
15825na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 9385na
Zambia, Christian Voice
5915al
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
6155va
17855va
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
6155me
17855va
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
17855va
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
6065na
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 7240eu
Guam, AWR/KSDA
15275as
India, All India Radio
9690as
13710as
Laos, National Radio
7145as
Sweden, Radio 15240na 15735va
Sweden, Radio 7275eu
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
6155va
17855va
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
6155va
17855va
Guam, TWR/KTWR
9975as
6095am
11785am
9985na
6065af
13730va
13730va
11620as
13730va
13730va
1400 UTC - 10AM EDT / 9AM CDT / 7AM PDT
1400
1400
1400
1400
1415 t h
1427
1427 f DRM
1430
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1430 fa
1430
1430
1430
1500
1500
1500
1500 Sat/Sun
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1400 1500
1400 1500
1400 1500
1400 1500 a
1400 1500
1400 1500 vl
1400 1500 mtw
1400 1500
1400 1500
1400 1500
1400 1500
1400 1500
1400 1500
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
DRM
vl
vl
DRM
1400 1500 DRM
1400 1500 Sat/Sun
Germany, Pan American BC 13645me
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
11600as
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
9750na
Australia, Radio 5995va
6080va
9590va
Guam, TWR/KTWR
9975as
Serbia, International Radio Serbia
Thailand, Radio 9830oc
UK, BBC World Service
9470eu
Anguilla, University Network
Australia, CVC International 13635as
Bhutan, BBS
6035as
Canada, CBC NQ SW Service
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
China, China Radio Intl
5955as
9460as
9700eu
9765as
9870as
13675na 13685af
15230na
17630af
Costa Rica, University Network
11870va
13750va
France, Radio France Intl
5920as
9580af
15615af
Germany, CVC International 15715me
Germany, Overcomer Ministries
Germany, Overcomer Ministries
13810va
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Guam, TWR/KTWR
9975as
India, All India Radio
9690as
13710as
Japan, Radio Japan/NHK World
9875as
11840oc
Jordan, Radio
11690na
Libya, Voice of Africa
17660af
17850af
21695af
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
Netherlands, Radio
9345as
11835as
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 7145pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 6095pa
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do
Nigeria, Voice of/ Ext. Svc Lagos
Oman, Radio Oman
15140as
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light
Singapore, MediaCorp Radio
South Africa, Channel Africa 9620af
Taiwan, Radio Taiwan Intl
15265as
UK, BBC World Service
7320eu
UK, BBC World Service
5975as
6195as
9410eu
9740eu
11895as
11920as 11940as
15485eu
17830eu 17885af
UK, BBC World Service
7320eu
UK, Bible Voice 11695as
13580na
7240as
6100eu
11775am
9625na
6160na
7300as
9795eu
13740na
9725va
7180as
17810eu
6110eu
11620as
7200as
17725af
9840as
6090al
7255af
7120va
6150do
6190af
11760as
12095af
21470af
1400 1500
1400 1500
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1400
1400
1400
1400
1400
1500 Sat/Sun
1500
1500
1500
1500
1430 1445 s
1430 1500
1430 1500
1430 1500 DRM
1430 1500
1500 UTC - 11AM EDT / 10AM CDT / 8AM PDT
1500 1510 mtwhfa
1500 1527
1500 1528
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1530 vl
1530
1530 Sun
1530
1530
1500 1530
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1545
1557
1559
1600
1600
1600
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1600 Sat/Sun
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
1500 1600 DRM
1500 1600
1500
1500
1500
1500
1600
1600 vl
1600 s
1600
1500 1600
1500 1600
1500 1600
1500 1600
1500
1500
1500
1500
1600 DRM
1600
1600
1600
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1600 vl
1600 DRM
1600
1600
1600 vl
1600
Turkmenistan, Turkmen Radio
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
7385na
Vietnam, Voice of 9550va
9840va
13860va
Eritrea, Bana Radio
5100do
Guam, AWR/KSDA
11640as
Hungary, Radio Budapest
6025eu
Nigeria, Radio, Natl Svc/Abuja
UK, BBC World Service
11860af
17885af
USA, Voice of America
7175va
15460va
Sweden, IBRA Radio
7340as
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 11675as
Germany, Overcomer Ministries
Anguilla, University Network
Australia, CVC International 13635as
Australia, Radio 5995va
6080va
9475as
9590va
Canada, CBC NQ SW Service
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
China, China Radio Intl
5955as
7325as
9435eu
9525eu
9870as
13685af 13740na
China, China Radio Intl
9750eu
Costa Rica, University Network
11870va
13750va
Germany, CVC International 11830af
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Italy, IRRS
9310eu
Japan, Radio Japan/NHK World
7200as
9505va
9875as
Jordan, Radio
11690na
Libya, Voice of Africa
17660af
17850af
21695af
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
Netherlands, Radio
9345as
11835as
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 7145pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 6095pa
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do
North Korea, Voice of Korea 7570eu
11710na
12015eu
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light
Romania, Radio Romania Intl
Russia, Voice of 7260as
7350as
Singapore, MediaCorp Radio
South Africa, Channel Africa 9620af
South Africa, Channel Africa 17770af
5015eu
12020va
9610eu
7275do
15420af
9760va
1500 1600
1500 1600 DRM
1500 1600
1500 1600
1500 1600
1500 1600
1500 1600
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
1500
1500
1500
1500
1600
1600
1600
1600
1500
1500
1500
1505
1505
1515
1530
1530
1530
1530
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
1530
1545
1600
1600
1600
1530 1600
1530 1600
1530 1600
1545 1600
UAE, AWR Africa 11670as
UK, BBC World Service
5870eu
UK, BBC World Service
5875eu 5965as
5975as
6190af
6195as 7465eu
9410eu
9740as
9810as 11820eu
11920as
11940af 12095eu 15105af
15400af
17830af 21470af
f DRM
UK, China BS VT Digital
9710eu
vl/ mtwhf UK, Sudan Radio Service
15575af
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
6085as
11855na
12010as 15210na
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
9480na
USA, KJES Vado NM
11715na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na 15590na
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
9930as
USA, Voice of America
4930af 6080af
7125va
9645va
11890va 12150va
13735va
15205va 15580af 17895af
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 9330na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
9450na
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 15665na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
9840am
11795am
13760am
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
13570am
USA, WRMI Miami FL
7385na
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 9985na 12160na
13845na
15825na
s
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 11920va
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 9385na
Zambia, Christian Voice
4965af
DRM
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 9800na
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 9515na
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 11850va 13765va
India, All India Radio
9425as
Bangladesh, Bangla Betar 4750as
Germany, AWR Europe
15225as
Iran, Voice of the Islamic Rep
6255as
7330as
mha
UK, Bible Voice 12035as
USA, Voice of America
6110va 7175va
9760va
15460va
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 9310va 11850va
13795va
s
Germany, Pan American BC 13820me
1600 UTC - 12PM EDT / 11AM CDT / 9AM PDT
17720as
17815na
11775am
1600 1615
1600 1620 mtwh
1600 1627
7240as
1600 1628
9625na
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
6160na
7160as
9785as
13630af
9725va
6190as
17725af
9890as
1630
1630
1630
1630
1630
1630
1640
1658
vl
h
Sat/Sun
f
1600 1700
1600 1700
1600 1700
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
1700 Sat
1700
1700
1700
1700
1700
1700 DRM
1700
1600 1700
6090al
9335na
7120va
7340eu
9660as
6150do
1600 1700
1600 1700
1600 1700
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
1700
1700 s
1700 vl
1700
1700
Pakistan, Radio 6215va
7530va
Moldova, Radio DMR Pridnestrovye
Iran, Voice of the Islamic Rep
7330as
Vietnam, Voice of 7280va
9550va
11630va
13860va
Eritrea, Bana Radio
5100do
Germany, Pan American BC 13820me
Guam, AWR/KSDA
11640as
Myanmar, Radio 9730do
Swaziland, TWR 6070af
USA, Voice of America
11890va
Moldova, Radio DMR Pridnestrovye
Germany, Deutsche Welle 6170as
15640as
Anguilla, University Network
Australia, CVC International 13635as
Australia, Radio 5995va
6080va
9475as
9710va
11660pa
Canada, CBC NQ SW Service
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 9515na
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 9800na
China, China Radio Intl
7150af
9435eu
9525eu
9570af
Costa Rica, University Network
13750va
Egypt, Radio Cairo
11740af
Ethiopia, Radio 7165af
9560af
France, Radio France Intl
7170af
15160af
Germany, CVC International 11830af
Germany, Overcomer Ministries
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Jordan, Radio
11690na
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
May 2007
11570va
6235eu
6160as
9730va
11805as
15205va
6235eu
9485as
11775am
7240as
9625na
6160na
7255eu
11870va
9730af
17815na
MONITORING TIMES
47
SHORTWAVE GUIDE
1400 1500
1400 1500
1415 1430
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
7580as
11560as
11565na 11855na 13695na
17760na
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
9480na
USA, KJES Vado NM
11715na
USA, KNLS Anchor Point AK 7355as
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 7505na 15590na
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
9930as
USA, Voice of America
4930af 6080af
7125va
9695va
11655va 11885va
12150va
15205va 15580af 17895af
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 9330na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
9955na
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 15665na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
6095am
9840am
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
11795am
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
13570am
USA, WRMI Miami FL
7385na
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 7465na 9985na
13845na
15825na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 9385na
Zambia, Christian Voice
5915al
6065af
Nepal, Radio
3230as
5005as 6100as
7165as
Germany, Pan American BC 13645as 13820as
Australia, Radio 5995va
6080va 7240as
9475as
9590va
11660pa
Myanmar, Radio 5986as
South Korea, KBS World Radio
9770eu
UK, BBC World Service
7465eu
SHORTWAVE GUIDE
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
1600
1700 DRM
1700
1700
1700
1700 vl
1700
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 7145pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 6095pa
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do 6090al
North Korea, Voice of Korea 9990va 11545af
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Russia, Voice of 4965as
4975as 6130eu
7260eu
7305as
7320eu
1600 1700 vl
Rwanda, Radio 6055do
1600 1700
Saudi Arabia, BSKSA
17660as
1600 1700
Taiwan, Radio Taiwan Intl
11550as 15515as
1600 1700
UK, BBC World Service
3255af 3915af
5875eu
5975as
6190af 6195as
7465eu
9410eu
9740as 11665eu
11820eu
11920as 12095eu 15105af
15400af
21470af
1600 1700 DRM
UK, BBC World Service
1296eu 5875eu
1600 1700 vl/ mtwhf UK, Sudan Radio Service
15575af
1600 1700
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
1600 1700
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
6085am
11565na
11830na 12010as 13695na
17690af
17760na 18980va 21455va
1600 1700
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
9480na
1600 1700
USA, KJES Vado NM
11715na
1600 1700
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 15590na
1600 1700
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
9930as
1600 1700
USA, Voice of America
4930af 6080af
13600va
13795af 15445va 15580af
17640va
17715af 17805af 17895af
1600 1700
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 9330na
1600 1700
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
1600 1700
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
9450va 15785va
1600 1700
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 17650na
1600 1700
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
9840am
15285am
1600 1700
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
13570am
1600 1700 smtwhf
USA, WMLK Bethel PA
9265eu
1600 1700
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
1600 1700
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
1600 1700
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 9985na 12160na
13845na
15825na
1600 1700
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 9385na 11920va
15250af
1600 1700
Zambia, Christian Voice
4965af
1605 1620 m
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
13675na
1605 1630 Sat/Sun
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
13675na
1615 1630 twhf
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
13675ca
1615 1700 Sat/Sun
UK, BBC World Service
11860af 15420af
17885af
1630 1700
Guam, AWR/KSDA
6155as
1630 1700
Slovakia, Radio Slovakia Int 5920eu 6055eu
1630 1700
Swaziland, TWR 6070af
1630 1700 Sat/Sun
Swaziland, TWR 6130af
1630 1700 mtwhf
UK, BBC World Service
15420af
1630 1700 s
UK, Bible Voice 9460me
1635 1700 Sat/Sun
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
134675na
1640 1650 mtwhfa
Turkmenistan, Turkmen Radio
4930eu
1640 1700 mtwhf
UK, Bible Voice 9460me
1645 1700 m
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
13675na
1645 1700 twhf
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
13675na
1645 1700 mtwhf
Swaziland, TWR 6130af
1645 1700 f
Sweden, IBRA Radio
7250as
1645 1700
Tajikistan, Tajik Radio
7245as
1645 1700 a
UK, Bible Voice 9460me
1700 UTC - 1PM EDT / 12PM CDT / 10AM PDT
1700
1700
1700
1700
1700
1700
1700
1700
1700
1700
1704
1704
1715
1715
1720
1727
1730
1730
1730
1730
1700
1700
1700
1700
1700
1700
1740 f
1745
1750 DRM
1800
1800
1800
1700
1700
1700
1700
1800 Sat
1800
1800
1800
48
DRM
mtwhf
mtwhf
mtwh
mtwhf
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 9515na
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 9800na
Swaziland, TWR 6130af
UK, Bible Voice 9460me
Moldova, Radio DMR Pridnestrovye
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
5930eu
France, Radio France Intl
11615af
Jordan, Radio
11690na
UK, BBC World Service
9435af
UK, United Nations Radio 7170va
17810va
Moldova, Radio DMR Pridnestrovye
UK, BBC World Service
6005af
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 7145pa
Anguilla, University Network
Australia, CVC International 13635as
Australia, Radio 5995va
6080va
9475as
9580va
9710va
11880pa
Canada, CBC NQ SW Service
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
6235eu
15710af
9565va
6235eu
9630af
11775am
7240as
11660pa
9625na
1700 1800
1700 1800
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
6160na
China, China Radio Intl
7150af 7205eu
7255eu
9570af
1700 1800
Costa Rica, University Network
11870va
13750va
1700 1800
Egypt, Radio Cairo
11740af
1700 1800
Eqt. Guinea, Radio Africa
15190af
1700 1800
Germany, CVC International 15680af
1700 1800 s
Germany, Universal Life
5775va
1700 1800 vl
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
1700 1800 fs
Italy, IRRS
9310va
1700 1800
Japan, Radio Japan/NHK World
9535va
11970eu
15355af
1700 1800 DRM
Japan, Radio Japan/NHK World
9770eu
1700 1800
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
1700 1800
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 6095pa
1700 1800
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do 6090al
1700 1800
Nigeria, Voice of/ Ext. Svc Lagos
15120va
1700 1800 vl
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
1700 1800
Romania, Radio Romania Intl
9535eu
11735eu
1700 1800
Russia, Voice of 6125as
7125as 7270va
7320eu
9470me
1700 1800 vl
Rwanda, Radio 6055do
1700 1800
Saudi Arabia, BSKSA
17600as
1700 1800
South Africa, Channel Africa 15235af
1700 1800
Swaziland, TWR 3200af
1700 1800
Taiwan, Radio Taiwan Intl
15690af
1700 1800 DRM
UK, BBC World Service
1296eu 5875eu
1700 1800
UK, BBC World Service
3255af 3915as
5975as
6190af
6195eu 7465eu
9410eu
9740as
11665eu 11955as
12095af
15400af 21470af
1700 1800 Sat/Sun
UK, Bible Voice 9460me
1700 1800 vl/ mtwhf UK, Sudan Radio Service
11705af
1700 1800
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
1700 1800
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
13695na
17555na
21680na
1700 1800
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
9480na
1700 1800
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 15590na
1700 1800
USA, KWHR Naalehu HI
9930as
1700 1800
USA, Voice of America
6080af 13710af
15580af
1700 1800 Sat/Sun
USA, Voice of America
4930af
1700 1800
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 9330na 18910na
1700 1800
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
1700 1800
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
9450va 15785va
1700 1800
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 17650na
1700 1800
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
9840am
15285am
15650am
1700 1800
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
13570am
1700 1800 smtwhf
USA, WMLK Bethel PA
9265eu
1700 1800
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
1700 1800
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
1700 1800
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 9985na 12160na
13845na
15825na
1700 1800
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 9385na 11920va
15250af
1700 1800
Zambia, Christian Voice
4965af
1715 1730
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 4005eu 7250eu
9635eu
9645eu
1715 1800 t
UK, Bible Voice 9460me
1730 1800
Bulgaria, Radio 5900eu
9600eu
1730 1800
Guam, AWR/KSDA
9980me
1730 1800 vl
Liberia, ELWA
4760do
1730 1800
Philippines, Radio Pilipinas 11720va 15190va
17720va
1730 1800
Swaziland, TWR 9500af
1730 1800
Sweden, Radio 6065va
1730 1800 s
UK, Bible Voice 9730me
1730 1800
USA, Voice of America
4930af 11815af
1730 1800 mtwhf
USA, Voice of America
15775af
1730 1800
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 9755af 11625af
13795af
1745 1800
India, All India Radio
7410eu 9445af
9950eu
11620eu 11935af 13605af
15075af
15155af 17670af
1751 1800 DRM
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 9440pa
1800 UTC - 2PM EDT / 1PM CDT / 11AM PDT
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1815 t
1815 a
1827
1828
1830 w
1830
1830
UK, Bible Voice 9460me
UK, Bible Voice 7210me
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
5930eu
Vietnam, Voice of 5955eu
7280va
Austria, AWR Europe
15315af
Nigeria, Radio, Natl Svc/Abuja
South Africa, AWR Africa
3215af
11830af
9400va
9730va
7275do
3345af
1800 1830
1800 1830 Sat/Sun
1800 1830
1800 1850
1800 1850 DRM
1800 1859
1859
1900
1900 mtwhf
1900
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900 vl
1900
1800
1800
1800
1800
1900 fs
1900 vl
1900
1900
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1900
1900
1900
1900 vl
1900
1800 1900
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1900 Sat/Sun
1900 vl
1900
1900
1900
1900 DRM
1900
1800 1900 a
1800 1900
1800 1900
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1900
1900
1900 smtwhf
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
1800
1800
1800
1800
1800
1900
1900 smtwhf
1900
1900
1900
1800 1900
1800
1800
1815
1830
1830
1830
1830
1830
1830
1830
1830
1900
1900
1900
1845
1845
1900
1900
1900
1900 s
1900 h
1900
1845
1845
1845
1851
1900 mtwhfa
1900
1900 a
1900 DRM
1900 UTC - 3PM EDT / 2PM CDT / 12PM PDT
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
1903
1915
1925
1928
1930
1900 1930 s
1900 1930
1900 1930
1900 1930 s
1900 1930 a
1900 1945
1900 1950
1900 1957 Sat/Sun
1900 2000
1900 2000
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
2000
2000
2000 vl
2000
2000 vl
2000
2000
1900
1900
1900
1900
2000 DRM
2000
2000
2000
1900
1900
1900
1900
2000
2000
2000 vl
2000
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
vl
vl
vl
vl
DRM
1900 2000 Sat/Sun
1900 2000
1900 2000
1900
1900
1900
1900
2000
2000
2000
2000
1900 2000
1900
1900
1900
1900
2000
2000
2000
2000
1900
1900
1900
1900
1900
2000
2000 smtwhf
2000
2000
2000
1900 2000
1900
1915
1930
1930
2000
2000 f
1958
2000 Sat/Sun
Bahrain, Radio Bahrain
6010as
Congo, RTV Congolaise
4765af 5985af
Turkey, Voice of 9785eu
Vietnam, Voice of 7280va
9730va
Germany, Deutsche Welle 9895af 15620af
17820af
Germany, Universal Life
5775me
Hungary, Radio Budapest
3975eu 6025eu
Philippines, Radio Pilipinas 11720va 15190va
17720va
UK, Bible Voice 6015eu
UK, Bible Voice 7260af
9460me
India, All India Radio
7410eu 9445af
9950eu
11620eu 11935af 13605af
15075af
15155af 17670af
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 11725pa
Netherlands, Radio
15315na 17660va
17735af
Anguilla, University Network
11775am
Australia, Radio 6080va
7240as 9500as
9580va
9710va
11880pa
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
6160na
China, China Radio Intl
7295va 9440va
Costa Rica, University Network
11870va
13750va
Eqt Guinea, Radio Africa
15190af
Germany, CVC International 9490af
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Italy, IRRS
9310va
Liberia, ELWA
4760do
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
Netherlands, Radio
5905af 7115af
11655af
17810af
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 11675pa
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do 6090al
Nigeria, Voice of/ Ext. Svc Lagos
15120va
North Korea, Voice of Korea 7100af 9975va
11535va
Papua New Guinea, Catholic Radio
4960do
Papua New Guinea, NBC
4890do
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Russia, Voice of 6175eu
7105eu 7290eu
7335af
11510af
Rwanda, Radio 6055do
Solomon Islands, SIBC
5020do 9545do
South Africa, Channel Africa 3345af
South Korea, KBS World Radio
7275eu
Swaziland, TWR 3200af
Thailand, Radio 7155eu
Uganda, Radio 4976do
5026do
UK, BBC World Service
1296do
UK, BBC World Service
3255af 5875eu
5955as
6005af
6190af 6195eu
9410eu
9630af
11955as 12095af
15400af
17830af
UK, Bible Voice 9470me
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
3230af
6020af
6085am 7160va 7395af
13695na
15115af 15565va 17535na
17555na
18980va
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
9480na
USA, KJES Vado NM
15385na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 15590na
USA, Voice of America
4930af 4940af
6080af
11975af 13710af 15580af
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 7415na 9330na
18910na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
9450va 15785va
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 17650na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
9840am
13760am
15285am
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
13570am
USA, WMLK Bethel PA
9265eu
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 9975na 12160na
13845na
15825na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 9385na 11920va
15250af
Zambia, Christian Voice
4965af
UK, Bible Voice 9470me
Serbia, International Radio Serbia
6100eu
Germany, Pan American BC 5850me
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
49
SHORTWAVE GUIDE
1800
1800
1800
1800
UK, BBC World Service
9740as
USA, Voice of America
4930af
USA, Voice of America
6080af 11975af
13710af
15580af 17895af
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 6095pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 9440pa
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 9530af 11765af
13730af
15235af
Poland, Radio Polonia
6015eu 7130eu
Anguilla, University Network
11775am
Argentina, RAE 9690eu
15345eu
Australia, Radio 6080va
7240as 9475as
9500as
9580va
9710va 11880pa
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
6160na
China, China Radio Intl
6100eu 7100eu
Costa Rica, University Network
11870va
13750va
Egypt, Radio Cairo
11740af
Eqt. Guinea, Radio Africa
15190af
Germany, CVC International 9490af
Germany, Universal Life
5775va
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
India, All India Radio
7410eu 9445af
9950eu
11620eu 11935af 13605af
15075af
15155af 17670af
Italy, IRRS
9310va
Liberia, ELWA
4760do
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
Netherlands, Radio
6020af 7125af
11655af
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do 6090al
Nigeria, Voice of/ Ext. Svc Lagos
15120va
North Korea, Voice of Korea 7570eu 12015eu
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Philippines, Radio Pilipinas 11720va 15190va
17720va
Russia, Voice of 6125as
7105eu 7125as
7270va
7295as
7320eu 11510af
Russia, Voice of 6055eu
6175eu
Rwanda, Radio 6055do
Saudi Arabia, BSKSA
17600as
Swaziland, TWR 3200af
9500af
Taiwan, Radio Taiwan Intl
3965eu
UK, BBC World Service
1296eu 5970eu
UK, BBC World Service
3255af 5875eu
5955as
6190af
6195eu 7465eu
9410eu
11955as 12095af 15400af
17830af
21470af
UK, Bible Voice 9730me
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
7240va
7345va
13695na 17535na 17555na
18980va
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
9480na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 15590na
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 7415na
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 9330na 18910na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
9450va 15785va
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 17650na
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
9840am
15285am
15650am
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
13570am
USA, WMLK Bethel PA
9265eu
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 9985na 12160na
13845na
15825na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 9385na 11920va
15250af
Yemen, Rep of Yemen Radio 9780me
Zambia, Christian Voice
4965af
Bangladesh, Bangla Betar 7185eu
Israel, Kol Israel 6985va
7545va 9345eu
Sweden, IBRA Radio
9529af
Slovakia, Radio Slovakia Int 5920eu 7345eu
Turkey, Voice of 9785eu
UK, BBC World Service
6005af 9630af
UK, Bible Voice 9730me
UK, Bible Voice 9460me
USA, Voice of America
4930af 6080af
11975af
13710af 15580af 17895af
Albania, Radio Tirana
6035eu 7465eu
Congo, RTV Congolaise
4765af 5985af
UK, Bible Voice 7210me
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 11675pa
1930 2000
1930
1930
1930
1935
1945
1945
1951
2000
2000
2000 s
1955
2000 a
2000
2000
Iran, Voice of the Islamic Rep
6010eu
6255va
7320af
9855af 11695af
Lithuania, Radio Vilnius
6250eu
Sweden, Radio 6065va
UK, Bible Voice 7260af
Italy, RAI Italia
5960eu
9845eu
UK, Bible Voice 6015va
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 9800am
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 15720pa
SHORTWAVE GUIDE
2000 UTC - 4PM EDT / 3PM CDT / 1PM PDT
2000
2000
2000
2000
2015 s
2015 a
2025
2027
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2030 mtwhfa
2030
2030
2030 f
2030
2030
2030
2030 s
2030
2000 2050 DRM
2000 2057
2000 2059
2000 2100
2000 2100
2000 2100
2000 2100
2000 2100
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100 vl
2100
2000
2000
2000
2000
2100
2100 vl
2100
2100
2000 2100 Sat/Sun
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100 vl
2100
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2000 2100
2000 2100
2000
2000
2000
2000
2100
2100
2100
2100
2000 2100
2000 2100
2000 2100
2000 2100
50
vl
vl
vl
mtwhf
vl
DRM
Germany, Pan American BC 5850me
UK, Bible Voice 6015va
Israel, Kol Israel 6280va
7545va 9345va
Iran, Voice of the Islamic Rep
6010eu
6255va
7320af
9855af 11695af
Albania, Radio Tirana
7465eu
Egypt, Radio Cairo
15375af
Germany, AWR Europe
15235as
Germany, Pan American BC 5850me
Lithuania, Radio Vilnius
6250eu
South Africa, AWR Africa
9655af
Swaziland, TWR 3200af
UK, Bible Voice 6015va
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 7365af 9755af
11625af
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 11675pa
Germany, Deutsche Welle 7130af 11795af
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 5850eu 7235eu
15325eu
Anguilla, University Network
11775am
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
2310do
4835do
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 2485do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
2325do
Australia, Radio 6080va
7240as 9500as
11650pa
11660pa 11880pa
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
6160na
China, China Radio Intl
5960eu 7170eu
7190eu
7285eu
7295va 7295va
9440va
9600eu
11640af 13630af
Costa Rica, University Network
13750va
Eqt Guinea, Radio Africa
15190af
Germany, CVC International 7285af
Germany, Deutsche Welle 11865af 15205af
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Indonesia, Voice of
9525eu 11785eu
15150al
Italy, IRRS
5775eu
Liberia, ELWA
4760do
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
Netherlands, Radio
5905af 7115af
17810af
Netherlands, Radio
15315na 17660va
17735na
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do 6090al
Nigeria, Voice of/ Ext. Svc Lagos
15120va
Papua New Guinea, Catholic Radio
4960do
Papua New Guinea, NBC
4890do
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Russia, Voice of 5955as
6145eu 7105eu
7290eu
7330eu
Rwanda, Radio 6055do
Solomon Islands, SIBC
5020do 9545do
South Africa, Channel Africa 3345af
Spain, Radio Exterior Espana 9665eu 11625af
Uganda, Radio 4976do
5026do
UK, BBC World Service
1296eu
UK, BBC World Service
3255af 5875eu
6005af
6190af
6195eu 9630af
12095af
15400af 17830af
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
3230af
5745va
5810va
6855va 7300va
7580va
15115af 15195af
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
9480na
USA, KJES Vado NM
15385na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 15590na
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 7415na 9330na
18910na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
9450va 15785va
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
11765am
15285am
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
13570am
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
2000
2000
2000
2000
2100 smtwhf
2100
2100
2100
2000 2100
2000
2005
2025
2030
2030
2100
2100
2045
2045
2058
2030 2100
2030 2100
2030 2100
2030 2100
2030 2100
2030 2100 Sat/Sun
2045 2100
2045 2100 DRM
2050 2100
2051 2100 DRM
USA, WMLK Bethel PA
9265eu
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 9975na
13845na
15825na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 9385na
15250af
Zambia, Christian Voice
4965af
Syria, Radio Damascus
9330eu
Italy, RAI Italia
5970va
11875va
Thailand, Radio 9535eu
Vietnam, Voice of 7280va
9550va
13860va
Cuba, Radio Havana
9505va
Netherlands, Radio
9800na
Romania, Radio Romania Intl
11810va
11940va 15465va
Turkey, Voice of 7170va
USA, Voice of America
4930af
7595as
11975af 13710af
USA, Voice of America
4940af
India, All India Radio
7410eu
9910oc
9950eu
11620eu
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 9800am
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 4005eu
7250eu
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 13730pa
12160na
11920va
12085eu
9730va
11760va
9515va
6080af
15580af
9445eu
11715oc
5885eu
2100 UTC - 5PM EDT / 4PM CDT / 2PM PDT
2100 2120
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2125
2127
2130
2130
2130
2130
2130
2130
2130
2130
2130
2130
2130
2157
2159
2159
2200
2200
Sat
DRM
smtwhf
Sat/Sun
2100 2200
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200 DRM
2200
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2200
2200
2200
2200 vl
2200
2200
2100 2200
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2100 2200
2100 2200
vl
DRM
vl
vl
DRM
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 4005eu
7250eu
Turkey, Voice of 7170va
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
5930va
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 2485do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
Austria, AWR Europe
11955af
Canada, CBC NQ SW Service
China, China Radio Intl
11640af
Cuba, Radio Havana
9505va
Hungary, Radio Budapest
6025eu
Italy, IRRS
5775eu
Nigeria, Radio, Natl Svc/Abuja
USA, Voice of America
7595as
Vatican City, Vatican Radio 9800na
Germany, Deutsche Welle 15205af
Germany, Overcomer Ministries
Spain, Radio Exterior Espana 9840eu
Anguilla, University Network
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
4835do
Australia, Radio 9500as
9660as
11695pa
12080as 13630as
Belarus, Radio
7360eu
7390eu
Bulgaria, Radio 5900eu
9700eu
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 9800na
China, China Radio Intl
7190eu
9600eu
Costa Rica, University Network
Eqt Guinea, Radio Africa
15190af
Germany, Deutsche Welle 9735af
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Guyana, Voice of 3291do
5950do
India, All India Radio
7410eu
9910oc
9950eu
11620eu
Japan, Radio Japan/NHK World
6090eu
6180eu
11855ca
21670pa
Liberia, ELWA
4760do
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 15270pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 13730pa
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do
North Korea, Voice of Korea 7570eu
Papua New Guinea, Catholic Radio
Papua New Guinea, NBC
4890do
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light
South Africa, Channel Africa 3345af
Syria, Radio Damascus
9330eu
UK, BBC World Service
1296eu
UK, BBC World Service
3255af
5875eu
5965as
6005af
6190af
6195va
9480eu
11675am
15400af
Ukraine, Radio Ukraine Intl 7510eu
USA, American Forces Radio
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb
5885eu
9430va
2325do
9625na
13630af
11760va
9525af
7275do
7310eu
11625af
11775am
2310do
11650pa
15515as
7420eu
6160na
7285eu
13750va
11865af
9445eu
11715oc
6035va
17825na
6090al
12015eu
4960do
7120va
12085eu
3915as
6125as
9650eu
4319usb
7811usb
2100 2200
2100
2100
2100
2100
2200
2200
2200
2200
2100 2200
2100 2200
2100 2200
2100
2100
2100
2100
2100
2200
2200 mtwhfa
2200 Sun
2200
2200
2100 2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200 mtwhfa
2200
2200
2200
2200 UTC - 6PM EDT / 5PM CDT / 3PM PDT
2200 2210
2200 2230
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2230 vl
2230
2230
2245
2258 DRM
2258
2300
2300
2200 2300
2200 2300
2200 2300
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2300
2300 smtwhf
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300 vl
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300 vl
2300
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2300 vl
2300
2300
2300 DRM
2300
2200 2300
2200
2200
2200
2200
2300
2300
2300
2300
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2300 mtwhf
2300
2300
2300
2300
2200
2200
2200
2200
2300
2300
2300
2300
Syria, Radio Damascus
9330eu 12085eu
India, All India Radio
7410eu 9445eu
11715oc
9950eu
11620eu 11715oc
Liberia, ELWA
4760do
Papua New Guinea, NBC
4890do
South Korea, KBS World Radio
3955eu
Egypt, Radio Cairo
9990eu
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 13730pa
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 15270pa
Anguilla, University Network
6090am
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
2310do
4835do
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 5025do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
4910do
Australia, Radio 13620as 13630pa 15230va
15240pa
15515va 17785va
Belarus, Radio
7360eu
7390eu 7490eu
Canada, CBC NQ SW Service
9625na
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
6160na
China, China Radio Intl
5915as 7170eu
Costa Rica, University Network
13750va
Eqt Guinea, Radio Africa
15190af
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
Guyana, Voice of 3291do
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do 6090al
Papua New Guinea, Catholic Radio
4960do
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
Romania, Radio Romania Intl
7185va
9675va
9790va
11940va
Solomon Islands, SIBC
5020do 9545do
Taiwan, Radio Taiwan Intl
15600eu
Turkey, Voice of 6195va
UK, BBC World Service
1296eu
UK, BBC World Service
5955as 5965as
5975am
6195as
7105as 9480eu
9650eu
9740af
15400af
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
21525af
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
9480na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 15590na
USA, Voice of America
7120va 7405as
11725va
15185va 15290va
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 5110na 18910na
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 7415na 9330na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
7560va 9975va
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
7490am
9660am
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
13570am
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 7465na 9985na
2200
2200
2205
2230
2230
2230
2230
2300 as
2300
2230
2257
2300
2300
2300
2245 2300
2259 2300 DRM
12160na
13845na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN
Zambia, Christian Voice
Italy, RAI Italia
11895va
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
Guam, AWR/KSDA
Papua New Guinea, NBC
USA, Voice of America
13755va
India, All India Radio
11620as
11645as
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl
3185na
4965af
5930na 9435af
15320as
9675do
7230va 9780va
9705as 9950as
13605as
15720pa
2300 UTC - 7PM EDT / 6PM CDT / 4PM PDT
2300 0000
2300 0000
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2300
2305
2315
2330
2330
2330
2330
2330
2330
2330
2335
2343
Anguilla, University Network
6090am
Australia, ABC NT Alice Springs
2310do
4835do
0000
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 5025do
0000
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
4910do
0000 smtwhf
Canada, CBC NQ SW Service
9625na
0000
Canada, CFRX Toronto ON 6070na
0000
Canada, CFVP Calgary AB 6030na
0000
Canada, CKZN St John’s NF 6160na
0000
Canada, CKZU Vancouver BC
6160na
0000
China, China Radio Intl
5915as 5990am
6040na
6145as
7180as 11970na
0000
Costa Rica, University Network
13750va
0000
Cuba, Radio Havana
9550va
0000
Egypt, Radio Cairo
11950eu
0000 vl
Ghana, Ghana BC Corp
4915do
0000
Guyana, Voice of 3291do
0000
India, All India Radio
9705as 9950as
11620as
11645as 13605as
0000
Malaysia, RTM/Trax FM
7295as
0000
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 13730pa
0000 DRM
New Zealand, Radio NZ Intl 15720pa
0000
Papua New Guinea, Catholic Radio
4960do
0000
Papua New Guinea, NBC
9675do
0000 vl
Papua New Guinea, Wantok R. Light 7120va
0000
Singapore, MediaCorp Radio
6150do
0000 vl
Solomon Islands, SIBC
5020do 9545do
0000
UK, BBC World Service
3915as 5965as
5985as
6170as
9480eu 11945as
11955as
0000
USA, American Forces Radio
4319usb
5446usb
5765usb 6350usb 7811usb
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
0000
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
9480na
0000
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 15590na
0000
USA, Voice of America
7120va 7405va
11725va
15185va 15290va
0000
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 5110na 7415na
9330na
18910na
0000
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
0000
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
7560va 9975va
0000
USA, WHRA Greenbush ME 5850na
0000
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
7315am
7490am
0000
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
9265am
0000
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
0000
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
0000
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 5070na 7465na
9985na
13845na
0000 smtwhf
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 5745ca
0000
Zambia, Christian Voice
4965af
2300
Bulgaria, Radio 9700na
11700na
2315
Nigeria, Radio/Kaduna
4770do 6090al
2315
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
11875af
15170am
15400am 17555na 17575am
2330
Australia, Radio 9660as
12080as 13630pa
13670pa
15230pa 15240va 17785va
17795va
2330
USA, Voice of America
6180va 7205va
15150va
0000
Canada, Radio Canada Intl 6100na
2330
Croatia, Croatian Radio
7285sa
0000
Australia, Radio 9660as
12080as 13620pa
13670pa
15230pa 15415va 17750va
17785va
17795va
0000
Burma, Dem Voice of Burma 5955eu
0000
Lithuania, Radio Vilnius
7325na
0000
USA, Voice of America
6180va 7205va
11665va
13640va 15150va
2357
Czech Rep, Radio Prague
5930na 7345na
2358
Vietnam, Voice of 9840as
12020as
2359 DRM
Sweden, Radio 9800na
0000 Sun/Mon Austria, Radio Austria Intl
9870sa
2368 twhfa
Austria, Radio Austria Intl
9870sa
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
51
SHORTWAVE GUIDE
2100
2115
2115
2130
2130
2130
2130
2130
2130
10320usb
12133usb 13362usb
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
5745va
5810va
5955af
6855va 7300va
7580va
15195af 15565af
USA, KAIJ Dallas TX
9480na
USA, KTBN Salt Lake City UT 15590na
USA, Voice of America
6080af 15580af
USA, WBCQ Monticello ME 7415na 9330na
18910na
USA, WBOH Newport NC 5920am
USA, WEWN Vandiver AL
6890va 15785va
USA, WHRI Cypress Creek SC
9660am
11765am
USA, WINB Red Lion PA
13570am
USA, WRMI Miami FL
9955va
USA, WRMI Miami FL
7385na
USA, WTJC Newport NC
9370na
USA, WWCR Nashville TN 9975na 12160na
13845na
15825na
USA, WWRB Manchester TN 9385na 11920va
15250af
Zambia, Christian Voice
4965af
Egypt, Radio Cairo
9990af
USA, Family Radio Worldwide FL
11875af
Australia, ABC NT Katherine 5025do
Australia, ABC NT Tennant Creek
4910do
Canada, CBC NQ SW Service
9625na
Guam, AWR/KSDA
11850as
Sweden, Radio 6065va
7420va
USA, Voice of America
7405as
M
ILCOM
MONITORING MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
Larry Van Horn, N5FPW
larryvanhorn@monitoringtimes.com
http://mt-milcom.blogspot.com
Military HF Comms Alive and Well
I
always chuckle when I read comments on
various newsgroups that HF comms are
dead. In one sense they are right; the higher
bands are dead. But it isn’t due to a massive
migration of services from the HF bands. It is
because the higher frequencies are not propagating well right now, because we are at the bottom
of Sunspot Cycle 23. Those higher frequencies
are not as good as they were five years ago. And
as we move into the summer months, static levels
and ionospheric absorption levels on the lower
frequencies will rise due to the longer daylight
hours, and they will not be in great shape for
distant HF reception then, either.
But this isn’t usually what such pessimists
are talking about. Their claim is that various radio
services are leaving the HF spectrum in droves
and HF is quickly becoming a waste land with
“nothing” left to monitor. And nothing could be
further from the truth. There is still a lot to hear
on the HF utility bands.
In this edition of MT Milcom I have listed
over 300 frequencies that were heard from various military organizations scattered around the
world during a one-week period on the shortwave
bands. As you can see by examining our list,
there is still a lot to listen for on shortwave radio
frequencies.
And, if you would like my latest HF Milcom
by-frequency list, swing your browser to our MT
Readers Only section of the Monitoring Times
website. I post the latest complete list there and
also post regular updates on my MT Milcom
blog pages. All frequencies below are listed in
kilohertz (kHz).
❖ One Week of Military Logs
Australian ADF-HFCS Net USB
3700.0 5878.0 9340.0 10212.0 11165.0
12172.0 20632.0 22868.0
Algerian Military ALE
3300.0 3331.0 5075.0 5236.0 5555.0
7705.0 7785.0
Brazilian Military ALE/USB
16333.0
16345.0
CanForce
CFH-Halifax FAX/RTTY
4271.0 6496.4
10536.0
MACS & VOLMET Trenton USB
6754.0 9007.0 11232.0
Military Net Digital/USB
4480.0
Chinese Military
CW
5227.0
Mil-Std-188-110A/141A ALE/USB
8049.0
Danish Air Force ALE/USB
6717.0 9035.0
11217.0
French Navy
Djibouti 300L 5N2 Stanag 4285
22447.0
52
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
FUV-Djibouti STANAG 4285 300L 5n2
7000.0
RBVITT-Dzaoudzi, Mayotte ARQ-E3/198/350
11521.8
Voice Net USB 3071.0
Georgia Military ALE/USB
5672.0
German Navy USB
2623.2 4356.5 8333.5 10190.7 10720.7
(also STANAG 4285)
Hungary Military ALE/USB
5762.0 8162.0
Indian Navy
RBSL RTTY 850/50
8500.0
VTG-Mumbai V marker CW 8634.0
VTK-Tuticorin V Marker CW 5150.0
VTP-Vizakhapatnam V marker CW
6418.0 6507.0
Irish Air Force ARQ 2461.5
Irish Navy ARQ
4601.5
Israeli Air Force ALE/USB
6921.0 8521.0
Israeli Navy 4XZ-Haifa ISR-Hybrid modem
5512.5
Italian Coast Guard ICI-Rome USB
6967.5
Italian Navy
IDR-Rome RTTY 75 baud 8412.0
Voice Net (USB) 4724.5
Macedonia Military ALE/USB
6200.0 6860.0 6880.0 7010.0 7455.0
7475.0 7622.0 7890.0 7938.0 7965.0
8060.0 8130.0 10380.0
Malaysian Navy 9MR-Johor Baharu RTTY
850/50 encrypted
6473.0 8461.5
Mexican Army ALE/USB
8000.0 8045.0
8090.0
Morocco Military ALE/USB
7813.0 8875.0 11130.0 12160.0
14550.0
NASA Eastern Test Range
“Cape Radio” <Primary> USB
10780.0
National Guard Aviation CONUS Net ALE/USB
7648.5 8065.0 8183.0 10528.5 12087.0
12916.0
National Guard Aviation Arizona Net ALE/USB
8136.0
National Guard CONUS Net ALE/USB
4837.0 5817.0 5833.5 11441.0 13568.0
17458.5
National Guard New York ALE/USB
4562.0
National Guard/Air National Guard Ohio
Aviation Net ALE/USB
3346.5 4000.0 5396.0 7562.0 7650.0
8057.0 10000.0
NATO-75 Cipher Stream 850/75
2819.6 5801.7 6753.0
NATO/DoD Link 11 data transmissions
2228.0 4170.0 4952.0 5039.0 5056.0
5171.0 5314.0 5705.0 6247.0 6255.0
6699.9 6790.0 9010.0
NATO/Royal Navy Secure broadcast NATO-75
850/75 KG-84 5052.0
NATO AWACS USB 6721.0
NATO Naval Trigraph Net FG/FH/FT USB
6721.5
Netherlands Navy PBB-Den Halder RTTY
2474.0
Norway Navy JWT-Stavanger USB
6727.0
Polish Military ALE/USB
5179.5 5220.0
6775.5 11475.0
Russian Air Defense Net CW 3322.0 6321.6
Russian Long Range Air Force REA4 Moscow
1000/50
2721.0 4179.0 5157.0 7018.0 9193.0
Russian Military
RUS-75
4093.8
81-81 3817.5 4537.5 4762.0 10444.0
CW
3162.0 3333.0 3354.0 3884.0
3930.0 5394.0 6207.5 6753.0 7002.0
MS-5/4800
2407.0 3803.7 4305.7
7932.0
Russian Navy CW (MX) Beacons
C-MX Moscow 4558.0 5154.0 7039.0
8495.0 10872.0
D-MX Sevastopol Ukraine 5153.7 7038.7
8494.7 10871.7
K-MX Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy
16332.3
M-MX Magadan 16332.4
P-MX Kaliningrad 2330.8 3593.8 3852.0
4557.8 5153.8
R-MX Ustinov
4325.9 5465.9
Russian Navy CW
RCV-Black Sea Fleet HQ Sevastopol,
Ukraine
10201.0
RIT-Northern Fleet HQ Severomorsk
11155.0
RMP-Kalinigrad 3192.0
Singapore Navy ALE/USB
5220.5 8062.0
Spanish Air Force USB
6715.0
STANAG 4285
2843.0 4346.0 6277.6 6385.0 8122.0
8303.0 8331.0 8476.0 8542.0 8565.0
8634.0 9096.0 12713.0 13058.0
14724.0 17060.5 18365.0
UK Army Combined Cadet Force (CCF) USB
5343.0
UK Royal Air Force (RAF)
CRC (Command & Reporting Centre) at RAF
Scampton “Blackdog” USB 6760.0
Kinloss Rescue-ARCC Kinloss USB
3930.0 5680.0
VOLMET USB
5450.0 11253.0
UK Royal Navy GYA-Northwood
Meteo Charts FAX 120/576 8040.0
Unidentified ANDVT comms USB [probable
USCG units)
8294.0
Ukraine Military CW
6804.0 6809.0
USAF Aerial Refueling Discrete USB
6761.0
USAF Civil Air Patrol ALE/USB 8012.0
USAF HF-GCS Scope Command ALE HF Network ALE/USB
3137.0 4721.0 5708.0 6721.0 9025.0
11226.0 13215.0 15043.0 18003.0
23337.0
USAF MARS HF Phone Patch Net USB
13927.1
US Armed Forces Network Key West FL USB
12133.5
US Army Aviation
2-135 AVN ALE/USB
5135.0
3-227 AVN ALE/USB
4451.0
Australian Defense
Force P-3 aircraft
on patrol
Net ALE/USB
7003.0 8003.0 8521.0
8714.0 12168.0
CONUS Net ALE/USB
3286.5 4521.5
4611.5 5554.5 6908.5 6911.5 7632.0
7667.5 9295.0 10680.0 10691.5
10821.0 11170.5
Iraq Net ALE/USB
5542.0 5602.0
6486.0 6906.0 7839.0 8950.0 11067.0
Net WAROPS (1/228th Avn Regt (“Winged
Warriors”) Operations-Soto Cano AB, Honduras ALE/USB 8972.0 10692.5 11628.5
US Army Command Emergency Operations
Net ALE/USB
3275.0 3285.0 5088.5 6985.0 7448.5
US Army Corps of Engineers Net ALE/USB
9122.5
US Army Flight Following Service (AFFS) ALE/
USB
8065.0
US Army Iraq Net ALE/USB 5118.0 5296.5
11047.6
US Army/National Guard Aviation CONUS Net
ALE/USB
7650.0 7718.5 7819.0 8171.5 8181.5
8184.5 9081.5 11439.5 11551.5
US BICE COTHEN ALE/ANDVT/USB
5732.0 7527.0 8912.0 10242.0 11494.0
13907.0 15687.0 18594.0 20890.0
23214.0 25350.0
US Coast Guard
CAMSLANT Chesapeake ANDVT/USB
8337.6
Fixed Wing Air/Ground USB
5696.0 8983.0
MAP Ops ALE/ANDVT/USB 10993.6
NMF- Boston FAX 9110.0
NMG-New Orleans FAX
4317.9 8503.9
12789.0 17146.0
NMG-US Coast Guard New Orleans “Perfect Paul” weather USB
8502.0
US DISA Non-secure Internet Protocol Router
Net (NIPR) ALE/USB
3068.0 4745.0 5684.0 8965.0 10600.0
10830.0 11199.0 13242.0 17973.0
20631.0
US DISA Secure Internet Protocol Router Net
(SIPR) ALE/USB
3113.0 5702.0 5902.0 6715.0 8968.0
9044.0 11181.0 15091.0 17976.0
27870.0
US DoD Unidentified Net MEDOPS/COROPS
ALE/USB
5500.0
US Federal Emergency Management Agency National Radio System (FNARS) USB
7348.0 10588.0
US Military HF-GCS Primary USB
11175.0
US Military Task Force Afghanistan ALE/USB
9190.0
US Navy CSG Voice Coordination Net USB
5517.0
US Navy FACSFAC VACAPES USB
4372.0
US Navy Okinawa NATO-75 850/75 KG-84
12683.0
US Navy Tactical Support Center (TSC) - Atlantic USB 8971.0
US Navy USS Enterprise
Carrier Strike Group (CSG) USB
3167.0
CSG Air Defense Voice Coordination Net
“EW” USB
5078.5
CSG Force Track Coordinator (Link-11/
Link-16) “EF” USB
4414.0
US SHARES SCN ALE Net ALE/USB
5711.0 11217.0 17487.0
US Southcom Flight Monitoring Facility (FMF)
“Smasher” USB 11205.0
Uzbekistan Military ALE/USB 5260.0 5270.5
7700.0
Venezuela Army ALE/USB
8060.0 8187.0
10600.0 14569.0
Venezuela Coast Guard/Riverine Forces ALE/
USB
8810.0 9380.0
Venezuela Navy ALE/USB
8270.0 8500.0
9017.0
❖ Milair Frequency Changes
Our intrepid reporter Jack NeSmith in
Florida checks in with few of the latest milair
frequency changes.
Alice International, TX KALI
290.450 Kingsville Approach (ex-300.400)
Allen AAF, AK PABI
125.325 Tower Primary (ex-119.800)
Barksdale AFB, LA KBAD
227.400 Pilot to Metro (Meteo)
307.025 ATIS
Cameron Memorial, MO KEZZ
118.400 Approach (ex-119.000)
Charleston AFB, SC KCHS
126.000 Tower
127.325/381.600 Clearance Delivery (ex118.000)
134.100/349.400 Base Command Post
(New callsign Palmetto Ops)
306.925 Charleston Approach Control
Columbus AFB, MS KCBM
118.150/363.125 North Approach Control
<Channel 5>
126.075 Approach Control (ex-120.400)
132.025/291.650 Approach Primary/Class
C (ex-127.950
263.150 South Approach Control
269.550 Clearance Delivery (ex-289.600)
379.925 Tower (ex-269.550)
Columbus AFB Auxiliary Field, MS 1MS8
363.650 RSU
Corpus Christi NAS, TX KNGP
340.200 Local Control North Primary
360.200 Local Control South Primary
Dover AFB, DE KDOV
257.875 Approach/Departure Control
Elmendorf AFB, TN PAED
128.800/306.925 Clearance Delivery
Fairbanks International, AK PAFA
120.900 Murphy Dome RCAG
133.500/233.700 Hill 3265 RCAG (ex336.400)
Fayetteville Regional, AR KFAY
125.175/397.850 RTS
Fort Benning/Lawson AAF, GA KLSF
118.100 Local Control
118.700 ATIS
121.025 GCA
121.700 Clearance Delivery/Ground Control (ex-121.700/121.075)
121.900 Ground Control
291.100 Local Control/Ground Control
Fort Drum/Wheeler-Sack AAF, NY
139.600 R-5201 North (ex-134.100)
Fort Greely/Delta Junction, AK
119.800/235.775 Local Control (ex125.325/254.275)
Fort Lewis/Gray AAF, WA KGRF
30.025 Rattlesnake (NFM)
120.100/290.900 Approach Services (Seattle Approach/Departure Control)
128.200 GCA Services (Civilian)
139.700 Local Control (ex-119.325)
139.925/239.000 Final Control
Fort Rucker/Cairns AAF, AL KOZR
273.425 Local SOD
Grand Forks AFB, ND KRDR
360.700 Clearance Delivery (ex-359.300)
Jacksonville NAS, FL KNIP
360.200 Tower Primary
Kansas City International, MO KMCI
118.400 Approach (East of runway 01-19)
(ex-119.000)
128.375 ATIS (ex-126.625)
Kingsville NAS, TX KNOG
290.450 Approach/Departure Control (ex300.400)
Luke AFB, AZ KLUF
118.150/363.125 North Approach <Channel 5> (ex-120.500/282.250)
Mayport NAS, FL KNRB
235.675 Radar
239.300 Tower Primary
288.325 Tower Secondary
323.250 Radar
379.025 Radar
New River MCAS, NC KNCA
119.500/325.000 MCOLF Oak Grove
“Blackburn”
253.300 Base Operations
Seattle ARTCC, WA
127.050 RCAG (ex-135.550)
290.550 RCAG (ex-282.300)
Springfield -Beckley Muni, OH KSGH
255.400 Ground Control (ex-261.100)
Vagabond AAF, WA KFCT
30.025 Rattlesnake (NFM)
139.700 FCT CTAF
Vance AFB, OK KEND
126.750 Approach Control West
Whitehead AFB, MO KSZL
119.250 Radar Arrival (ex-120.250)
Yuma MCAS, AZ KNYL
274.000 Yuma Range Control
❖ Aussie HF Military Network
Many of the military services worldwide
have been consolidating their HF communications services into joint systems. Here in the
US, DoD consolidated many JCS HF nets (i.e.
Navy HICOM etc) into the HF-GCS network. In
the UK, several older networks have now been
combined into the RAF TASCOMM.
Now we have another national military service net which has consolidated several service
nets into one. The Australian and New Zealand
military services now have one network known
as the Australia Defense Force (ADF) High Frequency Communications System (HFCS), with
the main station located at Canberra. They have
seven main HF voice frequencies that carry the
bulk of their voice comms listed below.
ADF-HFCS Voice Contact Nets (VCN) “Australia Control”
3700.0 kHz 0900-2100Z <VCN-1>
5878.0 kHz 0900-2100Z <VCN-2>
9340.0 kHz H 2 4 P r i m a r y N e t F r e q
<VCN-3>
10212.0 kHz H24 <VCN-4>
12172.0 kHz H24 <VCN-5>
20632.0 kHz 2100-0900Z <VCN-2 >
22868.0 kHz 2100-0900Z <VCN-1>
They also have an extensive list of HF
discrete frequencies. You can learn more about
this system (including their registered discrete
frequencies) on the Shortwave Listeners Delight
website at
http://members.optusnet.com.au/ventmond (main page) ... /page/raaf_rnzaf.
htm (frequencies) ... /pages/jp_2043.htm
(JP2043 High Frequency Modernisation
Project). And that does it for this month. Until
next time, 73 and good hunting.
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
53
F
ED FILES
GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATIONS
Chris Parris
chrisparris@monitoringtimes.com
www.mt-fedfiles.blogspot.com
A Super Week in Miami
S
uper Bowl XLI in Miami this past February was an event that provided some
insight into planned federal response
at large public gatherings as well as federal
interoperability with local public safety agencies. I was fortunate enough to be working as
part of the vast television broadcasting pool
covering this event for the world. That allowed
me some time to monitor the activities from
the main event site, Dolphin Stadium.
Major events that require federal involvement with security appear to have the Justice
Department and the FBI acting as the lead
in coordinating activities. Past Super Bowl
games as well as events like the Rose Bowl
in Pasadena, California, have shown that
many FBI and Justice allocated frequencies
in the VHF federal band are used as primary
channels at these events. And this Super Bowl
was considered a Level One national security
event, right behind a presidential inauguration
in importance.
Besides security coordination for events
like the Super Bowl, I suspect that these gatherings also provide an excellent opportunity
for training in a real-world situation. During
the week leading up to the big game, federal
and local police agencies took turns practicing tactical entries and maneuvers into the
stadium complex. This event also provided
some exercises in interconnecting various
radio communications systems. From what
I heard over the air, they were able to link
local public safety agencies to federal com-
munications systems through equipment set
up at the command center for this event, the
Joint Operation Center (JOC).
As one might imagine, the entire radio
spectrum was extremely busy with preparations leading up to the big game. The UHF
business bands were full of activity at the
stadium as well as wide-area activity covering the parties and hotel activities of the NFL,
security, media and sponsors. The 800 MHz
public safety trunked systems of Metro-Dade
and the Miami Police were active with security and support operations, as well as the
800 MHz trunked radio system of Broward
County public safety. Additional traffic from
local agencies as well as Florida State police
agencies were heard on some of the national
800 MHz conventional channels.
I arrived in Miami loaded up with radios
to help search the spectrum. I had my Uniden
396T, 796 and 996T radios, along with my
PRO-96 and Yupiteru MVT-7100 hand-held
scanners, and I could not have done without
my Optoelectronics Optocom computer-controlled receiver, running Probe software.
Once on location at Dolphin Stadium,
I realized that there were going to be some
challenges trying to monitor so much at once.
There was so much RF being transmitted from
in and near the stadium, I ended up using very
low-gain antennas and attenuators on all the
radios, so I was really only monitoring what
was happening nearby.
During the weekdays prior to the Super
Bowl, there was a lot of
activity on the federal
spectrum with testing
of new equipment, frequencies and the digital
“bridges” that allowed
the interconnection of
different radio systems.
If I had a nickel for every time I heard “Testing 1, 2, 3…” on a federal frequency during
that week, I could retire
now! But it did provide
a great deal of information on who was using what frequency and
what different agencies
All the vehicles headed into the secure area of Dolphin Stadium were on location. I was
are swept by the mobile VACIS or Vehicle and Cargo Inspection initially surprised at the
System. (Courtesy DHS Customs & Border Protection)
lack of encryption used
during all the testing
54
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
and through the Super Bowl. But a source
indicated to me that interoperability was the
primary goal of these interconnected systems,
so encryption was used only as required and
not left on full time.
As I mentioned earlier, many agencies
took turns doing tactical training exercises during the build up to the Super Bowl weekend.
The most interesting were the Custom & Border
Protection Air and Marine Division helicopters
that rehearsed some tactical maneuvers at Dolphin Stadium on the Wednesday prior to Super
Sunday. Three UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters
from Washington, D.C., using the call signs
“CHOCK 1”, ‘CHOCK 2” and “CHOCK 3”,
took turns landing on the football field in the
stadium then retrieving their personnel and taking off. After a couple of hours of training, they
departed to North Perry airport for refueling and
food, and then returned for additional tactical
training that evening.
Although this is by no means all of the
federal channels used for the Super Bowl week,
these are what I was able to log and confirm
as being used at my location at the stadium.
Some I was able to identify and some remain a
mystery:
163.1000, P-25
Unknown agency, but this
is a federal common frequency.
163.8625, P-25
Input to one of the FBI JOC
repeaters
163.8875, P-25
Input to one of the FBI JOC
repeaters
163.9000, P-25
Input to the 171.4375
Federal Interoperability repeater
164.4000, P-25
US Secret Service PAPA
frequency
164.5375
Unidentified agency or user
(Allocated to US Fish & Wildlife, Department
of the Interior)
164.6500, P-25
US Secret Service TANGO
frequency
164.9625, 100.0 DHS Customs and Border
Protection Air Marine Division Helicopter
operations at Dolphin Stadium. I never heard
this channel identified by a NET or TAC number, although it has been used in Florida for
many years..
165.2375, 100.0 DHS Customs and Border
Protection NET 1 (repeater) and TAC 1
(simplex), used by multiple air assets near
Dolphin Stadium. Most were communicating
with the JOC.
165.2875, P-25
ATF simplex use at Dolphin
Stadium.
166.4375, 100.0 DHS Customs and Border
Protection, input to NET 1 repeater.
167.2625, P-25
FBI Joint Operation Center
167.4375
FBI
167.5375, P-25
FBI Joint Operation Center
167.6125
FBI
167.6625, P-25
FBI Joint Operation Center,
many radio checks early during the week, but
later heard many ID checks, possibly checking incoming vehicles at the VACIS mobile
truck scanning setup.
167.7625, P-25
Known South Florida FBI
repeater
168.0125
Unidentified agency or user
(Allocated to US Fish & Wildlife, Department
of the Interior)
168.8750, 103.5pl DHS Customs and Border
Protection
169.4500, 100.0 DHS CBP NET 2 (CBP
Air Marine Division activity noted here all
week)
169.5500
Unidentified agency or
user (Likely Custom & Border Protection or
Immigrations and Customs Enforcement)
169.5750, 167.9 FBI Operations
170.8250, 167.9 FBI Joint Operations Center
171.0250
Unidentified agency or
user
171.4375, P-25
Federal Interoperability repeater. Many agencies heard here including
the JOC and Metro Dade Police and Metro
Dade Fire Rescue. Look for this frequency
to remain in place for future use in South
Florida.
173.0750
Unidentified agency or user
(Likely FBI / Justice Department)
413.2750, D431 USAF Thunderbirds ground
communications with lots of traffic regarding
weather conditions for the national anthem
fly-over.
I am certain there were more federal frequencies in use for the Super Bowl event than
those that were heard and logged. Surprisingly,
we heard nothing on known Department of Defense radio nets, but they were part of the Joint
Operations Center staff. And special thanks to
the local South Florida scanning group who
helped listen and confirm many of the frequencies listed above.
❖ Bureau of Prisons Project
On-Line
I have recently completed the initial version of a list of all the radio systems used by
facilities of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, part
of the Justice Department. Most BoP facilities
have moved or are in the process of moving to
UHF trunked systems for their communications
needs. Some are P-25 digital, some are still
analog. I have tried to collect all the available
information from various sources into one list.
That document is posted on the Monitoring
Times web site in the “MT Reader Only” area
at www.monitoringtimes.com/mtsubscriber/
You will need the current password that appears
in each month in Monitoring Times to enter this
area and access this file.
I will continue to update this listing as I
receive additional information. If you have any
corrections or updates to this list, please feel free
to send them along to us here at the Fed Files.
❖ Federal Scanning in
Puerto Rico
I recently had a chance to visit Puerto
Rico for work and brought a few scanners
along for the trip. Since Puerto
Rico is a territory of the United
States, the federal radio band
plans are the same as they are
here on the mainland. While
much of the communications
on these frequencies were in
English, Spanish is the dominant language spoken in Puerto
Rico, so I did note quite a bit of
Spanish on some federal radio
nets.
I only had short periods to
search out activity in the federal
bands, so here’s what I found
Interior of the Super Bowl JOC, or Joint Operation
active:
Center in Miami, Florida (Courtesy of the DHS Customs
157.1500
USCG SEC- & Border Protection)
are actually sewn in to the agent’s suit jacket
TOR San Juan, clear and
GREEN (encrypted) mode
lining. Other lists describe these frequencies
157.1750
USCG SECTOR San Juan,
as coming from small, “Dick Tracy” type
clear and GREEN (encrypted) mode
transmitters worn by the Secret Service agents
162.3000
Data bursts
162.8750, P-25 Unidentified, but most that allow them to talk in to their coat sleeves
rather than picking up a hand-held radio.
likely Immigration and Customs Enforcement
These mysterious frequencies have been
162.9000, P-25 Encrypted, most likely floating around for many years now, even
ICE
before the technology to make them a real163.2375
Unidentified agency or
ity existed. So where did these come from?
user
Who has ever heard these in use? I’ve always
165.2375, 100.0 DHS Customs, analog with
suspected that these descriptions were misunsome DES encryption. Lots of Over-TheAir-Rekeying (OTAR) of the radios, day and
derstandings that were passed along from list
night!
to list over many years without really knowing
166.2125, D226 Possibly US Post Office
where they came from.
166.4375, 100.0 Input to DHS 165.2375
The reference to “Wrist-Watch” radios
repeater
comes from the popular image of Secret Ser167.8625
Paging voice & data, Vetvice agents talking into their wristwatch or
erans Affairs Medical Center in San Juan
168.5250
Unidentified agency or
their sleeves. In reality they are talking into a
user (Possibly Department of Interior)
small microphone and transmit switch held in
168.8500
DHS Customs and Border
the palm that is wired to the agent’s portable
Protection, OTAR data bursts.
radio.
169.3000, P-25 Input to 172.9 repeater
At every event in which I have been close
170.6750
DHS Customs and Border
Protection
enough to verify it with my own eyes, all the
170.7375, P-25 Possible input to 162.9
Secret Service agents and motorcade vehicles
170.7500, P-25 Federal Building security
carried VHF radios. That’s not to say that the
in Hoto Rey, PR
Secret Service doesn’t have UHF frequen172.9000, P-25 DHS TSA at SJU airport
406.6125, P-25 BoP trunked system, Metro cies available to them. For many years the
uniformed division of the Secret Service used
Detention Center Guaynabo, PR
408.3500, P-25 BoP trunked system, Metro to use UHF frequencies for their operations at
Detention Center Guaynabo, PR
the White House and in Washington, DC. But,
409.2125, P-25 BoP trunked system, Metro since the integration of the Secret Service into
Detention Center Guaynabo, PR
the Department of Homeland Security, they
409.8000
Data bursts (FAA)
410.2000, P-25 BoP trunked system, Metro have switched to all VHF frequencies, most
likely to ensure seamless interoperability with
Detention Center Guaynabo, PR
410.4000, P-25 BoP trunked system, Metro other DHS agencies. There is also the mysteDetention Center Guaynabo, PR
rious Secret Service portable UHF trunked
414.7500, 82.5 US Postal Service, Postal
system that seems to surface in the strangest
Inspection Service
418.3000, 82.5 US Postal Service, Postal places.
However, some listeners insist that they
Security Service
❖ Fed Files Myths and
Legends:
Secret Service “Suit Radios”
If you run an Internet search for frequencies used by the Secret Service, many web
sites will include some federal UHF frequencies that are labeled as “Suit Radios” or on
some lists as “Wrist Watch Radios.” Some lists
have offered descriptions of these radios as
being small, lightweight hand-held units that
overheard motorcade and other security operations on UHF frequencies during events
involving Secret Service protective details.
While it’s possible that the Secret Service Uniformed Division were active at some events,
it’s also possible that other federal agencies,
perhaps the State Department, were involved
with the event.
And speaking of the Secret Service, we’ll
take a closer look at their radio communications next time we get together. So see you in
July!
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
55
B
OATS, PLANES, AND TRAINS
Iden Rogers
idenrogers@monitoringtimes.com
PLANES
Airport Information for Listeners
I
t goes without saying that much aircraft
activity centers around airports, particularly metro area airports. If you are new to
aircraft communications listening, the following
airport information should make the pursuit
more understandable and more enjoyable. For
others, this can serve as a helpful review.
By no means do you have to live close to
one of the nation’s busiest airports to enjoy airport communications. If you are curious about
the ranking of the thirty busiest airports in North
America (as of 2005), take a look at www.acina.org/asp/traffic.asp?art=217 The results
may surprise you. You will also find a link there
to an Excel spreadsheet file that ranks the 190
busiest airports.
Ok, let’s take a look at the airport stuff!
One good source for airport information
is AirNav.com at www.airnav.com/airports
Here, you can enter a city name or an established airport identifier, such as “LAX” for Los
Angeles International.
For a given airport, among the various
types of information offered by AirNav.com is
the altitude above sea level (MSL), the name
of the Sectional Chart, and the Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC or “Center”) that
includes the airport.
Frequency listings are given for Clearance
Delivery, Ground Control, Tower, Approach /
Departure, and when they exist, frequencies
for ATIS (Automatic Terminal Information
Service), AWOS (Automated Weather Observing System), and ASOS (Automated Surface
Observing System).
Nearby VOR and NDB navigational stations are listed. VHF Omnidirectional Range
(VOR) transmissions are in the 108-118 MHz
range and Non-Directional Beacons (NDBs) are
mostly in the 200-415 kHz range. The names
of these navigational stations are frequently
mentioned in pilot-controller exchanges, so
becoming familiar with the ones in your listening area can help you understand what is being
referred to.
Runway information is given in some
detail. Runway numbering, in particular, is
important for listeners to understand. It is explained below.
Near the bottom of the airport’s listing are
downloadable STARs (Standard Terminal Arrivals), IAPs (Instrument Approach Procedures),
56
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
and Departure Procedures in PDF format. The
procedure names are frequently part of pilotcontroller communications and important to
listening.
Many airport listings will include an aerial
photograph which helps to put a “face” on an
airport. There is also part of a Sectional Chart
by SkyVector.com. Clicking on it will bring
up an expanded display which helps to put
the airport’s location in better geographical
perspective.
Some airport listings will include a link to
an FAA airport diagram in PDF format. These
show runways, taxiways, terminal buildings,
hangers, fire houses, and more. If some airports
do not include an airport diagram at AirNav.
com, try: www.faa.gov/RunwaySAFETY/
naco.cfm
At AirNav.com, you can click on “Browse
by U.S. State” to bring up a listing of all airports in a given state. Clicking on “Advanced
Search” gains access to a useful search with
additional input qualifiers: “1. Tell us about a
nearby place.” There, you enter a city, town, Zip
Code, an airport identifier, or geographic coordinates, then in “2. Tell us about the airfields
you are looking for,” you can select airfields
by type – “Airports, Balloonports, Gliderports,
Heliports, Seaplane bases, STOLports, and
Ultralight Flightparks,” and additionally select
for “Public, Private, and/or Military.” In “3.
Where do you want to search?” you enter the
search radius, the default being twenty miles.
And, after all the selections are made, click on
“Search for airfields in this vicinity.”
❖ Airport/Facility Directory
The A/FD is another resource with similar
information for all U.S. airports, but it’s more
cumbersome to access. Each airport search
result is in PDF format. Go to http://avn.faa.
gov/index.asp?xml=naco/online/d_afd
and then scroll to and click on “digital - Airport/Facility Directory” under “Product.”
After making a selection using the down
arrows, but before clicking on an airport “View
PDF” link, the search result page will include
“Legend | Supplemental” links. The “Legend”
is a 500 kb, 20 page PDF download that has
abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used in
the directory. Included is a sample airport listing with its components explained over several
pages. It is worth downloading and saving for
reference, whether or not you plan to use the
AF/D airport listings. Forget “Supplemental,”
a 16 MB, 198 page PDF download.
Fig. 1- Parallel Runways at Sacramento International (SMF). From A/FD. Courtesy FAA.
If you are in the downloading mood, you
will see a “Chart User’s Guide” link near the
top left of the A/FD search page. There, you
will find VFR (Visual Flight Rules) and IFR
(Instrument Flight Rules) chart symbol PDF
downloads. These are a must for anyone who
uses or who is curious about charts as an aid to
monitoring.
❖ Airport Identifiers
Airports have three-letter identifiers. Place
a “K” (which stands for U.S.) before the three
letters and it becomes an international identifier,
so Los Angeles International is both LAX and
KLAX. If you hear an airport identifier used on
the radio, you can look it up at www.airnav.
com/airports Also, you can find the identifier
for a specific airport by entering its name or
city.
❖ Airport Communications
There are different categories of communications at airports. In “Clearance Delivery”
aircraft get their clearance before departing.
It includes information about the initial part
of the route, and the pilot will always read it
back to the controller to confirm correct copy.
If you plan to follow a particular aircraft right
from takeoff, do listen to the clearance and
take note of the specific Departure frequency,
because this is the only time it will be given.
On final for Runway 9R at Hartsfield - Jackson
Atlanta International Airport (ATL). The “9R”
means the right of two parallel runways with
a magnetic heading of 90 degrees / landing
directly East. Photo by Michael Martin; used
by permission.
After that aircraft is airborne, the Tower will
only say “contact Departure” without giving
the frequency.
“Ground Control” is where all the taxi
instructions are given for both departing and
arriving aircraft, and sometimes the Clearance
Delivery function will occur on this frequency.
The “Tower” controls aircraft in the vicinity
of the airport for departing and arriving aircraft
as well as those passing through the airport’s
airspace. The Ground Control function can occur
on the Tower frequency at some airports during
periods of low activity.
“Approach Control” and “Departure
Control” are functions of the area TRACON
(Terminal Radar Approach Control) facility. The
Tower hands off departing aircraft to Departure
Control and Approach Control hands off landing
aircraft to the Tower. AirNav.com and the A/FD
each provide all these frequencies.
❖ ATIS Broadcasts
Controllers and pilots will mention ATIS
(Automatic Terminal Information Service)
broadcasts in their communications at larger airports. For airports that have ATIS, the frequency
will be listed with other airport frequencies.
ATIS broadcasts are continuous, pre-recorded,
and repeat until updated. Each version is assigned a succeeding letter of the alphabet, expressed by using the military phonetic alphabet.
If the previous version was “Gulf,” the current
version will be “Hotel.” The start of each cycle
of the recording will state the airport name and
the version, as in “Information Hotel.”
Using such recorded broadcasts saves air
time and reduces controller workload by offering
current airport information to arriving and departing aircraft. Pilots needing ATIS information
often listen at times when cockpit workloads are
reduced.
ATIS broadcasts include weather information, the altimeter setting (current barometric
pressure for calibrating altimeters), the current
runway(s) in use, notices of airport hazards like
construction work, migratory birds, or problems
with runway lighting or with radio navigational
aids.
❖ AWOS and ASOS
AWOS (Automated Weather Observing
System) and ASOS (Automated Surface Observing System) are automated and broadcast
continuously in computer voice in the VHF
aircraft band. They will be listed among the
VHF airport frequencies for the airports that
have them. In the FAA’s words: “The AWOS
sensors measure weather parameters such as
wind speed and direction, temperature and dew
point, visibility, cloud heights and types, precipitation, and barometric pressure.” and “ASOS
provides weather observations which include:
temperature, dew point, wind, altimeter setting,
visibility, sky condition, and precipitation.”
In addition to providing useful information
to listeners, they, along with ATIS broadcasts,
can serve as continuous ground level signal
sources in the VHF aircraft band for evaluating
antennas and scanner sensitivity. Switching
back and forth between two antennas or two
scanners will show fairly quickly if one is better than the other. For such an evaluation, use
as many ground stations across the band as you
can find.
❖ Runway Numbering
Runway numbers are mentioned frequently
by controllers at airports or by Approach Control. “Runway Two Seven,” by adding the final
omitted zero, becomes “270.” This means that
when landing on this runway, the pilot is using
a magnetic compass direction of 270 degrees, or
directly West in this case. At other times, if the
wind is different, an aircraft landing on this same
stretch of pavement in the opposite direction
would be landing on “Runway Nine,” which is
090 degrees on a compass, or directly East.
Larger airports can have parallel runways,
with planes simultaneously landing and departing. Sacramento International Airport (SMF)
offers a great example. The airport has two
separated stretches of pavement parallel to each
other. When approaching from one direction,
there is “Runway One Six Left” (RWY 16L)
Control towers are the heart of airport pilotcontroller radio communications. Courtesy
FAA.
and “Runway One Six Right” (RWY 16R), both
with a compass direction of 160 degrees from
magnetic north. In the opposite direction, there
are RWYs 34L and 34R. In other words, RWY
34L is the same stretch of pavement as RWY
16R. See Figure 1.
❖ Published Procedures
STARs, IAPs, and Departure Procedures
were briefly mentioned above. Using the same
Sacramento International page at AirNav.com as
an example, scroll to near the bottom. You will
see the various “published” procedures listed by
name, such as “Tudor One,” “ILS RWY 16R,”
and “Dudes Nine.” Since controllers and pilots
both have reference to the exact details for
each procedure, they need only be called out by
name on the radio rather than repeating all the
details.
❖ Pilot/Controller Glossary
When air traffic controllers and pilots communicate with each other on the radio, they use
very specific terms and phrases. To increase your
enjoyment as a listener to aircraft communications, it is helpful to have them become part of
your vocabulary. This first link is searchable
on line: www.faa.gov/airports_airtraffic/
air_traffic/publications/atpubs/PCG/index.
htm This next one is a 585 kb, 144 page PDF
download which can be saved for easy reference:
www.faa.gov/airports_airtraffic/air_traffic/publications/media/pcg.pdf
❖ FlightAware.com
Last, but certainly not least, FlightAware
at http://flightaware.com/live is an excellent
resource for those with an interest in airliner and
other IFR flights. Here are some of the things
you can find there: Flight tracking of individual
flights with an updating graphic that shows the
flight’s progress, a flight’s route information,
IFR (excluding most military) flights in the
general area of any U.S. airport you select, airline departure and arrival schedules by airport,
“Airborne by Operator,” “Airborne By Aircraft
Type,” and more. And, it’s free. Lots of things
to click on and try. The May 2006 issue of MT
elaborates on some of the site’s features. The
FlightAware FAQ may answer some things as
well: http://flightaware.com/about/faq.
rvt
❖ MT Anthologies
Some of the above topics have been covered in much greater detail in earlier columns.
Don’t forget that previous MT issues are available on CD at: www.grove-ent.com/mtantindividual.html
See you next time. Send questions and
comments.
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
57
B
ELOW 500 kHz
Kevin Carey, WB2QMY
kevincarey@monitoringtimes.com
DXING THE BASEMENT BAND
DX Destinations
B
y far, the most common complaint I hear
from longwave listeners is noise – both
natural (QRN) and man-made (QRM).
Although there isn’t much we can do about natural
static – other than choose our listening times carefully – man-made static is another story. In the past
we’ve covered ways of locating and curing static
problems, but this month we’ll take an entirely different approach – moving away from the noise.
In case you haven’t guessed, I’m talking about
DXpeditions. Hams are famous for these events.
They pack up their gear and head for exotic lands
for the sole purpose of putting a station on the air.
Often, they are the only station operating from the
chosen location – much to the joy of award-chasing
hams “back home.”
Listeners can also go out on DXpeditions.
Perhaps their trips won’t take them to truly exotic
lands (although they might) but just getting away
from urban centers can be very rewarding when it
comes to adding new catches to your log.
conventional wire antennas, you’ll want to have
some sturdy trees within 100 feet or so to secure
your line. Users of active antennas or loops may
only require a small post driven into the ground.
By the way, when using wire antennas, don’t
feel that you must string out a quarter-mile of wire
for acceptable performance. I’ve found that under
the quieter conditions of a DXpedition, just 75 feet
of wire is often sufficient. (In fact, many portables
suffer overloading when a long antenna is used.)
❖ Location, Location
Finding the right spot for your DXpedition is
the main ingredient to success. A lot will depend on
whether you’re going with a large group, or plan to
have only a few attendees at the site. In its simplest
form, an event can be held at a campsite by simply
pitching tents and setting up a small table to hold
radio equipment. (See Figure 1.) This arrangement
is well suited to warmer climates.
For larger gatherings, indoor accommodations
are the preferred choice. A few years ago, I joined
a group of DXers who rented a large cabin in the
lower Adirondacks during the month of November.
Since it was the off-season for camping, the cost
was quite reasonable. The site included smaller
cabins around the main building that served as
sleeping quarters. Such an arrangement allowed
around-the-clock DXing during all kinds of
weather.
Another primary consideration for longwave
events is noise level. Try to pick a location at that is
at least five miles away from high voltage electric
lines, and does not have fluorescent or sodiumvapor lights nearby. (It may be possible to have
such lights turned off during your event.)
Before committing to a given location, I
recommend surveying the site with a portable
LW receiver to check for noise. While this does
not guarantee quiet conditions at the time of your
event, it will give you some idea of what to expect
and may help avoid an unpleasant surprise when
you’re trying to pull in a weak signal.
Scouting visits also allow you to evaluate the
possibilities for installing temporary antennas. For
58
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
Figure 1. The Essentials for a DXpedition – Receiver, headphones, beacon guide, snacks and
a carton of milk! Photo by Dick Pearce (VT)
taken while on DXpedition in Florida.
❖ Gear Checklist
Below is a brief checklist of things you may
want to take on your DXpedition (besides your
receiver, of course). The list is intended as a starting
point and can be customized to fit your individual
needs.
 Antenna wire, insulators, rope
 Headphones
 Reference books (beacon guide, maps, MT,
etc.)
 2-meter handheld (or a cell phone)
 Sleeping bag, pillow
 Flashlight
 Battery-powered alarm clock
 Toiletries
 Logsheets, pencils
 Food, snacks
 A good non-radio book
 Camera
 Tape recorder
 Small parts & equipment (fuses, connectors,
electrical tape, multimeter, hand tools, etc.)
❖ Communications
As noted in the list, it is desirable to have
some form of two-way communication while on
a DXpedition. Wired phones may not be readily
available, so I suggest taking along your 2-meter
handheld (if you’re a ham), or a cell phone.
Two-way communication was invaluable at
an event I attended a few years ago. There were
no phones, and we needed to report a fire, so using
a 2-meter radio, we contacted a distant ham who
alerted the local authorities. As the local fire siren
began to wind up, I knew that ham radio had done
its job. (Try doing that with the Internet.)
❖ The Big Day
If you’re going to a DXpedition, I recommend
getting there early. For weekend events, I like
to arrive on Friday afternoon while there is still
some daylight left. This allows time for setting up
stations, stringing antennas and getting the bugs
worked out of the installation.
As other DXers arrive, welcome them to the
site and offer to assist them with setting up their
equipment and antennas. Before long, a brief meeting should be held to introduce the participants,
discuss emergency procedures, food arrangements,
facilities, etc.
Beyond that, there’s not much more to be said.
The rest of the time is yours to tune the bands, read,
or visit with other DXers. I think you’ll find, as I
have, that it’s hard to beat the quieter conditions
and camaraderie offered by a DXpedition. Have
fun, and be sure to send some pictures to Below
500 kHz!
I’d like to hear from listeners who have participated in a DXpedition. Where did you go? What
did you hear that you couldn’t hear at home? Do
you have any tips beyond what we’ve discussed
here? I look forward to hearing from you either by
e-mail or postal mail.
❖ Hamfest Season
It’s time for my yearly plug of what I believe
is one of the best hamfests in the U.S! The Rochester (NY) Hamfest is celebrating its 73rd year in
2007, and the event has historically been a great
place to find LF-related gear and components. This
year’s fest will be held June 1, 2, 3 at the Monroe
County Fair & Expo Center. Full information
is available online at: www.rochesterhamfest.
org/.
You may even find me rummaging for WWII
“Command Series” transmitters and receivers
(AN/ARC-5). I’ve recently developed an interest in
these unique airborne sets, with the goal of getting
a complete ARC-5 station up and running on 80
or 40 meters. You can’t beat hamfests for finding
vintage gear and related accessories.
73, Best LW DX, and see you next month.
O
UTER LIMITS
THE CLANDESTINE, THE UNUSUAL, THE UNLICENSED
George Zeller
georgezeller@monitoringtimes.com
Pirate Radio and the Media
❖ Global Crisis Watch
Veteran clandestine radio journalist Martin Schoech in Germany reminds us that he is
producing a Global Crisis Watch podcast that
contains considerable up to the minute news
on clandestine radio stations on a worldwide
basis. If you want to listen to this informative
and useful podcast, check out the web site where
the feed originates. You will find it at www.
globalcrisiswatch.com
As they define their mission: “Global Crisis
Watch is a weekly current affairs podcast that
brings listeners to the front lines on the War of
Ideas with people who are fighting tyranny and
terror with the pulse of freedom.” The podcasts
normally run for about 45 minutes.
❖ Florida Pirate Web Site
From time to time we mention the excellent web site maintained by Terry Kreuger.
It covers breaking developments on DXing
Florida pirate radio stations, most of which are
low power FM operations. You can see Terry’s
web site for yourself at http://home.earthlink.
net/~tocobagadx/flortis.html
Another interesting log came in from
Horacio Nigro in Uruguay, who has heard a
couple of North American pirates, but who is
still struggling to identify this tremendous DX.
❖ Pirate Radio USA Film
CBC radio in Canada aired a feature in early
February on Pirate Radio USA, a Seattle, WA,
pirate formerly operating on FM. The station
has produced a film about pirate radio that is
being shown intermittently in theaters in both
Canada and the United States. We thank Walt
Salmaniw for the tip on this one.
Keep your eyes open in case this
film is shown in your area.
❖ Mainstream Press Coverage
The January 26 edition of the Hartford
Courant contained an article noting that Radio
Collinsville operates from that CT city on 1620
kHz with a bluegrass music format on Saturdays
from 1400-2000 UTC. The station claims to be
low power and within FCC regulations, but the
newspaper observed that the coverage area of
their signal includes at least Collinsville.
❖ New Iranian Clandestine
Via Clandestine Radio Watch #219 and
#220, BBCMS is reporting a new Iranian clandestine known as Clandestine Radio Council
Democracy. With the current war situation in
Iran and Iraq, this one is certainly worth watching. Unfortunately their 7435 kHz schedule
between 1700-1800 UTC is certainly inaudible
in North America, where the pirate band does not
propagate from a Russian transmitter site during
local daylight hours. But, you can hear their programming on demand via their web site located
at www.radioshora.org The shortwave schedule apparently operates on Tuesday, Thursday,
Friday, and Sunday. It is being heard in Europe
and Asia, but not in the Western Hemisphere.
❖ Radio Pun
An anonymous contributor sent in this
story. We missed it for April Fool’s Day, normally a significant pirate radio holiday. But, we
do have it in time for the forthcoming Memorial
Day holiday pirate broadcasts.
Two antennas met on a roof, fell in love and
got married. The ceremony wasn’t much, but the
reception was excellent.
WHAT WE ARE HEARING
Monitoring Times readers heard 31 different pirate radio stations this month. You can hear
them, too, if you use some simple techniques. Pirate radio stations never use regularly announced
schedules, but shortwave pirate broadcasting
increases noticeably on weekends and major
holidays. You sometimes have to tune your dial
up and down through the pirate radio band to
find the stations, but more than 95% of all North
American shortwave pirate broadcasts are heard
on 6925 kHz, plus or minus 30 or 40 kHz.
Altered States Radio- This veteran station has been
QSLing lately, so their advocacy for drug use does
not hinder normal functions. (Merlin)
Ann Hoffer Radio- This pirate exclusively features music
by Ann Hoffer. (None)
AYB- This one is only rarely heard. It features a techno
rock format, with identifications in Morse code.
(None)
Brother Stair Numbers Station- This parody of spy
numbers stations cleverly uses Brother Stair’s voice
to deliver all of the numbers. (None)
Captain Morgan- Twilight Zone television audio, rock
music, and comedy are the Captain’s regular format. (None, says to send loggings to the Free Radio
Network web site)
Grasscutter Radio- Classic rock music is always their
format. (Uses grasscutterradio@yahoo.com e-mail)
James Bond Radio- Music from James Bond films and
“Bond, James Bond” identifications are heard on
this one. (None)
KBC Radio- Tom de Wit’s quasi-Europirate has created
occasional excitement with some high powered 100
kW relays of their programs from Sitkunai, Lithuania
on 6255 kHz around 2200 UTC. As we see here this
month they have a nice QSL. Check out their web site
at www.kbcradio.eu/ (Ede and uses kbc@planet.
nl e-mail)
KI- This new one identified only in Morse code. It featured
a male announcer singing pirate tunes over recorded
guitars. (None)
KIPM- Alan Maxwell’s “Illuminati” existential dramas are
still audible despite hints that the programs are out of
production. (None known; Elkhorn invalid)
Kracker Radio- They have returned with strange
programming featuring obscure new age music.
(None)
MAC Shortwave- Paul Star shows up on many frequencies such as 3275, 6850, and 6925 kHz with his
professionally produced replica of the old top 40 radio
format. (Uses macshortwave@yahoo.com e-mail)
Mystery Radio- Andy Walker’s rock music Europirate was widely heard during the winter in North
America on 6220 kHz just prior to local sunset. (Uses
radio6220@hotmail.com and mysteryradio@hotmail.
com e-mail)
Punxsutawney Radio- Among the holiday special pirates
is this one from Goundhog Day. This year they showed
up on 3275 kHz to see their shadow. (None)
Radio Ice Cream- The Ice Cream Man hosts a heavy
metal format that is spiced with children eating ice
cream and candy. (Belfast)
Radio New York International- Some pirate broadcast
a taped relay of old programming from Alan Weiner’s
classic shipboard pirate from decades ago, prior to
WBCQ. (None)
Radio Odyssey- This Greek pirate created some excitement during the late winter with some broadcasts
from Greece on 6310 kHz that were heard in North
America. (Uses odyssey.greece@yahoo.gr e-mail)
Radio Piraña Internacional- This South American
pirate created some excitement with almost regular
broadcasts using 20 watts on variable 6307 kHz
during the late winter. Check out their web site at
www.geocities.com/radio_piranha/ for station
news. (Santiago)
Random Radio- Their eclectic format varies randomly
from show to show. Recent sign-ons were in various
languages, with the main show announced as their
English language service. (None; asks for reports via
the FRN web site)
Special Ed Radio- This new rock music station plays T
Rex, other rock groups, and rock parodies. (None
known yet)
Sunshine Radio- This one is one of the few female
announcers active in pirate radio today. (Uses
sunshineradio@yahoo.com e-mail)
The Crystal Ship- The “Voice of the Blue States Republic,”
transmits on randomly selected frequencies including
Continued on page 61
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
59
O
N THE HAM BANDS
THE FUNDAMENTALS OF AMATEUR RADIO
T.J. “Skip” Arey, N2EI
tjarey@monitoringtimes.com
Searching for an Island, with a Mountain,
with a Lighthouse
O
kay, you’ve accomplished the “Big
Three,” Worked All States (WAS),
Worked All Continents (WAC), and joined
the DX Century Club (DXCC). Now what?!
Well, in addition to chasing down the 5-band
versions of the above awards (or regrabbing them
with the low power QRP or other endorsement),
there are quite a few other fun ways to put your
operating skills to the test and fill your log with
some interesting contacts as well. Let’s spend a
little time this month looking over some of the
other challenges ham radio has to offer.
❖ ISLANDS ON THE AIR (IOTA)
This award program was started in 1964 by a
shortwave listener named Geoff Watts. Managed
by the Radio Society of Great Britain (RGSB)
since 1985, the IOTA program is a great challenge
for any ham. The goal of the IOTA program is to
encourage hams to contact (and to operate from)
the world’s island locations. The IOTA committee
has established a list of 1200 qualified islands (or
island groups) that can be contacted for credit
toward a number of awards.
There are some basic rules as to what qualifies as an island. Usually, they have to be in the
ocean, not a river or lake, and they have to measure at least 1 kilometer in length. Island locations
are given unique numbers associated with the
nearest continent. For example, NA-111 indicates
the island group off the coast of New Jersey, EU116 would indicate the Isle of Man, and SA-004
indicates the Galapagos Islands. Qualified islands
are listed in the official IOTA Directory, a book
available from The Radio Society of Great Britain
www.rsgb.org/ or through The American Radio
Relay League www.arrl.org/ The price in the
U.S. is $19.95 plus shipping and handling.
IOTA operations can show up anywhere on
the ham bands, but the main meeting place for
IOTA enthusiasts is 14.260 MHz. Other SSB frequencies include 28.560, 28.460, 24.950, 21.260,
18.128, 7.055 and 3.755MHz. CW frequencies
are 28.040, 24.920, 21.040, 18.098, 14.040,
10.115 and 3.530 MHz. So if you want to give
this aspect of the ham radio hobby a try, you may
want to keep one ear on these frequencies.
There is an annual IOTA Contest sponsored
by the RSGB. It is usually held on the last weekend of July. If you live near the coastline, you
may consider going portable and offering your
own local island to the effort.
For more detailed information on the IOTA
project check out the main web site at www.
rsgbiota.org/ Also, a listing of the current IOTA
islands can be found at the web site www.logiciel.
co.uk/iota/shtlist.html
60
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
❖ SUMMITS ON THE AIR
(SOTA)
Okay, so why should the beach bums have
all the fun? There is another award program with
similar goals but decidedly dissimilar locations
(unless perhaps you are talking about Oahu). The
UK based SOTA group encourages folks to set up
portable amateur radio stations on the summits of
hills and mountains, activating them for hams and
shortwave listeners around the world.
Similar to IOTA in many ways, SOTA uses
a system of identifying numbers for logging the
locations that qualify for awards. The general rule
for a qualifying summit is a location that is minimally 150 meters above the surrounding terrain.
A further twist is added by points being awarded
based upon any summit’s height above sea level.
Awards are offered in increments of points from
100 through 5000. There are also awards for activating locations (the Mountain Goat Trophy) and
for signal “chasers” (the Shack Sloth Trophy).
The SOTA differs from the IOTA program
in that it does not currently have standardized
calling or operating frequencies. Also, the SOTA
program is still not up and running in all parts of
the world, but since its inception in 2002, it has
been growing by leaps and bounds. Most recently,
the 2nd callsign region of the United States joined
in the fun. Its current activity centers on the more
vertical places in the State of New York, but I
expect to see further involvement in a wider area
in the near future.
For more general information and complete
rules for the SOTA program, go to the Web site
www.sota.org.uk/ For more information on the
United States 2nd region offerings, look for the
Web site www.kc2eus.org/sota/
I think I am going to talk to some other hams
in my Outdoor Club and see what we can do to
get a few high places on the air from the Northern
part of New Jersey.
❖ LIGHTHOUSES
Well now, we must come down from the
mountains and head back toward the shore line
for this next operating activity. While lighthouses
have largely gone out of use in favor of modern
navigation systems, they remain historic landmarks worth preserving and remembering. The
Amateur Radio Light House Society
enjoys the beauty and history of
lighthouses and lightships in a
special way. The Society seeks
to promote public awareness of
both ham radio and lighthous-
es, preserving lights that are in danger of extinction, and paying tribute to the role that hams and
lighthouse keepers have played in contributing to
maritime safety. The Society offers a number of
awards, but requires membership to participate
in the awards program. Initial membership is $25
and then $20 each year following.
Members of the society are encouraged to
“activate” identified lighthouses for the benefit
of other hams. Since it is not always possible to
have an operating position actually within the
lighthouse or lightship itself, the club operates on
the basis of a “Visual Sight Rule,” whereby you
are able to set up shop as long as you can see the
light from your operating position.
The Society maintains an exhaustive list of
the world’s lighthouses and lightships, currently
numbering 14,831 in 226 call areas. Quite a challenge for any ham!
The Society sponsors four operating events
annually. The Spring Lites QSO Party, generally
held in April, the National Lighthouse-Lightship
Weekend QSO Party in early August, the International Lighthouse-Lightship Weekend, held
the third weekend in August, and the Lighthouse
Christmas Lights QSO Party in December. They
also hold an annual convention, usually at a location near a well known lighthouse.
Like IOTA, the club has a series of suggested
operating frequencies. The SSB frequencies include 1.970, 3.970, 7.270, 14.270, 18.145, 21.370
and 28.370 MHz. The CW frequencies include
1.830, 3.530, 7.030, 10.130, 14.030, 18.070,
21.030 and 28.030 MHz.
For more information about the Amateur
Radio Lighthouse Society and its award program,
visit its Web site at http://arlhs.com/
Another Lighthouse Event
Not formally related to the Amateur Radio
Lighthouse Society, the International Lighthouse/Lightship Weekend is held every August,
activating dozens of Lighthouses and Lightships
world wide. This year’s event will be held 0001
UTC August 18th to 2359 UTC August19th, so
mark your calendars now. The Web site for this
operating event is at http://illw.net/
❖ COUNTY HUNTING
While we are looking at cumulative operating awards, we can’t forget the old standby for
many hams, County Hunting.
The goal of County Hunting is simple
enough: making two way contacts with hams in
every county in the United States. How hard can
that be? Well, there is the fact that there are 3,077
counties in the United States. Oh, and not all of
them have hams living in them. County hunting
is a true ham radio challenge. It usually involves
contacting mobile stations who have gone on the
road to operate from inactive counties for the
coveted USA-CA award. Fewer than 1,500 hams
have achieved this goal, but some of those have
actually done it multiple times.
Any contact you make can qualify toward the
various County Hunting awards. This is why it is
good to include your county of origin on your QSL
cards and ask for the same from other hams. But
the majority of County Hunters make use of the
County Hunting Nets operating on 14.336 MHz
SSB, 14.056.5 MHz CW and 10.122.5 MHz CW.
These are controlled nets, so before you jump in
with your call, give a good long listen to get the
hang of how things operate.
The USA-CA (Worked All Counties) Award
is administered through CQ Magazine at www.
cq-amateur-radio.com/usacarul.html but many
other award opportunities for County Hunters are
administered though the Mobile Amateur Radio
Awards Club (MARAC). Their Website is located
at http://marac.org/
County Hunting is an enjoyable operating
activity in that it can be done almost any time of
the day. The nets run fairly constantly, sometimes
QSYing to 40 meters when conditions warrant.
So it is easy to fit things into a busy personal
schedule. Counties can be chased with a fairly
modest home station. The main requirement for a
successful County Hunter is perseverance. If you
get on the air often enough over enough time, you
will find the counties you need to achieve your
goals.
All of the operating activities listed in this
month’s column have greater emphasis on fun
than on competition. That is probably the reason
I enjoy them so much.
❖ HAM RADIO WEB SITE OF
THE MONTH
This month’s Ham Radio Web site is all
about tubes:
I have made my way through the ham radio
world for years with a short bookshelf full of well
worn tube manuals, most dating from well back
in the 1960s. Most of these books are not only
beginning to show their age, they are flat-out falling apart at this point. That is why I was overjoyed
to find the website www.tubedata.org/
Started by Frank Philipse of The Netherlands, the site provides essential information on
the majority of tubes produced throughout the
world. In addition to scans of data sheets (in
Adobe .pdf format) for most tubes, the site has
loads of additional information on tube bases and
tube number systems. One of the most useful sections of the site, for me, has been the American to
Foreign tube substitution lists. I run across quite a
few old German and British receivers and figuring out what common Yankee tubes will fit their
sockets is a great help for restoration projects. This
is a link you will want to add to your favorites.
❖ HAM RADIO BOOK OF THE
MONTH
Power Supply Handbook
by John Fielding ZS5JF
274 pages
$29.95 plus shipping and handling
Published jointly by
The American Radio Relay League
225 Main Street
Newington, CT 06111-1494
www.arrl.org/
1-888-277-5289
and the Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB)
www.rsgb.org/
ISBN: 1-905086-21-0
ARRL Order No. 9977
This month’s book is all
about power:
Over the years, I have
discovered that the most common failure with most equipment in my shack has been
in the power supply. So any
resource that helps a radio hobbyist understand
the workings of the power chain in a transmitter, receiver, or any other gear is worth having
around. John Fielding is an electrical engineer and
a licensed amateur radio operator for 35 years. He
brings his years of skill and experience to hams
everywhere through this excellent book.
The book begins with a study of power
supply basics, the difference between regulated
versus unregulated power supplies as well as
design parameters. It then details all the components that can go into a power supply design and
how to decide which parts will work best in any
particular application. John goes on to show how
to build power supply systems from scratch and
also how to modify existing power circuits for
improved performance.
Also covered is how to go about correctly
testing and measuring a power supply’s performance and output. Fielding also covers battery
backup power systems, so important in making
sure your station is ready to go in any emergency.
If you want to fully understand most equipment’s
“weakest link” or if you just enjoy learning about
the inner workings of electronic equipment, this
book is well written for the average ham.
I suppose I should try to find a nice island
with a lighthouse on top of its highest hill. I
could set up a station that would provide a triple
opportunity for hams around the world.
Have fun. I’ll see you on the bottom end of
40 meters.
UNCLE SKIP’S CONTEST CALENDAR
MARAC County Hunter Contest (CW)
May 5 0000 UTC - May 6 2400 UTC
10-10 Int. Spring Contest (CW)
May 5 0001 UTC - May 6 2400 UTC
Indiana QSO Party
May 5 1600 UTC - May 6 0400 UTC
New England QSO Party
May 65 2000 UTC - May 6 0500 UTC
May 6 1300 - 2400 UTC
FISTS Spring Sprint
May 12 1700 UTC - 2100 UTC
CQ WW WPX Contest (CW)
May 26 0000 UTC - May 27 2359 UTC
Outer Limits continued from Page 59
1710, 3320, 3346, 3275, 6875, 6925, and 9057 for
The Poet’s rock music and leftist political commentary.
(Belfast and uses tcsshortwave@yahoo.com e-mail)
Undercover Radio- Dr. Benway’s rock music and
adventure programming “from the middle of nowhere” QSL is regularly generating QSLs. (Uses
undercoverradio@gmail.com e-mail)
Wal Mart Radio- This new one materialized right after
Punxsutawney Radio on 3275 kHz with a classic rock
music format. (None announced)
WBNY- Commander Bunny, the voice of the rodent
revolution, still transmits both digital SSTV mode
broadcasts and regular audio transmissions that often
involve monkeys. (Belfast)
WBZO- This rock music pirate also is a malicious parody
of a certain DXer. (None)
WPDR- This new one, with a slogan of “President’s Day
Radio,” appeared on that USA holiday with programming consisting entirely of speeches by several USA
Presidents. (None; said like the Presidents they do
not deliver)
WNKR- This rock music station may be a pirate production or a relay of programming generated elsewhere.
(None)
WPMR- Here’s another new one, using a slogan of
Wasabi Pea Man Radio. They feature middle eastern
music and pirate radio commentary. (Belfast)
WTCR- “Twentieth Century Radio” programs rock music.
(None)
WTPR- Tire Pressure Radio still claims that if DXers listen
to “Tire Pressure Radio” broadcasts, all of the air
will escape from the tires on their car. (Now using
Belfast)
❖ QSLing Pirates
Reception reports to pirate stations require three
first class stamps for USA maildrops or $2 US to
foreign locations. The cash defrays postage for mail
forwarding and a souvenir QSL to your mailbox.
Letters go to these addresses, identified above in
parentheses: PO Box 1, Belfast, NY 14895; PO Box
109, Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214; PO Box 146,
Stoneham, MA 02180; Casilla 159, Santiago 14, Chile;
Argonstraat 6, 6718-WT Ede, Holland, and PO Box
293, Merlin, Ontario N0P 1W0. Unfortunately, PO Box
69, Elkhorn, NE 68022 is no longer a valid address,
although a few pirates announce it.
Some pirates prefer e-mail, bulletin logs or
internet web site reports. The best bulletin for submitting your pirate loggings is the e-mailed Free Radio
Weekly newsletter, free to contributors via yukon@tm.
net. A few pirates will sometimes QSL reports left
on the outstanding Free Radio Network web site, at
http://www.frn.net
❖ Thanks
Your loggings and news about unlicensed broadcasting stations are always welcome via 7540 Highway
64 W, Brasstown, NC 28902, or via the e-mail address
atop the column. We thank this month’s valuable
contributors: Jerry Berg, Lexington, MA; Artie Bigley, Columbus, OH; Ralph Brandi, Middletown, NJ;
Richard Cuff, Allentown, PA; Ross Comeau, Andover,
MA; Richard Cuff, Allentown, PA; Gerry Dexter, Lake
Geneva, WI; Rich D’Angelo, Wyomissing, PA; John
Figliosi, Halfmoon, NY; Bill Finn, Philadelphia, PA;
Ulis Fleming, Glen Burnie, MD; Harold Frodge, Midland, MI; William T. Hassig, Mt. Prospect, IL; John
Herkimer, Caledonia, NY; Terry Kreuger, Clearwater,
FL; Ed Kusalik, Coaldale, Alberta; Chris Lobdell,
Tewksbury, MA; Greg Majewski, Oakdale, CT; Terry
Mares, Keyport, NJ; George Maroti, Mount Kisco,
NY; Joe Miller, Troy, MI; A. J. Michaels, Blue Ridge
Summit, PA; Horacio Nigro, Montevideo, Uruguay;
John Poet, Belfast, NY; Lee Reynolds, Lempster,
NH; Walt Salmaniw, Victoria, BC; Martin Schoech,
Eisenach, Germany; Andy Walker, UK; Joe Wood,
Greenback, TN; Larry Yamron, Pittsburgh PA; and
two anonymous contributors.
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
61
A
NTENNA TOPICS
BUYING, BUILDING AND UNDERSTANDING ANTENNAS
Clem Small, KR6A
clemsmall@monitoringtimes.com
A Pedestrian-Mobile Antenna
G
enerally, the higher and more in the
clear a handheld scanner or transceiver’s antenna is mounted, the better
that antenna performs. Performance is also
improved if we connect a quarter-wavelength
radial wire to the grounded portion of the
handheld’s antenna connector.
The project described below raises your
antenna by placing your antenna’s vertical element above your head (fig. 1A), clear of you
and of other persons nearby. As a plus, it adds
radials to the antenna. Thus, this antenna gives
significantly better performance than simply
using a rubber duck connected to your handheld
in the usual way. You can design this antenna for
frequencies of your choice.
If you’ve been to a busy hamfest, you have
probably seen one of these hats. The antenna
is mounted atop a hard hat such as that used
by construction workers to protect their heads.
From inside the top of the hat, a thin, 4 ft length
of coaxial cable runs down to your handheld.
The handheld can be on your belt, in your
pocket, in your hand, or wherever you wish to
put it.
small, hand-held grinder tool with a very small
router bit, I reduced the thickness of the material around the hole. Otherwise, the material
was too thick to screw on the connector nut
when the radial wires were placed under the
washer.
Making this hole and reducing the material’s thickness could probably be done with
other tools, such as a hot wood-burning pen
or hot soldering iron, though you may have to
clean and sand them off later! (Once the hole
is made, the hat of course no longer qualifies
as an OSHA-certified hard hat.)
The RG-174 coax (fig. 1B) used here
is both thinner and more pliable than largerdiameter coax, making it easy to manipulate.
Any feedline causes some signal loss: the
shorter the line, the less the loss. The 4-ft
length used here produces less than 1 dB signal
loss: an essentially negligible amount.
The hat end of the feedline uses a throughthe-panel, female, BNC socket: The kind that
totally encloses the end of the coax (fig. 1B) is
best here. The cable end which attaches to the
handheld uses a male, BNC plug, somewhat
like that on your rubber duck antenna (fig.
1B). Put the line through the hole in the hat
before attaching your second connector. Also
remember to put the nut and washer on the
female end of the line before you connect the
second connector.
❖ Radials:
I tried pruning the radials for resonance
with an SWR meter; however, using radials cut
to the length given by the formula below worked
best. I used size-18, bare hook-up wire, but size
is not critical here.
Using just two radials, both cut for 147
MHz, with no radials for the 70 cm band, produced results as good as when 70 cm radials
were added. If the two bands you use are not
related in an approximate 3-to-1 frequency ratio,
then omitting radials for the higher-frequency
band may not work as well for you. You can try
both ways and check it out.
Two radials for the same band can be made
as one continuous length of wire that is twice
the length of one radial. The midpoint of such a
wire is slipped beneath the washer of the female
coax fitting, and the nut then tightened. The two
halves of the wire then extending from the fitting
will be proper-length radials.
Once the center of the wire is clamped
under the connector’s washer, the radials then
extending from the connector are taped or glued
inside the hat. The radials are positioned against
the inner side of the hat straight down to near
the bottom brim area. Then bend them at a right
❖ Let’s Make One:
angle and run them near the brim as in figures
Unsnap and remove the headband while
1C and 1D. Space the radials evenly apart and
working on the hat. For the antenna socket,
don’t allow them to touch each other.
center a 1/2 inch hole in the hat’s top. It’s best
My hard-hat antenna was designed to
to drill first with a small bit and gradually
operate on both the 2-meter (144-148 MHz)
work up to a full 1/2-in bit. After that, using a
and the 70 cm (420 to 450 MHz) ham bands.
You may want your hat antenna
to function on other frequencies.
The length of one individual
radial (remember this is just half
the length you cut as described
above) or the length of a full,
quarter-wavelength vertical element can be found by: Length
(in inches) = 2808/(frequency
in MHz), or Length(in cm) =
7130/(frequency in MHz). Cut
the elements for the middle of the
bands you choose. Each radial for
147 MHz was 2808/147 = 19.1 in
long, and the telescoping, vertical, quarter-wavelength element
mentioned below was that same
length.
Covering the hat with tinfoil as a ground plane was significantly less effective than using
Fig. 1. A hard-hat antenna (A), connectors for the hard-hat antenna feedline (B), bottom view of the hat with radials.
two radials (C), X-ray, side-view of the hat with radials.
62
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
This Month’s Interesting Antenna-Related Web site:
This site features a hard hat carrying a
434 MHz vertical antenna, a tiny TV camera,
and a transmitter:
www.hamtv.com/pdffiles/Hatcam.pdf
Another hard-hat antenna with a slot
antenna for 24-cm TV:
www.southgatearc.org/atv/hatantenna.
htm
The next site lists a “Duck Clip” to clip
your rubber-duck HT antenna to your hat or
cap. I can’t tell from the ad if it has radials:
ww.pl-259.com/page5.html
❖ Some Comments:
A stubby duck antenna (shorter than a
rubber duck) should work well as the vertical
antenna element where signals are moderately
strong. Using a full-sized, quarter-wavelength,
vertical, telescoping element on 2-meters
increased the effectiveness of the hat antenna
significantly over an ordinary rubber duck and
should help if signals are weak. Surprisingly,
the quarter wave didn’t feel too unwieldy on
my head when in use, but it will knock the hat
from your head if you forget to duck low for
doorways!
I don’t have a 70-cm band rubber duck at
present, so I couldn’t make the same comparison
for that band. If I had, it would probably have
shown the same advantage for the full quarter
wave element over a rubber duck on that band,
too. The full quarter-wavelength on 70 cm is
only 6.4 in long.
Last Month:
I asked: “What is a ‘magnetic antenna?’
For that matter, what is an ‘electric antenna?’”
Well, there are two kinds of magnetic
antennas. One kind of magnetic antenna is a
small vertical antenna with a magnet to hold it
in place atop a vehicle. It’s called “magnetic”
because of its magnetic base.
Another kind of magnetic antenna is one
that responds primarily to the magnetic field
of an electromagnetic (radio) wave. Small loop
antennas and slot antennas are examples of
magnetic antennas.
There are also two kinds of electric antennas. One is the automobile-radio antenna
that has an electric motor that raises it when
the ignition is turned on and retracts it when
the ignition is turned off. It’s called “electric”
because it raises and lowers via an electric motor.
The other kind of electric antennas are
those that respond primarily to the electric field
of an electromagnetic wave. Wire antennas
such as dipoles and groundplane antennas are
examples of electric antennas. Incidentally, slot
antennas are the magnetic-antenna analogs of
electric dipole antennas.
This Month:
So we know about a hat that wears an antenna. But does an antenna ever wear a hat?
You’ll find an answer to this month’s
riddle, another riddle, another antenna-related
web site or so, and much more, in next month’s
issue of Monitoring Times. ‘Til then Peace,
DX, and 73.
❖ Sources for Parts:
www.dxing.info/equipment/rg_174_
coax_bryant.dx has info on RG-174, including
attaching the coax connectors. That site also has
links to suppliers of connectors for RG-174.
Sources of RG-174 coax include:
www.radiobooks.com/products/rg174.
htm, and,
www.allelectronics.com/cgi-bin/item/RG174/825/RG-174_MINI_CO-AXIAL_CABLE_.html
This next site had RG-174 at writing
time:
www.danssmallpartsandkits.net/
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
63
R
ADIO RESTORATIONS
Marc Ellis
marcellis@monitoringtimes.com
BRINGING OLD RADIOS BACK TO LIFE
Introducing the BC-348
B
ack in October 2001 (Wow! Was it
really that long ago?) we launched the
first of what became a very popular
group of articles on the World War II aircraft
“command set” receivers. Paired with the
transmitters that were also part of the system
(designated SCR274-N by the Army and
ARC-5 by the Navy), the command sets were
intended for plane-to-plane communication
within formations and were installed in both
our fighter planes and our bombers. Beautiful
in their ugliness, these amazingly compact little
sets were available by the thousands in the surplus market after the war and became the basis
for many a beginning ham station.
But besides interplane communications,
our long-range aircraft, such as bombers, also
needed facilities for communicating back to
base. And for this, more sophisticated equipment was required.
The receiver that
evolved for this
application was
the BC-348, a set
that was designed
to be operated by a
specialized radioman rather than a
fighter pilot. Like
the command sets,
the BC-348 was also
available in large
numbers after the
At the controls of a BC- war and was eagerly
348 in a B-17 radio cu- snapped up at barbicle. Floyd Jury, shown gain prices by the
here some 65 years ago, amateur radio comhas been a radio enthu- munity.
Unlike the sinsiast since grade school
and is an active member gle-band 6-tube
of The Antique Wireless command receivAssociation. Courtesy ers, the much larger
8-tube BC-348 was
AWA.
a multiband set and
had more advanced features such as a crystal
filter, a.v.c. control and adjustable bfo. Like the
command equipment, the ‘348 was powered
by a built-in dynamotor that operated from the
plane’s 24 v.d.c. electrical system.
While the spare simplicity of the command
sets gives them a lot of physical charm, the BC348s are (at least to my eyes) just plain ungainly.
But what these radios lack in appearance, they
make up for in historical significance. These are
the radios that were installed in the B-17s and
B-29s, piloted by our intrepid young air crews,
64
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
as they droned over Europe laying waste to Axis
manufacturing plants and bases.
❖ Some BC-348 History
Different models of the BC-348 are designated by different letter suffixes. One list
I have seen shows at least 20 of them. Some
letters indicate only minor electrical or physical
differences; others may refer only to the set’s
manufacturer or a specific contract.
Here’s what I’ve been able to piece together. The historical background comes from
Bill Fizette’s “The Communication Receiver”
column in the August 1986 issue of The Old
Timer’s Bulletin (Now The AWA Journal, for
which I have the pleasure of serving as Editor).
In the article, Bill quoted at length from an
interview he conducted with H.A. Robinson,
the BC-348’s original design engineer. (By the
way, Bill still writes “The “Communication
Receiver” for our publication.)
BC348 front view–see text. Courtesy AWA.
At any rate, the BC-348 started life in the
early 1930s as the BC-224, which operated
from a 12-14 volt aircraft electrical system.
The first major production run (the BC-224-A
– manufactured by RCA) was in 1936-1937.
In 1938, specifications were released for a substantially improved BC-224, and this, too, was
manufactured by RCA (as the BC-224-B).
With the changeover to 24-28 volt electrical systems in military aircraft, the BC-224-B
had to be redesigned. I imagine that the voltage
change was necessitated by the increased power
demand aboard the aircraft. This was the same
reason automobile electrical systems changed
over from six to 12 volts in the late 1950s. It
meant that power could be transferred at lower
currents, and therefore over smaller gauge
wires.
The change gave rise to the BC-348-B,
which was identical to the BC-224-B except for
the different dynamotor and the different tube
heater wiring necessitated by the higher-voltage
power supply. The BC-224-C and -D and the
BC-348-C (apparently there was no -D) seem
to be identical with the -B models of each set
– the only difference being in production run
contract.
However, an important change took place
with the -E models of both radios. Long-range
military aircraft were beginning to make extended flights over water, and there was a need
for a low frequency band for communication
with ships. Accordingly, beginning with the
BC-224-E and BC-348-E, the 1.5 - 18 MHz
frequency range formerly covered in six bands
was compressed into five – freeing a switch
position for a new 200-500 kHz band.
❖ Alphabet Soup
At this point, the letter suffixes became
associated not so much with physical changes
as with different contracts with different manufacturers. Because of growing wartime needs,
RCA was no longer the only manufacturer
of these radios. Stromberg Carlson, Belmont
Radio and Wells-Gardner all became suppliers.
The military maintenance manuals for these
receivers are very helpful in identifying letter suffixes that refer to identical, or virtually
identical, sets.
For instance the manual for the BC-348-E
and BC-224-E also covers the BC-348-M, -O,
-P and -S as well as the BC-224-G, -H, and -L.
And it specifically states that the sets are – for
all intents and purposes – identical (except,
of course, for their voltage requirements, as
described earlier. Let’s call these sets group 1.
Inside the BC-348–see text. Courtesy AWA.
Another group of virtually identical sets
(group 2) is the BC-348-H, -K, -L, and -R as
well as the BC-224-F and -K. Group 2 seems to
differ from group 1 only in that its audio output
tube is an octal-base 6K6GT instead of a tall
glass, 6-pin 41. According to Robinson, the
shorter “GT” style tube, which would
when in the upright position. The
black dynamotor is visible at the left
certainly have been preferable to the
rear, and the i.f. transformers (which
tall glass (“ST” style) type in a combat
can be individually unplugged for
radio, was simply not available at the
servicing) are on the deck in front of
time of the earlier design.
it.
Group 3, including BC-348-J,
The r.f. deck is located at the top right
-N and -Q (no BC-224 versions),
of the chassis, with the four-gang
does differ markedly from the first
tuning capacitor below it. The coil
two. Though the external appearance
enclosures are directly behind the
is identical, the design is revised
deck. Notice the square can (labeled
and simplified – using single-ended
101A) at the center rear of the chassis.
equivalents of the top-cap types found
This is the audio output transformer.
in the former groups. (In a singleBy moving a tap on it, one can change
ended tube, all of the connections are
the output to match either 4000- or
made at the bottom of the socket.) In
300-ohm headphones.
addition, this group uses a combined
oscillator/mixer tube (6SA7 pentagrid The BC-348 provided reliable base communications for long-range This concludes our introductory tour
of the BC-348. Next time we’ll take a
converter) instead of the separate bombers such as the B-17 (shown) and B-29.
good look at the unit that’s in the shop
oscillator and mixer tubes in the earwindow that exposes only the band in use.
awaiting
restoration and see what problems we
lier groups. All in all, the tube types used are
Below and to the right is the tuning knob,
more like those found in a home entertainment which is equipped with a convenient spinner. might be facing. It should be interesting!
receiver of the era. There are also physical dif- One of the features of these receivers is the
ferences in the arrangement of the i.f. strips.
very fine and precise geared-down tuning. But
without the spinner, it would take quite a while
to get from one end of a band to the other. The
knob to the left of, and slightly below, the tuning knob is the BFO (beat frequency oscillator)
All sets have two stages of r.f. and three
adjust control. It controls the tone of the signals
stages of i.f. with tube complements as shown
heard during Morse operation.
in Table 1. Table 2 shows the frequency ranges
Proceeding to the left of the BFO control,
for the various bandswitch positions in sets with
you’ll see the volume control, the bat-handle
and without the low-frequency band.
switch selecting manual or automatic volume
The receiver’s few simple controls can
control (MVC or AVC) operation and a couple
be clearly seen in the front illustration (from
of phone jacks. As it stands, this radio does not
the Bill Fizette article previously mentioned).
have enough gain for speaker operation, nor is
At the upper right center is a dial light control
it equipped to match a standard low-impedthat would be used, I presume, for dimming
ance speaker. Of course, it wasn’t unusual for
under combat conditions. The binding posts
hams who acquired these sets as surplus after
at lower right are for the antenna and ground.
the war to add an extra audio stage and proper
Just above them is the antenna adjust trimmer.
audio transformer to drive a speaker at their
The bandswitch is the star-shaped control just
stations.
below the tuning dial. A rotating mask in the
Above the MVC-AVC switch is the switch
dial turns with the bandswitch, positioning a
for turning the BFO on and off, and to the right
of that is a switch for
TABLE 1
cutting the crystal filter in and out. You may
TUBE COMPLEMENTS–BC-224 AND BC-348
be wondering about
BC-224-A Group 1 Group 2 Group 3
the wide, screwed-on
(See Text for the BC-348/224 models in each
plate below the pilot
group)
light dimmer. It’s there
1RF
6D6
6K7
6K7
6SK7
2RF
6D6
6K7
6K7
6SK7
to provide access to
OSC
76
6C5
6C5
–
the otherwise-inaccesMIXER
6D6
6J7
6J7
–
sible underside of the
OSC/MIX
–
–
–
6SA7
r.f. deck for trouble1IF
6D6
6K7
6K7
6SK7
shooting and servic2IF
–
–
–
6SK7
ing.
2IF/CW OSC
6F7
6F7
6F7
–
3IF/DET/AVC
6B7
6B8
6B8
–
I’ve included a
3 IF
–
–
–
6SJ7
shot of the set minus
DET/AVC/CW OSC –
–
–
6SR7
its cabinet (also from
OUTPUT
41
41
6K6GT
6K6GT
the Bill Fizette article)
VOLTAGE REG
–
991
991
–
to give you an idea of
the interior construction. To my eyes, at
TABLE 2
least, this radio is a lot
prettier on the inside
FREQUENCY RANGES (IN MHz) BY BANDSWITCH POSITION
than on the outside.
1
2
3
4
5
6
Now you can see how
EARLY SETS 1.5-3.0
3.0-5.0
5.0-7.5
7.5-10.5
10.5-14
14.0-18.0
the masks for the tuning dial are staggered,
“E” SUFFIX 0.2-0.5
1.5-3.5
3.5-6.0
6.0-9.5
9.5-13.5
13.5-18.0
so that they reveal
AND LATER
only one specific band
❖ Features of the BC-348
and BC-224
AWA Membership - P.O. Box 421, Dept. 2 Bloomfield, NY 14469-0421
http://www.antiquewireless.org
awamembership@rochester.rr.com (585) 392-3088
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
65
MT
REVIEW
Comparing Four Mid-Priced
Portables:
Grundig G4000A, Kaito 1103, Grundig
G5, and Sony ICF-SW7600GR
By Todd Van Gelder
I
’m tough on my shortwave portables. I
expose them to travel, the tropical conditions of a hot and humid bathroom during
showers, and occasional freezing conditions,
when I venture outside on winter nights to hunt
longwave beacons and elusive shortwave signals
away from the wrath of the RF interference that
pervades my Maryland neighborhood.
Since I rediscovered my love of shortwave
listening and DXing several years ago, I’ve acquired a small collection of affordable radios. My
initial purchase conditions were simple: digital
readout and SSB reception. Now this may not
seem like a lot to ask for, but as anyone who was
an SWL during the 1970s or before (as I was)
can tell you, these features were a mere fantasy
then. So, when I picked up the hobby again, I purchased a Grundig Yacht Boy 400PE. It seemed
amazing to me that for around one hundred and
forty dollars, one could purchase a compact, full
featured radio that covered longwave to shortwave and had great FM reception as well. More
importantly, as an occasional utility listener, I
could actually make out what was being said on
side-band and stations didn’t drift!
However, after several years of daily use,
sometimes under harsh conditions, the YB 400PE
started to have some minor problems. Most of
these issues were due to the fact that I traveled
quite a bit with it. So, it was time to pick up a
radio just for travel. Around that time, I started
to read some good things about the newly introduced Kaito 1103. The feature-set seemed incredible for any radio under two hundred dollars. The
fact that it was around ninety dollars made it a
downright bargain, so I ordered one.
The Grundig G-5 and Sony ICF-SW7600GR
were more recent acquisitions. My reasons for
picking up these additional radios will be mentioned later in this article.
❖ It’s what’s on the outside
that counts
The old adage, “It’s what’s on the inside
that counts,” is generally used when talking
about people. But when talking about shortwave
reception, it’s what’s on the outside that counts:
your antenna. When taking these radios through
their paces, I tested reception three ways: with the
attached whip antennas, the internal AM antennas
and with my outdoor longwire antenna.
I’ve had two outdoor setups in the last eight
years. The first was a 75 foot, end-fed wire,
which was in a horizontal V-shape. It provided
excellent reception, although it picked up its fair
share of noise, since we lived on a main road with
nearly half a dozen power lines running right past
our house. This past summer, our family moved a
few doors down, which took us off the main road,
so the noise levels are somewhat lower. However,
since we live in a historic village, I was faced
with the challenge of keeping my new antenna
setup discreet (as I had at the old house).
I had known that the previous owner of
our new house had installed an electric “border”
fence for his dog. This gave me a great idea. I
knew that there was well over two hundred feet of
heavy gauge copper wire buried throughout our
new property. I also noticed that at least 60 feet
of this wire ran across the rafters of our detached
garage. Since the previous owner had taken the
electronics off of the system in order to set up
The Grundig G4000A, Sony ICF-SWS7600GR, Kaito 1103 (Photo by Eric Van Gelder)
66
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
an electric fence at his new house, I thought that
tapping into the existing copper wire fencing at a
point closest to our house might make for a good
shortwave antenna and would insure that I had
no visible antennas outside of the house.
Though I understood that, theoretically, a
buried shortwave antenna is not ideal, I threw
caution to the wind. I snipped the heavy copper
wire where it ran next to the house in a planting bed and ran a length of coax out the side of
the house. I connected the center lead to both
stripped wires and sealed it up with a large
wire-nut. Strange though it may be, the antenna
performs quite well and provides that extra boost
needed when a whip antenna just won’t do the
trick. During the evaluations that follow, this was
the primary antenna used.
❖ The Grundig YB400PE –
A Full Featured Workhorse
Why mess with success? The YB 400PE
is likely the most popular shortwave portable in
recent history. So instead of dropping the model,
Grundig simply renamed it the Grundig G4000A.
I’ve been using this radio for over 5 years on
almost a daily basis and it has performed well. I
wish I could say “without a hitch,” but that would
not be true. On several occasions over the years,
the radio has lost all of the 40 pre-set frequencies
that I’ve entered into its memory and each time,
for no apparent reason. After this happened the
first time, I built a spreadsheet which listed all
of the frequencies, along with country or station
data. This way, I’d have a paper and electronic
record to back my choices up in the event this
happened again.
Just as I finished entering the 40 frequencies into the spreadsheet, it did happen again!
Fortunately, this radio shines compared to the
other three in the area of intuitive operation
when it comes to station memory entry, so reentering the frequencies wasn’t that much of a
chore. You simply enter the frequency, choose
a pre-set number, and away you go. Entering
presets into the other radios is more complex.
However, one of the drawbacks of this
Grundig model compared to the other radios
is that it only has 40 station presets. The Sony
has 100, the Kaito has 268, and the Grundig G5
has a whopping 700. Another minus is overall
frequency coverage. Where the other three radios cover almost all of the broadcast and utility
spectrum from longwave (LW) through commercial FM (US) and then some, the G4000A
has a frequency gap between 353 and 500 kHz.
I’ve found there are enough beacons (including
the one at our local small airport) and other
interesting signals in that range, that I missed
having continuous coverage.
On the other hand, this radio has great
sensitivity on LW. The proof was that on a trip
to the Caribbean, I could actually pick up numerous European broadcasters with it! In fact,
the overall sensitivity of the G4000A is excellent. There seems to be little difference in what
signals it can pull in from the bottom to the top
end of the shortwave frequency spectrum. It is
also sensitive enough to pick up several Cuban
broadcasters on AM, like Radio Reloj on 870
AM, with just a slight turn of the radio. For AM
reception, the G4000A uses the internal ferrite
bar antenna. The external antenna connection
only works for shortwave and FM, not AM or
LW.
One of the biggest differences between
these four radios is the tuning method. This
model can be tuned using direct frequency entry,
or by using one of the up or down buttons on the
front panel in steps of one, five and ten kHz (in
the case of FM).
As all of these radios are portable, battery
consumption is an issue. The G4000A is average
in this department. It will use up a new set of
alkaline batteries after around two weeks of daily
use of approximately an hour a day. However, an
excellent power adapter is included. It puts out
very little of the noise that is typically associated
with “wall warts” of this kind.
One other nice accessory is the wind-up
antenna (included). I’ve used this while traveling
not only with the G4000A, but with the other
radios mentioned in this article.
Since I use the G4000A as my daily alarm
clock as well as a SW receiver, I like the fact that
it has settings for two time zones. I have one set
to UTC and the other set to our local time. The
level of the backlight leaves a bit to be desired.
I noticed after about a year of use, the sidemounted volume control started to give off that
“crunchy” sound that is common to old potentiometers. It’s usually the sign of a dirty control. I
sprayed it with some commonly available CRC
electronic contact cleaner. It was fine for a while,
but started to happen again about two months
later. After several consecutive treatments with
that contact cleaner, I tried an alternate: Radio
Shack tuner cleaner w/lubricant. Four years after
that treatment, the problem still hasn’t returned.
So for this particular radio, I’m a believer in that
little can from RS!
In comparison to the other radios here, it’s
worth mentioning that the G4000A and the Sony
7600GR have the best audio quality when using
the built in speaker, with the Grundig getting
the slight edge. In terms of quality on SSB, the
G4000A is a bit tinny.
FEATURES
o Tunes both upper and lower sideband with
infinite fine-tuning.
o User selectable tuning steps: 1kHz/5kHz in
SW; 1kHz/9kHz/10kHz in MW; 1kHz/9kHz in
LW.
o User selectable wide/narrow bandwidth filter.
o DX/Local switch.
o Hi/Low tone option.
o Switchable 9kHz/10kHz scan rates on MW
o FM-stereo with mono option.
o Telescopic antenna for FM and shortwave
reception.
o Built-in ferrite antenna for MW and LW.
o External SW antenna can be connected via the
built-in receptacle.
o Shipped with owner’s manual, warranty card,
operating instructions, carrying case, earphones and AC adaptor for North American
use.
o Dimensions: 8”W x 4.8”H x 1.5”D Weight:
1lbs. 5oz.
o Power Source: 6 AA batteries (not included)
or AC adaptor (included)
o PLL synthesized tuning for rock-solid frequency
stability.
o Continuous shortwave from 1.6 through 30
megahertz, covering all existing shortwave
bands, AM and Longwave.
o Single sideband (SSB) circuitry
o 40 randomly programmable memory presets.
The memory “FREE” feature automatically
shows which memories are unoccupied and
ready to program.
o The LCD shows simultaneous display of time,
frequency, band, automatic turn-on, and sleep
timer.
o Liquid crystal display (LCD) shows time and
clock/timer modes.
o Dual alarm modes: beeper & radio.
o Dual clocks show time in 24 hour format.
RATINGS (0-10 scale) Grundig G4000A
Audio Quality
9
Battery Consumption
7
User Interface/Ease of Use
8
Overall Features
6
Overall Reception
7
Longwave Reception
7
Construction/Initial Quality
9
Long Term Quality
6
❖ The Kaito 1103 - Almost too
good to be true
When I first started reading the feature list
of the Kaito 1103 in an on-line catalog, I kept
glancing over at the price to make sure I wasn’t
imagining things. Here was a full range, full featured digital radio with SSB, 268 pre-set station
memory, a tuning knob, as well as direct input
tuning and two frequency readouts, one fully
digital and one that mimicked an analog radio and
all for around $90.00! It was as if someone had
gone into the subconscious minds of all of us who
loved analog radio, but also embraced the digital
age and came up with the ideal inexpensive radio.
In short, this radio was cool!
Even though there was a bit of a learning
curve when it came to operating the 1103, it
seemed the more I played with this radio, the
more I liked it. Because the tuning knob also
controls volume and several other functions, it
takes a while to get used to. However, there is
always another option besides this knob to select
or change each feature on the 1103.
The SSB on the 1103 is clear as one could
expect for a radio of this price, but better than I
expected.
The backlight is strong and steady on both
the digital and pseudo-analog readouts and battery consumption is very low. But with the 1103,
one need not worry about batteries, as the radio
comes with rechargeable batteries built in and the
wall adapter also acts as a charger. One charge
and the radio would play for over a week of daily
use. This is one feature that I really appreciate
and miss on the Sony 7600GR and the Grundig
G4000A.
In terms of sensitivity, the 1103 is just as
sensitive as the G4000A and like all of these dualconversion radios, there are rarely any frequency
ghosts or other signal overload problems associated with single-conversion radios. However, the
1103’s sensitivity seems to drop off sharply in the
longwave bands. I can easily pick up LW signals
with the other three radios that I can barely detect
with this one.
One drawback of this radio is that, that like
the G4000A, you can’t use the external antenna
jack for either AM or LW. One night I was trying
to tune in the pirate radio station from Brooklyn,
NY, “Radio Mosiach and Redemption” on 1710
AM. No dice. However, when I tuned to 1711,
my outdoor antenna was activated and there it
was! Radio Mosiach is a favorite target for me,
as I often visit family in the NY metro area. In
fact, the 1103 made for a handy direction finding
radio, as I tracked the pirate station to an approximate location near its mailing address, just off
Eastern Parkway in Brooklyn one afternoon.
Trouble in Paradise?
About two years into owning the 1103, the
multifunction knob used for tuning, volume, and
several other functions started to go bad. Via an
article in Monitoring Times, I had read about
the possibility of this happening on some early
production runs of both the Kaito and Degen
models of this radio. But there was no guarantee
that it would happen.
The symptoms started gradually; frequencies would zip by faster when using the tuning
knob and sound levels would jump sporadically
when using the same knob to adjust the volume.
I temporarily fixed the problem using the same
Radio Shack cleaner/lubricant spray I had used
on the G4000A, but the problem would return
the next day. Eventually, I had to open the 1103
in order to clean this control more thoroughly,
but this solution didn’t work, either.
However, by using the push buttons for
tuning and volume controls, I still use this radio
regularly. It’s still a technological marvel to
me.
FEATURES:
o 268 memory presets (Dynamic memory on
19 Pages) with autoscan
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
67
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Beeper, radio and sleep clock/alarm
Manual or direct-entry frequency tuning
Electronic volume set
Smart charger with count-down timer and
battery power/charge indicator
Meter band to frequency conversion
3 backlight modes
LCD bar graph signal strength indicator
External speaker, earphone, line output and
antenna jacks
Auto reset prevents deadlocking
Extra-long telescoping antenna improves
reception
DX/LOCAL switch to prevent front-end overload
FM mono/stereo selection
Music/news (voice) tone control with “Super
bass” selection
RATINGS (0-10 scale) Kaito 1103
Audio Quality
Battery Consumption
User Interface/Ease of Use
Overall Features
Overall Reception
Longwave Reception
Construction/Initial Quality
Long Term Quality
6
9
6
9
7
2
8
5
❖ The Grundig G5 – The New
Kid on the Block
The newly introduced Grundig G5 became available in 2006. This model takes the
features of the Kaito 1103 a step further. Once
the problems started on the 1103, I was tempted
to buy another of the same model, but fearing
history would repeat itself, made the step up to
the G5.
It’s no coincidence that the G5 has many
of the same features as the Kaito. In fact, the
side panel layout is almost identical. This is
because Kaito/Degen manufactures the G5
for Grundig. The G5 has excellent sensitivity
across the board on SW, AM and FM and is a
great performer in the LW band as well. This
made me curious as to why Grundig doesn’t
mention LW even existing on this radio in ads
or feature lists (a mystery that has yet to be
solved).
In terms of power, the G5 includes an
adapter that also acts as a battery charger, but
unlike the Kaito 1103, the rechargeable batteries are not included. Another oddity of this
charging system is that the radio asks you how
many hours you would like the batteries to
charge. The Kaito, on the other hand, stops the
charging process when the batteries are full.
This radio sports 700 memories, which is
an impressive number and one that I’d never
likely come even close to fully populating.
However, I found that the method for both
68
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
entering frequencies into memory and recalling
them was tedious and not well thought out. In
order to get to any page of memorized frequencies, one has to hold down the tiny button of
that page and scroll through the 10 selections.
I like intuitive radios and in this regard, the G5
is not.
SSB clarity on the G5 was very similar to
the 1103. In fact, in terms of performance, the
G5 is like the 1103 in many ways. One area
where the G5 stands head and shoulders above
the rest, though, is FM reception. I don’t know
if enhanced FM reception was an intended
feature, but it certainly is a welcome one. Just
using the built in whip antenna, I could clearly
get every station from not only Washington,
DC, which is around sixteen miles away, but
also Baltimore and its surrounding areas, which
is close to 30 miles away.
What was amazing was the selectivity
between tightly packed FM stations. This radio seemed to separate them with no problem.
Reception had very little of the “fuzz” that is
common to distant FM stations. The real test
was to try to tune in a weak FM station from
Annapolis, Maryland, that I enjoy. The station,
WRNR, is not only less than ten-thousand
watts, but it is over 50 miles away and beams
its signal away from the DC area, to eliminate
interference with WAFY from Frederick, Maryland. Although both stations put out similar
wattage, typically, because of directional patterns, WAFY wins the battle. Not so with the
G5. A quick turn of the antenna to the east, and
WRNR came in like a champ.
With the exception of the non-intuitive
memory feature, I really like the G5 overall.
However, the question that looms large is
whether or not the G5’s tuning multi-function
tuning knob will hold up. Since it has the same
genetic makeup (and presumably, comes from
the same factory) as the Kaito 1103, I wonder if
the same problems with the knob will ultimately
occur.
FEATURES:
o AM, FM-Stereo and Full-Shortwave Coverage (1711-29999 kHz)
o PLL Dual Conversion AM/SW Circuitry with
SSB
o 700 Programmable Memory Presets
o FM Station Auto Tuning Storage (ATS)
o Alpha-Numeric Four Character Memory
Bank Labeling
o Tunes via Auto-Scan, Manual-Scan, Direct
Key-in Entry and Tuning Knob
o Selectable 9/10 kHz AM Tuning Steps
o Clock, Sleep Timer and Four Programmable
Timers (for alarm or wake-up)
o Weekday Setting
o World Time-Zone Selection
o Shortwave Narrow/Wide Bandwidth Selection
o AM/FM News/Music Tone Selection
o Stereo Earphone and Line Out Sockets
o Socket for External Shortwave Antenna
o Internally Recharges Ni-MH Batteries (batteries not included)
o Power Source: 4 AA batteries (not included);
AC Adapter (included)
o Dimensions: 6-5/8” W x 4-1/8” H x 1-1/8”
D
o Weight: 12.2 oz
o Included: Owner’s Manual, Protective Case,
AC Adapter/Charger and Warranty Card
o Weight: 12.2 oz
RATINGS (0-10 scale) Grundig G5
Audio Quality
Battery Consumption
User Interface/Ease of Use
Overall Features
Overall Reception
Longwave Reception
Construction/Initial Quality
Long Term Quality
Audio Quality
Battery Consumption
User Interface/Ease of Use
Overall Features
Overall Reception
Longwave Reception
Construction/Initial Quality
Long Term Quality
6
7
5
9
8
8
8
NA
6
7
5
9
8
8
8
NA
❖ The Sony ICF-SW7600GR
– A great radio, built to last
When I went to J & R in New York City to
buy up the Sony ICF-SW7600GR, the salesman,
an older gentleman, said to me as he handed me
the radio, “You know, that one is still made in
Japan.” I laughed to myself, as I remembered
that as a kid that “Made in Japan,” meant “junk.”
Now, a piece of electronic equipment that’s made
in Japan and not China (as the other three radios
are) is considered a rarity. Japanese craftsmanship has become legendary, as it transformed the
entire automobile and electronics industries.
In fact, you can feel a real difference when
you first pick up the Sony 7600GR. It feels very
solid compared to the other three radios. It looks
and feels like it’s built to last. The buttons and
controls seem a bit bigger than even the G4000A.
In fact, in terms of look and feel, it seems that the
Sony and the Grundig are in direct competition.
The radios are both around $140.00 and have a
similar feature set and are around the same size.
The Sony wins in most categories, especially the
memory department, with 100 presets, although
it’s not as easy to program and recall stations as
it is on the G4000A.
It also has extended FM tuning range (as do
the 1103 and the G5). I also have noticed over the
years that this radio and its predecessor, the ICFSW7600G, have been mentioned numerous times
in MT’s Below 500 kHz column. As I felt that the
other three receivers were somewhat lacking in
either frequency selection and/or sensitivity in
the longwave bands, I wanted to see why the
Sony models were so often the radios of choice
in this range.
A quick survey of beacons answered my
question: This radio is by far the best performer
in the LW bands over the other three, and is quite
strong on the AM side, too.
On sideband, the Sony also outshines the
other radios with one simple feature: in addition
to a fine tuning control, it allows the user to select
upper or lower sideband via a switch. The other
radios have a general sideband switch and a finetuning knob only. Selectable upper and lower
sideband is a big help when pulling in sideband
signals if multiple transmissions are happening
on one particular frequency (as in listening to
hams).
However, the outstanding feature on the
Sony 7600GR is the selectable synchronous
detection mode. I’ve read and heard arguments
continued on page 71
F
IRST LOOK
New Product Reviews
By Larry Van Horn
larryvanhorn@monitoringtimes.com
The Uniden BC-RH96 Remote Head
I
am probably no different from a lot of other
scanner enthusiasts: I like to take my scanners with me in the car when I motor around
town or on vacation. But I also have a better half
who doesn’t like me permanently mounting my
base/mobile scanners on the dashboard and ruining
the appearance of the family chariot.
I also don’t want to be a safety hazard on the
roadways because I am constantly looking down
at the scanner to see what I am monitoring. So,
for this reason I do not like mounting my scanners at any eye level lower than the bottom of the
window.
Given all this, I was a happy camper when
Uniden released their new BC-RH96 remote head,
and it has proven to be a good logical solution to
both of these issues.
The BC-RH96 is a nearly full-featured remote control head for the Uniden BCD996T and
BCT15 base/mobile scanners, and the BCD396T
and BR-330T handheld scanners. It controls all
scanner functions including volume and squelch.
The only exception is that the remote head will
not support powering these scanners on or off.
It provides a large, easy to read LCD display
with adjustable backlight and contrast controls for
the orange-colored backlit display and keypad. For
the two Uniden handheld scanners, this remote
head can serve as a large LCD viewing screen.
It automatically recognizes the scanner
interface baud rate for reliable communications
between the various Uniden units mentioned
above. It will also emulate your mobile scanner’s
Close Call and Alert LED signals if you have
programmed the scanner to do these functions. All
you need to add is a separate speaker for complete
remote operation.
The remote head provides you with three
shortcut keys that you assign to the operations
you use most often. If you use your remote head
with more than one scanner, Uniden includes two
small laminated cards (printed on both sides) that
graphically show the keyboards of each of the four
scanners it operates and a place for you to record
which commands you are using the three shortcuts
for.
On the back of the remote head there is a jack
the user can use for installing firmware updates (it
faces downward). And there are also channels on
the back of the head for routing the control and
power cables.
❖ What’s in the box?
In addition to the BC-RH96 remote head,
accessories in the box include a steel mounting
bracket with attachment washers that are factory
installed; mounting hardware (screws and washers) to attach the bracket; threaded knobs to allow
mounting the remote head quickly to the bracket;
remote connection cable between the scanner and
remote head (10 feet in length); correctly polarized
cigarette lighter adapter to let you connect the
remote head to that outlet in your vehicle; owners
manual; the two aforementioned pocket-size quick
reference configuration cards; and a self-adhesive
cable clamp.
The manual is well written and should be
studied to get the most out of the BC-RH96 and
understand all of its operations.
❖ Overall Rating and Final
Thoughts
First, before you install this unit, I want to
point out a safety issue you should consider. Avoid
placing this unit in any airbag zones when mounting it in your vehicle.
I have seen some complaints on the Internet
newsgroups about the lack of a speaker. Personally,
I don’t want the speaker built-in; I want to make
my own choice of a speaker and where to place it
in my vehicle for optimum sound reproduction.
Others have complained that the 10-foot
scanner interface cable is too short in some installations. This shortfall can be easily overcome by
purchasing an iPod extender cable with male and
female mini plug connectors.
Another common complaint is there is only
one color LCD screen. Yes, this is true, but at least
it is a good color (orange) and not blue, like that
used on the BCD-396T LCD screen and keyboard
backlight.
Finally, there is the on/off power control issue. I understand why Uniden did not include this,
since we are dealing with two different voltage
levels, depending on which unit you connect the
remote head to – 6 volt handheld or 12 volt mobile.
I am sure overcoming some of the engineering associated with this issue would have added to the
cost of this accessory. So, I recommend tying in
the scanner to the ignition system so that starting
the car or going to the accessory position turns on
the scanner.
I also should point out that you will need
two sources of 13.8 VDC if you use the remote
head in your mobile with either the BCT-15 or
the BCD996T scanner. One, of course, is for the
scanner and the other one is for the remote head. If
you use the remote head with any of the scanners
in a base setup, you will need a 13.8 VDC power
supply hooked up to the remote head in order to
operate the unit.
Overall, this is a well-engineered unit and
will be a welcome addition to your mobile or base
monitor post if you own one of the new, compatible
Uniden scanners.
The Uniden BC-RH96 (ACC 98) is available from Grove Enterprises (1-800-438-8155 or
www.grove-enterprises.com) for $199.95
plus shipping.
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
69
O
N THE BENCH
PROJECTS, REVIEWS, TIPS & TECHNIQUES
This is your equipment page. Monitoring Times pays for projects, reviews,
radio theory and hardware topics.
Contact Rachel Baughn, 7540 Hwy 64
West, Brasstown, NC 28902; email
editor@monitoringtimes.com.
Getting that Rig Back on the Air
By Arthur R. Lee WF6P
O
ne day while changing frequencies on
the 40 meter band, the digital readout
on my ICOM IC-761 finally gave up
on me and went totally blank. I had been working a station on the Baja Maritime Mobile Net
(7.233 daily at 0800 PST/PDY). I slowly crept
down the band until I recognized my station
calling me – N6NUN, from his 53 foot cabin
cruiser moored in Sausalito, near San Francisco.
While I had my normal frequencies stashed in
the memory circuit and could still transmit and
receive, it was distracting to be unable to read
the frequencies.
For the previous six months or so, I had
been forewarned of impending failure. On occasion, the readout would blink a few times,
then flicker off. A gentle tap on the top of the rig
would always restore the readout. Even my wife,
AB6XJ, knew where to give the case a friendly
thump or two. As time went on, our taps became
harder and harder to get the desired results.
The ICOM 761, a very reliable piece of ham
gear.
Rather than risk using a bigger hammer
and denting the rig’s case, I decided to substitute
my backup rig, a 25-year-old Kenwood 930S.
Putting the old rig back on the air meant I had
to reread the manual. The bells and whistles I
enjoyed on the ICOM were not state-of-the-art
when the 930S was invented. With misgivings,
I slid the ICOM to the “Needs Work” shelf to
gather dust.
After a year of walking past the ICOM,
Tuning is much easier when you can read the
frequencies.
70
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
pangs of guilt overcame me. Letting a nice piece
of gear like that lay around fallow was criminal. I
resolved to fix it or ship it off to the manufacturer
for repairs. Through conversations with ham
pals, both on and off the air, I was convinced that
some simple work with a soldering iron was all
that was needed. The consensus was that a cold
solder joint was the culprit.
Out of the blue, I received a landline from
an old ham buddy, Gary Baker, N6ARV. He is
a former Navy electronics technician and computer designer and was stopping in to see me. I
told a small lie, that I was about to work on the
faulty rig. I knew he’d help, but after all, I really
was going to work on the rig – and sometime
soon.
When he got to my house I had the rig
sitting conveniently on the kitchen table. I had
my electrical toolbox at the ready. Together, we
started in to disassemble the case. At first we
tried to remove the front panel, then decided
that the top cover would serve us just as well.
With that off, and the speaker connection disconnected, we were able to get to the display
unit, its power supply and circuit board. There
wasn’t much room to maneuver the display unit
out from beneath and behind other components,
but with a great deal of care and patience and
lots of jiggling, it finally came free.
With the circuit board exposed, it was time
to check for any abnormality. Using a large
magnifying glass and strong flashlight, Gary
examined each of the nearly 60 or so connections, finding at least three that were suspect.
These were tiny connections.
With the aid of my 15 watt soldering iron,
the solder was heated at each joint and more
added. My spool of solder, although small in
diameter, was nearly too large for the fine work
With the top cover removed, most components
can be reached for service or inspection. The
readout component is shown in the upper left
hand corner of the photo.
required. Gary used a wet sponge to wipe the
iron’s tip clear of extra solder and flux. With
an expert dab here and there with the soldering
iron, the solder joints smoothed out. Fortunately,
I had an almost-never-used solder sucker I had
purchased from Radio Shack years earlier. It
now got used to a great advantage. Nice, shiny
solder connections were made, with due caution exercised to avoid any cross connections
from the circuit board traces. We made the final
inspection of the entire board, checking each
connection until we were satisfied that no more
needed attention.
Next, with a toothbrush dipped in rubbing
alcohol, the circuit board area was scrubbed
clean of all flux surrounding the joints. The board
was dried with a soft cloth. This latter process
was new to me. (I am told that commercial cleaning formerly used methyl ethyl keytone [MEK]
until it was banned.)
I was a bit surprised when we put the
readout unit back in the chassis, then replaced
the outer case. What if our repair didn’t work?
Gary didn’t seem to have the least doubt that we
solved the problem. I was a bit pessimistic as he
said, “OK Art, now plug in the power cord.” I
did as directed and turned the rig on. Voilà!
The display lit up like a new Christmas
tree. I was a very happy person. Not only had I
learned a few tricks about circuit board repair,
but the rig was now back in operation. Rejoicing, I immediately got on the air with it, working
dozens of stations. In my mind, I imagined that
the incoming signals were clearer than that offered by the Kenwood. This may have only been
a psychological reward for the work we did, but
I really felt good – until the next day.
❖ Déjà Vu
Back on the air again, the digits on the
display began to act strangely. When changing
frequencies, the readout would jump dozens of
digits or repeat odd frequencies. Oh no! Not
another trip inside the rig!
I felt pretty down until I remembered that
half the fun of being a ham radio operator was in
building or repairing our own rigs. Sure, I did all
that back in my high school years when taking
radio shop classes. Soldering leads to tube bases
with a 200 watt American Beauty iron was duck
soup. Just a quick touch and the job was done.
Back then there was always that nice smell of
smoking flux and burned hookup wire insulation.
Now, I had to use a 10 power magnifying
glass and bright light to see the connections. Even
a 15 watt pencil type soldering iron is nearly too
large. Using a couple of dental picks, I scraped
away even the most minute track of dirt, solder
or flux from the repaired connections.
The toothbrush and alcohol scrubbing is
something we never dreamed of when soldering resister and condensers to terminal strips,
components, or each other. If we got our irons to
heat the heavy chassis to just the right temperature, we could solder our connections direct for a
good ground. That had the advantage of reducing
unnecessary wiring. “Just don’t let the excess
solder run down on too many components,” our
shop teacher warned. A splatter of solder here and
there was permissible as long as we didn’t short
out anything in the process.
The author, back on the air and enjoying an
evening operating his repaired rig.
❖ Second Time’s a Charm
So back into the ICOM I went. This time
the display unit came free a bit quicker than the
first time. I inverted the unit and went through the
examination process once again. Taking my time
on my repair bench, I went over each soldered
connection. Gary had resoldered a through-board
MT Review continued from page 68
over the years that synchronous detection is
a “gimmick” or “glorified sideband.” I found
neither to be the case. Although, technically, it
does borrow its basic operational principles from
a sideband detection circuit, in actual use, it’s
quite different. It not only boosts weak signals,
it smoothes out moderate and strong signals as
well. It meets its goal of evening out the peaks
and valleys of reception of both groundwave and
propagation path signals.
Running the Sony and the Grundig G4000A
side-by-side using just the whip antennas, I was
able to pull in weak stations with the synchro
switch on that I simply could not hear at all on
the Grundig (like Belarus, for example). It is
quite amazing.
Of course, all good things come with a
downside. With the synchro switch engaged,
the level of background noise increases slightly.
But not nearly as much as it would with an active
amplifier hooked up to the antenna. The synchro
mode also brings an unadvertised advantage with
it. Although the Sony (and the other three radios)
have “high-low” tone switches, when listening to
a medium to strong station, if the synchro switch
is on, switching between upper and lower sideband (even though you’re not in sideband mode)
gives two additional tone selection choices. No,
it’s not as good as having a DSP circuit, but it
helps.
With all this great reception, my big question with the Sony is: why doesn’t it have a signal
strength meter? Although it will tell you via the
LED readout when a signal is strong enough for
synchro mode and will automatically lock to it
(if synchro is switched on), there is no other indicator of signal strength. I found this somewhat
frustrating in a radio this advanced, but certainly
not a deal-breaker.
This is also the only radio of the three where
a power supply has to be purchased separately
from the unit. Although this is another drawback,
batteries seem to last a bit over three weeks
when using the radio daily. So this has not been
a problem.
FEATURES:
o AM(LW/MW/SW)/FM Stereo Reception
o 10 Key Direct Access™ Tuning
o Short Wave Guide Book
o PLL Quartz Frequency Synthesized Tuning
o Hold Button
o Compact Antenna
o Synchronous Detection Circuitry
o Auto Scan Tuning/Memory Scan
o SSB Reception
o 1 kHz Step Tuning
o 100 Station Memory Presets
o World Time Clock/Dual Clock
connection that had looked questionable. There
was some flux that bridged the connections
between the circuit board traces. I scraped these
clean, and, with a dental pick, pressed hard on
each connection. There was no further evidence of
visible problems and I decided against resoldering
all the joints, lest I cause more problems than I
solved.
With another alcohol scrub down, followed
by a dry brush scrub down, I replaced the display
unit. Things went back together much more
quickly than before. This time, however, I did not
replace the outer case until I gave it the power test.
With power on, I was delighted to find the readout
back to normal. Whew!
With the rig back in its proper place at my operating station, I happily worked a dozen stations
over the next few days. As I sat in my California
QTH, a fellow in Moscow, Idaho, with a good
CW fist, gave me a favorable signal report. His
weather was 25 degrees F and one foot of snow on
the ground. A shiver ran through me as I thought
back to my three years of New Jersey’s winters.
My shack was a comfortable 72 degrees as I sat
there in my pajamas and slippers, tuning up and
down the band while admiring my crispy-clear
blue frequency read out digits. It was pure bliss!
tuning knob problems will pop up. But so far, so
good.
Putting the Grundig G4000A and the Sony
head to head, the Sony has a slight edge in terms
of features. However, I have been very happy
with the G4000A over the years. To borrow some
terminology from horse racing, overall, it’s a
photo finish. Although I would buy any one of
these radios again, the results of this tight race
look like this: (1) The Sony ICF-SW7600GR, (2)
the Kaito 1103, (3) the Grundig G4000A, (4) the
Grundig G5.
Luckily for the consumer, in the range of
$90-$150 radios, all bets are safe.
RATINGS (0-10 scale) Sony ICF-SW7600GR
Audio Quality
8
Battery Consumption
8
User Interface/Ease of Use
7
Overall Features
8
Overall Reception
9
Longwave Reception
9
Construction/Initial Quality
9
Long Term Quality
8
❖ Rounding the final turn, the
winners are:
Picking a winner among these radios is
tough. If based on ratings alone, the Sony would
win. However, each radio is unique enough to
make it stand out on its own, and if I were more
careful with how I handled my portables, some
of the problems listed above might not have occurred.
If genetics were the basis for my decision,
since the Kaito and the Grundig G5 come from
the same family, I’d give the Kaito the slight
edge, because of the easier user interface and
its superior access to the presets. However, I
haven’t owned the G5 long enough to know if
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
71
C
OMPUTERS & RADIO
RADIO-RELATED SOFTWARE & HARDWARE SOLUTIONS
John Catalano, PhD
johncatalano@monitoringtimes.com
Mac Radio Programs …
No Right Clicking Allowed
O
ver the fifteen years that I have been writing this column, I have received questions
from readers concerning radio software
for Apple Macintosh computers. Unfortunately, all
I could do was direct the reader to Mac software
titles and sites that I discovered in my Internet
searches. Until recently, my only access to Apple
computers were real oldies (Apple 2 & 3). But,
things have changed, at least temporarily.
Over the past few months I have become
involved with teaching science courses in the US
educational system. (A shocking eye opener in
iteself for someone like me, who has lived, worked
and interfaced with educational institutions in
Europe and Asia.)
Entering the US educational industry is like
entering Appleville: The Mac is king. Why? I’m
not sure. But it’s an excellent business strategy.
“Get them while they are young and you’ll have
the customer for all their life” …or until they
widen their experiences...
For the past five months I have been almost
completely based on a MacBook Pro, except for
writing this column. So, we are going to take advantage of my Mac and try some radio monitoring
programs firsthand. Ready for the first bite?
the $2000 price range.
Now to the programs! Searching the Internet
for Mac software, I discovered about twenty radio
related programs. Of these, I downloaded and ran
ten. We will take a quick look at five of these. Let’s
start with two digital signal decoder programs:
cocoaModem, version 2.0, and MultiMode, version 5.8.0.
CocoaModem
The cocoaModem takes its name from the
MacOS X’s Cocoa framework, the object-oriented
application environment in which the program was
written.
The main screen of this free program is seen
in Figure 1 decoding a RTTY signal. The two
perfect ellipses in the small display in the upper
left indicate that the mark and space signals are
perfectly tuned. Of course, the legible RYRY CQ
message being decoded below the tuning display
also verifies its correct operation.
Adjusting the frequency of the “listening”
❖ The MacBook Pro 1.1
This laptop computer is a real departure for
Apple. It is based on one of Intel’s latest dual core
2 GHz processors with 1 GB of RAM and a bus
speed of 667 MHz. In the past, Apple computers
did not use Intel processors, since they carried
the stigma of the PC and Windows. That is, until
now. This machine can run both Mac X v10.4.8
operating system (OS) and Windows XP.
Since running Windows is strictly “Verboten!” at my educational institution, I wouldn’t dare
run BootCamp (available for free at www.apple.
com/macosx/bootcamp/). This program allows
you to install and run XP on the MacBook Pro.
I am impressed with a number of features
on the MacBook Pro – the performance of the 15
inch LCD screen, keyboard action/illumination,
and the convenient arrangement of port connectors on the sides of the laptop instead of the hard
to reach back. The case, with its glowing apple on
the cover, is quite thin.
Having a thin Hollywood profile, however,
may have been done at the expense of mechanical robustness. The case feels like it flexes under
its own weight when picked up from a side. This
is not good for surface-mounted printed circuit
board construction and may lead to expensive
repair bills. Time will tell. My overall impression
is that it performs well; equal to other laptops in
72
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
Figure 1 –Decoding a RTTY signal using the
“cocoaModem”
band is done by typing a frequency in the box to
the right of the small display. To decode RTTY,
I started by calling up the RTTY Monitor, which
displays a frequency graph of the received signal.
The listening bands are shown as red vertical
lines. Noting the actual frequencies of the mark
and space peaks on the RTTY Monitor, the user
adjusts the program’s frequency band to match the
lower frequency of the signal peak. Then a shift
value is entered to locate the second peak. When
the program is correctly tuned, the red vertical line
will lie on top of the mark and space audio peaks.
The program can store four sets of audio frequency
data. Alternatively, the user can tune his receiver
so as to have audio tones match program’s audio
frequency settings.
Other modes the program can decode include
Wideband RTTY, Dual RTTY, PSK, Hellschreiber,
SITOR-B and HF-FAX.
CocoaModem was easy and simple to install
and operate. Once locked on the correct audio
frequencies, the decoded text stream stayed solid.
One minor problem that I did encounter was while
using the RTTY configuration screen under the
Windows menu. When I chose “Sound File” in the
Test command, the program sometimes froze at the
end of the sound file. This required re-starting the
program and loss of decoded messages. However,
no problem was encountered using live audio.
Perhaps it was a problem with my sound file or
(dare I say it) iTunes’ program?
I liked cocoaModem. It is a very smooth running and useful decoding program. An automatic
frequency lock feature, which would eliminate
hunting for the correct audio frequencies, would
be a nice addition. CocoaModem has both receive
and transmit capabilities, making it attractive to
both hams and SWLers. I suggest you Mac-ers
give cocoaModem a try. It can be downloaded
free from http://homepage.mac.com/chen/cocoaModemPage/index.html.
MultiMode
The other Mac decoder program I ran
was MultiMode version 5.8.0 from Black Cat
Systems, www.blackcatsystems.com/software/
multimode.html. This program can decode an
impressive list of signal types: CW, RTTY, SITOR A, SITOR B NAVTEX, WEFAX, Packet,
ACARS, SSTV, PSK31, Hellschreiber, SelCal,
ALE, DTMF, EIA, CCIR and CTCSS tones. Many
of these modes also have transmit capability.
MultiMode’s decode of the same RTTY signal is shown in Figure 2. The main screen is quite
basic with an audio scope screen at the top right.
Note the three vertical bars, which indicate the
current “listening” frequencies of the programs.
These can be adjusted by entering values in the
boxes to the left of the frequency “scope.”
This program also was easy to install and
operate. Once the user adjusted the frequencies
to match the audio peaks, decoded messages were
solid and steady. However, achieving this setting
Figure 2 – MultiMode’s Main screen also
decoding a RTTY signal
seemed to be more difficult and time consuming
in MultiMode as compared to cocoaModem. The
program’s jerky display rate may have contributed
to the problem.
Overall, quick tuning of a signal posed a
bit of a problem. However, MultiMode’s large
number of decoding modes is a very compelling
incentive. Again, an autotuning feature would be
a big user benefit.
You can download a working demo version
from the above website. A full version costs $89.
A “Lite” version that only decodes FAX, CW
and RTTY is available for $39.Their site contains
additional Mac radio programs including the next
one we will run.
DXToolBox OS X
This is another offering from Black Cat
Systems. Let me start by saying that I was fascinated for hours exploring all the capabilities of
the program. It is billed as a “Shortwave / Ham
Radio / HF Radio Propagation” program, but its
title does not do it justice. It really does so much
more, grabbing and displaying data from many
sources.
Trying to show you the basic screens, reports
and plots would take over twenty figures! We’ll
try to give you a quick overview.
First off, it has 12 main windows! And
some of these windows have 20 sub choices. The
amount and type of astrophysical and geophysical data that DX Toolbox gathers and displays is
incredible! Take a look at Figure 3. This screen
shows the Maximum Usable Frequency (MUF)
at every location on the Earth in real time! The
display can be updated with a click.
Using a dial-up connection to the Internet
takes about three minutes to download this screen.
One look at your location on the screen and you’ll
know which bands are best bets for communications at the moment from your location. The MUF
at the target station location is another key factor
that can be determined from Figure 3.
This is just one of eighteen different images
that are colored red/
yellow in Figure 4, we
would enjoy a beautiful
light show in the sky.
We h a v e j u s t
touched the surface of
DX Toolbox. Some additional program features
include the display of
Figure 4 – The Northcurrent conditions sumern Aurora as seen
mary, weekly highlights
from on top of the
and forecasts, electron
North Pole in real
flux, proton flux, solar
time in Dx Toolbox.
winds and many, many
more screens, images and reports. After a few
hours of use I’m still discovering new features.
Download the free time limited demo version
from the Black Cat Systems website at www.
blackcatsystems.com/software/dxtoolbox.html.
But be careful, or you’ll become an ionosphere
junkie. The registered, full version of DX Toolbox is $24.99 and is available for both Mac and
Windows.
Figure 5 – The F2 layer of the ionosphere over
the North Atlantic. Vertical bands correspond to
maximum usable frequencies (MUF).
SignalScope
In past columns we have covered programs
that turn a Windows PC into a useful electronic
instrument, such as an oscilloscope. Due to the limitations of the computer’s circuitry, the maximum
frequency of operation for these instruments is in
the high audio range, 30 kHz. Similar programs
have been developed for the Mac.
SignalScope, version 1.8.5, turns the Mac
into a sophisticated dual-channel signal display
instrument. Three modes of operation are possible:
FFT Analyzer, Spectrogram, Oscilloscope and XY
Plotter. User adjustable controls include vertical
Figure 3 – Maximum Usable Frequencies
(MUF) at locations on the Earth in real time!
DX Toolbox in action!
that can be obtained including real time images
of the Northern Aurora (Figure 4) and the F2 layer
of the ionosphere over the North Atlantic (Figure
5). The vertical bands in Figure 5 correspond to
maximum usable frequencies (MUF).
Figure 4 is very interesting since it shows the
intensity of charged solar particles, accelerated by
the Earth’s geomagnetic field and then interacting
with the ionosphere. If we were in the locations
Figure 6 – SignalScope’s FFT mode displaying
a RTTY signal
scale and linearity, frequency span, horizontal
scale and auto scaling. Signal levels and signal
frequency are displayed in real time on digital
displays. Figure 6 shows SignalScope in the FFT
mode displaying a RTTY signal. Notice the two
distinct mark and space peaks at 974.377 Hz and
approximately 1160 Hz.
SignalScope’s display update is very fast
and results in smooth curve generation. A feature
limited demo version is available at www.faberacoustical.com/SignalScope/. The cost of the full
version is $59.00. A Pro version is also available
at $99.00. This site lists other interesting Mac X
programs.
Tone Generator X
This program is simple, free and useful.
On the program’s only screen, Figure 7, the user
chooses the Waveform Type from sine, sawtooth,
triangle or square. The frequency in hertz is
entered by the user or selected from a list of presets.
Finally, the Frequency Type is selected from Tone, Tone
Sweep, White Noise,
Pink Noise, Blue Noise
and Brown Noise. The
program gives an excellent definition of
each of the “noise”
types. This free pro- Figure 7 – Simplicity
gram is simple to use Itself - Tone Generator
and very useful for all X’s only screen
types of audio testing.
Tone Generator version 1.0.2 can be found at
www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/13872.
❖ A Byte of Mac
After using the MacBook Pro for five months
there are “PC Windows” things I still miss. When
I need to copy or cut text, I still reach for a right
mouse click. But the Mac only has one mouse button. Commands such as copy, cut or spell check
have to be accessed via keystrokes or menus. It
really is much more time consuming and inconvenient as compared to a Windows’ right click.
I found MacR-1000 version 1.0 at http://
software.manoverboard.org/. This program
controls an ICOM PCR-1000 and does a nice
job of manipulating the receiver’s EEPROM. For
full functionality a registration cost of $21.95 is
required. However, due to the lack of a 9-pin serial
port on the MacBook Pro, I could not interface it
to the radio.
Yes, I know USB interfaces are available.
But, who needs yet another interface cable?! To
be fair, the lack of a 9-pin serial port is not unique
to the Mac. Recently I used a Compaq 700 laptop,
which did not have one, either. But then, I only
paid $130 for the used 700 at a flea market.
I hope everyone found it interesting to journey to the Mac side to see what is available for
radio people. And perhaps those of you running
Mac X OS will enjoy using these programs. For
me, using the Mac has been fun. But as soon as
I can get away from having to use a Mac …this
doctor is going back to my Windows XP (not Vista)
PCs. I want my right mouse click back!
May 2007
MONITORING TIMES
73
Foreign
Language
Recognition
In late 2006, Ian McFarland
introduced a two-CD set of shortwave station IDs and interval
signals, drawn from his 24 years
with Radio Canada International.
At the recent 20th Winter SWL
Fest, Ian introduced a second set
of two CDs which provide a little
nostalgia along with a valuable
language resource.
CD#1 is a Foreign Language
recognition course which was
presented by Dr. Richard E. Wood
on the Radio Canada SW Club
program. Sixty-eight different
languages are presented in 10
different language families or geographic regions, along with tips
you can use to help you identify
the language being spoken. Once
you know the language, the time of
broadcast, and the frequency, you
are well on your way to identifying
the station you are listening to.
CD#2 is a bonus containing
three full-length programs selected for their enduring significance.
The first show commemorated
World DX Friendship Year 1973,
with greetings from noted DXers
from around the world. The second
program on the CD celebrated the
80th anniversary of the first radio
broadcast by Reginald Fessenden.
It is particularly appropriate to
resurrect this nicely-produced
show, since we just celebrated the
100th anniversary of this event in
December 2006.
Last, but not least, is a look
back at RCI’s history, which Ian
produced in 1985 for the 40th anniversary show.
Series #2 is available by visiting www.dxer.ca and printing out
the pdf order form to mail in, or by
PayPal sent to listeningin@rogers.
com. Prices are $10 to Canada
($11 via PayPal); $12 to USA ($12
via PayPal); 13 Euros to Europe,
or $15 US dollars elsewhere. Send
to: Ian McFarland, 6667 Beaumont Avenue, Duncan, BC V9L
5X8, Canada.
Best of all, the net proceeds
from the sale of these CDs are being donated to the local Food Bank
in Duncan, British Columbia, a
registered charity where Ian Mc-
74
MONITORING TIMES
Farland volunteers. (And to which
the proceeds of the silent auction
at Winterfest were also donated.)
Tourist Trains
Kalmbach Publishing Co.,
publishers of Trains magazine, has
compiled a unique travel reference
in the Tourist Trains Guidebook.
Listed by state or province, the
book includes detailed information about
the best tourist trains and
rail museums
in the US and
Canada, along
with a directory of nearly
300 train rides,
museums, and
historical depots – many with pictures.
The 150 highlighted attractions include a little background
description, best features, when
to go, what’s worth doing, how
to get there, and other sites worth
visiting while you’re in the area.
All the listings are also indexed
for easy use. Among the advertisements at the beginning of the
book, you’ll also find a discount
card valid at many of the listed
atractions.
This 277-page soft-cover
book is available in hobbyshops
and bookstores, or direct from
Kalmbach in Waukesha, WI,
for $18.95. To order direct, call
(800)533-6644 or visit www.
kalmbachbooks.com.
Orbcomm Plotter
Have you ever wanted to
intercept and decode a satellite
downlink signal? Now, thanks to
Bev M Ewen-Smith and the Centro de Observação Astronómica no
Algarve (COAA), you can decode
downlink signals from some of
the easiest to monitor satellites
with a new software decoding
package called Orbcomm Plotter.
This new software is designed to
decode the VHF downlinks from
the Orbcomm satellite constellation.
Orbcomm is a satellite communication system (www.orbcomm.com) providing two-way
data and positioning service to
small, portable, user terminals in
May 2007
the VHF High frequency band.
You can use a simple VHF radio
receiver (scanner) tuned to the
band between 137 and 138 MHz
to pick up the strong signals from
these satellites. With Orbcomm
Plotter you can decode the telemetry and find out the positions of
the satellites, their operational status, and their uplink and downlink
channels.
Orbcomm Plotter decodes
transmissions from Orbcomm
satellites using the sound card in
your PC (Pentium level PC running Win95/98/Me/2k/XP with
compatible sound card). You will
also need a suitable VHF band
radio receiver/antenna tuned to
the Orbcomm data channels. The
program decodes the received
digital data, then displays and logs
the messages.
· Signal mode - displays the
raw digital signals on your PC
screen in a diagnostic display
which helps you to set up the
system and adjust the receiver.
· Message mode - displays each
decoded message in plain
language on your PC screen.
It displays the identity of the
Orbcomm satellite, the operating frequency, UTC date time,
position, uplink and downlink
frequencies, and coded message traffic.
· Satellite mode - displays the
operating frequency and last
known position of satellites
· Chart mode - displays the position of Orbcomm satellites:
real-time, history, or prediction.
· Message log - stores all messages received and decoded in
a text file.
Orbcomm Plotter can be freely downloaded from the COAA
website at www.coaa.co.uk/
orbcommplotter.htm and
used for 21 days. After that time it
must be registered online for Euro
25 (plus VAT for EU residents) or
about US$33 for personal use.
Icom IC-R9500
Now Available
The new, "flagship" wide
band receiver from Icom received
FCC type acceptance February
23rd. The Icom IC-R9500 is
expected in April at dealers like
Grove Enterprises – although at
$13,500, it may be on the shelf but
still out of reach! The IC-R9500 is
targeted to professionals for monitoring radio signals and analyzing
spectrum, or to high level scanner
enthusiasts.
What makes a receiver like
this so pricey? Features such as
triple conversion, two digital
signal processors, digital audio
recording, synchronous detection,
spectrum scope, ten VFOs, 1000+
memory channels with USB access, and digital twin passband
tuning, for starters. The receiver
covers 5 kHz to 3335 MHz (less
cellular) in all modes. It also offers five IF roofing filters with
selectable 240, 50, 15, 6 and 3 kHz
widths. The fact that it weighs in
at 44 lbs is another indication of
rock solid construction.
Detection modes include AM,
AM synch (selectable sideband),
USB, LSB, CW, FM, WFM. A
dual-notch filter provides 70 dB
attenuation of two heterodynes
with wide, middle, narrow bandwidths.
The R9500 will scan at an
approximate rate of 40 channels
per second, using various scanning schemes, such as memory,
program, frequency, priority,
mode, and auto memory write.
An optional P25 digital demodulator enables reception of digital
communications; however, it is
not able to track talk groups in a
trunked system.
Books and Equipment for announcement or review should be sent to What’s
New, c/o Monitoring Times, 7540 Highway 64 West, Brasstown, NC, 28902.
Press releases may be faxed to 828837-2216 or emailed to Rachel Baughn,
editor@monitoringtimes.com.
INDEX OF ADVERTISERS
Stock Exchange
Antique Radio ...................................... 65
LINE ADS
Antique Wireless .................................. 65
NON-COMMERCIAL SUBSCRIBER RATES: $.25 per word. All merchandise must be personal and radio-related.
COMMERCIAL, NON-SUBSCRIBER, AND MULTIPLE SALES RATES: $1.00 per word. Commercial line ads printed in bold type.
AOR ...................................... Cover 2, 75
Ads for Stock Exchange must be received 45 days prior to publication date. All ads must be paid in advance to Monitoring Times.
Ad copy must be typed for legibility.
C Crane .............................................. 25
Carey, Kevin ........................................ 71
1-3/4” SQUARE DISPLAY AD:
CIDX ................................................... 76
$50 per issue if camera-ready copy or, $85 if copy to be typeset. Photo-reduction $5 additional charge. For more information on commercial
ads, contact Beth Leinbach, 828-389-4007.
Communications Electronics ................. 27
Computer Aided Technology .................. 7
Cumbre DX ......................................... 76
Dave’s Hobby Shop ............................. 76
Electronic Specialty Products ................. 69
Grove Enterprises ............. 5, 19, Cover 3
Hauser, Glenn ..................................... 39
ICOM ......................................... Cover 4
Nil-Jon ................................................ 25
ODXA ................................................. 76
Attention all those wanting to know what’s going on with ham radio in the New
Orleans area, check out: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/GNOAmateurRadio/
Popular Communications ..................... 63
WANTED: Working Radio Shack D.S.SP 40 D Digital Signal Processor. Richard WA0KKC
913-432-5136
Robl, Ernest ......................................... 71
Blogs offer an opportunity for columnists to share information that does not make their columns. The news
might be too timely for deadline, too short, confined to a small geographical area, too far away to be heard in
North America, or even off the columnist’s regular “beat.” Bookmark these blogs for frequent visits!
Small Planet Systems ........................... 63
MT: AMERICAN BANDSCAN
http://americanbandscan.blogspot.com/ - by Doug Smith
MT: EDITOR’S DESK
http://mt-editor.blogspot.com/ - by Rachel Baughn
MT: FED FILES
http://mt-fedfiles.blogspot.com/ - by Chris Parris
MT: MILCOM
http://mt-milcom.blogspot.com/ - by Larry Van Horn
Larry’s Monitoring Post
http://monitor-post.blogspot.com/ - by Larry Van Horn
MT: SHORTWAVE
http://mt-shortwave.blogspot.com/- by Gayle Van Horn
MT: UTILITY WORLD
http://mt-utility.blogspot.com/- by Hugh Stegman
Time to Renew? Your label will tell you how many is-
sues remain in your subscription. When it’s time to renew,
your MT will arrive with a bright yellow cover sheet with
the renewal form. Renew by the second notice to avoid
missing an issue!
Prime Time Shortwave ......................... 65
Skyvision ............................................. 76
Universal Radio ............................. 11, 76
WBCQ ................................................ 21
WiNRADiO ............................................ 1
C Ku Satellite Equipment
Big Dish FTA Dish Parts
LNBs Switches Feeds
Shortwave Ham Gear
CB Radios Scanners
Antennas Cables Accessories
Books Electronic Parts
Dave’s Hobby Shop
600 Main Van Buren, AR
479-471-0751
www.daveswebshop.com
Satellite Dish Parts
Residential and Commercial
Get it all with just one call!
Ice Zapper
TM
Melts snow and ice!
Simply attach to your existing dish—
works on metal dishes up to 1.2m!
www.icezapper.com
www.skyvision.com
800-500-9275
76
MONITORING TIMES
May 2007
Listening In
That's what we do and who we are!
Since 1974
Acclaimed worldwide as one of the top
publications for radio listeners. Get a free
sample of our electronic monthly magazine
and see for yourself.
E-mail us and mention this ad
Ontario DX Association
155 Main St.N., Apt. 313
Newmarket, Ontario L3Y 8C2 Canada
E-mail: listeningin@rogers.com
www.odxa.on.ca
Your Source for
Radio Scanners,
Receivers, Accessories,
and Publications
JRC
NRD-545
RCV21DS
AOR
AR-5000A Plus 3 RCV44P
AR-8600II
RCV11
GE
$2569.95
$889.95
SUPERADIO III
RCV5
SANGEAN
ATS-505P
ATS-909
ATS-818Acs
RCV7
RCV8
RCV18
$109.95
$239.95
$184.95
KAITO
KA1103
RCV55
RCV32
RCV15
RCV25
RCV35
RCV52
$609.95
$499.95
$599.95
$729.95
$899.95
ICOM
R75
PCR1500
R1500
PCR2500
R2500
ETON
$1799.95
E1XM
S350 DELUXE
E5
G4000A
$54.95
$89.95
RCV34
RCV4
RCV10
RCV23
$499.95
$99.95
$149.95
$149.95
WiNRADiO
WR-3150 (External)
WR-3150 (Internal)
WR-3500 (External)
WR-3500 (Internal)
WR-3700 (External)
WR-3700 (Internal)
WR-G303e
WR-G303e w/pro demodulator
WR-G303i
WR-G303i w/ pro demodulator
WR-G313 (Internal)
WR-G313 (External)
WR-G305i
WR-G305i w/pro demodulator
WR-G305e
WR-G305e w/pro demodulator
WR-G315 (Internal)
WR-G315 (External)
Shipping/
Handling Charges
Total
Order
$1-$29.99
$30-$49.99
$50-$99.99
$100-$399.99
$400-$899.99
$900-$1499.99
$1500-$1999.99
$2000-$2499.99
$2500+
Shipping
Charges
$3.00
$6.95
$8.95
$12.95
$16.95
$20.95
$24.95
$28.95
$32.95
Established in 1979 by well-known
communications expert Bob Grove, Grove
Enterprises has become a world leader in radio
monitoring equipment, accessories, and
publications.
If you decide you don't like a product, Grove
Enterprises doesn't penalize you for it. There is
NO restocking fee so long as you call our toll
free number for a return authorization within
fifteen days of shipment and the item is returned
in new condition. Once the item is received we
will give you credit toward another item or issue
a full refund (less shipping charges). Software
cannot be returned if opened.
That's it! No hassle! No negotiations! Just
call 1-800-438-8155 and our friendly staff will
assist you with a return authorization number.
Grove means service and quality. You
won’t find better customer service
anywhere.
WiNRADiO Accessories
RCV48-E
RCV48-I
RCV49-E
RCV49-I
RCV50-E
RCV50-I
RCV46E
RCV46EP
RCV46
RCV46-P
RCV31
RCV31-E
RCV53
RCV53P
RCV53E
RCV53EP
RCV54
RCV54E
$1849.95
$1849.95
$2395.95
$2395.95
$2895.95
$2895.95
$549.95
$699.95
$449.95
$549.95
$949.95
$1149.95
$519.95
$619.95
$619.95
$719.95
$1,899.95
$2,049.95
o
sure t
e
k
a
M
e
s on th
visit u
get
web to and
test
the la
s!
t deal
s
e
t
a
e
gr
WR-DNC-3500 Frequency downconverter CVR02
AX-07B flexible VHF/UHF antenna
ANT47
AX-37A wide-band log-periodic antenna ANT28
AX-71C discone antenna
ANT01
AX-81S active HF antenna
ANT51
AX31-B Antenna
ANT 4
AX-91M magnetic antenna base
ANT48
Mounting Clamps for AX-71C
ACC71
USB Adaptor
ACC 2
Client Server Option-1000/1500 Series
ACC 14C
Client Server Option-3000 Series
ACC14B
Client Server Option-G313 Series
ACC14D
G303 Professional Demodulator
SFT20
G305 Professional Demodulator
SFT40
PCMCIA PC Card
ACC 28
Data Cable for 1500/3000 receiver
CBL 3
FSK Decoder
DEC 1
Portable Power Supply (external units only) PWR 5
Digital Suite
SFT 15
Advanced Digital Suite Upgrade
SFT 15U
Advanced Digital Suite
SFT 15A
World Radio Database Manager
SFT 16
Trunking Software
SFT 23
$189.95
$24.95
$389.95
$89.95
$189.95
$119.95
$24.95
$14.95
$49.95
$99.00
$399.00
$149.95
$179.95
$199.95
$89.95
$9.95
$349.95
$189.95
$85.00
$85.00
$179.95
$85.00
$89.95
(800) 438-8155
Grove Enterprises, Inc. - www.grove-ent.com
(800) 438-8155; (828) 837-9200; fax: (828) 837-2216
7540 Hwy 64 W; Brasstown, NC 28902 - email: order@grove-ent.com
������������
�������������������������������
�������������
Open as PDF
Similar pages