Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User`s Guide

Sun™ Remote System Control
(RSC) User’s Guide
For the Netra ct Server Alarm Card
™
Sun Microsystems, Inc.
901 San Antonio Road
Palo Alto, CA 94303-4900 U.S.A.
650-960-1300
Part No. 806-3301-11
February 2001, Revision A
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Contents
Preface
1.
xi
Sun Remote System Control Software Overview
Accessing RSC
1
RSC Capabilities
3
Server Status and Control
View Logs
RSC Security
2.
3
3
RSC Configuration
Using RSC
3
4
6
Configuring RSC Software
7
RSC Software and the Alarm Card
Verifying RSC Software Installation
▼
7
8
To Verify RSC Software Installation
Accessing the Alarm Card and RSC
8
8
Running the RSC Configuration Script
▼
1
9
To Run the RSC Configuration Script
Additional Configuration
9
11
Using the Environmental Monitoring Daemon
11
iii
▼
To Verify envmond Installation
11
▼
To Verify envmond Is Running
12
▼
To Stop and Start envmond
Configuring PPP
12
12
Configuring Alerts
13
Redirecting the Console to RSC
13
▼
To Redirect the Console to RSC
▼
To Redirect the Console From RSC to the CPU Serial Port
Console Session Information
14
15
Backing Up the RSC Configuration
3.
15
Using the RSC Command Shell
17
Logging In to Your RSC Account
17
▼
To Log In to Your RSC Account
RSC Command Overview
18
19
Server Status and Control Commands
environment
20
shownetwork
20
console
break
xir
20
21
21
21
reset
21
poweroff
poweron
22
22
powersupply n [on|off]
alarm n [on|off]
22
RSC View Log Commands
22
22
loghistory [index [+|-]n] [pause n]
iv
14
23
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
consolehistory [run|orun]
[index [+|-]n] [pause n]
24
25
consolerestart
RSC Configuration Commands
set variable value
25
25
25
show [variable]
date [[mmdd]HHMM|mmddHHMM[cc]yy][.SS]
password
27
useradd username
27
userdel username
28
usershow [username]
28
userpassword username
28
userperm username [c][u][a][r]
resetrsc
28
29
Other RSC Commands
help
26
30
30
version [-v]
logout
30
30
RSC Configuration Variables
30
▼
To Set a Configuration Variable in the RSC Command Shell
▼
To Set a Configuration Variable in the rscadm Utility
Serial Port Variables
Alert Variables
Alarm Variables
31
32
34
38
Ethernet Port Variables
Console Session Variable
Server Variable
31
41
42
43
Contents
v
4.
Using the rscadm Utility
Overview of the Utility
45
rscadm Subcommands
46
help
45
46
version
47
date [-s]
date [[mmdd]HHMM|mmddHHMM[cc]yy]][.SS]
set variable value
47
47
show [variable]
resetrsc [-s]
48
download [boot] file
48
send_event [-c] message
modem_setup
48
48
User Account Administration Subcommands
Turning on an Alert at a UNIX Prompt
5.
6.
49
Troubleshooting
53
53
Troubleshooting Server Problems Using RSC
56
A.
Configuring Alarm Card Modems
B.
Sample Script for an Alert Message or RSC Event
C.
Error Messages
Index
51
51
Troubleshooting RSC Problems
vi
49
Using OpenBoot PROM Features that Support RSC
rsc
47
57
61
63
71
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
Figures
FIGURE 1-1
RSC Remote Access Paths 2
FIGURE 1-2
RSC Remote Alert Paths 5
FIGURE 3-1
Message Format
39
vii
viii
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
Tables
TABLE 2-1
Information for RSC Configuration Script 9
TABLE 3-1
RSC Shell Commands
TABLE 3-2
Components of the date Command 26
TABLE 4-1
rscadm Utility Subcommands 46
19
ix
x
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
Preface
The Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card
describes how to use the Sun™ Remote System Control (RSC) software with your
Sun Netra™ ct server alarm card. This manual is written for experienced system
administrators with networking knowledge.
How This Book Is Organized
This manual contains the following chapters and appendices:
Chapter 1 is an overview of the RSC software.
Chapter 2 describes how to configure and back up the RSC software.
Chapter 3 describes how to use the RSC command shell, including commands and
variables.
Chapter 4 describes how to use the rscadm utility and its subcommands.
Chapter 5 describes OpenBoot™ PROM features that support RSC.
Chapter 6 contains information on troubleshooting RSC problems.
Appendix A describes using external modems with the alarm card.
Appendix B contains a sample script to log an RSC event or send an alert when
certain conditions occur.
Appendix C contains the error messages generated by the RSC software.
xi
Using UNIX Commands
This document may not contain information on basic UNIX® commands and
procedures such as shutting down the system, booting the system, and configuring
devices.
See one or more of the following for this information:
■
Solaris Handbook for Sun Peripherals
■
AnswerBook2™ online documentation for the Solaris™ operating environment
■
Other software documentation that you received with your system
Typographic Conventions
TABLE P-1
xii
Typographic Conventions
Typeface
Meaning
Examples
AaBbCc123
The names of commands, files,
and directories; on-screen
computer output
Edit your .login file.
Use ls -a to list all files.
% You have mail.
AaBbCc123
What you type, when
contrasted with on-screen
computer output
% su
Password:
AaBbCc123
Book titles, new words or terms,
words to be emphasized
Read Chapter 6 in the User’s Guide.
These are called class options.
You must be superuser to do this.
Command-line variable; replace
with a real name or value
To delete a file, type rm filename.
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
Shell Prompts
TABLE P-2
Shell Prompts
Shell
Prompt
C shell
machine_name%
C shell superuser
machine_name#
Bourne shell and Korn shell
$
Bourne shell and Korn shell superuser
#
Remote System Control shell
rsc>
OpenBoot PROM shell
ok
Related Documentation
In addition to the Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server
Alarm Card, the Netra ct server documentation set includes the following manuals:
TABLE P-3
Netra ct Server Documentation
Title
Part Number
Netra ct Server Start Here
806-5161
Netra ct Server Product Notes
806-3299
Netra ct Server Safety and Compliance Manual
806-3295
Netra ct Server Product Overview
806-3298
Netra ct Server Installation Guide
806-3294
Netra ct Server Service Manual
806-3296
Depending on the options you might have purchased for your machine, you might
have also received manuals for network interface cards.
As mentioned above, as a Netra ct server purchaser, you received a suite of online
documentation for the Solaris operating environment.
Preface
xiii
Accessing Sun Documentation Online
The docs.sun.comsm web site enables you to access Solaris technical
documentation on the Web. You can browse the docs.sun.com archive or search
for a specific book title or subject at:
http://docs.sun.com
Documentation and product information for the Netra product line are available at:
http://www.sun.com/netra
Ordering Sun Documentation
Fatbrain.com, an Internet professional bookstore, stocks select product
documentation from Sun Microsystems, Inc.
For a list of documents and how to order them, visit the Sun Documentation Center
on Fatbrain.com at:
http://www.fatbrain.com/documentation/sun
Sun Welcomes Your Comments
We are interested in improving our documentation and welcome your comments
and suggestions. You can email your comments to us at:
docfeedback@sun.com
Please include the part number (806-3301-11) of your document in the subject line of
your email.
xiv
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
CHAPTER
1
Sun Remote System Control
Software Overview
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) is a server management tool that enables you to
monitor and control your server over modem lines and over a network. RSC
provides remote system administration (sometimes called lights-out management) for
geographically distributed or physically inaccessible systems.
The RSC software works with the alarm card for the Netra ct server. The alarm card
supports serial and Ethernet connections to the Solaris console.
This chapter is organized as follows:
■
■
■
■
“Accessing RSC” on page 1
“RSC Capabilities” on page 3
“Using RSC” on page 4
“RSC Security” on page 6
Accessing RSC
You can access RSC from a workstation running the Solaris operating environment,
from an ASCII terminal, or from a device running ASCII terminal emulation
software. FIGURE 1-1 shows remote access paths to RSC.
The RSC firmware on the alarm card runs independently, and it uses standby power
from the server. Therefore, alarm card hardware and RSC software continue to be
effective when the server operating system goes offline; RSC can send notification of
hardware failures or other events that may be occurring on your server.
The server can boot and operate normally when RSC software is not enabled, and
Sun console features continue to be available on standard RS-232 ports.
1
Solaris workstation
and modem
Solaris workstation
and modem
PC
and modem
PC
and modem
Secure serial bus
Secure Ethernet
ASCII terminal
and modem
ASCII terminal
and modem
Company modem
pool
RSC modem
Solaris workstation
PC
FIGURE 1-1
2
RSC Remote Access Paths
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
RSC Capabilities
Sun Remote System Control provides the following capabilities for remotely
monitoring and controlling Sun Netra ct servers.
Server Status and Control
Server status and control features enable you to:
■
Show server environmental status.
■
Access a console that includes all UNIX console functions.
■
Send a break to put the server into debug mode.
■
Run diagnostic tests from a remote console.
■
Monitor the system remotely and receive error reporting.
■
Reset the server on demand. When the system is not responding, you can issue a
cold reset to bring the server back online.
■
Turn server power off and on.
■
Receive remote event notification of server problems.
RSC complements existing Sun monitoring and diagnostics tools such as Solstice
SyMON™, SunVTS™, the kadb kernel debugger, OpenBoot™ PROM (OBP), and
OpenBoot Diagnostics (OBDiag). Solstice SyMON operation remains unchanged,
and it continues to be the main tool for observing system operation behavior and
performance while the server operating system is up and running.
View Logs
Logging capabilities enable you to:
■
Display a detailed log of RSC errors, events, and RSC command history.
■
Display and reset server console logs.
RSC Configuration
You can control RSC configuration settings for:
■
Alerts
■
Alarms
Chapter 1
Sun Remote System Control Software Overview
3
■
Ethernet port
■
Serial port
■
RSC date and time
■
Your RSC password
■
RSC user accounts
Using RSC
After installing and configuring Sun Remote System Control software on the server,
you use an OpenBoot command and set OpenBoot variables that redirect the console
output to RSC.
After installation, you must run a script (rsc-config) that guides you through
basic configuration (see Chapter 2 for more information). If you plan to use a
modem on the RSC serial port, you must configure the modem properly. See
Appendix A for more information on modem configuration.
RSC user interfaces include:
■
A command-line interface you can access using standard telnet to the RSC
Ethernet port, and to the RSC serial port COM2 using point-to-point protocol
(PPP)
■
A command-line interface you can access by connecting an ASCII character
terminal directly to the RSC serial port COM1
RSC supports a maximum of four concurrent telnet connections per server.
Part of RSC configuration defines and enables alert mechanisms. Alerts provide
remote notification of system problems.
RSC sends an alert message whenever any of the following occurs:
■
A server redundant power supply fails.
■
A fan fails.
■
RSC receives a server-generated alert.
■
The server undergoes a hardware watchdog reset.
■
RSC detects five unsuccessful RSC login attempts within five minutes.
Each alert message includes the server name and other important details. RSC
configuration controls whether an alert is sent to an email address, to pagers, or to
both. In addition, an alert is always sent to any clients currently logged in to RSC
accounts for that server. FIGURE 1-2 shows RSC remote alert paths.
4
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
Solaris workstation
and modem
Alphanumeric pager 1
Solaris workstation
and modem
PC
and modem
Alphanumeric pager 2
PC
and modem
Secure serial bus
Secure Ethernet
ASCII terminal
and modem
ASCII terminal
and modem
Company modem
pool
RSC modem
Solaris workstation
PC
FIGURE 1-2
RSC Remote Alert Paths
Chapter 1
Sun Remote System Control Software Overview
5
When you receive an alert message, you can connect to your RSC account for the
server that caused the alert. You can then check console messages to determine
whether the server has recovered and is running, or whether the server operating
system is down.
If the server is running, you can log in to it using a separate connection and debug
the system using UNIX system administration tools such as SunVTS and Solstice
SyMON. If the client is not running the Solaris operating environment, these tools
may be available through X windows.
If the server is not running, or if UNIX system administration tools are not available,
you can use the RSC remote console feature to debug the server.
You can also debug the server by using RSC to:
■
■
■
Show environmental information
Reset the server, optionally forcing a panic core dump
Turn the server power off and then on, if the server is hung
After diagnosing a problem, you can schedule server downtime and service, if
necessary.
RSC Security
The hardware and process required to log in to an RSC account on a managed server
depend on company security practices and whether Ethernet or modem dial-in is
used. Further security is provided by RSC accounts, individual account access rights,
and passwords. RSC records all logins and sends an alert if it detects five login
failures within five minutes.
Characteristics of the modem and phone line that are connected to the RSC serial
port also determine access security for remote serial port connections; for example,
the use of a dialback option or a phone line that supports dial-out only. You can set
RSC to disconnect a session connected to the serial port after 10 minutes of
inactivity; see “serial2_hw_handshake” on page 33. The time-out on serial port 1 is
always set to disconnect a session after 10 minutes of inactivity
Note – As for any computer session, do not leave your session unattended. Always
use the RSC logout command before disconnecting your session. In addition, if you
initiated a server session, log out of it before logging out of RSC.
6
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
CHAPTER
2
Configuring RSC Software
This chapter provides information on configuring RSC software, including:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
“RSC Software and the Alarm Card” on page 7
“Verifying RSC Software Installation” on page 8
“Accessing the Alarm Card and RSC” on page 8
“Running the RSC Configuration Script” on page 9
“Additional Configuration” on page 11
“Redirecting the Console to RSC” on page 13
“Backing Up the RSC Configuration” on page 15
RSC Software and the Alarm Card
The alarm card is shipped installed in the Netra ct server. One alarm card is
supported per server.
The alarm card is supported by the Solaris 8 1/01 operating environment, which
includes the appropriate software drivers for the card, and by an enhanced version
of RSC 2.0 software for the alarm card. The RSC software is in the SUNWctac
package, which is on the Software Supplement for the Solaris 8 1/01 Operating
Environment CD.
The alarm card has hot-swap capability; information on hot swapping an alarm card
is located in the Netra ct Server Service Manual.
7
Verifying RSC Software Installation
After the Solaris operating environment is installed on the Netra ct server, verify
that the SUNWctac package is installed.
▼
●
To Verify RSC Software Installation
As root on the server, run the pkginfo command.
# pkginfo SUNWctac
system
SUNWctac
Netra ct Alarm Card Firmware and Utilities
After RSC software is installed on the server, it resides in the directory
/usr/platform/SUNW,UltraSPARC-IIi-Netract/.
If this package is not installed, you must install it from the Software Supplement CD
that was shipped with the Solaris operating environment. If you need instructions
on how to do this, refer to the Netra ct Server Installation Guide and the Solaris
documentation that came with the Solaris CDs.
Note that an online version of the Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide in the
package SUNWrscd should be disregarded, as that version does not apply to the
Netra ct server.
Accessing the Alarm Card and RSC
You can access and configure the alarm card over:
■
The Ethernet port, using telnet
■
A modem connection (terminal or PPP)
■
The serial line (console), using an ASCII terminal or the tip program.
If you have a rear-access Netra ct server, to use the console, a cable should be
connected to the rear serial port on the alarm card.
8
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
Running the RSC Configuration Script
After verifying the software installation, run the RSC configuration script
(rsc-config) to configure RSC for the alarm card. After this initial configuration,
you can change RSC configuration at any time (with appropriate user permissions)
with any of these methods:
▼
■
Use RSC commands in the RSC shell
■
Use the rscadm utility as root on the server
■
Run the rsc-config script again as root on the server. The script updates your
existing entries, except that it does not delete user names.
To Run the RSC Configuration Script
Before running the rsc-config script, make sure the environmental monitoring
daemon (envmond) is stopped. See “Using the Environmental Monitoring Daemon”
on page 11 for information on envmond.
1. As root, enter the following command:
# /usr/platform/SUNW,UltraSPARC-IIi-Netract/rsc/rsc-config
The rsc-config script prompts you for the information shown in TABLE 2-1. Certain
information is required the first time you run the script.
TABLE 2-1
Information for RSC Configuration Script
Information
Description
Server hostname (required)
The Netra ct server host name.
Customer information
The customer information string identifies the server in any
alert messages. The string can contain 40 characters maximum,
including alphanumeric characters and the hyphen character.
RSC Ethernet Interface
If you enable the Ethernet connection to RSC, you must provide
the IP mode, IP address, IP netmask, and IP gateway.
RSC IP Mode
Set to config (the default), to DHCP, or to none. Choose the
config mode to configure manually and enter Internet
addresses or choose DHCP if you want to use the dynamic host
configuration protocol. Choose none to leave the Ethernet
connection disabled.
Chapter 2
Configuring RSC Software
9
TABLE 2-1
Information for RSC Configuration Script (Continued)
Information
Description
RSC IP Address
The IP address for RSC. You must provide the address if you do
not use the DHCP mode.
RSC IP Netmask
The subnet mask. You must provide the subnet mask if you do
not use the DHCP mode.
RSC IP Gateway
The IP address of the default gateway to use when the
destination is not on the same subnet as RSC.
RSC Alert use
If you enable alerts, the alerts can be sent to an email address, to
a pager, or to both.
Email alerts
If you want alerts sent to an email address, provide the SMTP
server IP address and the email address you want used.
Pager alerts
If you want alerts sent to a pager, provide the telephone
number, modem initialization string, account password, baud
rate, data bits, parity, and stop bits for the pager. You can
designate one or two pagers to receive the alerts.
RSC Modem Interface
If you enable the modem interface, provide the PPP local and
remote IP addresses if you are using PPP, and provide the serial
port 2 baud rate, data bits, parity, and stop bits.
User account (required)
Add the RSC user account for superuser, or root. With the
appropriate permissions, this account enables the user to use the
RSC shell.
User name (required)
The user name can be a maximum length of 16 characters, it
must contain at least one lowercase alphabetic character, and the
first character must be alphabetic. The user name can contain
alphanumeric characters and the period, underscore, and
hyphen characters.
User permissions (required)
Choose the default, cuar, as this will be the only user account
until you add more accounts. The account with all four
permissions (console, user, admin, reset) is considered the
superuser, or root, account.
2. Enter your information when prompted by the script.
The rsc-config script displays a summary for each section and asks whether it is
correct.
3. For each section, respond y (for yes) to confirm your choices or respond n (for no)
to return to that section of the configuration script.
When you have confirmed all sections, the configuration script updates the RSC
flash PROM. The configuration information will remain on the RSC flash PROM
even if you reinstall the Solaris operating environment.
10
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
Note – It takes a few minutes to update the RSC flash PROM. Do not interrupt this
process by aborting the configuration procedure or removing system power. If the
update is interrupted, you must restart the configuration script and it must complete
successfully before RSC can function properly.
The configuration script prompts you for the password for the user account.
4. Enter the password for the user account.
The configuration script prompts you to reenter the password for the user account.
5. Reenter the password for the user account.
6. If you enabled the Ethernet connection to RSC, the script asks if you want to reset
RSC.
A reset is required before Ethernet configuration takes effect.
If you are using the environmental monitoring daemon, start the daemon.
After initial configuration, you can control configuration and add or modify user
accounts by using the RSC shell commands (see Chapter 3). You can also log in to
the server as root and use the rscadm utility to control RSC configuration and user
accounts (see Chapter 4).
Additional Configuration
Using the Environmental Monitoring Daemon
If you want to use the environmental monitoring daemon (envmond) to monitor the
server and send messages and heartbeats to the alarm card, make sure the daemon is
installed and that it is running.
To Verify envmond Installation
▼
●
As root, run the pkginfo command.
# pkginfo SUNWcteux SUNWctevx
system
system
SUNWcteux
SUNWctevx
Netra ct EnvMon Daemon and FRU policy (Usr) (64-bit)
Netra ct Environment Monitor Daemon and FRU policy (64-bit)
Chapter 2
Configuring RSC Software
11
▼
To Verify envmond Is Running
● As root, run the pgrep command.
# pgrep -l envmond
194 envmond
If you want to run the rsc-config script, you must stop the daemon.
▼
To Stop and Start envmond
1. As root, run the following command to stop envmond:
# /etc/init.d/envmon stop
2. As root, run the following command to start envmond:
# /etc/init.d/envmon start
For more information on using envmond, see “Environmental Monitoring and
Alarms” on page 39.
Configuring PPP
If point-to-point protocol (PPP) is enabled on serial port COM2, RSC supports
multiple shell sessions through one modem connection. If PPP is not enabled, only
one shell session can be run over the modem. RSC supports multiple sessions over
its Ethernet port.
To use PPP for dialing in to the RSC serial port, the RSC configuration variable
ppp_enabled must be set to true. In addition, you must configure PPP on each
client machine that will use PPP to dial in to RSC accounts on the RSC serial port.
To allow connection to RSC from a remote client using PPP, you must configure PPP
on the client. For a Solaris client, see Configuring and Using Solstice PPP 3.0.1 Clients.
For a PC client, see your PC documentation.
The Solstice PPP 3.0.1 client configuration script /usr/bin/pppinit creates a
CHAT script in /etc/opt/SUNWconn/ppp/script that defines the dialog that
occurs between a client and server during the connection phase. The contents of this
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
CHAT script are not needed to establish a PPP connection to RSC. To successfully
establish connection to RSC from a Solstice PPP client, comment or delete the
contents of the CHAT script, but do not delete the file.
Configuring Alerts
To configure alerts, set the following configuration variables using the RSC shell or
rscadm utility:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
customerinfo
hostname
page_enabled
page_info1
page_init1
page_baud1
page_stop1
page_parity1
page_password1
mail_enabled
mailuser
mailhost
For help configuring RSC alert variables, see “Alert Variables” on page 34. RSC
generates alert messages with the following format:
$EVENT $TIME $CUSTOMERINFO $HOSTNAME $IPADDR message
You can also use the rscadm subcommand send_event -c to send an alert. You
can do this directly at the superuser prompt (see Chapter 4, section “Turning on an
Alert at a UNIX Prompt” on page 49); you can also create a command file that runs
and sends the alert under special circumstances (see Appendix B for an example of a
script to do this).
Redirecting the Console to RSC
Until RSC software is configured, the system console is available as on any normal
Solaris server. You can set the input and output devices to RSC (redirect the console
to RSC) to allow the alarm card to connect to the server (start a console session) from
the RSC shell, and to create panic dumps and console logs of the server.
Chapter 2
Configuring RSC Software
13
Caution – The console is directed to the ttya port (also known as the COM 1 port)
on the CPU card or CPU transition card by default. If the console has been redirected
to RSC, the alarm card is not hot-swappable without a system reboot. Refer to the
Netra ct Server Service Manual for more information.
▼
To Redirect the Console to RSC
To enable RSC as the system console device, you must connect to the console port,
and either:
■
Use the eeprom command at a UNIX prompt to set the input and output devices:
# eeprom input-device=rsc
# eeprom output-device=rsc
or
■
Go to the OBP environment, and use the setenv command at the ok prompt to
set the input and output devices:
ok setenv input-device rsc
ok setenv output-device rsc
These commands take effect after the next server reset.
▼
To Redirect the Console From RSC to the CPU
Serial Port
At any time, to remove RSC as the default console and redirect the console from RSC
to the CPU console, you can connect to the alarm card’s console port, and either:
■
Use the eeprom command at a UNIX prompt to set the input and output devices:
# eeprom input-device=ttya
# eeprom output-device=ttya
or
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
■
Go to the OBP environment, and use the setenv command at the ok prompt to
set the input and output devices:
ok setenv input-device ttya
ok setenv output-device ttya
These commands take effect after the next server reset.
Console Session Information
See “console” on page 21, “break” on page 21, and “escape_char” on page 42, for
information about using these commands and variables in a console session.
Backing Up the RSC Configuration
You should periodically use rscadm commands to create a backup file that records
RSC configuration settings on a remote system. For example:
# rscadm show > remote-filename
# rscadm usershow >> remote-filename
#
Use a meaningful file name that includes the name of the server that RSC controls.
Later, you can refer to this file to restore the settings if you need to reinstall RSC
software on the server. To restore the settings, use the rscadm set command. For
example,
# rscadm set < remote-filename
#
Note that the set command restores configuration settings, but not user accounts.
Chapter 2
Configuring RSC Software
15
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
CHAPTER
3
Using the RSC Command Shell
The RSC command shell is a command-line interface that supports commands that
enable you to administer or diagnose the server. It also has commands for
configuring RSC. RSC supports a maximum of four concurrent telnet connections
per server.
This chapter describes:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
“Logging In to Your RSC Account” on page 17
“RSC Command Overview” on page 19
“Server Status and Control Commands” on page 20
“RSC View Log Commands” on page 22
“RSC Configuration Commands” on page 25
“Other RSC Commands” on page 30
“RSC Configuration Variables” on page 30
Note – If you need help with RSC commands, type rscadm help in the console
window or type help at the hostname rsc> prompt.
Logging In to Your RSC Account
After RSC software is installed and configured and an account has been set up for
you (by using either the rsc-config script or the rscadm useradd command),
you can connect to RSC and log in to your account using a Solaris workstation,
standard ASCII character terminal, or a computer running ASCII terminal emulation
software.
17
▼
To Log In to Your RSC Account
1. Connect to RSC using one of these methods:
a. If you are already connected to your company Ethernet, use the telnet
command to connect to RSC.
b. Use PPP to connect to the RSC modem.
To use this option, PPP must be enabled on serial port COM2.
c. If PPP is not enabled on the serial port, dial in to the RSC modem.
d. Connect your client machine directly to the RSC serial port.
When connection is established, the following screen appears:
RSC version 2.0 (hostname)
Please login:
2. Enter your RSC login name.
After you enter your RSC login name, you are prompted for your password.
Please enter password:
3. Enter your RSC password.
Your password is not echoed on the screen. After you correctly enter your password,
RSC displays this command prompt:
hostname rsc>
You can enter RSC shell commands at the hostname rsc> prompt.
Logins are recorded in the RSC event log. In addition, RSC sends an alert if it detects
five login failures within five minutes. You can also set RSC to disconnect a session
connected to the serial port after 10 minutes of inactivity; see
“serial2_hw_handshake” on page 33. Serial port COM1 has an idle time-out of 10
minutes enabled; idle time-out is not enabled if you are using the console
command.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
RSC Command Overview
The following table summarizes RSC shell commands.
TABLE 3-1
Type of Command
Server status and control
View logs
Configuration
RSC Shell Commands
Command
Description
environment
Displays current environmental information
shownetwork
Displays the current network configuration
console
Connects to the server console
break
Puts the server in debug mode
xir
Generates an externally initiated reset to the server
reset
Resets the server immediately
poweroff
Powers off the server
poweron
Powers on the server
powersupply
Deactivates or activates a power supply unit on the server
alarm
Sets alarm relays to allow notification of events
loghistory
Displays the history of all events logged in the RSC event
buffer
consolehistory
Displays the history of all console messages logged in the
buffer
consolerestart
Makes the current run console log the orun log
set
Sets a configuration variable
show
Displays one or more configuration variables
date
Displays or sets the current time and date
password
Changes your RSC password
useradd
Adds an RSC user account
userdel
Deletes an RSC user account
usershow
Shows characteristics of an RSC user account
userpassword
Sets or changes a user’s password
userperm
Sets the authorization for a user
resetrsc
Resets RSC, after prompting for confirmation
Chapter 3
Using the RSC Command Shell
19
TABLE 3-1
Type of Command
Other
RSC Shell Commands (Continued)
Command
Description
help
Displays a list of RSC shell commands and a brief
description of each
version
Displays the RSC firmware version
logout
Ends your current RSC shell session
Note – Some commands require a specific user permission level. See “userperm
username [c][u][a][r]” on page 28 for information about user permission levels.
More detailed descriptions of the commands are provided in the following sections.
Server Status and Control Commands
The following RSC commands show server status or control server operation.
environment
Use the environment command to display a snapshot of server environmental
status, such as temperatures, power supply status, active alarms, and so forth.
shownetwork
The shownetwork command displays the current network configuration,
for example:
hostname rsc> shownetwork
RSC network configuration is:
DHCP server: 129.149.2.3
IP Address: 129.149.2.6
Gateway Address: 129.149.2.7, 129.149.2.8
Netmask: 255.255.255.0
Ethernet Address: ae:30:30:00:00:01
hostname rsc>
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
console
Use the console command to enter RSC console mode and connect to the server
console from the RSC shell. When you use this command, the system displays a
standard Solaris login prompt. If RSC is not designated as the server console,
nothing is displayed.
You must have C level user permission to use this command. You use an escape
character sequence to return to the RSC prompt. The default escape sequence is ~.
(tilde period). For more information, see “escape_char” on page 42.
break
Use the break command to put the server into debug mode. You must have C level
user permission to use this command. Debug mode can use either kadb or OBP.
Issuing a :c in kadb or go in OBP causes the server to resume execution (if
possible); otherwise, you would normally reboot the server after issuing the break
command.
Use the break command, then the console command, to take control of the server.
xir
This command generates the equivalent of an externally initiated reset (XIR) of the
server. You must have R level user permission to use this command. The server
enters OBP mode and displays the ok prompt. This command is useful for driver or
kernel debugging, as most of the contents of the server’s memory and registers is
preserved. To resume the system after using the xir command, you must reboot the
server.
Use the xir command, then the console command, to take control of the server.
reset
This command forcibly resets the server. You must have R level user permission to
use this command. If the panic_dump variable is set to true, RSC attempts to
create a panic core dump on the server.
Chapter 3
Using the RSC Command Shell
21
poweroff
Use the poweroff command to power off the server. You must have R level user
permission to use this command. This command has no effect if the server is already
powered off. RSC remains available since it uses the server’s standby power.
poweron
Use the poweron command to power on the server. You must have R level user
permission to use this command. This command has no effect if the server is already
powered on.
powersupply n [on|off]
The powersupply command enables you to deactivate a power supply on the
server. Power supply 1 or power supply 2 can be specified. You must have R level
user permission to use this command.
alarm n [on|off]
Use the alarm command to set external alarm relays 0, 1, 2, or 3 on the alarm card
to on or off. This command is useful for testing purposes. You must have R level user
permission to use this command. You can view the current status of alarms with the
environment command.
If envmond is running, alarm 0 is immediately cleared by the heartbeat. See “Alarm
Variables” on page 38 for more information on alarms.
RSC View Log Commands
The following RSC commands work with RSC and console log files.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
loghistory [index [+|-]n] [pause n]
Use the loghistory command without subcommands to display the history of all
events logged in the RSC event buffer. These events include server reset events and
all RSC commands that change the state of the system. You can also use the
command abbreviation lhist.
Use the following subcommands to control loghistory display.
index [+|-]n
Use the index subcommand to designate a buffer position at which to begin the
display, as follows:
■
index +n to designate a line number relative to the beginning of the buffer
■
index -n to designate a line number relative to the end of the buffer
■
index n to designate a line number relative to the beginning of the buffer (same
as index +n)
The origin of counting is 1; that is, index +1 indicates the first line in the buffer,
index -1 indicates the last. For example:
hostname rsc> loghistory index -30
This command prints the last 30 lines and any additional lines that were appended
to the buffer between the time that the command began execution and the time that
it terminated.
pause n
Use the pause subcommand to display n lines of the log at a time (similar to the
more command). The value of n must be a decimal integer. The default is to display
the entire RSC log without pausing.
Each event recorded in the log has the following format:
$TIME $HOSTNAME $EVENTID $message
EVENTID is a unique identifier for the event, TIME is the time the event occurred (as
measured by RSC time), and message is a user-friendly description of the event.
Chapter 3
Using the RSC Command Shell
23
The following is an example event log entry:
JAN 01 07:33:03 sst4828: 00060003: “RSC System booted”
consolehistory [run|orun]
[index [+|-]n] [pause n]
Use the consolehistory command to display console messages logged in RSC
buffers. With no arguments, this command prints the entire contents of all nonempty console buffers. You can use the command abbreviation chist.
There are two console logs:
■
The run buffer contains the most recent data received from the server operating
system.
■
If the system panics and resets, the orun buffer will contain messages printed to
the console before the reboot, which are the panic messages.
The run and orun buffers can contain up to 16 Kbytes of information.
RSC always writes to the run (run) log. When the run log fills up, it overwrites old
data in the run log.
When RSC senses a server reset or when the consolerestart command is issued,
RSC stores the contents of the current run log in the orun log. The run log is
cleared and all further server operating system messages are stored in the run log.
pause n
Use the pause subcommand to display n lines of the log at a time (similar to the
more command). The value of n must be a decimal integer. The default is to display
10 lines of the log at a time.
See “loghistory [index [+|-]n] [pause n]” on page 23 for a description of the index
subcommand.
Note – Time stamps recorded in console logs reflect server time. These time
stamps may be offset from RSC time stamps recorded in the RSC event log. To
find information on synchronizing RSC time with server time using the rscadm
utility, see “date [-s] date [[mmdd]HHMM|mmddHHMM[cc]yy]][.SS]” on page 47.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
consolerestart
Use the consolerestart command to copy the current run log into the old log
buffer (designated orun). This command copies the current run buffer to the orun
buffer, overwriting the previous contents. Then it clears the current run buffer. You
must have A level user permission to use this command.
RSC Configuration Commands
RSC configuration commands set or show characteristics of the RSC or server
configuration:
set variable value
Use the set command to set an RSC configuration variable. You must have A level
user permission to use this command. See “RSC Configuration Variables” on page 30
for descriptions of these variables.
Changes to some variables do not take effect until the alarm card is reset using the
command resetrsc or rscadm resetrsc.
You can use the null string ("") to set a variable to null. To set a variable to a string
that includes spaces, enclose the string in double quotes. For example:
hostname rsc> set page_info2 ""
hostname rsc> set page_init1 "&F &E0"
show [variable]
Use the show command to display the value of RSC configuration variables. You can
specify one variable only; if you do not specify a variable, RSC displays all
configuration variables. See “RSC Configuration Variables” on page 30 for
descriptions of these variables.
Chapter 3
Using the RSC Command Shell
25
date [[mmdd]HHMM|mmddHHMM[cc]yy][.SS]
Use the date command without arguments to show RSC’s current date and time.
For example:
hostname rsc> date
TUE FEB 22 10:29:58 2000
hostname rsc>
If you have A level user permission, you can use the date command to set the
current date and time. The following table describes components of the date format.
TABLE 3-2
Components of the date Command
Option
Description
mm
Month number
dd
Day-of-the-month number
HH
Hour number (24-hour system)
MM
Minute number
.SS
Second number
cc
First two digits of year
yy
Last two digits of year
You can omit the month, day, and year; the current values are applied as defaults.
Examples:
hostname rsc> date 031521452000
hostname rsc> date 03152145
hostname rsc> date 2145
The first example sets the time to March 15, 9:45 p.m., 2000. The second example sets
the time to March 15, 9:45 p.m. of the current year. The third example sets the time
to 9:45 p.m. of the current month, day, and year.
Note – Whenever the server boots, it sets the RSC current date and time. To keep
RSC time in sync with server time, implement a script that uses the command
rscadm date -s to update RSC time periodically from the server time. The RSC
shell date command cannot synchronize RSC time with the server time.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
password
Use the password command to change the RSC password for the account to which
you are logged in. This command behaves similarly to the UNIX passwd(1)
command.
When used to change a password, RSC prompts for your current password, and if
you enter it correctly, it prompts for the new password. RSC prompts again for the
new password, and updates it if entered identically both times. For example:
hostname rsc> password
password: Changing password for username
Enter login password:
Enter new password:
Re-enter new password:
hostname rsc>
Passwords have the following restrictions:
■
They must contain at least six characters (only the first eight characters are
significant).
■
They must contain at least two alphabetic characters and at least one numeric or
special character; alphabetic characters can be both uppercase and lowercase.
■
They must differ from the user’s login name and any reverse or circular shift of
that login name; for comparison purposes, uppercase and lowercase letters are
equivalent.
■
The new password must differ from the old by at least three characters; for
comparison purposes, uppercase and lowercase letters are equivalent.
useradd username
Adds an RSC user account. You must have U level user permission to use this
command. The maximum number of RSC user accounts is four. Valid characters for
username include:
■
Alphabetic characters
■
Numeric characters
■
Period (.)
■
Underscore (_)
■
Hyphen (-)
Chapter 3
Using the RSC Command Shell
27
The username field has a maximum length of 16 characters, it must contain at least
one lowercase alphabetic character, and the first character must be alphabetic. If
these restrictions are not met, the system issues a warning and the command fails.
userdel username
Deletes an RSC user account. You must have U level user permission to use this
command.
usershow [username]
Shows RSC user accounts. You must have U level user permission to use this
command. If no argument is supplied, all accounts are shown. Information
displayed includes user name, permissions, and whether a password is assigned.
For example:
hostname rsc> usershow
Username Permissions Password?
setup
cuar
Assigned
msmith
c--r
None
hostname rsc>
userpassword username
Sets or changes the password for the specified user account. You must have U level
user permission to use this command. RSC does not prompt for an existing
password. See the password command for details on password format and
restrictions. For example:
hostname rsc> userpassword msmith
New password:
Re-enter new password:
hostname rsc>
userperm username [c][u][a][r]
Sets or changes permission levels for a specified user account.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
All RSC users can look at RSC information. The following arguments increase a
user’s authorization level:
■
c – Console permission; authorized to connect to the server console
■
u – User administration permission; authorized to use commands that add and
delete users, change user permissions, and change the authorization level of other
users
■
a – Administration permission; authorized to change the state of RSC
configuration variables
■
r – Reset/power permission; authorized to reset, power on, and power off the
server, and reboot RSC
You must have U level user permission to use this command. You can specify zero
through four authorizations. The default authorization level for a new RSC account
is none of the above.
If you do not specify authorization levels, RSC sets the permissions for username to
read-only. However, the default user permission for the account you create during
the installation procedure is cuar (full authorization).
A user with read-only permission can use the following commands only:
■
help
■
password
■
date (show only)
■
shownetwork
■
environment
■
loghistory
■
consolehistory
■
show
■
version
■
logout
resetrsc
The resetrsc command performs a hard reset of RSC. This terminates all current
RSC sessions. You must have A level user permission to use this command. You can
also reset RSC by using the rscadm resetrsc command.
Chapter 3
Using the RSC Command Shell
29
Other RSC Commands
help
The help command displays a list of all RSC shell commands and a brief
description of each.
version [-v]
The version command displays the firmware version running on RSC. Use the -v
option to display more verbose information. Examples:
hostname rsc> version
RSC Bootmon version: 1.x
RSC version: 2.x
hostname rsc> version -v
RSC Bootmon version: 1.x
RSC Bootmon checksum: A91695A9
RSC version: 2.x
RSC firmware checksum: 4FF151DA
RSC firmware built Feb 15 2000, 16:14:30
...
hostname rsc>
logout
The logout command ends your RSC session and closes your RSC connection.
RSC Configuration Variables
RSC has nonvolatile configuration variables you can use to change RSC behavior.
The rsc-config script sets most configuration variables during installation. After
installation, you can use the RSC shell or the rscadm utility (see Chapter 4) to set or
change configuration variables.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
This section describes these types of RSC variables:
■
■
■
■
■
■
▼
Serial port variables
Alert variables
Alarm variables
Ethernet port variables
Console session variable
Server variable
To Set a Configuration Variable in the RSC
Command Shell
You must have level A user permission to set configuration variables in the RSC
shell.
1. Log in to your RSC account.
2. Use the set command with the variable and its value that you want to set:
hostname rsc> set variable value
▼
To Set a Configuration Variable in the rscadm
Utility
1. Log into the server as root.
2. Use the rscadm set command with the variable and its value that you want to
set:
# rscadm set variable value
Changes to variables take effect immediately except as noted.
You can use the null string ("") to set a variable to null. To set a variable to a string
that includes spaces, enclose the string in double quotes.
Chapter 3
Using the RSC Command Shell
31
Serial Port Variables
The alarm card has two serial ports. Serial port 1 is locked at 9600 baud, 8 data bits,
1 stop bit, no parity; it cannot be changed. Serial port 2 is configurable, and has two
modes that can be set using the serial2_mode variable.
serial2_mode
When the serial2_mode variable is set to modem or tty (terminal mode), you can
specify values for the variables described in this section. The default setting is
disabled.
serial2_baud
This variable sets the RSC serial port baud rate. Valid values are:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
300
1200
2400
4800
9600
19200
38400
57600
115200
The default setting is 9600. Changes to this variable take effect on the next login
connection over the RSC serial port.
If you change the serial baud rate after configuring the serial port modem, you must
reconfigure the modem (see Appendix A).
serial2_parity
This variable sets the RSC serial port parity; valid values are none, odd, or even.
The default setting is none. Changes to this variable take effect on the next login
connection over the RSC serial port.
If you change the serial parity setting after configuring the serial port modem, you
must reconfigure the modem (see Appendix A).
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
serial2_stop
This variable sets the number of RSC stop bits; valid values are 1 or 2. The default
setting is 1. Changes to this variable take effect on the next login connection over the
RSC serial port.
If you change the serial stop bits setting after configuring the serial port modem, you
must reconfigure the modem (see Appendix A).
serial2_data
This variable sets the number of RSC data bits; valid values are 7 and 8. The default
setting is 8. Changes to this variable take effect on the next login connection over the
RSC serial port.
If you change the serial data bits setting after configuring the serial port modem,
you must reconfigure the modem (see Appendix A).
serial2_hw_handshake
This variable controls whether RSC uses hardware handshaking on the serial port.
Valid values are true and false; the default setting is true. If set to true, and if
the hardware supports hardware flow control, hardware flow control and modem
control are enabled. If set to false, or if the hardware does not support hardware
flow control, RSC disconnects a session connected to the serial port after 10 minutes
of inactivity.
The following ppp variables apply to serial port 2.
ppp_local_ip_addr
Use this variable to specify the Internet protocol (IP) address for RSC to use during
a PPP session; use standard dot notation. If this variable is empty, RSC expects the
remote node to set the Internet address dynamically. The default setting is 0.0.0.0
(empty). Changes to this variable take effect on the next PPP connection over the
RSC serial port.
Chapter 3
Using the RSC Command Shell
33
ppp_remote_ip_addr
Use this variable to specify the IP address for the remote node during a PPP session;
use standard dot notation. If this variable is empty, RSC expects that the remote
node already has an Internet address assigned for the PPP session. The default
setting is 0.0.0.0 (empty). Changes to this variable take effect on the next PPP
connection over the RSC serial port.
ppp_enabled
Use this variable to specify whether PPP is the default protocol on the RSC serial
port. Valid values are true or false; the default is false. Changes to this variable
take effect on the next login connection over the RSC serial port.
Alert Variables
SNMP Alerts
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) allows you to control RSC from a
remote host. SNMP is insecure; there are no user permissions associated with it. Use
SNMP only if you have RSC on a secure LAN.
snmp_enabled
Use this variable to specify whether SNMP will be used for RSC configuration and
alerts. Valid values are true or false; the default is false.
snmp_host
This variable contains the Internet address to which RSC sends SNMP trap alerts.
Specify the address using standard dot notation. For example:
hostname rsc> set snmp_host 139.143.4.2
If this variable is empty, or if the snmp_enabled variable is set to false, no alert is
sent. The default setting is empty.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
Paging and Mail Alerts
customerinfo
This variable contains customer information used in the message generated for a
pager or email alert, for instance, one of the following:
■
■
■
■
Server service contract number (recommended)
Server location
Name or telephone extension of the server’s system administrator
Name of the department that owns the server
This string can be up to 40 characters, including alphanumeric characters and
hyphen (-). The default setting is empty.
hostname
This variable contains the name of the server connected directly to RSC; RSC
includes this name in alert messages and in the rsc> prompt. The hostname is set
with rscadm set hostname. If the hostname is changed, current sessions keep the
old hostname prompt until the user logs out and logs back in. This string can be up
to 40 characters, including alphanumeric characters and hyphen (-). The default
setting is empty.
page_enabled
Use this variable to specify whether paging is enabled for RSC alerts. Valid values
are true or false; the default is false.
page_info1
This variable contains the phone number and associated pager ID number for
sending a TAP alert to a pager. Use the character @ to separate the telephone number
and ID. Valid characters are:
■
■
■
■
digits (0-9)
* (asterisk)
# (pound sign)
, (comma)
For example:
hostname rsc> set page_info1 18004420500@1234332
Chapter 3
Using the RSC Command Shell
35
If both the page_info1 and page_info2 variables are empty, or if the
page_enabled variable is set false, no paging will occur. The default setting for
page_info1 is empty.
page_init1
This variable specifies a string consisting of attention (AT) commands used for
configuring the RSC modem prior to sending an alert to pager 1.
page_password1
This variable contains the pager service password used to send an alert to pager 1.
The password must be an alphanumeric string of six characters or fewer.
page_baud1
This variable specifies the serial port baud rate to use when sending an alert to pager
1. Valid values are 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, and 9600. After RSC sends the page
alert, the baud setting reverts to the setting specified in the serial2_baud variable.
page_data1
This variable specifies the number of RSC serial port data bits for sending an alert to
pager 1. Valid values are 7 and 8. After RSC sends the page alert, the data bits revert
to the setting specified in the serial2_data variable.
page_parity1
This variable specifies the RSC serial parity for sending an alert to pager 1. Valid
values are none, odd, and even. After RSC sends the page alert, the parity reverts to
the setting specified in the serial2_parity variable.
page_stop1
This variable specifies the number of RSC serial port stop bits for sending an alert to
pager 1. Valid values are 1 and 2. After RSC sends the page alert, the stop bits revert
to the setting specified in the serial2_stop variable.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
page_info2
This variable contains the phone number and associated pager ID number for
sending a TAP alert to another pager. Use the character @ to separate the telephone
number and ID. Valid characters are:
■
■
■
■
digits (0-9)
* (asterisk)
# (pound sign)
, (comma)
For example:
hostname rsc> set page_info2 18004420596@4433444
If both the page_info1 and page_info2 variables are empty, or if the
page_enabled variable is set false, no paging will occur. The default setting for
page_info2 is empty.
page_init2
This variable specifies a string consisting of attention (AT) commands used for
configuring the RSC modem prior to sending an alert to pager 2.
page_password2
This variable contains the pager service password used to send an alert to pager 2.
The password must be an alphanumeric string of six characters or fewer.
page_baud2
This variable specifies the serial port baud rate to use when sending an alert to pager
2. Valid values are 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, and 9600. After RSC sends the page
alert, the baud setting reverts to the setting specified in the serial2_baud variable.
page_data2
This variable specifies the number of RSC serial port data bits for sending an alert to
pager 2. Valid values are 7 and 8. After RSC sends the page alert, the data bits revert
to the setting specified in the serial2_data variable.
Chapter 3
Using the RSC Command Shell
37
page_parity2
This variable specifies the RSC serial parity for sending an alert to pager 2. Valid
values are none, odd, and even. After RSC sends the page alert, the parity reverts to
the setting specified in the serial2_parity variable.
page_stop2
This variable specifies the number of RSC serial port stop bits for sending an alert to
pager 2. Valid values are 1 and 2. After RSC sends the page alert, the stop bits revert
to the setting specified in the serial2_stop variable.
mail_enabled
Use this variable to specify whether an email message is sent for RSC alerts. Valid
values are true or false; the default is false.
mailuser
This variable contains the address used for email alerts. The string has a 40-character
limit; the default setting is empty. Although only a single mail address is permitted,
you can notify several people that a problem has occurred by using an email alias.
mailhost
This variable contains a colon-separated list of Internet addresses to which RSC
sends SMTP mail alerts. Each address is tried until the SMTP alert is successfully
transmitted. Specify addresses using standard dot notation. For example:
hostname rsc> set mailhost 139.143.4.2:139.142.4.15
You can specify a maximum of two addresses. If this variable is empty, or if the
mail_enabled variable is set to false, no email is sent. The default setting is
empty.
Alarm Variables
Alarm variables work with the environmental monitoring daemon (envmond) to
provide alarming.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
Environmental Monitoring and Alarms
The envmond daemon runs on the server connected to RSC; it is responsible for the
main interaction between the Solaris operating environment and the alarm card.
envmond monitors the server and sends the alarm card:
■
Status messages (the alarmn_prefix variables determine whether an alarm
should be turned on or off as a result of the messages)
■
A “heartbeat” every second (the watchdog variables determine the alarm card’s
reaction to missed heartbeats)
The alarm card, based on values set in the alarmn_prefix variables, determines
whether to turn on an alarm; if an alarm is turned on, the alarm card sends a
notification, for example, by email or pager, depending on the alert settings.
There are four relays on the external alarm port: 0, 1, 2, and 3. Relay 0 is reserved for
the system; you can set the alarmn_prefix values for relays 1, 2, and 3. The n in an
alarmn_prefix variable corresponds to the same alarm port number.
Use the environment command to view the status of alarms.
Messages
The messages generated by envmond have six digits, in the format shown in
FIGURE 3-1.
05 02 01
Unit Type
FIGURE 3-1
Status code
Unit Number
Message Format
Valid values for the unit type are:
Unit Type
Description
03
Power Supply
04
Temperature Sensor
05
Fan
90-99
User-specified unit
Chapter 3
Using the RSC Command Shell
39
Use the alarmn_prefix variables to specify the unit type.
Values for the unit number can be 01 or 02, for example, Power Supply 01.
Values for the status codes are:
Status Code
Description
00
OK
01
Failed
02
Present, but status unknown
10
Not present
99
Informational message only, no status update
Thus, the message depicted in FIGURE 3-1 means, “Fan 2 failed.”
alarm1_prefix
Use this variable to specify the unit type for messages that will activate alarm relay
1. The default value is 03 (power supply). Other valid values are 04 (temperature), 05
(fan), and a number in the range 90 through 99.
alarm2_prefix
Use this variable to specify the unit type for messages that will activate alarm relay
2. The default value is 04 (temperature). Other valid values are 03 (power supply), 05
(fan), and a number in the range 90 through 99.
alarm3_prefix
Use this variable to specify the unit type for messages that will activate alarm relay
3. The default value is 05 (fan). Other valid values are 03 (power supply), 04
(temperature), and a number in the range 90 through 99.
solaris_watchdog_timeout
The number of seconds before the alarm card determines that the system is hung or
has failed. If envmond is running, the daemon sets this variable to 10 seconds by
default. If this variable is set to 0, the alarm card ignores any heartbeats that arrive
from envmond. If this variable is set to a positive value, the alarm card notices if a
40
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
heartbeat from envmond has not arrived in time. A time-out indicates a system
failure, and an alarm relay is activated; a system failure message is also sent through
event notification to email or a pager.
solaris_watchdog_reboot
Use this variable to specify whether the alarm card should attempt to reset a system
that is hung or has failed. Valid values are true or false. The default is false. See
also “panic_dump” on page 43.
Ethernet Port Variables
ip_mode
Use this variable to control how RSC configures the IP address for its local Ethernet
port. Choose the ip_mode value according to the services available on the network
to which RSC is connected. The following list describes the available values.
■
none – Ethernet port is disabled and is not accessible.
■
dhcp – Use the dhcp protocol to obtain the IP address.
■
config – Use the ip_addr configuration variable to obtain the IP address.
When the alarm card is first installed in the system, the Ethernet interface is disabled
(the ip_mode is set to the default of none). When you run the rsc-config script,
the script prompts you to configure the Ethernet interface by displaying the default
for ip_mode as config. Changes to this variable take effect after the next RSC reset.
ip_addr
This variable is used only if the ip_mode variable is set to config. Specify the IP
address in standard Internet dot notation; the default setting is 0.0.0.0 (empty).
Changes to this variable take effect after the next RSC reset.
ip_netmask
This variable is used only if the ip_mode variable is set to config. Specify the
subnet mask in standard Internet dot notation; the default setting is 0.0.0.0
(empty). Changes to this variable take effect after the next RSC reset.
Chapter 3
Using the RSC Command Shell
41
ip_gateway
This variable is only used if the ip_mode variable is set to config. This is the
default gateway to which RSC will send IP packets when the destination is not on
the same subnet as RSC. Specify the IP address in standard Internet dot notation; the
default setting is 0.0.0.0 (empty). Changes to this variable take effect after the next
RSC reset.
tpe_link_test
Use this variable to specify whether 10BASE-T Ethernet Link Integrity tests are
enabled. Valid values are true or false; the default is true. The false value
should be used for installations where RSC is located in a hub that does not support
Link Integrity tests or that has the Link Integrity tests disabled. Link Integrity tests
should have consistent settings for both RSC and the local hub; if the settings are not
consistent, communication may not be possible.
Console Session Variable
escape_char
This variable sets the escape sequence character for ending a console session and
returning to the RSC shell. The escape sequence applies to all RSC users for the
server. The escape sequence consists of the escape character followed by a period.
The default escape character is ~ (tilde).
When you change the escape sequence character, your current console session is not
impacted; the new escape sequence character is valid only for future console
sessions. Use the show command to display the current escape sequence character.
The escape sequence character can be a single alphanumeric character. It can also be
a control character. To enter a control character as the escape character, type “^”
(Shift-6) to represent the Control key, followed by another character. If the second
character is a question mark (?), the Delete key is selected; otherwise the second
character is converted to a control character and used as the escape character. For
example, if you enter ^y to set the escape character, users will use Control-y,
followed by a period (.), to end a console session.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
If you are using tip to administer your system, the system will not recognize the
default escape sequence of ~. (tilde period). Use the following command to change
the escape sequence to another character if you are using tip to administer your
system:
# rscadm set escape_char new_character
where new_character is the new escape sequence character that you want to use. For
example, to change the escape sequence character to # (pound), enter:
# rscadm set escape_char #
Server Variable
panic_dump
Use this variable to specify whether the server will generate a core dump when it is
reset by RSC. RSC resets the server when the reset RSC shell command is issued or
when the solaris_watchdog_reboot variable is set to true and heartbeats are
not received in solaris_watchdog_timeout seconds. Valid values are true or
false. The default is false.
Chapter 3
Using the RSC Command Shell
43
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
CHAPTER
4
Using the rscadm Utility
This chapter describes the rscadm utility. It contains these sections:
■
■
■
“Overview of the Utility” on page 45
“rscadm Subcommands” on page 46
“Turning on an Alert at a UNIX Prompt” on page 49
Overview of the Utility
The rscadm utility and its subcommands enable administration of RSC from the
host. You must log in to the server as root to use rscadm. Most rscadm
subcommands are also available using the RSC command shell, but rscadm is
convenient for:
■
■
■
■
■
Reconfiguring RSC when account passwords are unknown
Resetting RSC when it fails to respond
Backing up configuration data
Downloading RSC firmware
Synchronizing RSC date and time to the server’s date and time.
The rscadm utility is installed in the directory
/usr/platform/SUNW,UltraSPARC-IIi-Netract/rsc.
45
The rscadm utility uses the following subcommands.
TABLE 4-1
rscadm Utility Subcommands
Subcommand
Description
help
Displays a list of rscadm commands and brief descriptions for
each
version
Displays information about the firmware running on RSC
date
Displays or sets the current time and date
set
Sets a configuration variable
show
Displays one or more configuration variables
resetrsc
Resets RSC immediately
download
Downloads firmware to the RSC flash PROM
send_event
Logs an event; can also send an alert message
modem_setup
Changes configuration of the modem connected to the RSC
serial port
useradd
Adds an RSC user account
userdel
Deletes an RSC user account
usershow
Shows characteristics of an RSC user account
userpassword
Sets or changes a user’s password
userperm
Sets the authorization for a user
rscadm Subcommands
Use the rscadm subcommands with the rscadm utility on the server. For example:
# rscadm show
help
This subcommand prints out a basic Help message including a list of rscadm
subcommands and a short description of each.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
version
The version subcommand displays information about the firmware running on
RSC. For example:
# rscadm version
RSC Version v2.0
RSC Bootmon v2.0
RSC Main
v2.0.15
RSC Post Status = 0xFFFF
#
date [-s]
date [[mmdd]HHMM|mmddHHMM[cc]yy]][.SS]
Use the date subcommand to show the current date and time; use the -s option to
synchronize RSC time to the server time. Supply a date with the subcommand to set
RSC time to a time other than the server time.
See “date [[mmdd]HHMM|mmddHHMM[cc]yy][.SS]” on page 26 for a description
of date formats.
set variable value
Use the set subcommand to set an RSC configuration variable. See “RSC
Configuration Variables” on page 30 for descriptions of these variables.
You can use the null string ("") to set a variable to null. To set a variable to a string
that includes spaces or UNIX shell special characters, enclose the string in double
quotes. For example:
# rscadm set page_info2 ""
# rscadm set page_init1 "&F &E0"
show [variable]
Use the show subcommand to display the value of one or more RSC configuration
variables. If you do not specify a variable, RSC displays all configuration variables.
See “RSC Configuration Variables” on page 30 for descriptions of these variables.
Chapter 4
Using the rscadm Utility
47
resetrsc [-s]
This subcommand resets RSC immediately. To terminate all connections cleanly
before the reset, use the -s option. If no argument is supplied, this subcommand
performs a hard reset and drops all connections.
download [boot] file
This subcommand supports downloading new firmware residing in file into RSC. If
you specify boot, the contents of file are installed in the boot section of RSC nonvolatile memory. When the transfer is completed, the alarm card performs a self-test;
envmond reinitializes itself after the alarm card reports the self-test completed
successfully.
send_event [-c] message
Use this subcommand to enter an event into the RSC event log. Use the -c option to
also send an alert message that RSC forwards according to the alert configuration.
The message is an ASCII string of no more than 80 characters. To use a string that
includes spaces or UNIX shell special characters, enclose the string in double quotes.
See Appendix B for an example of a Perl script that uses this subcommand to send
an alert, and see “Turning on an Alert at a UNIX Prompt” on page 49 for an example
of using this subcommand at a UNIX prompt.
modem_setup
Use this subcommand to change configuration of the modem connected to the RSC
serial port. If the modem is properly connected, you can enter standard AT
commands and see responses from the modem. At the beginning of a line, enter the
escape character (~) followed by a period to exit from this subcommand. Example:
# rscadm modem_setup
AT <enter>
OK
~.
#
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
The escape sequence for rscadm modem_setup is always ~. The RSC console has
a configurable exit character, but the escape character for rscadm modem_setup is
hard-coded. If you are using tip to administer your system, and you run rscadm
modem_setup over this connection, the tip connection recognizes the ~. escape
sequence and breaks the tip connection. The rscadm modem_setup process
continues to run.
User Account Administration Subcommands
To administer user accounts from the host using rscadm, log in to the host as root
and use the rscadm utility with the following subcommands:
■
useradd (see “useradd username” on page 27)
■
userdel (see “userdel username” on page 28)
■
usershow (see “usershow [username]” on page 28)
■
userpassword (see “userpassword username” on page 28)
■
userperm (see “userperm username [c][u][a][r]” on page 28)
Turning on an Alert at a UNIX Prompt
This section gives an example of how to turn on an alert at a UNIX prompt using
rscadm subcommands. This example configures the alarm card to turn on an alarm
and send a notification in email.
1. Configure the alarm card for email notification:
# rscadm set mail_enabled true
# rscadm set mailhost 139.143.4.2
# rscadm set mailuser joe@company.com
2. Configure an alarm relay, in this example, alarm 3:
# rscadm set alarm3_prefix 91
Chapter 4
Using the rscadm Utility
49
3. Send alert messages:
#
#
#
#
rscadm
rscadm
rscadm
rscadm
send_event
send_event
send_event
send_event
-c
-c
-c
-c
“910100
“910101
“910100
“910110
Process
Process
Process
Process
is now being monitored”
failed”
OK”
no longer monitored”
When the “failed” event is received, the alarm card:
1. Turns on alarm relay 3.
2. Logs the failure to the alarm card console, logs, and environment command.
3. Sends email notification to the mailuser specified.
4. Sends an SNMP trap (if snmp_enabled and snmp_host variables have been set).
When the “OK” event is received, the alarm card:
1. Turns off alarm relay 3.
2. Logs the OK event to the alarm card console, logs, and environment command.
3. Sends email notification to the mailuser specified.
4. Sends an SNMP trap (if snmp_enabled and snmp_host variables have been set).
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
CHAPTER
5
Using OpenBoot PROM Features
that Support RSC
This chapter contains information about OpenBoot PROM features that support
RSC.
Two environment variable properties are available to the user for specifying the RSC
console to OBP. Define these variables at the ok prompt. For example:
ok setenv input-device rsc
ok setenv output-device rsc
These properties take effect after the next server reset.
rsc
This property is a new device alias that is valid for ttyio, input-device, and
output-device OBP console variables. ttya output and input are typically still set
to be the default, and keyboard and ttyb continue to be other valid options.
51
52
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
CHAPTER
6
Troubleshooting
This chapter includes information about troubleshooting these problems:
■
■
“Troubleshooting RSC Problems” on page 53
“Troubleshooting Server Problems Using RSC” on page 56
Troubleshooting RSC Problems
Cannot log in to RSC
■
Check the RSC device name you are connecting to (normally servername-rsc).
■
Check that you are using your correct RSC user name; it might not be the same as
your system user name.
■
Check that you are using your correct RSC password.
Cannot connect to RSC using telnet
RSC supports a maximum of four simultaneous telnet connections. When all telnet
sessions are active, further attempts to connect using the telnet command will
receive a connection closed error. For example, from UNIX:
% telnet bert-rsc
Trying 129.148.49.120...
Connected to bert-rsc.
Escape character is ’^]’.
Connection closed by foreign host.
53
Cannot connect to RSC through the Ethernet connection
First, log in to the server as root and see if the command rscadm version reports
a good status. If it does, RSC is working and there is an Ethernet configuration
problem. Use the rscadm show command to check that Ethernet configuration
variables are set correctly.
You can also:
■
Log in to RSC through the serial port and use the shownetwork command to see
the current settings.
■
Log in to another machine on the network and use the ping command to see if
RSC is alive. Use RSC’s name (for instance, servername-rsc), not the server name,
as the argument to the ping command.
■
Run SunVTS diagnostics to check the Ethernet connection; the external Ethernet
test requires that the device be connected to a functional 10-Mbit hub.
■
Run SunVTS diagnostics to check the alarm card hardware.
Cannot connect to RSC through the serial port
First, log in to the server as root and see if the command rscadm version reports
a good status. If it does, RSC is working. Use the rscadm show command to check
that serial port configuration variables are set correctly.
If the problem is with a modem:
■
Log in to the server as root and use the command rscadm modem_setup to
check and verify modem configuration. It is very important that the modem is
configured to use a fixed baud rate for incoming calls.
■
Verify that the modem is working properly by attaching it to another computer.
■
Attach a terminal or another system to the serial port and verify that the serial
port is working.
■
Run SunVTS diagnostics to check the serial port; the external serial port test
requires a serial loopback connector.
■
Run SunVTS diagnostics to check the alarm card hardware.
No alerts received from RSC
■
RSC does not send alerts for all RSC events; check that the alert you are expecting
is an event for which RSC sends alerts.
■
Log in to the server as root and use the command rscadm send_event
-c message to send an alert.
If email alerts are not received:
54
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
■
Check email configuration variables.
■
Check that the mail server and backup mail server are up and configured
properly.
■
Try sending an email message to the recipients without using RSC.
■
Check Ethernet configuration.
If pager alerts are not received:
■
Check pager configuration variables.
■
Try sending a pager message by some method other than RSC.
■
Check with your pager service for proper pager configuration, or problems with
the paging service.
If SNMP traps are not received:
■
Check that the snmp_enabled variable is set to true.
■
Try issuing the ping command for the IP address in the snmp_host variable.
■
Check the SNMP management station to be sure it can receive traps from other
hosts.
RSC passwords are unknown
If users have forgotten RSC passwords or passwords are not working, log in to the
server as root and use the command rscadm userpassword to assign new
passwords. Inform RSC users of the new passwords.
Times in RSC event log do not match times in server console
logs
Log in to the server as root and use the command rscadm date -s to synchronize
RSC time to server time. Consider setting up a repetitive job to do this using the
cron utility.
Some RSC functions work, but others do not
Specific user permissions are required to perform functions; check your permission
level. In addition, the following problems may exist:
■
The poweroff command has no effect: The server is already powered off.
■
The poweron command has no effect: The server is already powered on.
Chapter 6
Troubleshooting
55
RSC is not working after you swap the alarm card hardware
After replacing an alarm card, you must reconfigure RSC. Use the rscadm utility to
restore configuration settings from a backup file and manually add users.
Troubleshooting Server Problems
Using RSC
RSC is useful for troubleshooting a server that is not responding. If the server is
responsive, connect to it as usual and use standard tools such as Solstice SyMON,
SunVTS, and OpenBoot Diagnostics.
If the server is not responding, log in to your RSC account and:
■
■
■
56
Check the RSC event log and server environmental status for problems.
Check console logs for recent error messages.
Try connecting to the server console to reboot the system.
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
APPENDIX
A
Configuring Alarm Card Modems
This appendix provides information on alarm card modems. It is organized as
follows:
■
■
“External Modems” on page 57
“Troubleshooting Modem Problems” on page 60
External Modems
You can access RSC using an Ethernet connection, and you can also install a
dedicated modem connected to the RSC serial port 2 for access from outside your
company network. For increased security, you can specify a dialback number if the
modem supports this feature.
To install and configure the modem, follow the instructions that came with it. To
enable and set up the RSC modem, use the following configuration settings unless
otherwise indicated. You can use the RSC shell or the rscadm utility to change
configuration variables.
57
General Settings
Use the following settings to configure the RSC serial port 2.
TABLE A-1
Serial Port 2 General Settings
GUI Setting
Configuration Variable Setting
Serial Port 2 Settings
Baud Rate: 9600
Parity: None
Stop Bits: One
Data Bits: 8
Enable hardware handshaking
Enable PPP on serial port
serial2_baud 9600
serial2_parity none
serial2_stop 1
serial2_data 8
serial2_hw_handshake true
ppp_enabled true
Pager Variable Settings
For sending pager alerts, RSC is designed to operate with any modem paging
service that complies with the Telocator Alphanumeric Protocol (TAP). If you want
to support both dial-in to the RSC modem and dial-out to pagers, you should set the
RSC serial port 2 baud rate and pager baud rates to 9600.
Use the following settings to enable and configure pager alerts. Use of pager 2 is
optional; you do not need to enter settings for pager 2 if you are using a single
pager.
TABLE A-2
58
Pager Alert Settings
Setting
Configuration Variable Setting
Send RSC alerts to pagers
page_enabled true
Number: phone number to dial
PIN: pager user’s PIN
page_info1 number@ID
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
TABLE A-2
Pager Alert Settings (Continued)
Setting
Configuration Variable Setting
Baud Rate: 9600
Parity: even
Stop Bits: 1
Data Bits: 7
Password: password
Modem Init. String: see “Modem
Initialization Strings” on page 60
page_baud1 9600
page_parity1 even
page_stop1 1
page_data1 7
page_password1 password
page_init1
Number: phone number to dial
PIN: pager user’s PIN
page_info2 number@ID
Baud Rate: 9600
Parity: even
Stop Bits: 1
Data Bits: 7
Password: password
Modem Init. String: see “Modem
Initialization Strings” on page 60
page_baud2 9600
page_parity2 even
page_stop2 1
page_data2 7
page_password2 password
page_init2
Pager Phone Number
Pager phone numbers are the number for the paging service’s TAP connection, and
not the number for voice page notifications. It must be a phone number that
connects to a modem that adheres to the TAP protocol. You may need to contact
your paging service to obtain this number as well as other pager configuration
parameters.
Pager phone numbers must include the complete string to dial; for instance, if your
internal phone network requires a 9 before the number, include it. You can include a
comma (,) after the 9 if a pause is required in order to wait for a dial tone. For
example, 9,8005551212.
Storing Configuration Strings in the Modem’s NVRAM
Use the rscadm modem_setup command to set modem configuration. Arguments
to the modem_setup command consist of attention (AT) commands. Store the
settings in the modem’s NVRAM.
Use the following initialization:
■
■
■
Turn off RTS flow control.
Reset modem when DTR drops.
Set the serial port 2 to fixed baud rate for incoming calls.
Appendix A
Configuring Alarm Card Modems
59
Modem Initialization Strings
Use the modem initialization strings for pagers 1 and 2 to allow RSC to set modem
parameters required by the paging service during modem setup. The initialization
string consists of attention (AT) commands.
The variables page_init1 and page_init2 have a maximum length of 15
characters, and are not stored in the modem’s NVRAM. Settings in the page_init1
and page_init2 variables complement or override the settings you store in the
modem’s NVRAM memory using the rscadm modem_setup command. Note that
if you use a different phone number or paging service for pagers 1 and 2, you may
need to enter different initialization strings for each pager.
Pager Passwords
The pager passwords are the password for the TAP paging service. In most cases in
the United States, this password is not used. However, some paging services (for
instance, in the United Kingdom) require a password.
Troubleshooting Modem Problems
You can log in to the host as root and use the command rscadm modem_setup to
debug modem problems. Then you can issue AT commands to the modem and
attempt to dial the paging terminal of your paging service. When you connect
successfully to a paging terminal that uses the TAP protocol, you should receive the
ID= prompt, indicating the start of a successful TAP connection.
If you cannot log in successfully using AT commands, check modem hardware
configuration such as DIP switches and RSC serial port 2 settings.
Instead of using the rscadm command, you can connect the modem to one of the
server’s serial ports and use a UNIX utility such as tip to connect to the TAP
paging terminal. This allows you to check the modem independent of RSC. If you
can connect successfully using this method, you know you are using the correct
paging terminal number. See the man pages for tip and stty for UNIX-level
troubleshooting.
To check pager alerts, use the command rscadm send_event -c message.
This sends an alert message to pagers specified by RSC configuration.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
APPENDIX
B
Sample Script for an Alert Message
or RSC Event
You can embed the rscadm subcommand send_event in a script or command file
to log an RSC event or send an alert when certain conditions occur. Use the -c
option to send an alert.
This appendix provides an example Perl script file named dmon.pl that sends an
RSC alert when a specified disk partition exceeds a specified percent of its capacity.
To use this script as intended, submit a separate entry to the crontab utility for
each disk partition you want to monitor.
CODE EXAMPLE B-1
#!/usr/bin/perl
# Disk Monitor
# USAGE: dmon <mount> <percent>
# e.g.: dmon /usr 80
@notify_cmd = ’/usr/platform/SUNW,UltraSPARC-IIi-Netract/rsc/rscadm’;
if (scalar(@ARGV) != 2)
{
print STDERR “USAGE: dmon.pl <mount_point> <percentage>\n”;
print STDERR “ e.g. dmon.pl /export/home 80\n\n”;
exit;
}
open(DF, “df -k|”);
$title = <DF>;
$found = 0;
while ($fields = <DF>)
{
chop($fields);
($fs, $size, $used, $avail, $capacity, $mount) = split(’ ’, $fields);
if ($ARGV[0] eq $mount)
{
$found = 1;
61
CODE EXAMPLE B-1
(Continued)
if ($capacity > $ARGV[1])
{
print STDERR “ALERT: \””, $mount, “\” is at “, $capacity,
“ of capacity, sending notification\n”;
$notify_msg = ’mount point “’.$mount.’” is at ’.
$capacity.’ of capacity’;
exec (@notify_cmd, ’send_event’, ’-c’, $notify_msg)
|| die “ERROR: $!\n”;
}
}
}
if ($found != 1)
{
print STDERR “ERROR: \””, $ARGV[0],
“\” is not a valid mount point\n\n”;
}
close(DF);
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
APPENDIX
C
Error Messages
This appendix provides information on error messages, and it is organized as
follows:
■
■
“Error Messages at the rsc> Prompt” on page 63
“Error Messages From the rscadm Utility” on page 65
Error Messages at the rsc> Prompt
Could not get username for user username
During execution of the userpassword command, a SEEPROM error occurred.
Error adding user username
An error occurred during execution of the useradd command; this message is
followed by a more detailed message.
Error changing password for username
An error occurred during execution of the userpassword command; this
message is followed by a more detailed message.
Error changing password for username
During execution of the userpassword command, a SEEPROM error occurred.
Error changing password for username - password must be at least
three characters different from old password - password must
not be based on username
You entered an invalid password.
63
Error deleting user username
An error occurred during execution of the userdel command; this message is
followed by a more detailed message.
Error displaying user username
An error occurred during execution of the usershow command; this message is
followed by a more detailed message.
Error setting permission for username
An error occurred during execution of the userperm command; this message is
followed by a more detailed message.
ERROR: username did not start with letter or did not contain
lowercase letter.
You entered an invalid user name.
Failed to allocate buffer for console mode.
During execution of the console command, RSC could not allocate enough
memory to connect to the console.
Failed to allocate memory!
During execution of the show command, RSC could not allocate enough memory
to show the variable’s value.
Failed to get password for username
During execution of the userpassword command, a SEEPROM error occurred.
Failed to set variable to value
During execution of the set command, RSC encountered a SEEPROM error.
Invalid login
Login attempt failed; this message appears at the login prompt.
Invalid password
You entered an illegal password with the userpassword command.
Invalid permission: permission
You entered an invalid user permission. Valid permissions are [c] [u] [a] [r].
Malformed username
You specified a nonexistent user when entering the userpassword, userperm,
or userdel command.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
No free user slots
This error occurs if you try to add a user account when RSC already has four
accounts configured. RSC supports only four user accounts; you must delete an
account before you can add another.
Passwords don’t match
The two entries for a new password did not match.
Permission denied
You attempted to execute a shell command for which you do not have the proper
user permission level.
Sorry, wrong password
You entered an incorrect current password.
Unable to get value of variable variable
During execution of the show command, you used an invalid variable name.
User already registered
The user you are trying to add already has an RSC account on this server.
User does not exist
The user name you specified is not associated with an RSC account on this server.
Error Messages From the rscadm Utility
Passwords didn’t match, try again
During execution of the userpassword subcommand, you enter the password
twice. If the passwords do not match, you are prompted to enter again.
rscadm: all user slots are full
This error occurs if you try to add a user account when RSC already has four
accounts configured; RSC supports only four user accounts. You must delete an
account before you can add another.
rscadm: command line too long
Check for an extremely long command line.
Appendix C
Error Messages
65
rscadm: command unknown
You used an invalid rscadm subcommand.
rscadm: could not connect to modem
During execution of the modem_setup subcommand, RSC could not connect to
the RSC modem. Is the modem connected? Perhaps the modem is currently being
used by the paging subsystem, or RSC is connected to another modem.
rscadm: could not disconnect from modem
During execution of the modem_setup subcommand, RSC refused to disconnect
from the modem.
rscadm: could not read date from RSC
An undefined error in RSC firmware occurred when trying to get the RSC date.
rscadm: could not send alert
During execution of the send_event subcommand, RSC firmware couldn’t send
event.
rscadm: could not set date on RSC
RSC detected an internal error while trying to set the date.
rscadm: couldn’t add user
RSC encountered an internal error when trying to add a user account. The RSC
SEEPROM may be faulty.
rscadm: couldn’t change password
RSC encountered an internal error when trying to change a user password.
The RSC SEEPROM may be faulty.
rscadm: couldn’t change permissions
RSC encountered an internal error when trying to change user permissions.
The RSC SEEPROM may be faulty.
rscadm: couldn’t create thread
During execution of the modem_setup subcommand, a thread create call failed.
rscadm: couldn’t delete user
RSC encountered an internal error when trying to delete a user account. The RSC
SEEPROM may be faulty.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
rscadm: couldn’t get information on user
RSC encountered an internal error when trying to access user information during
a usershow subcommand. The RSC SEEPROM may be faulty.
rscadm: download failed, RSC reported erase error
During execution of the download subcommand, RSC reported a hardware
problem when trying to program the RSC EEPROM.
rscadm: download failed, RSC reported int_wp error
During execution of the download subcommand, RSC reported a hardware
problem when trying to program the RSC EEPROM.
rscadm: download failed, RSC reported range error
During execution of the download subcommand, RSC reported a hardware
problem when trying to program the RSC EEPROM.
rscadm: download failed, RSC reported verify error
During execution of the download subcommand, RSC reported a hardware
problem when trying to program the RSC EEPROM.
rscadm: download failed, RSC reported vpp error
During execution of the download subcommand, RSC reported a hardware
problem when trying to program the RSC EEPROM.
rscadm: download failed, RSC reported wp error
During execution of the download subcommand, RSC reported a hardware
problem when trying to program the RSC EEPROM.
rscadm: the RSC lock file was found. Only one instance of
rscadm can run at a given time.
As stated.
rscadm: the RSC hardware was not detected
As stated.
rscadm: the RSC hardware could not be initialized
As stated.
rscadm: Error downloading file
An internal error occurred during execution of the download subcommand.
Appendix C
Error Messages
67
rscadm: ERROR, callback init failed
An internal error occurred during execution of the download subcommand.
rscadm: ERROR, passwords didn’t match
During execution of the userpassword subcommand, you enter the password
twice. If passwords do not match, you are prompted to enter again. If they do not
match again, the subcommand fails.
rscadm: ERROR, unable to set up message queue
An internal error occurred during execution of the download subcommand.
rscadm: event message can’t exceed 80 characters
The message for the send_event subcommand cannot exceed 80 characters.
rscadm: file could not be opened
During execution of the download subcommand, could not open the file specified
on the command line.
rscadm: file not a valid s-record
During execution of the download subcommand, the file to download is not a
valid s-record file.
rscadm: INTERNAL ERROR in set date
This is an internal rscadm software error.
rscadm: INTERNAL ERROR, overflow in callback
An internal error occurred during execution of the download subcommand.
rscadm: invalid variable
During execution of the set subcommand, you entered an invalid variable.
rscadm: invalid variable or value
During execution of the set subcommand, you entered an invalid variable or
value.
rscadm: malformed password
You entered an invalid password. A valid password has between six and eight
characters, at least two of which are alphabetic characters, and at least one of
which is a numeric or special character.
rscadm: malformed username
You entered invalid characters in a user name.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
rscadm: maximum username length is - 16
The user name you entered exceeded 16 characters; the maximum length for a
user name is 16 characters.
rscadm: RSC did not respond during boot initialization
An internal error occurred during execution of the download subcommand.
rscadm: RSC failed to respond during download
During execution of the download subcommand, RSC did not enter boot mode
correctly.
rscadm: RSC firmware not responding
RSC main firmware is not responding. Perhaps RSC is booting, main firmware is
corrupt, or RSC has a hardware problem.
rscadm: RSC not responding to requests
The response expected from RSC was not sent. Is RSC working?
rscadm: RSC returned fatal error
During execution of the download subcommand, RSC returned an
undocumented error.
rscadm: RSC returned garbage
This error can occur in various situations; as stated.
rscadm: RSC returned unknown error
During execution of the download subcommand, RSC returned undocumented
status (neither success nor failure).
rscadm: RSC returned wrong response
RSC returned an invalid response during a user* subcommand. This is
considered an internal error in RSC or rscadm.
rscadm: RSC unable to free up memory
This message can occur in various situations. The rscadm utility was unable to
free the received message from the RSC firmware.
rscadm: Unable to reset RSC hardware
During execution of the resetrsc subcommand, an attempt to hard reset RSC
failed.
Appendix C
Error Messages
69
rscadm: unable to send data to RSC
RSC did not acknowledge sent data. Is RSC working?
rscadm: Unable to send modem data to RSC
RSC did not acknowledge data sent to it. Is RSC working?
rscadm: user already exists
The user you are trying to add already has an RSC account on this server.
rscadm: username did not start with letter or did not contain
lowercase letter
You used an invalid user name format when trying to add an RSC user account.
rscadm: username does not exist
The user name you specified is not associated with an RSC account on this server.
rsc-config cannot be run while envmond is running
envmond must be stopped before you can run the rsc-config program.
This program MUST be run as root
As stated.
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
Index
A
alarm card, 7
alarm command, 22
alarming, 38
alert messages, 4
alerts
configuring, 13, 34
creating a script to send, 61
format, 13
troubleshooting, 54
variables, 34
B
backing up configuration, 15
break command, 21
C
command shell
configuration commands, 25
configuration variables, 30
alert, 34
console, 42
Ethernet port, 41
serial port, 32
logging in to, 17
other commands, 30
server status and control commands, 20
view log commands, 22
commands, shell, 17
alarm, 22
break, 21
configuration commands, 25
configuration variables, 30
alert, 34
console, 42
Ethernet port, 41
serial port, 32
console, 21
consolehistory (chist), 24
consolerestart, 25
date, 26
environment, 20
help, 30
loghistory (lhist), 23
logout, 6, 30
other commands, 30
password, 27
poweroff, 22
poweron, 22
powersupply, 22
reset, 21
resetrsc, 29
server status and control, 20
set, 25
show, 25
shownetwork, 20
table, 19
useradd, 27
userdel, 28
userpassword, 28
userperm, 28
usershow, 28
Index
71
version, 30
view log commands, 22
xir, 21
configuration
backing up, 15
point-to-point protocol (PPP), 12
configuration script, 9
configuration variables, 30
alarm
alarm1_prefix, 40
alarm2_prefix, 40
alarm3_prefix, 40
solaris_watchdog_reboot, 41
solaris_watchdog_timeout, 40
alert, 34
customerinfo, 35
hostname, 35
mail_enabled, 38
mailhost, 38
mailuser, 38
page_baud1, 36
page_baud2, 37
page_data1, 36
page_data2, 37
page_enabled, 35
page_info1, 35
page_info2, 37
page_init1, 36
page_init2, 37
page_parity1, 36
page_parity2, 38
page_password1, 36
page_password2, 37
page_stop1, 36
page_stop2, 38
snmp_enabled, 34
snmp_host, 34
console, 42
escape_char, 42
Ethernet port, 41
ip_addr, 41
ip_gateway, 42
ip_mode, 41
ip_netmask, 41
tpe_link_test, 42
serial port, 32
ppp_enabled, 34
ppp_local_ip_addr, 33
72
ppp_remote_ip_addr, 34
serial2_baud, 32
serial2_data, 33
serial2_hw_handshake, 33
serial2_mode, 32
serial2_parity, 32
serial2_stop, 33
server
panic_dump, 43
console, 21, 42, 51
redirecting, 13 to 15
console command, 21
console log, 3, 22
consolehistory (chist) command, 24
consolerestart command, 25
customerinfo variable, 13
D
date command, 26
DHCP, 9
documentation, xiii, xiv
drivers, for alarm card, 7
E
eeprom command, 14
environment command, 20
environmental monitoring daemon, see envmond
envmond, 11 to 12, 22, 38 to 41, 48
error messages, 63
escape character, 42, 49
event log, 3
creating a script to write to, 61
F
fan, 40
G
gateway, 10
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
H
P
help command, 17, 30
hostname, 9
hostname variable, 13, 35
hot swap, 7, 14
page_enabled variable, 13
page_info1 variable, 13
password, 11, 55
password command, 27
point-to-point protocol (PPP)
configuration, 12
ppp_enabled variable, 12
power supply, 20, 40
poweroff command, 22
poweron command, 22
powersupply command, 22
ppp_enabled variable, 12
PROM, 10
I
inactivity time-out, 6, 33
input-device variable, 13, 51
installation directory, 8
IP address, 10, 20, 41
L
link integrity tests, 42
loghistory (lhist) command, 23
login failures, 18
logout command, 6, 30
M
mail_enabled variable, 13
modem
example of general settings, 58
multiple sessions, 12
pager variable settings, 58
setup, 48 to 49, 57 to 60
N
netmask, 10
O
OpenBoot PROM (OBP), 14, 15
environment variable properties for RSC
rsc, 51
output-device variable, 13, 51
R
Remote System Control
capabilities, 3
configuration, backing up, 15
configuring, 7, 9
flash PROM, 10
installing, 7
login failures, 18
overview, 1
security, 6
using, 4
reset command, 21
resetrsc command, 29
root account, 10
rscadm date, 47
rscadm download, 48
rscadm help, 46
rscadm modem_setup, 48
rscadm resetrsc, 48
rscadm send_event, 48
rscadm set, 15, 47
rscadm show, 47
rscadm utility, 9, 11, 13, 15, 45
rscadm version, 47
rscadm, and user account administration, 49
rsc-config script, 9, 9 to 11
Index
73
S
script, sample, 61
security, 6
serial port, 4, 8, 13, 32
session time-out, 6
sessions, multiple
Ethernet port, 12
serial port modem, 12
set command, 25
setenv command, 14
shell commands, 17
alarm, 22
break, 21
configuration commands, 25
configuration variables, 30
alert, 34
console, 42
Ethernet port, 41
serial port, 32
console, 21
consolehistory (chist), 24
consolerestart, 25
date, 26
environment, 20
help, 30
loghistory (lhist), 23
login, 17
logout, 6, 30
other commands, 30
password, 27
poweroff, 22
poweron, 22
powersupply, 22
reset, 21
resetrsc, 29
server status and control, 20
set, 25
show, 25
shownetwork, 20
table, 19
useradd, 27
userdel, 28
userpassword, 28
userperm, 28
usershow, 28
version, 30
view log commands, 22
xir, 21
74
show command, 25
shownetwork command, 20
SMTP, 10, 38
SNMP, 34
subnet mask, 10
superuser account, 10
T
telnet, 4, 8, 17
temperature, 20, 40
time
differences in event and console logs, 24
synchronizing to server’s, 47
troubleshooting, 55
time-out, 6, 18, 33
tip program, 8, 43, 49
troubleshooting RSC problems, 53
cannot connect through Ethernet, 54
cannot connect through serial port, 54
cannot log in, 53
no alerts received, 54
not working after alarm card swap
replacement, 56
passwords unknown, 55
some functions work, others do not, 55
times don’t match, 55
troubleshooting server problems using RSC, 56
U
user account, 10, 15, 17, 27
user permissions, 20, 28
useradd command, 27
userdel command, 28
userpassword command, 28
userperm command, 28
usershow command, 28
V
variables, configuration, 30
alarm
alarm1_prefix, 40
Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
alarm2_prefix, 40
alarm3_prefix, 40
solaris_watchdog_reboot, 41
solaris_watchdog_timeout, 40
alert, 34
customerinfo, 35
hostname, 35
mail_enabled, 38
mailhost, 38
mailuser, 38
page_baud1, 36
page_baud2, 37
page_data1, 36
page_data2, 37
page_enabled, 35
page_info1, 35
page_info2, 37
page_init1, 36
page_init2, 37
page_parity1, 36
page_parity2, 38
page_password1, 36
page_password2, 37
page_stop1, 36
page_stop2, 38
snmp_enabled, 34
snmp_host, 34
console, 42
escape_char, 42
Ethernet port, 41
ip_addr, 41
ip_gateway, 42
ip_mode, 41
ip_netmask, 41
tpe_link_test, 42
serial port, 32
ppp_enabled, 34
ppp_local_ip_addr, 33
ppp_remote_ip_addr, 34
serial2_baud, 32
serial2_data, 33
serial2_hw_handshake, 33
serial2_mode, 32
serial2_parity, 32
serial2_stop, 33
server
panic_dump, 43
version command, 30
X
xir command, 21
Index
75
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Sun Remote System Control (RSC) User’s Guide for the Netra ct Server Alarm Card • February 2001
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