Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide

Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280
System Administration Guide
TM
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Part No. 817-0509-10
December 2002, Revision A
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Contents
1.
Overview
1
System Controller
I/O Ports
1
2
LOM Prompt
3
Solaris Console
4
Environmental Monitoring
System Indicator Board
4
4
Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS)
Reliability
6
6
Disabling Components or Boards and Power-On Self-Test (POST)
Manual Disabling of Components
Environmental Monitoring
Availability
7
7
7
Dynamic Reconfiguration
Power Failure
Host Watchdog
Serviceability
8
8
System Controller Reboot
LEDs
7
8
8
8
9
iii
Nomenclature
9
System Controller Error Logging
9
System Controller XIR (eXternally Initiated Reset) Support
2.
Starting and Setting Up the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280
Installing and Cabling Hardware
12
Using the Power (On/Standby) Switch
Powering On and Off
Powering On
13
14
14
▼
Initial Power-On
14
▼
Powering On from Standby Mode
Bringing the System to Standby Mode
After Powering On
Setting Up the System
14
15
18
19
▼
To Set the Date and Time
19
▼
To Set Up the Password
▼
To Configure Network Parameters
20
20
Installing and Booting the Solaris Operating Environment
To Install and Boot the Solaris Operating Environment
▼
To Install the Lights Out Management Packages
▼
To Install the LOM Drivers
23
▼
To Install the LOM Utility
▼
To Install the LOM Manual Pages
25
27
27
▼
To Forcibly Reset the System
▼
To Reset the System Controller
Console Navigation Procedures
27
28
29
Establishing a LOM/Console Connection
iv
22
▼
Resetting the System
3.
11
30
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
23
22
9
Accessing the LOM/Console Using the Serial Port
▼
To Connect to an ASCII Terminal
▼
To Connect to a Network Terminal Server
▼
To Connect to Serial Port B of a Workstation
▼
To Access the LOM/Console Using the Telnet Command
▼
To Disconnect from the LOM/Console
Switching Between the Different Consoles
▼
30
To Break to the LOM Prompt
39
Selecting an Escape Sequence
39
30
32
33
35
36
37
▼
To Connect to the Solaris Console from the LOM Prompt
39
▼
To Break to the LOM Prompt from the OpenBoot PROM
40
▼
To Break to the OpenBoot Prompt when Solaris is Running
▼
To Terminate a Session If You Are Connected To the System Controller
Through the Serial Port 41
▼
To Terminate a Session If You Are Connected to the System Controller
with telnet 42
41
4.
System Controller Message Logging
5.
Using Lights Out Management and the System Controller from Solaris
LOM Command Syntax
43
45
45
Monitoring the System From Solaris
46
Viewing Online LOM Documentation
46
Viewing the LOM Configuration (lom -c)
48
Checking the Status of the Fault LED and Alarms (lom -l)
Viewing the Event Log (lom -e)
Checking the Fans (lom -f)
48
49
50
Checking the Internal Voltage Sensors (lom -v)
Checking the Internal Temperature (lom -t)
50
53
Contents
v
Viewing All Component Status Data and the LOM Configuration Data (lom a) 54
Other LOM Tasks Performed From Solaris
55
Turning Alarms On and Off (lom -A)
55
Changing the lom> Prompt Escape Sequence
(lom -X) 56
Stopping LOM from Sending Reports to the Console When at the LOM
Prompt (lom -E off) 56
Upgrading the Firmware (lom -G filename)
6.
Running POST
57
59
OpenBoot PROM Variables for POST Configuration
Controlling POST With the bootmode Command
Controlling the System Controller POST
7.
Troubleshooting
67
Device Mapping
67
CPU/Memory Mapping
63
64
67
IB_SSC Assembly Mapping
System Faults
59
69
72
Customer Replaceable Units
Sun Fire V1280
Netra 1280
74
74
74
Manual Blacklisting (while waiting for repair)
75
Special Considerations for CPU/Memory Boards
Recovering a Hung System
▼
To Recover a Hung System Manually
Moving System Identity
Temperature
77
79
79
Power Supplies
vi
77
82
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
76
Displaying Diagnostic Information
82
Assisting Sun Service Personnel in Determining Causes of Failure
8.
Firmware Upgrade Procedures
85
Using the flashupdate Command
85
flashupdate Command—Examples
Using the lom -G Command
Examples
9.
83
87
88
89
CPU/Memory Board Replacement and Dynamic Reconfiguration (DR)
Dynamic Reconfiguration
Overview
91
91
91
Command Line Interface
DR Concepts
Quiescence
91
92
92
Suspend-Safe and Suspend-Unsafe Devices
Attachment Points
DR Operations
92
93
94
Hot-Plug Hardware
Conditions and States
94
94
Board States and Conditions
Board Receptacle States
Board Occupant States
Board Conditions
95
95
95
96
Component States and Conditions
Component Receptacle States
Component Occupant States
Component Conditions
Component Types
96
96
96
97
97
Contents
vii
Nonpermanent and Permanent Memory
Limitations
98
Memory Interleaving
98
Reconfiguring Permanent Memory
Command Line Interface
The cfgadm Command
99
99
Displaying Detailed Board Status
Command Options
98
99
Displaying Basic Board Status
100
101
Testing Boards and Assemblies
102
To Test a CPU/Memory Board
▼
97
102
Installing or Replacing CPU/Memory Boards
▼
104
▼
To Install a New Board
104
▼
To Hot-Swap a CPU/Memory Board
▼
To Remove a CPU/Memory Board From the System
104
To Disconnect a CPU/Memory Board Temporarily
Troubleshooting
107
Unconfigure Operation Failure
107
CPU/Memory Board Unconfiguration Failures
Configure Operation Failure
110
CPU/Memory Board Configuration Failure
Error Logging
Glossary
Index
viii
111
113
117
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
110
107
106
105
Figures
FIGURE 1-1
I/O Ports 2
FIGURE 1-2
System Indicator Board 5
FIGURE 2-1
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Power (On/Standby) Switch 13
FIGURE 3-1
Navigation Procedures 38
FIGURE 4-1
System Controller Logging
FIGURE 7-1
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 IB_SSC PCI Physical Slot Designations for IB6 71
FIGURE 7-2
System Indicators 73
FIGURE 9-1
Details of the Display for cfgadm -av
44
101
ix
x
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Tables
3
TABLE 1-1
Selected Management Tasks
TABLE 1-2
System Indicator LED Functions 5
TABLE 6-1
POST Configuration Parameters 60
TABLE 7-1
CPU and Memory Agent ID Assignment 68
TABLE 7-2
I/O Assembly Type and Number of Slots 69
TABLE 7-3
Number and Name of I/O Assemblies per System 69
TABLE 7-4
I/O Controller Agent ID Assignments 69
TABLE 7-5
IB_SSC Assembly PCI Device Mapping
TABLE 7-6
System Fault Indicator States
TABLE 7-7
Blacklisting Component Names 75
TABLE 7-8
Checking Temperature Conditions Using the showenvironment Command 79
TABLE 9-1
Types of DR Operation 94
TABLE 9-2
Board Receptacle States
TABLE 9-3
Board Occupant States 96
TABLE 9-4
Board Conditions
TABLE 9-5
Component Occupant States
TABLE 9-6
Component Conditions
TABLE 9-7
Component Types
TABLE 9-8
DR Board States from the System Controller (SC) 99
TABLE 9-9
cfgadm -c Command Options 102
70
73
95
96
97
97
97
xi
xii
TABLE 9-10
cfgadm -x Command Options 102
TABLE 9-11
Diagnostic Levels 103
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Code Samples
CODE EXAMPLE 2-1
Hardware Reset Output from the System Controller 18
CODE EXAMPLE 2-2
Output From the setupnetwork Command 21
CODE EXAMPLE 2-3
Installing the LOM Drivers
CODE EXAMPLE 2-4
Installing the LOM Utility
CODE EXAMPLE 2-5
Installing the LOM Manual Pages 27
CODE EXAMPLE 5-1
Sample Output from the lom -c Command 48
CODE EXAMPLE 5-2
Sample Output from the lom -l Command 48
CODE EXAMPLE 5-3
Sample LOM Event Log (Oldest Event Reported First) 49
CODE EXAMPLE 5-4
Sample Output from the lom -f Command 50
CODE EXAMPLE 5-5
Sample Output from the lom -v Command 50
CODE EXAMPLE 5-6
Sample Output from the lom -t Command 53
CODE EXAMPLE 6-1
POST Output Using max Setting
CODE EXAMPLE 6-2
Setting SCPOST Diagnostic Level to min
CODE EXAMPLE 6-3
SCPOST Output with Diagnostic Level Set to min
CODE EXAMPLE 8-1
Downloading the sgpci.flash Image 89
CODE EXAMPLE 8-2
Downloading the sgcpu.flash Image 89
CODE EXAMPLE 9-1
Output of the Basic cfgadm Command
CODE EXAMPLE 9-2
Output of the cfgadm -av Command 100
23
25
62
64
65
100
xiii
xiv
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Preface
This book presents a step-by-step description on how to power on and customize the
platform setup.
This book describes information on system controller security, software steps to
power off the system, how to perform firmware updates, how to remove and replace
system boards (CPU/Memory boards and I/O assemblies), PCI cards, plus the
software steps needed to remove the System Controller and Repeater boards,
troubleshooting, and a glossary of technical terms.
How This Book Is Organized
Chapter 1 describes the system controller, and explains board states, describes
redundant system components, minimum system configurations, and reliability,
serviceability, and availability.
Chapter 2 describes how to power on and set up the system for the first time.
Chapter 3 describes how to navigate within the system controller.
Chapter 4 explains System Controller message logging..
Chapter 5 describes how to use the LOM from the Solaris console.
Chapter 6 describes how to run the power-on self-test (POST).
Chapter 7 describes troubleshooting information including LEDs, system faults,
displaying diagnostic information, displaying system configuration information,
disabling components (blacklisting) and mapping device path names to physical
system devices.
xv
Chapter 8 provides information on firmware updates, including how to update the
flash PROMs and the procedure for updating the system controller firmware.
Chapter 9 describes Dynamic Reconfiguration and the procedures you can use.
Using UNIX Commands
This book assumes you are experienced with the UNIX® operating environment. If
you are not experienced with the UNIX operating environment, see one or more of
the following for this information:
■
AnswerBook2™ online documentation for the Solaris operating environment.
■
Other software documentation that you received with your system.
Typographic Conventions
Typeface
Meaning
Examples
AaBbCc123
The names of commands, files,
and directories; on-screen
computer output
Edit your .login file.
Use ls -a to list all files.
% You have mail.
AaBbCc123
What you type, when
contrasted with on-screen
computer output
% su
Password:
AaBbCc123
Book titles, new words or terms,
words to be emphasized
Read Chapter 6 in the User’s Guide.
These are called class options.
You must be superuser to do this.
Command-line variable; replace
with a real name or value
To delete a file, type rm filename.
xvi Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Shell Prompts
Shell
Prompt
C shell
machine_name%
C shell superuser
machine_name#
Bourne shell and Korn shell
$
Bourne shell and Korn shell superuser
#
LOM shell
lom>
Related Documentation
Type of Book
Title
Part Number
Service
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 Service Manual
817-0510
System
Controller
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Controller
Command Reference Manual
817-0511
Accessing Sun Documentation
You can view and print a broad selection of Sun™ documentation, including
localized versions, at:
http://www.sun.com/documentation
Preface
xvii
Sun Welcomes Your Comments
Sun is interested in improving its documentation and welcomes your comments and
suggestions. You can email your comments to Sun at:
docfeedback@sun.com
Please include the part number of your document, which is on the title page, in the
subject line of your email.
xviii
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
CHAPTER
1
Overview
This chapter presents a software overview of the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 system.
The objective of this chapter is to provide you with a basic understanding of the
features of the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 system.
The procedural overview of how to set up your system, and detailed procedures, is
covered in Chapter 2.
System Controller
The System Controller is an embedded system resident on the IB_SSC Assembly
which connects to the system baseplane. The system controller is responsible for
providing the Lights Out Management (LOM) functions which include power on
sequencing, sequencing module power on self tests (POST), environmental
monitoring, fault indication and alarms.
The System Controller provides an RS232 serial interface and one 10/100 Ethernet
interface. Access to the LOM command line interface and the Solaris/OpenBoot
PROM console is shared and obtained through these interfaces.
System Controller functions include:
■
■
■
■
■
■
Monitoring the system
Providing the Solaris and OpenBoot PROM consoles
Providing the virtual TOD (time of day)
Performing environmental monitoring
Performing system initialization
Coordinating POST
The software application running on the System Controller provides a command line
interface for you to modify system settings.
1
I/O Ports
The following ports are on the rear of the system:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Console serial (RS-232) port (RJ45)
Reserved serial (RS-232) port (RJ45)
Two Gigabit Ethernet ports (RJ-45)
Alarms port (DB15)
System Controller 10/100 Ethernet port (RJ45)
UltraSCSI port
Up to six PCI ports (five 33 MHz, one 66 MHz)
Their locations are shown in FIGURE 1-1.
PCI0 - PCI5
SCSI3
68-pin SCSI
10/100 Ethernet
LOM/System
Controller
PCI 0
33MHz
SSC1
AA
Serial
PCI 1
33MHz
BB
Serial
PCI 2
33MHz
PCI 3
33MHz
PCI 4
33MHz
PCI 5
66MHz
ALARMS
Alarms port
SSC1
Link
Active
NET
0
GBit
Serial ports
Link
Active
NET
1
GBit
Net0/Net1
AC
3
PSU2 input
AC
2
PSU1 input
AC
1
PSU0 input
AC
0
SOURCE A
SOURCE A
B
PSU3 input
FIGURE 1-1
2
I/O Ports
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
The console serial port and 10/100 Ethernet port can be used to access the System
Controller.
Use the console serial port to connect directly to an ASCII terminal or a NTS
(network terminal server). Connecting the System Controller board with a serial
cable enables you to access the System Controller command line interface with an
ASCII terminal or an NTS.
Use the 10/100 Ethernet port to connect the System Controller to the network.
LOM Prompt
The LOM prompt provides the command line interface for the System Controller. It
is also the place where console messages are displayed.
The prompt is:
lom>
Some of the system management tasks are shown in TABLE 1-1.
TABLE 1-1
Selected Management Tasks
System Controller Management Tasks
System Controller Commands To Use
Configuring the System Controller.
password, setescape, seteventreporting,
setupnetwork,setupsc
Configuring the system.
setalarm, setlocator
Powering boards on and off and powering the
system on or off.
poweron, poweroff, reset, shutdown
Testing the CPU/Memory board.
testboard
Resetting the System Controller.
resetsc
Marking components as faulty or OK.
disablecomponent, enablecomponent
Upgrading firmware.
flashupdate
Displaying the current System Controller settings.
showescape, showeventreporting, shownetwork,
showsc
Chapter 1
Overview
3
TABLE 1-1
Selected Management Tasks (Continued)
System Controller Management Tasks
System Controller Commands To Use
Displaying the current system state.
showalarm, showboards, showcomponent,
showenvironment, showfault, showhostname,
showlocator, showlogs, showmodel,
showresetstate
Setting the date, time, and time zone.
setdate
Displaying the date and time.
showdate
Solaris Console
If the Solaris operating environment, the OpenBoot PROM, or POST is running, you
can access the Solaris console. When you connect to the Solaris console, you will be
in one of the following modes of operation:
■
■
■
Solaris operating environment console (% or # prompts)
OpenBoot PROM (ok prompt)
System will be running POST and you can view the POST output.
To switch between these prompts and the LOM prompt, refer to “Switching Between
the Different Consoles” on page 37.
Environmental Monitoring
There are sensors that monitor temperature, voltage, and cooling.
The System Controller polls these sensors in a timely manner and makes the
environmental data available. If necessary, the System Controller shuts down
various components to prevent damage.
For instance, in the case of an overtemperature, the System Controller notifies the
Solaris operating environment of the overtemperature and the operating
environment takes action. In the case of extreme overtemperature, the System
Controller software can shut down the system without first notifying the operating
environment.
System Indicator Board
The system indicator board contains the On/Standby switch and indicator LEDs as
shown in FIGURE 1-2.
4
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
On/Standby switch
SYSTEM
ALARM
POWER SOURCE
SERVICE REQUIRED
Locator
System Active
System Fault
FIGURE 1-2
UNIX Running
Top Access Required
Source A and Source B
Alarm1 and Alarm2
System Indicator Board
The indicator LEDs function as shown in TABLE 1-2.
TABLE 1-2
System Indicator LED Functions
Name
Locator*
Colour
Function
White
Normally off; can be lit by user command
System
Fault*
Amber
Lights when the LOM detects a fault
System
Active*
Green
Lights when power is applied to the system
Top Access
Amber
Lights when a fault occurs in a FRU which can only be replaced
from the top of the system
UNIX Running
Green
Lights when Solaris is running.
Alarm1 and Alarm2
Green
Light when triggered by events as specified in the LOM
Source A and Source B
Green
Light when the relevant power feeds are present
* This indicator is repeated on the rear of the system.
Chapter 1
Overview
5
Reliability, Availability, and
Serviceability (RAS)
Reliability, availability, and serviceability (RAS) are features of this system. The
descriptions of these features are:
■
Reliability is the probability that a system stays operational for a specified time
period when operating under normal environmental conditions. Reliability differs
from availability in that reliability involves only system failure, whereas
availability depends on both failure and recovery.
■
Availability, also known as average availability, is the percentage of time that a
system is available to perform its functions correctly. Availability can be measured
at the system level or in the context of the availability of a service to an end client.
The “system availability” is likely to impose an upper limit on the availability of
any products built on top of that system.
■
Serviceability measures the ease and effectiveness of maintenance and system
repair for the product. There is no single well-defined metric, because
serviceability can include both Mean Time to Repair (MTTR) and diagnosability.
The following sections provide details on RAS. For more hardware-related
information on RAS, refer to the Sun Fire V1280 Service Manual. For RAS features
that involve the Solaris operating environment, refer to the Sun Hardware Platform
Guide.
Reliability
The software reliability features include:
■
■
■
Disabling Components or Boards and Power-On Self-Test (POST)
Manual Disabling of Components
Environmental Monitoring
The reliability features also improve system availability.
6
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Disabling Components or Boards and Power-On Self-Test
(POST)
The power-on self-test (POST) is part of powering on the system. If the board or
component failed testing, POST disables components or boards. The showboards
command displays the board as either being failed or degraded. The system,
running the Solaris operating environment, is booted only with components that
have passed POST testing.
Manual Disabling of Components
The system controller provides component-level status and user-controlled disabling
of components, which is also referred to as blacklisting.
You can add a faulty component to a blacklist with the disablecomponent
command. Components in the blacklist will not be configured. You can remove a
component from the blacklist with the enablecomponent command.
The showcomponent command displays status information about the component,
including whether or not it has been disabled.
Environmental Monitoring
The System Controller monitors the system’s temperature, cooling, and voltage
sensors. The System Controller provides the latest environmental status information
to the Solaris operating environment and Sun Management Center software for Sun
Fire systems. If hardware needs to be powered off, the System Controller notifies the
Solaris operating environment to perform a system shutdown.
Availability
The software availability features include:
■
■
■
■
Dynamic Reconfiguration.
Power Failure.
System Controller Reboot.
Host Watchdog.
Chapter 1
Overview
7
Dynamic Reconfiguration
The following components can be dynamically reconfigured:
■
■
■
■
Hard disk drives.
CPU/Memory boards.
Power supplies.
Fans.
Power Failure
On recovery from a power outage, the System Controller attempts to restore the
system to its previous state.
System Controller Reboot
The System Controller can be rebooted and will start up and resume management of
the system. The reboot does not disturb the currently running Solaris operating
environment.
Host Watchdog
The System Controller monitors the state of the Solaris operating environment and
will initiate a reset if Solaris stops responding.
Serviceability
The software serviceability features promote the efficiency and timeliness of
providing routine as well as emergency service to the system.
■
■
■
■
8
LEDs.
Nomenclature.
System Controller error logging.
System Controller XIR (eXternally Initiated Reset) support.
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
LEDs
All field-replaceable units (FRUs) that are accessible from outside the system have
LEDs that indicate their state. The System Controller manages all the LEDs in the
system, with the exception of the power supply LEDs, which are managed by the
power supplies. For a discussion of LED functions, refer to the appropriate board or
device chapter of the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 Service Manual.
Nomenclature
The System Controller, the Solaris operating environment, the power-on self-test
(POST), and the OpenBoot PROM error messages use FRU name identifiers that
match the physical labels in the system. The only exception is the OpenBoot PROM
nomenclature used for I/O devices, which use the device path names as described in
Chapter 7, to indicate I/O devices during device probing.
System Controller Error Logging
System Controller error messages are automatically notified to the Solaris operating
environment. The System Controller also has an internal buffer where error
messages are stored. You can display the System Controller logged events, stored in
the System Controller message buffer, by using the showlogs command.
System Controller XIR (eXternally Initiated Reset) Support
The System Controller reset command enables you to recover from a hung system
and extract a Solaris operating environment core file. .
Chapter 1
Overview
9
10
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
CHAPTER
2
Starting and Setting Up the Sun Fire
V1280/Netra 1280
This chapter describes how to power on your system using the System Controller
command line interface (LOM prompt), how to set up the System Controller using
the setupnetwork command, and how to boot the Solaris operating environment.
This chapter contains the following topics:
■
■
■
■
■
■
“Installing and Cabling Hardware” on page 12
“Using the Power (On/Standby) Switch” on page 13
“Powering On and Off” on page 14
“Setting Up the System” on page 19
“Installing and Booting the Solaris Operating Environment” on page 22
“Resetting the System” on page 27
The list below summarizes the major steps you must perform to power on and set
up the system, which are explained using step-by-step procedures.
1. Install and cable the hardware.
2. Apply external power to the hardware.
3. Set the date and time for the system.
4. Set the password for the System Controller.
5. Set up system-specific parameters with the setupnetwork command.
6. Power on all hardware with the poweron command.
7. If the Solaris operating environment is not pre-installed, install it.
8. Boot the Solaris operating environment.
9. Install the Lights Out Management packages from the Solaris Supplementary CD.
11
Installing and Cabling Hardware
1. Connect a terminal to the System Controller board serial port.
Refer to FIGURE 1-1.
2. Set up the terminal to use the same baud rate as the serial port.
The serial port settings of the System Controller board are:
■
9600 8N1:
■
9600 baud
■
8 data bits
■
No parity
■
1 stop bit
More details can be found in the Sun Fire V1280 Site Preparation and Installation Guide.
12
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Using the Power (On/Standby) Switch
Caution – The power switch is not an On/Off switch, it is an On/Standby switch.
It does not isolate the equipment.
The power (On/Standby) switch of the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 system is a
rocker type, momentary action switch. It controls only low voltage signals and no
high voltage circuits pass through it.
On/Standby switch
SYSTEM
ALARM
POWER SOURCE
SERVICE REQUIRED
FIGURE 2-1
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Power (On/Standby) Switch
The symbols on the switch are:
On
■
Press and release to power on the server. This is the equivalent of the LOM
poweron command.
Standby
■
Press for less than four seconds to initiate an orderly shutdown of the system into
Standby mode. This is equivalent to issuing the shutdown command at the lom>
prompt. This is the method to use under normal operation.
■
Press and hold down for more than four seconds to perform a system power
down to standby mode. This is equivalent to issuing the poweroff command at
the lom> prompt. This process is not interruptible. You should ensure that Solaris
is cleanly shut down before powering a system to standby mode otherwise data is
at risk of being lost. The recommended method of powering down to standby is
by using the shutdown command at the LOM prompt.
Use the LOM setupsc command to prevent accidental operation of the
On/Standby switch.
Chapter 2
Starting and Setting Up the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280
13
Powering On and Off
Powering On
▼ Initial Power-On
1. Ensure all power cables are connected and external circuit breakers are switched
on.
2. The system will enter Standby mode.
The only indicator LEDs to be illuminated on the system indicator board are the
Source A and Source B indicators. The IB_SSC assembly Active LED will also be
illuminated, but not visible from the front of the system.
▼ Powering On from Standby Mode
Powering the system on from Standby mode can be achieved in either of two ways:
■
■
Operating the On/Standby switch
Sending the poweron command via the LOM port.
If the auto-boot? variable has been set in the OBP, the system will automatically
boot into the Solaris operating environment.
Using the On/Standby Switch
1. Check that power is applied to the system and that it is correctly in Standby
mode.
The only indicator LEDs to be illuminated on the system indicator board are the
Source A and Source B indicators. The IB_SSC assembly Active LED will also be
illuminated, but not visible from the front of the system.
2. Momentarily press the On/Standby switch to the right.
The system will power on completely. The System Active indicator will be
illuminated in addition to the Source A and Source B indicators. The system will
execute the power on self tests (POST).
14
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Using the LOM poweron Command
● At the lom> prompt, type:
lom>poweron
The System Controller will first power on all the power supplies, followed by the fan
tray. Finally the System Controller will power on the system boards. If the value of
the OpenBoot PROM variable auto-boot? is true then the system will also boot
the Solaris operating environment.
Individual modules can also be powered on using the poweron command. For
further details see the Sun Fire V1280 System Controller Command Reference Manual.
The System Active indicator will be illuminated in addition to the Source A and
Source B indicators. The system will execute the power on self tests (POST).
Note – The poweron all command only powers on individual components; it
does not boot Solaris.
Refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Controller Command Reference Manual
for a full description of the poweron command.
Bringing the System to Standby Mode
This can be achieved in one of five ways:
■ Using the UNIX shutdown command.
■ Sending the shutdown command via the LOM port
■ Sending the shutdown command using the On/Standby switch
■ Sending the poweroff command via the LOM port
■ Sending the poweroff command using the On/Standby switch
Note – You should ensure that Solaris is cleanly shut down before powering a
system to standby mode otherwise data is at risk of being lost.
Chapter 2
Starting and Setting Up the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280
15
Using the Solaris shutdown Command
● At the system prompt, type:
# shutdown -i5
The system will power off to standby mode. The only indicator LEDs to be
illuminated on the system indicator board are the Source A and Source B indicators.
The IB_SSC assembly Active LED will also be illuminated, but not visible from the
front of the system.
Sending the LOM shutdown Command
Use the LOM shutdown command to perform a clean shutdown of Solaris followed
by a power down of all modules and system chassis to standby mode.
Note – If Solaris is running this command will attempt to halt the system cleanly
before powering down the system to standby mode, and is the equivalent of the
Solaris init 5 command.
At the lom> prompt, type:
lom>shutdown
After Solaris has been stopped, the system will power off to standby mode. The only
indicator LEDs to be illuminated on the system indicator board are the Source A and
Source B indicators. The IB_SSC assembly Active LED will also be illuminated, but
not visible from the front of the system.
Refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Controller Command Reference Manual
for a full description of the LOM shutdown command.
Sending the shutdown Command Using the On/Standby Switch
● Momentarily press the system On/Standby switch to the left.
This initiates an orderly shutdown of the system into Standby mode. This is
equivalent to issuing the shutdown command at the lom> prompt.
16
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Sending the LOM poweroff Command
Use the poweroff command when you wish to power down all modules and
system chassis to standby mode.
● At the lom> prompt, type:
lom>poweroff
This will abruptly terminate Solaris.
Do you want to continue? [no]
Only answer yes if you wish to forcibly power down the system regardless of the
state of Solaris. Under normal operation you should use the shutdown command.
Type y to continue or press Return to cancel the command.
The system will power off to standby mode. The only indicator LEDs to be
illuminated on the system indicator board are the Source A and Source B indicators.
The IB_SSC assembly Active LED will also be illuminated, but not visible from the
front of the system.
Refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Controller Command Reference Manual
for a full description of the poweroff command.
Sending the poweroff Command Using the On/Standby Switch
Only use this method if you wish to forcibly power down the system regardless of
the state of Solaris. Under normal operation you should send the shutdown
command either from the lom> prompt or from the On/Standby Switch (see
“Sending the shutdown Command Using the On/Standby Switch” on page 16).
● Press the On/Standby switch to the left and hold it for at least four seconds.
The system will power down to standby mode. The only indicator LEDs to be
illuminated on the system indicator board are the Source A and Source B indicators.
The IB_SSC assembly Active LED will also be illuminated, but not visible from the
front of the system.
Chapter 2
Starting and Setting Up the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280
17
After Powering On
You will see the following output on the System Controller serial port connection:
CODE EXAMPLE 2-1
Hardware Reset Output from the System Controller
Hardware Reset...
@(#) SYSTEM CONTROLLER(SC) POST 23 2002/03/22 18:03
PSR = 0x044010e5
PCR = 0x04004000
Basic sanity checks done.
Skipping POST ...
ERI Device Present
Getting MAC address for SSC1
Using SCC MAC address
MAC address is 0:3:xx:xx:xx:xx
Hostname: some_name
Address: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
Netmask: 255.255.255.0
Attached TCP/IP interface to eri unit 0
Attaching interface lo0...done
Gateway: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
interrupt: 100 Mbps half duplex link up
Copyright 2001-2002 Sun Microsystems, Inc.
Use is subject to license terms.
All rights reserved.
Lights Out Management Firmware
RTOS version: 23
ScApp version: 5.13.0007 LW8_build0.7
SC POST diag level: off
The date is Friday, July 19, 2002, 3:48:50 PM BST.
Fri
Fri
Fri
Fri
Fri
Fri
Fri
Fri
Fri
18
Jul
Jul
Jul
Jul
Jul
Jul
Jul
Jul
Jul
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
15:48:51 some_name lom: Boot: ScApp 5.13.0007, RTOS 23
15:48:54 some_name lom: SBBC Reset Reason(s): Power On Reset
15:48:54 some_name lom: Initializing the SC SRAM
15:48:59 some_name lom: Caching ID information
15:49:00 some_name lom: Clock Source: 75MHz
15:49:02 some_name lom: /N0/PS0: Status is OK
15:49:03 some_name lom: /N0/PS1: Status is OK
15:49:03 some_name lom: Chassis is in single partition mode.
15:49:05 some_name lom: Cold boot detected: recovering active domains
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Hardware Reset Output from the System Controller (Continued)
CODE EXAMPLE 2-1
Hardware Reset...
Fri Jul 19 15:49:06 some_name lom: NOTICE: /N0/FT0 is powered off
Connected.
lom>
Setting Up the System
After powering on, you must set up your system using the System Controller
setdate and setupnetwork commands described in this chapter.
This section contains the following topics:
■
■
■
▼
“To Set the Date and Time” on page 19
“To Configure Network Parameters” on page 20
“To Install and Boot the Solaris Operating Environment” on page 22
To Set the Date and Time
Note – If your time zone area is using daylight or summer time, this is set
automatically.
● Set the date, time, and time zone for the system using the setdate command at
the LOM prompt:
The following example shows setting the time zone to Pacific Standard Time (PST)
using the offset from Greenwich mean time (GMT), date, and time to Thursday,
April 20, 2000 at 18 hours 15 minutes and 10 seconds.
lom>setdate -t GMT-8 042018152000.10
If Solaris is running, use the Solaris date command instead.
For more information on the setdate command, refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra
1280 System Controller Command Reference Manual.
Chapter 2
Starting and Setting Up the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280
19
▼
To Set Up the Password
1. At the LOM prompt, type the System Controller password command.
2. At the Enter new password: prompt, type in your password.
3. At the Enter new password again: prompt, re-type in your password.
lom>password
Enter new password:
Enter new password again:
lom>
In the event that your password has been lost or forgotten, contact SunService for
advice.
▼
To Configure Network Parameters
The Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 system can be administered from the System
Controller LOM prompt and from Solaris. There are two ways to access the
LOM/Console connection.
■
■
Through the System Controller Serial port connection.
Through a telnet (network connection) using the 10/100 Ethernet port.
Note – The system can be administered solely through the serial port, but if you
want to use the 10/100 Ethernet port it is recommended that a separate secure
subnet be used for this connection.
● At the LOM prompt type setupnetwork:
lom>setupnetwork
Note – If you press the Return key after each question, the current value will not be
changed.
See the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Controller Command Reference Manual for
full details of the setupnetwork command. CODE EXAMPLE 2-2 shows an example of
the setupnetwork command.
20
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
CODE EXAMPLE 2-2
Output From the setupnetwork Command
lom>setupnetwork
Network Configuration
--------------------Is the system controller on a network? [yes]:
Use DHCP or static network settings? [static]:
Hostname [hostname-sc]:
IP Address [123.xxx.xxx.xxx]:
Netmask [255.255.255.0]:
Gateway [123.xxx.xxx.xxx]:
DNS Domain [xxx.somewhere.com]:
Primary DNS Server [123.xxx.xxx.xxx]:
Secondary DNS Server [123.xxx.xxx.xxx]:
lom>
Use the information in CODE EXAMPLE 2-2 as a guide for the information you need to
enter for each parameter value entry.
Chapter 2
Starting and Setting Up the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280
21
Installing and Booting the Solaris
Operating Environment
To use LOM commands you must install the Lights Out Management 2.0 packages
(SUNWlomu, SUNWlomr and SUNWlomm) from the Solaris Supplementary CD.
▼
To Install and Boot the Solaris Operating
Environment
1. Access the LOM prompt.
See Chapter 3.
2. Power on the system. Type poweron.
Depending on the setting of the OpenBoot PROM auto-boot? parameter the
system will attempt to boot Solaris or will remain at the OpenBoot PROM ok
prompt. The default setting is true which will attempt to initiate a Solaris boot. If
the setting of auto-boot? is false or there is no bootable Solaris image installed
then you will get the OpenBoot PROM ok prompt.
lom>poweron
<POST messages displayed here . . . >
. . .
. . .
ok
3. If necessary, install the Solaris operating environment.
Refer to your installation documentation, which is available with your Solaris
operating environment release.
4. At the ok prompt, boot the Solaris operating environment by typing the
OpenBoot PROM boot command:
ok boot [device]
For the optional device parameter, see the OpenBoot PROM devalias command,
which displays the predefined aliases.
22
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
After the Solaris operating environment is booted, the login: prompt is displayed.
login:
▼
To Install the Lights Out Management Packages
The three LOM packages needed on a Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 are SUNWlomu
(LOMlite Utilities (usr)), SUNWlomm (LOMlite manual pages), and SUNWlomr (LOM
drivers). These are available on the Solaris Supplementary CD.
Note – The latest patches to these packages is available from SunSolve in patch
110208. It is strongly advised that the latest version of patch 110208 is obtained from
SunSolve and is installed on the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 to make use of the latest
LOM utility updates.
▼ To Install the LOM Drivers
● As root, type:
CODE EXAMPLE 2-3
Installing the LOM Drivers
# pkgadd -d . SUNWlomr
Processing package instance <SUNWlomr> from </var/tmp>
LOMlite driver (root)
(sparc) 2.0,REV=2000.08.22.14.14
Copyright 2000 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved.
## Executing checkinstall script.
Using </> as the package base directory.
## Processing package information.
## Processing system information.
9 package pathnames are already properly installed.
## Verifying package dependencies.
## Verifying disk space requirements.
## Checking for conflicts with packages already installed.
## Checking for setuid/setgid programs.
This package contains scripts which will be executed with super-user
permission during the process of installing this package.
Do you want to continue with the installation of <SUNWlomr> [y,n,?] y
Installing LOMlite driver (root) as <SUNWlomr>
Chapter 2
Starting and Setting Up the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280
23
CODE EXAMPLE 2-3
Installing the LOM Drivers (Continued)
## Installing part 1 of 1.
20 blocks
i.drivers (INFO): Starting
i.drivers (INFO): Installing
i.drivers (INFO): Installing
i.drivers (INFO): Installing
i.drivers (INFO): Installing
i.drivers (INFO): Installing
/var/tmp/SUNWlomr/reloc/platform/sun4u/kernel/drv/lom
/var/tmp/SUNWlomr/reloc/platform/sun4u/kernel/drv/lomp
/var/tmp/SUNWlomr/reloc/platform/sun4u/kernel/drv/sparcv9/lom
/var/tmp/SUNWlomr/reloc/platform/sun4u/kernel/drv/sparcv9/lomp
/var/tmp/SUNWlomr/reloc/platform/sun4u/kernel/drv/sparcv9/lomv
i.drivers (INFO): Identified drivers ’lom lomp lomv’
i.drivers (INFO): Cleaning up old driver ’lom’...
Cleaning up old devlink entry ’type=ddi_pseudo;name=SUNW,lom
i.drivers (INFO): Cleaning up old driver ’lomp’...
Cleaning up old devlink entry ’type=ddi_pseudo;name=lomp
i.drivers (INFO): Cleaning up old driver ’lomv’...
Cleaning up old devlink entry ’type=ddi_pseudo;name=SUNW,lomv
type=ddi_pseudo;name=lomv
\M0’
i.drivers (INFO): Cleaning up old driver ’lomh’...
Cleaning up old devlink entry ’type=ddi_pseudo;name=SUNW,lomh
i.drivers
driver
aliases
link
spec
lom’
lomp’
\M0
lom’
(INFO): Adding driver ’lomp’...
= ’lomp’
= ’’
= ’lomp’
= ’lomp’
Adding devlink entry ’type=ddi_pseudo;name=lomp lomp’
adding driver with aliases ’’ perm ’* 0644 root sys’
devfsadm: driver failed to attach: lomp
Warning: Driver (lomp) successfully added to system but failed to attach
i.drivers
driver
aliases
link
spec
(INFO): Adding driver ’lomv’...
= ’lomv’
= ’SUNW,lomv’
= ’SUNW,lomv lomv’
= ’\M0’
Adding devlink entry ’type=ddi_pseudo;name=SUNW,lomv
\M0’
Adding devlink entry ’type=ddi_pseudo;name=lomv \M0’
adding driver with aliases ’SUNW,lomv’ perm ’* 0644 root sys’
devfsadm: driver failed to attach: lomv
Warning: Driver (lomv) successfully added to system but failed to attach
i.drivers
driver
aliases
link
spec
(INFO): Adding driver ’lom’...
= ’lom’
= ’SUNW,lomh SUNW,lom’
= ’SUNW,lomh SUNW,lom’
= ’lom’
Adding devlink entry ’type=ddi_pseudo;name=SUNW,lomh
Adding devlink entry ’type=ddi_pseudo;name=SUNW,lom
24
lom’
lom’
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
CODE EXAMPLE 2-3
Installing the LOM Drivers (Continued)
adding driver with aliases ’SUNW,lomh SUNW,lom’ perm ’* 0644 root sys’
devfsadm: driver failed to attach: lom
Warning: Driver (lom) successfully added to system but failed to attach
i.drivers (SUCCESS): Finished
[ verifying class <drivers> ]
Installation of <SUNWlomr> was successful.
#
Note – The WARNING messages concerning lomp, lomv and lom driver
attachment seen during the installation of the SUWNlomr package can be safely
ignored since the SUNWlomr package is not used on the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280
system. However, the presence of the package is required to allow successful
upgrade via future patches.
▼ To Install the LOM Utility
● As root, type:
CODE EXAMPLE 2-4
Installing the LOM Utility
# pkgadd -d . SUNWlomu
Processing package instance <SUNWlomu> from
</cdrrom/suppcd_s28u7_multi_s28u7_supp.08al1/Lights_Out_Management_2.0/Product>
LOMlite Utilities (usr)
(sparc) 2.0,REV=2000.08.22.14.14
Copyright 2000 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Using </> as the package base directory.
## Processing package information.
## Processing system information.
4 package pathnames are already properly installed.
## Verifying package dependencies.
## Verifying disk space requirements.
## Checking for conflicts with packages already installed.
## Checking for setuid/setgid programs.
Installing LOMlite Utilities (usr) as <SUNWlomu>
## Installing part 1 of 1.
1432 blocks
Chapter 2
Starting and Setting Up the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280
25
CODE EXAMPLE 2-4
Installing the LOM Utility
Installation of <SUNWlomu> was successful.
#
26
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
▼ To Install the LOM Manual Pages
● As root, type:
CODE EXAMPLE 2-5
Installing the LOM Manual Pages
# pkgadd -d . SUNWlomm
Processing package instance <SUNWlomm> from
</cdrom/suppcd_s28u7_multi_s28u7_supp.08al1/Lights_Out_Management_2.0/Product>
LOMlite manual pages
(sparc) 2.0,REV=2000.08.22.14.14
Copyright 2000 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Using </> as the package base directory.
## Processing package information.
## Processing system information.
5 package pathnames are already properly installed.
## Verifying disk space requirements.
## Checking for conflicts with packages already installed.
## Checking for setuid/setgid programs.
Installing LOMlite manual pages as <SUNWlomm>
## Installing part 1 of 1.
71 blocks
Installation of <SUNWlomm> was successful.
Resetting the System
▼
To Forcibly Reset the System
The reset command is used to reset the system in the event of a system hang or
hardware problem. If Solaris is running then you will be prompted to confirm this
action:
Chapter 2
Starting and Setting Up the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280
27
lom>reset
This will abruptly terminate Solaris.
Do you want to continue? [no] y
NOTICE: XIR on CPU 3
By default, reset uses XIR (externally initiated reset) to reset the CPU processors in
the system. The externally initiated reset forces control of the processors into the
OpenBoot PROM and begins the OpenBoot PROM's error reset recovery actions. The
error reset recovery actions preserve most of the Solaris states to allow the collection
of data need for debugging the hardware and software, including a Solaris operating
environment core file. After saving the debug information, if the value of the
OpenBoot PROM variable auto-boot? is true, the system will boot Solaris. The
OpenBoot PROM's error reset recovery actions are controlled by setting the
OpenBoot PROM error-reset-recovery configuration variable.
reset is prevented in standby, and the message reset not allowed, domain A
keyswitch is set to off is displayed.
Note – If the system is still hung (you cannot log into the Solaris operating
environment and typing the break command did not force control of the system
back into the OpenBoot PROM ok prompt), after you type the reset command for
the first time, you must next type reset -a in order to reset everything.
The reset -a command is equivalent to the OpenBoot PROM reset-all word.
▼
To Reset the System Controller
Use the resetsc command to reset the System Controller. This can be used in the
event of a hardware or software problem causing the System Controller Application
to malfunction.
lom>resetsc
Are you sure you want to reboot the system controller now? [no] y
This will cause the System Controller to reset, execute the System Controller POST
level specified using the setupsc command and restart the LOM software.
28
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
CHAPTER
3
Console Navigation Procedures
This chapter explains step-by-step procedures and provides illustrations for
connecting to the system and navigating between the LOM shell and the console. It
also explains how to terminate a System Controller session.
Topics covered in this chapter include:
■
“Establishing a LOM/Console Connection” on page 30
■
“To Connect to an ASCII Terminal” on page 30
■
“To Connect to a Network Terminal Server” on page 32
■
“To Connect to Serial Port B of a Workstation” on page 33
■
“To Access the LOM/Console Using the Telnet Command” on page 35
■
“Switching Between the Different Consoles” on page 37
■
“To Break to the LOM Prompt” on page 39
■
“To Connect to the Solaris Console from the LOM Prompt” on page 39
■
“To Break to the LOM Prompt from the OpenBoot PROM” on page 40
■
“To Break to the OpenBoot Prompt when Solaris is Running” on page 41
■
“To Terminate a Session If You Are Connected To the System Controller
Through the Serial Port” on page 41
■
“To Terminate a Session If You Are Connected to the System Controller with
telnet” on page 42
29
Establishing a LOM/Console
Connection
There are two ways to access the LOM/Console connection.
■
■
Through the System Controller Serial port connection.
Through a telnet (network connection) using the 10/100 Ethernet port.
Under normal operation (when Solaris is running or the system is in the OpenBoot
PROM) connecting to the LOM/Console will automatically select a connection to the
Solaris console, otherwise a connection to the LOM prompt is made.
The LOM prompt is:
lom>
Accessing the LOM/Console Using the Serial Port
With the serial port, you can connect to one of three types of device.
■
■
■
ASCII terminal
Network terminal server
Workstation
Please see the Sun Fire V1280 Site Preparation and Installation Guide for details of how
to make the physical connections.
The procedure is different for each type of device.
▼ To Connect to an ASCII Terminal
1. If the LOM password has been set (and the previous connection was logged out)
you will be prompted for a password.
Enter Password:
Enter the correct password as previously set up using the password command.
30
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
2. If the password is accepted the System Controller indicates that a connection has
been made.
If the system is in standby mode the lom prompt is automatically displayed.
Connected.
lom>
Otherwise type a single carriage return and the Solaris console prompt will be
displayed.
Connected.
#
3. If a connection to the LOM/console is already established over the network port
then you will be offered the opportunity to forcefully connect by logging out the
other connection:
Enter Password:
The console is already in use.
Host:
somehost.acme.com
Connected: May 24 10:27
Idle time: 00:23:17
Force logout of other user? (y/n) y
Connected.
lom>
Otherwise type a single carriage return and the Solaris console prompt will be
displayed.
Connected.
#
Chapter 3
Console Navigation Procedures
31
▼ To Connect to a Network Terminal Server
1. You will be provided with a menu of various servers to which you can connect.
Select the required server.
2. If the LOM password has been set (and the previous connection was logged out)
you will be prompted for a password.
Enter Password:
Enter the correct password as previously set up using the password command.
3. If the password is accepted the System Controller indicates that a connection has
been made.
If the system is in standby mode the lom prompt is automatically displayed.
Connected.
lom>
Otherwise type a single carriage return and the Solaris console prompt will be
displayed.
Connected.
#
32
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
4. If a connection to the LOM/console is already established over the network port
then you will be offered the opportunity to forcefully connect by logging out the
other connection:
Enter Password:
The console is already in use.
Host:
somehost.acme.com
Connected: May 24 10:27
Idle time: 00:23:17
Force logout of other user? (y/n) y
Connected.
lom>
Otherwise type a single carriage return and the Solaris console prompt will be
displayed.
Connected.
#
▼ To Connect to Serial Port B of a Workstation
1. At the Solaris shell prompt type:
# tip hardwire
See the tip man page for a complete description of the tip command.
2. If the LOM password has been set (and the previous connection was logged out)
you will be prompted for a password.
Enter Password:
Enter the correct password as previously set up using the password command.
Chapter 3
Console Navigation Procedures
33
3. If the password is accepted the System Controller indicates that a connection has
been made.
If the system is in standby mode the lom prompt is automatically displayed.
Connected.
lom>
Otherwise type a single carriage return and the Solaris console prompt will be
displayed.
Connected.
#
4. If a connection to the LOM/console is already established over the network port
then you will be offered the opportunity to forcefully connect by logging out the
other connection:
Enter Password:
The console is already in use.
Host:
somehost.acme.com
Connected: May 24 10:27
Idle time: 00:23:17
Force logout of other user? (y/n) y
Connected.
lom>
34
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
▼ To Access the LOM/Console Using the Telnet Command
In order to be able to access the LOM/System Controller via telnet to the 10/100
Ethernet port you must first set up the interface.
Refer to “To Configure Network Parameters” on page 20.
1. Type the telnet command at the Solaris prompt to connect to the System
Controller.
% telnet <system_controller_hostname>
Trying 123.123.123.95...
Connected to interpol-sc.
Escape character is ‘^]’.
2. If the LOM password has been set up you will be prompted for a password.
# telnet <system_controller_hostname>
Trying 123.123.123.95...
Connected to interpol-sc.
Escape character is ‘^]’.
Enter password:
3. Enter the correct password as previously set up using the password command.
4. If the password is accepted the System Controller indicates that a connection has
been made.
If the system is in standby mode the lom prompt is automatically displayed.
Connected.
lom>
Otherwise type a single carriage return and the Solaris console prompt will be
displayed.
Connected.
#
Chapter 3
Console Navigation Procedures
35
5. If a connection to the LOM/Console is already established over the serial port
then you will be offered the opportunity to forcefully connect by logging out the
other connection:
# telnet <system_controller_hostname>
Trying 123.123.123.95...
Connected to interpol-sc.
Escape character is ‘^]’.
The console is already in use.
Host:
somehost.acme.com
Connected: May 24 10:27
Idle time: 00:23:17
Force logout of other user? (y/n) y
Connected.
lom>
In this case you should first use the LOM logout command on the serial connection
to make the connection available. Refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System
Controller Command Reference Manual for further details.
▼ To Disconnect from the LOM/Console
When you have finished using the LOM/Console you can disconnect your
connection by using the logout command.
On the serial port the response is:
lom>logout
Connection closed.
When connected over the network the response is:
lom>logout
Connection closed.
Connection to <system controller host> closed by foreign host.
$
36
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Switching Between the Different
Consoles
The System Controller console connection provides access to the System Controller
LOM command line interface or the Solaris/OpenBoot PROM console.
This section describes the procedures how to navigate between the:
■
■
■
LOM prompt.
Solaris system console.
OpenBoot PROM.
These procedures are summarized in FIGURE 3-1
Chapter 3
Console Navigation Procedures
37
Solaris Operating Environment
Type the escape
sequence
#
OpenBoot PROM
Type the escape
sequence
ok
LOM shell
Type: lom>console
Type: lom>break
lom>
FIGURE 3-1
38
Navigation Procedures
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
▼
To Break to the LOM Prompt
● When connected to the Solaris console, typing the escape sequence will take the
console into the LOM prompt.
By default the escape sequence is set to ‘#.’. That is, a # sign followed by a period.
For instance, if the escape sequence is the default of #. you will see:
lom>
Selecting an Escape Sequence
If you are typing at the console and type the first character of the escape sequence,
there is a one second delay before the character appears on the screen. This is
because the system waits to see if the next character in the escape sequence is about
to be typed. The second character must be typed within this one-second window. If
all the characters in the escape sequence are typed then the lom> prompt appears. If
the next character to be typed is not the next character in the escape sequence, then
the characters belonging to the escape sequence that were typed are output to the
screen.
It is recommended that you choose an escape sequence that does not start with a
sequence of characters that is frequently typed at the console, otherwise the delay
between your striking the keys and the character appearing on the screen may be
confusing.
▼
To Connect to the Solaris Console from the LOM
Prompt
● To connect to the Solaris console, use the console command from the LOM
prompt, then type a carriage return.
If Solaris is running the system will respond with the Solaris prompt:
lom>console
#
Chapter 3
Console Navigation Procedures
39
If the system was in the OpenBoot PROM then the system will respond with the
OpenBoot PROM prompt:
lom>console
{2} ok
If the system is in standby mode, the following message will be generated:
lom>console
Solaris is not active
▼
To Break to the LOM Prompt from the OpenBoot
PROM
● The process of moving from the OpenBoot PROM to the LOM prompt is the same
as moving from Solaris to the LOM prompt.
Type the sequence of escape characters (default #.).
{2} ok
lom>
40
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
▼
To Break to the OpenBoot Prompt when Solaris
is Running
● When the Solaris operating environment is running the usual effect of sending a
break signal to the console is to force entry to the OpenBoot PROM or kernel
debugger.
Do this by using the break command from the LOM prompt:
lom>break
This will suspend Solaris.
Do you want to continue? [no] y
Type ‘go’ to resume
debugger entered.
{1} ok
▼
To Terminate a Session If You Are Connected To
the System Controller Through the Serial Port
● If you are at the Solaris prompt or the OpenBoot PROM go to LOM prompt by
typing the escape sequence, then terminate the LOM prompt session by typing
logout followed by a single carriage return:
lom>logout
● If you are connected through a terminal server invoke the terminal server’s
command to disconnect the connection.
● If the connection was established using a tip command then type the tip exit
sequence ‘~.’:
~.
Chapter 3
Console Navigation Procedures
41
▼
To Terminate a Session If You Are Connected to
the System Controller with telnet
● If you are at the Solaris prompt or the OpenBoot PROM, go to the LOM prompt
by typing the escape sequence and terminate the LOM prompt session by using
the logout command.
The telnet session will terminate automatically:
lom>logout
Connection closed by foreign host.
%
42
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
CHAPTER
4
System Controller Message Logging
The Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Controller generates timestamped messages
for system events, processes such as when powering on, booting, powering off,
changes to hot pluggable units, environmental warnings etc.
The messages are initially stored in the System Controller onboard memory in a
circular 128-message buffer (note that a single message can span multiple lines). In
addition, the System Controller sends the messages to the Solaris host when it is
running Solaris, and these are processed by the system log daemon (syslogd).
When Solaris is running, messages are sent at the time they are generated by the
System Controller. Retrieval of messages not already copied from the System
Controller takes place at Solaris boot time or when the System Controller is reset.
The logged messages can be viewed at the System Controller lom> prompt by using
the showlogs command. The messages can also be displayed at the Solaris prompt
by using the lom(1m) utility (see Chapter 5).
Typically, the messages are stored on the Solaris host in the /var/adm/messages
file, the only limiting factor being the available disk space.
Messages that are held in the System Controller core memory are volatile and are
not retained if the power is removed from the System Controller by loss of both
power sources, less than two power supplies are operational, removal of the IB_SSC,
or the System Controller is reset. Messages stored on the system disk are available
when Solaris is rebooted.
The display of the messages on the shared Solaris/System Controller console port,
when at the lom> prompt is controlled by the seteventreporting command (see
the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Controller Command Reference Manual). This
determines whether a message is printed at the lom> prompt at the time the
message is logged, and also whether it is posted to the Solaris logging system so that
it is written to /var/adm/messages.
43
Main system hardware
System Controller
Main CPU
LOM history log in ring
buffer (128 messages)
Solaris messages
Disk, /var/adm/messages
accessible when system is up
and running
Discard
Last messages entered
available (FIFO)
Discard
LOM writes message
LOM port
LOM commands gain access to history log
whenever system is On or in standby mode
(i.e. System Controller not broken or unpowered)
FIGURE 4-1
44
System Controller Logging
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
CHAPTER
5
Using Lights Out Management and
the System Controller from Solaris
This chapter explains how to use the LOM-specific commands available in Solaris
for monitoring and managing a Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 system. To use these
commands you should install the Lights Out Management 2.0 packages (SUNWlomr,
SUNWlomu and SUNWlomm) from the Solaris Supplemental CD. Refer to “To Install
the Lights Out Management Packages” on page 23 for a description of how to install
the LOM packages.
Note – The latest patches to these packages is available from SunSolve in patch
110208. It is strongly advised that the latest version of patch 110208 is obtained from
SunSolve and is installed on the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 to make use of the latest
LOM utility updates.
The chapter contains the following sections:
■
■
“Monitoring the System From Solaris” on page 46
“Other LOM Tasks Performed From Solaris” on page 55
LOM Command Syntax
lom
lom
lom
lom
[-c] [-l] [-f] [-v] [-t] [-a] [-G] [-X]
-e <n>, [x]
-A on|off <n>
-E on|off
where:
-c displays LOM configuration.
45
-l displays the status of the Fault and Alarms LEDs.
-e displays the event log.
-f displays fan status. This information is also displayed in the output from the
Solaris prtdiag -v command.
-v displays the status of the voltage sensors. This information is also displayed in
the output from the Solaris prtdiag -v command.
-t displays temperature information. This information is also displayed in the
output from the Solaris prtdiag -v command.
-a displays all component status data.
-A turns alarms on and off.
-X changes the escape sequence.
-E switches event logging to the console on and off.
-G upgrades the firmware.
Monitoring the System From Solaris
There are two ways of interrogating the LOM device (System Controller) or of
sending it commands to perform:
■
By executing LOM commands from the lom> shell prompt
For information about how to do this, see Chapter 3.
■
By executing LOM-specific Solaris commands from the UNIX # prompt
These commands are described in this chapter.
The Solaris commands described in this section, which are all available from the
UNIX # prompt, run the /usr/sbin/lom utility.
Where appropriate, the command lines given in this section are accompanied by
typical output from the commands.
Viewing Online LOM Documentation
● To view the manual pages for the LOM utility, type:
46
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
# man lom
Chapter 5
Using Lights Out Management and the System Controller from Solaris
47
Viewing the LOM Configuration (lom -c)
● To view the current LOM configuration, type:
CODE EXAMPLE 5-1
Sample Output from the lom -c Command
# lom -c
LOM configuration settings:
serial escape sequence=#.
serial event reporting=default
Event reporting level=fatal, warning & information
Serial security=disabled
Automatic return to console=disabled
firmware version=13.7
firmware checksum=0000
product revision=0.0
product ID=Netra T12
Checking the Status of the Fault LED and Alarms
(lom -l)
● To check whether the System Fault LED and alarms are on or off, type:
CODE EXAMPLE 5-2
Sample Output from the lom -l Command
# lom -l
LOM alarm states:
Alarm1=off
Alarm2=off
Alarm3=on
Fault LED=off
#
Alarms 1 and 2 are software flags. They are associated with no specific conditions
but are available to be set by your own processes or from the command line (see
“Turning Alarms On and Off (lom -A)” on page 55). Alarm 3 is UNIX Running and
is not user-configurable.
48
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Viewing the Event Log (lom -e)
● To see the event log, type:
# lom -e n,[x]
where n is the number of reports (up to 128) that you want to see and x specifies the
level of reports you are interested in. There are four levels of event:
1. Fatal events
2. Warning events
3. Information events
4. User events (not used on Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 systems)
If you specify a level, you will see reports for that level and above. For example, if
you specify level 2, you will see reports of level 2 and level 1 events. If you specify
level 3, you will see reports of level 3, level 2, and level 1 events.
If you do not specify a level, you will see reports of level 3, level 2, and level 1
events.
CODE EXAMPLE 5-3 shows a sample event log display.
CODE EXAMPLE 5-3
Sample LOM Event Log (Oldest Event Reported First)
# lom -e 11
LOMlite Event Log:
Fri Jul 19 15:16:00 commando-sc lom: Boot: ScApp 5.13.0007, RTOS
23
Fri Jul 19 15:16:06 commando-sc lom: Caching ID information
Fri Jul 19 15:16:08 commando-sc lom: Clock Source: 75MHz
Fri Jul 19 15:16:10 commando-sc lom: /N0/PS0: Status is OK
Fri Jul 19 15:16:11 commando-sc lom: /N0/PS1: Status is OK
Fri Jul 19 15:16:11 commando-sc lom: Chassis is in single
partition mode.
Fri Jul 19 15:27:29 commando-sc lom: Locator OFF
Fri Jul 19 15:27:46 commando-sc lom: Alarm 1 ON
Fri Jul 19 15:27:52 commando-sc lom: Alarm 2 ON
Fri Jul 19 15:28:03 commando-sc lom: Alarm 1 OFF
Fri Jul 19 15:28:08 commando-sc lom: Alarm 2 OFF
Chapter 5
Using Lights Out Management and the System Controller from Solaris
49
Checking the Fans (lom -f)
● To check status of the fans, type:
CODE EXAMPLE 5-4
Sample Output from the lom -f Command
# lom -f
Fans:
1 OK speed self-regulating
2 OK speed self-regulating
3 OK speed self-regulating
4 OK speed self-regulating
5 OK speed self-regulating
6 OK speed self-regulating
7 OK speed self-regulating
8 OK speed self-regulating
9 OK speed 100 %
10 OK speed 100 %
#
If you need to replace a fan, contact your local Sun sales representative and quote
the part number of the component you need. For information, see the Sun Fire
V1280/Netra 1280 Service Manual.
The information output from this command is also contained in the output from the
Solaris prtdiag -v command.
Checking the Internal Voltage Sensors (lom -v)
The -v option displays the status of the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 system internal
voltage sensors.
● To check the status of the supply rails and internal voltage sensors, type:
CODE EXAMPLE 5-5
Sample Output from the lom -v Command
# lom -v
Supply voltages:
1 SSC1
v_1.5vdc0
2 SSC1
v_3.3vdc0
3 SSC1
v_5vdc0
4 RP0
v_1.5vdc0
5 RP0
v_3.3vdc0
6 RP2
v_1.5vdc0
7 RP2
v_3.3vdc0
50
status=ok
status=ok
status=ok
status=ok
status=ok
status=ok
status=ok
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
CODE EXAMPLE 5-5
Sample Output from the lom -v Command (Continued)
8 SB0
v_1.5vdc0
status=ok
9 SB0
v_3.3vdc0
status=ok
10 SB0/P0
v_cheetah0 status=ok
11 SB0/P1
v_cheetah1 status=ok
12 SB0/P2
v_cheetah2 status=ok
13 SB0/P3
v_cheetah3 status=ok
14 SB2
v_1.5vdc0
status=ok
15 SB2
v_3.3vdc0
status=ok
16 SB2/P0
v_cheetah0 status=ok
17 SB2/P1
v_cheetah1 status=ok
18 SB2/P2
v_cheetah2 status=ok
19 SB2/P3
v_cheetah3 status=ok
20 IB6
v_1.5vdc0
status=ok
21 IB6
v_3.3vdc0
status=ok
22 IB6
v_5vdc0
status=ok
23 IB6
v_12vdc0
status=ok
24 IB6
v_3.3vdc1
status=ok
25 IB6
v_3.3vdc2
status=ok
26 IB6
v_1.8vdc0
status=ok
27 IB6
v_2.4vdc0
status=ok
System status flags:
1 PS0
status=okay
2 PS1
status=okay
3 FT0
status=okay
4 FT0/FAN0
status=okay
5 FT0/FAN1
status=okay
6 FT0/FAN2
status=okay
7 FT0/FAN3
status=okay
8 FT0/FAN4
status=okay
9 FT0/FAN5
status=okay
10 FT0/FAN6
status=okay
11 FT0/FAN7
status=okay
12 RP0
status=okay
13 RP2
status=okay
14 SB0
status=ok
15 SB0/P0
status=online
16 SB0/P0/B0/D0 status=okay
17 SB0/P0/B0/D1 status=okay
18 SB0/P0/B0/D2 status=okay
19 SB0/P0/B0/D3 status=okay
20 SB0/P1
status=online
21 SB0/P1/B0/D0 status=okay
22 SB0/P1/B0/D1 status=okay
23 SB0/P1/B0/D2 status=okay
24 SB0/P1/B0/D3 status=okay
25 SB0/P2
status=online
26 SB0/P2/B0/D0 status=okay
Chapter 5
Using Lights Out Management and the System Controller from Solaris
51
CODE EXAMPLE 5-5
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
#
Sample Output from the lom -v Command (Continued)
SB0/P2/B0/D1 status=okay
SB0/P2/B0/D2 status=okay
SB0/P2/B0/D3 status=okay
SB0/P3
status=online
SB0/P3/B0/D0 status=okay
SB0/P3/B0/D1 status=okay
SB0/P3/B0/D2 status=okay
SB0/P3/B0/D3 status=okay
SB2
status=ok
SB2/P0
status=online
SB2/P0/B0/D0 status=okay
SB2/P0/B0/D1 status=okay
SB2/P0/B0/D2 status=okay
SB2/P0/B0/D3 status=okay
SB2/P1
status=online
SB2/P1/B0/D0 status=okay
SB2/P1/B0/D1 status=okay
SB2/P1/B0/D2 status=okay
SB2/P1/B0/D3 status=okay
SB2/P2
status=online
SB2/P2/B0/D0 status=okay
SB2/P2/B0/D1 status=okay
SB2/P2/B0/D2 status=okay
SB2/P2/B0/D3 status=okay
SB2/P3
status=online
SB2/P3/B0/D0 status=okay
SB2/P3/B0/D1 status=okay
SB2/P3/B0/D2 status=okay
SB2/P3/B0/D3 status=okay
IB6
status=ok
IB6/FAN0
status=okay
IB6/FAN1
status=okay
The information output from this command is also contained in the output from the
Solaris prtdiag -v command.
52
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Checking the Internal Temperature (lom -t)
● To check the internal temperature of the system and also the system’s warning and
shutdown threshold temperatures, type:
CODE EXAMPLE 5-6
Sample Output from the lom -t Command
# lom -t
System Temperature Sensors:
1 SSC1
t_sbbc0
2 SSC1
t_cbh0
3 SSC1
t_ambient0
4 SSC1
t_ambient1
5 SSC1
t_ambient2
6 RP0
t_ambient0
7 RP0
t_ambient1
8 RP0
t_sdc0
9 RP0
t_ar0
10 RP0
t_dx0
11 RP0
t_dx1
12 RP2
t_ambient0
13 RP2
t_ambient1
14 RP2
t_sdc0
15 RP2
t_ar0
16 RP2
t_dx0
17 RP2
t_dx1
18 SB0
t_sdc0
19 SB0
t_ar0
20 SB0
t_dx0
21 SB0
t_dx1
22 SB0
t_dx2
23 SB0
t_dx3
24 SB0
t_sbbc0
25 SB0
t_sbbc1
26 SB0/P0
Ambient
27 SB0/P0
Die
28 SB0/P1
Ambient
29 SB0/P1
Die
30 SB0/P2
Ambient
31 SB0/P2
Die
32 SB0/P3
Ambient
33 SB0/P3
Die
34 SB2
t_sdc0
35 SB2
t_ar0
36 SB2
t_dx0
37 SB2
t_dx1
38 SB2
t_dx2
Chapter 5
36
45
23
21
28
22
22
62
47
62
65
23
22
57
42
53
56
48
39
49
54
57
53
53
40
29
57
27
51
27
53
29
50
51
40
52
54
61
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
53 degC : shutdown 63 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
53 degC : shutdown 63 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
92 degC : shutdown 97 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
92 degC : shutdown 97 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
92 degC : shutdown 97 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
92 degC : shutdown 97 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
Using Lights Out Management and the System Controller from Solaris
53
CODE EXAMPLE 5-6
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
SB2
SB2
SB2
SB2/P0
SB2/P0
SB2/P1
SB2/P1
SB2/P2
SB2/P2
SB2/P3
SB2/P3
IB6
IB6
IB6
IB6
IB6
IB6
IB6
IB6
IB6
Sample Output from the lom -t Command (Continued)
t_dx3
t_sbbc0
t_sbbc1
Ambient
Die
Ambient
Die
Ambient
Die
Ambient
Die
t_ambient0
t_ambient1
t_sdc0
t_ar0
t_dx0
t_dx1
t_sbbc0
t_schizo0
t_schizo1
53
52
42
27
54
26
53
27
51
27
51
29
29
68
77
76
78
51
48
53
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
degC
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
warning
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
92 degC : shutdown 97 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
92 degC : shutdown 97 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
92 degC : shutdown 97 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
92 degC : shutdown 97 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
82 degC : shutdown 87 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
102 degC : shutdown 107 degC
The information output from this command is also contained in the output from the
Solaris prtdiag -v command.
Viewing All Component Status Data and the LOM
Configuration Data (lom -a)
● To view all LOM status and configuration data, type:
# lom -a
54
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Other LOM Tasks Performed From
Solaris
This section explains how to:
■
■
■
■
Turn the alarm indicators on and off
Change the LOM escape sequence
Stop the LOM from sending reports to the console
Upgrade the firmware
Turning Alarms On and Off (lom -A)
There are two alarms associated with the LOM. They are associated with no specific
conditions but are software flags available to be set by your own processes or from
the command line.
● To turn an alarm on from the command line, type:
# lom -A on,n
where n is the number of the alarm you want to set: 1 or 2.
● To turn the alarm off again, type:
# lom -A off,n
where n is the number of the alarm you want to turn off: 1 or 2.
Chapter 5
Using Lights Out Management and the System Controller from Solaris
55
Changing the lom> Prompt Escape Sequence
(lom -X)
The character sequence #. (hash, dot) enables you to escape from Solaris to the lom>
prompt.
● To change the default escape sequence, type:
# lom -X xy
where xy are the alpha-numeric characters you want to use.
Note – Quotes may be required for special characters to be interpreted by the shell.
Note – If you are typing at the console and type the first character of the escape
sequence, there is a one second delay before the character appears on the screen.
This is because the system waits to see if the next character in the escape sequence is
about to be typed. If all the characters in the escape sequence are typed then the
lom> prompt appears. If the next character to be typed is not the next character in
the escape sequence, then the characters belonging to the escape sequence that were
typed are output to the screen.
Stopping LOM from Sending Reports to the
Console When at the LOM Prompt (lom -E off)
LOM event reports can interfere with information you are attempting to send or
receive on the console.
● To stop the LOM from sending reports to the console, type:
# lom -E off
To prevent LOM messages displaying when you are at the LOM prompt, turn off
serial event reporting. This is equivalent to the seteventreporting command
described in the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Controller Command Reference
Manual.
56
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
● To turn serial event reporting on again, type:
# lom -E on
Upgrading the Firmware (lom -G filename)
For a full description, refer to Chapter 8.
Chapter 5
Using Lights Out Management and the System Controller from Solaris
57
58
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
CHAPTER
6
Running POST
Each of the system boards (CPU/Memory boards and IB_SSC Assembly) contain a
flash PROM that provides storage for power-on self-test (POST) diagnostics. POST
tests the following:
■
■
■
■
■
■
CPU chips
External cache
Memory
Bus interconnect
I/O ASICs
I/O buses
POST provides several diagnostic levels which can be selected using the OpenBoot
PROM variable diag-level. In addition, the bootmode command enables the
POST settings to be declared for the next system reboot.
There is a separate POST which runs on the System Controller and which can be
controlled using the setupsc command.
OpenBoot PROM Variables for POST
Configuration
The OpenBoot PROM enables you to set variables that configure how POST runs.
These are described in the OpenBoot 4.x Command Reference Manual.
You can use the OpenBoot printenv command to display the current settings:
{3} ok printenv diag-level
diag-level
init
(init)
59
You can use the OpenBoot PROM setenv command to change the current setting of
a variable:
{1} ok setenv diag-level quick
diag-level=quick
For example, you can configure POST to run fastest by using:
{1} ok setenv diag-level init
diag-level=init
{1} ok setenv verbosity-level off
verbosity-level=off
This has the same effect as using the System Controller command
bootmode skipdiag at the LOM prompt. The difference is that by using the
OpenBoot command the settings remain permanent until you change them again.
TABLE 6-1
POST Configuration Parameters
Parameter
Value
Description
diag-level
init
(default value)
Only system board initialization code is run. No testing is
done. This is a very fast pass through POST.
quick
All system board components are tested using few tests with
few test patterns.
max
All system board components are tested with all tests and
test patterns, except for memory and Ecache modules. For
memory and Ecache modules, all locations are tested with
multiple patterns. More extensive, time-consuming
algorithms are not run at this level.
mem1
Runs all tests at the default level plus more exhaustive
DRAM and SRAM test algorithms.
mem2
This is the same as mem1 with the addition of a DRAM test
that does explicit compare operations of the DRAM data.
off
No status messages are displayed.
min
(default value)
Test names status messages, and error messages are
displayed.
max
Subtest trace messages are displayed.
off
No error messages are displayed.
min
The failing test name is displayed.
verbosity-level
error-level
60
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
TABLE 6-1
POST Configuration Parameters (Continued)
Parameter
interleave-scope
interleave-mode
reboot-on-error
Value
Description
max
(default value)
All relevant error statuses are displayed.
within-board
(default value)
The memory banks on a system board will be interleaved
with each other.
across-boards
The memory will be interleaved on all memory banks across
all of the boards in the system.
optimal
(default value)
The memory is mixed-size interleaving in order to gain
optimal performance.
fixed
The memory is fixed-size interleaving.
off
There is no memory interleaving.
false
(default value)
The system will be paused when there is an error.
true
The system will be rebooted.
This parameter is the same as the OpenBoot PROM
nvramrc? parameter. This parameter uses aliases that are
stored in nvramrc.
use-nvramrc?
true
The OpenBoot PROM executes the script stored in nvramrc
if this parameter is set to true.
false
(default value)
The OpenBoot PROM does not evaluate the script stored in
nvramrc if this parameter is set to false.
Controls booting of the Solaris operating environment.
auto-boot?
error-reset-recovery
true
(default value)
If this value is true, the system boots automatically after
POST has run.
false
If this parameter value is set to false, you will obtain the
OpenBoot PROM ok prompt after POST runs, from which
you must type a boot command to boot the Solaris
operating environment.
Controls the behavior of the system after an externally
initiated reset (XIR) as well as a red mode trap.
Chapter 6
Running POST
61
TABLE 6-1
POST Configuration Parameters (Continued)
Parameter
Value
Description
sync
(default value)
The OpenBoot PROM invokes sync. A core file is generated. If
the invocation returns, the OpenBoot PROM performs a
reboot.
none
The OpenBoot PROM prints a message describing the reset
trap that triggered the error reset and passes control to the
OpenBoot PROM ok prompt. The message describing the
reset trap type is platform specific.
boot
The OpenBoot PROM firmware reboots the system. A core
file is not generated. Rebooting a system occurs using the
OpenBoot PROM settings for diag-device or bootdevice, depending on the value of the OpenBoot PROM
configuration variable diag-switch? If diag-switch? is
set to true, the device names in diag-device will be the
default for boot. If diag-switch? is set to false, the
device names in boot-device will be the default for boot.
The default output from POST will be similar to CODE EXAMPLE 6-1.
CODE EXAMPLE 6-1
POST Output Using max Setting
Testing CPU Boards ...
Loading the test table from board SB0 PROM 0 ...
{/N0/SB0/P0} Running CPU POR and Set Clocks
{/N0/SB0/P1} Running CPU POR and Set Clocks
{/N0/SB0/P2} Running CPU POR and Set Clocks
{/N0/SB0/P3} Running CPU POR and Set Clocks
{/N0/SB0/P0} @(#) lpost 5.13.0007
2002/07/18 12:45
{/N0/SB0/P2} @(#) lpost 5.13.0007
2002/07/18 12:45
{/N0/SB0/P1} @(#) lpost 5.13.0007
2002/07/18 12:45
{/N0/SB0/P0} Copyright 2001 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved.
{/N0/SB0/P0} Subtest: Setting Fireplane Config Registers
{/N0/SB0/P0} Subtest: Display CPU Version, frequency
{/N0/SB0/P0} Version register = 003e0015.21000507
{/N0/SB0/P0} Cpu/System ratio = 6, cpu actual frequency = 900
{/N0/SB0/P1} Copyright 2001 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved.
. . .
. . .
. . . <more POST ouput>
. . .
. . .
pci bootbus-controller pci
Probing /ssm@0,0/pci@18,700000 Device 1 Nothing there
Probing /ssm@0,0/pci@18,700000 Device 2 Nothing there
Probing /ssm@0,0/pci@18,700000 Device 3 ide disk cdrom
62
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
CODE EXAMPLE 6-1
Probing
Probing
pci pci
Probing
Probing
Probing
Probing
Probing
POST Output Using max Setting (Continued)
/ssm@0,0/pci@18,600000 Device 1
/ssm@0,0/pci@18,600000 Device 2
Nothing there
scsi disk tape scsi disk tape
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,600000
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,600000
Nothing there
Nothing there
Nothing there
network
network
Device
Device
Device
Device
Device
1
2
3
1
2
Sun Fire V1280
OpenFirmware version 5.13.0007 (07/18/02 12:45)
Copyright 2001 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved.
SmartFirmware, Copyright (C) 1996-2001. All rights reserved.
16384 MB memory installed, Serial #9537054.
Ethernet address 8:0:xx:xx:xx:xx, Host ID: 80xxxxxx.
NOTICE: obp_main: Extended diagnostics are now switched on.
{0} ok
Controlling POST With the bootmode
Command
The System Controller bootmode command allows you to specify the boot
configuration for the next system reboot only. This removes the necessity for taking
the system down to the OpenBoot PROM to make these changes, for instance to the
diag-level variable.
For example, use the following command to force the highest level of POST tests to
be run prior to the next reboot:
lom>shutdown
lom>bootmode diag
lom>poweron
Chapter 6
Running POST
63
To force the lowest level of POST tests to be run prior to the next reboot, use:
lom>shutdown
lom>bootmode skipdiag
lom>poweron
If the system is not rebooted within 10 minutes of the bootmode command being
issued, the bootmode setting is returned to normal and the previously-set values of
diag-level and verbosity-level are applied.
For a fuller description of these commands, refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280
System Controller Command Reference Manual.
Controlling the System Controller POST
The System Controller Power-On Self Test is configured using the LOM setupsc
command. This enables the System Controller POST level to be set to off, min or
max. For a fuller description of this command, refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280
System Controller Command Reference Manual.
System Controller POST output only appears on the System Controller serial
connection.
To set the SCPOST diagnostic level default to min:
CODE EXAMPLE 6-2
Setting SCPOST Diagnostic Level to min
lom>setupsc
System Controller Configuration
------------------------------SC POST diag Level [off]: min
Host Watchdog [enabled]:
Rocker Switch [enabled]:
Secure Mode [off]:
lom>
64
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
When SCPOST diag-level is set to min you will see the following output on the
serial port whenever the System Controller is reset:
CODE EXAMPLE 6-3
SCPOST Output with Diagnostic Level Set to min
@(#) SYSTEM CONTROLLER(SC) POST 21 2001/12/11 17:11
PSR = 0x044010e5
PCR = 0x04004000
SelfTest running at DiagLevel:0x20
SC Boot PROM
Test
BootPROM CheckSum
IU
Test
IU instruction set
Test
Test
Little endian access
Test
Test
FPU instruction set
Test
SparcReferenceMMU
Test
SRMMU TLB RAM
Test
SRMMU TLB Read miss
Test
SRMMU page
probe
Test
SRMMU segment probe
Test
SRMMU region probe
Test
SRMMU context probe
Test
. . .
. . .
. . . <more SCPOST ouput>
. . .
. . .
Local I2C AT24C64
Test
EEPROM
Device
Test
performing eeprom sequential read
FPU
Local I2C PCF8591
Test
VOLT_AD
Device
Test
channel[00000001] Voltage(0x00000099)
channel[00000002] Voltage(0x0000009D)
channel[00000003] Voltage(0x0000009A)
channel[00000004] Voltage(0x00000000)
Local I2C LM75
Test
TEMP0(IIep) Device
Test
Temparature : 24.50 Degree(C)
Local I2C LM75
Test
TEMP1(Rio)
Device
Temparature : 23.50 Degree(C)
:1.49
:3.37
:5.1
:0.0
Test
Chapter 6
Running POST
65
CODE EXAMPLE 6-3
SCPOST Output with Diagnostic Level Set to min (Continued)
Local I2C LM75
Test
TEMP2(CBH)
Device
Temparature : 32.0 Degree(C)
Local I2C PCF8574
Test
Sc CSR
Device
Console Bus Hub
Test
CBH Register Access
POST Complete.
66
Test
Test
Test
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
CHAPTER
7
Troubleshooting
This chapter provides troubleshooting information for a system administrator. The
chapter describes the following topics:
■
■
■
■
“System Faults” on page 72
“Displaying Diagnostic Information” on page 82
“Assisting Sun Service Personnel in Determining Causes of Failure” on page 83
“Recovering a Hung System” on page 77
Device Mapping
The physical address represents a physical characteristic that is unique to the device.
Examples of physical addresses include the bus address and the slot number. The
slot number indicates where the device is installed.
You reference a physical device by the node identifier—Agent ID (AID). The AID
ranges from 0 to 31 in decimal notation (0 to 1f in hexadecimal). In the device path
beginning with ssm@0,0 the first number, 0, is the node ID.
CPU/Memory Mapping
CPU/Memory board and memory agent IDs (AIDs) range from 0 to 23 in decimal
notation (0 to 17 in hexadecimal). The system can have up to three CPU/Memory
boards.
67
Each CPU/Memory board has four CPUs, depending on your configuration. Each
CPU/Memory board has up to four banks of memory. Each bank of memory is
controlled by one memory management unit (MMU), which is the CPU. The
following code example shows a device tree entry for a CPU and its associated
memory:
/ssm@0,0/SUNW/UltraSPARC-III@b,0 /ssm@0,0/SUNW/memory-controller@b,400000
where:
in b,0
■
■
b is the CPU agent identifier (AID)
0 is the CPU register
in b,400000
■
■
b is the memory agent identifier (AID)
400000 is the memory controller register
There are up to four CPUs on each CPU/Memory board (TABLE 7-1):
■
■
CPUs with agent IDs 0–3 reside on board name SB0
CPUs with agent IDs 8–11 on board name SB2, and so on.
TABLE 7-1
CPU and Memory Agent ID Assignment
CPU/Memory Board Name
Agent IDs On Each CPU/Memory Board
CPU 0
CPU 1
CPU 2
CPU 3
SB0
0 (0)
1 (1)
2 (2)
3 (3)
SB2
8 (8)
9 (9)
10 (a)
11 (b)
SB4
16 (10)
17 (11)
18 (12)
19 (13)
The first number in the columns of agent IDs is a decimal number. The number or letter in parentheses
is in hexadecimal notation.
68
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
IB_SSC Assembly Mapping
TABLE 7-2 lists the types of I/O assembly, the number of slots each I/O assembly has,
and the systems the I/O assembly types are supported on.
TABLE 7-2
I/O Assembly Type and Number of Slots
I/O Assembly Type
Number of Slots Per I/O Assembly
PCI
6
TABLE 7-3 lists the number of I/O assemblies per system and the I/O assembly name.
TABLE 7-3
Number and Name of I/O Assemblies per System
Number of I/O Assemblies
I/O Assembly Name
1
IB6
Each I/O assembly hosts two I/O controllers:
■
■
I/O controller 0
I/O controller 1
When mapping the I/O device tree entry to a physical component in the system, you
must consider up to five nodes in the device tree:
■
■
■
■
■
Node identifier (ID)
ID controller agent ID (AID)
Bus offset
PCI slot
Device instance
TABLE 7-4 lists the AIDs for the two I/O controllers in each I/O assembly.
TABLE 7-4
I/O Controller Agent ID Assignments
Slot Number
I/O Assembly Name
Even I/O controller AID
Odd I/O Controller AID
6
IB6
24 (18)
25 (19)
The first number in the column is a decimal number. The number (or a number and letter combination) in parentheses is in
hexadecimal notation.
The I/O controller has two bus sides: A and B.
■
■
Bus A, which is 66 MHz, is referenced by offset 600000.
Bus B, which is 33 MHz, is referenced by offset 700000.
The board slots located in the I/O assembly are referenced by the device number.
Chapter 7
Troubleshooting
69
This section describes the PCI I/O assembly slot assignments and provides an
example of the device path.
The following code example gives a breakdown of a device tree entry for a SCSI
disk:
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/pci@3/SUNW,isptwo@4/sd@5,0
Note – The numbers in the device path are hexadecimal.
where:
in 19,700000
■
■
19 is the I/O controller agent identifier (AID)
700000 is the bus offset
in pci@3
■
3 is the device number
isptwo is the SCSI host adapter
in sd@5,0
■
■
5 is the SCSI target number for the disk
0 is the logic unit number (LUN) of the target disk
This section describes the PCI I/O assembly slot assignments and provides an
example of the device path.
TABLE 7-5 lists, in hexadecimal notation, the slot number, I/O assembly name, device
path of each I/O assembly, the I/O controller number, and the bus.
TABLE 7-5
IB_SSC Assembly PCI Device Mapping
I/O Assembly Name
Device Path
Physical Slot Number
I./O Controller Number
Bus
IB6
/ssm@0,0/pci@18,700000/*@1
0
0
B
/ssm@0,0/pci@18,700000/*@2
1
0
B
/ssm@0,0/pci@18,700000/*@3
x
0
B
/ssm@0,0/pci@18,600000/*@1
5
0
A
/ssm@0,0/pci@18,600000/*@2
w
0
A
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/*@1
2
1
B
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/*@2
3
1
B
70
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
TABLE 7-5
IB_SSC Assembly PCI Device Mapping (Continued)
I/O Assembly Name
Device Path
Physical Slot Number
I./O Controller Number
Bus
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/*@3
4
1
B
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,600000/*@1
y
1
A
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,600000/*@2
z
1
A
where:
w = onboard LSI1010R SCSI controller
x = onboard CMD646U2 EIDE controller
y = onboard Gigaswift Ethernet controller 0
z = onboard Gigaswift Ethernet controller 1
and * is dependent upon the type of PCI card installed in the slot.
Note the following:
■
■
■
600000 is the bus offset and indicates bus A, which operates at 66 MHz.
700000 is the bus offset and indicates bus B, which operates at 33 MHz.
*@3 is the device number. In this example @3 means it is the third device on the
bus.
/ssm@0,0/pci@18,700000/*@2
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/*@1
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/*@2
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/*@3
/ssm@0,0/pci@18,600000/*@1
FIGURE 7-1
/ssm@0,0/pci@18,700000/*@1
Slots
0
1
2
3
4
5
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 IB_SSC PCI Physical Slot Designations for IB6
Chapter 7
Troubleshooting
71
where * is dependent upon the type of PCI card installed in the slot.
For instance:
■
■
■
Dual Differential Ultra SCSI card (375-0006) in Slot 4
FC-AL card (375-3019) in Slot 3
FC-AL card (375-3019) in Slot 2
would generate device paths as follows:
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/scsi@3,1
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/scsi@3,1 (scsi-2)
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/scsi@3,1/tape (byte)
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/scsi@3,1/disk (block)
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/scsi@3 (scsi-2)
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/scsi@3/tape (byte)
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/scsi@3/disk (block)
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/SUNW,qlc@2 (scsi-fcp)
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/SUNW,qlc@2/fp@0,0 (fp)
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/SUNW,qlc@2/fp@0,0/disk (block)
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/SUNW,qlc@1 (scsi-fcp)
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/SUNW,qlc@1/fp@0,0 (fp)
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,700000/SUNW,qlc@1/fp@0,0/disk (block)
System Faults
A system fault is any condition that is considered to be unacceptable for normal
system operation. When the system has a fault, the Fault LED (
) will turn on.
The system indicators are shown in FIGURE 7-2.
72
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
On/Standby switch
SYSTEM
ALARM
POWER SOURCE
SERVICE REQUIRED
Locator
System Power
System Fault
FIGURE 7-2
UNIX Running
Top Access Required
Source A and Source B
Alarm1 and Alarm2
System Indicators
The indicator states are shown in TABLE 7-6. You must take immediate action to
eliminate a system fault.
TABLE 7-6
System Fault Indicator States
FRU name
Fault
indicator lit
when fault
detected*
System
Fault
indicator lit
on FRU
fault*
Top Access
lit on FRU
fault1
Comments
System Board
Yes
Yes
Yes
Includes processors, Ecache and DIMMs
Level 2 repeater
Yes
Yes
Yes
IB_SSC
Yes
Yes
Yes
System Controller
No
Yes
Yes
IB_SSC fault LED lit
Fan
Yes
Yes
Yes
IB Fan fault LED lit
Power Supply
Yes (by
hardware)
Yes
No
All power supply indicators are lit by the
power supply hardware. There is also a
predicted fault indicator. Power supply
EEPROM errors do not cause degraded
state as there is no indicator control.
Power distribution board
No
Yes
Yes
Can only be degraded.
Baseplane
No
Yes
Yes
Can only be degraded.
System indicator board
No
Yes
Yes
Can only be degraded.
System configuration
card
No
Yes
No
Chapter 7
Troubleshooting
73
TABLE 7-6
System Fault Indicator States (Continued)
FRU name
Fault
indicator lit
when fault
detected*
System
Fault
indicator lit
on FRU
fault*
Top Access
lit on FRU
fault1
Fan tray
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Main fan
Media bay
Disk
Comments
* This includes faults where the FRU is only degraded.
Customer Replaceable Units
Sun Fire V1280
The following FRUs are considered to be ones on which you can deal with faults:
■
■
■
■
Hard disks – hot swappable
PSUs (PS0/PS1/PS2/PS3) – hot swappable
CPU/Memory Boards (SB0/SB2/SB4) – can be blacklisted if considered faulty
Repeater Boards (RP0/RP2) – can be blacklisted if considered faulty
If a fault is indicated on any other FRU or a physical replacement of blacklisted
FRUs above is required, then SunService should be called.
Netra 1280
The following FRUs are considered to be ones on which you can deal with faults:
■
■
Hard disks – hot swappable
PSUs (PS0/PS1/PS2/PS3) – hot swappable
Note – Only suitably trained personnel or SunService are permitted to enter the
Restricted Access Location to hotswap PSUs or hard disk drives.
■
■
CPU/Memory Boards (SB0/SB2/SB4) – can be blacklisted if considered faulty
Repeater Boards (RP0/RP2) – can be blacklisted if considered faulty
If a fault is indicated on any other FRU or a physical replacement of blacklisted
FRUs above is required, then SunService should be called.
74
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Manual Blacklisting (while waiting for repair)
The System Controller supports the blacklisting feature, which allows you to disable
components on a board (TABLE 7-7).
Blacklisting provides a list of system board components that will not be tested and
will not be configured into the Solaris operating environment. The blacklist is stored
in nonvolatile memory.
TABLE 7-7
Blacklisting Component Names
System
Component
Component Subsystem
CPU system
Component Name
slot/port/physical_bank/logical_bank
CPU/Memory boards (slot)
SB0, SB2, SB4
Ports on the
CPU/Memory board
P0, P1, P2, P3
Physical memory banks on
CPU/Memory boards
B0, B1
Logical banks on CPU/Memory boards
L0, L1, L2, L3
I/O assembly
system
slot/port/bus or slot/card
I/O assembly
IB6
Ports on the
I/O assembly
P0, P1
Buses on the I/O assembly
B0, B1
I/O cards in the I/O assemblies
PCI0, PCI1, PCI2, PCI3, PCI4, PCI5
Repeater
system
<slot>
Repeater board
RP0, RP2
Blacklist a component or device if you believe it might be failing intermittently or is
failing. Troubleshoot a device you believe is having problems.
There are three system controller commands for blacklisting:
■
■
■
disablecomponent
enablecomponent
showcomponent
Chapter 7
Troubleshooting
75
The disablecomponent and enablecomponent commands only update the
blacklist. They do not directly affect the state of the currently configured system
boards.
The updated lists will take effect when you do one the following:
■
■
Reboot the system.
Use dynamic reconfiguration to configure the board containing the blacklisted
component out of and then back into the system.
In order to use disablecomponent and enablecomponent on the Repeater
Boards (RP0/RP2) the system first has to be shut down to Standby using the
poweroff command.
When the disablecomponent or enablecomponent command is issued for a
Repeater Board (RP0/RP2), the System Controller will be automatically reset to
make use of the new settings.
If a replacement Repeater Board is inserted, it is necessary to manually reset the
System Controller using the resetsc command. Refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra
1280 System Controller Command Reference Manual for a description of this command.
Special Considerations for CPU/Memory Boards
In the unlikely event that a CPU/Memory board fails the interconnect test during
POST, a message similar to the following will appear in POST output:
Jul 15 15:58:12 noname lom: SB0/ar0 Bit in error P3_ADDR [2]
Jul 15 15:58:12 noname lom: SB0/ar0 Bit in error P3_ADDR [1]
Jul 15 15:58:12 noname lom: SB0/ar0 Bit in error P3_ADDR [0]
Jul 15 15:58:12 noname lom: AR Interconnect test: System board SB0/ar0 address
repeater connections to system board RP2/ar0 failed
Jul 15 15:58:13 noname lom: SB0/ar0 Bit in error P3_INCOMING [0]
Jul 15 15:58:17 noname lom: SB0/ar0 Bit in error P3_PREREQ [0]
Jul 15 15:58:17 noname lom: SB0/ar0 Bit in error P3_ADDR [18]
Jul 15 15:58:17 noname lom: SB0/ar0 Bit in error P3_ADDR [17]
A CPU/Memory board failing the interconnect test may prevent the poweron
command from completely powering up the system. The system will then drop back
to the lom> prompt.
As a provisional measure, before Service intervention is obtained, the faulty
CPU/Memory board can be isolated from the system using the following sequence
of commands at the System Controller lom> prompt:
76
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
lom>disablecomponent SBx
.
.
lom>poweroff
.
.
lom>resetsc -y
A subsequent poweron command should now be successful.
Recovering a Hung System
If you cannot log into the Solaris operating environment, and typing the break
command from the LOM shell did not force control of the system back to the
OpenBoot PROM ok prompt, then the system has stopped responding.
In some circumstances the host watchdog will detect that the Solaris operating
environment has stopped responding and will automatically reset the system.
Assuming that the host watchdog has not been disabled (using the setupsc
command) then the Host Watchdog will cause an automatic reset of the system.
Also, you can issue the reset command (default option is -x which causes an XIR
to be sent to the processors) from the lom> prompt. The reset command causes the
Solaris operating environment to be terminated.
Caution – When the Solaris operating environment is terminated, data in memory
might not be flushed to disk. This could cause a loss or corruption of the application
file system data. Before the Solaris operating environment is terminated, this action
requires confirmation from you.
▼
To Recover a Hung System Manually
1. Complete the steps in “Assisting Sun Service Personnel in Determining Causes of
Failure” on page 83.
2. Access the LOM shell.
See Chapter 3.
Chapter 7
Troubleshooting
77
3. Type the reset command to force control of the system back to the OpenBoot
PROM. The reset command sends an externally initiated reset (XIR) to the
system and collects data for debugging the hardware.
lom>reset
Note – An error is displayed if the setsecure command has been used to set the
system into secure mode. You cannot use the reset or break commands while the
system is in secure mode. Refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Controller
Command Reference Manual for more details.
4. This step depends on the setting of the Open Boot PROM
error-reset-recovery configuration variable.
■
If the error-reset-recovery configuration variable is set to none, the system
returns immediately to the OpenBoot PROM. When the OpenBoot PROM takes
control, it takes actions based on the setting of the OpenBoot PROM
error-reset-recovery configuration variable. You can type any OpenBoot
PROM command from the ok prompt, including rebooting the Solaris operating
environment with the boot command. Also, you can force a core file with the
sync command. The actions that can be configured by this variable might mean
that the system will not return to the ok prompt.
■
If the error-reset-recovery configuration variable is not set to none, the
OpenBoot PROM will automatically take recovery actions.
■
If the error-reset-recovery configuration variable is set to sync (default),
the system generates a Solaris operating environment core file and reboots the
system.
■
If the OpenBoot PROM error-reset-recovery configuration variable is set to
boot, the system is rebooted.
5. If the previous actions fail to reboot the system, use the poweroff and poweron
commands to power cycle the system.
To power off the system, type:
lom>poweroff
To power on the system, type:
lom>poweron
78
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Moving System Identity
You may decide that the simplest way to restore service in some circumstances is to
use a complete replacement system. In order to facilitate the rapid transfer of
system identity and critical settings from one system to its replacement, the System
Configuration Card (SCC) can be physically removed from the SCC Reader (SCCR)
of the faulty system and inserted into the SCCR of the replacement system.
The following information is stored on the System Configuration Card (SCC):
■
■
■
■
MAC addresses
■
System Controller 10/100 Ethernet Port
■
Onboard Gigabit Ethernet port NET0
■
Onboard Gigabit Ethernet port NET1
Hostid
Critical LOM configurations
■
LOM password
■
escape sequence
■
SC network settings (IP address / DHCP / gateway etc.)
■
eventreporting level
■
host watchdog enabled/disabled
■
On/Standby enabled/disabled
■
secure mode enabled/disabled
Critical OBP configurations
■
auto-boot?
■
boot-device
■
diag-device
■
use-nvramrc?
■
local-mac-address?
Temperature
One indication of problems may be overtemperature of one or more components.
Use the showenvironment command to list current status.
TABLE 7-8
Checking Temperature Conditions Using the showenvironment Command
lom>showenviroment
Slot
---SSC1
SSC1
Device
--------SBBC 0
CBH 0
Sensor
Value
--------- -----Temp. 0
34
Temp. 0
41
Units
Age
Status
--------- ------- -----Degrees C
1 sec OK
Degrees C
1 sec OK
Chapter 7
Troubleshooting
79
TABLE 7-8
Checking Temperature Conditions Using the showenvironment Command (Continued)
SSC1 Board 0
Temp. 0
SSC1 Board 0
Temp. 1
SSC1 Board 0
Temp. 2
SSC1 Board 0
1.5 VDC 0
SSC1 Board 0
3.3 VDC 0
SSC1 Board 0
5 VDC 0
/N0/PS0 Input 0
Volt. 0
/N0/PS0 48 VDC 0 Volt. 0
/N0/PS1 Input 0
Volt. 0
/N0/PS1 48 VDC 0 Volt. 0
/N0/FT0 Fan 0
Cooling
/N0/FT0 Fan 1
Cooling
/N0/FT0 Fan 2
Cooling
/N0/FT0 Fan 3
Cooling
/N0/FT0 Fan 4
Cooling
/N0/FT0 Fan 5
Cooling
/N0/FT0 Fan 6
Cooling
/N0/FT0 Fan 7
Cooling
/N0/RP0 Board 0
1.5 VDC
/N0/RP0 Board 0
3.3 VDC
/N0/RP0 Board 0
Temp. 0
/N0/RP0 Board 0
Temp. 1
/N0/RP0 SDC 0
Temp. 0
/N0/RP0 AR 0
Temp. 0
/N0/RP0 DX 0
Temp. 0
/N0/RP0 DX 1
Temp. 0
/N0/RP2 Board 0
1.5 VDC
/N0/RP2 Board 0
3.3 VDC
/N0/RP2 Board 0
Temp. 0
/N0/RP2 Board 0
Temp. 1
/N0/RP2 SDC 0
Temp. 0
/N0/RP2 AR 0
Temp. 0
/N0/RP2 DX 0
Temp. 0
/N0/RP2 DX 1
Temp. 0
/N0/SB0 Board 0
1.5 VDC
/N0/SB0 Board 0
3.3 VDC
/N0/SB0 SDC 0
Temp. 0
/N0/SB0 AR 0
Temp. 0
/N0/SB0 DX 0
Temp. 0
/N0/SB0 DX 1
Temp. 0
/N0/SB0 DX 2
Temp. 0
/N0/SB0 DX 3
Temp. 0
/N0/SB0 SBBC 0
Temp. 0
/N0/SB0 Board 1
Temp. 0
/N0/SB0 Board 1
Temp. 1
/N0/SB0 CPU 0
Temp. 0
/N0/SB0 CPU 0
1.8 VDC
80
22
22
28
1.49
3.35
4.98
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Degrees C
1
Degrees C
1
Degrees C
1
Volts DC
1
Volts DC
1
Volts DC
1
- 48.00 Volts DC
- 48.00 Volts DC
Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto
1.49 Volts DC
3.37 Volts DC
20
Degrees C
19
Degrees C
55
Degrees C
45
Degrees C
57
Degrees C
59
Degrees C
1.48 Volts DC
3.37 Volts DC
22
Degrees C
22
Degrees C
53
Degrees C
43
Degrees C
49
Degrees C
52
Degrees C
1.51 Volts DC
3.29 Volts DC
46
Degrees C
39
Degrees C
45
Degrees C
49
Degrees C
53
Degrees C
48
Degrees C
49
Degrees C
24
Degrees C
24
Degrees C
47
Degrees C
1.72 Volts DC
sec OK
sec OK
sec OK
sec OK
sec OK
sec OK
1 sec
1 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
5 sec
6 sec
6 sec
6 sec
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
TABLE 7-8
/N0/SB0
/N0/SB0
/N0/SB0
/N0/SB0
/N0/SB0
/N0/SB0
/N0/SB0
/N0/SB0
/N0/SB0
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/SB2
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
/N0/IB6
Checking Temperature Conditions Using the showenvironment Command (Continued)
CPU 1
CPU 1
SBBC 1
Board 1
Board 1
CPU 2
CPU 2
CPU 3
CPU 3
Board 0
Board 0
SDC 0
AR 0
DX 0
DX 1
DX 2
DX 3
SBBC 0
Board 1
Board 1
CPU 0
CPU 0
CPU 1
CPU 1
SBBC 1
Board 1
Board 1
CPU 2
CPU 2
CPU 3
CPU 3
Board 0
Board 0
Board 0
Board 0
Board 0
Board 0
Board 0
Board 0
Board 0
Board 0
Fan 0
Fan 1
SDC 0
AR 0
DX 0
DX 1
Temp. 0
1.8 VDC 1
Temp. 0
Temp. 2
Temp. 3
Temp. 0
1.8 VDC 0
Temp. 0
1.8 VDC 1
1.5 VDC 0
3.3 VDC 0
Temp. 0
Temp. 0
Temp. 0
Temp. 0
Temp. 0
Temp. 0
Temp. 0
Temp. 0
Temp. 1
Temp. 0
1.8 VDC 0
Temp. 0
1.8 VDC 1
Temp. 0
Temp. 2
Temp. 3
Temp. 0
1.8 VDC 0
Temp. 0
1.8 VDC 1
1.5 VDC 0
3.3 VDC 0
5 VDC 0
12 VDC 0
Temp. 0
Temp. 1
3.3 VDC 1
3.3 VDC 2
1.8 VDC 0
2.5 VDC 0
Cooling 0
Cooling 0
Temp. 0
Temp. 0
Temp. 0
Temp. 0
47
1.72
37
24
24
49
1.71
46
1.72
1.51
3.29
55
37
47
50
53
47
48
23
24
45
1.72
46
1.73
37
24
25
47
1.71
45
1.71
1.50
3.35
4.95
11.95
29
28
3.30
3.28
1.81
2.51
High
High
63
77
69
73
Degrees C
Volts DC
Degrees C
Degrees C
Degrees C
Degrees C
Volts DC
Degrees C
Volts DC
Volts DC
Volts DC
Degrees C
Degrees C
Degrees C
Degrees C
Degrees C
Degrees C
Degrees C
Degrees C
Degrees C
Degrees C
Volts DC
Degrees C
Volts DC
Degrees C
Degrees C
Degrees C
Degrees C
Volts DC
Degrees C
Volts DC
Volts DC
Volts DC
Volts DC
Volts DC
Degrees C
Degrees C
Volts DC
Volts DC
Volts DC
Volts DC
Degrees
Degrees
Degrees
Degrees
C
C
C
C
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
7
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
sec
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
Chapter 7
Troubleshooting
81
TABLE 7-8
Checking Temperature Conditions Using the showenvironment Command (Continued)
/N0/IB6 SBBC 0
/N0/IB6 IOASIC 0
/N0/IB6 IOASIC 1
Temp. 0
Temp. 0
Temp. 1
51
46
52
Degrees C
Degrees C
Degrees C
8 sec OK
8 sec OK
8 sec OK
Power Supplies
Each power supply unit (PSU) has its own LEDs as follows:
■
■
■
Power/Active – lit if PSU is supplying main power; blinks if PSU is in Standby
mode
Faulty – lit if PSU has detected a fault condition and has turned off its main
output
Predictive Fail – lit if PSU has detected a pending internal fault but is still
providing main output power (degraded PSU fan speed is the only trigger for this
condition).
In addition there are two System LEDs labelled SourceA and SourceB. These show
the state of the power feeds to the system. There are four physical power feeds
and they are split into A and B.
Feed A supplies PS0 and PS1, feed B supplies PS2 and PS3. If either PS0 or PS1
receives input power then the SourceA indicator is lit. If either PS2 or PS3 receives
input power then the SourceB indicator is lit. If neither of the supplies receives input
power, the indicator is turned off.
These indicators are set on the basis of periodic monitoring at least once every 10
seconds.
Displaying Diagnostic Information
For information on displaying diagnostic information, refer to the Sun Hardware
Platform Guide, which is available with your Solaris operating environment release.
82
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Assisting Sun Service Personnel in
Determining Causes of Failure
Provide the following information to Sun service personnel so that they can help
you determine the causes of your failure:
■
A verbatim transcript of all output written to the system console leading up to the
failure. Also include any output printed subsequent to user actions. If the
transcript does not show certain user actions, in a separate file include comments
on what actions prompted particular messages.
■
A copy of the system log file from /var/adm/messages from the time leading
up to the failure.
■
The following system controller command output from the LOM shell:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
showsc -v command
showboards -v command
showlogs command
history
date
showresetstate
showenvironment
Chapter 7
Troubleshooting
83
84
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
CHAPTER
8
Firmware Upgrade Procedures
This chapter explains how to upgrade the system firmware.
The firmware on the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 system can be updated by two
mechanisms:
■
■
The flashupdate command from the System Controller LOM prompt.
The lom -G command in the Solaris operating environment.
The first method requires that the 10/100 System Controller Ethernet port is
connected to a suitable network and is configured so that it can see an external ftp or
http server which contains the new firmware images to be downloaded.
Using the flashupdate Command
The flashupdate command requires that the 10/100 Ethernet port can access an
external ftp or http server.
The flashupdate command updates the flash PROMs in the System Controller and
the system boards (CPU/Memory boards and I/O assembly). The source flash image
is normally held on an NFS server. In the case of CPU/Memory boards you can
update one board with the flash image from another.
The syntax for the flashupdate command is:
flashupdate [-y|-n] -f <url> all|systemboards|scapp|rtos|<board> . . .
flashupdate [-y|-n] -c <source_board> <destination_board> . . .
flashupdate [-y|-n] -u
where:
-y does not prompt for confirmation.
-n does not execute this command if confirmation is required.
85
-f specifies a URL as the source of the flash images. This option requires a network
connection with the flash image held on an NFS server. Use this option to install new
firmware.
<url> is the URL of the directory containing the flash images and must be of
the form:
ftp://[<userid>:<password>@]<hostname>/<path>
or
http://<hostname>/<path>
all causes all boards (CPU/Memory, I/O Assembly and System Controller) to be
updated. This action reboots the System Controller.
systemboards causes all CPU/Memory boards and the I/O Assembly to be
updated.
scapp causes the System Controller application to be updated. This action reboots
the System Controller.
rtos causes the System Controller real time operating system to be updated. This
action reboots the System Controller.
<board> names a specific board to be updated (sb0, sb2, sb4 or ib6).
-c specifies a board as the source of flash images. Use this option to update
replacement CPU/Memory boards.
<source_board> is a pre-existing CPU/Memory board to be used as the source
of the flash image (sb0, sb2 or sb4).
<destination_board> is the CPU/Memory board to be updated (sb0, sb2 or
sb4).
-u automatically updates all CPU/Memory boards with the image from the board
which currently has the highest firmware revision. Use this option to update
replacement CPU/Memory boards.
-h displays help for this command.
A power cycle is required in order to activate the updated OpenBoot PROM.
Note – flashupdate cannot retrieve flash images from a secure (userid/password)
protected HTTP URL. A message of the form flashupdate: failed, URL does
not contain required file: <file> will be returned, although the file may
exist.
86
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
Caution – Do not interrupt the flashupdate operation. If the flashupdate
command is terminated abnormally, the System Controller will go into single use
mode and will only be accesible from the serial port.
Caution – Before performing a flashupdate, check the firmware revisions of all
boards using the showboards -p version command.
Caution – If the System Controller application (scapp) or real time operating
system (rtos) are to be updated, you are strongly recommended to run the
flashupdate command from a LOM shell running on the serial connection so that
the results can be fully monitored.
Caution – Before updating CPU/Memory boards or the I/O Assembly, ensure that
all boards to be updated are powered on by using the poweron command.
flashupdate Command—Examples
To update the flash PROMs on the System Controller, I/O Assembly and all
CPU/Memory boards, type:
lom>flashupdate -f ftp://<host>/<path> all
To update the System Controller application and real time operating system type:
lom>flashupdate -f ftp://<host>/<path> scapp rtos
To bring CPU/Memory boards sb2 and sb4 up to the same firmware level as board
sb0, type:
lom>flashupdate -c sb0 sb2 sb4
A power cycle is required in order to activate the updated OpenBoot PROM.
Chapter 8
Firmware Upgrade Procedures
87
Using the lom -G Command
There are four image types which may need to be transferred using this method
with names of the following form:
■
■
■
■
sgpci.flash (contains I/O board Local POST)
sgcpu.flash (contains CPU/Memory Board Local POST and OBP)
sgsc.flash (contains LOM/System Controller firmware)
sgrtos.flash (contains LOM/System Controller Real Time Operating System)
You must place these in a suitable directory, for instance /var/tmp, and issue the
lom -G command with the filename of the file to be downloaded. The firmware
knows from header information contained in the file which image type is being
upgraded.
These images will be provided in a patch downloadable from
www.sunsolve.sun.com or from your SunService representative.
The patch README file should contain full instructions for installing these new
firmware images. It is very important that the instructions are followed exactly
otherwise you may render your system unbootable.
Caution – Do not interrupt the lom -G operation. If the lom -G command is
terminated abnormally, the System Controller will go into single use mode and will
only be accessible from the serial port.
Caution – Before performing a lom -G, check the firmware revisions of all boards
using the showboards -p version command.
Caution – You are strongly recommended to run the lom -G command from a
Solaris console running on the serial connection so that the results can be fully
monitored.
Caution – Before updating CPU/Memory boards or the I/O Assembly, ensure that
all boards to be updated are powered on by using the poweron command.
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Examples
Downloading the sgpci.flash image:
CODE EXAMPLE 8-1
Downloading the sgpci.flash Image
# lom -G sgpci.flash
WARNING:
This program will replace LOMlite2 firmware version 5.13 with version 0.1
Are you sure you want to continue?
Enter ’C’ and return to Continue or anything else to Terminate
C
Transferring 308 kB image to the system controller.
This may take several minutes.
...................................................
Validating image...
308 kB IO image transferred.
Programming /N0/IB6 PROM 0
Comparing image and flash
# Image and flash are different, proceeding with update.
Erasing
..... Done
Programming ..... Done
Verifying
..... Done
May 22 14:28:37 commando lw8: /N0/IB6 PROM 0 updated with version 5.13.5 05/17/2
002.
Firmware update complete.
You must reboot Solaris to load the new firmware.
#
Downloading the sgcpu.flash image:
CODE EXAMPLE 8-2
Downloading the sgcpu.flash Image
# lom -G sgcpu.flash
WARNING:
This program will replace LOMlite2 firmware version 5.13 with version 0.1
Are you sure you want to continue?
Enter ’C’ and return to Continue or anything else to Terminate
C
Transferring 792 kB image to the system controller.
This may take several minutes.
...................................................
Chapter 8
Firmware Upgrade Procedures
89
CODE EXAMPLE 8-2
Downloading the sgcpu.flash Image (Continued)
Validating image...
# 792 kB CPU image transferred.
Programming /N0/SB0 PROM 0
Comparing image and flash
Image and flash are different, proceeding
Erasing
............. Done
Programming ............. Done
Verifying
............. Done
May 22 14:46:40 commando lw8: /N0/SB0 PROM
002.
Programming /N0/SB0 PROM 1
Comparing image and flash
Image and flash are different, proceeding
Erasing
............. Done
Programming ............. Done
Verifying
............. Done
May 22 14:47:08 commando lw8: /N0/SB0 PROM
002.
Programming /N0/SB2 PROM 0
Comparing image and flash
Image and flash are different, proceeding
Erasing
............. Done
Programming ............. Done
Verifying
............. Done
May 22 14:47:36 commando lw8: /N0/SB2 PROM
002.
Programming /N0/SB2 PROM 1
Comparing image and flash
Image and flash are different, proceeding
Erasing
............. Done
Programming ............. Done
Verifying
............. Done
May 22 14:48:10 commando lw8: /N0/SB2 PROM
002.
with update.
0 updated with version 5.13.5 05/17/2
with update.
1 updated with version 5.13.5 05/17/2
with update.
0 updated with version 5.13.5 05/17/2
with update.
1 updated with version 5.13.5 05/17/2
Firmware update complete.
You must reboot Solaris to load the new firmware.
#
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CHAPTER
9
CPU/Memory Board Replacement
and Dynamic Reconfiguration (DR)
This chapter describes how to dynamically reconfigure the CPU/Memory boards on
the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 system.
Dynamic Reconfiguration
Overview
DR software is part of the Solaris operating environment. With the DR software you
can dynamically reconfigure system boards and safely remove them or install them
into a system while the Solaris operating environment is running and with
minimum disruption to user processes running on the system. You can use DR to do
the following:
■
■
■
■
Minimize the interruption of system applications while installing or removing a
board.
Disable a failing device by removing it before the failure can crash the operating
system.
Display the operational status of boards.
Initiate system tests of a board while the system continues to run.
Command Line Interface
The Solaris cfgadm(1M) command provides the command line interface for the
administration of DR functionality.
91
DR Concepts
Quiescence
During the unconfigure operation on a system board with permanent memory
(OpenBoot PROM or kernel memory), the operating environment is briefly paused,
which is known as operating environment quiescence. All operating environment
and device activity on the baseplane must cease during a critical phase of the
operation.
Note – Quiescence may take several minutes, depending on workload and system
configuration.
Before it can achieve quiescence, the operating environment must temporarily
suspend all processes, CPUs, and device activities. It may take a few minutes to
achieve quiescence depending on system usage and activities currently in progress.
If the operating environment cannot achieve quiescence, it displays the reasons,
which may include the following:
■
■
■
An execution thread did not suspend.
Real-time processes are running.
A device exists that cannot be paused by the operating environment.
The conditions that cause processes to fail to suspend are generally temporary.
Examine the reasons for the failure. If the operating environment encountered a
transient condition—a failure to suspend a process—you can try the operation again.
RPC or TCP Time-out or Loss of Connection
Time-outs occur by default after two minutes. Administrators may need to increase
this time-out value to avoid time-outs during a DR-induced operating system
quiescence, which may take longer than two minutes. Quiescing a system makes the
system and related network services unavailable for a period of time that can exceed
two minutes. These changes affect both the client and server machines.
Suspend-Safe and Suspend-Unsafe Devices
When DR suspends the operating environment, all of the device drivers that are
attached to the operating environment must also be suspended. If a driver cannot be
suspended (or subsequently resumed), the DR operation fails.
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A suspend-safe device does not access memory or interrupt the system while the
operating environment is in quiescence. A driver is suspend-safe if it supports
operating environment quiescence (suspend/resume). A suspend-safe driver also
guarantees that when a suspend request is successfully completed, the device that
the driver manages will not attempt to access memory, even if the device is open
when the suspend request is made.
A suspend-unsafe device allows a memory access or a system interruption to occur
while the operating environment is in quiescence.
Attachment Points
An attachment point is a collective term for a board and its slot. DR can display the
status of the slot, the board, and the attachment point. The DR definition of a board
also includes the devices connected to it, so the term ‘occupant’ refers to the
combination of board and attached devices.
■
■
A slot (also called a receptacle) has the ability to electrically isolate the occupant
from the host machine. That is, the software can put a single slot into low-power
mode.
Receptacles can be named according to slot numbers or can be anonymous (for
example, a SCSI chain). To obtain a list of all available logical attachment points,
use the -l option with the cfgadm(1M) command.
There are two formats used when referring to attachment points:
■
A physical attachment point describes the software driver and location of the slot. An
example of a physical attachment point name is:
/devices/ssm@0,0:N0.SBx
where N0 is node 0 (zero),
SB is a system board,
x is a slot number. A slot number can be 0, 2 or 4 for a system board.
■
A logical attachment point is an abbreviated name created by the system to refer to the
physical attachment point. Logical attachment points take the following form:
N0.SBx
■
Note that cfgadm will also show the I/O assembly N0.IB6, but as this is nonredundant no DR actions willl be allowed on this attachment point.
Chapter 9
CPU/Memory Board Replacement and Dynamic Reconfiguration (DR)
93
DR Operations
There are four main types of DR operation.
TABLE 9-1
Types of DR Operation
Connect
The slot provides power to the board and monitors its temperature.
Configure
The operating environment assigns functional roles to a board, and
loads device drivers for the board, and brings the devices on that
board into use by the Solaris operating environment.
Unconfigure
The system detaches a board logically from the operating
environment. Environmental monitoring continues, but devices on
the board are not available for system use.
Disconnect
The system stops monitoring the board, and power to the slot is
turned off.
If a system board is in use, stop its use and disconnect it from the system before you
power it off. After a new or upgraded system board is inserted and powered on,
connect its attachment point and configure it for use by the operating environment.
The cfgadm(1M) command can connect and configure (or unconfigure and
disconnect) in a single command, but if necessary, each operation (connection,
configuration, unconfiguration, or disconnection) can be performed separately.
Hot-Plug Hardware
Hot-plug devices have special connectors that supply electrical power to the board
or module before the data pins make contact. Boards and devices that have hot-plug
connectors can be inserted or removed while the system is running. The devices
have control circuits to ensure they have a common reference and power control
during the insertion process. The interfaces are not powered on until the board is
home and the System Controller instructs them to.
The CPU/Memory boards used in the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 system are hotplug devices.
Conditions and States
A state is the operational status of either a receptacle (slot) or an occupant (board). A
condition is the operational status of an attachment point.
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Before you attempt to perform any DR operation on a board or component from a
system, you must determine state and condition. Use the cfgadm(1M) command
with the -la options to display the type, state, and condition of each component
and the state and condition of each board slot in the system. See the section
“Component Types” on page 97 for a list of the component types.
Board States and Conditions
This section contains descriptions of the states and conditions of CPU/Memory
boards (also known as system slots).
Board Receptacle States
A board can have one of three receptacle states: empty, disconnected, or connected.
Whenever you insert a board, the receptacle state changes from empty to
disconnected. Whenever you remove a board the receptacle state changes from
disconnected to empty.
Caution – Physically removing a board that is in the connected state, or that is
powered on and in the disconnected state, crashes the operating system and can
result in permanent damage to that system board.
TABLE 9-2
Board Receptacle States
Name
Description
empty
A board is not present.
disconnected
The board is disconnected from the system bus. A board can be in
the disconnected state without being powered off. However, a board
must be powered off and in the disconnected state before you
remove it from the slot.
connected
The board is powered on and connected to the system bus. You can
view the components on a board only after it is in the connected
state.
Board Occupant States
A board can have one of two occupant states: configured or unconfigured. The
occupant state of a disconnected board is always unconfigured.
Chapter 9
CPU/Memory Board Replacement and Dynamic Reconfiguration (DR)
95
TABLE 9-3
Board Occupant States
Name
Description
configured
At least one component on the board is configured.
unconfigured
All of the components on the board are unconfigured.
Board Conditions
A board can be in one of four conditions: unknown, ok, failed, or unusable.
TABLE 9-4
Board Conditions
Name
Description
unknown
The board has not been tested.
ok
The board is operational.
failed
The board failed testing.
unusable
The board slot is unusable.
Component States and Conditions
This section contains descriptions of the states and conditions for components.
Component Receptacle States
A component cannot be individually connected or disconnected. Thus, components
can have only one state: connected.
Component Occupant States
A component can have one of two occupant states: configured or unconfigured.
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TABLE 9-5
Component Occupant States
Name
Description
configured
Component is available for use by the Solaris operating
environment.
unconfigured
Component is not available for use by the Solaris operating
environment.
Component Conditions
A component can have one of three conditions: unknown, ok, failed.
TABLE 9-6
Component Conditions
Name
Description
unknown
Component has not been tested.
ok
Component is operational.
failed
Component failed testing.
Component Types
You can use DR to configure or to unconfigure several types of component.
TABLE 9-7
Component Types
Name
Description
cpu
Individual CPU
memory
All the memory on the board
Nonpermanent and Permanent Memory
Before you can delete a board, the environment must vacate the memory on that
board. Vacating a board means flushing its nonpermanent memory to swap space
and copying its permanent (that is, kernel and OpenBoot PROM memory) to another
memory board. To relocate permanent memory, the operating environment on a
system must be temporarily suspended, or quiesced. The length of the suspension
Chapter 9
CPU/Memory Board Replacement and Dynamic Reconfiguration (DR)
97
depends on the system configuration and the running workloads. Detaching a board
with permanent memory is the only time when the operating environment is
suspended; therefore, you should know where permanent memory resides so that
you can avoid significantly impacting the operation of the system. You can display
the permanent memory by using the cfgadm(1M) command with the -v option.
When permanent memory is on the board, the operating environment must find
another memory component of adequate size to receive the permanent memory. If
that is not possible the DR operation will fail.
Limitations
Memory Interleaving
System boards cannot be dynamically reconfigured if system memory is interleaved
across multiple CPU/Memory boards.
Reconfiguring Permanent Memory
When a CPU/Memory board containing non-relocatable (permanent) memory is
dynamically reconfigured out of the system, a short pause in all domain activity is
required which may delay application response. Typically, this condition applies to
one CPU/Memory board in the system. The memory on the board is identified by a
non-zero permanent memory size in the status display produced by the
cfgadm -av command.
DR supports reconfiguration of permanent memory from one system board to
another only if one of the following conditions is met:
■
The target system board has the same amount of memory as the source system board;
-OR■
The target system board has more memory than the source system board. In this case,
the additional memory is added to the pool of available memory.
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Command Line Interface
The following procedures are discussed in this section:
■
■
■
■
■
“To
“To
“To
“To
“To
Test a CPU/Memory Board” on page 102
Install a New Board” on page 104
Hot-Swap a CPU/Memory Board” on page 104
Remove a CPU/Memory Board From the System” on page 105
Disconnect a CPU/Memory Board Temporarily” on page 106
Note – There is no need to enable dynamic reconfiguration explicitly. DR is enabled by
default.
The cfgadm Command
The cfgadm(1M) command provides configuration administration operations on
dynamically reconfigurable hardware resources. TABLE 9-8 lists the DR board states.
TABLE 9-8
DR Board States from the System Controller (SC)
Board States
Description
Available
The slot is not assigned.
Assigned
The board is assigned, but the hardware has not been configured to
use it. The board may be reassigned by the chassis port or released.
Active
The board is being actively used. You cannot reassign an active
board.
Displaying Basic Board Status
The cfgadm program displays information about boards and slots. Refer to the
cfgadm(1) man page for options to this command.
Many operations require that you specify the system board names. To obtain these
system names, type:
# cfgadm
Chapter 9
CPU/Memory Board Replacement and Dynamic Reconfiguration (DR)
99
When used without options, cfgadm displays information about all known
attachment points, including board slots and SCSI buses. The following display
shows a typical output.
CODE EXAMPLE 9-1
Output of the Basic cfgadm Command
# cfgadm
Ap_Id Type Receptacle Occupant Condition
N0.IB6 PCI_I/O_Boa connected configured ok
N0.SB0 CPU_Board connected configured unknown
N0.SB4 unknown emptyunconfigured unknown
c0
scsi-bus connected configured unknown
c1
scsi-bus connected unconfigured unknown
c2
scsi-bus connected unconfigured unknown
c3
scsi-bus connected configured unknown
Displaying Detailed Board Status
For a more detailed status report, use the command cfgadm -av. The -a option
lists attachment points and the -v option turns on expanded (verbose) descriptions.
CODE EXAMPLE 9-2 is a partial display produced by the cfgadm -av command. The
output appears complicated because the lines wrap around in this display. (This
status report is for the same system used in CODE EXAMPLE 9-1.) FIGURE 9-1 provides
details of each display item.
CODE EXAMPLE 9-2
Output of the cfgadm -av Command
# cfgadm -av
Ap_Id Receptacle Occupant Condition Information
When Type Busy Phys_Id
N0.IB6 connected configured ok powered-on, assigned
Apr 3 18:04 PCI_I/O_Boa n /devices/ssm@0,0:N0.IB6
N0.IB6::pci0 connected configured ok device
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,70000
Apr 3 18:04 io n /devices/ssm@0,0:N0.IB6::pci0
N0.IB6::pci1 connected configured ok device
/ssm@0,0/pci@19,600000
Apr 3 18:04 io n /devices /ssm@0,0:N0.IB6::pci1
N0.IB6::pci2 connected configured ok device
/ssm@0,0/pci@18,700000
Apr 3 18:04 io n /devices/ssm@0,0:N0.IB6::pci2
N0.IB6::pci3 connected configured ok device
/ssm@0,0/pci@18,600000
Apr 3 18:04 io n /devices/ssm@0,0:N0.IB6::pci3
N0.SB0 connected configured unknown powered-on, assigned
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CODE EXAMPLE 9-2
Output of the cfgadm -av Command (Continued)
Apr 3 18:04 CPU_Board n /devices/ssm@0,0:N0.SB0
N0.SB0::cpu0 connected configured ok cpuid 0, speed 750 MHz,
ecache 8 MBytes
Apr 3 18:04 cpu n /devices/ssm@0,0:N0.SB0::cpu0
N0.SB0::cpu1 connected configured ok cpuid 1, speed 750 MHz,
ecache 8 MBytes
Apr 3 18:04 cpu n /devices/ssm@0,0:N0.SB0::cpu1
N0.SB0::cpu2 connected configured ok cpuid 2, speed 750 MHz,
ecache 8 MBytes
Apr 3 18:04 cpu n /devices/ssm@0,0:N0.SB0::cpu2
FIGURE 9-1 shows details of the display in CODE EXAMPLE 9-2:
Attachment
Point ID
Occupant State
Condition
Receptacle State
Board/Component
Information
N0.IB6
connected
configured
ok
powered-on, assigned
Apr 3 18:04 PCI_I/O_Boa n /devices/ssm@0,0:N0.IB6
When Connected
Busy State
Physical ID and location
Board/Component
Type
FIGURE 9-1
Details of the Display for cfgadm -av
Command Options
The options to the cfgadm -c command are listed in TABLE 9-9.
Chapter 9
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101
TABLE 9-9
cfgadm -c Command Options
cfgadm -c Option
Function
connect
The slot provides power to the board and begins monitoring the
board. The slot is assigned if it was not previously assigned.
disconnect
The system stops monitoring the board and power to the slot is
turned off.
configure
The operating system assigns functional roles to a board and loads
device drivers for the board and for the devices attached to the
board.
unconfigure
The system detaches a board logically from the operating system
and takes the associated device drivers offline. Environmental
monitoring continues, but any devices on the board are not available
for system use.
The options provided by the cfgadm -x command are listed in TABLE 9-10.
TABLE 9-10
cfgadm -x Command Options
cfgadm -x Option
Function
poweron
Powers on a CPU/Memory board.
poweroff
Powers off a CPU/Memory board.
The cfgadm_sbd man page provides additional information on the cfgadm -c
and cfgadm -x options. The sbd library provides the functionality for hotplugging system boards of the class sbd, through the cfgadm framework.
Testing Boards and Assemblies
▼ To Test a CPU/Memory Board
Before you can test a CPU/Memory board, it must first be powered on and
disconnected. If these conditions are not met, the board test fails.
You can use the Solaris cfgadm command to test CPU/memory boards. As
superuser, type:
# cfgadm -t ap-id
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To change the level of diagnostics that cfgadm runs, supply a diagnostic level for
the cfgadm command as follows:
# cfgadm -o platform=diag=<level> -t ap-id
where level is a diagnostic level, and ap-id is one of the following: N0.SB0, N0.SB2
or N0.SB4.
If you do not supply level, the default diagnostic level is set to the default. The
diagnostic levels are:
TABLE 9-11
Diagnostic Levels
Diagnostic Level
Description
init
Only system board initialization code is run. No testing is done. This
is a very fast pass through POST.
quick
All system board components are tested with few tests and test
patterns.
default
All system board components are tested with all tests and test
patterns, except for memory and Ecache modules. Note that max
and default are the same definition.
max
All system board components are tested with all tests and test
patterns, except for memory and Ecache modules. Note that max
and default are the same definition.
mem1
Runs all tests at the default level, plus more exhaustive DRAM
and SRAM test algorithms. For Memory and Ecache modules, all
locations are tested with multiple patterns. More extensive, timeconsuming algorithms are not run at this level.
mem2
The same as mem1, with the addition of a DRAM test that does
explicit compare operations of the DRAM data.
Chapter 9
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103
Installing or Replacing CPU/Memory Boards
Caution – Physical board replacement should only be carried out by qualified
service personnel.
▼ To Install a New Board
Caution – For complete information about physically removing and replacing
CPU/Memory boards, refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 Service Manual. Failure
to follow the stated procedures can result in damage to system boards and other
components.
Note – When replacing boards, you sometimes need filler panels.
If you are unfamiliar with how to insert a board into the system, read the Sun Fire
V1280/Netra 1280 Service Manual before you begin this procedure.
1. Make sure you are properly grounded with a wrist strap.
2. After locating an empty slot, remove the system board filler panel from the slot.
3. Insert the board into the slot within one minute to prevent the system
overheating.
Refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 Service Manual for complete step-by-step
board insertion procedures.
4. Power on, test, and configure the board using the cfgadm -c configure
command:
# cfgadm -c configure ap_id
where ap_id is one of the following: N0.SB0, N0.SB2 or N0.SB4.
▼ To Hot-Swap a CPU/Memory Board
Caution – For complete information about physically removing and replacing boards,
refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 Service Manual. Failure to follow the stated
procedures can result in damage to system boards and other components.
1. Make sure you are properly grounded using a wrist strap.
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Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
2. Power off the board with cfgadm.
# cfgadm -c disconnect ap_id
where ap_id is one of the following: N0.SB0, N0.SB2 or N0.SB4.
This command removes the resources from the Solaris operating environment and
the OpenBoot PROM, and powers off the board.
3. Verify the state of the Power and Hotplug OK LEDs.
The green Power LED will flash briefly as the CPU/Memory board is cooling down.
In order to safely remove the board from the systems the green Power LED must be
off and the amber Hotplug OK LED must be on.
4. Complete the hardware removal and installation of the board. For more
information refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 Service Manual.
5. After removing and installing board, bring the board back to the Solaris operating
environment with the Solaris dynamic reconfiguration cfgadm command.
# cfgadm -c configure ap_id
where ap_id is one of the following: N0.SB0, N0.SB2 or N0.SB4.
This command powers the board on, tests it, attaches the board, and brings all of its
resources back to the Solaris operating environment.
6. Verify that the green Power LED is lit.
▼ To Remove a CPU/Memory Board From the System
Note – Before you begin this procedure, make sure you have ready a system board filler
panel to replace the system board you are going to remove. A system board filler
panel is a metal board with slots that allow cooling air to circulate.
1. Detach and power off the board from the system by using the cfgadm -c
disconnect command.
# cfgadm -c disconnect ap_id
where ap_id is one of the following: N0.SB0, N0.SB2 or N0.SB4.
Chapter 9
CPU/Memory Board Replacement and Dynamic Reconfiguration (DR)
105
Caution – For complete information about physically removing and replacing boards,
refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 Service Manual. Failure to follow the stated
procedures can result in damage to system boards and other components.
2. Remove the board from the system.
Refer to the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 Service Manual for complete step-by-step
board removal procedures.
3. Insert a system board filler panel into the slot within one minute of removing the
board to prevent system overheating.
▼
To Disconnect a CPU/Memory Board
Temporarily
You can use DR to power down the board and leave it in place. For example, you
might want to do this if the board fails and a replacement board or a system board
filler panel is not available.
● Detach and power off the board using the cfgadm -c disconnect command.
# cfgadm -c disconnect ap_id
where ap_id is one of the following: N0.SB0, N0.SB2 or N0.SB4.
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Troubleshooting
This section discusses common types of failure:
■
■
“Unconfigure Operation Failure” on page 35
“Configure Operation Failure” on page 41
The following are examples of cfgadm diagnostic messages. (Syntax error messages
are not included here.)
cfgadm: hardware component is busy, try again
cfgadm: operation: Data error: error_text
cfgadm: operation: Hardware specific failure: error_text
cfgadm: operation: Insufficient privileges
cfgadm: operation: Operation requires a service interruption
cfgadm: System is busy, try again
WARNING: Processor number number failed to offline.
See the following man pages for additional error message detail: cfgadm(1M),
cfgadm_sbd(1M), and config_admin(3X).
Unconfigure Operation Failure
An unconfigure operation for a CPU/Memory board can fail if the system is not in a
correct state before you begin the operation.
CPU/Memory Board Unconfiguration Failures
■
Memory on a board is interleaved across boards before an attempt to unconfigure the
board.
■
■
A process is bound to a CPU before an attempt to unconfigure the CPU.
Memory remains configured on a system board before you attempt a CPU
unconfigure operation on that board.
■
■
The memory on the board is configured (in use). See “Unable to Unconfigure
Memory on a Board With Permanent Memory” on page 108.
CPUs on the board cannot be taken off line. See “Unable to Unconfigure a CPU” on
page 110.
Chapter 9
CPU/Memory Board Replacement and Dynamic Reconfiguration (DR)
107
Cannot Unconfigure a Board Whose Memory Is Interleaved Across
Boards
If you try to unconfigure a system board whose memory is interleaved across system
boards, the system displays an error message such as:
cfgadm: Hardware specific failure: unconfigure N0.SB2::memory: Memory is
interleaved across boards: /ssm@0,0/memory-controller@b,400000
Cannot Unconfigure a CPU to Which a Process is Bound
If you try to unconfigure a CPU to which a process is bound, the system displays an
error message such as the following:
cfgadm: Hardware specific failure: unconfigure N0.SB2::cpu3: Failed to off-line:
/ssm@0,0/SUNW,UltraSPARC-III
● Unbind the process from the CPU and retry the unconfigure operation.
Cannot Unconfigure a CPU Before All Memory is Unconfigured
All memory on a system board must be unconfigured before you try to unconfigure
a CPU. If you try to unconfigure a CPU before all memory on the board is
unconfigured, the system displays an error message such as:
cfgadm: Hardware specific failure: unconfigure N0.SB2::cpu0: Can’t unconfig cpu
if mem online: /ssm@0,0/memory-controller
● Unconfigure all memory on the board and then unconfigure the CPU.
Unable to Unconfigure Memory on a Board With Permanent Memory
To unconfigure the memory on a board that has permanent memory, move the
permanent memory pages to another board that has enough available memory to
hold them. Such an additional board must be available before the unconfigure
operation begins.
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Memory Cannot Be Reconfigured
If the unconfigure operation fails with a message such as the following, the memory
on the board could not be unconfigured:
cfgadm: Hardware specific failure: unconfigure N0.SB0: No available memory
target: /ssm@0,0/memory-controller@3,400000
Add to another board enough memory to hold the permanent memory pages, and
then retry the unconfigure operation.
To confirm that a memory page cannot be moved, use the verbose option with the
cfgadm command and look for the word permanent in the listing:
# cfgadm -av -s “select=type(memory)”
Not Enough Available Memory
If the unconfigure fails with one of the messages below, there will not be enough
available memory in the system if the board is removed:
cfgadm: Hardware specific failure: unconfigure N0.SB0: Insufficient memory
● Reduce the memory load on the system and try again. If practical, install more
memory in another board slot.
Memory Demand Increased
If the unconfigure fails with the following message, the memory demand has
increased while the unconfigure operation was proceeding:
cfgadm: Hardware specific failure: unconfigure N0.SB0: Memory operation failed
cfgadm: Hardware specific failure: unconfigure N0.SB0: Memory operation refused
● Reduce the memory load on the system and try again.
Chapter 9
CPU/Memory Board Replacement and Dynamic Reconfiguration (DR)
109
Unable to Unconfigure a CPU
CPU unconfiguration is part of the unconfiguration operation for a CPU/Memory
board. If the operation fails to take the CPU offline, the following message is logged
to the console:
WARNING: Processor number failed to offline.
This failure occurs if:
■
■
■
The CPU has processes bound to it.
The CPU is the last one in a CPU set.
The CPU is the last online CPU in the system.
Unable to Disconnect a Board
It is possible to unconfigure a board and then discover that it cannot be
disconnected. The cfgadm status display lists the board as not detachable. This
problem occurs when the board is supplying an essential hardware service that
cannot be relocated to an alternate board.
Configure Operation Failure
CPU/Memory Board Configuration Failure
Cannot Configure Either CPU0 or CPU1 While the Other Is Configured
Before you try to configure either CPU0 or CPU1, make sure that the other CPU is
unconfigured. Once both CPU0 and CPU1 are unconfigured, it is then possible to
configure both of them.
CPUs on a Board Must Be Configured Before Memory
Before configuring memory, all CPUs on the system board must be configured. If
you try to configure memory while one or more CPUs are unconfigured, the system
displays an error message such as:
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cfgadm: Hardware specific failure: configure N0.SB2::memory: Can’t
config memory if not all cpus are online: /ssm@0,0/memorycontroller
Error Logging
Error messages from Solaris are logged using syslog and SunMC. Error messages
from the System Controller are also logged to SunMC.
Chapter 9
CPU/Memory Board Replacement and Dynamic Reconfiguration (DR)
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Glossary
ap_id
Attachment point identifier; an ap_id specifies the type and location of the
attachment point in the system and is unambiguous. There are two types of
identifier: physical and logical. A physical identifier contains a fully specified
pathname, while a logical identifier contains a shorthand notation.
Attachment point
A collective term for a board and its card cage slot. A physical attachment point
describes the software driver and location of the card cage slot. A logical
attachment point is an abbreviated name created by the system to refer to the
physical attachment point.
cfgadm command
cfgadm is the primary command for dynamic reconfiguration on the Sun Fire
V1280/Netra 1280 system. For information about the command and its
options, refer to the cfgadm(1M), cfgadm_sbd(1M), and cfgadm_pci(1M)
man pages. For any late-breaking news about this and related commands, refer
to the Solaris 8 section at the DR web site. See Chapter 9.
Condition
Configuration
(system)
Configuration (board)
Connection
Detachability
Disconnection
DR
The operational status of an attachment point.
The collection of attached devices known to the system. The system cannot use
a physical device until the configuration is updated. The operating system
assigns functional roles to a board and loads device drivers for the board and
for devices attached to the board.
The operating system assigns functional roles to a board and loads device
drivers for the board and for devices attached to the board.
A board is present in a slot and is electrically connected. The temperature of
the slot is monitored by the system.
The device driver supports DDI_DETACH and the device (such as an I/O
board or a SCSI chain) is physically arranged so that it can be detached.
The system stops monitoring the board and power to the slot is turned off. A
board in this state can be unplugged.
See Dynamic Reconfiguration
113
Dynamic
Reconfiguration
Hot-plug
Hot-plug boards and modules have special connectors that supply electrical
power to the board or module before the data pins make contact. Boards and
devices that do not have hot-plug connectors cannot be inserted or removed
while the system is running.
Hot swap
A hot swap device has special DC power connectors and logic circuitry that
allow the device to be inserted without the necessity of turning off the system.
IP Multipathing
(IPMP)
Logical DR
Occupant
Platform
Internet Protocol multipathing. Enables continuous application availability by
load balancing failures when multiple network interface cards are attached to a
system. If a failure occurs in a network adapter, and if an alternate adapter is
connected to the same IP link, the system switches all the network accesses
from the failed adapter to the alternate adapter. When multiple network
adapters are connected to the same IP link, any increases in network traffic are
spread across multiple network adapters, which improves network
throughput.
A DR operation in which hardware is not physically added or removed. An
example is the deactivation of a failed board that is then left in the slot (to
avoid changing the flow of cooling air) until a replacement is available.
Hardware resource such as a system board or a disk drive that occupies a DR
receptacle or slot.
A specific Sun Fire system model, such as the Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280
system.
Physical DR
A DR operation that involves the physical addition or removal of a board. See
also “Logical DR.”
Quiescence
A brief pause in the operating environment to allow an unconfigure and
disconnect operation on a system board with non-pageable OpenBoot PROM
(OBP) or kernel memory. All operating environment and device activity on the
backplane must cease for a few seconds during a critical phase of the
operation.
Receptacle
Port
114
Dynamic Reconfiguration (DR) is software that allows the administrator to (1)
view a system configuration; (2) suspend or restart operations involving a port,
storage device, or board; and (3) reconfigure the system (detach or attach
hotswappable devices such as disk drives or interface boards) without the need
to power down the system. When DR is used with IPMP or Solstice DiskSuite
software (and redundant hardware), the server can continue to communicate
with disk drives and networks without interruption while a service provider
replaces an existing device or installs a new device. DR supports replacement
of a CPU/Memory, provided the memory on the board is not interleaved with
memory on other boards in the system.
A receiver such as a board slot or SCSI chain.
A board connector.
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
SNMP
State
Suspendability
Suspend-safe
Suspend-unsafe
System Controller
software
Unconfiguration
Simple Network Management Protocol. SNMP is any system listening to
SNMP events. This is usually the system with the Sun Management Center
software installed.
The operational status of either a receptacle (slot) or an occupant (board).
To be suitable for DR, a device driver must have the ability to stop user
threads, execute the DDI_SUSPEND call, stop the clock, and stop the CPUs.
A suspend-safe device is one that does not access memory or interrupt the
system while the operating system is in quiescence. A driver is considered
suspend-safe if it supports operating system quiescence (suspend/resume). It
also guarantees that when a suspend request is successfully completed, the
device that the driver manages will not attempt to access memory, even if the
device is open when the suspend request is made.
A suspend-unsafe device is one that allows a memory access or a system
interruption while the operating system is in quiescence.
The main application that performs all of the System Controller hardware
management functions.
The system detaches a board logically from the operating system and takes the
associated device drivers off-line. Environmental monitoring continues, but
any devices on the board are not available for system use.
Glossary
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Index
A
alarms, checking status, 48
alarms, setting, 55
attachment points, 93
auto-boot? OpenBoot variable, 61
availability, 7
state, 96
type, 97
condition, component, 95
CPU/Memory board, replacement, 91
CPU/Memory mapping, 67
D
B
blacklisting
components, 75
manual, 75
board
condition, 96
displaying status, 99
occupant state, 95
receptacle state, 95
board status, detailed, 100
bootmode command, 60, 63
C
cfgadm command, 91, 99
componens
blacklisting, 75
disabling, 75
component
condition, 97
occupant state, 96
receptacle state, 96
date and time, setting, 19
device name mapping, 67
device path names to physical system devices, 67
diag-level OpenBoot variable, 60
diagnostic information, displaying, 82
disablecomponent command, 75
disabling a component, 75
domain
console, 4
Dynamic Reconfiguration, 91
E
enablecomponent command, 75
environmental monitoring, 4
error-level OpenBoot variable, 60
error-reset-recovery OpenBoot variable, 61
event reporting, 56
117
F
failures, determining causes, 83
fans, checking status, 50
fault LED, checking status remotely, 48
fault, system, 72
firmware, upgrading, 85
flashupdate command, 85
LOM serial port, 56
stopping event reporting, 56
lom -t command, 53
lom -v command, 50
lom -X command, 56
M
H
hangs, determining causes, 83
hard hung system, recovering from, 78
hardware, powering on, 18
hot-plug devices, 94
hung system, recovering, 77
hung system, recovering from, 78
I
I/O assemblies
mapping, 69
initial power-on, 14
interleave-mode OpenBoot variable, 61
interleave-scope OpenBoot variable, 61
internal temperature, checking, 53
internal voltage sensors, 50
maintenance, 85
manual blacklisting, 75
mapping, 67
CPU/Memory, 67
I/O assembly, 69
node, 67
memory
interleaved, 98
nonpermanent, 97
permanent, 97
reconfiguring, 98
monitoring, environmental conditions, 4
N
navigation procedures, 29
network parameters, setting, 20
node mapping, 67
nonpermanent memory, 97
L
O
logical attachment point, 93
LOM
escape sequence, changing, 56
monitoring the system, 46 to ??
online documentation, 46
sample Event Log, 49
setting the alarms, 55
lom -A command, 55
lom -E command, 56
lom -f command, 50
lom -G command, 88
lom -l command, 48
LOM prompt
accessing, 39
On/Standby switch, 13
OpenBoot PROM variables, 59
OpenBoot prompt, accessing, 41
overtemperature, 79
118
P
password command, 20
password, setting, 20
permanent memory, 97
physical attachment point, 93
POST, 59
controlling, 59, 63
Sun Fire V1280/Netra 1280 System Administration Guide • December 2002
OpenBoot PROM variables, 59
power supply, 82
powering on hardware, 18
power-off, 15
to standby, 15
poweroff command, 17
power-on, 14
from standby, 14
initial, 14
poweron command, 15
power-on self test, See POST
printenv command, 60
suspend-unsafe devices, 92
system
hard hung, recovering from, 78
System Controller POST, See SCPOST
system faults, 72
system identity, moving, 79
system, hung, recovering, 77
T
temperature, 79
terminal, connecting, 30
troubleshooting, 67
Q
quiescence, 92
U
use-nvramrc? OpenBoot variable, 61
R
RAS, 6
reboot-on-error OpenBoot variable, 61
recovering from a hard hung system, 78
reliability, 6
V
verbosity-level OpenBoot variable, 60
voltage sensors, 50
S
SCPOST, controlling, 64
serviceability, 8
setdate command, 19
setenv command, 60
setupnetwork command, 20
setupsc command, 64
showcomponent command, 75
showenvironment command, 79
shutdown command, 16
Solaris console
accessing, 39
Solaris, installing and booting, 22
standby
power off to, 15
power on from, 14
state, component, 95
suspend-safe devices, 92
Index
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