N1 Ethernet/IP Network Technical Bulletin

Metasys Network Technical Manual
Network Communications Section
Technical Bulletin
Issue Date
636
0401
N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Introduction
Page
5
•
Introduction to the Metasys N1 LAN
5
•
Introduction to Ethernet
5
•
N1 Ethernet/IP Theory of Operation
6
•
Definition of Terms
7
•
Additional Sources for Information
9
Designing the Network
11
•
General
11
•
System Performance Requirements
12
•
Media
15
•
Components
*17
•
Configuration
22
•
Manageability and Maintainability
24
•
Limitations
27
•
Specifications
29
Planning and Estimating an Installation
31
•
Protocol Standards and Compatibility
31
•
Environment and Power
31
•
System Expansion
31
•
Cabling Guidelines
*32
*Indicates those sections where changes have occurred since the last printing.
© 2001 Johnson Controls, Inc.
Code No. LIT-6360175
1
www.johnsoncontrols.com
Setting Up the N1 Ethernet/IP Network
37
•
General
37
•
Before You Start
37
•
Installing the Ethernet Adapter Card
40
•
Installing Hubs and Repeaters
41
•
Testing Cable
41
•
Laying Cable
43
•
Installing the Connectors
43
•
Wiring Details
43
•
Verifying the N1 LAN Installation
50
Setting Up the Metasys Network on Ethernet
51
•
Obtaining the IP, Subnet Mask, and UDP Port Addresses
*52
•
Hardware Requirements
*53
•
Configuring Ethernet Adapter Cards for the NCMs
53
•
Configuring the OWS
54
•
Moving ARCNET Nodes to an Ethernet Connection or Changing Gate/Node
Addresses of Existing Metasys Nodes
62
•
Changing a Single Metasys Node IP Address
64
•
Changing the IP Address of Multiple Metasys Nodes
66
•
Installing the Hardware at the NCM
67
•
Configuring the NCMs
68
•
Configuring Multiple N1 Networks
73
•
Example 1: Reconfiguring a Single Ethernet N1 as
Two or More Individual Networks
77
Example 2: Configuring Separate Networks as Multinetworks
80
•
*Indicates those sections where changes have occurred since the last printing.
2
Page
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Troubleshooting Procedures
Page
83
•
Using Windows Tools
83
•
Debugging OWS and NCM Failures
84
•
Troubleshooting a Single NCM Failure
85
•
Troubleshooting a Multiple NCM Failure
87
•
Troubleshooting an OWS
87
•
Troubleshooting General Metasys Network Failures
88
•
Troubleshooting Other Network Problems
88
Appendix A: Glossary
*93
Appendix B: Ordering Information
107
•
Johnson Controls Code Numbers
107
•
Supplier Part Numbers
*107
References
109
*Indicates those sections where changes have occurred since the last printing.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
3
4
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Introduction
Introduction to
the Metasys
N1 LAN
The Metasys N1 Local Area Network (LAN) can use Ethernet or
ARCNET technology in the circuit boards and software of Operator
Workstations (OWSs) and the Network Control Module (NCM 350s).
These devices communicate over the N1 Ethernet/IP cable via an Ethernet
Adapter Card, which is also known as a Network Interface Card (NIC).
Note: For ARCNET installations, refer to the N1 ARCNET Local Area
Network Technical Bulletin (LIT-636017).
The Metasys N1 LAN (hereafter referred to as N1) carries all types of
communication, including shared point and control information, database
uploads and downloads, commands to field equipment, summaries, and
change-of-state messages. The N1 supports the distributed nature of the
Metasys Network, in which each node has a specific function to perform
and relies on others only for shared data. For example, one node might be
located in the basement and serve a chiller, while another node may be
located in the penthouse and serve the cooling towers. In addition, the
nodes could share data, such as the same outside air temperature.
The N1 Ethernet/IP (as opposed to ARCNET) uses the industry standard
User Datagram Protocol (UDP) service provided by Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and works with single and multiple
segment LANs.
Introduction to
Ethernet
Today, Ethernet is the most widely used LAN technology; approximately
80 percent of all LAN connections installed use Ethernet. It strikes a good
balance between speed, price, ease of installation, and supportability.
The Ethernet standard is defined by the Institute of Electrical and
Electronic Engineers (IEEE) in a specification known as IEEE 802.3.
The 802.3 specification covers rules for Ethernet LAN configurations,
media, and how the elements of the network should interact. The Ethernet
protocol provides the services called for in the Physical and Data Link
Layers of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) reference model.
According to the 802.3 specification, Ethernet networks transmit data at a
rate of 10 million bits per second (Mbps). This means that when a station
transmits a packet onto the Ethernet medium, it transfers data to the
destination node at a rate of 10 Mbps. This equals approximately
250 pages of text per second.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
5
Benefits
The major benefits of an Ethernet network are:
•
performance
•
flexible cabling and device connections
•
low cost per connection, interoperability
•
equipment and topology compatibility
•
easy installation and expandability
•
reduced maintenance costs
Ethernet transmits data efficiently and flexibly. Ethernet segments may be
connected to a variety of other communications types such as high speed
backbones running up to 155 megabits per second. Backbone options
include the 100 Mbps Fast Ethernet, Fiber Distributed Data Interface
(FDDI), Token Ring, and the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM).
Note: Metasys nodes can only connect directly to 10 Mbps Ethernet.
To use higher speed backbones, other network equipment must be
installed.
The Ethernet network standard is used reliably in commercial and
industrial settings around the world every day. Peer-to-peer
communications and automatic network configuration enhance the
reliability of Ethernet. Peer-to-peer communication ensures that the
network is not dependent on any single device to control the transmission
of data between devices.
Due to Ethernet popularity, you can link systems built by many different
vendors to the same Ethernet LAN. Its extensive installation base,
widespread vendor support, and use of standard Personal Computer (PC)
hardware and software make Ethernet easy and economical to expand.
Ethernet’s wide implementation contributes to its interoperability and
provides a common basis for supporting heterogeneous networks.
N1 Ethernet/IP
Theory of
Operation
6
The access method used by devices connected to an Ethernet LAN is
another key element defined in the IEEE 802.3 specification. The Ethernet
access method is called Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision
Detect (CSMA/CD). Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) provides a
means for all hosts on a baseband network to be able to access the network
medium. Collision Detect (CD) is a method each host uses to determine
when another host is attempting to use the network. When a node is ready
to transmit, its “carrier sense” listens to see if other devices are already
transmitting because with CSMA/CD, each station contends for access to
the shared medium. In other words, any node can attempt to communicate
at any time.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
A collision on the Ethernet LAN results when two nodes try sending
packets at exactly the same time. Collisions are considered normal events,
and Ethernet networks are designed to quickly resume normal activity after
a collision occurs. If the network hardware detects a collision, both devices
delay at random intervals and attempt to resend. The process repeats until
the packet transmits successfully or is automatically aborted after sixteen
consecutive collisions. A message transmits at optimum speed if there are
no collisions with other nodes.
Table 1 is a comparison of ARCNET and Ethernet methods of operation.
Table 1: ARCNET and Ethernet Comparison
Definition of
Terms
N1 LAN Feature
ARCNET
Ethernet
Media
Coax, Twisted Pair, Fiber
Coax, Twisted Pair, Fiber
Speed
2.5 Mbps
10 Mbps
Network Access
Token Passing
CSMA/CD
Topology
Bus, Star, Mixed
Bus, Star, Mixed
Network Type
Single Segment LAN
Multiple Segment LAN
This section includes a few key terms that appear throughout this
document. Appendix A: Glossary of this document contains a complete
glossary of Ethernet and important networking and connectivity terms.
Node--A node is any addressable device connected to the LAN using an
Ethernet Adapter Card.
Metasys Node--A Metasys node is a specific type of node (NCM or
OWS), which is connected to the N1.
Internet Protocol (IP)--The IP is the network-level protocol from the
TCP/IP family of protocols, which clearly identifies a node on the
network. The Metasys system uses IP for routing messages on an Ethernet
LAN. TCP/IP protocols were developed with public funding and are in the
public domain. It is used when referring to network-layer items such as
addresses and routing. In many contexts, IP, Internet, and TCP/IP are used
interchangeably. Each node must have a unique IP address.
Segment--A segment is an electrically continuous section of cable that is
terminated at both ends (i.e., does not pass through a hub or repeater).
See Figure 1.
Private Network--A private network runs only Metasys software with no
third-party nodes or applications. A private network is the most desirable
network option, because performance can be more readily maintained.
A private network is not susceptible to problems caused by non-Metasys
Network traffic.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
7
Segmented Network--A segmented network runs Metasys software on its
own Ethernet segment. Third-party equipment or applications may coexist
on separate Ethernet segments.
Shared Network--A shared network is one in which both Metasys
software and other nodes and applications coexist on the Ethernet media. It
is the least desirable configuration from the standpoint of ensuring
optimum performance and data integrity in the face of high traffic levels.
Multinetwork Feature--A feature available on the M5 Workstation that
allows multiple Metasys N1 Ethernet Networks to coexist on the same
transmission medium in isolation from one another. Nodes within a single
Metasys N1 Ethernet Network can communicate only with other nodes
within their network, or M5 Workstations with Multinetwork feature.
Bus Segment
NCM350
Bus Segment
OWS
NCM350
NCM350
NCM350 NCM350
NCM350
Repeater
T
T
T
T
T
= 50 ohm terminator
Dfbusseg
Figure 1: Defining a Bus Segment
8
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Additional
Sources for
Information
Depending on the LAN, the N1 may use non-Johnson Controls
(third-party) products. Therefore, this document may not contain all the
installation, commissioning, and troubleshooting information you need.
Furthermore, collaborate with the network administrator or whoever has
responsibility for providing network support, because there may be
established vendors and equipment standards for your site.
The Setting Up the Metasys Network on Ethernet section later in this
document details the process of connecting Metasys NCMs and OWSs to
an Ethernet/IP configured network. Specifically, it outlines installing the
hardware and software and configuring both the NCM and OWS. Consult
the following documentation for additional details on installing and
commissioning that is performed at the OWS:
Table 2: Additional Sources for Information
Topic
Source
Engineering and commissioning
the NCM
Network Control Module 300 Series Technical
Bulletin (LIT-6360251)
Troubleshooting bridges, hubs,
and repeaters
Manufacturer’s literature
Coax, twisted pair, and optical
fiber cable preparation
Manufacturer’s literature
For a thorough introduction to Ethernet networks, consult Ethernet Tips
and Techniques: For Designing, Installing and Troubleshooting Your
Ethernet Network, 2nd Edition by Byron Spinney. This book, which is
included with Global Learning Services Module LM49, is a good starting
point for anyone who needs to install an Ethernet network or who wants to
learn the basics about Ethernet. The References section of this document
includes a list of sources of information on networks and connectivity.
In addition, N1 Ethernet/IP Network Product Bulletin Supplement
(LIT-635033a), which is located in the Metasys Network Sales Resource
Manual (FAN 635), can help determine whether it is possible and/or
advisable to run Metasys software on a particular Ethernet Local Area
Network (LAN). It also provides insight as to the complexities of the
existing network. The last section of this supplement compares the
features and benefits of the two communications networks used with the
Metasys Building Automation System (BAS): ARCNET and Ethernet. The
purpose of this information is to help you select the most appropriate BAS
backbone network.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
9
10
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Designing the Network
This section contains considerations that are important for designing and
laying out the N1 LAN. How to choose the network configuration, media,
and components is also covered.
General
Your decision to use one network over another may
be based on several factors including cost of
installing wiring and customer requirements. You
may also want to decide, based on your specific
application, what offers the best balance of cost,
performance, and reliability for current and
future needs. For installations that already use
Ethernet cable, the expense associated with
installing additional coax cable for an N1 ARCNET
LAN may be prohibitive. That is why a Metasys
system now supports the transmission of N1
messages across the existing Ethernet cables with
minimal impact on performance.
Note:
ARCNET and Ethernet can coexist on the same network.
(See Figure 18.) For example, the Metasys Ethernet Router
integrates Metasys N1 LAN ARCNET segments with an Ethernet
network. The router provides the physical connection between a
Metasys ARCNET segment and the Ethernet network. No special
commands are necessary to switch between networks; data
automatically transmits between networks without operator
knowledge or intervention. However, when you add a directly
connected IP network node to the Ethernet/IP network, you need to
manually modify the configuration on each Ethernet Router. Refer
to the Metasys Ethernet Router Technical Bulletin (LIT-6295035).
Metasys software is a distributed, peer-to-peer application. The overall
traffic generated by any Metasys application with up to 50 nodes is
generally very limited (less than two percent of total bandwidth).
However, every Metasys node sends messages to all other existing
Metasys nodes on a continual basis.
There are a few, general rules you should be aware of when designing the
N1 LAN. They are:
•
Follow all National Electric Code (NEC) and local code restrictions.
•
Do not wire more than 100 Metasys nodes to any one network.
Note: Do not exceed 100 total nodes when using the M5 Workstation
Multinetwork feature.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
11
•
For all wiring, follow Telecommunications Industries
Association/Electronic Industries Association (TIA/EIA)-568A
requirements for pinout configurations, cabling topology, and distance
limitations.
•
Make sure to follow the cabling lengths and required cabling distance
between two nodes, repeaters, or hubs as described in Table 6.
•
Make sure all components in the LAN comply with IEEE 802.3 or
Ethernet Version 2 (V2.0) specifications.
•
Be aware that rules restricting the number of repeaters and routers
between nodes vary by manufacturer. Some allow two hops, but most
allow four. Limiting routers to no more than four hops between any
two NCMs ensures that communication performance is maintained.
•
Make sure you have a transceiver for fiber optic and 10Base5
connections.
This section focuses on the following factors for deciding how to design
the N1 LAN:
System
Performance
Requirements
•
system performance requirements
•
media
•
components
•
configuration
•
manageability and maintainability
•
limitations
•
specifications
Evaluating various network design options requires collecting and
understanding historical data and networking resource needs. In cases
where there is no existing network, you should survey vendors or others
who have experience with similar network requirements. There are many
different methods of segmenting, routing, and filtering traffic on a given
LAN. You may want to seek the advice of a network consultant when in
doubt. The preferred order of configurations, starting with the most
desirable, is as follows:
1. Private--Metasys software only.
2. Segmented--Metasys software on its own Ethernet segment.
3. Shared--Metasys software and other applications all on the same
network.
12
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
It is recommended that Metasys software run on its own segment or
network to ensure optimum performance and data integrity. Gateway and
network port NCM types generate much higher traffic levels than other
NCM types. It is strongly recommended that message traffic from these
NCM types be limited to dedicated Ethernet segments. For a shared
network application, it is important to gather the following information
and to understand how these factors affect network usage:
•
number of users
•
type of functions
•
frequency and duration of use
•
network traffic patterns
•
uptime and bandwidth requirements
Network Users
The performance of the N1 depends mostly on how many nodes are
installed and how the system’s functions and features are applied at these
nodes. For example, a system with many nodes and light data sharing
operates more efficiently than a system with few nodes and heavy data
sharing. Therefore, you need to consider how the data is shared when
designing the system applications.
Network
Functions
For shared network applications, the size of the files that are being
transferred, printed, and saved, in addition to geographical and
environmental concerns, are also issues to consider when making
decisions about segmentation, hardware, and media types.
Network Usage
Characteristics
Identifying potential traffic problems early helps to determine the need for
and location of bridges and routers. It is equally important to understand
that to remedy unreliable communication problems, such as frequent
Metasys software online/offline occurrences, a second network or
segmentation of the existing network may be needed. Isolating devices that
frequently communicate with one another can reduce collisions.
Network Traffic
Patterns
It is important to know the network traffic pattern. When using an existing
Ethernet LAN as the Metasys N1 Network, it is very important to
understand the potential impact of the traffic from non-Metasys equipment
on the LAN.
If Metasys software is installed on a shared network, the network needs to
have sufficient capacity to handle the Metasys communications. Sufficient
bandwidth is particularly important during periods of peak traffic.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
13
Network
Bandwidth
Requirements
For a Metasys system to run properly, the network must have available
bandwidth of 30N 2 bps, where N equals the number of Metasys nodes. On
a typical 10 Mbps Ethernet LAN, a 50 node Metasys Network consumes
only 0.75% (less than 1%) of the bandwidth. However, if these 50 nodes
were spread among different buildings and connected by a 56 Kilobits per
second (Kbps) WAN (Wide Area Network), the Metasys Network
saturates the 56 Kbps WAN and does not run. Depending on the network
topology, WAN traffic may be reduced by using routers to filter messages
within the building.
Although a Metasys Network requires a minimum connection rate of
56 Kbps, it only uses a small portion of this bandwidth for its required
communication. The following equation gives a guideline as to how much
of the available bandwidth is required for a Metasys Network:
30 N 2
(100) = Percent Utilization
WAN Speed in bps
Where N equals the number of Metasys nodes and 30 is the number of bps
needed per Metasys node.
For example, the equation for a system with six NCMs and one OWS
running across a 56 Kbps link would read:
30 × (7) 2
(100) = 2.62%
56,000
This says that at a minimum, a Metasys Network requires 2.62% of the
capacity of the 56 Kb WAN link. Additional bandwidth is required to run
global features such as Data Sharing or Demand Limiting/Load Rolling
(DL/LR).
Use the above equation to roughly estimate bandwidth needs. If the
application requires NCM to NCM communication on a regular basis
(e.g., accessing Outdoor Air Temperature points, Demand Limiting/Load
Rolling [DL/LR], Metalink), add an estimate of this traffic density to
this amount to obtain the overall bandwidth required. In general, you
should reserve 2% of the 10 Mbps total bandwidth for a Metasys Network.
Additional customer or branch application traffic must be accounted for
separately.
Table 3 identifies your network requirements.
Table 3: Metasys Network N1 Data Reliability
Type
Reliability
Private
High
Segmented
Moderate
Shared
Moderate-Low
Note:
14
Reliability varies depending on the site configuration.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Media
With the proper equipment, many different types of media can be
connected to the N1 LAN. These include:
•
Attachment User Interface (AUI) Cable
•
10Base5, Thick Coaxial
•
10Base2, Thin Coaxial
•
10BaseT, Unshielded Twisted Pair, Shielded Twisted Pair
•
10BaseFL, Fiber Optic Cable
The cabling lengths, distances between nodes, and the advantages and
disadvantages associated with each media are summarized in Table 6 of
this document. Detailed descriptions of transmission media and
configuration options are covered in the Designing the Network section of
this document.
The following information briefly describes the different types of media
that are referred to throughout this document:
AUI Cable--Attachment User Interface (AUI) or drop cable is often used
to connect an Ethernet hub to a backbone cable via a transceiver. AUI can
also be used to connect a workstation or piece of networking hardware to a
networking medium the equipment does not directly support. AUI is
comprised of eight twisted pairs of wires, which makes working with it a
challenge. The major benefit when using an AUI connection is that it
supplies power to any external transceiver.
10Base5, Thick Coax Cable--Thick coax, the cable type specified by the
IEEE 10Base5 standard, is rarely used in new installations. It is terminated
at either end by an N-type connector. A 50-ohm terminator cap is also
required at each end.
10Base2, Thin Coax Cable--Thin coax is the cable type specified by the
IEEE 10Base2 standard. These cables are terminated with BNC
connectors. Thin coaxial cable supports only 30 transceiver connections
per segment and limits segment length to 185 meters (607 feet). It is
flexible and easy to handle. A 50-ohm terminator cap is also required at
each end.
10BaseT, Twisted Pair Cable--Specified by the IEEE 10BaseT standard,
Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) and Shielded Twisted Pair (STP) are the
most common and economical media to install. The connectors are also
more affordable. The maximum recommended length of this cable is
100 meters (330 feet). Many buildings have CAT3 UTP 24 gauge
telephone lines already in place that could be used for the LAN.
Note: IEEE 802.3 standard requires category (CAT) 3, 4, 5 with
2- or 4-pair wire.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
15
10BaseFL, Fiber Optic Cable--Specified by the IEEE 10BaseFL
standard, fiber optic cable is used in broadband applications and those
involving long distances. Maximum distance for fiber optic cable varies by
manufacturer. Both plastic and glass fiber optic cabling contain fiber
strands sheathed by an insulating material. Plastic fiber provides better
resiliency and fewer handling restrictions than glass fiber. Glass fiber is
very costly to terminate and degrades over time; however, it offers longer
distance specifications and higher data rates than plastic fiber.
Choosing a
Transmission
Medium
You have several media choices for the N1 LAN. The most common
medium is the twisted pair using a star configuration, because it is
inexpensive, and easy to install, troubleshoot, and repair. UTP cable used
for LANs is similar to telephone cable, but has somewhat more stringent
specifications regarding its susceptibility to outside Electromagnetic
Interference (EMI) than common telephone wire. Shielded Twisted Pair
(STP) comes with a shielding around the cable to provide more protection
against EMI and is recommended for use in manufacturing environments
or where high interference is present.
Of the two types of twisted pair cable, UTP is the more commonly used.
10BaseT, the specification for running Ethernet on UTP, stands for
10 Mbps, baseband signaling (the signaling method used by Ethernet
networks), over twisted pair cable. Other Ethernet specifications include
10Base5, which uses a thick coax cable, and 10Base2, which uses a thin
coaxial cable media. Today, 10Base5 is seldom installed in new Ethernet
networks, and 10Base2 is used only in very small office networks. An
additional standard allows 10BaseFL Ethernet to run on fiber optic cable.
To reduce long term maintenance and vendor costs, stay within the
guidelines of the existing LAN topology. Thin coax cable is used in most
isolated or standalone installations because it provides excellent protection
against noise and interference. Twisted pair, a less expensive choice, is
best suited for short distances. It is used in most desktop and LAN
environments. Optical fiber, which provides optimum noise immunity and
lightning protection, can be used for runs between buildings.
The N1 LAN components are designed for thin coax cable or twisted pair.
Fiber optic connections are also available by using an AUI connector and
fiber optic transceiver.
Note: Fiber optic connector styles must be selected to match the
converter. This varies according to application requirements.
The SMA, SC, and ST are the types of connectors.
16
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
It is important to confer with the network administrator about internal
standards. Many buildings have a cabling system and media standard in
place, and all installed networks must follow this standard. Complying
with an existing standard may result in higher short term installation costs
but results in long term maintenance cost savings.
Components
The components of Ethernet include both hardware and software.
Many of the N1 LAN components are vendor products. Refer to
Appendix B: Ordering Information of this document for a list of all vendor
products that have been tested with the N1 LAN. For details about special
configuration steps, refer to vendor documentation.
Hardware
Components
The following information briefly describes each hardware component that
may be required by the network configuration and media. Some Ethernet
networks use each component while others use only some of the
components. Refer to Appendix B: Ordering Information of this document
for recommended vendor and part numbers. Table 4 contains the NCM
code equivalencies for Europe and North America.
Table 4: NCM Code Equivalencies
North America
Europe
NCM300
NCM311
NCM350
NCM361
NCM Series (NCM300 and NCM350)
NCM Series (NCM311 and NCM361)
•
NU-NCM350-1 (NCM350)--An NCM350 or upgraded NCM300-1
with a ROM150 Memory Module upgrade is required. The NCM350 is
an improved hardware platform that supports the same features as the
NCM300 plus Ethernet communication, Dial-up, S2 Migration
applications, internal modems, and internal RS-232 connections. The
NU-ROM150 Memory Module is already installed in the NCM350.
An Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) compatible Ethernet Adapter
Card needs to be purchased separately and installed in an ISA slot.
Note: The NCM350 supports either ARCNET or Ethernet
applications. Because the NCM350 is required for Ethernet
applications, use NCM350s whenever there is a possibility that
Ethernet might be deployed at a later date.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
17
•
NU-NCM300-1 (NCM300-1)--An NCM300-1 (Version B or later)
with a ROM150 Memory Module upgrade may be used instead of an
NCM350. For ROM150 installation instructions, refer to the Setting
Up the Metasys Network on Ethernet section, Installing the Hardware
at the NCM subsection, Installing the ROM150 heading located in this
document.
A
C1
R6
R7
R8
R9
R5
R4
C1
R1
R2
R3
Note: The NU-NCM-300-0 (NCM300) may be returned to the
Johnson Controls Repair Center to be upgraded to an
NCM-300-1 or NCM-350. The NU-NCM300-0 is not field
upgradable.
B
•
NU-ROM150 Memory Module--The NU-ROM150 Memory Module
is required to upgrade an NCM300-1 to an NCM350 for Ethernet
support. Refer to Appendix B: Ordering Information of this document
for information on ordering the upgrade kit, which includes the
NU-ROM150-1 (Flash SIMM), installation instructions, and a new
NCM350 label.
•
Ethernet Adapter Card--Metasys nodes (OWS or NCM350) require
an Ethernet Adapter Card, which is commonly referred to as a NIC, to
communicate over the Ethernet network. The Ethernet Adapter Card
installs into either the ISA card slot on both the NCM350
(NU-NCM350-1) and OWS.
The Ethernet Adapter Card supports coax, AUI, and twisted pair
connectors directly and fiber optic connections when used with an AUI
to fiber optic transceiver. Many PCs (OWSs) are now manufactured
with an integrated Ethernet Adapter Card.
18
•
Fiber Optic SC Connector--The SC connector, similar to the ST and
SMA connectors, is a fiber optic micro transceiver. Technical
enhancements include an auto-reset jabber feature and five diagnostic
Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs).
•
Fiber Optic ST Connector--The fiber optic ST connector is a micro
transceiver that enables the use of fiber optic media. This transceiver
can be combined with existing copper based AUI Ethernet
configurations to allow AUI-to-fiber connections. It is plug compatible
with most IEEE 802.3 hardware and implements all Ethernet transmit,
receive, and collision detection functions.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
•
Fiber Optic SMA Connector--The Fiber Optic SMA connector is a
common hardware component used in Ethernet networks. It allows an
AUI cable to connect to various media, including thick or thin coaxial,
fiber, or twisted pair as well as repeaters, bridges, and intelligent hubs.
With a Metasys Network, a transceiver is needed only for fiber optic
connections. The Ethernet Adapter Card intrinsically supports AUI,
twisted pair, and thin coax connections.
•
AUI Transceiver Cable--AUI transceiver cable is a 15-pin cable.
It may be required if there is not enough space in the NCM standard
enclosure when the fiber optic transceiver is connected directly to the
Ethernet Adapter Card.
•
T-Connectors--A T-connector is required at each OWS, repeater, and
NCM when the transmission medium is a thin wire coax.
•
Terminator Caps--Terminator caps are 50 ohm resistors that are
required to properly terminate the N1 LAN. They prevent signal
reflections. A terminator cap is required at the end of each segment in
a bus network when the transmission medium is a thin wire coax.
•
Hub--The hub is the core of a network or cabling system. Twisted
pair, AUI, and fiber optic Ethernet, and many proprietary network
topologies use hubs to connect multiple cable segments together.
These cable segments could be a star or bus topology. Hubs have
multiple ports to attach the different cable runs and combine different
media types. The intelligent hub acts as a multi-port bridge in that it
monitors the physical port address segments to prevent collisions and
improve efficiency and network speed.
16
or
Note: The isolation capability of an intelligent hub requires adequate
processing power, memory, and interconnect technology.
•
Unmanaged Hub or Concentrator--Similar to an inexpensive
multiplexer, the unmanaged hub allows nodes to connect to the
network in a star configuration. Many unmanaged hubs are being
replaced with intelligent hubs. Unmanaged hubs do not provide
additional functionality such as Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP).
•
Gateway--A gateway is used to pass network traffic from one protocol
to another and to handle differences in data format, speed, and signal
levels. An IP gateway would be used to transmit IP packets using
different protocols such as ARCNET, IPX, or SNA.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
19
CHANNEL B
CHANNEL A
CHANNEL B
CHANNEL A
CHANNEL B
CHANNEL A
CHANNEL B
CHANNEL A
Software
Components
20
•
Repeater--The function of a repeater is to regenerate incoming signals,
so you can extend transmission distances while maintaining signal
quality. In addition to collision detection, the repeater reshapes,
re-times, and retransmits signals to both Ethernet segments. An
Ethernet hub is also a repeater. The maximum number of times a
signal can be regenerated for Ethernet is four times.
•
Multi-port Repeater or Hub--A multi-port repeater connects more
than two segments. The multi-port repeater usually has an AUI
connection and multiple ports for thin coaxial, twisted pair, or other
common media. The primary application for a multi-port repeater is to
provide a connection to the thick coaxial backbone while serving an
area that uses thin coaxial, AUI, or twisted pair.
•
Bridge--Similar to the repeater, a bridge joins two network segments
from separate LANs. However, a bridge passes only those packets
intended for a node on the other side. The segments on either side of
the bridge are separate in terms of length rules. The bridge can be used
to lengthen a segment and to segregate traffic on busy networks.
Isolating a Metasys system from other network traffic can increase
reliability and still provide all network users access to Metasys data.
A bridge is the best way to combine a Metasys segment with a shared
segment.
•
Routers--A router is a network device typically used in WANs. It
forwards IP network traffic from one connected network to another.
The router functions much like the bridge but also has filtering
capabilities. The filters allow the router to make decisions on how to
route the IP packets it sends and receives.
The software components include:
•
Windows 98 SE, Windows NT--Windows 98 SE and
Windows NT are Ethernet compatible. The Microsoft TCP/IP
Protocol must be installed and configured.
•
Metasys Release 8.0 or later--Metasys Release 8.0 or later software
supports the Ethernet N1 LAN. All nodes running Ethernet must use
Metasys Release 8.0 or later software.
•
Metasys Release 10.01 or later--Metasys Release 10.01 or later
supports the M5 Workstation Multinetwork feature.
•
NCM Drivers--The NCM350 is designed to run with standard packet
drivers.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Ethernet Cards
For use in the NCM350, order the NU-NET301-0. The OWS can use any
Ethernet Adapter Card supported by Microsoft Windows software.
Note: A small number of NU-NET301-0 Ethernet adapter assemblies
supplied by Kingston Technologies do not fit into the
NU-NCM350. The cause is two reinforcement ribs on the
mounting bracket that are too long. Only a limited number of the
incorrectly bracketed adapters were produced. All new adapters are
produced with the correct bracket. Inspect the NU-NET301-0
before taking it to a job. For a replacement NU-NET301-0, contact:
Tyler Ernt or Mike Kuppinger
17600 Newhope St.
Fountain Valley, CA 92708
1-800-435-2620
Choosing the
Metasys
Components
The following information is a list of components that you need for
Metasys nodes.
•
Ethernet Adapter Card--One Ethernet Adapter Card is required for
each OWS and each NCM350 that is on the N1 Local Area Network
(LAN).
•
Fiber Optic Transceiver--One is required for each NCM350 and
OWS connected to the network via fiber optic cable. Each fiber optic
transceiver connects to the Johnson Controls equipment via an AUI
port and then to the LAN hub via fiber optic cable.
•
Operator Workstation (OWS)--Many PCs can be purchased with an
integrated Ethernet port. Metasys software is compatible with this type
of hardware as long as the integrated Ethernet Adapter Card is
supported by Windows software. Refer to the Operator Workstation
Configurations Bulletin (LIT-636013d), located in the Operator
Devices section of this manual, for Metasys OWS platforms that are
currently recommended/supported as well as hardware and software
options. Plug and play cards such as the Intel EtherExpress PRO/10
LAN Adapter can be used in the OWS.
Note: For the OWS, you may also select an Ethernet Adapter Card that
has an integrated fiber optic transceiver. This type of card allows
the PC to operate in a smaller area.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
21
Configuration
Another important part of designing and installing a LAN is selecting the
appropriate topology for the application. Ethernet networks can be
configured in either a star, bus, or mixed topology.
Star Topology
The robust star network features two or more nodes connected to a central
hub using unshielded twisted pair or fiber optic media. The hubs can be
placed in wiring closets conveniently located in a building. The advantage
of the star topology is ease of fault isolation by passing and repairing
faulty nodes. A disadvantage is that the star topology requires more cable
than a bus topology.
Bus Topology
Coaxial cable was the original LAN medium, and it is used in a bus
topology. A bus network features nodes wired in a daisy chain with
network terminators at each end of the chain. With the bus, all nodes are
attached to a single length of cable. The advantages of a bus topology
include low cable lengths and low sensitivity to node failures; the
disadvantages include high sensitivity to distance and difficult prewiring
for future expandability. This topology is rarely used in new LAN
installations, because it is relatively difficult to accommodate adding new
users or moving existing users from one location to another. It is also
difficult to troubleshoot problems on a bus LAN unless it is very small.
Components of both the star and bus networks can be used together to
provide a mixed network. Figure 2 and Figure 3 show the two most
prevalent network configurations.
22
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
NCM350
Operator
Workstation
NCM350
Twisted Pair
or
Fiber Optic
NCM350
NCM350
Hub
NCM350
NCM350
Operator
Workstation
EIPSTAR
Figure 2: N1 Ethernet/IP LAN Star Configuration
NCM350
Coax
NCM350
Note: Do not use RG-62A/U cable with Ethernet.
N1 LAN
NCM350
Repeater
Hub
Twisted Pair
or
Fiber Optic
NCM350
Operator
Workstation
NCM350
NCM350
Operator
Workstation
EIPLANMI
NCM350
Figure 3: N1 Ethernet/IP LAN Mixed Configuration
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
23
Choosing a
Configuration
Of the three different N1 LAN network configurations, the star network is
recommended for NCMs and OWSs that are widely separated from each
other (500 to 1500 feet). The bus network, on the other hand, is best for
NCMs and OWSs that are situated close to each other (under 607 feet).
A mixed network is best for systems with some nodes that are close to
each other, and others that are widely separated.
Use Table 5 to help decide which configuration is best.
Table 5: N1 LAN Network Configurations
Ease of Installation
Easiest:
Star
Bus
Ease of Maintenance
Hardest:
Mixed
Easiest:
Star
Hardest:
Mixed
Greatest:
Mixed
Bus
and Troubleshooting
Flexibility
Bus
Reliability
(can vary according to application)
Manageability
and
Maintainability
Consistent
Media
24
Least:
Star
Highest:
Star
Lowest:
Bus
Mixed
As a rule, it is easier to manage and maintain a network with a simple
design than it is one with a more complex design. Techniques for
simplifying a network design include:
•
using consistent media
•
providing cable and hardware accessibility
•
limiting the number of nodes per segment
•
clearly documenting the IP addresses used on all Metasys equipment
•
establishing customer roles and responsibilities
•
placing nodes in best physical location
The specific environment and application must be evaluated when
selecting a media type. Where possible, use one type of media to avoid
having to meet the different installation, maintenance, and test equipment
requirements that are unique to each medium. Hardware connections and
special equipment associated with each medium can further complicate
network management and maintenance.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Cable and
Hardware
Accessibility
Accessing the network cable and hardware is necessary for maintaining
and expanding the network. To simplify future cable alterations, install a
generously sized conduit for network cables in the walls.
Each type of media has length restrictions. For any one segment, avoid
running cable beyond 80 percent of the allotted cable length. Use
additional hardware rather than have segments that exceed cable limits.
Maximum cable length is media specific and is covered later in this
document. Cable run lengths must also be considered, because LAN
communication equipment is typically stored in closets and may not be
closest to the NCM.
Number of
Nodes
Other key LAN installation and design factors are the maximum number
of Metasys and Ethernet nodes, as well as the maximum length of cable
for each N1 segment. Up to 100 Metasys nodes (NCMs and OWSs) can
reside on an Ethernet network.
IP Addresses
Documentation
Documenting IP addresses guarantees access to them at all times and
reduces the chances of defining the addresses on more than one node.
Roles and
Responsibilities
The N1 Ethernet/IP Network Product Bulletin Supplement (LIT-635033a)
in the Metasys Network Sales Resource Manual (FAN 635) contains
questions that helps identify and manage network complexities as well as
plan for future network growth. Also covered is the question whether the
customer can meet bandwidth, security, software, and other requirements
necessary to guarantee the performance of a Metasys system.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
25
Physical
Location of the
Nodes
Table 6 contains the minimum/maximum cabling lengths and distances
required between two nodes for various media. The minimum cable
lengths also apply to repeaters and hubs.
Table 6: Cabling Lengths and Distances between Nodes by Media
Feature
Plastic Fiber
Optic
(Multimode)
Glass
Fiber Optic
Thin Coax
Twisted
Pair
Minimum
Distance
between
Nodes
*
*
0.5 m
(1.6 ft)
2.5 m
(8.2 ft)
Maximum
Length
2000 m
(6560 ft*)
2000 m
(6560 ft*)
185 m
(607 ft)
100 m
(330 ft)
Advantages
EMI/RFI
immunity
Impervious to
EMI and RFI.
Offers
extended
length.
Economical.
Easy
termination
and handling.
Economical.
Simple
termination
Disadvantages
Shorter runs
than glass
fiber
Termination,
equipment,
and labor
costs
Noise
resistance
lower than
thick coaxial or
fiber
Least noise
resistance
Number of
Connects per
Segment**
2
2
30
2
* Fiber optic distances vary by manufacturer.
** This is the number of physical connections allowed on one cable segment.
Equipment
Closets and
Cable Runs
Identify the location of each node, all electrical equipment, and potential
hazards using a copy of the facility’s layout. Also check for an adequate
number of easily accessible, ventilated equipment closets with power.
Centrally located closets minimize cable runs.
Consider placing cable for future growth during the initial installation
phase. This reduces costs associated with installation and the interruption
of normal office workflow.
A hop is a transmission of a data packet through a router in a network of
interconnected segments of subnetworks. A measure of a path through an
internetwork is the hop count (the number of routers the packet passes
through enroute to its destination). Due to the inherent time delays in
traversing Ethernet nodes, a general rule is to allow no more than
four hops between any two nodes. However, this is dependent upon the
equipment manufacturer’s specifications. Check with the manufacturer to
determine the allowable number of hops.
26
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Limitations
Speed
Certain characteristics associated with Ethernet communications can affect
system performance. They include:
•
speed
•
access times
•
distance
The speed of the Ethernet network is affected by the fact that Ethernet is
forced to transmit extra data for each message sent. Not only do all
messages sent on the network require message headers, but Ethernet’s
minimum message size necessitates padding small messages. In addition,
the CSMA/CD access method tends to slow down the Ethernet network
when it operates at more than 60% of its bandwidth.
Thus, heavy Ethernet traffic may slow down performance of a Metasys
system.
Notes: The Metasys system can be configured as a private network or
connected to an existing network. When configured as a private
network (i.e., when there are no other applications co-existing on
the LAN), the Metasys system provides all the benefits associated
with Ethernet, and experience high reliability. However, when
configured with other applications on the LAN, caution must be
taken to ensure that enough bandwidth is available to support the
Metasys application.
Never attempt to connect an ARCNET node to an Ethernet
network. This saturates the Ethernet network with ARCNET
broadcasts and make the entire network unusable.
Access Times
Unlike the ARCNET network, which uses the token passing access
method, access to the LAN cannot be guaranteed for time critical
messages. Similarly, worst case response times for transmissions between
nodes cannot be predicted, since Ethernet access times depend on the
amount of other data being transmitted on the network. By tying into an
existing shared Ethernet network, the network communication is subject to
disruption caused by other nodes attached to the network.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
27
Distance
As with all networks, distance limitations vary depending on the cable
used. For example, an Ethernet thin coax network is limited to a total
distance of around 2428 feet, with a maximum length for any one segment
being 607 feet. For most BAS applications, the Ethernet distance
limitations are not a problem. Care must be taken to abide by all distance
limitations noted above as well as those given by the network component
manufacturer. Limiting distances to no more than 80% of the design
capacity allows room for future additions to the network. Ethernet is a
LAN topology and is not a solution for a Wide Area Network (WAN)
because of media distance limitations.
Using the same connection conventions established with the Metasys N1
ARCNET (e.g., connecting a remote OWS over phone, leased, or ISDN
lines), connect remote devices. However, Metasys nodes can communicate
over a WAN if a continuously connected, 56 Kilobits per second (Kbps) or
higher speed connection can be provided for the remote Metasys nodes.
This is a LAN to WAN internetworking issue. The design and components
for this type of connection vary based on the type of LAN/WAN network.
The services of a network consultant may be needed, if the customer does
not have the expertise to provide this type of connection.
28
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Specifications
Table 7: Specifications
Product Name
N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Protocol
TCP/IP (UDP Datagrams), CSMA/CD
Error Checking
Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC)
Communication Rate
10 Megabits per second (Mbps)
Addressable Nodes
Metasys:
Ethernet:
Termination Method
End-of-Line Resistor (50 ohm) at End of Each Bus Segment
(10Base2 and 10Base5 only)
Surge Protection
Varies by Vendor
Media Types
Coaxial Cable RG58A/U (Belden B89907, B9907)
Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP), Shielded Twisted Pair (STP)
(CMP-00424 SAS-3 and CMP-00424 FAS-5 Belden)
CAT 3, 4, or 5 with 2- or 4-pair Recommended
Optical Fiber (370-948-FDDI-02)
Note:
Other cables will work. Call your cable supplier for
information on the correct cable for your application.
Configuration
Choices
Star
Bus
Mixed (Star + Bus)
Standard
Components for the
NCM and the OWS
Ethernet Adapter Card (NCM must use.)
OWS can use any Ethernet Adapter Card supported by
Microsoft Windows software. Ethernet Adapter Cards that
support plug and play installation are recommended.
Fiber optic transceivers are required for fiber optic
connections.
Up to 100
Up to 1024 per network segment (includes
Metasys nodes)
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
29
30
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Planning and Estimating an
Installation
This section describes briefly what you need to know when planning to
install the N1 LAN. Specifically it includes information about:
•
protocol standards compatibility
•
environment and power
•
cabling guidelines
Protocol
Standards and
Compatibility
10 Mbps N1 Ethernet LAN protocol standards and compatibility include:
Environment
and Power
Refer to the Network Control Module 300 Series Technical Bulletin
(LIT-6360251) located in the Control Modules section of this manual for
details about installing the NCM including space, environment, and power
information.
System
Expansion
Over time, the control needs of a building may require additional nodes.
You will need a hub or repeater to expand the network if the maximum
number of nodes per segment or the maximum length of a bus segment has
been reached.
•
IEEE 802.3 CSMA/CD
•
IEEE 802.3 10Base2, 10Base5, 10BaseT, 10BaseFL (FL/FOIRL)
Adding nodes to the N1 LAN is not complicated. Refer to the Setting Up
the Metasys Network on Ethernet section of this document for details on
adding nodes to the N1 LAN. The star network affords the easiest
expandability if one of its hubs has an unused port. However, the bus
network is less costly to expand than the star network if the former
requires an additional hub. Nodes can be added to either configuration
until up to 100 Metasys devices are connected.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
31
Cabling
Guidelines
The acceptable cable layout for the N1 LAN depends on whether you have
chosen a star, bus, or mixed network. Figure 5, Figure 6, and Figure 7
show examples of such network designs. However, there are many other
layout design options.
Star Network
Follow the maximum cable lengths as shown in Figure 4 for a star
network. Use hubs or repeaters to extend the N1 LAN.
Coax Cable
Hub, 185 m (607 ft)
Node,
or
Link
Twisted Pair
Hub,
Node,
or
Link
Hub
100 m (330 ft)
Optical Fiber
Hub,
Node,
or
Link
Hub
1931.1 m (6336 ft)
for Multimode*
Hub,
Node,
or
Link
*Distances for optical fiber
vary by manufacturer.
STARCABL
Figure 4: Maximum Distances for Star Network
32
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Figure 5 shows an example of a layout for a star network.
NCM
NCM
10BaseT=100 m (330 ft)
10Base2=185 m (607 ft)
Operator
Workstation
10Base2=185 m (607 ft)
10BaseT=100 m (330 ft)
Hub
Hub
100 m
(330 ft)
185 m
(607 ft)
10BaseT=100 m (330 ft)
10Base2=185 m (607 ft)
NCM
10BaseT=185 m (330 ft)
10Base2=185 m (607 ft)
BLDG_1
Fiber
1931 m (6336 ft) to Another Building*
*Fiber optic distances vary by manufacturer.
Figure 5: Cable Layout for a Star Network
Note: Terminators are required only for 10Base2.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
33
Bus Network
Figure 6 shows an example of a coax (10Base2) layout for a bus network.
NCM
T
A
NCM
6.1 m (20 ft)
Operator
Workstation
Repeater
TT
B
T
ThirdParty
PC
C
Hub
NCM
D
Coax
Fiber
BLDG_2
1931 m (6336 ft) to Another Building*
Notes: A-B and C-D must not exceed 185 m (607 ft).
*Fiber optic distances vary by manufacturer.
T
= 50 ohm Terminator Cap
Figure 6: Cable Layout for a Shared Bus Network
34
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Mixed Network
Figure 7 shows an example of a cable layout for a mixed network, which
uses coax cable.
T
NCM
NCM
185 m (607 ft)
T
T
Operator
Workstation
185 m (607 ft)
Hub
185 m (607 ft)
A
NCM
NCM
Hub
Coax
B
BLDG_3
Fiber
1931 m (6336 ft) to Another Building*
Note: A-B bus segment must not exceed 185 m (607 ft).
*Fiber optic distances vary by manufacturer.
T
= 50 ohm Terminator Cap
Figure 7: Cable Layout for a Mixed Network
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
35
10BaseT Private
Metasys
Configuration
For private Metasys Networks, use 10BaseT hubs. If the local network
should expand, 10BaseT hubs can be connected to accommodate
additional users. They can be connected using straight-through UTP patch
cables or linked over a variety of media using the AUI port and
appropriate transceiver. Figure 8 shows an example of a private Metasys
Network configuration. This is not the only way to configure a private
Metasys Network. When selecting a hub for this type of configuration,
ensure compatibility with the IEEE 802.3 10BaseT specification for
supporting 10 Mbps Ethernet UTP wire. See the Installing Hubs and
Repeaters section in this document for more information on hubs.
10BaseT
8 Port Hub With SNMP
NCM
NCM
100 m (330 ft) maximum
10BaseT Cascade
Input Port
NCM
NCM
NCM
100 m (330 ft) maximum
Operator
Workstation
NCM
10BaseT
NCM
NCM
UTP
10BaseT
NCM
Fiber Optic
Transceiver
Fiber Optic Connection
to Next Building
NCM
UTP
10BaseT
Figure 8: 10BaseT Private Metasys Configuration
36
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Setting Up the
N1 Ethernet/IP Network
General
Before You
Start
The following section describes the guidelines to follow when installing
the N1 LAN. When routing the N1 LAN wiring, please be aware of the
following rules:
•
Do not allow loose T-connectors or adapters to touch the metal surface
of the NCM base frame. To ensure that this does not happen, wrap
electrical tape or install a plastic shroud around metal components.
•
Follow vendor recommendations for connectors, accessories, and
methods of termination.
Before installing the equipment on the network, it is important that the
following information and components are available:
•
A unique IP address must be defined for each node. To obtain these
addresses, contact the network administrator or whomever provides
network support. Duplicate IP addresses within a network can cause
subtle errors that are difficult to correct.
•
For a private Metasys Network, IP addresses can be assigned as
desired. The network administrator must define a subnet mask for each
NCM and OWS.
•
If the network is more than one routed segment, each NCM and OWS
node requires a defined router address. The router address is used with
the destination IP address and the subnet mask to properly route and
deliver packets to other subnets.
•
When using the M5 Workstation Multinetwork feature to configure
multiple N1 networks, you must assign a UDP port address to each N1.
See the Configuring Multiple N1 Networks section of this document.
•
When using an existing Ethernet LAN as the Metasys N1 Network, it
is very important that the customer understands the potential impact of
the traffic from non-Metasys equipment on the LAN. It is equally
important that the customer understands how to remedy unreliable
communication problems, such as frequent Metasys online/offline
occurrences. Segmentation or a separate network may be required.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
37
•
There are many different methods of segmenting, routing, and filtering
traffic on a given LAN. You may want to seek the advice of a network
consultant if the customer does not have this expertise. Keep in mind
the preferred order of configurations (private, segmented, shared)
respectively.
•
The media must support both the hub connection and the Metasys
nodes. Port availability is also required. If no port is available, you
must add a second hub, upgrade the existing hub, or replace the hub to
make more ports available.
•
Use NCM300-1 or NCM350-1 NCMs or later for Ethernet networks.
If you are upgrading existing NCM300-1s to an Ethernet network,
replace the existing NU-ROM101 Memory Module with an
NU-ROM150 Module. (An NCM300-0 cannot be upgraded to an
NCM350-1 in the field.)
•
Use an Ethernet Adapter Card and NU-ROM150 Memory Module.
•
Use ST, SC, or SMA transceivers for fiber connections. If connecting
fiber to an NCM, be sure that the NCM enclosure can house the
transceiver connected to the Ethernet Adapter Card. If not, short
transceiver cables are required to connect the Ethernet Adapter Card to
the transceiver.
•
Obtain valid copies of Microsoft Windows software for all OWSs.
•
Understand the characteristics of network utilization and identify areas
of potential concern and problems. Most network administrators
should have access to a network utilization profile. During peak
activity, capacity may be exhausted. Extended peak times may cause
Metasys performance problems such as online/offline occurrences.
•
Reserve 2% of the 10 Mbps total bandwidth for the Metasys system.
Additional customer or branch application traffic must be accounted
for separately.
•
Confer with the network administrator regarding the segmenting of
Metasys system traffic from other LAN traffic. Installation of a
third-party manufacturer’s bridge is one of the easiest methods
available for providing Metasys segmentation.
When configuring your NCMs and commencing initial setup in a
temporary location (before installation at a permanent location), you must
make an Ethernet connection between the NCMs and OWS.
38
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Connecting the
OWS and NCM
Using Crossover
Patch Cable
If you do not have a hub available, connect the OWS to one NCM at a
time. If the OWS Ethernet adapter is configured for an RJ45 (twisted pair)
connection, use a crossover patch cable to directly connect the OWS and
NCM. This cable enables two Ethernet adapters to be connected without
going through a hub. Crossover patch cable may be available at a local
electronics store, or you can make one.
Making Crossover Patch Cable
When looking at the end of an RJ45 connector, with the cable running
away from you and the plastic tab toward the bottom, Pin 1 is on the right.
Figure 9 shows how to connect the wires on the crossover patch panel.
RJ45
Plug
+
Tx + 1
3
Tx -
2
6
Rx -
Tx + 3
1
Tx
Tx -
2
Tx -
6
RJ45
Plug
Pinout
Figure 9: Crossover Patch Cable Pinout
Connecting Crossover Patch Cable
After the cable is made, connect it directly between the Ethernet adapter in
the OWS and the adapter in the NCM. Mark the cable, so you are able to
identify it later.
Note: You must not use this cable when connecting to a hub. Hub
connections require straight-through patch cables.
Connecting the
OWS and NCM
Using Coax
Cable
If the OWS Ethernet adapter is configured for a BNC (coax) connection,
use coax cable to directly connect the OWS and NCM adapters. Be sure to
use a T-connector and a 50 ohm terminator at each end.
As long as the Ethernet Adapter Card in the NCM is configured for Auto
mode, the adapter switches automatically between twisted pair and coax,
whichever is connected. Auto is the card’s default mode.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
39
Connecting the
OWS and NCM
Using AUI Cable
If you are using the AT-2000U Plus adapter card and want to configure it
for AUI mode (instead of Auto), before you configure the NCM, you can
connect to the adapter as follows:
1.
Connect an AUI cable to the AT-2000U Plus.
2.
At the other end of the AUI cable, connect a transceiver to convert
from AUI to either twisted pair or coax (based on whether you are
using the crossover patch cable or coax).
Refer to the Setting Up the Metasys Network on Ethernet section of this
document for directions on configuring Ethernet Adapter Cards for the
NCM and OWS and connecting Metasys NCMs and OWSs to Ethernet.
For information about solutions to problems that may occur on the N1
LAN, see the Troubleshooting Procedures section of this document.
Installing the
Ethernet
Adapter Card
The Ethernet Adapter Card is a required component for the NCM350. It
fits into one of the available expansion board slots. Refer to the Installing
the Hardware at the NCM heading under the Setting Up the Metasys
Network on Ethernet section located in this document for detailed
instructions on installing the Ethernet Adapter Card.
For the NCM350, set the Ethernet Adapter Card according to Table 8:
Table 8: Settings for NCM350 Ethernet Adapter Card
Parameter
Required Setting
Operation Mode
I/O Mode (NE2000)
I/O Base Address
320H
Interrupt Level (IRQ)
10
Boot ROM
Disable
Connector Type
Auto for Coax or Twisted Pair
AUI Cable for Connection to a Transceiver
AT Bus Compatible
Compatible
The OWS Ethernet Adapter Card is installed with and controlled by
Microsoft Windows software. Follow the instructions for loading
Microsoft Windows software on the OWS as described in the Microsoft
literature.
40
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Installing Hubs
and Repeaters
Hubs, repeaters, and bridges may be installed in any convenient place
where power is available. This may be inside or near an NCM or between
NCMs.
Note: In the case of a shared or segmented network, the location of hubs
and repeaters is best determined by whomever provides general
network support at a location. It is important to identify and work
with this group.
The layout of the network determines the exact location of the hubs and
repeaters. They do not need to be installed in separate enclosures, since
their enclosures provide adequate protection. Refer to the vendor’s
literature for installation instructions.
Testing Cable
Volt Ohmmeter
(VOM)
Testing the cable in the box or on the spool prior to installation identifies
faulty cable. The two methods of testing cable are:
•
Volt Ohmmeter (VOM)
•
Handheld cable scanner or LAN cable meter
The VOM is not as thorough as other equipment but is useful for testing
the basic functionality of wire media. To test for shorts, follow these steps
as shown in Figure 10:
1.
Check to make sure the braid and connector are not touching at any
place along the cable. The presence of a short may be an indication
that the braid and connector are touching.
2.
Check for infinity at one end of the cable to confirm that it registers
on the meter’s lowest ohm scale. An infinity reading indicates that
there are no shorts.
Note: The infinity reading varies by VOM; however, on many VOMs,
infinity is displayed as an overload (OL).
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
41
Center
Conductor
Dielectric
Material
Braid
Cable
Jacket
OL
ohm
Insulation
Conductors
VOM
Cable
Jacket
Probe 1
1
OL
2
Probe 2
3
4
ohm
testcabl
Figure 10: Testing Cable with a VOM
Perform a second VOM procedure to test for an open by following these
steps:
1.
Terminate one end of the coaxial cable with a connector.
2.
Attach a 50 ohm terminator and check for an approximate 50 ohm
reading.
Note: Ohm readings vary according to value, terminator tolerance, and
cable length.
To test for continuity using twisted pair cable:
42
1.
Short the individual wires of the twisted pair cable together at
one end and check for continuity at the other end.
2.
Check the ohm reading between Conductors 1 and 2, 1 and 3,
and 1 and 4 to make sure all readings are 0 ohm or slightly higher,
allowing for the resistance of the cable.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Handheld Cable
Scanner
The handheld cable tester tool is easy to use. It provides information about
cable length, shorts, noise, termination, impedance, and resistance. The
more sophisticated meters also measure Ethernet traffic activity, collisions,
and jabber. Most units are both menu- and dial-based. You can use most
handheld testers to verify that your cable meets the applicable standards.
Use the following steps to test cable with the handheld tester:
1.
Terminate both ends of the cable with the appropriate connectors.
2.
Attach one end of the cable to the tester.
Note: Most units have an autotest for shorts, opens, lengths of cable, and
abnormalities.
3.
Laying Cable
For twisted pair cabling, use a loopback module to check for noise
and to provide a cable pinout.
Installing all the cable support hardware, including conduits and cable
troughs, is the first step of the installation process. To simplify this
process, follow these rules:
1. Use the distributor’s kit or develop a system for numbering the cable
ends as well as the box or roll from which you are pulling the cable.
2. Avoid pulling cable bundles over a stationary cable.
3. Pull cable without using excessive force and investigate heavy
resistance to a pull.
4. Properly trim or secure excess cable.
5. Leave an extra foot or two at both ends of a run in case you need to
replace cable ends.
Installing the
Connectors
This is a critical step, which can cause installation and troubleshooting
problems if not properly executed. Each connector on the network impacts
the entire network, so it is worthwhile to practice installing the connectors
before attempting to do so.
Wiring Details
The wiring instructions depend on whether the N1 LAN is a star, bus, or
mixed network.
!
WARNING:
To avoid damage to equipment or possible
electrical shock, be sure that the power supply to
each node has been disconnected before wiring
commences.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
43
Wiring for a Star
Network
Figure 11 shows an example of how the components of a star network are
wired. Follow these steps:
1.
At the hub, install the modules that are needed, referring to the
manufacturer’s literature. Insert a cable into an open port on the hub.
2.
Route the cable from the hub to the NCM.
For more details, refer to the Network Control Module 300 Series
Technical Bulletin (LIT-6360251) located in the Control Modules section
of the Metasys Network Technical Manual (FAN 636).
10Base2 System
For a 10Base2 system, install a T-connector on the NCM’s coax port
(located on the NCM’s Ethernet Adapter Card). Wire the N1 cable from
the hub to one side of the T-connector. If the NCM is at the end of the line,
install a 50 ohm terminator cap on the other side.
10BaseT System
For a 10BaseT system, install a RJ45 plug on the cable and plug it into the
Ethernet Adapter Card.
10BaseFL System
For 10BaseFL, attach the fiber cable to a transceiver, which is connected
to an AUI extension cable. Attach the cable to the AUI port on the adapter
card.
44
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Hub
Hub
Hub
(Coax to Fiber)
Fiber
Operator Workstation w/Ethernet Board
12345678
O1N
- AT T E N T IO N P LE A SE DIS CONNEDT BA TT E RY
B E F O R E I N S T A L L I N G ME M O R Y
D-R
A
M
N2 N2
+ -
REF
50 ohm
Terminator Cap*
NE X T S E RV I C E D A T E :
B
AT
T ER
Y
IS
A
SLO
TS
T-connector
CO
234
N567F
IG
C
O
M
PM
O-R
D IS CO N N EC T
PO W E R B EF O R E
SE R VIC I NG
PO
W
ER
SU
PP
LY
I
50 ohm
Terminator Cap*
.
II
Coax
Connector
TS
I II
IV
D AN G E R
L I NE V O LT A G E
IN S ID E
NCM350
12345678
O1
N
AM
REF
D-R
50 ohm
Terminator Cap*
N2 N2
+ -
Note: Do not use RG-62A/U cable
with Ethernet.
- AT T E N T IO N P LE A SE DIS CONNEDT BA TT E RY
B E F O R E I N S T A L L I N G ME M O R Y
NE X T S E RV I C E D A T E :
BA
TT
E RY
IS
A
SL
O
TS
CO
4567
23N
FI
G
D IS CO N N EC T
PO W E R B EF O R E
SE R VIC I NG
P OW
ER
SU
PP
LY
I
*T-connectors and terminators are required
for coax cable only.
.
II
C
OM
M
PO
-
R
TS
III
Note: Refer to Table 6 for distance limitations.
IV
D AN G E R
L I NE V O LT A G E
IN S ID E
NCM350
Starw1
Figure 11: Wiring Star Network Components
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
45
Wiring for a Bus
Network
Figure 12 shows an example of how the components of a bus network are
wired.
If the NCM350/OWS is not at the end-of-line:
1.
Install a T-connector into the coax port on the Ethernet card.
2.
Wire the N1 cable from the previous node to one side of the
T-connector.
3.
Wire another length of N1 cable to the other side of the T-connector,
which you wire to the next node.
If the NCM350/OWS is at the end-of-line:
46
1.
Install a T-connector into the coax port on the Ethernet Adapter Card.
2.
Wire the N1 cable from the previous node to one side of the
T-connector.
3.
Install a 50 ohm terminator into the other side.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
To Next
Hub
Hub
(Coax to Fiber)
Fiber
A
T-connector
12345678
1
- AT T E N T IO N P LE A SE DIS CONNEDT BA TT E RY
D-R
AM
N2 N2
+ -
REF
B E F O R E I N S T A L L I N G ME M O R Y
NE X T S E RV I C E D A T E :
TS
SAO
SI L
CO
4567
23N
F
CP IG
OO .
MR
MT
S-
B AT
TE
RY
T-connector
D IS CO N N EC T
PO W E R B EF O R E
SE R VIC I NG
PO
W
ER
SU
PP
LY
I
II
III
Coax
Connector
Operator Workstation
w/Ethernet Board
D AN G E R
IV
L I NE V O LT A G E
IN S ID E
NCM350
Note: Do not use RG-62A/U cable with Ethernet.
B
12345678
1
- AT T E N T IO N P LE A SE DIS CONNEDT BA TT E RY
D-
RAM
50 ohm
Terminator Cap
N2 N2
+ -
REF
B E F O R E I N S T A L L I N G ME M O R Y
NE X T S E RV I C E D A T E :
BA
TT
E RY
D IS CO N N EC T
PO W E R B EF O R E
SE R VIC I NG
P OW
ER
SU
P PLY
I
.
II
CO
4567
23N
FI
G
III
IV
D AN G E R
L I NE V O LT A G E
IN S ID E
NCM350
Note: Total cable length between Points A and B must not exceed distance limitations given in Table 6.
buswa
Figure 12: Wiring Bus Network Components
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
47
Hybrid Networks
A major advantage of Ethernet-based systems is the ability to use hybrid
networks to meet special configuration requirements. Different types of
media may be used in conjunction with hubs to connect readily accessible
nodes, such as those located in a common office area, with inaccessible
nodes located in a basement, equipment room, or plant.
10BaseT connectors can be used in areas with ready access to the network,
less than or equal to 330 feet (100 meters). In remote areas, a fiber
transceiver is used to increase distances. Maximum distances vary by
manufacturer. The hub converts the fiber to whatever common backbone
is deployed throughout the building. See Figure 13.
48
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
10BaseT
Hub
NCM
100 m (330 ft) Maximum
10 BaseT
Building
Backbone
10 Base2
Hub
10 Base2
185 m (607 ft) Maximum
T
NCM
10Base2
T
Hub
10 Base2
185 m (607 ft) Maximum
NCM
10B.T
Hub
NCM
10 BaseT
100 m (330 ft) Maximum
10BaseFL
Fiber Optic Ethernet Transceiver
SMA Connector
Hub
NCM
1931 m (6336 ft) Maximum*
or
Fiber Optic Ethernet Transceiver
ST Connector
1931 m (6336 ft) Maximum*
*Fiber optic distances vary by manufacturer.
NCM
n1bldg
T = 50 ohm Terminator Cap
Figure 13: Method of Wiring to an Isolated NCM
Note: In this application, the existing hub must support or be augmented
to support fiber connections.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
49
Verifying the
N1 LAN
Installation
To verify that the N1 LAN is installed properly, make sure that:
•
the installation follows the recommended maximum and minimum
cable lengths.
•
only those nodes that are located at the ends of N1 LAN bus segments
have 50 ohm terminators. The nodes between the two end nodes must
not have 50 ohm terminators installed.
•
the proper cables are being used. The recommendations are:
-
RG58A/U for coax (Belden B89907, B9907)
-
MCP-00424 SAS-3 and CMP-00424 FAS-5 Belden for twisted
pair
-
370-948-FDDI-02 for optical fiber
Other cable will work. Call your cable supplier for information on the
correct cable for your application.
•
50
the network is communicating properly. Ensure Metasys nodes come
alive.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Setting Up the
Metasys Network on Ethernet
Once your N1 LAN is connected and you have verified proper network
communication, you are ready to connect the Metasys NCMs and OWSs.
The process involves both hardware and software installation and
configuration of both the NCMs and the OWS. Table 9 shows the
sequence of steps.
Table 9: Sequence of Steps
Step
Hardware
Installation
Software
Installation
Configuration
1
Obtain IP addresses,
subnet mask address,
and UDP port
addresses.
2
Configure Ethernet
Adapter Card for the
NCMs.
Load Windows
software.
3
4
Install the Ethernet
Adapter Card in the
OWS.
5
Verify the protocol in
Windows software.
6
Load Metasys.
7
Modify the
METASYS.INI file.
8
Compile .DDL files.
9
Perform a global
download.
10
Install the Ethernet
Adapter Cards in the
NCMs.
11
Install the transmission
medium to the Ethernet
network.
12
Install the Memory
Modules in the NCMs.
13
Configure all NCMs to
proper configuration.
Once you have completed the configuration, you are able to communicate
between the NCMs and the OWS over the N1 LAN.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
51
Obtaining the
IP, Subnet
Mask, and UDP
Port Addresses
In cases where registered IP addresses are not available, the addresses and
subnet mask can be defined. Figure 14 is an example of how the address
might be selected for a private Metasys Network, without hubs or routers.
IP addresses are of the form 10.X.X.X, 172.16.X.X, and 192.168.X.X
where the last byte is the same as the Metasys node address.
10Base2 Coax
T
NCM
Subnet/Gate 1
Metasys
Node 1
Addressing IP 10.1.1.1
IP Addressing
NCM
Subnet/Gate 2
Node 2
IP 10.1.1.2
NCM
Subnet/Gate 3
Node 3
IP 10.1.1.3
Operator
Workstation
Subnet/Gate 100
Node 100
IP 10.1.1.100
T
NCM
Subnet/Gate X
Node X
IP 10.1.1.X
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
private
Figure 14: Wiring a Private Metasys Network
Choosing IP
Addresses
IP addresses may be chosen arbitrarily only for a private network
(one which contains only Metasys devices).
If the network is ever connected to another Ethernet network, the
IP addresses must be made compatible with the new network.
Note: If two nodes anywhere on the extended network have duplicate
IP addresses, serious communication problems result.
Choosing the
Subnet Mask
The subnet mask is a value, which is used to determine whether IP nodes
are on the same Ethernet segment (or subnet).
Note: The subnet/node terminology used for addressing Metasys devices
is not the same as the subnet referred to here.
Each of the four parts of the IP address is represented in the computer as a
byte and therefore has a maximum value of 255. A value of 255 in the
subnet mask means that that byte of the IP address is the same for all
nodes on a particular Ethernet segment. In Figure 14, a subnet mask of
255.255.255.0 means that the first three bytes of each address on the
segment are the same, and only the fourth byte is variable.
52
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Suppose the segment in this example were connected (through a router) to
another Ethernet segment whose addresses were 10.1.2.x, rather than
10.1.1.x. In order for a node on the example segment to communicate with
another node, it would have to know whether the receiving node is on the
same segment or on the other segment. The subnet mask allows the node
to make this determination based on whether the first three bytes of the
IP address are the same.
Note: When connecting Metasys nodes to an existing Ethernet network,
consult the network administrator. For a simple private Metasys
Network (no network routers), use a subnet mask of
255.255.255.0.
For more information on IP addresses and subnet mask addresses, refer to
Before You Start in the Setting Up the N1 Ethernet/IP Network section.
Choosing UDP
Port Addresses
UDP port addresses must be chosen if you are configuring multiple
N1 networks with the M5 Workstation Multinetwork feature. See the
section titled Configuring Multiple N1 Networks in this technical bulletin.
Hardware
Requirements
For the OWS, select an Ethernet Adapter Card that is compatible with
Microsoft Windows software. For the NCM, the only card that is qualified
for use is the NU-NET301-0. The current manufacturer of this card is
Kingston Technology.
Note: A small number of NU-NET301-0 Ethernet adapter assemblies
supplied by Kingston Technologies do not fit into the
NU-NCM350. The cause is two reinforcement ribs on the
mounting bracket that are too long. Only a limited number of the
incorrectly bracketed adapters were produced. All new adapters are
produced with the correct bracket. Inspect the NU-NET301-0
before taking it to a job. For a replacement NU-NET301-0, contact:
Tyler Ernt or Mike Kuppinger
17600 Newhope St.
Fountain Valley, CA 92708
1-800-435-2620
Configuring
Ethernet
Adapter Cards
for the NCMs
Configure the Ethernet Adapter Cards for the NCM. Do this first since it
may require the use of the OWS hardware. By doing this first, you do not
disturb the OWS after it has been configured. The NCM network card
must be configured to use IRQ10 and IO Base Address 320.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
53
Configuring the
OWS
Installing the
Ethernet Adapter
Card
Before loading any software, install the Ethernet Adapter Card into your
OWS. Once the card is installed, verify that the OWS is physically
connected to the network cable.
During the configuration process, you need to set various addresses.
Before configuring the OWS, make sure to contact your network
administrator for the following:
•
IP address
•
subnet mask address
•
gateway address/network router (if applicable)
Note: For private Metasys Networks, see Figure 14 for an example of
how to assign the IP and subnet mask addresses.
The gateway/network router address applies only if the network consists
of multiple Ethernet segments separated by routers (excluding
Metasys Ethernet Router). Therefore, some applications may not require
a gateway address. The field appears be blank or have 0.0.0.0., depending
on the application.
If you need to move an N1 OWS frequently (as with an N1 laptop), you
may need more IP addresses. If the OWS has an IP address on an Ethernet
segment, it may be connected at any point on that segment. To connect it
on a different segment, however, requires a different IP address compatible
with the new segment. Thus, the OWS needs an IP address for each
segment to which it may be connected. Make an OWS entry in the
GLOBAL.DDL file for every desired connection point (as though an OWS
actually existed on each segment). When moving an OWS from segment
to segment, compile a NET.DDL file that configures the OWS to match
the appropriate OWS definition on the new segment.
If you are running Windows NT software with Metasys Release 9.01 or
later, refer to the Windows NT 4.0 Workstation Resource Kit and the
Windows NT Server Resource Kit or see your system/network
administrator for information about loading. Ethernet Adapter Cards
should be installed in a workstation only by a qualified person. Consult
your system/network administrator for assistance.
Loading
Windows
Software
54
If you already have Microsoft Windows software loaded, you can now
verify that the NIC card is in the system. Follow the instructions for
loading Windows software on the OWS as described in the
Microsoft literature. You must load this software before loading
Metasys Person-Machine Interface (PMI) software.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
IMPORTANT:
Upgrading from Windows 95 software to
Windows 98 software is not supported. You must
install Windows 98 software as a new install.
After the Windows software installation, you need to verify that your
network card is listed in the system and add the Microsoft Protocol
TCP/IP.
Verifying Card is in the System
With Microsoft Windows software running on the OWS, verify that your
card is listed on the system:
1.
Right click on the Network Neighborhood icon located on your
desktop. A floating drop-down menu appears.
2.
Select Properties. The Network dialog box appears (Figure 16).
3.
Under the Configuration tab, verify that your network card is listed.
If it is not listed, select the Add button and add it at this time.
Note: The current manufacturer of the NU-NET301-0 is Kingston
Technology.
Verifying Card is Programmed Properly
To verify that the Ethernet Adapter Card is programmed properly:
Note: Steps 1 and 2 apply to the NU-NET301-0 or other NE2000
Compatible Ethernet Adapter Cards only. Non-NE2000 cards may
not show the Resources tab.
1.
Under the Configuration tab, select the line for the network card
(NE2000 compatible).
2.
Select the Properties button.
3.
Under the Resources tab (Figure 15), verify that the Interrupt Request
Queue (IRQ) and I/O address match the Ethernet Adapter Card
configuration. You may need to run the software that comes with the
Ethernet Adapter Card to determine the settings for which it is
configured. To do this, select Start > shut down and restart the PC in
MS-DOS mode.
Note: It may be necessary to reconfigure windows and the Ethernet
Adapter Card to avoid conflicts with other devices in the OWS.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
55
?
NE 2000 Compatible Properties
Driver Type
Bindings
X
Resources
These hardware settings must be known in order for
this network adapter to start.
Configuration type: Basic Configuration 0
Interrupt (IRQ):
3
I/O address range: 200-21F
# - indicates value is set to current hardware setting
* - indicates a conflict with other hardware
OK
Cancel
Necard
Figure 15: Network Card Compatible Properties Dialog Box
with Windows Default Values
Adding the TCP/IP Protocol
To add the TCP/IP protocol:
56
1.
While still under the Configurations tab, look under the list of
installed network components to verify that you have the TCP/IP
protocol installed for your adapter card (Figure 16). Look for a line
that contains TCP/IP and name of your adapter card. For example, it
could say, TCP/IP and NE2000 Compatible. If it is not there,
you must add it.
2.
To add the TCP/IP protocol, click the Add... button. The Select
Network Component Type dialog box appears.
3.
Select Protocol and click the Add button. The Select Network
Protocol dialog box appears.
4.
Select Microsoft as the manufacturer and TCP/IP as the Network
Protocol type, then OK.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
?
Network
X
Configuration Identification Access Control
TCP/IP -> 3COm EtherLink III ISA (3C509/3C509b)
TCP/IP -> Ne2000 Compatible
TCP/IP Stack FTP Software, Inc.
ARCserve Agent
File and printer sharing for Microsoft Networks
Properties
Remove
Add...
Primary Network Logon:
Client for Microsoft Networks
File and Print Sharing...
Description
OK
Cancel
Network
Figure 16: Network Dialog Box
Modifying the TCP/IP Protocol
To modify the TCP/IP protocol:
1.
To configure the TCP/IP properties (establish the address of the
OWS), select the TCP/IP that is assigned to the Ethernet Adapter
Card.
2.
Click the Properties button. The TCP/IP Properties dialog box
appears.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
57
?
TCP/IP Properties
Bindings
Gateway
X
DNS Configuration
Advanced
WINS Configuration
IP Address
An IP address can be automatically assigned to this
computer. If your network does not automatically
assign IP addresses, ask your network administrator
for an address, and then type it in the space below.
Obtain an IP address automatically
Specify an IP address
.
.
.
IP Address:
.
.
.
Subnet Mask:
.
.
.
OK
Cancel
Tcp
Figure 17: TCP/IP Properties Dialog Box
Note: You must obtain the IP address, subnet mask address, and
gateway/network router address (if applicable) from the network
administrator.
3.
Under the IP address tab, select Specify an IP address, and enter the IP
address of the OWS. The IP address must be defined when the node is
added to the Ethernet network.
4.
Under the IP address tab, specify the subnet mask.
5.
If applicable, enter the gateway address (network router) under the
Gateway tab. The network administrator indicates whether the
gateway address is applicable.
6.
Click the OK button on the TCP/IP Properties dialog box. The
changes are automatically saved.
7.
Click the OK button on the Network Properties dialog box. The
changes are automatically saved.
Note: Windows software may prompt you to reload files. Follow the
prompts and load the necessary files. At the end of the installation,
your OWS should be configured properly.
58
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
8.
Reboot the OWS by clicking the Start button and selecting Shut
Down from the menu. Choose Restart the Computer? from the Shut
Down Windows dialog box and click the Yes button.
9.
If you have an existing IP network, use the PING.EXE command to
verify that Windows software is working properly. Packet Internet
Groper (PING) is a network utility used primarily in TCP/IP
networks. PING tests the accessibility of a remote network station by
sending it an echo request and waiting for a reply. For more
information on PING, see the Windows 98 Resource Kit manual, or
the Windows NT Resource Kit manual. Send the PING command
(PING xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx; fill in the IP address of the node to which
you want to PING) to an existing node on the network to verify the
network connection.
Loading Metasys
PMI Software
Skip this section if the Metasys software is already loaded. Install the
Metasys PMI (Release 8.0 or later) software following the instructions in
the Operator Workstation Technical Bulletin (LIT-636013). At the end of
the installation, exit the Metasys system.
Modify
METASYS.INI
File
You need to add two lines to the METASYS.INI file. For Windows 98
software, the file is located under the Windows directory C:\windows. For
Windows NT software, the file is located in the WINNT directory. Under
the Metasys bracket [Metasys], type the following:
Network_type=IP
subnet_mask=*
* equals subnet mask number defined by the network administrator
and follows the format of the following example:
Subnet_mask=255.255.255.0. For a simple private Metasys Network
(no network routers), set subnet_mask=255.255.255.0.
Note: The METASYS.INI entries ARCNETIO, ARCNETMODEL, and
ARCNETINT, if they exist, do not have to be deleted. They are
ignored.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
59
.DDL Files
Every connection to the Ethernet must have a unique subnet address
(also referred to as the gate address). To meet that criterion, changes need
to be made to the NET.DDL and GLOBAL.DDL files.
NET.DDL
Note: In this section on NET.DDL and the section on GLOBAL.DDL,
the requirement for uniqueness of subnet addresses and node
addresses applies only within an N1 network. If you are
configuring Multiple N1 networks using the M5 Workstation
Multinetwork feature, you may reuse subnet and node addresses as
long as they are not duplicated within the same network. However,
IP addresses of nodes directly connected to the Ethernet/IP network
may never be duplicated, even if the nodes are in different
networks.
You must assign a unique subnet address for every node that is directly
connected to the Ethernet/IP network. It is recommended that you use the
Metasys node address number as the subnet address. If the node is not
directly connected to the Ethernet/IP network but is connected via the
Ethernet Router, the node’s subnet address would be the same as that of
the Ethernet Router.
Subnet Address 100
Node 100
IP 192.9.205.40
OWS 1
Ethernet/IP N1
Direct Connection
78
OUT
ON
.
LINE
OF
END
-A
PLTTEN
E AS
ED
ISC T
I ON
R
O
N
O
N ED
EIN
ST
TB
D-RAM
b
B EF
P OW
a
LA
I
N
G
-
AT
T ER
Y
+
2 N2 N
F E R
Y
O R
E M
M
ER
Direct Connection
C ON
F IG
D
ELOA
R
1 2 34 5 67 8
IN
12 34 56 78
a
Y
TER
BAT
N XE
T S
E R
VI C
E D
AT E
:
IS
A SL
ARCNET N1
O TS
b
SUP
ER
POW
LY
P
CT N
ORE
IG
IC
ONNE BEF
ER
DI SC ERV
POWS
I
II
CO
- RT
MMPO
S
III
NCM 27
GER
DAN
LIN
AG E
LT
O
VE I DE
I NS
OUT
12 34 56 78
1 2 34 5 67 8
NFI
ON
G.
G.
AS E
C O ST A
ENTIO
EI N
D IS
L E
-ATT
P
FE R
-
2 N2 N
FE R
2 N
M
N
Y
R
ER Y
M O
T T
M E
A
B
G
IN
E D
T
N N L L
R
O
E F
B
D- RA
W ER
PO
b
a
N
M
RA
R Y
Y
R
T TE
M O
A
B
M E
E D
T
I
G
N
N N L L
D-
C O ST A
ENTIO
D IS
EI N
S E
R
O
L EA
E F
-ATT
P
B
W ER
PO
b
a
+
+
OUT
LINE
OF
END
CO
NFI
ON
LINE
OF
END
CO
E
N
a
E
N
a
XT
SER
SER
VIC
CIV
E
D
E :
TA
ERY
E :
AT
ERY
E
D
BATT
XT
BATT
I SA
I SA
TS
S LO
TS
S LO
b
b
SUP
ER
POW
Y
PL
Y
PL
RE
T
G
O
IN
NEC
N RVIC
RBEF
DISCO SE
POWE
SUP
ER
POW
RE
T
O
G
NEC I N
BEF
N RVIC
ER
ISCO SE
D POW
I
I
II
II
CO
CO
MMP
MMP
ORT
ORT
S
S
II
I
III
I N
E
L
G E
L TA
VO DE
INSI
IV
Subnet Address 28
Node 20
IP 192.9.205.42
G E
R
GE VOL TA IDE
I N
E
DAN L INS
R
E
DANG
IV
NCM 20
78
LOAD
RE
78
LOAD
RE
1 2 34 5 67 8
IN
12 34 56 78
IN
Ethernet Router
Subnet Address 28
IP 192.9.205.42
2 N
IV
Subnet Address 27
Node 27
IP 192.9.205.41
NCM 21
Subnet Address 28
Node 21
IP 192.9.205.42
OWS 2
Subnet Address 28
Node 22
IP 192.9.205.42
Ether
Figure 18: IP Network Connections Using an Ethernet Router
60
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
GLOBAL.DDL
All node numbers, regardless of the network type (Ethernet or ARCNET),
must be unique.
Each connection to the IP network must have a unique subnet address and
a unique IP address. The IP address is defined using the IP subkeyword for
Network Controllers (NCs) and PCs. Note that the IP addresses are
segmented by commas, not periods.
ARCNET nodes share the subnet address and IP address of their Ethernet
Router. This is because they are not directly connected to the Ethernet/IP
network.
The following Global DDL file would be used to describe the network
shown in Figure 18:
@GLOBAL "EXAMPLE1"
* The following Ethernet devices have unique subnet, node and IP addresses.
PC “OWS1”, “Ethernet Workstation”, 0 , 0
N1Direct 100 , 100
IP 192,9,205,40
NC “NCM27”, “Ethernet NCM-27”, 0 , 0 , 27 , 27 , “N2” , “ ” , “ENG” , 9600
IP 192,9,205,41
* The Ethernet Router has its own unique subnet and IP addresses.
* The following ARCNET devices all share the subnet and IP addresses of the
* Ethernet Router. But they all have unique node addresses.
PC “OWS2”, “Arcnet Workstation”, 0 , 0
N1Direct 28, 22
IP 192,9,205,42
NC “NCM20”, “Arcnet NCM-20”, 0 , 0 , 28 , 20 , “N2” , “ ” , “ENG” , 9600
IP 192,9,205,42
NC “NCM21”, “Arcnet NCM-21”, 0 , 0 , 28 , 21 , “N2” , “ ” , “ENG” , 9600
IP 192,9,205,42
. . . (etc.)
After checking over the .DDL files, follow the steps below:
1.
Compile the NET.DDL and GLOBAL.DDL files and fix any compile
errors.
2.
Start the Metasys software and verify that it is operating properly.
3.
Perform a global download.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
61
Moving
ARCNET Nodes
to an Ethernet
Connection or
Changing
Gate/Node
Addresses of
Existing
Metasys Nodes
Use this process to modify the Metasys gate or node address of any
defined Metasys node. This process defines the steps required to readdress
Metasys nodes.
IMPORTANT:
Do not skip steps or change the sequence of the steps
to correctly change Metasys addresses. Failure to
complete the steps in the correct order results in
intermittent/unreliable operation of the
Metasys Network.
This process does not apply if you are only changing the IP address of an
existing Metasys node.
This process assumes required Metasys Ethernet Routers have been
configured and connected to the network. A Metasys Ethernet Router is
required if the resultant Metasys Network has a mix of Ethernet and
ARCNET devices defined within the same Metasys Network. Please refer
to the Metasys Ethernet Router Technical Bulletin (LIT-6295035) for
information on installing and configuring these devices.
Modify all OWS nodes before any NCM nodes.
OWS
To change an OWS node address:
1.
Obtain the IP address for the node, the subnet mask, and network
router information.
2.
Upload the global data and UNDDL the global database.
3.
Rename the global.und file to global.ddl.
4.
Edit the global.ddl file to add a new OWS. Do not remove or change
the old OWS configuration at this time.
Note: All N1 nodes must have an assigned IP address. Any Metasys node
on an ARCNET segment connected to a Metasys Ethernet Router
needs to have the IP address of the Metasys Router assigned to it.
5.
Edit the global.ddl file to change the report destinations, remove the
old OWS device as the destination, and add the new OWS device as
the destination.
6.
Stop the Metasys software on the OWS. (Exit to the Program
Manager.)
7.
Compile the global.ddl file.
8.
Start the Metasys software on the OWS.
9.
Download the global.ddl file.
10. Stop the Metasys software on the OWS. (Exit to the Program
Manager.)
62
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
11. Remove the OWS from the old network connection and connect it to
the new network connection.
12. Edit the net.ddl file to change the Metasys gate and node to the new
parameters.
13. Compile the net.ddl file.
14. Start the Metasys software on the OWS.
15. Edit the global.ddl file to remove the old OWS definition.
16. Compile and download the global .ddl file.
NCM
To change NCM node address:
1.
Obtain the IP address for the node, the subnet mask, and network
router information.
2.
Upload all NCMs and verify you have the current Graphic
Programming Language (GPL) or JC-BASIC files available for all
NCMs on the archive OWS.
3.
Highlight the NCM and select Action > Archive Data to archive data
for each NC which stores all trend and totalization data in the PC
files.
4.
Upload the global data.
5.
Stop the Metasys software on the OWS. (Exit to the Program
Manager.)
6.
UNDDL the global database and all of the NCM databases.
(UNDDL GLOBAL net_name; UNDDL NC net_name nc_name)
7.
Rename all of the new .und files using the .ddl extension.
8.
Edit the global.ddl file with the correct information of the NCM being
changed.
Note: Any Metasys node on an ARCNET segment connected to a
Metasys Ethernet router needs to have the IP address of the
Metasys Router assigned to it. Do not download the global file at
this time.
9.
Start the Metasys software on the OWS.
10. Run WNCSETUP to configure the NOVRAM data of the NCM that
is being moved.
11. Select Command > IP address Configuration and add the correct
IP address information in the pop-up window.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
63
12. Define an IP address for the network router even if the device does
not exist. Use an unused IP address. (Define an IP address for the
network router by changing the value of the last octet to an unused
host address.)
13. Select Command > NOVRAM and modify the archive device
configuration data. If the archive device is an N1 device, remember to
set the IP address of the archive device.
14. Select Command > NOVRAM and modify the node’s address
configuration.
15. Disconnect the node from the ARCNET network and do not connect
it to the Ethernet at this time. This node must be offline to all other
NCMs until all of the other NCMs have had a new download.
16. Stop the Metasys software on the OWS. (Exit to the Program Manager.)
17. Compile the new global.ddl file.
18. Start the Metasys software on the OWS.
19. Download the new global.ddl file.
Note: It may take several minutes for global data to be sent to all of the
nodes on the network.
20. Stop the Metasys software on the OWS. (Exit to the Program
Manager.)
21. Compile the NCM .ddl files for all of the NCMs in the Metasys Network.
22. Start the Metasys software on the OWS.
23. Download all of the NCMs except the NCM being moved. (Data
download is OK.)
24. Disconnect the battery from the moved NCM and cycle power to clear
its memory.
25. Reconnect the NCM battery.
26. Connect the moved NCM to the Ethernet network. The NCM should
ask for and receive a download from the archive OWS.
Changing a
Single Metasys
Node IP
Address
Follow this process to change the IP address of a single Metasys node. If
the Metasys gate or node address is being changed, follow the process
described above.
OWS
To change an OWS IP address:
1.
64
On an OWS communicating with the rest of the Metasys Network
(not the OWS you want to re-address), select Setup > IP address
Configuration.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
2.
Modify the OWS’s IP address and save the changes. This
configuration is automatically distributed to all of the other nodes on
the network.
3.
Go to the OWS with the new address.
4.
Select Setup > IP address Configuration.
5.
Modify this OWS’s IP address and save the changes.
6.
Stop the Metasys software on the OWS. (Exit to the Program
Manager.)
7.
Change the IP address for the computer.
8.
Select Start > Settings > Control Panel.
9.
Double-click the Network icon.
10. Select TCP/IP.
11. Click the Properties button.
12. Change the IP address.
13. Verify the subnet mask definition in the METASYS.INI file matches
the subnet mask defined in the Windows software network
configuration settings.
14. Restart Windows software to implement the new IP address.
15. Start the Metasys software.
16. After normal communications has been restored between OWSs and
NCMs, use WNCSETUP to reconfigure the archive configuration of
any NCM that uses a re-addressed OWS as its archive.
NCM
To change an NCM IP address:
1.
Run WNCSETUP to configure the NOVRAM data of the NCM being
moved. (If you cannot communicate over the N1 network, connect
directly to the NCM.)
2.
Modify the IP address configuration to set the new values.
3.
Use WNCSETUP to force a reset to the NCM.
4.
Using an OWS communicating with the rest of the Metasys Network,
select Setup > IP address Configuration.
5.
Modify the IP address associated with the NCM being changed and
save the changes. This configuration is automatically distributed to all
of the other nodes on the network.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
65
Changing the
IP Address of
Multiple
Metasys Nodes
OWS
The following process applies when users are modifying their network and
the changes require re-addressing all of the IP nodes on the network. The
correct order of the devices to change depends on the communication
between the Metasys nodes. If the devices are still able to communicate,
re-address the NCMs before the OWSs. If the network structure has
changed and the Metasys nodes are no longer able to communicate, start
with the OWS devices. Re-addressed Metasys nodes may not be able to
communicate to other nodes until after the network changes have been
implemented.
To change the IP address of multiple OWS nodes:
1.
Using an OWS communicating with the rest of the Metasys Network
(not the OWS you want to re-address), select Setup > IP address
Configuration.
2.
Modify the OWS’s IP address and save the changes. This
configuration is automatically distributed to all of the other nodes on
the network.
3.
Go to the OWS with the new address.
4.
Select Setup > IP address Configuration.
5.
Modify this OWS’s IP address and save the changes.
6.
Stop the Metasys software on the OWS. (Exit to the Program
Manager.)
7.
Change the IP address for the computer.
8.
Select Start > Settings > Control Panel.
9.
Double-click the Network icon.
10. Select TCP/IP.
11. Click the Properties button.
12. Change the IP address.
13. Verify that the subnet mask definition in the METASYS.INI file
matches the subnet mask defined in the Windows network
configuration settings.
14. Restart Windows software to implement the new IP address.
15. Start the Metasys software.
16. Repeat Steps 4 through 10 for each OWS being re-addressed.
17. After normal communications has been restored between OWSs and
NCMs, use WNCSETUP to reconfigure the archive configuration of
any NCM that uses a re-addressed OWS as its archive.
66
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
NCM without
Communication
to the OWS
NCM with
Communication
to the OWS
Note: This process requires a laptop computer configured as a direct
connect OWS to the NCMs on the network.
To change the IP address of multiple NCM nodes without communication
to the OWS:
1.
Using an OWS communicating with the rest of the Metasys Network,
select Setup > IP address configuration.
2.
Modify the OWS’s IP address and save the changes. This
configuration is automatically distributed to all of the other nodes on
the network.
3.
Connect a laptop computer configured as a direct connect OWS to the
NCM.
4.
Run WNCSETUP to configure the NOVRAM data of the NCM that
is being moved.
5.
Modify the IP address configuration to set the new values.
6.
Use WNCSETUP to force a reset to the NCM.
To change the IP address of multiple NCM nodes with communication to
the OWS:
1.
Run WNCSETUP to configure the NOVRAM data of the NCM being
moved.
2.
Modify the IP address configuration to set the new values.
3.
Use WNCSETUP to force a reset to the NCM.
4.
Select Setup > IP address Configuration.
5.
Modify the IP address associated with this NCM and save the
changes. This configuration is automatically distributed to all of the
other nodes on the network.
Installing the
Hardware at
the NCM
Installing the
Ethernet Adapter
Card
Before installing the Ethernet Adapter Card, make sure the NCM is
powered down.
1.
Install the Ethernet Adapter Card in the NCM.
2.
Attach the transmission media to the Ethernet Adapter Card.
IMPORTANT:
Be sure to use an Ethernet Adapter Card instead of an
ARCNET card with the Ethernet coax connector. This
mistake can go unnoticed at first because both Ethernet
and ARCNET use the same type of connector.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
67
Installing the
ROM150
If you are upgrading an NU-NCM300-1 (Version B or later) to an
NCM350, you need to replace the existing NU-ROM101 Memory Module
with an NU-ROM150 Module. Remove the old module and install the new
module into the slot parallel to the ISA connector on the NCM. The
module only fits with the socket/chip component facing away from the
ISA slot. Seat the module carefully before pressing it into position.
Detailed installation instructions are included with the NU-NCM300-1 to
NU-NCM350-1 Upgrade Kit Installation Sheet (Part No. 24-8617-4).
If you have an NCM350, the NU-ROM150 is already installed.
Configuring the
NCMs
The last two stages of setting up the NCMs on the Ethernet network
involve configuring and powering up the NCMs. Complete both
procedures on one NCM at a time.
If the NCM is already mounted in its permanent location and if the battery
is not already connected, connect the battery at this time. If the NCM is
being configured at a temporary location, either fully charge the battery
(12 hour minimum charging time) or disconnect it.
Note: A partial charge may cause the NCM to malfunction after being
downloaded and transported to its permanent location. If you
experience this problem, disconnect the battery and cycle power on
the NCM. The NCM requests a download. Reconnect the battery
after the download has completed.
Use the NCSETUP for Windows program to configure the NCM. To do
so, make a direct connection between the NCM and the OWS, and follow
the instructions in the NCSETUP for Windows Technical Bulletin
(LIT-6360251d). A laptop can also be used, if it is directly connected to
the NCM and is loaded with Metasys software.
Directly
Connecting the
NCM and PC
To make a direct connection between the NCM and the PC, you need to
define the PC as an unconfigured OWS. To do so, compile an appropriate
@NET DDL file on the PC. If the NC NOVRAM contains a null (empty)
network name (as should be the case with an NCM directly from the
factory), then you may define any network name in the @NET file and still
be able to connect using WNCSETUP. However, if the NCM contains a
non-empty network name (e.g., XYZNET), then you must specify
XYZNET as the network name in the @NET DDL file.
Note: Failure to specify XYZNET causes a Network Name Invalid
message to be displayed in the NC Direct window. If you see this
message, shut the Metasys system down and change the network
name in the @NET file to match the name displayed in the NC
Direct window.
68
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
If you are unable to communicate between WNCSETUP and the NC,
check to make sure that the network name, Port 3 baud rate, gate address,
and node address in the NCMs NOVRAM are set properly. Use the
Windows HyperTerminal program to find the NCMs NOVRAM settings.
To view the NCM350 start up information that is generated on Port 4,
follow these steps:
1.
Shut down the Metasys software to avoid any possible conflict
between the Metasys program and HyperTerminal.
2.
Connect a null modem serial cable (the same cable used for OWS and
NCM direct connection) from COM1 or COM2 (whichever is
available) on the PC to Port 4 of the NCM (next to the NT RJ45 Port).
3.
Run HYPERTRM.EXE from Windows Start-Run or from
Start-Program-Accessories-HyperTerminal.
4.
Enter a name for the HyperTerminal file you are creating
(e.g., NC9600.HT).
5.
Select OK.
6.
From the drop-down menu in the Connect Using field, select either
Direct to COM1 or Direct to COM2, depending on which PC port is
being used. Select OK.
7.
From the drop-down menu in the Port Settings field, select 9600 bps.
Select OK.
8.
Power up the NCM or press the NCMs Reset button if it’s already
powered up. If the battery is connected and the NCM is in a
downloaded (operational) state, you must press the Reset button.
9.
Watch the HyperTerminal screen for information about the Network
name, Port 3 baud rate, gate, and node address of the NCM. The IP
address of the NC is displayed. A display of network = , indicates
an empty (null) network name.
10. Other information displayed may include the Interrupt Number
(or IRQ), I/O Port (or I/O Address), and Ethernet Address
(or MAC Address).
11. Restart the Metasys system and try connecting with WNCSETUP.
Configuring an
NCM That Has
Never Been
Configured
To configure an NCM that has never been configured, select Gate 1,
Node 99, and network name WNCSETUP in the NCM Address Entry
dialog box. Click OK. The NCM Setup dialog box appears (Figure 19).
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
69
NCM Setup
X
WNCSETUP has detected that this NCM is using the NOVRAM
factory defaults. You have the option to setup the NCM for
either Arcnet or IP (NCM350 only).
Setup Type
Arcnet
IP
Ncmset
Figure 19: NCM Setup Dialog Box
1.
Select IP. Click OK.
2.
When the IP address Settings dialog box appears (Figure 20), enter the
IP address, subnet mask and network router (Gateway) numbers.
Notes: If there is no network router (because all Metasys nodes are on the
same Ethernet segment), a network router address must still be
defined. Use the same first three octets as the Metasys IP addresses
and use a non-existent IP address for the fourth octet (but do not
use 0 or 255 for the fourth octet).
An IP NCM cannot be used as a direct connect NCM if the
network card is removed and an IP address is defined. An
ARCNET NCM can be used as a direct connect (standalone) NCM
if the network card is removed. The IP NCM can be used
standalone only if the IP address is left at the 000 defaults and the
network card is removed. If an IP address is defined, the NCM fails
on startup.
IP Address Settings
IP Address 192
Subnet mask 255
Network router 192
X
9
205
51
255
255
0
9
205
2
Broadcast Type
UDP Port Address:
[2050-65535]
11001
All Ones
Network Directed
None
ipaddr
Figure 20: IP Address Settings Dialog Box
3.
If you are configuring multiple N1 networks and need to change the
UDP port address, enter the address in the UDP port address field.
Click OK.
Note: Obtain these numbers from the network administrator.
70
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
X
Novram View and Modify
NCM Address
Gate
1
OK
Node
142
Cancel
Code Download Type
Advanced...
Network
JCHDQTRS
Network Port
Archive Device Address
Port
Arcnet
Gate
1
IP
Archive IP Address
Port 2
Port Baud Rate
Port 3
Node
209
0
0
0
0
Phone Type
Check if Dial
Port 5
Pulse
Tone
Port 3 Baud Rate:
19200
Port 6
Phone Number
Reboot on DownLoad Error
Acquired Memory Size 300000
Bytes
Frequency
60 HZ
Alarm/Warning Delay Mode for AD/AI Objects
Warning Delay (time in minutes - default setting)
General Alarm Delay (time in seconds)
NOVRAM View
Figure 21: NOVRAM View and Modify Dialog Box
IMPORTANT:
4.
Be sure to fill in all of the values in the NOVRAM
dialog box (as well as the applicable fields in the
Archive Device Address section) before clicking OK to
exit. When you change the gate and node addresses, the
NCM reboots. If you have not filled out all of the
information, the NCM may not communicate.
When the NOVRAM View and Modify dialog box appears
(Figure 21).
a.
Set the NCM gate (subnet) and node addresses, the Network
name and the Code Download Type.
b.
Select IP or the correct port number and fill in the gate, node, and
IP address of the archive device.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
71
IMPORTANT:
c.
5.
If the archive gate address or IP address is not entered
correctly, the NCM may be able to start a download, but
it cannot finish one.
Click OK.
The NCSETUP Windows Application dialog box (Figure 22) appears.
X
Ncsetup Windows Application
!
If the NCM node address has been changed the NCM should now be rebooting.
OK
ncwinset
Figure 22: NCSETUP Windows Application Dialog Box
If you modified the node address, the NCM reboots. Now go to Step 7 in
the next section.
Configuring a
Previously
Configured NCM
If the NCM has already been configured in the field, follow the steps
below:
1.
Start the NCSETUP for Windows program (WNCSETUP).
2.
Select the NCMs Gate and Node address in the NCM Address Entry
dialog box and the network name from the NET.DDL file. Click OK.
If you do not know the Gate and Node address, refer to the Directly
Connecting the NCM and PC heading earlier in this section.
3.
From the Command menu, select IP address Configuration. The
IP Address Settings dialog box appears (Figure 20).
4.
Enter the IP address, subnet mask, and network router (Gateway)
numbers that you received from the network administrator. Click OK
to save the settings and close the dialog box.
5.
From the Command menu, select NOVRAM. The NOVRAM View
and Modify dialog box (Figure 21) appears.
IMPORTANT:
a.
72
Make sure to fill in all of the values in the NOVRAM
dialog box (as well as the applicable fields in the
Archive Device Address section) before clicking OK
to exit. When you change the gate and node addresses,
the NCM reboots. If you have not filled out all of the
information, the NCM may not communicate.
Set the NCM gate (subnet) and node addresses, the Network
name and Code Download Type.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
b.
Select IP or the correct port number and fill in the gate, node, and
IP address of the archive device.
IMPORTANT:
c.
If the archive gate address or IP address is not entered
correctly, the NCM may be able to start a download, but
it cannot finish one.
Fill in any remaining information.
6.
Click OK to save. The NCM reboots if the node address was changed.
7.
Repeat the procedure on the remaining NCMs.
After performing the configuration on all the NCMs, your NCMs and
OWS are now ready to communicate on the IP network.
Note: If you defined your OWS as an unconfigured direct connected
OWS during the NCM configuration process, reconfigure it now as
an N1 Direct Ethernet OWS.
Powering Up
the NCMs
Before you power up the NCMs, make sure you are running the Metasys
software on your OWS. When the NCM is powered up, it should ask for a
download at the OWS. As long as all of the files have been compiled for
the NCM, the download is completed.
Configuring
Multiple N1
Networks
The M5 Workstation Multinetwork feature can be used to monitor and
control more than one Metasys N1 Ethernet Network simultaneously.
See the Using the Network Map chapter in the M5 Workstation User’s
Guide (FAN 1153.2) for a description of the Multinetwork feature. The
configuration of multiple N1 networks is similar to the configuration of
single Ethernet networks, but there are some special considerations. This
section describes the additional steps required to configure a multiple N1
Metasys Ethernet network.
Upgrading
Before
Reconfiguring
Your Network
If you are reconfiguring a Metasys Release 9.01 (or earlier) network from a
single network configuration to multiple N1s, or if you are combining
individual Release 9.01 (or earlier) networks into a multiple N1
configuration, you must upgrade all of the nodes in the existing
configurations to Release 10.0 before reconfiguring for multiple N1s. This
is because the Enhanced Report/Access Groups feature introduced at
Release 10.0 does not allow global data to be modified during the upgrade
from Release 9.01 to Release 10.0. Since the Multinetwork system
reconfiguration process requires changing globals, it cannot be started
until the upgrade to Release 10.0 is done.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
73
Addressing
IP Addresses
As with a single Ethernet N1 network, IP addresses must never be
duplicated. All Metasys nodes must have a unique IP address whether they
are on the same N1 or different N1s.
UDP Port Addresses
Single Metasys Ethernet networks use a default value of 11001 for their
UDP port address (UDPPA) The UDPPA is an element of the IP
addressing scheme. Therefore, for single networks, the UDPPA does not
have to be considered when configuring the network. With the
M5 Workstation Multinetwork feature, the UDPPA is used as an
additional addressing element to distinguish between the multiple N1
networks. Each N1 network must have a unique UDPPA. Refer to the
IP Address Settings dialog box (Figure 20).
For multiple N1s, it is recommended that the network with the most NCs
use a UDPPA value of 11001. NCMs automatically configure themselves
to use this value, so configuration time is minimized by using other values
on N1s with fewer NCMs.
Start numbering other networks in the Multinetwork configuration with
11003 and continue sequentially. Do not use a UDPPA of 11002. The
value 11002 is used by the Metasys Ethernet Router, and should be
avoided even if there are no Metasys Ethernet Routers in the system. The
recommended addressing for five N1s would be 11001, 11003, 11004,
11005, 11006.
Check with the Network Administrator or the customer’s Ethernet network
support provider. Determine if they know of any reason why any of the
UDDPAs you’ve chosen should not be used on their network. It is very
unlikely that there will be any objection to using these UDPPAs, but if
necessary, you can use any UDPPA from 2050 to 65535 (but not 11002).
Subnet and Node Addresses
The rules for assigning subnet addresses (also known as Gate Addresses)
and node addresses to Metasys NCMs and Workstations apply on a per
network basis. As long as the rules for Subnet/Node addresses are
followed on each N1, you need not be concerned about duplication of
Subnet/Node addresses between N1s. For example, it is OK for two NCs
on different N1s to each have a Subnet/Node Address of 15/15. The fact
that they have different network names and use different UDPPAs
prevents them from interfering with each other, but they are both able to
communicate with the M5 Workstation with the Multinetwork feature.
74
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Configuring the
M5 Workstation
with
Multinetwork
Feature
Configuring an M5 Workstation to communicate with multiple N1s is
similar, for example, to configuring a Metasys OWS to communicate with
an N1 and a second network directly connected through an NCM. The
Workstation must have a database for each network and a separate entry in
the Net DDL file for each network.
The M5 Workstation must have the usual set of Global, NC, and Model
DDL files for each network. The M5 Workstation must be included in
each Global file, since it is a part of each network. There is no change in
the format of Global, NC, or Model DDL files.
The Net DDL file must have a NET entry and an N1DIRECT entry for
each N1 network. The N1DIRECT keyword now has an optional
third parameter, which is used only if multiple N1s are being defined.
The third parameter is the UDP port address.
Example: @NET
NET
NET
NET
"NETWORK1",
N1DIRECT
"NETWORK2",
N1DIRECT
"NETWORK3",
N1DIRECT
"First N1 Network", "PC-240"
240, 240, 11001
"Second N1 Network", "PC-240"
240, 240, 11003
"Third N1 Network", "PC-240"
240, 240, 11004
An M5 Workstation named PC-240 using subnet/node Address 240/240
would use the example Net DDL file to define three N1 networks using
UDPPA 11001, 11003 and 11004.
Configuring an
OWS on One of
the N1 Networks
For an OWS that functions as a node on only one of the N1s (i.e., is not an
M5 Workstation with Multinetwork feature talking to other N1s), you
must define the UDPPA being used by the network of that OWS. To do
this, add the UDPPA parameter to the N1DIRECT keyword line in the
OWS Net DDL file.
Example: @NET
NET
"NETWORK2", "Second N1 Network", "PC-150"
N1DIRECT
150, 150, 11003
An OWS named PC-150 using subnet/node Address 150/150 on
NETWORK2 would use the above Net DDL file.
As mentioned above, single Metasys Ethernet networks that are not part of
a Multinetwork system use a default UDPPA of 11001. When configuring
such a network, it is not necessary to put the third parameter on the
N1DIRECT line of an OWS. The OWS uses 11001 by default. Remember
that this is only true for N1s that are not part of a Multinetwork system.
For Multinetwork system configurations, any OWS on one of the
component networks must have a UDPPA specified on the N1DIRECT
keyword line.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
75
Configuring an
NCM350
An NCM350 cannot belong to more than one Metasys N1 network. The
network to which it belongs is defined in the NCM via the Network Name
and the UDPPA. Both of these values are defined using WNCSETUP. The
Network Name is defined as usual via the NOVRAM View and Modify
dialog box (Figure 21). The UDPPA is defined in the IP Address Settings
dialog box (Figure 20).
If the NCM is on a network that uses UDPPA 11001, you do not need to
configure the UDPPA. The NCM uses 11001 by default.
If the NCM is on a network using a UDPPA other than 11001, you must
configure the UDPPA. This requires that the flash memory code in the
NCM be at Revision 8.02 or higher. You can see the Revision number by
selecting the Information command in WNCSETUP. If the EPROM
Release is reported as anything earlier than Release 8.02, you need to
download the Release 8.02 flash code to the NCM. See the NCSETUP for
Windows Technical Bulletin (LIT-6360251d) for instructions on how to
download the flash code. Select filename FLASH802.FLH.
After upgrading the flash to Revision 8.02, use the IP address Settings
dialog box to set the UDPPA to the desired value. When the NCM is
restarted, it communicates on the network that uses the new UDPPA.
Configuring a
Metasys
Ethernet Router
In a multi-network system configuration, one of the N1s may contain a
segment of ARCNET nodes communicating with Metasys Ethernet nodes
via a Metasys Ethernet Router or a Contemporary Control Systems, Inc.
(CCSI) Metasys gateway.
If you are using the Metasys Ethernet Router, the Metasys Ethernet
software must be at Version 2.0 or above. The ROUTER.CFG file must
contain the “/U nnnnn” switch, which specifies the UDPPA of the network
to which the Ethernet Router (and the ARCNET nodes) belong. Replace
the nnnnn with the desired UDP port address.
If you are using CCSI embedded Metasys Ethernet Router, all versions of
the CCSI device support multiple N1 Network features. The Switches,
Subnets, Addresses text window must contain the “/U nnnnn” switch,
which specifies the UDPPA of the network to which the Ethernet Router
(and the ARCNET nodes) belong. Replace the nnnnn with the desired
UDP port address.
If the router’s network is to be accessible from an M5 Workstation with
Multinetwork feature, add the subnet (gate) number and IP address of the
M5 Workstation to the router configuration file. When the router is
restarted, the ARCNET nodes communicates on the network that uses the
UDPPA specified in the router configuration file.
76
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Example 1:
Reconfiguring a
Single Ethernet
N1 as Two or
More Individual
Networks
This example assumes:
•
There is an existing Ethernet N1 with network name NET1.
•
The network has ten NCMs with node numbers from 1 to 10, and
three PCs with node numbers from 101 to 103.
•
All NCMs are archived at PC103.
•
You want to split the network into two N1s called NET1 and NET2.
(This example can be extrapolated to more than two networks - the
procedure is similar).
•
NET1 contains NCMs 1-7 and PC101.
•
NET2 contains NCMs 8-10 and PC102.
•
PC103 is an M5 Workstation with the Multinetwork feature and
remains the archive for all NCMs.
•
Even though Subnet and Node addresses may be duplicated between N1
networks, all Subnet/Node addresses remain unchanged to minimize
disruption to the system and the time required to complete the job.
•
NET1 (the original network name) remains the name of the larger of
the two resultant networks to minimize disruption to the system and
the time required to complete the job. The reconfiguration process
goes more smoothly if you minimize the renaming of system
components. If necessary, rename components as a separate project
after the network has been successfully split up.
•
NET1 continues to use UDP port address 11001 (the default address used
by all single Ethernet N1s). UDP port address 11003 is used for NET2.
To reconfigure a single Ethernet N1 as two or more individual networks,
so each network is accessible from an M5 Workstation with the
Multinetwork feature.
1.
Upgrade to Release 10.01 or later.
2.
Upgrade the NCM350s on NET2 to EPROM Release 8.02.
3.
Update the DDL files offline. The Net files look like this:
PC101 Net file: NET "NET1", "Network 1", "PC101"
N1DIRECT
101, 101, 11001
PC102 Net file: NET "NET2", "Network 2", "PC102"
N1DIRECT
102, 102, 11003
PC103 Net file: NET "NET1", "Network 1", "PC103"
N1DIRECT
103, 103, 11001
NET "NET2", "Network 2", "PC103"
N1DIRECT
103, 103, 11003
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
77
4.
Create separate NET1 and NET2 global files. You can do this by
starting with two copies of the NET1 global file and removing the
NCMs and OWSs that are not part of the network, or by cutting NET2
devices from the NET1 global file and pasting them to a NET2 global
file. All global data items must be split into their associated global
data file; for example, System Names, PC Groups, Report Access
Groups. The Multinet Workstation (PC103) must appear in both
global files. Be sure that the @GLOBAL line contains the appropriate
network name.
PC101 appears within the global file for NET1 only.
PC102 appears within the global file for NET2 only.
PC103 appears within both global files, since it is part of both
networks.
5.
Shut down the Metasys software on PC103.
6.
On PC103, compile the new Net file with both networks defined.
7.
On PC103, compile the NET2 global file. Do not compile the new
NET1 global yet. We want the NET2 devices to remain in the NET1
database for now.
8.
Start the Metasys software on PC103.
9.
Log onto NET2 using the Metasys password. Add a Level 1 password
that also exists on the NET1 network. This allows switching between
network maps without logging off and on. At this point, PC103 is
talking to the NET1 network (including NET2 devices) on
UDPPA 11001 and is trying to talk to the NET2 network using
UDPPA 11003.
10. Bring up WNCSETUP on PC103. Verify the network name box
contains NET1.
11. Connect to NC8.
12. Using WNCSETUP, change NC8’s Network Name to NET2 and its
UDP port address to 11003.
13. From WNCSETUP, do a RESET (not a Reload) of NC8. If you do a
Reload, an empty database is downloaded to the NCM, because it has
not yet been uploaded to the NET2 network directory.
14. After a minute or two (when NC8 has completed resetting), select
NC8 under the DEVICES system of the NET2 network map and
select Action > Diagnostic > OK. The NC8 error log appears.
15. View the DEVICES system summary. Refresh the Devices summary
until you see that NC8 is online.
78
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
16. Upload NC8 to PC103. This stores all the NC data (including Trend,
Totalization, GPL, etc.) under the NET2 directory where it must be.
17. Do a Data Only download to NC8. This is necessary to make the new
network name take effect in the NCM. Wait for the download to
complete and the NCM to come online.
18. Repeat Steps 10 through 17 for NC9 and NC10.
19. Load the new Net and Global files PC102.
20. Compile the Net, then the Global and start up the workstation.
21. Do a global download.
22. Repeat Steps 19 through 21 for PC101.
23. At PC103, shut down the Metasys system and compile the new NET1
global file. Do not restart the Metasys software.
24. If you want to copy all of the passwords from NET1 to NET2, copy
the files PASSWD10.DOB, PASSWD10.NOB, and PASOID10.NOB
from the %FMSDATA%\NET1.DOB directory to the
%FMSDATA%\NET2.DOB directory.
25. At PC103, restart the Metasys system, log on to NET2, and do a
global download.
26. Switch to the NET1 network map. (Use the M5 Change Network
toolbar button to switch between network maps. Alternative methods
for switching maps are the View-Change Network menu item on the
network map or the Action-Activate Network menu item on the
Network Summary.)
27. Do a global download on NET1.
28. Test PC103 to verify that both networks are accessible, and everything
is working correctly.
This completes the example reconfiguration. There are some follow-up
activities that may be necessary, depending upon your network
configuration:
•
If there are any other PCs that need to be configured as
M5 Multinetwork workstations, upgrade them by creating a Net file
similar to the one for PC103, but with appropriate PC Name, Gate, and
Node addresses. Copy the Net file and both global files to the
workstation. Compile the Net and global files, start Metasys software,
and do a global download on both networks.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
79
Example 2:
Configuring
Separate
Networks as
Multinetworks
•
PC Groups—If there are non-Multinetwork workstations on the
original network that have not been reconfigured, they may now
display obsolete PC groups on their network map because their global
data contains PC groups for objects that have been moved to another
network. Copy the global DDL file for the appropriate network from
the M5 Multinet workstation to the non-Multinet workstation, compile
it, and do a global download.
•
To effectively organize your GPL strategy (source) files, you may wish
to move the NET2 GPL strategy files from their location under NET1
to their new location under NET2.
This example assumes:
•
There are two existing (separate) Ethernet N1s with network name
NET1 and NET2. Assume NET1 is the larger of the two. NET1
continues to use the default UDP port address 11001. NET2
(also presently using 11001) switches to 11003.
•
The NCMs on each network continue to be archived at their present
archive OWS assignments.
•
An M5 Workstation on NET1 becomes a Multinetwork workstation
capable of monitoring and controlling both networks.
If you have separate Ethernet N1 networks (electrically isolated from each
other) and want to have the ability to monitor and control both networks
from a single workstation, follow this procedure:
1.
From any workstation on NET2, connect to an NCM on NET2.
2.
Using WNCSETUP, change the NCM’s UDP port address to 11003.
3.
From WNCSETUP, do a reset (not a Reload) of the NCM.
4.
Repeat Steps 1 through 3 for the remaining NCMs on NET2. At this
point, all of the NCMs are offline to NET2 workstations, but they are
running standalone and controlling their trunks.
5.
At any OWS on NET2, shut down the Metasys software and add the
UDP port address 11003 as the third parameter on the Net file
N1DIRECT line. For example:
PC102 Net file: NET "NET2", "Network 2", "PC102"
N1DIRECT
80
102, 102, 11003
6.
Compile the Net file and restart the OWS.
7.
View a summary of the DEVICES system of the NET2 network map.
All NCMs should be online (provided they've had a few minutes to
come back online after having been Reset).
8.
Repeat Steps 5 through 7 for any other OWSs on NET2.
9.
Physically connect the Ethernet media of the two networks.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
10. At the M5 Workstation on NET1, shut down the Metasys software.
Change the Net file to define both networks. For example:
M5 Net file:
NET "NET1", "Network 1", "M5OWS"
N1DIRECT
105, 105, 11001
NET "NET2", "Network 2", "M5OWS"
N1DIRECT
105, 105, 11003
11. Compile the NET file and restart the M5 Workstation. You should be
able to monitor and control both networks.
12. Test the M5 Workstation to verify that both networks are accessible,
and everything is working correctly.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
81
82
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Troubleshooting Procedures
This section highlights troubleshooting tools that you can use to solve
communication problems across the N1 LAN. If you are not receiving any
communication from a particular node, Windows software provides a
number of programs that can help you isolate either a node or network fault.
If nodes are going offline frequently, the Windows tools does not help.
In this situation, a network sniffer can be used to isolate the problem. You
may also use a network analyzer, such as LANAlyzer by Novell. It may
help locate and correct problems faster than traditional methods. Contact
your network administrator for help.
If ARCNET and Ethernet coexist on the same network, troubleshoot by
dividing the network into sections. Figure 18 shows a mixed ARCNET
and Ethernet network.
Using Windows
Tools
The following tools can be used with the Microsoft Windows software
operating system when:
•
a node goes offline
•
you added a new node to the IP network and it does not communicate
These programs help you determine how much of the network is
functioning or not functioning. The programs are loaded onto your PC
when you add the Microsoft protocol TCP/IP. More information is
available in the Windows help files. Below are brief descriptions.
WINIPCFG.EXE
This command displays the IP configuration of the Operator Workstation.
Note: This command is called IPCONFIG.EXE in Windows NT and
Windows 2000 software.
PING.EXE
The PING command verifies that messages can be sent and received over
the IP network. The command format is:
PING xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
where “xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx” is the Internet address of a computer on the
IP network. Other OWSs and TCP/IP compatible computer systems send
back a response. Failures are caused by cable problems, device driver
configuration problems, or computers being offline. The display indicates
if the PING was successful along with some Ethernet statistics. If there
appears to be intermittent IP network failures, put PING into a continuous
test mode using the following command:
PING -t xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
83
In this mode, the PING program continually asks for a response from the
remote computer system. If there are any IP network communications
errors, they are noted. If the IP network is running properly, no errors are
recorded. After testing the IP network in this mode for several minutes,
type Ctrl C.
TRACERT.EXE
This command allows you to view the route a packet takes across the
network, as well as displaying all the IP addresses. See the Help files for
information on using this command.
ARP.EXE
This command views the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) table,
which is used to direct messages between IP network nodes. See the help
files for information on using this command.
Debugging
OWS and NCM
Failures
OWS Error Log
The error log contains the following message:
Source node = local node
File: c:\fms\bin\n1ethern.exe
Module: n1ethern
Line 606
Cause:
METASYS.INI contains the line AcceptAllIP=Yes.
Solution: This line is reserved for Metasys Application Enabler (MAE)
workstations only. Remove from all PMI workstations.
Single IP
Address Does
Not Respond
84
At a workstation that is communicating with other nodes, use the PING
command to communicate to a known address on the IP network in the
same network segment. Follow the paths of either two outcomes:
•
Ιf your communication worked, there is a problem with the node.
To troubleshoot, check the problem node’s configuration. For an
NCM, direct connect an OWS and view the NC Error Logs. If you
need to extract the NCM configuration, use HyperTerminal to connect
to Port 4. As it initializes, the NCM downloads some of its
configuration information into the terminal program. For an OWS,
look at OWS Error Logs and PING other nodes. If you are unable to
find the problem, contact Field Support Services in Milwaukee.
•
Ιf your communication did not work, there is a problem with the
segment. You need to isolate the exact point of breakage and find out
how much of the network is functioning. To do so, PING other nodes
on the same segment. PING the Ethernet Router if one exists between
the node you’re on and the failed node. Finally, use TRACERT.EXE.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Metasys
ARCNET
Connected
Devices Do Not
Respond
All the Devices
on One ARCNET
Segment Do Not
Respond
Troubleshooting
a Single NCM
Failure
Note: These next two sections cover situations where you have ARCNET
devices being accessed through a Metasys Ethernet Router from an
Ethernet OWS or Ethernet NCM.
If any other node on the same ARCNET segment responds normally, the
Metasys Ethernet Router is not at fault. The problem could be caused by a
Metasys device failure or an ARCNET cable problem. Check the device
for any malfunctions, and use troubleshooting information from the
N1 ARCNET Local Area Network Technical Bulletin (LIT-636017) to
isolate the problem. To determine whether it is a network or node
problem, use the Metasys diagnostic screen to verify. Try to read the N1
status of the failing nodes:
•
From an ARCNET node: If you are able to communicate with other
ARCNET nodes except for the failing node, then network
communication is OK. Problem is isolated to that node.
•
If you are able to communicate with other ARCNET nodes except for
the failing node, then the Ethernet Router, IP network, and ARCNET
network are OK. The problem is isolated to that node.
If you are having a communication problem between the IP network and
the ARCNET network, try the steps below.
1.
If other ARCNET segments are working, the problem is isolated to
the failing segment. Use PING to find out if the suspect router
responds to Ethernet messages.
2.
If the router responds, look at the ARCNET cable and Metasys
equipment.
3.
If the router does not respond, look at the router and the Ethernet
network.
When a single NCM (or a few sporadic NCMs) fail to communicate on the
N1, it is most likely a commissioning problem with the NCMs, rather than
a network problem. If all the NCMs on a given segment fail to
communicate or have sporadic communication failures, the problem is
more likely a network problem, and the routers should be investigated.
Refer to the Troubleshooting section of the Metasys Ethernet Router
Technical Bulletin (LIT-6295035) located in the Metasys Connectivity
Technical Manual (FAN 629.5).
If the N2 communication on the suspected NCM and the rest of the
network are operating properly, network problems may be a result of the
hardware configuration or incompatible hardware and driver.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
85
A single NCM failure may be caused by the following:
Troubleshooting
an NCM
•
incompatible NCM and/or ROM
•
improperly seated ROM150
•
incompatible Ethernet Adapter Card and ROM150 Packet Driver
•
use of ARCNET board and/or coax rather than Ethernet Adapter
Card/coax
•
insufficient Ethernet stub length
•
replication of or incorrect IP address
If you have configured a new NCM on the IP network and it is not
communicating, troubleshoot using the steps below.
1.
Verify there are no errors in the NC Error Log. (Use a direct connect
OWS to read the log.)
2.
Verify that the IP configuration is correct, including the IP address,
subnet mask, and router address.
3.
Verify that the NCM’s archive device is properly configured in the
NCM’s NOVRAM.
4.
Verify that the Metasys GLOBAL.DDL is configured properly and
downloaded.
5.
Check the METASYS.INI file and make sure the changes for the
IP network type and subnet address have been made.
6.
Verify the NCM configuration is correct by the following:
7.
86
a.
Connect a VT100 terminal or PC running HyperTerminal to
Port 4 of the NCM through a null modem serial cable (i.e., same
cable used to connect to Port 3) and cycle power. A DOS startup
screen appears.
b.
Verify the network name, subnet address, IP address, and the
output from the packet driver (program that drives the Ethernet
card). The output from the packet driver indicates that it is talking
to the network card. For an example of the packet driver startup
information, see Checking for Proper Ethernet Adapter Card
Setup later in this section.
c.
Verify that the packet driver loads and that there are no error
messages.
Determine if the NCM responds to PING commands. If not, that could
mean there is an IP stack problem or a NCM NOVRAM configuration
problem.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
8.
Install the NCM’s Ethernet Adapter Card in a PC, and run the
manufacturer’s diagnostic software that came with the card. This
establishes whether the adapter card is working properly.
If you are unable to bring the NCM online after verifying the above
information, contact Field Support Services in Milwaukee.
Troubleshooting
a Multiple NCM
Failure
When many nodes fail, the problems tend to be systemic rather than
related to a particular node. Call the network administrator to help resolve
these problems. Typically, the network administrator has special network
hardware, such as a LAN sniffer, that can quickly isolate the problem.
If Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is also employed on
the network, use it to isolate problems.
Troubleshooting
an OWS
The troubleshooting tips below are only general guidelines, since there is
such a variety of IP network cards available. If the OWS is having
problems communicating:
1.
Verify that the IP stack is loaded and configured.
2.
Use the Network Properties dialog box in Windows software to verify
that the driver for your network card is bound to the IP stack.
3.
Ensure the IP stack runs, or if not, troubleshoot accordingly.
a.
4.
Verify that Windows software is talking to the Ethernet Adapter
Card. To do so:
-
Click the right mouse button once on the My Computer icon.
-
Select Properties. Under the Device Manager tab, make sure
the network card icon does not have a ! or X over it. Those
symbols indicate a configuration problem between Windows
software and the Ethernet Adapter Card.
-
If there is an ! or X over the icon, contact the Ethernet
Adapter Card manufacturer to correct the configuration
problem.
b.
Run the diagnostics program that comes with the network card to
verify that the card is functioning properly.
c.
Use the PING.EXE command to try to communicate with other
nodes on the network.
Verify that the METASYS.INI file contains the following lines:
Network_Type=IP
Subnet_Mask= (correct address)
5.
Check the Metasys OWS error log.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
87
Troubleshooting
General
Metasys
Network
Failures
Troubleshooting
Other Network
Problems
88
The following is a list of other situations that may occur and what to do
about them:
•
If a particular NCM is not communicating over the N1 LAN, try
bypassing the N1 by connecting to it directly. If the NCM can
communicate, you know that the N1 cables or connections are faulty.
•
If you are experiencing download problems over the N1, recompile the
DDL software to see if that resolves the problems.
•
If database definitions have changed, inspect the changes to ensure that
referenced points haven’t been erased.
•
If you are running the Slide Show (from Micrografx Designer) on
your workstation, too short of an interval between slides causes the
workstation to go offline. To eliminate this problem, temporarily
extend the interval time to 200 seconds.
The network problems that may occur are most likely caused by the
following:
•
improper Ethernet Adapter Card setup
•
improper network termination
•
incorrect address assignments of the NCM, IP address, and/or subnet
mask on the NCM NOVRAM.
•
loose coax cable connectors
•
malfunctioning hubs and repeaters
•
not enough hard disk space on the Operator Workstation
•
improper Ethernet Adapter Card for installed packet driver
•
improper OWS setup of Windows Ethernet driver
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Checking for
Proper Ethernet
Adapter Card
Setup
The Ethernet Adapter Card must be configured for IRQ 10 and I/O address
space of hexadecimal 320. Connect a VT100 Terminal (or equivalent) to
Port 4 on the NCM. Cycle power to the NCM (force a reload). The packet
driver start up information, which is outlined below, is displayed on the
terminal:
DOS Initialization
Datalight miniBIOS (R) v6 (Revision 2.0)
Copyright (c) 1989-1994 Datalight, Inc.
Tested RAM 128K
Driver List
A: miniCMD>rem Allied Telesyn AT2000U+ Ethernet card
A: miniCMD>rem Allied Telesyn packet driver
A: miniCMD>rem AT2000UP.FLH May 31, 1996
A: miniCMD>rem Card is automatically configured as IRQ 10,
I/O port 320h
Adapter Card Configuration Tool
A: miniCMD>diag /I10 /P320
Ethernet Adapter Diagnostics Program V2.22a
Flash Disk Files
A: miniCMD>dir
OUTADR.EXE
COMMAND.COM
AUTOEXEC.BAT
ETHPK.COM
DIAG.EXE
NCM Configuration Information
A: miniCMD>outadr
network name = jchdqtrs, port 3 baud rate = 19200
gate = 92, node = 92
IP address = 159.222.20.99
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
89
Packet Driver Output
A: miniCMD>ethpk 0x60 10 0x320
E2k/E1k/PCMCIA Ethernet Packet Driver (940921) Ver 1.07
R.P.T. Intergroups International Ltd. Copyright 1994
Packet interrupt number 0x60 (96)
Interrupt number 0xA (10)
I/O port 0x320 (800)
Using 80[123]86 I/O instructions
Using 16 bits slot
My Ethernet address is 00:40:95:9A:34:AC
A: miniCMD>
A: miniCMD>
Checking for
Proper
Termination
(Thin Coax Only)
To verify proper cable termination, complete the following steps:
1.
Check all N1 LAN wiring, the placement of 50 ohm terminators, and
the value of the terminators. All N1 LAN wiring must be electrically
continuous (unbroken) from end to end. This requires that each N1
connection has a T-connector installed with two N1 cables connected,
or one cable and one 50 ohm terminator cap connected.
2.
Check to make sure only one 50 ohm terminator cap is installed at the
ends of each bus segment. The components that can accept
terminators include the N1 LAN coax connector on the NCM, the
Operator Workstation N1 LAN board, and the active links.
3.
You must have a 50 ohm terminator installed on the hubs. However,
do not place terminators on nodes that are in the middle of the N1.
4.
Place the 50 ohm terminators on end-of-line devices at all times. If the
cable is disconnected from an end-of-line device, a 50 ohm terminator
must be placed on the end of the cable.
Note: If this is not done, reflections from the unconnected end of the
cable may disrupt communications.
Be sure to use only 50 ohm terminators on the N1 LAN. You can measure
the resistance of a terminator with an ohmmeter. Place one lead on the
male pin and the other lead to the body of the terminator. The reading
should be 50 ohm.
90
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Note: A properly connected N1 LAN has a resistance between 23 and
27 ohm as measured at any point on the LAN when all coax
connectors to ISA Ethernet Adapter Cards, hubs, and
repeaters are disconnected and both terminators are attached.
To measure resistance:
1. Disconnect all coax connectors from ISA Ethernet Adapter
Cards, hubs, and repeaters.
2. Insert a T-connector anywhere on the N1 LAN.
3. Connect it to an ohmmeter.
4. Measure between the center conductor and the metal housing.
Checking for
Incorrect
Address
Assignments
Incorrect address assignments can cause communication problems. An
incorrect address is either not properly defined or defined twice for
two different nodes (i.e., duplicate address).
Inspecting Coax
Cable
Connectors
A coax connector that is not properly crimped and installed can cause
communication problems. An ohmmeter is required to check for bad
connectors. To check for a short:
Ensure that each NCM is correctly addressed on the OWS by checking the
NCM focus window. The NCM address must match the NCM address
listed in the workstation and the NCM archive address must point to the
appropriate archive PC.
1.
Measure the resistance across the cable at the connector.
2.
Check for an open by shorting one end of the cable and measuring the
resistance again.
3.
Bend the cable back and forth at the connector when making these
measurements, because sometimes the connection is marginal and
gives proper readings in some positions.
4.
If defective, cut off the old coax connector and install a new one.
Make sure you are using an Ethernet Adapter Card instead of an ARCNET
card with the Ethernet coax connector. This mistake can go unnoticed at
first, because both Ethernet and ARCNET may use the same type of
connector.
Checking Hubs
and Repeaters
The hubs and repeaters feature LEDs that indicate their status. When these
devices are working properly, the LEDs are on. For detailed
troubleshooting information, refer to the manufacturer’s literature.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
91
Checking
Operator
Workstation’s
Hard Disk
When available space on the hard disk of the OWS is reduced to a
few megabytes (2-3 MB), the workstation goes offline and is no longer
able to communicate with other nodes. It is good practice to leave at least
10 MB of hard disk space available at all times. You can have the Metasys
system automatically warn you when your hard drive space runs low in the
METASYS.INI file on the Operator Workstation. (Refer to the
README.OWS file for details.)
Checking the
Ethernet Card
for the Correct
Packet Driver
Refer to Step 6 under the heading Troubleshooting an NCM located earlier
in this section.
Checking the
OWS Setup of
Ethernet Driver
Refer to Verifying Card is in the System under Configuring the OWS,
Loading Windows Software, which is located in the Setting Up the
Metasys Network on Ethernet section of this document.
92
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Appendix A: Glossary
10Base2
A part of the IEEE 802.3 specification that uses coax cable, also called
thin wire Ethernet. The “10” in this term indicates 10 Mbps baseband data
transmission, and the “2” indicates that segments can be a maximum of
185 meters (607 feet) in length.
10Base5
A part of the IEEE 802.3 specification that uses thick coaxial cable, also
called thick wire Ethernet. The “10” in this term indicates 10 Mbps
baseband data transmission, and the “5” indicates that segments can be a
maximum of 500 meters (1640 feet) in length.
10BaseT
A part of the IEEE 802.3 specification that uses twisted pair cable, also
called twisted pair Ethernet. The “10” in this term indicates 10 Mbps
baseband data transmission, and the “T” indicates twisted pair wiring.
Segments can be a maximum of 100 meters (330 feet) in length.
ACK
Acknowledge or acknowledgment (ACK). Name given to network traffic
that acts as an acknowledgment or the field in a network transmission unit
that indicates it is an acknowledgment. A response from a host indicating
that a previous transmission has been received.
address
A number or group of numbers that uniquely identifies a node on the
network.
API
Application Programming Interface. A programming language and
messaging format that allows one application program to interact with the
functions of other programs, communications systems, or hardware
drivers.
application layer
A logical entity of the OSI model, the top of the seven layer structure.
ARCNET
Attached Resource Computer Network (ARCNET) is a low-cost token
passing network system developed by Datapoint in 1977. A local area
network, it transmits digital signals one message at a time (i.e., baseband)
and its worst case response time in transmissions between nodes can be
predicted (i.e., deterministic). ARCNET communicates at a rate of
2.5 megabits per second.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
93
ARP
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP). On Ethernet TCP/IP networks, each
node is identified by a physical network address and an IP address.
ARP determines which physical network address corresponds to a given IP
address.
asynchronous
communications
A form of communications in which information is transmitted as a serial
stream of bits. Each character is represented as a string of bits separated by
a “start bit” and a “stop bit.” No clock or other timing mechanism is used.
ATM
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM). A general purpose switching
method for carrying voice, data, image, and video.
AUI cable
Attachment Unit Interface (AUI) cable. An IEEE term for four twisted pair
wire cable that connects an Ethernet device (e.g., adapter card) to an
external Ethernet transceiver. Also called transceiver or drop cable.
backbone
network
A segment of network that links several individual workgroup or
department LANs together in a single building. It is also used to link
several building LANs together in a campus environment.
Balun
BALanced UNbalanced. A device that allows interconnection between a
balanced transmission line (e.g., twisted pair cable) and an unbalanced line
(e.g., coax cable).
bandwidth
The data carrying capacity of a transmission line or channel, or the rate of
information exchange between two data systems.
baseband
A transmission method that uses cable to transmit a single signal. On a
baseband network, such as Ethernet, only one device can transmit at a
time. Devices on a baseband network are permitted to use all the available
bandwidth for transmission, and the signals they transmit do not need to be
multiplexed onto a carrier frequency.
baud
The measure of signal changes per second in a device such as a modem.
BNC connector
A type of connector used to connect thin coax Ethernet and ARCNET
cables.
bridge
A device that provides a communications pathway between two or more
LAN segments (or rings). A bridge forwards frames between segments
based on MAC (OSI Data Link Layer) addresses of the frames.
94
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
broadband
A method of conveying information over a local area network in which
many channels can be carried simultaneously--voice, video, or data. The
digital signals from the sending devices are modulated at different
frequencies, allowing for multiple networks on a single cable.
broadband
services
Broadband services, sometimes called “fast packets” services, provide data
rates at T1 (1.544 Mbps) or higher.
broadcast
In shared medium networks, such as Ethernet, token ring, and FDDI, each
frame is simultaneously broadcast to all stations on the network segment
or ring.
broadcast
address
A unique address that tells all stations on the network or network segment
to read a particular frame or packet.
brouter
Bridge router. A hybrid device that represents the merging of bridge and
router technologies.
burst
A continuous transfer of data without interruption from one device to
another.
bus topology
A linear topology where nodes are daisy-chained together.
carrier
A company that provides telephone and data communications services
within a Local Access and Transport Area (LATA) or between LATAs in
the United States. Primary inter-LATA carriers are AT&T, MCI, and
Sprint.
carrier services
Telephone and data communication services provided by carriers for a fee
to users. Wide Area Networks (WANs) are often built by interconnecting
LANs using carrier services.
CAT5
Category 5 cable. CAT5 cable supports 10 MHz data applications.
CCITT
Consultative Committee for International Telegraphy and Telephony
(CCITT).
collision
When two stations try to send packets at the same time, a collision occurs.
Ethernet network collisions are considered normal events. The CSMA/CD
access method is designed to quickly restore the network to normal
activity after a collision occurs.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
95
contention
Contention occurs on shared medium networks that use a contention based
network access method such as Ethernet. It occurs when two or more
stations attempt to access the medium at the same time. Too much
contention can reduce throughput.
CSMA/CD
Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detect (CSMA/CD). CSMA
provides a means for all hosts on a baseband network to be able to access
the network medium in turn; CD is a method each host uses to determine
when another host is attempting to use the network.
dedicated
network
A system configured with no other applications coexisting on the LAN
(i.e., a network running only Metasys software). A dedicated network is
characterized by high reliability.
Domain Name
Service (DNS)
Part of the TCP/IP protocol stack, DNS maps network addresses to logical
names. Other TCP/IP protocols, such as Telnet and FTP, use DNS to
resolve logical names to network addresses.
driver (LAN)
A software module that controls an input/output port or external device.
Typically, a “driver” refers to software resident in one system, which is
used to communicate to another system.
2
E PROM or
EEPROM
Non-volatile, electrically programmable, read-only memory that can be
erased with electrical signals.
Ethernet
A baseband network medium that communicates at 10 megabits per
second and uses the CSMA/CD access method.
Ethernet V2.0
A standard that defines the header information of an Ethernet message.
This standard is based on Release for Comment (RFC) 894.
Fast Ethernet
A local area network technology that transmits information between
computers at 100 Mbps via twisted pair and fiber optic media.
100BaseT and 100VG-AnyLAN are two LAN standards that can carry
Ethernet frames at 100 Mbps. The 100VG-AnyLAN system is
standardized under a new number: IEEE802.12. Currently, Fast Ethernet is
not as widely used as the 10 Mbps, twisted pair version of Ethernet. Fast
Ethernet is typically used as a building backbone. The Metasys system is
not supported on Fast Ethernet.
FDDI
Fiber Distribution Data Interface (FDDI). A high-speed fiber optics LAN
standard that uses token passing with a data transmission rate of
155 megabits per second.
96
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
FTP
File Transfer Protocol (FTP). One of the protocols associated with the
TCP/IP stack. FTP allows a TCP/IP “client” to download a file from a
TCP/IP host over a LAN or WAN.
Flash memory
Non-volatile memory that can be updated with software.
frame
Sometimes referred to as “packet.” A method of packaging data or sets of
bits for transmission.
frame relay
A variable length frame based wide area transmission that runs at between
56 Kbps and 1.544 Mbps (T1) speeds and allows for a fully meshed
network with multiple sites. Frame relay services are designed primarily
for LAN-to-LAN communication.
frame Type 802
An IEEE 802.2 standard that defines the header information of an Ethernet
message.
gateway
A multi-homed host used to route network traffic from one network to
another, also used to pass network traffic from one protocol to another.
hop
A transmission of a data packet through a router in a network of
interconnected segments of subnetworks. A measure of a path through an
internetwork is the hop count (the number of routers the packet passes
through enroute to its destination).
hub
A central location for the attachment of wires from the network stations.
A 10BaseT Ethernet hub is essentially a multi-port repeater in which each
port connects a single attached station. The term “hub” can refer to many
types of wiring concentrators, including standalone, stackable, and chassisbased hubs for Ethernet, token ring, and FDDI networking.
ICMP
Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP). Part of the TCP/IP protocol
stack, ICMP is the protocol used by IP routers and hosts to send control
and error messages between themselves.
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The IEEE is a
professional society that develops and publishes standards for the electrical
engineering and computer industry.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
97
IEEE 802.3
An Ethernet specification commonly defined by IEEE that covers rules for
configuring Ethernet LANs, the types of media that can be used, and how
the elements of the network should interact. The physical and transport
layers of an 802.3 network use CSMA/CD on a bus topology and are
identical to Ethernet V2.0.
intelligent hub
Intelligent hubs are wiring concentrators that can be monitored and
managed by network operators.
Internet
The Internet refers to the World Wide Web of interconnected computers
and computer networks that links schools, businesses, government
agencies, research institutions, and other organizations. The Internet uses
TCP/IP protocols.
internet
This term with a lower case “I” refers to any internetwork of LANs linked
by routers and/or bridges; in other words, one building’s network of
networks.
interoperability
The term generally refers to different computer systems, networks,
operating systems, and applications that share information and work
together. Levels of interoperability range from basic data exchange to
cooperative computing.
IP
Internet Protocol is a Network Layer protocol that is used by IP routers to
route data packets in an internetwork of LANs.
IP address
Internet Protocol (IP) address. A 32-bit network address that uniquely
locates a host or network within its internetwork. The IP address is a
4-octet address that uniquely defines the node on the network. Each octet
is in the range of 0 to 255; for example 122.51.35.113. These addresses,
when registered, are unique world wide. This assures connectivity
compatibility if the network ever is connected on a public WAN such as
the Internet.
IPX
Internetwork Packet Exchange. Novell Network Layer protocol.
ISO
International Standards Organization.
ISDN
Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN). ISDN integrates data, voice,
and video signals onto a digital telephone line.
ITU
International Telecommunications Union. A United Nations treaty
organization based in Geneva, Switzerland.
98
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Jabber
Random transmission of data onto a network cable by a faulty transceiver
that can corrupt the transmission of other stations. Jabber control is a
function built into transceivers to inhibit this activity.
LAN
Local Area Network. A LAN is a high-speed communications system
designed to link computers and other data processing devices together
within a small geographic area such as a workgroup, department, or a
single floor of a multi-story building.
LAN topologies
Cable layouts for local area networks; for example bus, ring, and star.
These layouts display the nodes, routers, gateways, bridges, and media
being used.
link
A connection between two network entities.
local network
traffic
Nodes on the same segment of a network. Packets that are sent locally do
not need to traverse the network.
M5
Workstation
A Metasys OWS with added N1 OPC Server and Client capability.
M5
Multinetwork
Workstation
A Metasys M5 Workstation utilizing the M5 Multinetwork feature.
Communicates with multiple Metasys N1 Ethernet Networks. Retains the
ability to communicate with Metasys direct connect and dialup networks.
MAC
Media Access Control (MAC). A sublayer of the Data Link Layer, which
puts packets from higher protocol layers into the proper network frame
format, handles error detection, and most importantly, implements the
network access control method.
MAC address
Media Access Control (MAC) address. Each network adapter has a unique
six byte address that is “burned in” to firmware on the card. The first
three bytes denote the card manufacturer and the last three bytes are
unique among all of the cards sold by that manufacturer. The MAC
address is used to deliver MAC frames to stations attached to a shared
medium LAN such as Ethernet.
MAN
Metropolitan Area Network (MAN). A backbone network that spans a
metropolitan area and is provided as a public utility within that area.
manageable hub
Another term for intelligent hubs. Each of the ports on a managed hub can
be configured, monitored, and enabled or disabled by a network operator
from a hub management console.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
99
media (network
or transmission)
The method used to propagate a signal over a network; the media used to
transmit a signal.
medium
Any material or substance that can be, or is, used for the propagation of
signals, usually in the form of modulated radio, light, or acoustic waves,
from one point to another, such as optical fiber, cable, wire, dielectric slab,
wave, air, or free space.
message header
The beginning of a message that contains required control and addressing
information.
multi-homed
host
A device containing addresses for multiple networks. May also contain
multiple protocols.
NAK
Unacknowledge or unacknowledgment. The field in a network
transmission unit that indicates the message has not been acknowledged.
This indicates that the destination node cannot accept a message for which
it has been addressed.
NCSETUP for
Windows
Software
(WNCSETUP)
Metasys utility that runs under Windows software and sets up and
modifies an NCM’s non-volatile RAM (NOVRAM) and flash
configuration. This tool is necessary for commissioning an NCM.
NDIS
Network Driver Interface Specification (NDIS). Designed by Microsoft to
give network users access to multiple higher layer protocols from a single
network adapter card driver.
network
administrator
The individual responsible for managing and maintaining the network.
NIC
The Network Interface Card (NIC) is used to make the physical connection
to the network. The NIC is placed inside the computer and connected to
the network cable. Once the physical connection is in place, it is up to the
network software to manage communications between stations on the
network. The NIC then transmits the packet onto the LAN. The packet is
transmitted as a stream of data bits represented by changes in electrical
signals. The packet is seen by all stations as it travels along the shared
cable. The NIC in each station checks the destination address in the packet
header to determine if the packet is addressed to it.
node
Any device connected to a network. A Metasys node is an OWS or NCM.
NOVRAM
Non-volatile RAM, or random access memory. NOVRAM retains the
contents of its memory when power is turned off.
100
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
octet
A sequence of eight bits.
OSI
Open Systems Interconnection (OSI). A collection of international
standards, controlled by the International Standards Organization (ISO).
These standards define the protocols that enable interconnection and
interoperation between systems connected to a local or remote network.
OSI is described as the OSI reference model.
OSI reference
model
The ISO structure for the ideal network architecture. The model is divided
into seven layers of functionality: physical, data link, network, transport,
session, presentation, and application layers.
packet
The envelope used by nodes to send messages to one another.
packet driver
The software that works with the hardware to send and receive Ethernet
packets on a network. This driver provides a standard software interface
between an application and a NIC. This standard was developed by
FTP Corporation.
patch panel
Usually installed in a wiring closet, a patch panel is used to make network
cabling easier. A patch panel contains rows of modular jacks that can be
used to terminate cable runs from network stations to hub ports. A network
administrator can easily connect, move, test, and disconnect network
devices by plugging and unplugging patch panel connections.
peer-to-peer
network
Peer-to-peer is a communication method that eliminates the need for a
“master” polling computer or other central weak link. With a peer-to-peer
network, nodes communicate equally to each other across the network.
Each node stores its own programming, while it passes and receives
information down the line.
PING
Packet Internet Groper. A network application that uses UDP to verify
reachability of another host on the internetwork. This utility is used to
assure a node can receive and transmit Ethernet messages.
PPP
Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP). PPP is a serial communication protocol
designed to support transmission of packets over synchronous and
asynchronous links. PPP can encapsulate different Network Layer
protocols. PPP automatically assigns IP addresses, so that remote
computers can connect into an IP network at any time.
protocol
A set of rules that specifies the behavior of interacting systems,
particularly as characterized by the rules used to exchange information.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
101
protocol stack
In most local and wide area networks, communications protocols are
implemented in layers. The protocols at one layer use the services of the
layer below it and provide services to the layers above it. Together they
form a protocol stack, a set of protocols designed to work effectively
together. There are several commonly used protocol stacks, including the
ISO Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) stack, TCP/IP and their associated
protocols, and Novell NetWare stack.
repeater
A device used to extend the length, topology, or interconnectivity of the
physical network medium beyond the limits imposed by a single segment.
RG-58 coaxial
cable
Two conductor (copper center and braid connector) shielded coaxial cable
used primarily in 10Base2 Ethernet LANs.
RG-62 coaxial
cable
Two conductor (copper center and braid connector) shielded coaxial cable
used primarily in ARCNET LANs.
ring topology
A closed loop network.
RIP
Routing Information Protocol (RIP). One of several path selection
algorithms available for use by routers.
RJ45
An 8-pin modular connector used on unshielded twisted pair cable
primarily for 10BaseT Ethernet and token ring LANs, also used for some
multi-line phones.
ROM150
The NU-ROM150 Memory Module is included in the NCM350 and is
required to upgrade a NCM300-1 for Ethernet support. The ROM150
contains a Flash memory chip, which can be downloaded with new
programs if necessary. The memory includes the packet driver to support
the AT-2000U Plus Ethernet Adapter Card.
router
Routers are internetworking devices. They are more complex and
expensive than bridges. They use network layer protocol information with
each packet to route communications from one LAN to another.
router address
This address is used in conjunction with the destination IP address and the
subnet mask. Whenever the destination of the packet is not on the local
network, the packet is routed to the router. This device has tables defined
within it that deliver the packet to the appropriate destination.
RTOS
Realtime Operating System (RTOS). A proprietary realtime operating
system created by Johnson Controls for Metasys products.
102
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
segment
The network transmission unit used by TCP, also may refer to a single
LAN that connects to an organizational internetwork.
shared network
A network configured with other applications on the LAN. Application
support can be limited by bandwidth availability.
SIMM
Single Inline Memory Module (SIMM). A hardware packaging scheme
that allows high density memory chips to be packaged onto a small board.
SLIP
Serial Line Internet Protocol. SLIP is a serial communication protocol
designed to support transmission of IP packets over synchronous and
asynchronous links such as dial-up telephone lines.
SMA
The fiber optic connector developed and manufactured by Allied Signal
Amphenol Products Division.
SMTP
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP). SMTP is a message transfer
protocol used in conjunction with the TCP/IP protocols on the Internet and
other TCP/IP networks. It provides a store-and-forward function between
the mail systems of networked computers.
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol.
SPX
Sequenced Packet Exchange (SPX). Novell connection oriented transport
layer communications protocol. SPX guarantees delivery and provides
packet sequencing for messages sent over a Network using the Novell IPX
Network Layer protocol.
ST
Straight Tip (ST) connector. A fiber optic connector used to join single
fibers together at interconnects or to connect them to fiber optic cross
connects.
stackable hubs
Stackable hubs look and act like standalone hubs except that several of
them can be stacked or connected together, usually by short lengths of
cable. When they are linked together, they can be managed as a single unit.
star topology
A network topology where the central control point is connected
individually to all stations.
StarLAN 10
A local area network that connects nodes to hubs in a star wired bus
configuration using unshielded, twisted pair wire. The network
communicates at ten megabits per second.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
103
STP
Shielded Twisted Pair (STP) cable, which has shielding around it to
provide more protection against Electromagnetic Interference (EMI).
subnet
A physical or logical subdivision of the TCP/IP network. The subnet is
also part of the Metasys address field. It is sometimes referred to as the
“gate.”
subnet mask
A method of representing a portion of the IP network address that is
devoted to subnet addresses. This mask is used in conjunction with the IP
address to determine how packets traverse the network. An IP address can
be divided into two parts: network address and host address. The subnet
mask defines the dividing line between the two parts.
switches
Switches link several separate LANs and provide packet filtering between
them. A LAN switch is a device with multiple ports, each of which can
support an entire Ethernet or token ring LAN.
T1/T3 Services
T1 and T3 are synchronous transmission services for delivering digital
data and voice over wide area networks. “T-carrier” services use time
division multiplexing to multiplex multiple voice and data channels over a
single T1 or T3 circuit. The transmission rate for T1 is 1.544 Mbps, which
can support 24 64 Kbps channels (64 Kbps is the standard bandwidth
requirement for one full duplex, uncompressed voice circuit). T3 runs at
44.736 Mbps and supports 28 T1 circuits.
TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). The name
usually given to the collection of network protocols used by the Internet
protocol suite. The name is taken from the two primary network protocols
of the Internet protocol suite.
throughput
The measurement of the amount of data to be transferred through a
communications device or system, usually expressed in bits or bytes
per second.
token passing
The process of passing a token to each node that allows the node to talk on
the network.
token ring
A local area network architecture that uses a “token,” passed from
one network node to the next, to grant permission to transmit on the
network. The token ring daisy chains nodes together to form a ring
topology.
104
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
transceiver
A transceiver, also called a media attachment unit, provides the interface
between the adapter card and the network medium. It translates signals
from the adapter to signal levels required by the medium.
transparent
bridge
Transparent bridging is used to link Ethernet LAN segments. Transparent
bridges use the destination MAC address of the frame to determine
whether to forward it to one or more of the bridge’s other ports. The term
transparent comes from the fact that no modification of the MAC frame is
required to bridge frames between LAN segments.
UDP
User Datagram Protocol (UDP). A connectionless transport layer network
protocol for the exchange of requests and replies between networked hosts
but that does not by itself guarantee delivery of a message.
UDP header
Header information in a UDP data packet.
UDP Port
Address
The User Datagram Protocol (UDP) port address. The Metasys network
uses the UDP port address to communicate with all other nodes. The
M5 Multinetwork feature uses multiple UDP port addresses to isolate and
distinguish between Metasys N1 Ethernet Networks.
UTP
Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) wire; 4-wire 24/26 AWG with a RJ-45
telephone type connector. The type of wire used on 10BaseT networks.
VOP
Velocity of Propagation (VOP). The speed that signals travel down a
cable. It is measured as a percentage of the speed of light in a vacuum.
WAN
Wide Area Network (WAN). Generally refers to a network that connects
users and systems across large distances and usually employs telephone or
other long range communications medium.
X.25
An ITU (CCITT) protocol used in wide area packet switched data
networks. It uses an x.21 physical layer and Link Access
Procedure-Balanced (LAPB) link access layer protocol. X.25 also defines
the packet layer. This is not supported by the Metasys system.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
105
References
Additional
Information
Definitions for the designated terms were compiled from the following
documents:
•
“Data Communications Glossary.” In Data Communications. New
York: McGraw Hill. January 1985.
•
“Glossary.” In ARCNET Factory LAN Printer. Downers Grove:
Contemporary Control Systems, Inc. (CCSI), 1987.
•
Loshin, Pete. “Glossary and Abbreviations.” In TCP/IP for Everyone:
Chestnut Hill: Academic Press, Inc., 1995.
•
Hands on Local Area Networks. Oakbrook: Insight Communications,
1995.
For further information on networks, connectivity and the like, refer to:
•
Bernaden, John A., and Anna Fay Williams. Open Protocols:
Communications Standard for Building Automation Systems. Lilburn:
Fairmont Press, Inc., 1989.
•
Bernaden, John A., and Richard E. Neubauer. The Intelligent Building
Sourcebook. Lilburn: Fairmont Press, Inc., 1988.
•
Gibbs, Mark. Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Networking. Indianapolis:
SAMS Publishing, 1995.
•
Nunemacher, Greg. LAN Primer, 3rd ed. New York: M&T Books,
1995.
•
Schatt, Dr. Stan. Understanding Local Area Networks.
New York: Howard W. Sams and Company, 1989.
•
Spinney, Byron. Ethernet Tips and Techniques: For Designing,
Installing, and Troubleshooting Your Ethernet Network, 2nd ed.
Fort Washington: CBM Books, 1995.
Several Ethernet sites and newsgroups exist on the World Wide Web.
Many of these contain quick tutorials, frequently asked questions, and
vendor information. Ethernet sites you may want to try are:
106
•
http://www.blackbox.com/
•
http://www.alliedtelesyn.com/
•
http://www.ctron.com/
•
http://www.usenet.com/
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Appendix B:
Ordering Information
Johnson
Controls
Code Numbers
Table 10: Johnson Controls Code Numbers
Description
Code Number
NCM350 Network Control Module
NU-NCM350-8
ROM150 Memory Module
NU-ROM150-1
NCM361 Network Control Module (Europe only)
NU-NET361-8 (Essen Factory)
Table 11: Order Information for Johnson Controls Repair Parts
Supplier Part
Numbers
Description
Order Number
NCM350 Network Control Module Repair
NU-NCM350-708
The following supplier models are provided for your convenience; there
may be other equivalent models not included here.
Table 12: Ethernet Adapter Cards and Fiber Optic Transceivers
and Cable
Description
Ethernet Network
Card
Boards, Transceivers, Cable
Part Number/Manufacturer
Supplier
NU-NET301-0
Fiber Optic
Transceivers
ST Connector
SMA Connector
SC Connector
AT-MX40F/ST
AT-MX50F/SM
AT-MX55F/SC
Allied Telesyn International Corp.
960 Stewart Drive, Suite B
Sunnyvale, CA 94085
1-800-424-4284
To contact
Johnson Controls IT
Acquisition Services,
refer to the Computer
Price List on
The Advisor:
The Advisor >
Business Support >
Strategic Procurement >
IT Acquisition Services >
Computer Price List
Transceiver Cable
3 foot PVC Office
Type
CCSI Embedded
Metasys Ethernet
Router (optional—
used to connect
ARCNET to Ethernet)
DCA1320
JC-EP-RG
Contemporary Control
Systems, Inc.
2431 Curtiss Street
Downers Grove, IL 60515
1-630-963-7070
www.ccontrols.com
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
107
108
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
References
Conner, Douglas. “The Deterministic Character of ARCNET Proves
Ideal for the Factory Floor,” Newton: EDN, vol. 33, no. 19,
(15 September, 1988): 101-110.
Hoswell, Katherine L. and George M. Thomas. ARCNET Factory LAN
Primer: Downers Grove: Contemporary Control Systems, Inc., 1987.
Spinney, Byron. Ethernet Tips and Techniques: For Designing, Installing,
and Troubleshooting Your Ethernet Network, 2nd Edition.
Fort Washington: CBM Books, 1995.
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
109
Notes
110
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
Notes
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
111
Notes
Controls Group
507 E. Michigan Street
P.O. Box 423
Milwaukee, WI 53201
112
Network Communications—N1 Ethernet/IP Network
www.johnsoncontrols.com
FAN 636
Metasys Network Technical Manual
Release 11.00
Printed in U.S.A.
Open as PDF
Similar pages