Making a new OMS Studio Setup

Dear Opcode,
Please help me make an OMS Studio Setup. IÕve never
done this before. Thank you.
Sincerely,
Valued Customer
Well, Valued Customer, you’ve come to the right place. That’s what this document is designed to do. We’re
going to walk through an OMS Setup with you.
Press the Go On button (at the bottom right) to proceed sequentially through this document. That’s what
you’ll want to do most of the time, since this is designed for step-by-step instructions. To see the previous
page, click Go Back. If you want to jump to a specific topic, clicking on Shortcuts will give you a
list of available topics.
Click Go On to get started!
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I’ve Never Done This Before!
Don’t panic. It’s going to be all right.
We’re about to go through the process of making an OMS Setup step-by-step. This is good news. OMS is a powerful little
application that acts as the hub of your computer’s MIDI communication. OMS is here to make your life easier, and this document
is here to make OMS easier. Groovy.
Before we proceed, you’ll need to have OMS installed. You may have already done this, which would be great. If not, OMS
probably came with your MIDI interface (you remember--the one we’re about to set up). If you lost your OMS disks, or if your
dog ate them, you can always download the latest version of OMS free at Opcode’s website:
http://www.opcode.com
We recommend installing the latest version of OMS with which your software is compatible.
OK, let’s get moving. Again, just press the Go On button (at the bottom right) to proceed sequentially through this document.
If you want to skip to a particular section, click on one of the links below.
What Kind of Interface do You Have?
SERIAL: Make Physical Connections
(or)
USB: Make Physical Connections
Note About Physical Connections
Launch OMS
Deal with AppleTalk...
The Create New Studio Setup screen
OMS Driver Search screen
OMS Driver Setup screen
Identifying MIDI Devices
OMS MIDI Device Setup screen...
Save your Setup
OMS Studio Setup window
Define Your Synths
Device Icon
MIDI Device Info...
You’re Done!
Save Again!
Questions?
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What
Kind of
Interface do
You
Have?
Although almost all of the principles we’re about to discuss apply to everybody, the physical connections you’ll make now are
slightly different depending on whether you’re using a USB MIDI interface or a serial MIDI interface. In the interest of avoiding
confusion, we’ll discuss them separately.
Serial interfaces have ports that look like this:
. A comprehensive list of serial interfaces would be somewhere between
long and really, really long; it includes these Opcode interfaces: MIDI Translator, MIDI Translator II, MIDI Translator Pro and Pro
Sync, Studio 3, Studio 4, Studio 5 (and Studio 5 Lx), Studio 64X, Studio 128X, and Studio 64XTC.
USB interfaces have ports that look like this:
. (Sorry, we couldn’t find a slick picture of one of those ports. We’ll work
on it for the next rev of this document.) There aren’t too many of them on the market yet, because these ports are a relatively
new innovation while serial ports have been around for a pretty long time in computer years. You’ll find USB ports on iMacs and
the new blue G3s. Opcode’s MIDIport 32 is a USB MIDI interface.
Please click one of the links below.
I Have a Serial
Interface
I Have a USB
Interface
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SERIAL:
Make
Physical
Connections
We may as well get the manual labor out of the way. You have a computer, a MIDI interface, and some MIDI devices
(synthesizers, samplers, controllers, etc.). Now we’ll connect them using different types of cables.
This is the back of an Opcode Studio 64XTC, the interface we’re using.
The back of your computer has at least one serial port, which looks like this in real life:
have two: one printer port, and one modem port. They are labeled with these icons:
Your MIDI devices also have MIDI ports, which look like this:
MIDI THRU.
. Most desktop computers
(Printer) and
(Modem).
. These ports are usually labeled MIDI IN, MIDI OUT, and
Your computer doesn’t have MIDI ports, which is why you need a MIDI interface in the first place. A (serial) MIDI interface is sort of like a big
serial-to-MIDI/MIDI-to-serial adaptor, but this is a very smart adaptor.
Bonus Tractor Tip (two for the price of one!): MIDI cables support data transmission in one direction only, which is why you must connect two
cables if you want to send and receive data to and from your gear. MIDI is always sent from an OUT port to an IN port (never from an IN to an
OUT). More on this on the News at 6:00.
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...Make
Physical
Connections
Step A: Connect a serial cable from the Macintosh’s Modem port to the MIDI interface’s appropriate port.
Step B: Connect MIDI cables from the MIDI OUTs of your MIDI devices to the MIDI INs of your MIDI interface.
Step C: Connect MIDI cables from the MIDI INs of your MIDI devices to the MIDI OUTs of your MIDI interface.
Obvious (and unillustrated) Step D: Connect power cables and turn on your equipment.
The back of a Macintosh computer
ImageWriter II A
printer cable A serial cable connects the 64XTC’s “Mac” port to the Mac’s “Modem” port.
1A
C
Network Mac
MIDI cables connect the synthesizers
to the MIDI interface.
MIDI
IN
1B
2A
IDI
MIDI
M
3
4
1
MIDI
THRU
The Korg N1’s MIDI ports
(connected to the 64XTC’s Port 1)
2
3
C
4
I
MID
MIDI
B
MIDI
OUT
2B
B
MIDI
IN
MIDI
OUT
MIDI
THRU
The Clavia Nord Lead’s MIDI ports
(connected to the 64XTC’s Port 3)
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USB:
Make
Physical
Connections
By the way, we should mention that this document assumes that you’ve already installed any necessary drivers for your USB
MIDI interface.
We may as well get the manual labor out of the way. You have a computer, a MIDI interface, and some MIDI devices
(synthesizers, samplers, controllers, etc.). Now we’ll connect them using different types of cables.
This is the back of an Opcode MIDIport 32, the interface we’re referring to for the next couple of pages. The majority of this
document refers to an Opcode Studio 64XTC, but the next couple of pages are a little detour. Please don’t be confused.
USB
2 MIDI OUT 1
2 MIDI IN 1
Your computer has at least one USB port, which looks like this:
. If you have a blue G3, the USB ports are on the back.
If you have an iMac, the USB ports are on the right-hand side (don’t connect to the USB port on the iMac’s keyboard; use the one
on the CPU). You may also have one or more USB ports on a USB PCI card installed in your computer, but if that’s the case, you’ll
probably know where to find them.
Your MIDI devices also have MIDI ports, which look like this:
MIDI THRU.
. These ports are usually labeled MIDI IN, MIDI OUT, and
Your computer doesn’t have MIDI ports, which is why you need a MIDI interface in the first place. A (USB) MIDI interface is sort of like a big
USB-to-MIDI/MIDI-to-USB adaptor, but this is a very smart adaptor.
Bonus Tractor Tip (buy one, get one free): MIDI cables support data transmission in one direction only, which is why you must connect two cables
if you want to send and receive data to and from your gear. MIDI is always sent from an OUT port to an IN port (never from an IN to an OUT).
Stay tuned for more information.
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...Make
Physical
Connections
Step A: Connect a USB cable from the Macintosh’s USB port to the MIDI interface’s USB port.
Step B: Connect MIDI cables from the MIDI OUTs of your MIDI devices to the MIDI INs of your MIDI interface.
Step C: Connect MIDI cables from the MIDI INs of your MIDI devices to the MIDI OUTs of your MIDI interface.
Obvious (and unillustrated) Step D: Connect power cables and turn on your equipment.
The back of a Macintosh computer
USB cable A-connector
A
A USB cable connects the MIDIport 32’s USB port to the Mac’s USB port.
USB cable B-connector
USB
MIDI
2 MIDI OUT 1
2 MIDI IN 1
C
C
MIDI
B
MIDI
IN
MIDI
OUT
MIDI
THRU
The first device’s MIDI ports
(connected to the MIDIport 32’s Port 2)
MIDI
MIDI
MIDI cables connect the synthesizers
to the MIDI interface.
B
MIDI
IN
MIDI
OUT
MIDI
THRU
The second device’s MIDI ports
(connected to the MIDIport 32’s Port 1)
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Note
About
Physical
Connections
Notice that MIDI connections to and from one piece of MIDI equipment (a synthesizer, sampler, or controller, etc.) are always
made to the same numbered port on the MIDI interface. For instance, if the device’s MIDI OUT goes into the interface’s MIDI IN
port 3, then the device’s MIDI IN should also be connected to the interface’s MIDI OUT port 3.
1A
1B
2A
2B
3
4
1
2
3
4
Both connections on
interface port 3
Interface’s MIDI OUT connected to device’s MIDI IN
MIDI
IN
Device’s MIDI OUT connected to interface’s MIDI IN
MIDI
OUT
MIDI
THRU
This connection scheme serves many purposes, not the least of which is to make it easier for OMS to keep track of your devices.
You can buy the cables necessary for these connections at just about any computer store. You need a USB or Macintosh serial
cable to connect your interface to the computer; if it’s a serial cable, this must be an Imagewriter II or AppleTalk serial cable.
MIDI cables should have the same type of MIDI connection at both ends.
You don’t always have to make MIDI connections both ways (IN to OUT and OUT to IN) for every piece of MIDI equipment. If you have a rackmount sound module, you only need to connect the interface’s MIDI OUT to the module’s MIDI IN, because you’ll only be sending MIDI
information to the module. On the other hand, if you have a controller with no internal sounds (like many wind controllers), you need only to
connect the controller’s MIDI OUT to the interface’s MIDI IN.
If you’re using a librarian application (such as Galaxy or Galaxy Plus Editors), you absolutely must make MIDI connections both ways (IN to OUT and OUT to
IN). Librarian applications require that MIDI can be sent to and received from devices with which they communicate.
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Launch
OMS
Phew--we’re done lifting the heavy stuff. On to the software.
Launch OMS Setup. Unless you’ve moved the file, it’s in the Opcode>OMS Applications folder. Doubleclick on it.
(Remember, we’re assuming that you already have OMS installed. If not, you need to install it before we can proceed. You
probably received a copy of OMS with your MIDI interface. If not, or if you lost your disks, or if you don’t have them for any
other reason, you can always download the latest version of OMS at:
http://www.opcode.com
We recommend installing the latest version of OMS with which your software is compatible.)
Okay, back to the land of flowing text. In case you forgot what to do while reading that giant aside, we’ll say it again: launch OMS.
“OMS” stands for “Open Music System”. In bygone years it used to stand for “Opcode MIDI System”, but Opcode made the OMS standard public
so that other software and hardware developers could use it. Opcode believes that anything that can make studio gear from different
manufacturers work well together is a benefit to everyone involved--you, your dealer(s), and the manufacturers.
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Deal
with
AppleTalk...
Do you see this screen? If not, you can read the next couple of pages from some nifty information, or skip ahead if you’re in a
terrible rush. Click on skip ahead to...well, to skip ahead.
Click
to disable AppleTalk.
If you really want to, you can leave AppleTalk on. You probably won’t notice any difference. However, if you find that you’re having MIDI
communication problems, try turning AppleTalk off and see if that takes care of it.
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...Finish
dealing
with
appletalk
Click
. To be perfectly honest, it doesn’t matter whether you physically disconnect the AppleTalk network or
not. Serial Interface Users: if you followed the connection diagram earlier, you won’t have the AppleTalk network physically
connected now anyway.
You may be wondering why you keep getting these AppleTalk dialogs when you launch OMS or any OMS-compatible application. You might just
want to turn AppleTalk off for good, especially if you’re not actually using it. To do so, go to your computer’s Apple menu (the colorful apple in
the upper-left-hand corner of the screen) and select “Chooser”. Select “Inactive” for the AppleTalk setting in that window, and you won’t have
to deal with these dialogs again. Neat!
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The
Create
New
Studio
Setup
screen
If you don’t see this window automatically, choose New from the File menu.
Click
to create your Studio Setup.
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OMS
Driver
Search
screen
Put a check next to the serial port that your MIDI interface is connected to. In this example, we have an Opcode Studio 64XTC
connected to the Modem port, so we’ve put a check next to the modem icon.
Important!
If you’re using a
USB MIDI
interface, you
don’t have to
check any ports
in this dialog
box. OMS
automatically
searches all USB
ports regardless
of what’s
Then, click
checked here.
what’s connected.
to begin creating your OMS Studio Setup. OMS will now “look” out your serial ports to see
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searching...
OMS searches through its installed drivers to find one that matches your MIDI interface.
Don’t press the
next screen when it’s done.
button while OMS is searching for MIDI interfaces. OMS will automatically move on to the
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OMS
Driver
Setup
screen
When done searching, OMS shows you what it found.
Great! OMS found the interface--a Studio 64XTC on the Modem port. Click
, because the list is correct.
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Identifying
MIDI
Devices
OMS attempts to automatically detect what type of device is connected to each port of your MIDI interface.
Don’t press the
screen when it’s done.
button while OMS is identifying MIDI devices. OMS will automatically move on to the next
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OMS MIDI
Device
Setup
screen...
OMS tells you what it found. Sometimes OMS is “smart” enough to figure out what kind of synths you have connected to your
interface, but usually it can’t tell. No problem, though--you’ll be able to define the synths (or controllers, samplers, etc.) that are
connected in just a second.
The OMS MIDI Device Setup screen is displayed.
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...OMS
MIDI
Device
Setup
Screen
Put X’s in the boxes next to the ports you’re going to use. You may have to scroll down to see all of the available ports.
In this example, we have a Korg N1 on port 1 and a Clavia Nord Lead on port 3. OMS didn’t automatically detect either of the
synths, so we manually put checks next to ports 1 and 3. Click
when you’re done selecting ports.
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Save
your
Setup
OMS automatically asks you to save your setup. Never miss a chance to save. You won’t be sorry.
Give the setup any name you like. It’s named “My Studio Setup” by default. It’s a good idea to keep your OMS Studio Setup in
your OMS Applications folder so that you can always find it if you need to.
Click
when you’ve named the setup and placed it in the correct folder.
You can save as many different Studio Setups as you like, but you can only work with one of them at a time. The “active” OMS Studio Setup
(the one that you’re working with at any given time) is referred to as the Current setup. You can always tell whether or not a setup document
is current because a current setup has a little diamond to the left of its name (when it’s open in OMS). For example:
. The diamond to the left of “My” indicates that this is the current Studio Setup. Have a look at the next
page to see “My Studio Setup” in context.
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OMS
Studio
Setup
window
Now that your document has been saved, it is displayed in the OMS Studio Setup window. This is the window you’ll usually use to
work with your Studio Setup(s).
The diamond here indicates that this is the current Studio Setup.
Most people never use this, but it won’t hurt anything. Leave it alone, and it
will leave you alone.
The QuickTime Music driver is disabled, as shown by the red circle with the line
through it. Since you have a MIDI interface, you probably don’t want to use
this anyway.
The interface, an Opcode Studio 64XTC on the Modem port.
The as-yet-undefined Korg N1 on MIDI port 1.
The as-yet-undefined Clavia Nord Lead on MIDI port 3.
Above is a picture of the OMS Studio Setup window (labeled so you know what everything is).
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Define
Your
Synths
At this point you’re mostly ready to go, but a few cosmetic improvements will help things make more sense. Let’s define the
synths as what they actually are, instead of little pictures of keyboards with question marks on them and generic names.
Doubleclick on a keyboard-with-a-question-mark-on-it to define the synth.
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MIDI
Device
Info...
This is the MIDI Device Info Window. Right now OMS doesn’t know anything about the Manufacturer, Model, Name, etc. of the
synth we selected (we selected the synth on port 3, which is a Clavia Nord Lead). We’re about to change all of that!
Pop-up menu containing a list of manufacturers
Pop-up menu containing a list of device models
Device icon
More on this later
Check this box if the device will be used to
trigger MIDI messages (keyboards, wind
controllers, guitar controllers, etc.)
Device name; set by default, but you can type in this field
Synchronization settings;
more on this later
Check this box if the device can receive MIDI
on more than one channel simultaneously
X’ed channels will be available
for sending MIDI to the device
Note that the synth is named “Port 3” by default, since that’s the MIDI port that it’s on.
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...MIDI
Device
Info...
The first thing we’ll do is define the Manufacturer and Model. Click on the pop-up menu next to Manuf : to get a list of
manufacturers.
Since this is a Clavia keyboard, we choose Clavia from the list.
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...MIDI
device
Info...
Select Nord Lead from the Model popup menu, and define the MIDI channels you want to Nord Lead to receive on. In this
example, the Nord Lead will be receiving on channels 1-4. Click to remove or insert an X.
When you’re done with these definitions, click
. This will bring you back to the OMS Studio Setup window.
See the six little boxes on the right hand side, labeled Receives and Sends at the top? The settings in these boxes control the
synchronization capabilities of the selected synth. In this case, OMS automatically knows that the Nord Lead can receive MIDI Beat Clock. Most
people will never use these capabilities, so if you don’t know what to check, don’t worry about it. This won’t affect basic MIDI communication
(sending and receiving notes, controller data, etc.) at all.
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...MIDI
Device
Info...
Now let’s define the Korg N1 (on port 1). Doubleclick on it (in the OMS Studio Setup window) to open the MIDI Device Info screen
for that synth.
Choose Korg from the Manufacturer popup menu. Choose N1 from the Model pop-up menu.
But wait! N1 isn’t in the list! Luckily, this doesn’t actually matter. Just choose ( o t h e r ) instead.
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...MIDI
Device
Info...
Then, type “N 1 ” into the Name field. This is purely for your viewing pleasure. The name of the synth here will be the name
shown in all of your OMS-compatible applications, but it won’t actually change the way OMS communicates MIDI with they
synthesizer (or sampler, controller, etc.). Heck--you can go ahead and call it “Harriett” if you want to...just remember that the N1
has a cute little name when you’re working in another app.
Since the N1 receives on all 16 channels and is a controller, we’ll leave all of these options checked.
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...MIDI
Device
Info
Now let’s get rid of the goofy keyboard-with-a-question-mark-on-it icon. Click on the icon (in the upper-left-hand corner) to
change it.
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Device
Icon
The Device Icon window opens. Select an itty bitty picture that you like from the icons shown here. Remember to scroll down to
see all of the available options.
When you’ve chosen an icon that you like, click
.
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You’re
Done!
Your Studio Setup is complete! It looks mah-velous.
Save
Again!
Save! Save! Save!
Go to the next page for some very important conceptual information.
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WhatÕ s the difference between OMS automatically detecting my synthesizer and me defining it?
Trick question--there is no difference! OMS doesn’t alter the MIDI that it sends and receives based on the device’s
Manufacturer/Model/Name definition (in OMS). It just doesn’t. The Manufacturer, Model, and Name settings are just there for
you--they make it easier for you to know which synth you’re dealing with when you’re working in an OMS-compatible
application. The only time that the Manufacturer/Model settings change communication patterns at all is when you’re working
with Galaxy. (The Name setting never has any effect on anything except the way that the device shows up in a list of devices.) If
you don’t believe us, try defining your devices as all the wrong stuff and giving them silly names. You’ll still be able to control
them in OMS (and any OMS-compatible applications).
What do I set my Device IDÕ s to? What is that, anyway?
The Device ID is a way to distinguish between two of exactly the same device in a setup. For example, if you have two Korg N1s
in the same setup, you’d want to give them different Device ID’s. The Device ID setting is also important when working with
System Exclusive information (SysEx data)--if a device’s Device ID is set incorrectly, the SysEx probably won’t be received. SysEx
isn’t MIDI, though. Librarian applications like Galaxy use SysEx to communicate, but sequencers generally do not. So this is kind
of a trick question too--you don’t have to worry about Device ID settings in most cases. Usually the default setting is just
fine--don’t bother changing it. And, contrary to semi-popular belief, your Device ID does not have to match a receive channel.
What are those six little boxes on the right hand side of the MIDI Device Info window?
As described in a Tractor Tip earlier, the settings in these boxes control the synchronization capabilities of the selected synth. For
example, if you want to sync the internal sequencer of a synth so that it will play back in tandem with your software, you set it up
here. Most people never use these capabilities, so if you don’t know what to check, don’t worry about it. This won’t affect basic
MIDI communication (like sending and receiving MIDI notes and controller information) at all.
Why exactly did you give the informational notes a title like Ò Tractor TipsÓ ?
Because of the picture of the tractor.
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We certainly hope this was helpful. Please keep your
eye out for more ÔÒDear OpcodeÓ letters.
Sincerely,
Opcode
Copyright ©1999 by Opcode Systems. Written by Angela Hill and everyone else included in the Òroyal weÓ
mentioned throughout. All rights reserved. This document may not, in whole or part, be copied, photocopied,
reproduced, translated or converted to any electronic or machine readable form without prior consent of
Opcode Systems, Inc. All product and brand names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their
respective companies.
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