Developing PlayReady Clients - Center

Developing PlayReady Clients
April 2015
Abstract
Microsoft® PlayReady® is the premier platform for protection and distribution of digital content.
This white paper provides an overview of the PlayReady product suite and discusses PlayReady
client technologies in terms of key concepts, platform compatibility and support for related
technologies, and tools and options for developing PlayReady clients.
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Microsoft PlayReady
Developing PlayReady Clients
Table of Contents
Introduction....................................................................................................................................................................... 2
The PlayReady Product Suite ...................................................................................................................................... 3
Client Technologies ................................................................................................................................................... 4
Server Technologies .................................................................................................................................................. 6
Fundamental Concepts ................................................................................................................................................. 6
Media Distribution Workflow................................................................................................................................. 7
The PlayReady Header Object ............................................................................................................................... 9
Licenses and Policies ................................................................................................................................................. 9
License Acquisition Models ................................................................................................................................. 11
Client Authentication ............................................................................................................................................. 12
Device Activation and Revocation..................................................................................................................... 13
Device and Platform Compatibility........................................................................................................................ 13
Supported Media Formats ........................................................................................................................................ 14
MPEG-DASH .............................................................................................................................................................. 17
Smooth Streaming .................................................................................................................................................. 19
HLS ................................................................................................................................................................................ 20
Backward Compatibility with Windows Media DRM ...................................................................................... 20
Development Tools and Options ........................................................................................................................... 20
Native Applications ................................................................................................................................................. 21
Web Applications .................................................................................................................................................... 24
PlayReady Device Porting Kit .............................................................................................................................. 25
Tools and Options by Platform .......................................................................................................................... 27
Testing Resources ........................................................................................................................................................ 29
Release Requirements ................................................................................................................................................ 29
Compliance and Robustness ............................................................................................................................... 29
Licensing Options......................................................................................................................................................... 30
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Introduction
Microsoft PlayReady is a comprehensive content protection and management solution for multiindustry (mainly entertainment) products and services across all platforms and types of devices.
With more than 15 years and $2 billion of research and development, a full IP patent portfolio,
proven robustness, and backing by a dedicated breach response team, PlayReady has become
the industry-leading, digital rights management (DRM) system for protecting media content on
certified devices. It provides scalable, secure, user-friendly protection of content for a wide
range of distribution and consumption options. PlayReady supports:

Multiple media content distribution models, including subscription, video on demand,
rental, ad-based, and purchase (download to own).

Multiple media delivery options, including live and on-demand streaming, and basic and
progressive download.

Emerging and established international and industry standards, including MPEG-DASH,
HTML5 media extensions, Smooth Streaming, and Apple HTTP Live Streaming (HLS).

A broad range of consumer devices, including phones, laptops, tablets, set-top boxes,
Smart TVs, and connected Blu-ray™ players.

All major client platforms, including Android, iOS, Windows®, Windows Phone®, and
Xbox®.
PlayReady is also approved and adopted by major Hollywood studios, the Digital Entertainment
Content Ecosystem, UltraViolet™, Smart TV Alliance, and HbbTV®.
As a content protection system, PlayReady is fundamentally designed to secure the distribution
of digital content and to enable rights to be specified and enforced for that content, primarily
through the use of digital encryption keys (content keys) and licenses. With its cross-functional
and cross-platform capabilities, PlayReady is also a versatile component of any larger digital
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media ecosystem. The following diagram identifies major phases and components of the digital
media ecosystem and PlayReady support for them.
Figure 1 – PlayReady Support for Phases and Components of the Digital Media Ecosystem
In this white paper we’ll provide a brief overview of the PlayReady product suite and we’ll
discuss PlayReady client technologies in terms of key concepts, platform compatibility and
support for related technologies, and tools and options for developing, testing, and distributing
PlayReady clients. To learn about PlayReady more generally, see Deploying PlayReady
Technology on the PlayReady website.
The PlayReady Product Suite
To enable end-to-end content protection across the media ecosystem, the PlayReady product
suite includes both client and server technologies. It also includes software development kits
(SDKs) and a device porting kit for implementing those technologies on various platforms.
The following diagram identifies the primary components of the PlayReady product suite.
Figure 2 – The PlayReady Product Suite
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To support development of PlayReady clients, Microsoft offers several SDKs, each of which is
optimized for a specific major platform, and the PlayReady Device Porting Kit, which can be used
to implement PlayReady functionality on virtually any platform or type of device. The porting kit
is typically used for devices such as set-top boxes (STBs), Smart TVs, kiosks, and mobile devices,
and it is the foundation for all the PlayReady client SDKs. To support development and
deployment of PlayReady server technologies, PlayReady offers the PlayReady Server SDK, which
provides detailed documentation, tools, and APIs for tasks such as generating content keys and
issuing licenses.
Client Technologies
A PlayReady client is a device or component — for example, an STB, app, media application, or
browser plug-in — that can use PlayReady technologies to acquire and interpret licenses,
decrypt and play back protected content, and enforce the license policies defined by a content
provider. To perform those tasks, PlayReady clients use a combination of the media framework
and other APIs provided by the host platform and PlayReady APIs, which add layers of content
protection to that framework.
PlayReady provides a multitude of client options spanning all major platforms and virtually any
type of device. Those options derive from native support on many platforms, the latest web
standards and technologies, PlayReady client SDKs that are optimized for specific platforms, and
a device porting kit that can be used to implement PlayReady functionality on virtually any
platform or type of device.
To support PlayReady client development directly, Microsoft offers the following kits:

Silverlight SDK for Windows and MacOS X Used to develop PlayReady-enabled apps
that are working in browser plugins. This SDK can be used to implement PlayReady
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protection for live and on-demand playback of MPEG-DASH and Smooth Streaming
content (in combination with the Smoot Streaming Client SDK) and various PlayReady
features.

PlayReady Client SDK for Windows Store app Used to develop PlayReady-enabled
apps that leverage native WinRT APIs. This SDK can be used to implement PlayReady
protection for live and on-demand playback of MPEG-DASH and Smooth Streaming
content (in combination with the Smooth Streaming Client SDK) and various PlayReady
features.

Windows Phone SDK Used to develop PlayReady-enabled apps that leverage native
Phone APIs by using Windows Phone SDK. This SDK can be used to implement PlayReady
protection for live and on-demand playback of MPEG-DASH and Smooth Streaming
content (in combination with the Smooth Streaming Client SDK for Windows Phone) and
various PlayReady features.

Xbox ADK (Xbox 360 and Xbox One) Used to develop PlayReady-enabled apps that
leverage native Xbox APIs by using Xbox Application Development Kit. This SDK can be
used to implement PlayReady protection for live and on-demand playback of Smooth
Streaming content as a native support and various PlayReady features. XboxOne ADK
supports also MPEG-DASH content natively.

HTML5 Video/Audio web standard platform with Media Extensions on Internet
Explorer 11 (on Windows 8.1) Used to develop PlayReady-enabled JavaScript apps that
leverage both W3C Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) APIs and Media Source Extensions
(MSE) APIs. This application platform and APIs is interoperable for cross-platform devices,
and can be used to implement PlayReady protection for live and on-demand playback of
MPEG-DASH content,

PlayReady Client SDK for Android – Used to develop PlayReady-enabled apps that
leverage native Android APIs. This SDK can be used to implement PlayReady protection
for media formats that Android natively supports, live and on-demand playback of MPEGDASH and Smooth Streaming content, and various PlayReady features.

PlayReady Client SDK for iOS – Used to develop PlayReady-enabled apps that leverage
native iOS APIs. This SDK can be used to implement PlayReady protection for media
formats that iOS natively supports such as HLS, live and on-demand playback of MPEGDASH, Smooth Streaming and HLS content, and various PlayReady features.

PlayReady Device Porting Kit – Provides a comprehensive PlayReady API, portable
source code, tools, test resources, and documentation to build PlayReady clients for a wide
variety of system architectures, operating system environments, and device classes. The
porting kit is frequently used by device manufacturers and providers to implement
PlayReady technologies on devices such as STBs, Smart TVs, kiosks, mobile devices, HDMI
dongles, and even on Android and iOS devices.
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Each kit provides APIs, a sample media application, tools, detailed technical information, and
task-based guidance for implementing PlayReady protection mechanisms and features on the
target platform or device. Kit users can also access a fully functioning PlayReady server to test a
client’s ability to acquire licenses and decrypt and play back content. To learn more about the
kits, see Development Tools and Options.
Server Technologies
PlayReady server technologies help prepare content for distribution, issue licenses to PlayReady
clients, and optionally manage domains and meter content usage. To perform those tasks,
PlayReady server technologies provide the following services:

License Service – Stores licenses that specify protection information and rights for using
content, and receives and responds to authentication and license requests from PlayReady
clients. License services handle tasks such as managing usage rules and policies that are
applied to licenses, implementing business logic for authorization and control of usage
rights, and building and issuing licenses to PlayReady clients.

Domain Controller – Determines what a given domain represents. A domain is a virtual
entity that represents a group of users or devices that can share licenses for media
content — for example, a game console, tablet, and phone within the same household.
The domain controller can store a list of entities that are associated with a domain, handle
requests to join or leave a domain, and enforce policies that define how many devices or
users can be part of a domain.

Metering Service – Stores information about the number of times that a media file is
played, based on playback counts that PlayReady clients upload to the service. The
metering service also obtains metering certificates to help ensure the security of metering
data. Note that metering does not affect any behavior on a user’s system or identify the
user. It simply allows content providers to assess royalties accurately.
Of those services, only the license service is integral to implementing PlayReady for content
protection. The domain controller and metering service are optional, depending on a content
provider’s business and distribution model.
At their core, PlayReady server technologies are SOAP-based web services that run in Internet
Information Services (IIS) and provide standard operations, messages, and schemas for
communicating, accessing, and managing protection data on a server. All the services are
configured, deployed, and managed by using the PlayReady Server SDK.
Fundamental Concepts
PlayReady media files are encrypted by AES encryption algorithm, so those can be moved,
archived, copied, and distributed but their content cannot be consumed without a license. A
license contains a content key, which is a symmetric cryptographic key that is used to decrypt a
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media file, and it specifies policies that define how and under what conditions a file’s content
may be used.
In the following sections, we’ll provide an overview of the media distribution workflow and the
role of PlayReady client and server technologies within that workflow. We’ll also explain key
concepts that enable PlayReady clients to protect various types of media content. To learn more
about these and related concepts, see Deploying PlayReady Technologies on the PlayReady
website.
Media Distribution Workflow
In the typical flow of content within a content distribution system, an encoding/packaging server
takes unprotected media content and encrypts and packages the content for distribution. After
the content is packaged, it’s delivered to a distribution network. The distribution network then
delivers the content to various endpoints for consumption.
The following diagram illustrates the typical flow of content and licenses within a distribution
system.
Figure 3 – Typical Flow of Content and Licenses within a Distribution System
In the preceding diagram, the basic steps are:
1. A media asset is sent to an encoder for encoding and encryption.
2. The encoder does the following:

Encodes the media asset.

Encrypts the resulting media file by using a content key, which it shares with
PlayReady license services. PlayReady uses AES-128 CTR encryption.
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
Adds a PlayReady header to the media file. The PlayReady header is a rights
management header that enables a PlayReady client to decrypt and acquire a
license for the file.
3. The encoder packages the media file and sends it to a content distribution network for
delivery to PlayReady clients.
4. The content distribution network sends the media file to a PlayReady client in response to
a request from the client.
5. The client does the following:

Attempts to play back the media file and finds the PlayReady header in the file.
Because the file contains this header, the client determines that the file is encrypted
and a license must be acquired to play back the file.

By using information in the PlayReady header, the client sends a license request to
a designated license server. The request includes a content identifier, which
uniquely identifies the media file, and the public key from a key pair that is unique
to the client device (device public key).
6. The license server receives the license request and does the following:

Authenticates the device.

Executes business logic to ensure that the user and the device are authorized to
consume the content in the media file.

Builds the license and adds policies that specify usage rules and restrictions for
consuming the content in the media file. The license also includes the content key
for the file.

Encrypts the license by using the client device’s public key. Using the device’s
public key to encrypt the license both protects license data and ensures that the
license applies to only that device.

Sends the resulting license to the client.
7. The client receives the license and decrypts it by using the private key from the key pair
that is unique to the client device (device private key). The client then uses the license to
securely decrypt and play back the media file in accordance with the policies specified in
the license.
The preceding steps represent simple packaging and consumption processes. Processes vary
between systems due to many factors, such as distribution and delivery model, and PlayReady
supports a wide range of models.
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The PlayReady Header Object
The PlayReady header object is a placeholder to store PlayReady rights management header
that enables PlayReady clients to acquire a license for and decrypt the content in a media file. It
can also store an embedded license directly in a media file. The header is added to and
subsequently stored in a media file or, for streaming content, a media manifest file when the file
is packaged for distribution.
Each PlayReady rights management header contains a standard set of metadata about a license.
This includes a key ID that identifies the content key, the type of encryption used to encrypt the
file, the URL for the applicable license acquisition service (LAURL), and any custom attributes
that a content provider chooses to define. PlayReady rights management headers are encoded
using UTF-16.
In a basic workflow, a PlayReady client finds and extracts the PlayReady rights management
header from a media or media manifest file when it begins parsing the file. The client then
processes the header data to acquire a license for and ultimately decrypt the content with the
content key in the acquired license. In most cases, this includes sending the header to the
appropriate license service, which in turn processes the header data, verifies that the license
request is from a valid client (client authentication), and then issues a license to the client.
For detailed technical information about the PlayReady header, see the PlayReady Header
Object specification on the PlayReady website.
Licenses and Policies
A license contains two fundamental protection components, a content key and policies. A
content key is a symmetric cryptographic key that is used to decrypt a media file. Policies are
usage rules that specify how, when, and where a file’s content can be consumed. When a license
is built for a media file, the content key and appropriate policies are added to the license for the
file. When a license is issued to a PlayReady client, the client uses the content key and policies to
decrypt and play back the file according to the rules specified in the license.
In PlayReady, policies support several types of usage rules, most commonly: time-based
restrictions, which specify a time frame that a license is valid for; output-protection levels, which
indicate whether playback is restricted to specific types of output ports on devices; and,
allowable-export restrictions, which specify restrictions for moving or exporting content to a
different content protection scheme. Both output-protection and allowable-export policies are
governed by the PlayReady compliance and robustness rules.
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To support a variety of distribution scenarios, PlayReady provides several enhanced license
model. The following table identifies and describes those models.
Enhanced License
Model
Description
Simple license
A license contains two fundamental protection components, a
content key and policies. A content key is a symmetric
cryptographic key that is used to decrypt a media file. Policies are
usage rules that specify how, when, and where a file’s content can
be consumed.
Chained license
A series of associated licenses that collectively specify content keys
and policies for one or more media files. Each license chain includes
a root license and one or more leaf licenses that are associated with
and dependent on the root license:

Leaf license – Contains the content key (leaf key) for a specific
media file, defines any policies that are specific to the file, and
references and inherits policies from the root license that it is
associated with.

Root license – Contains an uplink key (root key) that is used
to encrypt content keys (leaf keys) in all the leaf licenses that
are associated with it. It also stores policies that apply to all
the content that is licensed by those leaf licenses.
Chained licenses are frequently used in subscription-based
distribution models because they enable providers and users to
renew licenses for a large number of media files more efficiently.
Scalable chained
license
An extension of the chained license model that allows a provider to
issue only a subset of content keys instead of all required leaf keys
for all content. Designed to support Live TV scenarios, this model
enables a provider to create a master key set that specifies all the
channels and regions for a service. The master key set is then used
when generating scalable root and scalable leaf licenses for channel
content. The scalable root license defines the channels and regions
for a user’s account and a client requests that license before
streaming any content. Scalable leaf licenses are generated and
delivered in-stream for each live channel.
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Enhanced License
Model
Description
Embedded license
A license that is acquired and subsequently stored in the PlayReady
header of a media file. Because the license is stored or ‟embedded”
in the media file, instead of being issued and stored separately, it’s
immediately available. This can facilitate user scenarios such as
moving content from one device to another, backing up content,
and playing back content with a device that is offline. In addition,
an embedded license can be bound to a domain certificate, which
allows the media file to be played by other devices that are
members of the same PlayReady domain.
License Acquisition Models
PlayReady supports two license acquisition models, proactive and reactive. In the proactive
model, a client acquires and stores a license locally before playback is initiated, and the acquired
license typically persists in local storage. This model is typically used in purchase (download to
own), rental, and subscription-based scenarios with/without time-based restriction policies.
In the reactive model, a client acquires a license on demand when playback is initiated. This
model is typically used in streaming and progressive playback scenarios. The reactive model also
supports use of non-persistent licenses, which is a license that is stored temporarily in a client’s
local memory, used only once, and expires automatically when playback ends. This type of
license works well in scenarios that don’t support or require offline playback.
PlayReady clients can use a mixture of proactive and reactive licenses. The PlayReady client SDKs
and the PlayReady Device Porting Kit can be used to implement both acquisition models.
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Client Authentication
In the context of content protection, client authentication may occur at two levels, the client
device and the user. PlayReady handles device authentication automatically through its use of
device keys when issuing licenses to PlayReady clients, as illustrated in the following diagram.
Figure 4 – Role of Device Keys in the Licensing Process
Each PlayReady client device has a unique public-private key pair. When a client sends a license
request to a license service, it includes its device public key. The license service uses that public
key to verify that the client device is a valid PlayReady client before it issues the license. If the
device is a valid PlayReady client, the license service uses the device’s public key to encrypt the
content key for the media file and then sends the resulting license to the client. The client must
then use its device private key to decrypt and play back the content. This authentication model
ensures that the issued license is valid and usable only on that device (in the case of the device
binding).
For user authentication, PlayReady license services are designed to integrate with the
authentication model that a content provider chooses to implement. In practice, user
authentication is integrated with PlayReady in either of two ways:

Clients send license requests to a license service indirectly through a proxy server. In this
model, each license request is first sent to a proxy server. The proxy server then
authenticates the user and passes license requests from valid users to the license service.

Clients send license requests to the license service directly and include an authentication
token. In this model, an authentication token is passed to a server with a license request
and the license service can validate the token with a separate authentication service.
The PlayReady SDKs and Device Porting Kit can be used to integrate a PlayReady
implementation with either authentication model.
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Device Activation and Revocation
Activation is a process that allows licenses to be issued and bound to a PlayReady client device.
For this reason, a client device must be activated before most PlayReady protection mechanisms
will work. By default, activation occurs automatically the first time a PlayReady client attempts to
play back content that is protected by PlayReady technologies. To avoid any playback lag during
activation, you can implement activation proactively in a PlayReady client. The PlayReady client
SDKs and Device Porting Kit explain how.
Revocation is a process that identifies a PlayReady client device or a model of client devices
whose security or compliance is compromised and prevents the device from accessing
additional licenses for protected content. For example, if a specific device model was
compromised, the corresponding model certificate can be revoked to prevent devices of that
model from playing protected content until the issue is addressed through a firmware or other
type of update. When identified, the device or the model of device may be added to a
revocation list. Revocation lists are managed by Microsoft and used by license servers to deny
license requests from devices that have been revoked. A software and/or firmware in that client
device should be upgraded with a new software and/or firmware which address the security or
compliance issue.
Device and Platform Compatibility
To support a broad spectrum of media distribution models, PlayReady client technologies are
compatible with all major platforms and virtually any type of device — they work on a variety of
device classes, architectures, and system environments. This means that you can implement a
PlayReady client on any type of in- or out-of-home device, including mobile phones, tablets,
laptops, game consoles, STBs, Smart TVs, kiosks, and embedded displays. You can also
implement PlayReady on network device (ND) transmitters and receivers, which enable users to
share media content between devices that are connected to the same Internet Protocol (IP)
network. Overall, any device that is capable of receiving and playing media content can host
PlayReady client technologies.
In addition, a PlayReady client can use any application model that is supported by the target
platform. For example, a PlayReady client might be a desktop application for a Windows 7 or
Linux computer, a universal app for a Windows 8 tablet and Windows Phone 8 device, an Xbox
One app, or an app for an Android phone or iPad. It might also be a Silverlight® or HTML5
media application.
The breadth of client options derives from a combination of factors — native PlayReady support
on many platforms, the PlayReady client SDKs and Device Porting Kit for other platforms, and
PlayReady support for the latest web standards and technologies. Another significant factor is
the PlayReady architecture and development model. PlayReady makes extensive use of the
media framework, interfaces, and APIs of the host platform and combines them with PlayReady
APIs that add layers of content protection. Consequently, you can build a client that uses the
application model, features, and APIs that you want for your specific business needs.
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The following Microsoft platforms provide native support for PlayReady:

Windows 7 and later

Windows Phone, all versions

Xbox One and Xbox 360®
For other platforms, you can build a PlayReady client by using a PlayReady SDK that is designed
specifically for that platform (Android or iOS) or the PlayReady Device Porting Kit. The porting
kit provides portable, platform-independent source code and a comprehensive API for calling
PlayReady functions. To help you optimize a PlayReady client for a specific platform, both the
source code and functions are designed to accommodate differing device capabilities and
configurations. To learn more about the PlayReady kits, see Development Tools and Options.
Moving away from specific platforms, you also have the option of leveraging the latest web
standards and technologies to build a PlayReady client that works on multiple platforms. Both
Silverlight and MPEG-DASH (MPEG Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP) provide crossplatform solutions for delivering protected media content. Silverlight provides built-in PlayReady
support for multiple media formats and it works on Windows, Mac OS X, and Windows Phone
devices. On Windows and Mac OS X devices, Silverlight can be used if a free specialized plug-in
is installed and it can be used for both in- and out-of-browser scenarios. PlayReady supports
both types of scenarios.
MPEG-DASH, when used with HTML5 Media Source Extensions (MSE) and Encrypted Media
Extensions (EME), also provides an end-to-end framework for delivering protected content to
multiple platforms. Like Silverlight, it can be used for both in- and out-of-browser scenarios.
Unlike Silverlight however, it doesn’t require any specialized plug-ins and it consists of only ISO
and W3C standards. PlayReady fully supports MPEG-DASH, MSE, and EME. In addition, Windows
8.1 introduced built-in support for EME APIs.
Supported Media Formats
PlayReady supports a plethora of standard encoding and delivery formats for essentially any
type of media content, including movies, premium live content, music, games, and images.
PlayReady can be bound to any type of file format by defining the binding specification to the
file format. PlayReady isn’t tied to a specific media format. Instead, PlayReady support is
determined by whether a client understands the PlayReady binding for a media file. In addition,
PlayReady uses only industry-standard encryption technologies to protect content. Bolstering
that support, Microsoft continuously publishes specifications about using PlayReady to protect
content in commonly used formats, and most commercial encoders and packagers support
PlayReady technologies.
PlayReady supports nearly all standard and platform-specific media formats. This includes the
new Common File Format (CFF), which the Digital Entertainment Content Ecosystem (DECE)
designed to work with UltraViolet players on all platforms and with all protection systems
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approved by the DECE. PlayReady is approved by the DECE. CFF can be used by other
distribution systems and is expected to be used more broadly, partly because MPEG is currently
updating the MPEG-4 container format to include aspects of CFF. Here is major media formats
which can bind PlayReady.
Name
Container
Codec
Description
PlayReady Media Format
File (.PYV or .PYA)
ASF
Video: WMV
Audio: WMA
This is the binding of
PlayReady to the Advanced
Systems Format (ASF).
PlayReady Envelope File
Arbitrary
Arbitrary
This is the binding of
PlayReady to any type of
format.
Protected Interoperable
File Format (PIFF)
ISOBMFF
Video: WMV,
H.264
Audio: WMA,
AAC
This file format is and ISO
Base Media File brand with
the extension of the binding
of PlayReady. This format is a
single encoding format
appropriate for download,
broadcast, streaming and
multi-bitrate adaptive
streaming.
DECE Common File
Format
ISOBMFF
Codecs
capable to
ISOBMFF
container
This file format is and ISO
Base Media File brand.
PlayReady is bound by using
ISO Common Encryption.
The format is used for
UltraViolet DTO content.
DECE Common
Streaming Format
ISOBMFF
Codecs
capable to
ISOBMFF
container
This file format is and ISO
Base Media File brand.
PlayReady is bound by using
ISO Common Encryption.
This supports late binding
for DTO content using
SMPTE packaging format,
late binding for streaming
using MPEG DASH Media
Presentation Descriptor file.
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Name
Container
Codec
Description
PlayReady MPEG-2 TS
MPEG2-TS
Codecs
capable to
MPEG-2 TS
container
This file format can be used
for PlayReady protected HLS.
The binding specification is
disclosed only to the
PlayReady licensees. This
MPEG-2 TS format is
compatible with Azure
Media Services.
Of the various encoding options for video content, some of the more commonly used formats
that PlayReady supports are H.263, H.264, and H.265 codecs. For audio content, supported
formats include AAC, AAC+, and WMA codecs. In addition, PlayReady supports UHD (ultra high
definition), HD (high definition), SD (standard definition), and PD (portable definition) profiles.
PlayReady support with the codecs is also determined by whether a client understands the
PlayReady binding for a codec.
For content distribution, PlayReady also supports multiple distribution options, of which there
are two primary methods:

Download, basic and progressive – Allows a client to begin playing content only after all
or some of a media file is downloaded to the client device. In a basic download, playback
cannot begin until the entire media file is downloaded. In a progressive download,
playback begins as soon as the initial portion of the file is downloaded and the rest of the
file is downloaded in parallel with playback. The most commonly used formats for
downloadable content are Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG), Windows Media® Video
(WMV), and Apple QuickTime Movie (MOV). PlayReady supports all these formats.

Stream, live and on demand – Allows a client to begin playing content immediately instead
of waiting for all or some of a media file to be downloaded. If the content is encoded at
multiple bit rates, a client can optimize playback quality in real time by requesting
segments from various encoded bit rates of the media asset. This process, called adaptive
bit rate (ABR) streaming, begins immediately when playback begins and continues as
playback proceeds. The client determines which bit rate to request based on factors such
as available network bandwidth, buffer status, and CPU capacity. The most commonly used
formats for streaming content are MPEG-DASH, Smooth Streaming, and HTTP Live
Streaming (HLS). PlayReady supports all these formats.
The primary difference between the two methods is how content is received and stored by a
client. A client should render media files the same way regardless of whether they are
downloaded and played from local storage or streamed.
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All of the common streaming formats — MPEG-DASH, Smooth Streaming, and HLS — support
both live and on-demand ABR streaming. However, only MPEG-DASH is an international
standard. Other signal differences between the formats are inherent support for multiple
content protection systems and supported client platforms. Although Smooth Streaming and
HLS are commonly used at this time, MPEG-DASH is quickly becoming the most cross-platform
interoperable format.
MPEG-DASH
Developed by the DASH Industry Forum, MPEG Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (MPEGDASH) is the first open ISO standard for ABR streaming technology. The standard specifies
formats for delivering live or on-demand media content to a full spectrum of clients and devices
via HTTP. The standard (ISO/IEC 23009) was first published in April 2012.
In addition to defining standard file formats, MPEG-DASH is the foundation for a larger media
framework that enables providers to package, protect, distribute, and deliver only one set of
media files to almost any platform. The MPEG-DASH framework is designed to:

Provide users with the highest quality video experience – MPEG-DASH combines premium
video features with the best ABR streaming technologies developed thus far. Supported
features include trick modes (seek, fast forward, rewind), closed captions, multiscreen
capability, and multitrack capabilities for audio and subtitles. MPEG-DASH also supports
business features such as ad insertion.

Eliminate dependencies on proprietary and platform-specific formats – Media file formats
are based on ISO MPEG formats, which are the most commonly used media formats. In
addition, MPEG-DASH isn’t tied to only one specific codec.

Reuse existing content, devices, and delivery infrastructure – Specialized media servers
aren’t required for distribution. Instead, HTTP web servers and protocols can be used,
which means content can be delivered through existing Internet infrastructures. In
addition, content can be streamed to various types of applications without requiring
specialized plug-ins. If used with HTML5 Media Source Extensions (MSE) and HTML5
Encrypted Media Extensions (EME), providers can protect and deliver the same media file
to multiple platforms.

Work with multiple content protection systems – MPEG-DASH doesn’t use a DRM-specific
encoding format. Instead, protection is applied by using the format and methods defined
by the ISO Common Encryption Scheme (CENC). Consequently, a media file can be
encoded and encrypted once and used with multiple content protection systems,
including PlayReady.
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The following diagram illustrates the key components of the framework.
Figure 5 – Key Components of the MPEG-DASH Framework
Delving more deeply into content protection, MPEG-DASH is designed to work with any content
protection system that supports the CENC standard (ISO/IEC 23001). CENC defines a common
format for capturing the encryption data that a client needs to decrypt a file. All other protection
mechanisms — for example, how content keys are acquired and how policies are associated with
a media file — remain specific to the protection system that is being used. Consequently, the
same media file can be used with multiple content protection systems. PlayReady technologies
fully support the CENC standard and can be used to protect MPEG-DASH content. For detailed
information about implementing PlayReady support for MPEG-DASH, see DASH Content
Protection using Microsoft PlayReady on the PlayReady website.
Client support for the MPEG-DASH framework includes any web browser or application that
supports MPEG-DASH formats and the W3C’s HTML5 and HTML5 Media Source Extensions
(MSE) recommendations. MSE defines a JavaScript API for streaming content and providing ABR
and live streaming features without requiring any specialized plug-ins or application
customization. It essentially enables you to build streaming media applications by using only
HTML and JavaScript. Currently, HTML5 and MSE are supported by the latest versions of Internet
Explorer, Chrome, Safari, and Firefox.
To protect content that is delivered by using MSE, providers use HTML5 Encrypted Media
Extensions (EME). Also defined by the W3C, EME is an API that enables a JavaScript application
to decrypt a media file and work with a content protection system to apply protection
mechanisms. The EME architecture uses a Content Decryption Module (CDM) that translates
generic EME APIs into the requisite data for a specific content protection system. Combined with
CENC, EME enables a single JavaScript application to deliver the same protected content to
every platform that supports EME and uses the same CDM (protection system).
Starting with Windows 8.1, Windows provides APIs that were built specifically to support EME
and it provides a PlayReady framework that uses CDM functionality. Internet Explorer 11 uses
those APIs and other Windows browsers and applications can do the same. By using the
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PlayReady Device Porting Kit, the PlayReady CDM can be implemented on other platforms
spanning a variety of device types. Note that Windows Phone does not currently support EME.
To facilitate browser support, Microsoft published a specification that defines a general interface
for mapping EME methods and events to protection systems and platform components. This
interface — the Content Decryption Module interface (CDMi) — enables an application to access
a platform CDM and expose the CDM functionality needed to protect content, without requiring
browsers to license and incorporate DRM components. Use of the CDMi also provides an
additional layer of protection because it uses platform components, instead of browser
components, for critical protection functions such as decryption. Although it was developed by
Microsoft, the CDMi is an open interface that can be used by any browser with any content
protection system. For detailed technical information about CDMi, see the Content Decryption
Module Interface specification on the PlayReady website. For an in-depth look at how the
various HTML5 extensions and the CDMi work together, see Interoperability, Digital Rights
Management and the Web on the PlayReady website.
Smooth Streaming
Smooth Streaming, also known as HTTP Smooth Streaming or Microsoft Smooth Streaming, is
developed by Microsoft as an IIS Media Services extension and a component of Microsoft Media
Foundation, which is the Windows multimedia platform. It can be used for live or on-demand
ABR streaming. Streams can be served by a standard HTTP web server if the IIS Media Services
extension is installed, or a dedicated media server.
Smooth Streaming is natively supported by the Windows client operating system (Windows
Vista® and later), the Windows Server® operating system (2003 and later), Xbox 360, and Xbox
One™. It’s also supported by Silverlight 4 and later, which means that content can be delivered
to devices running Windows Phone 7 and later, and web browsers and Silverlight applications
on Windows and Mac OS X devices that have the Silverlight plug-in. Support can be
implemented on additional platforms by using the Smooth Streaming Client Porting Kit.
Smooth Streaming is based on the ISO base media file brand’s Protected Interoperable File
Format (PIFF). Standardized by Microsoft, PIFF defines a standard format for audio-video
containers and ABR metadata. It also defines an optional encryption scheme that is designed to
interoperate with multiple content protection systems. The only differences are how content
keys are acquired and how policies are associated with a media file. For detailed technical
information about PIFF, see the Protected Interoperable File Format specification on the
Microsoft website.
PlayReady technologies provide full support for Smooth Streaming content. PlayReady client
support includes clients for all supported versions of Windows operating systems, Windows
Phone, Xbox One, Xbox 360, and web browsers and Silverlight applications on Windows and
Mac devices that have the Silverlight plug-in. Support can be extended to other platforms by
using the appropriate PlayReady client SDK or the PlayReady Device Porting Kit.
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HLS
HTTP Live Streaming (HLS) is developed by Apple for the iOS and Mac OS X (Snow Leopard and
later) operating systems and Apple’s QuickTime and Safari software. It can be used for live or
on-demand ABR streaming. As its name implies, streams can be served by a standard HTTP web
server; a dedicated media server isn’t required.
HLS is the only streaming format that is natively supported by Apple devices, including iPhones,
iPads, iPods, and Apple TV. It’s also supported by Android devices and some STBs and thirdparty players. HLS is based on the MPEG-2 file format and it provides a standard AES-128
encryption mechanism. By default, HLS exchanges content keys by using a combination of
HTTPS and either device-specific credentials or an HTTP cookie. The result is a simple DRM
system.
For more robust protection, PlayReady technologies can be used to protect HLS content either
in addition to or in lieu of default HLS encryption mechanisms. PlayReady client support can be
implemented on iOS and Android devices by using the appropriate PlayReady client SDK and on
other HLS-supported platforms by using the PlayReady Device Porting Kit.
Backward Compatibility with Windows Media DRM
PlayReady license services and some of clients support backward compatibility with content that
is protected by Windows Media® DRM (WMDRM) technology. However, there are some
constraints:

License acquisition – A PlayReady license service can issue a license for WMDRM content
only if a PlayReady client requests the license by using the PlayReady message protocol.
PlayReady license services cannot issue a license to a WMDRM client (such as Windows
Media Player) by using the legacy WMDRM message protocol.

Clients – Although PlayReady clients offer full support for WMDRM content, WRDRM
clients cannot decrypt and use content that is protected by PlayReady.
If those constraints are addressed, PlayReady license services and clients can issue and acquire
licenses for WMDRM and PlayReady content concurrently. This means that a content provider
can deploy and migrate to PlayReady in manageable stages. Silverlight and PlayReady Client
SDK for Windows Store app can support this backward compatibility.
Development Tools and Options
Your choice of development tool for building a PlayReady client depends primarily on the target
platform, the application model that you want to use, and the media formats and distribution
methods that your client needs to support.
For Microsoft Windows, Windows Phone, Android, and iOS platforms, you can use PlayReady
Client SDKs that are designed specifically for those platforms. For web applications that work on
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multiple platforms, your choice of development tool depends largely on the technology that you
want to use. For other platforms and types of devices, you can use the PlayReady Device Porting
Kit.In the following sections we’ll walk through the various development tools and options for
building PlayReady clients, starting with the native application and web application on
PlayReady supported platforms, and other type of platforms and devices with PlayReady Device
Porting Kit.
Native Applications
With the PlayReady Client SDKs, you can develop native applications for Windows, Windows
Phone, Android, and iOS devices to provide more rich experiences to end-users with calling
platform’s native APIs. But this type of application is dependent on the platform functionalities
and interfaces, such as platform media player function. You need to consider application
development efforts (costs, resources, and so on) for each platform which you want to deliver
the contents.
PlayReady Client SDK for Windows and Windows Phone
For Microsoft platforms, you can use standard platform SDKs in combination with a PlayReady
client SDK that’s designed specifically for the platform. For the latest Microsoft platforms, those
SDKs are:

For Windows 8.1, the PlayReady Client SDK for Windows 8.1 Store Apps

For Windows Phone 8.1, the PlayReady Client SDK for Windows 8.1 Phone Apps
Both SDKs are available from the Visual Studio Gallery. To learn more, see Developing PlayReady
Windows Store and Web Apps in the Windows Developer Center on MSDN®. Microsoft also
published a sample universal app that demonstrates how to play back PlayReady-protected
content on Windows 8.1 and Windows Phone 8.1 devices. You can learn more about that app on
the sample's download page in the Visual Studio Gallery.
Smooth Streaming Client SDK for Windows Store app/Windows Phone can support clear and
PlayReady-protected Smooth Streaming content. With Player Framework for Windows and
Windows Phone, clear and PlayReady-protected MPEG-DASH content can be supported.
Xbox ADK
Xbox 360 and Xbox One natively support PlayReady. To develop an application for either
console, use the Xbox Application Development Kit (ADK). To learn more about developing Xbox
applications, see the Xbox Developers Program website.
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PlayReady API included in the Xbox One ADK is very similar with PlayReady
Client SDK for Windows and Windows Phone. An almost part of JavaScript
application code for Windows and Windows Phone can be re-used for Xbox
One application.PlayReady Client SDK for Android
The PlayReady Client SDK for Android provides PlayReady libraries, tools, and reference
information for building PlayReady-enabled apps that work on Android devices running Android
version 4.0 (API level 14, Ice Cream Sandwich) or later.
The SDK is designed to be used with the Android SDK and Eclipse IDE, which you can download
as part of the Android Developer Tools (ADT) bundle from the Android Developers website.
After you install the ADT bundle and configure it by using the Android SDK manager, simply
install the PlayReady Client SDK for Android to begin developing your app. To install and use
the PlayReady SDK with ADT, your computer must be running Windows Vista or later or meet
the base ADT requirements for Linux.
By using the SDK, you can easily integrate PlayReady functionality with native Android APIs and
implement PlayReady protection for media formats that Android natively supports, such as HLS.
For example, the Android MediaPlayer class controls playback of media content on an Android
device. By using the PlayReady SDK, you extend that class with PlayReady APIs to enable
playback of media content that is protected by PlayReady technologies.
You can also use the SDK to implement PlayReady protection for MPEG-DASH and Smooth
Streaming content that’s delivered live or on demand, as well as offline playback of files in the
Common File Format (CFF) or Protected Interoperable File Format (PIFF) formats. For video
content, PlayReady support includes PD, SD, and HD profiles, as well as a Timed Text Markup
Language (TTML) parser for captions.
The SDK also helps you implement support for a wide range of PlayReady protection
mechanisms and features, including device activation and revocation, network device (ND)
receiver functionality, proactive and reactive license acquisition, enforcement of outputprotection levels, embedded licenses, chained licenses, domain management, and metering. For
Live TV scenarios, you can also implement support for key rotation, scalable chained licenses,
blackout services, and ad insertion.
To help you develop a PlayReady-enabled app, the SDK provides the following resources, all of
which are customized specifically for Android development:

A complete set of PlayReady shared libraries.

A sample application that you can use as a reference or starting point for your own app.

A programming guide that explains how to implement specific PlayReady features and
provides details about platform-specific considerations and limitations.
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
Detailed reference information for relevant interfaces, classes, enumeration types, and
error codes.

Instructions for preparing to release your app.
In addition, the SDK includes specifications for PlayReady extensions, protocols, and formats.
As an SDK user, you also have access to a PlayReady test server that you can use to test and
debug your app for tasks such as acquiring content and licenses, joining and leaving domains,
and processing metering data.
To obtain the PlayReady Client SDK for Android, you can purchase a PlayReady license or
request a PlayReady evaluation agreement. To learn more, see Licensing Options.
PlayReady Client SDK for iOS
The PlayReady Client SDK for iOS provides PlayReady libraries, tools, and reference information
for developing PlayReady-enabled apps that work on devices running iOS version 6.0 or later.
Applicable devices include iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch.
The SDK is designed to be used with Xcode 4.5.2 or later running on Mac OS X Lion (10.7) or
later. You can download Xcode from the Apple Developer website. After you install and
configure Xcode, set up your provisioning profile with the iOS Developer Program, and install
the PlayReady Client SDK for iOS to begin developing your app.
Much like the PlayReady SDK for Android, the PlayReady SDK for iOS helps you integrate
PlayReady functionality with native iOS APIs and implement PlayReady protection for media
formats that iOS natively supports, such as HLS. For example, the iOS Media Player framework
can be used to play back video on an iOS device. By using the PlayReady SDK, you extend that
framework with PlayReady APIs that enable playback of media content that’s protected by
PlayReady technologies.
You can also use the SDK to implement PlayReady protection for live and on-demand playback
of MPEG-DASH and Smooth Streaming content, as well as offline playback of CFF and PIFF files.
For video content, PlayReady supports PD, SD, and HD profiles, and a TTML parser for captions.
The PlayReady SDK also helps you implement support for PlayReady protection mechanisms
and features such as device activation and revocation, network device (ND) receiver
functionality, proactive and reactive license acquisition, enforcement of output-protection levels,
embedded licenses, chained licenses, domain management, and metering. For Live TV scenarios,
you can also implement support for key rotation, scalable chained licenses, blackout services,
and ad insertion.
To help you develop a PlayReady-enabled app, the SDK provides the following resources, all of
which are customized specifically for iOS development:

A complete set of PlayReady shared libraries.
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
A sample application that you can use as a reference or starting point for your own app.

A programming guide that explains how to implement specific PlayReady features and
provides details about platform-specific considerations and limitations.

Detailed reference information for relevant interfaces and classes, protocols, enumeration
types, notifications, and error codes.

Instructions for preparing to release your app.
In addition, the SDK includes specifications for PlayReady extensions, protocols, and formats.
As an SDK user, you also have access to a PlayReady test server that you can use to test and
debug your app for tasks such as acquiring content and licenses, joining and leaving domains,
and processing metering data.
To obtain the PlayReady Client SDK for iOS, you can purchase a PlayReady license or request a
PlayReady evaluation agreement. To learn more, see Licensing Options.
Web Applications
While the SDKs are ideal development tools for Windows, Android, and iOS devices and the
PlayReady Device Porting Kit is an ideal solution for other platforms, you have additional options
for developing PlayReady clients. If you prefer to develop a PlayReady client that works on
multiple platforms, a web or browser-based application may be the best solution. Currently,
optimal solutions for these types of applications derive from using Silverlight or a combination
of MPEG-DASH, HTML5 Media Source Extensions (MSE), and HTML5 Encrypted Media
Extensions (EME).
Silverlight
Silverlight is a cross-platform technology for developing web, desktop, and mobile applications
that work on Windows, Mac OS X, and Windows Phone devices. It uses various web standards —
primarily eXtensible Application Markup Language (XAML) and the HTML Document Object
Model (DOM) — and a lightweight version of the .NET Framework. It also provides built-in
support for PlayReady technologies.
On Windows and Mac OS X platforms, Silverlight can be used for both in- and out-of-browser
scenarios if a free plug-in is installed. The plug-in works on computers running Windows Vista or
later and Mac OS X Lion (10.5.7) or later. For in-browser scenarios, the plug-in is available for
current versions of Internet Explorer and versions of Chrome, Safari, and Firefox which support
Netscape Plugin Application Programming Interface (NPAPI). Silverlight is primarily designed for
hosting in a Web page. However, there are several alternative hosting options that enable
Silverlight to run outside the browser or within another host environment. See more details at
“Alternative Hosting” on MSDN.
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To develop a Silverlight application for Windows or Mac OS X, you can use Visual Studio 2010 or
later and the Silverlight Tools for Visual Studio. To develop a Silverlight application for Windows
Phone, use the Silverlight for Windows Phone Toolkit. You can download the tool kits and learn
more about developing Silverlight applications at the Silverlight Developer Center on MSDN. For
a current list of supported browsers and operating systems, visit the Silverlight website.
SmoothStreamingMediaElement provided by Smooth Streaming Client SDK (for Silverlight) can
support clear and PlayReady-protected Smooth Streaming and MPEG-DASH.
HTML5 Video/Audio with Media Extensions (EME/MSE)
When used with HTML5 Media Source Extensions (MSE) and Encrypted Media Extensions (EME),
MPEG-DASH also provides a cross-platform solution for delivering protected content. Unlike
Silverlight however, it doesn’t require any specialized plug-ins. PlayReady provides full support
for MPEG-DASH, MSE, and EME. To learn more about the standards and PlayReady support for
them, see Supported Media Formats.
MPEG-DASH and MSE are currently supported by the latest versions of Internet Explorer,
Chrome, Safari, and Firefox. In addition, Windows 8.1 introduced built-in support for EME APIs
and maintained native support for PlayReady.
To develop a web application that delivers PlayReady-protected content by using MPEG-DASH,
MSE, and EME, you can use your preferred IDE. For detailed information about implementing
PlayReady protection for MPEG-DASH content, see DASH Content Protection using Microsoft
PlayReady on the PlayReady website.
PlayReady Device Porting Kit
The PlayReady Device Porting Kit provides a primitive set of PlayReady APIs, portable source
code, tools, test resources, and documentation to help you port PlayReady technologies to a
wide variety of system architectures, operating system environments, and types of devices —
game consoles, STBs, Smart TVs, embedded displays, gateway devices, and more. You can use
the porting kit, along with your preferred development environment, to implement PlayReady
technologies on virtually any platform.
A definitive component of the porting kit is a comprehensive API for calling PlayReady functions
from an application. The functions span all PlayReady features and are designed to help you
leverage and accommodate differing device and platform capabilities and configurations. Some
functions are required because they enable fundamental tasks such as initializing, decrypting,
and rendering protected media files. Other functions are optional, depending on the features
that you want to implement.
For example, by using the kit you can build a client that performs basic protection functions and
also does any or all of the following:

Uses secure and anti-rollback clocks to enforce time-based policies.
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
Acquires licenses directly ‟over the air” (DLA-OTA) through a wireless network or
indirectly via a proxy application.

Uses a hardware-based cryptographic core that you provision by using the kit.

Acts as an ND transmitter or receiver that sends or receives and plays streaming content,
enabling users to share media content between devices that are connected to the same
IP network.

Supports key rotation, scalable chained licenses, blackout services, and ad insertion for
Live TV content.

Meters content usage.

Provides backward compatibility with content that is protected by Windows Media DRM
(WMDRM) technology.
The porting kit clearly indicates whether a specific function is required or optional. It also
explains which functions to use for specific PlayReady features and how to implement them.
Another key component of the porting kit is platform-independent source code for a PlayReady
client application. The source code is written to conform to the ANSI C standards and it supports
both big- and little-endian formats, which means it’s truly designed to work with multiple
compilers and platforms. You can use the source code as a starting point for your own client by
modifying it to conform to your target architecture. The kit makes it easy to set system and
environment variables such as processor type and target platform, choose compile-time options
that optimize memory usage and threading, and set link-time options that specify which
features and functionality to enable. From there, you’re ready to start building, testing, and
optimizing your client.
Overall, the PlayReady Device Porting Kit offers the following components:

A complete set of PlayReady APIs that conform to the ANSI C standards and support both
big- and little-endian formats.

Platform-independent source code that you can port to any device or platform and use as
a starting or reference point for your own client.

A hardware abstraction layer that enables critical cryptography tasks to be executed on a
secure processor or for processor-intensive tasks to be run on dedicated hardware.

Code samples that demonstrate how various functions work and can serve as a starting
point for your own code. You can customize each sample to target a specific platform.

A comprehensive programming guide that explains how to implement specific PlayReady
features and support various distribution models.
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
Detailed reference information for functions, structures, enumeration types, data types,
error codes, and messages.

Technical specifications for PlayReady extensions, protocols, and formats.

A test kit that contains a collection of scripts that you can compile and run individually or
as a batch to test your code. Each test area includes its own executable, script file, and
output examples. You can also build custom test areas.

Several sets of tools and utilities, including tools for testing cryptography code, utilities
for inspecting files and stores such as licenses in a license store, and a tool for verifying
that media files are transferred correctly to a device.

Test certificates and keys, and a certificate request kit for generating key pairs and
requesting the certificates needed to release a client to a production environment.
As a porting kit user, you also gain access to a PlayReady test server. The test server provides a
series of test scenarios and protected media files that you can use to test whether your client
can acquire content and process licenses correctly.
There are no specific hardware or system requirements for using the porting kit, although the kit
has been tested specifically on computers running current versions of the Windows operating
system and Ubuntu-based Linux distributions. In addition, the porting kit works with any
compiler that supports ANSI C, such as Microsoft Visual Studio®. To help you get started, the kit
includes compiler definitions for Microsoft C and GNU C as well as empty compiler definitions
that you can use to customize the kit for a specific compiler.
Tools and Options by Platform
Considering the variety of options, the following table can help you identify the client
development options for each major platform. The table is sorted alphabetically by platform.
Platform
Client Development Options
Android
To develop apps for Android version 4.0 (API level 14) and later, a
PlayReady Client SDK is available for Android. A variety of SDKs have
also been developed by PlayReady licensees that support additional
functionalities including support for earlier versions of Android.
iOS
To develop apps for iOS 6.0 and later, a PlayReady Client SDK is
available for iOS. A variety of SDKs for iOS have also been developed by
PlayReady licensees that support additional functionalities.
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Platform
Client Development Options
Linux
To develop applications on a Linux based device platform, use the
PlayReady Device Porting Kit. The porting kit has been tested
specifically with Ubuntu-based distributions but can be used for any
Linux distribution.
Max OS X
Use the Silverlight browser plug-in which provides built-in support for
PlayReady technologies. For information about the Silverlight plug-in,
visit the Silverlight website.
Windows 7
Use the Silverlight browser plug-in which provides built-in support for
PlayReady technologies. For information about the Silverlight plug-in,
visit the Silverlight website.
Windows 8
Windows 8 and later natively support PlayReady. Use any of the
following:




For apps, use the PlayReady Client SDK for Windows 8.1 Store
Apps and the Smooth Streaming Client SDK.
For web- or browser-based applications that support HTML5
media extensions, use EME and MSE for ABR streaming delivery.
For web- or browser-based applications that don’t support
PlayReady via EME, use the Silverlight browser plug-in.
For desktop applications use Silverlight to develop an Out-ofBrowser application.
All of those SDKs are available from the Visual Studio Gallery.
Windows Phone
Windows Phone 8 and later natively support PlayReady. To develop
apps for Windows Phone, use the Smooth Streaming Client SDK for
Windows Phone 8.1 and the PlayReady Client SDK for Windows 8.1
Phone Apps. Both SDKs are available from the Visual Studio Gallery.
Xbox
Xbox 360 and Xbox One natively support PlayReady. To develop an
application for either console, use the Xbox SDK (XDK) or Application
Development Kit (ADK), depending on the type of application.
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Testing Resources
To help you test a PlayReady client, Microsoft provides a comprehensive set of test tools for
licensed users of a PlayReady client SDK or the PlayReady Device Porting Kit.
Of the test tools, a key resource is the PlayReady test server. The test server is a fully functioning
PlayReady server that helps you test and debug a PlayReady client for a multitude of tasks such
as acquiring licenses for different types of media content, enforcing various types of policies,
joining and leaving domains, and processing metering data. The server hosts a PlayReady
license service, provides a series of test cases, and stores sample media files in various formats
and with various policies. To find and learn about each test case and related sample files, you
can use the server’s web interface and in-depth documentation that’s included in the SDKs and
porting kit.
In addition to test server access, the PlayReady Device Porting Kit provides a suite of tools and
utilities for testing ported code. This includes executable files and source code for learning and
testing specific PlayReady functions, tools for testing cryptography code, and utilities for
inspecting files and stores. The porting kit also provides a test framework with predefined tests,
organized by functional area, and a modular structure and source code that you can use to build
and integrate custom tests into the framework.
All of the PlayReady test resources can be used in addition to the tools and test resources
provided by other SDKs and the IDE that you use to develop a PlayReady client.
Release Requirements
Before you can release a PlayReady client to a production environment, you need to perform
various tasks in addition to typical release tasks for any client. For PlayReady clients, additional
pre-release tasks include verifying that the client meets PlayReady compliance and robustness
requirements and obtaining the appropriate certificates from Microsoft. Pre-release tasks vary
based on several factors, such as which type of client you want to release and how you want to
distribute it. The PlayReady client SDKs and PlayReady Device Porting Kit provide instructions for
preparing to release a PlayReady client and Microsoft provides additional resources to guide
you through the release process.
Compliance and Robustness
PlayReady clients, like all PlayReady technologies and implementations, are governed by a
content protection regime. The regime defines and enforces compliance and robustness rules,
administers a chain of trust, and establishes remedies for security breaches. A security breach is
a circumvention or non-compliant implementation of PlayReady technology that puts content at
risk by allowing users to bypass or remove restrictions on content usage.
Compliance rules specify required behaviors of PlayReady implementations and the software
that accesses those implementations. They describe how media content may be accessed and
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shared according to specific rights and restrictions. Robustness rules specify protection
requirements for each type of media asset in a PlayReady implementation. They ensure that
implementations are designed to protect content in a robust manner.
The PlayReady compliance and robustness rules are specified in PlayReady license agreements
and all PlayReady implementations and products must satisfy the requirements defined in those
rules. Microsoft defines and enforces the rules, acting as the compliance and robustness
administrator for PlayReady technologies. Microsoft also maintains processes and resources for
discovering and remedying security breaches, including a dedicated breach response team. To
read the compliance and robustness rules, see the Compliance & Robustness Rules area of the
PlayReady website or your license agreement
Licensing Options
To develop and distribute a PlayReady client for Microsoft endpoints, such as Windows 8,
Windows Phone, Xbox, or Silverlight, you do not need a PlayReady license. You do however
need a PlayReady Master Agreement and a PlayReady Service Deployment License to distribute
licenses to Microsoft endpoints.
To develop and distribute a PlayReady client for all other platforms, you’ll need to sign the
PlayReady Master Agreement and purchase the PlayReady license that reflects your business
needs, as indicated in the following table. After you obtain a license, you can download the SDK
and other packages associated with the license.
License
Scenarios
Includes
Microsoft PlayReady
Intermediate
Product License
For developing a
PlayReady client for iOS or
Android devices or
developing a client device
such as an STB, Smart TV,
or media player.
PlayReady Device Porting Kit,
PlayReady Client SDKs for iOS and
Android, PlayReady Document Pack,
PlayReady Windows 8.1 Sample
Application with ND, CDMi Example
Code for PlayReady, Client SDK
SL2000 Test Library, Company Device
Test Certificate
Microsoft PlayReady
Final Product
License
For distributing a
PlayReady client or client
device to users or using
PlayReady clients in a
commercial deployment.
PlayReady Certificate Generation Kit,
PlayReady Client SDKs for iOS and
Android, PlayReady Document Pack,
PlayReady Windows 8.1 sample
application with ND, client SDK
SL2000 library, Company Device
Certificate
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Microsoft PlayReady
Developing PlayReady Clients
If you want to try PlayReady before purchasing a license to develop an Android or iOS client,
you can request a PlayReady evaluation agreement by contacting wmla@microsoft.com. The
evaluation agreement includes the appropriate PlayReady client SDK and a non-production
SL150 certificate for testing a client with PlayReady.
Instead of licensing PlayReady technologies directly, you can contract with a Microsoft
PlayReady ASP licensee. For more information, see Approved Microsoft PlayReady Licensees.
For additional information about PlayReady licensing, see the Licensing page on the PlayReady
website. If you have questions about PlayReady licenses or the licensing process, please contact
Microsoft at wmla@microsoft.com.
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