RS523 GSM-R Issue 1 final GB_GSM-R Handbook

Handbook RS523
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
GSM-R Handbook
RS523
Issue 1
December 2016
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Contents
Published by:
RSSB
The authoritative version of this document is available at
www.rssb.co.uk
Contents approved by Traffic Operation and Management
Standards Committee.
Enquiries on this document can be forwarded to:
enquirydesk@rssb.co.uk
GSM-R
Handbook RS523
Issue 1, September 2016
© Copyright 2016
Rail Safety and Standards Board Limited
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Contents
You will need this handbook if you
carry out the duties of a:
•
driver
•
operations controller
•
signaller
•
train operator’s controller.
Note: This handbook contains train radio and fixed
terminal information typically found on the Great Britain
mainline railway. Other equipment may differ in
functionality.
1
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Contents
1
Introduction
2
Equipment
3
4
2
2.1
Train radio functions
2.2
Fixed terminal functions
Powering up
3.1
Train radio
3.2
Fixed terminal
Registration
4.1
Registration of the train radio
4.2
Pending registration
4.3
Company wild card codes (99x)
4.4
Preregistration
4.5
Registration problems
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Contents
5
Radio communications
5.1
GSM-R call types
5.2
Urgent calls
5.3
Railway emergency group calls (REC)
5.4
Short dial codes
5.5
Using the train radio phonebooks
5.6
Cab to cab calls
5.7
Misrouted calls
5.8
Role profiles
5.9
Role transfer
5.10 Call transfer
6
7
PA calls and DSD alarm
6.1
DSD alarm calls
6.2
PA calls
Operational text messages
7.1
Standing at signal message
7.2
Contact signaller message
7.3
Contact train operator control message
7.4
Wait message
7.5
Acknowledge message
7.6
Messages between signal boxes
3
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Contents
8
9
10
Broadcast calls
8.1
Types of broadcast calls
8.2
General broadcast calls
8.3
Advisory broadcast calls
8.4
Acknowledged (safety) broadcast calls
Deregistration
9.1
Deregistration of the train radio
9.2
Deregistration problems
Faults
10.1 GSM-R TD failure
10.2 Train radio failures
10.3 Network coverage issues
10.4 Call failure and dropped calls
10.5 Checking the train radio can make and receive calls
(echo call test)
10.6 Loss of a signaller’s fixed terminal
10.7 Loss of train operator’s fixed terminal
10.8 Use of hand portable devices
10.9 Use of transportable devices
4
1
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Introduction
Purpose of this handbook
This handbook is intended as guidance to users of the GSM-R
system used on the GB mainline railway.
It has been designed as a day-to-day reference guide for the less
frequently used processes and functions of the GSM-R system.
The handbook looks at these from the perspective of a driver,
operations controller, signaller and train operator’s controller.
5
2
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Equipment
2.1 Train radio functions
These are some of the buttons found on the GSM-R driver’s
control panel (DCP) and an explanation of their functions.
Accept: Used to answer calls and accept user
entries on the display.
Reject or cancel: Used to reject or delete
entries on the display or to end a call.
Menu: Provides access to the in-built menu.
TOC phonebook: Provides access to the train
operator’s phonebook.
Up within menu or increase volume: Used to
scroll up through the screen or menu options or to
increase the volume.
Down within menu or decrease volume: Used to
scroll downwards through the screen or menu
options or reduce the volume.
Test button: Used to test the train radio.
Increase brightness/scroll right: Increases the
brightness of the display or used to scroll to the right
when the text on the screen is longer than 20
characters.
Reduce brightness/scroll left: Reduces the
brightness of the display or used to scroll to the left
when the text on the screen is longer than 20
characters.
6
2
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Equipment
Registration/turn on: Enables registration and
deregistration of the train radio. Turns driver’s control
panel on when pressed for two seconds.
Standing at signal: Used to inform the signaller that the
train is at a stand at a stop signal.
ST: Used to acknowledge to the signaller that a broadcast
has been received and understood.
Call signaller: To make a call to the signaller.
Railway emergency group call (REC): Used to make a
railway emergency group call.
Urgent call: Used to make an urgent call to the signaller.
7
2
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Equipment
2.2 Fixed terminal functions
These are some of the buttons on the fixed terminal and their
functions.
Incoming message: To acknowledge a message.
Hold: Used to place a call on hold.
Forward: Allows a call to be forwarded to a third
party.
ongoing
Conference: Allows third parties to be dialled in to a
call.
Dial pad: Used to dial telephone numbers.
Phonebook: Makes the phonebook entries visible.
Record and broadcast: To record and broadcast
messages.
More: To display more functions.
Less: To display less functions.
8
2
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Equipment
Settings: To adjust the brightness of the display and
volume controls.
Roles: To change signaller roles.
SMS: To compose and send a message.
NR about: Displays the software version of the fixed
terminal.
Emergency dial pad: Displays a sub menu that will
display the speed dial keys for group call areas.
9
3
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Powering up
3.1 Train radio
The train radio system is generally connected to the train battery
supply, this enables usage of any train radio on which the batteries
are switched on. During normal operation the supply to the train
radio is provided when the master switch is moved away from the
off position. The driver control panel can also be powered up by
pressing the Registration/Deregistration button for more than
two seconds.
3.2 Fixed terminal
If the power supply to the signaller’s or controller’s fixed terminal is
interrupted, it will reboot and return to the log in screen.
10
4
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Registration
4.1 Registration of the train radio
When preparing a train for service the train radio is always required
to be registered with the GSM-R network. This enables the
registration of a headcode and will allow the signaller to contact the
train radio. It will also support the correct routing of calls from the
train radio to the signaller.
Drivers should always make sure that the correct headcode is
displayed on the train radio.
4.2 Pending registration
If GSM-R network coverage is not available, pending registration
will be used. Pending registration enables the train radio to be
prepared to register once GSM-R network coverage becomes
available.
Note: Pending registration is not available through the menu.
In order for the pending registration to be completed, the driver
needs to follow these steps.
1. Press the Registration button.
2. Press the Accept button.
After five seconds the ‘Reg code saved’ message is cleared and
replaced by a ‘Searching networks - Please wait’ message.
The registration process will only be complete once GSM-R
coverage is detected and the driver has responded to the prompt
from the train radio to press the Accept button.
The pending registration state can be cancelled by pressing the
Cancel button at any time.
11
4
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Registration
4.3 Company wild card codes (99x)
The ‘99x’ company wild card code should only be used when
registration problems are being experienced.
If a train radio has been registered using a company wild card
code, it will not be possible for a call to the signaller to be routed to
the controlling signaller. It may be necessary to use the phonebook
to contact the correct signaller.
The company wild card codes can be found in the Sectional
Appendix.
4.4 Preregistration
The preregistration function is available by using the menu.
If it is necessary for trains to be preregistered at a location where
this is not normally done, the signaller will normally arrange for
drivers to be told. This will avoid delay in registering the train radio.
When preregistering the train radio, the company wild card code
should be used.
Preregistration can be triggered manually by the driver pressing
the Accept button.
12
4
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Registration
4.5 Registration problems
4.5.1 Registration failure
There may be times when ‘Registration failed’ is displayed after an
attempt has been made to register the train radio. The driver would
normally check the registration code was entered correctly by
attempting to register the train radio a second time.
If the second attempt also fails, the first point of contact would be
the signaller who may know about a problem that is causing
registration failures.
Two attempts should be made at registration using the details
provided before contacting the signaller. The call to the signaller
will need to be made using the phonebook. This step also confirms
that the train radio is correctly connected to the network and calls
can be made.
After contacting the signaller, one further attempt can be made
using a ‘99x’ company wild card code if necessary.
When a train is registered with the ‘99x’ company wild card code,
voice calls and operational text messages may be routed to the
wrong signaller. The driver should always check the train radio
display to make sure the connection is to the correct signaller and
to confirm the correct identity of the signaller once communication
is established.
The driver would tell the signaller if the ‘99x’ company wild card
code has also failed to register the train.
13
4
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Registration
This flowchart indicates the process that a driver can follow to
determine their actions when experiencing a train radio registration
failure.
Fig 1. Registration failure flowchart
DCP
NR
TD
TRN
14
Abbreviations
Drivers control panel
Network Rail
Train describer
Train reporting number (headcode)
4
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Registration
4.5.2 Wrong train reporting number displayed
If the headcode displayed on the driver’s control panel is incorrect,
the train radio should be deregistered and reregistered using the
correct headcode and location code.
4.5.3 Duplicate registration identity
There may be instances when a registration code is already in use
by another train radio. Any new registration will be rejected and the
message ‘Duplicate’ will appear on the display. If it appears that
the correct code has been entered, contact can be made with the
signaller for a new code. In most cases, the signaller would advise
the driver to use the ‘99x’ company wild card code.
If the attempt using the ‘99x’ company wild card code also results
in ‘duplicate’ being displayed on the train radio, the driver will need
to contact the signaller for an alternative ‘99x’ company wild card
code.
Note: As the train radio is not registered, the driver would be
required to find the signaller’s number from the phonebook or dial
the signaller’s full number using the ‘12nn’ short code if this is
available.
15
4
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Registration
4.5.4 Loss of registration
If the train radio loses registration at any time, a reregistration is
required.
4.5.5 Failure of the train radio to deregister
If the train radio fails to deregister, the driver should attempt to
deregister. If this also fails it should be reported to the signaller.
4.5.6 Unregistered trains
A train can continue in service following unsuccessful attempts to
register the train radio. Provided GSM-R GB is displayed on the
screen, the core functionality of the radio system is still available.
If the signaller needs to contact an unregistered train they may
make a broadcast call to the area in which the unregistered train is
travelling and request the driver to contact them.
The signaller can use the train headcode to gain the attention of
the driver.
The driver will need to use the Network Rail phonebook to contact
the controlling signaller.
A railway emergency group call will still operate correctly on an
unregistered train but it is important to confirm that the correct
signaller has been contacted.
16
4
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Registration
4.5.7 Display is blank, shows a failure message or
remains stuck at ‘Searching Networks’
If the display is not showing the expected message, the driver can
contact the signaller to ascertain if a network failure has occurred.
There is an option that allows the driver to manually select the
GSM-R GB network via the menu using ‘Settings’ and ‘Select
Network’.
4.5.8 Radio unable to identify the GSM-R GB network
If the train radio connects to a network but only displays ‘Network?’
in the ‘Network Name’ field, then a manual selection of the network
is required. The driver can access the menu and use ‘Settings’ and
‘Select Network’ to manually select the required network.
4.5.9 The radio connects to the wrong network
In GB the train radio would normally default to the ‘GSM-R GB’
network. In the unlikely event that it logs on to another network,
the driver can change to the GB network via the menu using
Settings and Select Network.
17
5
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Radio communications
5.1 GSM-R call types
There are two types of GSM-R calls, point-to-point and group calls.
5.1.1 Point-to-point calls
Point-to-point calls can be separated into four types.
Normal call and urgent call
These are similar to telephone calls in which both people can
speak at the same time.
Driver’s Safety Device (DSD) alarm
This is an alarm sent from the train radio to the fixed terminal in the
event that the driver does not acknowledge and reset the DSD in
the allotted timescale for the traction type being driven.
Public address (PA) calls
These are calls made by the signaller or train operator’s control
and are a one-way method of communication. The driver will also
be able to hear the PA announcement over the train radio
loudspeaker.
Berth-triggered broadcast calls
A berth-triggered broadcast call is a pre-recorded message
received by the train when it enters a selected berth. The berthtriggered broadcast can be acknowledged when instructed to do so
by pressing the ST button once the message has completed, the
call terminated and the instructions understood. The berth-triggered
broadcast allows the signaller to caution a train in certain
circumstances without the need to bring the train to a stand first.
18
5
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Radio communications
5.1.2 Group calls
Group calls can be separated into three types.
Railway Emergency Group Call (REC)
This is a multi-party method of communication but only one person
can speak at a time.
Broadcast area call
This is a method of communication which allows a signaller to
broadcast a message to several trains within a given area.
Shunting group calls
These are conference calls where multiple drivers and shunters can
participate in the call.
5.2 Urgent calls
An urgent call is given a higher priority by the GSM-R system and
will override a normal call. An urgent call can be made in relation to
an incident affecting one train only.
5.2.1 Driver actions and indications
If the signaller makes an urgent call to a train, the message will
begin with the following script.
‘This is an urgent call from the signaller at _____ to the driver of
(train reporting number) _____’.
If this call is received the driver should respond as quickly as
possible.
5.2.2 Signallers actions and indications
If a driver makes an urgent call, the call will be displayed on the
signaller’s incoming call screen. The active call button will flash
yellow.
An urgent call must be answered as a priority over existing calls with
the exception of a REC call.
19
5
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Radio communications
5.3 Railway Emergency Group Calls
A REC is the highest priority call and can be made from any
terminal or train radio that is connected to the GSM-R network. The
Press to Talk button (PTT) must be used by the driver to speak
during a REC. If the PTT button is not used correctly, the signaller is
able to override it, see 5.3.3.
On receiving a REC the driver must stop the train and confirm that
they are at a stand by pressing the ST button.
A REC can be used during any emergency situation affecting more
than one line or more than one train.
It is important that, when a REC is initiated, the details of the
incident are established quickly in order for the incident to be dealt
with correctly and for unaffected trains to proceed as soon as
possible.
5.3.1 Signaller and route controller actions and
indications (Lead and non-lead signallers)
Making a REC
In an emergency situation the signaller may need to initiate a REC.
The lead signaller who initiates the REC call will be the lead
signaller during the conversation. All other signallers will be able to
monitor the call.
After the REC has been made and the signaller is sure that the
emergency has been protected, the lead signaller will close the
REC.
Receiving a REC
If receiving a REC, an alarm will sound on the fixed terminal and the
call will be answered automatically. The call will be heard over the
loudspeaker.
The lead signaller will be able to participate in the call, any non-lead
signallers will only be able to monitor the call.
20
5
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Radio communications
5.3.2 Driver actions and indications
Making a REC
In an emergency situation the driver may need to initiate a REC.
Once the REC has commenced the PTT button should be used to
speak.
Receiving a REC
If you receive a REC the train radio will sound an audible alarm and
display the message ‘STOP EMERGENCY’.
It is good practice for other drivers not to speak unless requested by
the lead signaller or if they have important information to add to the
call.
After the audible alarm, the call will be automatically connected. If a
signaller is making the REC you will hear the following message.
“This is a railway emergency call. I repeat this is a railway
emergency call from the signaller at _____ to all trains in the
_____ area.”
The lead signaller will indicate the end of each REC by stating “end
of railway emergency group call.”
An emergency group call is not considered completed until this
phrase has been heard.
When the railway emergency group call has ended, any train that
has not been instructed by the lead signaller to remain at a stand,
can proceed if the driver is certain that the train is not affected by
the incident.
5.3.3 PTT override
When a driver is pressing the PTT button the lead signaller cannot
be heard.
If the driver forgets to release the PTT, then the lead signaller can
override the PTT by pressing the override button on the fixed
terminal.
21
5
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Radio communications
5.3.4 REC closure
The call can only be ended by the lead signaller. It is important
that the call is closed correctly to avoid unnecessary delays.
5.3.5 Accidental use of REC
If you accidentally initiate a REC you should speak to the lead
signaller and explain the circumstances. This is to avoid extensive
delays whilst the initiator of the REC is determined.
5.4 Short dial codes
The train radio includes a function which enables short dial code
calls to the signaller (1200), operations control (1300) and
electrical control operator (ECO) (1400) with the use of the key
pad. When using these short dial codes, the call will normally be
connected to the correct controlling area in which the train radio is
registered. The train must be correctly registered in order for the
short dial codes to work correctly.
5.5 Using the train radio phonebooks
If it is necessary to contact a signaller not controlling the signalling
on the line on which the train is located or the train radio is
unregistered, the train radio phonebooks should be used.
The Network Rail phonebook has details of signallers, operations
controllers and ECOs. The train operator’s phonebook contains
contacts specific to the train operator.
The entries in the train radio phonebooks are listed alphabetically
and can be searched using the scroll buttons to move the cursor
up and down the list. Alternatively, the first three letters of the
location can be entered into a search field using the keypad.
22
5
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Radio communications
5.6 Cab-to-cab calls
Examples of when cab to cab calls are authorised in the Rule
Book are:
• Locomotives coupled in tandem.
• Working trains with a locomotive at each end.
• Assistance from the rear of a failed train.
• Locomotive assisting in the rear (where banking is authorised
in the Sectional Appendix).
• Driving a traction unit from other than the leading cab (for
example if the controls in the leading cab are defective).
A cab-to-cab call can be made via the menu and requires both
drivers to enter the same headcode and location code.
5.7 Misrouted calls
The train radio does not provide an indication of network problems
that may prevent calls being routed to the correct signaller. If the
signaller is aware of such a fault they should set up a broadcast
call to alert trains entering the area of the known fault.
In these circumstances a normal call may be wrongly routed to
another signaller who does not control the signalling in that area.
Drivers should always check that they are communicating with the
correct signaller using normal communication protocols.
If a driver receives a broadcast telling them about network
problems in a specific area and they need to contact the signaller,
they should do so using the Network Rail phonebook or by dialling
the telephone number shown in the Periodical Operating Notice
(PON).
The signaller should record and report details of any misrouted
calls.
23
5
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Radio communications
5.8 Role profiles
The role profile sets the limits of a signaller’s area of responsibility
for receiving GSM-R messages.
If appropriately configured, a single role profile can be used by
more than one user at the same time. For example by a signaller
and signal box supervisor.
5.9 Role transfer
A single role profile can be transferred to another signaller’s
terminal. This should only be done in the following circumstances.
• A signal box is to be closed or opened with a switching out
facility.
• A signaller is unable to log into the system or the fixed terminal
has failed.
• A signaller is to leave the signal box for other than normal
duties.
A clear understanding should be reached between the signallers
concerned before the transfer takes place.
5.10 Call transfer
Signallers are able to forward calls to third parties such as other
signallers, drivers, maintenance control or the emergency services.
The signaller should come to a clear understanding with all parties
involved in the call when a call transfer is taking place.
If the signaller receives a misrouted call, the call transfer facility
can be used to direct the call to the correct signaller. Please refer
to section 5.7.
REC calls cannot be transferred.
24
6
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
PA calls and DSD alarm
6.1 DSD alarm calls
The train radio will send a DSD alarm message to the signaller
after one minute if:
• the master switch is in the ‘forward’ or ‘reverse’ position, and
• no action is taken by the driver to reset the DSD.
If a DSD alarm message is received the signaller should attempt to
contact the driver.
If a driver is aware that a DSD alarm call has been triggered, they
should inform the signaller and advise them that the alarm was
triggered in error.
6.2 PA calls
If the signaller is unable to contact the driver, it may be necessary
for the signaller to make a PA announcement to a driver-only
operated (DOO) passenger train. This allows the signaller to seek
assistance if the driver is suspected of being incapacitated.
If the driver is able to respond to the PA announcement, a
point-to-point call should be made after the PA announcement has
terminated.
25
7
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Operational text messages
7.1 Standing at signal message
This is used by drivers to indicate that their train is standing at a
signal at danger, or an end of authority and it is not immediately
obvious why the train has been brought to a stand.
The signaller can respond to this message by:
• clearing the signal or issuing a new movement authority
• sending a ‘wait’ message
• making a voice call to the driver to explain why the train is being
detained.
7.2 Contact signaller message
This is normally the first method a signaller uses to contact the
driver.
The driver should only reply when it is safe to do so by pressing
the Accept button.
7.3 Contact train operator control
message
This will be received if the train operator wishes to speak to the
driver.
The driver should only reply when it is safe to do so by pressing
the Accept button.
7.4 Wait message
The driver may receive a ‘wait’ message in response to sending
the ‘standing at signal’ message.
The driver would need to wait for further instructions, clearance of
the signal or the issuing of a new movement authority.
26
7
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Operational text messages
7.5 Acknowledge message
The driver can acknowledge a broadcast call by pressing the ST
button.
Once the driver has acknowledged a broadcast message, the
signaller will receive an acknowledgement message on the fixed
terminal.
7.6 Messages between signal boxes
Signallers can send text messages to adjacent signal boxes for
regulation purposes only. These messages are automatically recorded
and saved on the fixed terminal.
27
8
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Broadcast calls
8.1 Types of broadcast calls
Broadcast calls are a method of communication by which the
signaller can pass on information to individual drivers or groups of
drivers.
These calls are answered automatically by the train radio and the
driver will hear the call over the loudspeaker in the driving cab.
There are two types of broadcast calls.
Berth-triggered broadcast call
This type of call is activated once the train enters the berth
relevant to the broadcast. The message is pre-recorded by the
signaller. The signaller will receive either a ‘failed’ or ‘not sent’
message if the call has not been received by the train radio. These
types of calls include advisory and acknowledged (safety)
broadcast calls.
Cell-based group broadcast call
This type of call is applicable to a pre-defined service area and will
be received by all drivers within that area. These calls can be
pre-recorded or live.
The content of the broadcast calls can be separated into three
categories: general, advisory and safety. Messages in the safety
category must be acknowledged by the driver. General broadcast
calls are cell based.
28
8
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Broadcast calls
8.2 General broadcast calls
The following communication protocol for a general broadcast call
would begin with.
“This is a general broadcast from the signaller at _____ to all
trains in the _____ area”.
Once the message has been communicated, the call is terminated
with:
“End of general broadcast.”
In this situation acknowledgement of the broadcast is not required.
8.3 Advisory broadcast calls
An advisory broadcast can be used to provide advice to drivers, for
example, concerning line congestion and delays to the service.
The following script must be followed.
“This is an advisory broadcast from the signaller at _____”
Once the advice has been communicated, the call is terminated
with.
“End of advisory broadcast”.
In this situation acknowledgement of the broadcast is not required.
29
8
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Broadcast calls
8.4 Acknowledged (safety) broadcast
calls
Safety broadcast calls are used to reach a clear understanding by
using non verbal acknowledgement.
After listening to the message in its entirety and after the call has
been terminated the driver acknowledges their understanding of
the message by pressing the ST button.
Uses for safety broadcasts
Safety broadcast calls can be used for the following scenarios.
• Poor rail conditions.
• Animals on the line (Not tunnels).
• Defective Emergency Indicators.
• Unusual events (Not Track or Signalling).
Scripts for safety broadcasts
The following scripts set out the content of a pre-recorded safety
broadcast:
Poor rail conditions
“This is a safety broadcast from the signaller at ______. There are
low/exceptionally poor* railhead conditions at/on* the approach to
______. Only acknowledge if you have fully understood this
message. To acknowledge, press the ST button. End of safety
broadcast.”
*Delete as appropriate.
Animals on or near the line
“This is a safety broadcast from the signaller at _____. There are
animals on or near the line at/between* _____and* ______,
proceed at caution. Only acknowledge if you have fully understood
this message. To acknowledge, press the ST button. End of safety
broadcast.”
*Delete as appropriate.
30
8
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Broadcast calls
Defective Emergency Indicators
“This is a safety broadcast from the signaller at _____. There is a
defective emergency indicator for a __ mph emergency speed
restriction at _____. Only acknowledge if you have fully
understood this message. To acknowledge, press the ST button.
End of safety broadcast.
Unusual events
“This is a safety broadcast from the signaller at _____. *
___________________. Only acknowledge if you have fully
understood this message. To acknowledge, press the ST button.
End of safety broadcast.”
*Insert details of the incident, location and any speed restriction in
the main body of the broadcast.
Note: unusual events can include overcrowding on station
platforms. The location of the event must be easily identifiable by
the signaller and the driver.
31
9
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Deregistration
9.1 Deregistration of the train radio
If the train radio is not correctly deregistered at the end of the
journey, subsequent attempts to register that train radio may not
be successful.
Incorrect deregistration could also result in the headcode
remaining on the signallers fixed terminal.
If the train radio is not correctly deregistered, a ‘duplicate’
headcode fault message may be displayed on the train radio.
9.1.1 Deregistration - end of journey
The train radio will automatically begin the deregistration process
once the driving desk is moved to the off position.
The radio can be allowed to complete the deregistration process
automatically or stopped by following the instructions on the
screen.
9.1.2 Deregistration - mid journey
If the train is to change headcode mid journey this can be done by
manually deregistering and re-registering using the train radio
menu.
9.1.3 Deregistration - reversing movement
It is important that the train radio is deregistered during a reversing
movement before trying to register the same headcode on the
radio of the cab that will become leading in the new movement.
32
9
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Deregistration
9.2 Deregistration problems
9.2.1 Train radio failed to deregister from previous
journey
If the train radio has failed to deregister from the previous journey,
the driver will not be able to register a new TRN. If the previous
TRN or the registration code is shown in the train number field the
driver should attempt to deregister the radio.
Note: The signaller may be able to identify a ‘stuck registration’ on
the fixed terminal. It may be possible to register to the exact same
registration code but only if the train is standing at the same signal
as the previous train. Otherwise the signaller will report this as a
fault.
9.2.2 PA deregistration failure
If during registration the train radio displays ‘Deregistration failed
PA’, fixed terminal users will be unable to initiate a call to the
train’s PA system. This is referred to as a stuck headcode.
If the cancel button is pressed the display will show ‘No PA Reg’d’.
The driver should attempt to deregister the train radio but if the
fault persists the driver should report it to the signaller and await
further instructions. The signaller may be able to clarify that the PA
is shown on the fixed terminal and will therefore be able to call the
PA.
33
10
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Faults
10.1 GSM-R TD failure
If the GSM-R connection to the train describer fails, the signaller
will receive a ‘GSM-R TD’ failure message.
During such a failure, calls from trains will be routed to a signaller
based on its GSM-R radio cell location and not its signalling
location. In cell fringe areas this may mean that calls are not
directed to the controlling signaller.
As a result of a TD failure, drivers should need to be informed. The
best method of communicating this is via a broadcast call.
Due to the nature of the failure the phonebook should be used.
Any misrouted calls should be dealt with as described in section
5.7.
10.2 Train radio failures
10.2.1 Power-up self-test failures
If the train radio fails the power-up test, the driver will see a failure
message. Failures can be split into service affecting failures and
non-service affecting failures.
Service affecting failures
If the train radio experiences a service affecting failure it will not be
permitted to enter service, unless the Train Operator’s Control
gives permission.
Non-service affecting failures
If the train radio experiences a non-service affecting failure the
train can continue in service.
Generally, as long as the train radio can make and receive a REC,
the radio will not be considered defective.
34
10
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Faults
10.2.2 Service affecting failures
These can be either specific messages, a blank screen or a ‘Radio
Failure’ message associated with a fault number. These faults
should be reported to the signaller immediately using alternative
methods of communication.
A blank screen, or any of the following faults, should be treated as
indicating a defective radio. The driver should carry out the
instructions in Rule Book GERT8000 module TW5 Preparation and
movement of trains Defective or isolated vehicles and on-train
equipment.
• Failure XX (range 01-07).
• Radio failure.
• Cab Radio Flt.
• EPROM/RAM Flt.
RAM Test failure and the EPROM test fault message will occur
when the control panel initialises.
10.2.3 Non-service affecting faults
Non-service affecting faults are identified by a ‘Warning’ followed
by a number which identifies the type of fault to the maintainer.
This type of fault means that the train radio will work, but may be
limited in its functionality.
If the train is being prepared to enter service it can do so without
restriction but the driver should advise the Train Operator’s Control
before departure.
35
10
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Faults
10.2.4 Cancelling fault messages
If the message relates to a service affecting failure, the driver will
be unable to remove this from the train radio display and the radio
would be treated as a failure.
With certain failure types the train radio will attempt to re-boot five
minutes after displaying the failure. It may be possible to manually
re-boot the radio before this time (as shown in company
instructions) to attempt to clear the fault.
The driver will need to acknowledge the fault message by pressing
the Cancel button.
A reminder of this fault will remain on the display until the radio
display is switched off.
10.2.5 Train radio displays a foreign language
The train radio will normally use English when powered up. If the
previous user has changed the language and the train radio has
been switched off but not powered down, it may display a foreign
language. The language can be changed back to English by using
the menu short cut. The menu short cut is MENU, 3, 2, 1.
10.3 Network coverage issues
Although the GSM-R system provides full coverage of the Network
Rail managed infrastructure, there may be times when there is a
temporary break in coverage, for example, a base station fault.
There will be a warning tone sounded through the loudspeaker and
a message ‘Searching networks - Please wait’ on the cab mobile
display.
36
10
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Faults
10.3.1 No network message
The ‘No Network’ message appears when the train radio attempts
to connect to the network at power up and:
• receives a corrupted or unintelligible message, or
• receives no response at all, or
• is denied access.
The user can manually reselect the GSM-R GB network through
the menu using the following procedure.
Press the Menu key
Select Option [3] ‘Settings’
Select Option [1] ‘Select Network’
Select ‘GSM-R GB’ and press the Accept button.
This process would be followed at a location where there is known
to be GSM-R GB coverage.
10.3.2 If the train radio does not find the network at
the starting location
Unless advice of a network failure has been received, the driver
should contact the signaller to establish if there is a GSM-R failure.
In locations affected by GSM-R network issues, the train radio can
be pre-registered and the train can enter into service as normal.
If network coverage is not regained once the train has passed
through the affected area, the train radio should be considered as
defective.
The driver should carry out the instructions in Rule Book
GERT8000 module TW5 Preparation and movement of trains
Defective or isolated vehicles and on-train equipment.
37
10
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Faults
10.3.3 Public mobile network interference
In some circumstances, a train radio may be affected by public
radio network interference. This interference prevents the train
radio automatically connecting to the GSM-R GB network and will
result in the train radio displaying ‘Searching Networks’. This is
most common in terminal stations when a service terminates and
the driver changes ends.
In a high proportion of cases the fault can be rectified by using the
following procedure.
Press the Menu key
Select Option [3] ‘Settings’.
Select Option [1] ‘Select Network’.
Select ‘GSM-R GB’ and press the Accept button.
If the fault has been successfully rectified the train radio will
connect to the GSM-R GB network.
If the above actions do not rectify the fault, the actions in section
10.3.2 should be followed.
38
10
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Faults
10.4 Call failure and dropped calls
The driver should report any instances of call failures or dropped
calls to the signaller.
The signaller should log the details of any failed or dropped calls in
the train register and report the fault as set out in Network Rail
company instructions.
10.5 Checking the train radio can make
and receive calls (echo call test)
If the driver believes that the train radio may not be making and
receiving calls, this can be checked by making an ‘echo call’ to the
network. To do this, use the keypad to dial ‘1900’, record a short
message and then wait a few seconds for the recorded message
to be played back. If the message is not played back the signaller
should be informed, if necessary, by using an alternative methods
of communication.
10.6 Loss of a signaller’s fixed terminal
A complete failure of the fixed terminal should be reported to the
infrastructure manager. The most likely reason is the loss of data
connection to the GSM-R network. If the signaller is aware of the
failure a general broadcast can be made to alert drivers.
If this occurs a notification will appear. The message should be
acknowledged by the driver.
If the connection is lost for a significant period of time, the fixed
terminal will log out and will revert to a pink screen.
When connection is restored, the display on the fixed terminal will
return to the normal log in screen.
In the event of the loss the fixed terminal, the procedures
concerning role transfer and role rescue should be followed.
Please refer to section 5.9.
39
10
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Faults
10.7 Loss of a train operator’s fixed
terminal
A complete failure of the fixed terminal should be reported to the
infrastructure manager. The most likely reason is the loss of data
connection to the GSM-R network.
10.8 Use of hand portable devices
In the event of a train radio failure the train may be allowed to
remain in service with an operational hand portable device.
This device will not be registered onto the GSM-R system.
Rule Book GERT8000 module TW5 Preparation and movement of
trains Defective or isolated vehicles and on-train equipment
includes information regarding the use of hand portable devices.
10.9 Use of transportable devices
In the event of a train radio failure the train may be allowed to
remain in service with an operative transportable device.
The transportable device can be registered onto the GSM-R
network in the same manner as the normal train radio.
Rule Book GERT8000 module TW5 Preparation and movement of
trains Defective or isolated vehicles and on-train equipment
includes information regarding the use of transportable devices.
40
Notes
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
41
Uncontrolled When Printed
Document comes into force on 03/12/2016
Email Tel
Twitter
Web
enquirydesk@rssb.co.uk
+44 (0) 20 3142 5300
@RSSB_rail
www.rssb.co.uk
Rail Safety Standards Board
The Helicon
One South Place
London
EC2M 2RB